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News division of the publicly funded British Broadcasting Corporation

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Latest podcast episodes about BBC News

MrBallen Podcast: Strange, Dark & Mysterious Stories
Episode 41 -- "Root of All Evil"

MrBallen Podcast: Strange, Dark & Mysterious Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 32:05


Today's podcast features two separate, unique stories that share a theme: The terrifying things people will do for money. The audio from these stories has been pulled from my YouTube channel, which is just called MrBallen, and has been remastered for today's podcast.Story names, previews & links to original YouTube videos:Story 1 -- “Graphic Content" -- A popular TV show in Brazil reveals their awful secret. (Original YouTube link -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sj1nh-qnv0E)Story 2 -- "Inside a Nigerian Death Factory" -- A horrible thing was discovered inside of a warehouse in the middle of a Nigerian forest… (Original YouTube link -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT3y8ZTgrtY)For 100s more stories like these, check out my YouTube channel just called "MrBallen" -- https://www.youtube.com/c/MrBallenIf you want to reach out to me, contact me on Instagram, Twitter or any other major social media platform, my username on all of them is @MrBallenSPOILERS BELOW THIS POINT:.....Main Sources:Story 1: Graphic Content1) Britannica entry on Manaus -- https://www.britannica.com/place/Manaus2) Wikipedia page for Wallace Souza -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallace_Souza3) The Times UK coverage of the story -- https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/wallace-souza-and-the-incredible-true-crime-drama-behind-netflixs-killer-ratings-kkwvwd5xt4) @60 Minutes Australia - "TV host accused of committing murder to boost ratings | 60 Minutes Australia" -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yu03MpFaHDg5) BBC article in Portuguese -- https://www.bbc.com/portuguese/geral-48454730Story 2: Inside a Nigerian Death Factory**This story did not have very good reporting done on it, however I attempted to put together the best/most accurate version of events as possible.*****This story was suggested by Reddit user "-Big-Dazzle" on our MrBallen subreddit "r/mrballen"1) Twisted Travel & True Crime Podcast, "Forest of Horror, The Soka Forest Ritual Killings" -- https://www.audible.com/pd/Forest-of-Horror-The-Soka-Forest-Ritual-Killings-Podcast/B09KW8FL912) Vanguard article, "Disturbing tales from Ibadan forest of horror" -- https://www.vanguardngr.com/2014/03/disturbing-tales-ibadan-forest-horror/3) New Telegraph Online article, "Forest of horror that throws Ibadan into confusion" -- https://web.archive.org/web/20150704194736/http://newtelegraphonline.com/forest-horror-throws-ibadan-confusion/4) Punch website article, "Ibadan horror: Victim recounts ordeal in forest" -- https://web.archive.org/web/20150704171649/http://www.punchng.com/news/ibadan-horror-victim-recounts-ordeal-in-forest/5) BBC News article, "Nigerian 'House of Horror' riot in Ibadan" -- https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-267211126) YouTube channel @SaharaTV "Soka Forest Of Horror In Ibadan - One Found, More Victims Might Be Underground" -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVBNCGxMaYI&t=119s7) Information Nigeria website, "Ibadan Horror Forest: Eyewitness Recounts What Happened [Video]" -- https://www.informationng.com/2014/04/ibadan-horror-forest-eyewitness-recounts-what-happened-video.html8) The Nation article, "Ibadan forest of horror: Police arrest six suspects" -- https://thenationonlineng.net/ibadan-forest-horror-police-arrest-six-suspects/9) Ibadan Wikipedia page -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibadan10) Okada Wikipedia page -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okada_(motorcycle_taxi)11) Mysterious Universe article, "The Grim Tale of the Ibadan Forest of Horrors" -- https://mysteriousuniverse.org/2021/02/the-grim-tale-of-the-ibadan-forest-of-horrors/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Best of Today
Dame Deborah James 'brought so much joy and hope'

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 7:14


The cancer campaigner, blogger, broadcaster and former teacher, Dame Deborah James, has died aged 40. She had been receiving end-of-life care for bowel cancer at home and had raised millions for cancer research. She hosted the BBC podcast 'You, Me and the Big C' and was given a damehood in May in recognition of her fundraising. Today's Amol Rajan speaks to BBC News presenter George Alagiah, who is living with bowel cancer, about Dame Deborah. (Image: Dame Deborah James, Credit: Getty Images)

Motoring Podcast - News Show
Enhance An Older Body - 28 June 2022

Motoring Podcast - News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 44:13


FOLLOW UP: FORD ENDING FOCUS PRODUCTIONWe discussed that Ford was considering the future of the German Saarlouis plant, three weeks ago during Screaming In Your Car episode. That now seems to have been decided, as Ford are investing in their Valencia plant for EV models. After 2025 the Focus will be end, which has caused an obvious conclusion that the German factory will close. For more on this, click the JustAuto article here. FOLLOW UP: PRIVATE PARKING CODE OF PRACTICE PAUSEDIn February this year, the Government proudly announced it was introducing new rules to cap fines, have a transparent and independent appeals system and essentially make parking fairer. Much more quietly, in fact so quietly it was almost silent, they announced that this would be withdrawn after legal action from parking firms. To read more, click this RAC article link. FOLLOW UP: FLEETS URGED TO SUBMIT EV DATA TO HMRCTwo fleet industry organisations are asking their members to submit information to HMRC so that they can see the effect energy prices are having and suitably compensate in the September changes to rates. More can be read on this matter, by clicking this link to the Autocar article. NEW SENTENCING LIMITS FOR DRIVERS WHO KILLThe sentencing powers have been changed for those who cause death by dangerous driving and careless driving whilst under the influence of drink and drugs. The new limit will be a life sentence. There will also a new offence of causing serious injury by careless driving, which will have a stiff penalty. For more on this story, click here for the BBC News article. BRADFORD CLEAN AIR ZONE DATE Bradford has confirmed that their Cat C + Clean Air Zone (CAZ) will go live from 22 September 2022. This will cover commercial vehicles, busses, mini busses, hackney cabs and private hire vehicles that do not meet the requirements. You can read more about his by clicking on the link to the BVRLA article here. LOTUS AND BENTLEY TO BUILD SOME CLASSIC EXAMPLESLotus Advanced Performance will build bespoke, limited run cars based on 1960s and 70s cars. The newly formed wing of the company will also take over their motorsport interests. With limited details on exactly what is being planned there are some rumours of restomod versions of key cars from the back catalogue of Lotus. For more, click this Autocar link. Meanwhile, Bentley, buoyed by the success of their Blower Continuation Series, has announced they are producing 12 of their two-time Le Mans winning Speed Six cars. They have already been snapped up, at only £1.5 million. Again, to read more, click here for the Jalopnik link. TOYOTA RECALLING BZ4X OVER WHEEL NUT ISSUEBefore they are even delivered, Toyota has spotted a potential risk of wheel nuts loosening during heavy braking of their first specific all-electric car the bZ4X. Once they have identified a remedy then the roll out of deliveries will take place. Click here to learn more, from the Autocar article. TFL TO BEGIN FINING CARS WHO ENTER CYCLE LANESThanks to new powers, TfL are to begin to fine vehicles that enter cycle lanes illegally. During the initial six months warnings will initially be issued but then fines of £160 for each infringement, unless paid quickly, is the penalty. To learn more, click here to read the BBC News article. ——————————————————————————-If you like what we do, on this show, and think it is worth a £1.00, please consider supporting us via Patreon. Here is the link to that CLICK HERE TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST——————————————————————————-WRC: SAFARI RALLY Oh boy, that was a brutal one. Brilliant result for Toyota, a 1, 2, 3, 4! They also did that in 1993. A shocker for Hyundai and M-Sport. The Safari Rally is meant to be tough, but I'm not sure it should be this tough, although some covering the sport think they should all be as hard as this. Rovenpera won again, Evans was second and Katsuta made the podium this time after just missing out in Portugal. Ogier came in fourth, like Loeb, his participation was muted again. Neuville was the best placed Hyundai in fifth, Tanak retired TWICE and Solberg was tenth. To find out more about what happened, click here for the DirtFish article. To find out Alasdair Lindsey's Driver Ratings, click the DirtFish link. To read the DirtFish What We Learned article, click here. GOODWOOD FESTIVAL OF SPEEDOver the last weekend we saw all manner of incredible vehicles being driven up the hill or sat outside the wonderful Goodwood House. Here we link to some of the coverage, for you to catch up with. Goodwood Road & Racing's coverage can be found by clicking this link here. EVO's coverage can be found by clicking this link and don't forget to open the gallery as there are some stunning photos. For a full roundup of the cars that we on show, click here for the Autocar link. Obviously, the star of the show was the McMurtry Spéirling that broke the record for the hillclimb. Click here to watch the video. To see what Autocar found in the car park, click this link here. AND FINALLY: HOT WHEELS LEGEND TOUR 2022Following the successful first Hot Wheels Legend Tour, last year, where Lee Johnstone's Volvo P1800 Gasser won the global prize to be made into an actual model, the judges will be once again looking for the best real cars to make into a special Hot Wheels model. For more on this, click here for the Motoring Research article.

The Bike Shed
344: Spinner Armageddon

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 38:50


Steph has an update and a question wrapped into one about the work that is being done to migrate the Test::Unit test over to RSpec. Chris got to do something exciting this week using dry-monads. Success or failure? This episode is brought to you by BuildPulse (https://buildpulse.io/bikeshed). Start your 14-day free trial of BuildPulse today. Bartender (https://www.macbartender.com/) dry-rb - dry-monads v1.0 - Pattern matching (https://dry-rb.org/gems/dry-monads/1.0/pattern-matching/) alfred-workflows (https://github.com/tupleapp/alfred-workflows/blob/master/scripts/online_users.rb) Raycast (https://www.raycast.com/) ruby-science (https://github.com/thoughtbot/ruby-science) Inertia.js (https://inertiajs.com/) Remix (https://remix.run/) Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of The Bike Shed! Transcript: AD: Flaky tests take the joy out of programming. You push up some code, wait for the tests to run, and the build fails because of a test that has nothing to do with your change. So you click rebuild, and you wait. Again. And you hope you're lucky enough to get a passing build this time. Flaky tests slow everyone down, break your flow, and make things downright miserable. In a perfect world, tests would only break if there's a legitimate problem that would impact production. They'd fail immediately and consistently, not intermittently. But the world's not perfect, and flaky tests will happen, and you don't have time to fix all of them today. So how do you know where to start? BuildPulse automatically detects and tracks your team's flaky tests. Better still, it pinpoints the ones that are disrupting your team the most. With this list of top offenders, you'll know exactly where to focus your effort for maximum impact on making your builds more stable. In fact, the team at Codecademy was able to identify their flakiest tests with BuildPulse in just a few days. By focusing on those tests first, they reduced their flaky builds by more than 68% in less than a month! And you can do the same because BuildPulse integrates with the tools you're already using. It supports all of the major CI systems, including CircleCI, GitHub Actions, Jenkins, and others. And it analyzes test results for all popular test frameworks and programming languages, like RSpec, Jest, Go, pytest, PHPUnit, and more. So stop letting flaky tests slow you down. Start your 14-day free trial of BuildPulse today. To learn more, visit buildpulse.io/bikeshed. That's buildpulse.io/bikeshed. STEPH: What type of bird is the strongest bird? CHRIS: I don't know. STEPH: A crane. [laughter] STEPH: You're welcome. And on that note, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Let's wrap up. [laughter] Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey, Chris, I saw a good movie I'd like to tell you about. It was just over the weekend. It's called The Duke, and it's based on a real story. I should ask, have you seen it? Have you heard of this movie called The Duke? CHRIS: I don't think so. STEPH: Okay, cool. It's a true story, and it's based on an individual named Kempton Bunton who then stole a particular portrait, a Goya portrait; if you know your artist, I do not. But he stole a Goya portrait and then essentially held at ransom because he was a big advocate that the BBC News channel should be free for people that are living on a pension or that are war veterans because then they're not able to afford that fee. But then, if you take the BBC channel away from them, it disconnects them from society. And it's a very good movie. I highly recommend it. So I really enjoyed watching that over the weekend. CHRIS: All right. Excellent recommendation. We will, of course, add that to the show notes mostly so that I can find it again later. STEPH: On a more technical note, I have a small update, or it's more of a question. It's an update and a question wrapped into one about the work that is being done to migrate the Test::Unit test over to RSpec. This has been quite a journey that Joël and I have been on for a while now. And we're making progress, but we're realizing that we're spending like 95% of our time in the test setup and porting that over, specifically because we're mapping fixture data over to FactoryBot, and we're just realizing that's really painful. It's taking up a lot of time to do that. And initially, when I realized we were just doing that, we hadn't even really talked about it, but we were moving it over to FactoryBot. I was like, oh, cool. We'll get to delete all these fixtures because there are around 208 files of them. And so that felt like a really good additional accomplishment to migrating the test over. But now that we realize how much time we're spending migrating the data over for that test setup, we've reevaluated, and I shared with Joël in the Slack channel. I was like, crap. I was like, I have a bad idea, and I can't not say it now because it's crossed my mind. And my bad idea was what if we stopped porting over fixtures to FactoryBot and then we just added the fixtures to a directory that RSpec would look so then we can rely on those fixtures? And then that way, we're literally then ideally just copying over from Test::Unit over to RSpec. But it does mean a couple of things. Well, one, it means that we're now running those fixtures at the beginning of RSpec test. We're introducing another pattern of where these tests are already using FactoryBot, but now they have fixtures at the top, and then we won't get to delete the fixtures. So we had a conversation around how to manage and mitigate some of those concerns. And we're still in that exploratory. We're going to test it out and see if this really speeds us up referencing the fixtures. The question that's wrapped up in this is there's something different between how fixtures generate data and how factories generate data. So I've run into this a couple of times now where I moved data over to just call a factory. But then I was hitting these callbacks or after-save-hooks or weird things that were then preventing me from creating the record, even though fixtures was creating them just fine. And then Joël pointed out today that he was running into something similar where there were private methods that were getting called. And there were all sorts of additional code that was getting run with factories versus fixtures. And I don't have an answer. Like, I haven't looked into this. And it's frankly intentional because I was trying hard to not dive into understanding the mechanics. We really want to get through this. But now I'm starting to ponder a little more as to what is different with fixtures and factories? And I liked that factories is running these callbacks; that feels correct. But I'm surprised that fixtures doesn't, or at least that's the experience that I'm having. So there's some funkiness there that I'd like to explore. I'll be honest; I don't know if I'm going to. But if anybody happens to know what that funkiness is or why fixtures and factories are different in that regard, I would be very intrigued because, at some point, I might look into it just because I would like to know. CHRIS: Oh, that is interesting. I have not really worked with fixtures much at all. I've lived a factory life myself, and thus that's where almost all of my experience is. I'm not super surprised if this ends up being the case, like, the idea that fixtures are just some data that gets shoveled into the database directly as opposed to FactoryBot going through the model layer. And so it's sort of like that difference. But I don't know that for certain. That sounds like what this is and makes sense conceptually. But I think this is what you were saying like, that also kind of pushes me more in the direction of factories because it's like, oh, they're now representative. They're using our model layer, where we're defining certain truths. And I don't love callbacks as a mechanism. But if your app has them, then getting data that is representative is useful in tests. Like one of the things I add whenever I'm working with FactoryBot is the FactoryBot lint rake task RSpec thing that basically just says, "Are your factories valid?" which I think is a great baseline to have. Because you may add a migration that adds a default constraint or something like that to the database that suddenly all your factories are invalid, and it's breaking tests, but you don't know it. Like subtly, you change it, and it doesn't actually break a test, but then it's harder later. So that idea of just having more correctness baked in is always nice, especially when it can be automated like that, so definitely a fan of that. But yeah, interested if you do figure out the distinction. I do like your take, though, of like, but also, maybe I just won't figure this out. Maybe this isn't worth figuring it out. Although you were in the interesting spot of, you could just port the fixtures over and then be done and call the larger body of work done. But it's done in sort of a half-complete way, so it's an interesting trade-off space. I'm also interested to hear where you end up on that. STEPH: Yeah, it's a tough trade-off. It's one that we don't feel great about. But then it's also recognizing what's the true value of what we're trying to deliver? And it also comes down to the idea of churn versus complexity. And I feel like we are porting over existing complexity and even adding a smidge, not actual complexity but adding a smidge of indirection in terms that when someone sees this file, they're going to see a mixed-use of fixtures and factories, and that doesn't feel good. And so we've already talked about adding a giant comment above fixtures that just is very honest and says, "Hey, these were ported over. Please don't mimic this. But this is some legacy tests that we have brought over. And we haven't migrated the fixtures over to use factories." And then, in regards to the churn versus complexity, this code isn't likely to get touched like these tests. We really just need them to keep running and keep validating scenarios. But it's not likely that someone's going to come in here and really need to manage these anytime soon. At least, this is what I'm telling myself to make me feel better about it. So there's also that idea of yes, we are porting this over. This is also how they already exist. So if someone did need to manage these tests, then going to Test::Unit, they would have the same experience that they're going to have in RSpec. So that's really the crux of it is that we're not improving that experience. We're just moving it over and then trying to communicate that; yes, we have muddied the waters a little bit by introducing this other pattern. So we're going to find a way to communicate why we've introduced this other pattern, but that way, we can stay focused on actually porting things over to RSpec. As for the factories versus fixtures, I feel like you're onto something in terms of it's just skipping that model layer. And that's why a lot of that functionality isn't getting run. And I do appreciate the accuracy of factories. I'd much rather know is my data representative of real data that can get created in the world? And right now, it feels like some of the fixtures aren't. Like, how they're getting created seemed to bypass really important checks and validations, and that is wrong. That's not what we want to have in our test is, where we're creating data that then the rest of the application can't truly create. But that's another problem for another day. So that's an update on a trade-off that we have made in regards to the testing journey that we are on. What's going on in your world? CHRIS: Well, we got to do something exciting this week. I was working on some code. This is using dry-monads, the dry-rb space. So we have these result objects that we use pretty pervasively throughout the app, and often, we're in a controller. We run one of these command objects. So it's create user, and create user actually encompasses a ton of logic in our app, and that object returns a result. So it's either a success or a failure. And if it's a success, it'll be a success with that new user wrapped up inside of it, or if it's a failure, it's a specific error message. Actually, different structured error messages in different ways, some that would be pushed to the form, some that would be a flash message. There are actually fun, different things that we do there. But in the controller, when we interact with those result objects, typically what we'll do is we'll say result equals create user dot run, (result=createuser.run) and then pass it whatever data it needs. And then on the next line, we'll say results dot either, (results.either), which is a method on these result objects. It's on both the success and failure so you can treat them the same. And then you pass what ends up being a lambda or a stabby proc, or I forget what they are. But one of those sort of inline function type things in Ruby that always feel kind of weird. But you pass one of those, and you actually pass two of them, one for the success case and one for the failure case. And so in the success case, we redirect back with a notice of congratulations, your user was created. Or, in the failure case, we potentially do a flash message of an alert, or we send the errors down, or whatever it ends up being. But it allows us to handle both of those cases. But it's always been syntactically terrible, is how I would describe it. It's, yeah, I'm just going to leave it at that. We are now living in a wonderful, new world. This has been something that I've wanted to try for a while. But I finally realized we're actually on Ruby 2.7, and so thus, we have access to pattern matching in Ruby. So I get to take it for a spin for the first time, realizing that we were already on the correct version. And in particular, dry-monads has a page in their docs specific to how we can take advantage of pattern matching with the result objects that they provide us. There's nothing specific in the library as far as I understand it. This is just them showing a bunch of examples of how one might want to do it if they're working with these result objects. But it's really great because it gives the ability to interact with, you know, success is typically going to be a singular case. There's one success branch to this whole logic, but there are like seven different ways it can fail. And that's the whole idea as to why we use these command objects and the whole Railway Oriented Programming and that whole thing which I have...what is this word? [laughs] I feel like I should know it. It's a positive rant. I have raved; that is how our users kindly pointed that out to us. I have raved about the Railway Oriented Programming that allows us to do. But it's that idea that they're actually, you know, there's one happy path, and there are seven distinct failure modes, seven unhappy paths. And now, using pattern matching, we actually get a really expressive, readable, useful way to destructure each of those distinct failures to work with the particular bits of data that we need. So it was a very happy day, and I got to explore it. This is, again, a feature of Ruby, not a feature of dry-monads. But dry-monads just happens to embrace it and work really well with it. So that was awesome. STEPH: That is awesome. I've seen one or two; I don't know, I've seen a couple of tweets where people are like, yeah, Ruby pattern matching. I haven't found a way to use it. So I'm excited that you just shared a way that you found to use it. I'm also worried what it says about our developer culture that we know the word rant so well, but rave, we always have to reach back into our memory to be like, what's that positive word or something that we like? [laughs] CHRIS: And especially here on The Bike Shed, where we try to gravitate towards the positive. But yeah, it's an interesting point that you make. STEPH: We're a bunch of ranters. It's what we do, pranting ranters. I don't know why we're pranting. [laughs] CHRIS: Because it's that exciting. That's what it is. Actually, there was an interesting thing as we were playing around with the pattern matching code, just poking around in the console session with it, and it prints out a deprecation warning. It's like, warning: this is an experimental feature. Do not use it, be careful. But in the back of my head, I was like, I actually know how this whole thing plays out, Ruby 2.7, and I assure you, it's going to be fine. I have been to the future, at least I'm pretty sure. I think the version that is in Ruby 2.7 did end up getting adopted basically as it stands. And so, I think there is also a setting to turn off that deprecation warning. I haven't done it yet, but I mostly just enjoyed the conversation that I had with this deprecation message of like, listen, I've been to the future, and it's great. Well, it's complicated, but specific to this pattern matching [laughs] in Ruby 3+ versions, it went awesome. And I'm really excited about that future that we now live in. STEPH: I wish we had that for so many more things in our life [laughs] of like, here's a warning, and it's like, no, no, I've seen the future. It's all right. Or you're totally right; I should avoid and back out of this now. CHRIS: If only we could know how the things would play out, you know. But yeah, so pattern matching, very cool. I'll include a link in the show notes to the particular page in the dry-monads docs. But there are also other cool things on the internet. In an unrelated but also cool thing that I found this week, we use Tuple a lot within our organization for pair programming. For anyone who's not familiar with it, it's a really wonderful piece of technology that allows you to pair program pretty seamlessly, better video quality, all of those nice things that we want. But I found there was just the tiniest bit of friction in starting a Tuple call. I know I want to pair with this person. And I have to go up and click on the little menu bar, and then I have to find their name, then I have to click a button. That's just too much. That's not how...I want to live my life at the keyboard. I have a thing called Bartender, which is a little menu bar manager utility app that will collapse down and hide the icons. But it's also got a nice, little hotkey accessible pop-up window that allows me to filter down and open one of the menu bar pop-out menus. But unfortunately, when that happens, the Tuple window isn't interactive at that point. I can't use the arrow keys to go up and down. And so I was like, oh, man, I wonder if there's like an Alfred workflow for this. And it turns out indeed there is actually managed by the kind folks at Tuple themselves. So I was able to find that, install it; it's great. I have it now. I can use that. So that was a nice little upgrade to my workflow. I can just type like TC space and then start typing out the person's name, and then hit enter, and it will start a call immediately. And it doesn't actually make me more productive, but it makes me happier. And some days, that's what matters. STEPH: That's always so impressive to me when that happens where you're like, oh, I need a thing. And then you went through the saga that you just went through. And then the people who manage the application have already gotten there ahead of you, and they're like, don't worry, we've created this for you. That's one of those just beautiful moments of like, wow, y'all have really thought this through on a bunch of different levels and got there before me. CHRIS: It's somewhat unsurprising in this case because it's a very developer-centric organization, and Ben's background being a thoughtbot developer and Alfred user, I'm almost certain. Although I've seen folks talking about Raycast, which is the new hotness on the quick launcher world. I started eons ago in Quicksilver, and then I moved to Alfred, I don't know, ten years ago. I don't know what time it is anymore. But I've been in Alfred land for a while, but Raycast seems very cool. Just as an aside, I have not allowed myself... [laughs] this is another one of those like; I do not have permission to go explore this new tool yet because I don't think it will actually make me more productive, although it could make me happier. So... STEPH: I haven't heard of that one, Raycast. I'm literally adding it to the show notes right now as a way so you can find The Duke later, and I can find Raycast later [chuckles] and take a look at it and check it out. Although I really haven't embraced the whole Alfred workflow. I've seen people really enjoy it and just rave about it and how wonderful it is. But I haven't really leaned into that part of the world; I don't know why. I haven't set any hard and fast rules for myself where I can't play around with these technologies, but I haven't taken the time to do it either. CHRIS: You've also not found yourself writing thousands of lines of Vimscript because you thought that was a good idea. So you don't need as many guardrails it would seem. That's my guess. STEPH: This is true. CHRIS: Whereas I need to be intentional [laughs] with how I structure my interaction with my dev tools. STEPH: Instead, I'm just porting over fixtures from one place to another. [laughs] That's the weird space that I'm living in instead. [laughs] CHRIS: But you're getting paid for that. No one paid me for the Vimscript I wrote. [laughter] STEPH: That's fair. Speaking around process-y things, there's something that's been on my mind that Valeria, another thoughtboter, suggested around how we structure our meetings and the default timing that we have for meetings. So Thursdays are my team-focused day. And it's the day where I have a lot of one on ones. And I realized that I've scheduled them back to back, which is problematic because then I have zero break in between them, which I'm less concerned about that because then I can go for an hour or something and not have a break. And I'm not worried about that part. But it does mean that if one of those discussions happens to go over just even for like two or three minutes, then it means that someone else is waiting for me in those two to three minutes. And that feels unacceptable to me. So Valeria brought up a really good idea where I think it's only with the Google Meet paid version. I could be wrong there. But I think with the paid version of it that then you can set the new default for how long a meeting is going to last. So instead of having it default to 30 minutes, have it default to 25 minutes. So then, that way, you do have that five-minute buffer. So if you do go over just like two or three minutes with someone, you've still got like two minutes to then hop to the next call, and nobody's waiting for you. Or if you want those five minutes to then grab some water or something like that. So we haven't implemented it just yet because then there's discussion around is this a new practice that we want everybody to move to? Because I mean, if just one person does it, it doesn't work. You really need everybody to buy into the concept of we're now defaulting to 25 versus 30-minute meetings. So I'll have to let you know how that goes. But I'm intrigued to try it out because I think that would be very helpful for me. Although there's a part of me that then feels bad because it's like, well, if I have 30 minutes to chat with somebody, but now I'm reducing it to 25 minutes each time, I didn't love that I'm taking time away from our discussion. But that still feels like a better outcome than making somebody wait for three to five minutes if something else goes over. So have you ever run into something like that? How do you manage back-to-back meetings? Do you intentionally schedule a break in between or? CHRIS: I do try to give myself some buffer time. I stack meetings but not so much so that they're just back to back. So I'll stack them like Wednesdays are a meeting-heavy day for me. That's intentional just to be like, all right, I know that my day is going to get chopped up. So let's just really lean into that, chop the heck out of Wednesday afternoons, and then the rest of the week can hopefully have slightly longer deep work-type sessions. And, yeah, in general, I try and have like a little gap in between them. But often what I'll do for that is I'll stagger the start of the next meeting to be rather than on the hour or the half-hour, I start it on the 15th minute. And so then it's sort of I now have these little 15-minute gaps in my workflow, which is enough time to do one or two small things or to go get a drink or whatever it is or if things do run over. Like, again, I feel what you're saying of like, I don't necessarily want to constrain a meeting. Or I also don't necessarily want to go into the habit of often over-running. I think it's good to be intentional. Start meetings on time, end meetings on time. If there's a great conversation that's happening, maybe there's another follow-up meeting that should happen or something like that. But for as nonsensical of a human as I believe myself to be, I am rather rigid about meetings. I try very hard to be on time. I try very hard to wrap them up on time to make sure I go to the next one. And so with that, the 15-minute staggering is what I've found works for me. STEPH: Yeah, that makes sense. One-on-ones feels special to me because I wholeheartedly agree with being very diligent about like, hey, this is our meeting time. Let's do a time check. Someone says that at the end, and then that way, everybody can move on. But one on ones are, there's more open discussion space, and I hate cutting people off, especially because it might not be until the last 15 minutes that you really got into the meat of the conversation. Or you really got somewhere that's a little bit more personal or things that you want to talk about. So if someone's like, "Yeah, let me tell you about my life goals," and you're like, "Oh, no, wait, sorry. We're out of time." That feels terrible and tragic to do. So I struggle with that part of it. CHRIS: I will say actually, on that note, I'm now thinking through, but I believe this to be true. Everyone that reports to me I have a 45-minute one-on-one with, and then my CEO I set up the one-on-one. So I also made that one a 45-minute one-on-one. And that has worked out really well. Typically, I try and structure it and reiterate this from time to time of, like, hey, this is your space, not mine. So let's have whatever conversation fits in here. And it's fine if we don't need to use the whole time, but I want to make sure that we have it and that we protect it. Because I often find much like retro, I don't know; I think everything's fine. And then suddenly the conversation starts, and you're like, you know what? Actually, I'm really concerned now that you mentioned it. And you need that sort of empty space that then the reality sort of pop up into. And so with one on one, I try and make sure that there is that space, but I'm fine with being like, we can cut this short. We can move on from one-on-one topics to more of status updates; let's talk about the work. But I want to make sure that we lead with is there anything deeper, any concerns, anything you want to talk through? And sort of having the space and time for that. STEPH: I like that. And I also think it speaks more directly to the problem I'm having because I'm saying that we keep running over a couple of minutes, and so someone else is waiting. So rather than shorten it, which is where I'm already feeling some pain...although I still think that's a good idea to have a default of 25-minute meetings so then that way, there is a break versus the full 30. So if people want to have back-to-back meetings, they still have a little bit of time in between. But for one on ones specifically, upping it to 45 minutes feels nice because then you've got that 15-minute buffer likely. I mean, maybe you schedule a meeting, but, I don't know, that's funky. But likely, you've got a 15-minute buffer until your next one. And then that's also an area that I feel comfortable in sharing with folks and saying, "Hey, I've booked this whole 45 minutes. But if we don't need the whole time, that's fine." I'm comfortable saying, "Hey, we can end early, and you can get more of your time back to focus on some other areas." It's more the cutting someone off when they're talking because I have to hop to the next thing. I absolutely hate that feeling. So thanks, I think I'll give that a go. I think I'll try actually bumping it up to 45 minutes, presuming that other people like that strategy too, since they're opting in [laughs] to the 45 minutes structure. But that sounds like a nice solution. CHRIS: Well yeah, happy to share it. Actually, one interesting thing that I'm realizing, having been a manager at thoughtbot and then now being a manager within Sagewell, the nature of the interactions are very different. With thoughtbot, I was often on other projects. I was not working with my team day to day in any real capacity. So it was once every two weeks, I would have this moment to reconnect with them. And there was some amount of just catching up. Ideally, not like status update, low-level sort of thing, but sort of just like hey, what have you been working on? What have you been struggling with? What have you been enjoying? There was more like I needed bigger space, I would say for that, or it's not surprising to me that you're bumping into 30 minutes not being quite long enough. Whereas regularly, in the one on ones that I have now, we end up cutting them short or shifting out of true one-on-one mode into more general conversation and chatting about Raycast or other tools or whatever it is because we are working together daily. And we're pairing very regularly, and we're all on the same project and all sorts of in sync and know what's going on. And we're having retro together. We have plenty of places to have the conversation. So the one-on-one again, still, I keep the same cadence and the same time structure just because I want to make sure we have the space for any day that we really need that. But in general, we don't. Whereas when I was at thoughtbot, it was all the more necessary. And I think for folks listening; I could imagine if you're in a team lead position and if you're working very closely with folks, then you may be on the one side of things versus if you're a little bit more at a distance from the work that they're doing day to day. That's probably an interesting question to ask, and think about how you want to structure it. STEPH: Yeah, I think that's an excellent point. Because you're right; I don't see these individuals. We may not have really gotten to interact, except for our daily syncs outside of that. So then yeah, there's always like a good first 10 minutes of where we're just chatting about life and catching up on how things are going before then we dive into some other things. So I think that's a really good point. Cool, solving management problems on the mic. I dig it. In slightly different news, I've joined a book club, which I'm excited about. This book club is about Ruby. It's specifically reading the book Ruby Science, which is a book that was written and published by thoughtbot. And it requires zero homework, which is my favorite type of book club. Because I have found I always want to be part of book clubs. I'm always interested in them, but then I'm not great at budgeting the time to make sure I read everything I'm supposed to read. And so then it comes time for folks to get together. And I'm like, well, I didn't do my homework, so I can't join it. But for this one, it's being led by Joël, and the goal is that you don't have to do the homework. And they're just really short sections. So whoever's in charge of leading that particular session of the book club they're going to provide an overview of what's covered in whatever the reading material that we're supposed to read, whatever topic we're covering that day. They're going to provide an overview of it, an example of it, so then we can all talk about it together. So if you read it, that's wonderful. You're a bit ahead and could even join the meeting like five minutes late. Or, if you haven't read it, then you could join and then get that update. So I'm very excited about it. And this was one of those books that I'd forgotten that thoughtbot had written, and it's one that I've never read. And it's public for anybody that's interested in it. So to cover a little bit of details about it, so it talks about code smells, ways to refactor code, and then also common patterns that you can use to solve some issues. So there's a lot of really just great content that's in it. And I'll be sure to include a link in the show notes for anyone else that's interested. CHRIS: And again, to reiterate, this book is free at this point. Previously, in the past, it was available for purchase. But at one point a number of years ago, thoughtbot set all of the books free. And so now that along with a handful of other books like...what's Edward's DNS book? Domain Name Sanity, I believe, is Edward's book name that Edward Loveall wrote when he was not a thoughtboter, [laughs] and then later joined as a thoughtboter, and then we made the book free. But on the specific topic of Ruby Science, that is a book that I will never forget. And the reason I will never forget it is that book was written by the one and only CTO Joe Ferris, who is an incredibly talented developer. And when I was interviewing with thoughtbot, I got down to the final day, which is a pairing session. You do a morning pairing session with one thoughtbot developer, and you do an afternoon pairing session with another thoughtbot developer. So in the morning, I was working with someone on actually a patch to Rails which was pretty cool. I'd never really done that, so that was exciting. And that went fine with the exception that I kept turning on Caps Lock on their keyboard because I was used to Caps Lock being CTRL, and then Vim was going real weird for me. But otherwise, that went really well. But then, in the afternoon, I was paired with the one and only CTO Joe Ferris, who was writing the book Ruby Science at that time. And the nature of the book is like, here's a code sample, and then here's that code sample improved, just a lot of sort of side-by-side comparisons of code. And I forget the exact way that this went, but I just remember being terrified because Joe would put some code up on the screen and be like, "What do you think?" And I was like, oh, is this the good code or the bad code? I feel like I should know. I do not know. I'm not sure. It worked out fine, I guess. I made it through. But I just remember being so terrified at that point. I was just like, oh no, this is how it ends for me. It's been a good run. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: I made it this far. I would have loved to work for this nice thoughtbot company, but here we are. But yeah, I made it through. [laughs] STEPH: There are so many layers to that too where it's like, well if I say it's terrible, are you going to be offended? Like, how's this going to go for me if I speak my truths? Or what am I going to miss? Yeah, that seems very interesting (I kind of like it.) but also a terrifying pairing session. CHRIS: I think it went well because I think the code...I'd been following thoughtbot's work, and I knew who Joe was and had heard him on podcasts and things. And I kind of knew roughly where things were, and I was like, that code looks messy. And so I think I mostly got it right, but just the openness of the question of like, what do you think? I was like, oh God. [laughs] So yeah, that book will always be in my memories, is how I would describe it. STEPH: Well, I'm glad it worked out so we could be here today recording a podcast together. [laughs] CHRIS: Recording a podcast together. Now that I say all that, though, it's been a long time since I've read the book. So maybe I'll take a revisit. And definitely interested to hear more about your book club and how that goes. But shifting ever so slightly (I don't have a lot to say on this topic.) but there's a new framework technology thing out there that has caught my attention. And this hasn't happened for a while, so it's kind of novel for me. So I tend to try and keep my eye on where is the sort of trend of web development going? And I found Inertia a while ago, and I've been very, very happy with that as sort of this is the default answer as to how I build websites. To be clear, Inertia is still the answer as to how I build websites. I love Inertia. I love what it represents. But I'm seeing some stuff that's really interesting that is different. Specifically, Remix.run is the thing that I'm seeing. I mentioned it, I think, in the last episode talking about there was some stuff that they were doing with data loading and async versus synchronous, and do you wait on it or? They had built some really nice levers and trade-offs into the framework. And there's a really great talk that Ryan Florence, one of the creators of Remix.run, gave about that and showed what they were building. I've been exploring it a little bit more in-depth now. And there is some really, really interesting stuff in Remix. In particular, it's a meta-framework, I think, is the nonsense phrase that we use to describe it. But it's built on top of React. That won't be true for forever. I think it's actually they would say it's more built on top of React Router. But it is very similar to Next.js for folks that have seen that. But it's got a little bit more thought around data loading. How do we change data? How do we revalidate data after? There's a ton of stuff that, having worked in many React client-side API-heavy apps that there's so much pain, cache invalidation. How do you think about the cache? When do you fetch from the network? How do you avoid showing 19 different loading spinners on the page? And Remix as a framework has some really, I think, robust and well-thought-out answers to a lot of that. So I am super-duper intrigued by what they're doing over there. There's a particular video that I think shows off what Remix represents really well. It's Ryan Florence, that same individual, the creator of Remix, building just a newsletter signup page. But he goes through like, let's start from the bare bones, simplest thing. It's just an input, and a form submits to the server. That's it. And so we're starting from web 2.0, long, long ago, sort of ideas, and then he gradually enhances it with animations and transitions and error states. And even at the end, goes through an accessibility audit using the screen reader to say, "Look, Remix helps you get really close because you're just using web fundamentals." But then goes a couple of steps further and actually makes it work really, really well for a screen reader. And, yeah, overall, I'm just super impressed by the project, really, really intrigued by the work that they're doing. And frankly, I see a couple of different projects that are sort of in this space. So yeah, again, very early but excited. STEPH: On their website...I'm checking it out as you're walking me through it, and on their website, they have "Say goodbye to Spinnageddon." And that's very cute. [laughs] CHRIS: There's some fundamental stuff that I think we've just kind of as a web community, we made some trade-offs that I personally really don't like. And that idea of just spinners everywhere just sending down a ball of application logic and a giant JavaScript file turning it on on someone's computer. And then immediately, it has to fetch back to the server. There are just trade-offs there that are not great. I love that Remix is sort of flipping that around. I will say, just to sort of couch the excitement that I'm expressing right now, that Remix exists in a certain place. It helps with building complex UIs. But it doesn't have anything in the data layer. So you have to bring your own data layer and figure out what that means. We have ActiveRecord within Rails, and it's deeply integrated. And so you would need to bring a Prisma or some other database connection or whatever it is. And it also doesn't have more sort of full-featured framework things. Like with Rails, it's very easy to get started with a background job system. Remix has no answer to that because they're like, no, no, this is what we're doing over here. But similarly, security is probably the one that concerns me the most. There's an open conversation in their discussion portal about CSRF protection and a back and forth of whether or not Remix should have that out of the box or not. And there are trade-offs because there are different adapters that you can use for auth. And each would require their own CSRF mitigation. But to me, that is the sort of thing that I would want a framework to have. Or I'd be interested in a framework that continues to build on top of Remix that adds in background jobs and databases and all that kind of stuff as a complete solution, something more akin to a Rails or a Laravel where it's like, here we go. This is everything. But again, having some of these more advanced concepts and patterns to build really, really delightful UIs without having to change out the fundamental way that you're building things. STEPH: Interesting. Yeah, I think you've answered a couple of questions that I had about it. I am curious as to how it fits into your current tech stack. So you've mentioned that you're excited and that it's helpful. But given that you already have Rails, and Inertia, and Svelte, does it plug and play with the other libraries or the other frameworks that you have? Are you going to have to replace something to then take advantage of Remix? What does that roadmap look like? CHRIS: Oh yeah, I don't expect to be using Remix anytime soon. I'm just keeping an eye on it. I think it would be a pretty fundamental shift because it ends up being the server layer. So it would replace Rails. It would replace the Inertia within the stack that I'm using. This is why as I started, I was like, Inertia is still my answer. Because Inertia integrates really well with Rails and allows me to do the sort of it's not progressive enhancement, but it's like, I want fancy UI, and I don't want to give up on Rails. And so, Inertia is a great answer for that. Remix does not quite fit in the same way. Remix will own all of the request-response lifecycle. And so, if I were to use it, I would need to build out the rest of that myself. So I would need to figure out the data layer. I would need to figure out other things. I wouldn't be using Rails. I'm sure there's a way to shoehorn the technologies together, but I think it sort of architecturally would be misaligned. And so my sense is that folks out there are building...they're sort of piecing together parts of the stack to fill out the rest. And Remix is a really fantastic controller and view from their down experience and routing layer. So it's routing, controller, view I would say Remix has a really great answer to, but it doesn't have as much of the other stuff. Whereas in my case, Inertia and Rails come together and give me a great answer to the whole story. STEPH: Got it. Okay, that's super helpful. CHRIS: But yeah, again, I'm in very much the exploratory phase. I'm super intrigued by a lot of what I've seen of it and also just sort of the mindset, the ethos of the project as it were. That sounds fancy as I say it, but it's what I mean. I think they want to build from web fundamentals and then enhance the experience on top of that, and I think that's a really great way to go. It means that links will work. It means that routing and URLs will work by default. It means that you won't have loading spinner Armageddon, and these are core fundamentals that I believe make for good websites and web applications. So super interested to see where they go with it. But again, for me, I'm still very much in the Rails Inertia camp. Certainly, I mean, I've built Sagewell on top of it, so I'm going to be hanging out with it for a while, but also, it would still be my answer if I were starting something new right now. I'm just really intrigued by there's a new example out there in the world, this Remix thing that's pushing the envelope in a way that I think is really great. But with that, my now…what was that? My second or my third rave? Also called the positive rant, as we call it. But yeah, I think on that note, what do you think? Should we wrap up? STEPH: Let's wrap up. CHRIS: The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review on iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey. STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. ALL: Byeeeeeeee!!!!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Dobré ráno | Denný podcast denníka SME
V USA sa začal boj proti ženám (28. 06. 2022)

Dobré ráno | Denný podcast denníka SME

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 19:37


Roe vs Wade je minulosť. Precedens, ktorý chránil právo na interrupcie pre ženy v spojených štátoch už neplatí. Najvyšší súd sa totiž po 50tich rokoch stal konzervatívnejším, keď troch konzervatívnych sudcov vymenoval Donald Trump. Čo sa teraz bude diať v USA? Budeme vidieť prípady žien, ktorým neurobia interrupciu ani v ohrození života, podobne ako v Poľsku, či nedávno na Malte? A bude pokračovať Najvyšší súd aj v obmedzovaní antikoncepcie, či manželstiev gayov? Zuzana Kovačič Hanzelová sa pýtala Ireny Hůlovej, vedúcej advokačnej činnosti českej pobočky Amnesty International. Zdroje zvukov: Washington Post, BBC News, ABC News Odporúčanie: Téma interrupcií polarizuje, a je ťažká. Pre mnohých je nemožné rozprávať sa o nej racionálne. Ezra Kleinovi sa to však podarilo a vo svojom podcaste zverejnil hodinovú diskusiu o argumentácii oboch strán - pre aj proti z právneho hľadiska. Dilemy, morálne aj právne o interrupciách sú môj zaujímavý tip na záver v podcaste The Ezra Klein show v dieli The ethics of abortion. https://open.spotify.com/episode/1v7640V6MDqcj8ByovpU5M?si=052f2a2236ef444d – Ak máte pre nás spätnú väzbu, odkaz alebo nápad, napíšte nám na dobrerano@sme.sk – Všetky podcasty denníka SME nájdete na sme.sk/podcasty – Podporte vznik podcastu Dobré ráno a kúpte si digitálne predplatné SME.sk na sme.sk/podcast – Odoberajte aj denný newsletter SME.sk s najdôležitejšími správami na sme.sk/brifing – Ďakujeme, že počúvate podcast Dobré ráno.

Best Book Ever
104 Suswati Basu on "The Stranger" by Albert Camus

Best Book Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 33:20


Suswati Basu is a multilingual disabled journalist, mental health books show podcast host, and award-winning activist.She has written for the Guardian, Huffington Post, and the F-Word blogs, and has worked for various media outlets such as the BBC, Channel 4 News, and ITV News. She has worked in China, India, and the UK and currently writes on a freelance basis. As a result, she speaks multiple languages including Mandarin, Spanish, Hindi, and Bengali. Suswati has also appeared on BBC Radio's Woman's Hour with Jenni Murray as well as BBC News, speaking in regard to feminist issues. As a survivor and thriver from trauma, living with both mental health and physical disabilities, she began the How To Be... podcast looking at helping mental wellbeing through reading and interviewing authors.   Suswati joined me today to talk about Albert Camus' “The Stranger,” a classic of Existentialist literature, featuring a disconnected main character who faces consequences for a violent action he committed, even though he evidently has no concept of consequences, violence, or feelings. If you're my age and you grew up in the States, you probably read this in your high school English class, and all I can tell you is that it's a totally different book now.     Follow the Best Book Ever Podcast on Instagram or on the Best Book Ever Website   This episode is sponsored by Lover's Moon by Mark Leslie and Julie Strauss   Do you have a book you want to tell me about? Go HERE to apply to be a guest on the Best Book Ever Podcast.   Host: Julie Strauss Website/Instagram     Guest: Suswati Basu Podcast/Website/Facebook/Instagram/You Tube/Twitter Discussed in this episode: The Stranger by Albert Camus The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte 1984 by George Orwell Haramacy: A Collecgtion of Stories Prescribed by Voices from the Middle East, South Asian, and the Diaspora by Zahed Sultan Energize: Make the Most of Every Moment by Simon Alexander Ong How to Be Sad: Everything I've Learned About Getting Happier by Being Sad by Helen Russell The Year of Living Danishly: Uncovering the Secrets of the World's Happiest Country by Helen Russell Stronger: Changing Everything I Knew About Women's Health by Poorna Bell   (Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links, meaning I get a few bucks off your purchase at no extra expense to you. The charity links are NOT affiliates, but they are organizations I trust and personally donate money to. Anytime you shop for books, you can use my affiliate link on Bookshop, which also supports Indie Bookstores around the country. If you're shopping for everything else – clothes, office supplies, gluten-free pasta, couches – you can use my affiliate link for Amazon. Thank you for helping to keep the Best Book Ever Podcast in business!)

Best Book Ever
104 Suswati Basu on "The Stranger" by Albert Camus

Best Book Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 33:20


Suswati Basu is a multilingual disabled journalist, mental health books show podcast host, and award-winning activist.She has written for the Guardian, Huffington Post, and the F-Word blogs, and has worked for various media outlets such as the BBC, Channel 4 News, and ITV News. She has worked in China, India, and the UK and currently writes on a freelance basis. As a result, she speaks multiple languages including Mandarin, Spanish, Hindi, and Bengali. Suswati has also appeared on BBC Radio's Woman's Hour with Jenni Murray as well as BBC News, speaking in regard to feminist issues. As a survivor and thriver from trauma, living with both mental health and physical disabilities, she began the How To Be... podcast looking at helping mental wellbeing through reading and interviewing authors.   Suswati joined me today to talk about Albert Camus' “The Stranger,” a classic of Existentialist literature, featuring a disconnected main character who faces consequences for a violent action he committed, even though he evidently has no concept of consequences, violence, or feelings. If you're my age and you grew up in the States, you probably read this in your high school English class, and all I can tell you is that it's a totally different book now.     Follow the Best Book Ever Podcast on Instagram or on the Best Book Ever Website   This episode is sponsored by Lover's Moon by Mark Leslie and Julie Strauss   Do you have a book you want to tell me about? Go HERE to apply to be a guest on the Best Book Ever Podcast.   Host: Julie Strauss Website/Instagram     Guest: Suswati Basu Podcast/Website/Facebook/Instagram/You Tube/Twitter Discussed in this episode: The Stranger by Albert Camus The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte 1984 by George Orwell Haramacy: A Collecgtion of Stories Prescribed by Voices from the Middle East, South Asian, and the Diaspora by Zahed Sultan Energize: Make the Most of Every Moment by Simon Alexander Ong How to Be Sad: Everything I've Learned About Getting Happier by Being Sad by Helen Russell The Year of Living Danishly: Uncovering the Secrets of the World's Happiest Country by Helen Russell Stronger: Changing Everything I Knew About Women's Health by Poorna Bell   (Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links, meaning I get a few bucks off your purchase at no extra expense to you. The charity links are NOT affiliates, but they are organizations I trust and personally donate money to. Anytime you shop for books, you can use my affiliate link on Bookshop, which also supports Indie Bookstores around the country. If you're shopping for everything else – clothes, office supplies, gluten-free pasta, couches – you can use my affiliate link for Amazon. Thank you for helping to keep the Best Book Ever Podcast in business!)

Last Word
Dom Phillips (pictured), Stephen S. Thompson, Caroline Drummond, Maureen Hiron

Last Word

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 28:09


Matthew Bannister on Dom Phillips, the freelance journalist who was ambushed and shot dead on a trip into the Amazon rain forest. Stephen S. Thompson, the novelist and screenwriter who won a BAFTA for his TV drama telling the story of his brother's experiences during the Windrush scandal. Caroline Drummond, who campaigned for greater links between farming and environmental protection – and oversaw the launch of Open Farm Sunday. Maureen Hiron, the top-class bridge player who invented many new games including Continuo and Quizwrangle. Producer: Neil George Interviewed guest: Sian Phillips Interviewed guest: Sylvia Colombo Interviewed guest: Anthony Bryan Interviewed guest: Krishnendu Majumdar Interviewed guest: Minette Batters Interviewed guest: Ian Pigott Interviewed guest: W. Eric Martin Interviewed guest: Deej Johnson Archive clips used: BBC News 24, Dom Phillips and Bruno Pereira 16/06/2022; Metrópoles - Café da Manhã Com Jornalistas 14/06/2022; BBC News Online, Amber Rudd's regret over scale of Windrush problem 26/04/2018; Edinburgh Television Festival, Sitting in Limbo - Edinburgh TV Festival 2021 12/06/2021; Left Bank Pictures/BBC/Ian Johnson Publicity, BBC Trailers Sitting in Limbo 01/06/2020; BAFTA, Sitting in Limbo wins Single Drama BAFTA TV Awards 2021 06/06/2021; BBC Radio 4, The Archers 07/06/2019; BBC Two, A Will To Win 20/10/1986; Granada TV, The Krypton Factor 1993.

Ctrl Alt Delete
#392 Vicky Spratt: We Need To Talk About Britain's Housing Crisis

Ctrl Alt Delete

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 45:35


My guest today is Vicky Spratt, the author of TENANTS: The People on the Frontline of Britain's Housing Emergency and journalist whose work regularly shapes public policy. She is also currently the iPaper's Housing Correspondent. Her 2016 campaign Make Renting Fair got letting fees in England and Wales banned, and she has spoken at political conferences, appeared on BBC News, Newsnight, Woman's Hour, Radio 4 and tons more. Vicky is an incredible voice on this issue and I found this episode really galvanising, enraging, inspiring and empowering. Vicky has a way of making people wake up and feel engaged when it comes to issues that feel pretty overwhelming. I hope you enjoy this episode and if you did please consider sharing with a friend or leaving a review - or both! Thanks for listening.LINKS:Join my Substack community and come and say hi! https://thehyphen.substack.com/Buy TENANTS here: https://uk.bookshop.org/a/153/9781788161275Check out the work of Kwajo Tweneboa: https://bit.ly/3sXemWqBuy DISCONNECTED here: https://uk.bookshop.org/a/153/9781529373127My books: https://uk.bookshop.org/contributors/emma-gannonMy favourite 2022 reads: https://uk.bookshop.org/lists/best-reads-of-2022 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Stories of our times
The fight for the Amazon: The long, bloody history to save the forest

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 26:45


When journalist Dom Phillips and indigenous expert Bruno Perreira were murdered while on a fact finding trip in the Amazon, it highlighted the threats to those working to protect the forest from exploitation. That fight, against those who want to use its resources, is one that has been going on for years - with little end in sight.This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Guests: - Stephen Gibbs, Latin America Correspondent, The Times and The Sunday Times.- Leticia Valverdes, Brazilian photographer.Host: Luke Jones.Clips from: Al Jazeera, Sky News, NBC News, PBS, BBC News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Health Check
Poor Covid immunity after Omicron

Health Check

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 26:39


New research reveals a poor immunity boost after infection with the Omicron variant. Might this explain why getting Covid again has been more common with this wave? BBC News health reporter, Smitha Mundasad unpicks the data. And the first World Health Organisation mental health report in two decades calls for change. Dévora Kestel, Director of WHO’s Mental Health and Substance Use Department joins Claudia Hammond to discuss the findings. Plus Professor Russell Foster on why looking after our body clocks can help with a good night's sleep. Presenter: Claudia Hammond Producer: Erika Wright (Picture: Covid-19 Omicron illustration. Photo credit: Sakchai Vongsasiripat/Getty Images.)

Intelligence Squared
How to Be an Antiracist, with Ibram X. Kendi

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 48:15


Activist, historian and academic Ibram X. Kendi's book, How To Be and Antiracist, won the National Book Award for nonfiction as well as topping bestseller lists in 2020, a year in which the murder by police of George Floyd made the impact of Kendi's words inescapable. He came to Intelligence Squared a few months prior in August 2019 for a wide-ranging discussion on the themes of the book with BBC News journalist and visiting journalism professor at Princeton, Razia Iqbal. The two speakers will be meeting again in the coming weeks for a follow-up conversation discussing what can be done to educate future generations, which is the subject of Ibram's new book: How To Raise An Antiracist. Head to www.intelligencesquared.com for tickets to the event at London's Conway Hall on Monday 4th of July. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Worldwide Business Intelligence Podcast
Communication is key: key messages, key audiences, key objectives with Steve Bustin

Worldwide Business Intelligence Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 60:34


Learn about the communication mistakes that hold back individuals and businesses from reaching their true potential Get insights into what turns a ‘good' public speaker into a ‘great' public speaker Understand how to protect your images and reputation online   Steve Bustin is a communications expert, turning individuals and organisations into brilliant communicators through his company, Get Your Voice Heard, based in the UK and working worldwide. He delivers his expertise as a keynote speaker, coach and author and is also in demand as a conference and event emcee. He's a former BBC News journalist and ran a PR agency for many years before focusing on public speaking and coaching others as speakers. He's the author of The Authority Guide to Presenting and Public Speaking and The Authority Guide to PR for Small Business, the Immediate Past President of the Professional Speaking Association UK & Ireland and was named UK Speaker of the Year in 2015. As well as speaking and coaching on a range of communication skills, Steve also speaks on online safety and protecting yourself online, based on his experience of becoming the ‘face' of an online dating scam. More details on www.getyourvoiceheard.co.uk or www.youtube.com/stevebustin

The Slippery Slope
New Zealand want to Tax the Sheep.

The Slippery Slope

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 11:39


New Zealand considers taxing cow and sheep burps to combat climate change The government of New Zealand has proposed a novel way of fighting climate change: charging farmers for the burps, farts and waste of farm animals. "There is no question that we need to cut the amount of methane we are putting into the atmosphere, and an effective emissions pricing system for agriculture will play a key part in how we achieve that," James Shaw, New Zealand's climate change minister, told BBC News last week. Methane is the second-most prevalent greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and the majority of methane emissions come from human activity. Since methane causes much more warming than carbon in the first few decades after it is released, but then dissipates in the atmosphere more quickly, clamping down on methane emissions is essential to averting catastrophic climate change, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. President Biden and the European Union unveiled a global effort to cut methane emissions at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, Scotland, last November. This is just my opinion. J Fallon Apple Music J Fallon Spotify J Fallon YouTube The Slippery Slope Apple Podcasts The Slippery Slope YouTube The Slippery Slope Stitcher --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jason-fallon/message

Motoring Podcast - News Show
Consultant Created Toss - 20 June 2022

Motoring Podcast - News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:10


UK HOUSEHOLDS GET CLEAN AIR MONITORSHouses in Tideford, Cornwall, along the A38, are having plug-in air purifiers installed as part of a project to understand how bad the air in that area is, thanks to the traffic. The results will be shared by the local council, with Highways England so they can all understand how much affect the number of vehicles have. To read more, click here for the BBC News article. EXPERIENCE SCORES FOR CARSThe EPM Advisory Council, a collection of automotive brands and suppliers, has come up with a recommendation that cars are scored on the experience they give drivers and passengers, called the EPM. The Experience Per Mile is supposed to help evaluate how positive the in-car experience has been. Aspects such as remaining connected, how productive one is and entertained will all be given a score. More can be found on this by clicking this Autocar link. MG HALTS SALESDue to the rocketing demand for their vehicles and the continued effects of the semi conductor crisis, along with covid issues, MG has paused sales of their EVs in the UK. They anticipate being able to take orders once again soon. For more, click the AMOnline article link here. ——————————————————————————-If you like what we do, on this show, and think it is worth a £1.00, please consider supporting us via Patreon. Here is the link to that CLICK HERE TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST——————————————————————————-WRC: SAFARI RALLY THIS WEEKA reminder to keep an eye out for the DirtFish coverage of the Safari Rally this week, as WRC returns! BRANDS HATCH BUS SERVICEBrands Hatch Shuttle Buses will run a service for some major racing events this year, ferrying people from Azalea Drive to the circuit. Hopefully this will make it easier for people to use public transport and get to see some cracking motorsport. For more, click here to read the Brands Hatch article. MOVE CONFERENCE ROUNDUP:Alan and Andrew talk about their time at the conference and highlights from what they saw. BICESTER SCAMBLEAlan has been busy this week, he went to ANOTHER event over the weekend, the fabulous Scramblers. You can hear him give a quick round up of what he saw. DESIGNERS MOOD BOARD: NURNBERGER DOES RETURN TO ASTONWhilst Andrew sits smugly with the knowledge his lucky guess from a few shows ago was right, Miles Nurnberger has returned to Aston Martin following the departure of Tobias Moers as CEO. To learn more, click the Car Design News article link. LUNCHTIME READ: MY TRIP TO ITALY WITH SIR STIRLING MOSSAndrew Frankel recounts, in some wonderful writing, his time with Sir Stirling Moss and Norman Dewis in Italy to celebrate the Jaguar C-Type taking part in the Mille Miglia in 1952, The fondness Andrew has for the two and how wonderful it must have been to be there really comes across. Click here to read the Goodwood Road & Racing article. LIST OF THE WEEK: THE EVOLUTION OF THE SUPERCARAs Goodwood Festival of Speed is this weekend, we thought we would share a list all about supercars across history and how some moved the needle on. Click here for the Hagerty article link. Don't forget to tell the chaps if you agree with the choice. AND FINALLY: FORD ONLINE ARCHIVE JUST WENT LIVEFord has opened a massive online archive to the public. Items from between 1903 to 2003 can be accessed via the link in the Jalopnik article. What a wonderful way to spend many, many hours pouring over old information and pictures. Click here to read the Jalopnik article.

The Writing Coach Podcast with Rebecca L. Weber
WCP184 Human rights reporting with Sara Cincurova

The Writing Coach Podcast with Rebecca L. Weber

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 43:30


Sara Cincurova is a freelance human rights journalist from Slovakia, focusing on migration, conflict, human rights, humanitarian issues, and women's rights. She has written for The Guardian, BBC News, The New York Magazine, Al Jazeera English, Der Spiegel, Foreign Policy, The HuffPost, The New Humanitarian, Women's Media Center and many more. Sara extensively covered the conflict in eastern Ukraine since 2014 and reported from Kharkiv and other cities in Ukraine as of  February 24, 2022. She has reported from more than twenty countries, and investigated issues such as sexualized violence against women dissidentents in Venezuelan prisons, violence against pregnant refugees in Libyan detention centers, women who were forced to cross the Mediterranean during pregnancy, forced sterilizations of transgender people in Slovakia, and investigated how domestic abuse impacted disabled victims in Covid times.  In this episode, Sara shares: How pitching, reporting, and writing stories that matter differs for smaller and larger reaching publications Challenges of being embedded on a search-and-rescue vessel in the Mediterranean as a journalist on board, and participated in the rescue of 408 refugees Follwing up with pregnant refugees, documenting what happened to them and their babies Using deep reporting for multiple outlets Interviewing sources about prior and current trauma Establishing safety and the importance of authenticity when reporting on a humanitarian crisis Desire to share the truth and protect others Working as a freelancer when war broke out 

Stories of our times
Is the Pope planning to quit?

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 27:09


The ailing pontiff has prompted speculation that he will resign with a planned visit to the tomb of a 13th-century pope who quit after five months.Meanwhile, his remarks about foes plotting his replacement have some observers wondering who is wielding the knife — or the lead piping…This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Guest: Tom Kington, Italy correspondent, The Times.Host: Jenny Kleeman.Clips: ABC News, BBC News, Catholic News Service, Channel 4 News, CNN, EWTN, France 24, National Geographic, NBC News, NewsNation, Newsmax TV, TheLip TV, WTHR. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Last Word
Dame Paula Rego (pictured), Bruce Kent, Hilary Devey CBE

Last Word

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 28:06


Matthew Bannister on Dame Paula Rego, the acclaimed Portuguese-born artist who later made her home in the UK and was renowned for making vivid and disturbing work focussing on the subjugation of women. We talk to her son Nick Willing. Bruce Kent, the Catholic priest who became a leader of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. Hilary Devey CBE, who founded a multi-million pound freight distribution business and was one of the Dragons on the TV show Dragons Den. Producer: Neil George Interviewed guest: Nick Willing Interviewed guest: Jacky Klein Interviewed guest: Kate Hudson Archive clips used: BBC Radio 4, Desert Island Discs - Dame Paula Rego 07/12/1997; Kismet Film Company/ BBC, Paula Rego - Secrets and Stories 25/03/2017; Eric Minh Swenson Art Films, Samella Lewis - Pioneering Visual Artist and Educator 19/12/2016; BBC Radio Ulster, Bruce Kent documentary 13/03/1988; British Movietone, Aldermaston March - Natural Sound 12/04/1963; British Movietone, The March to Aldermaston in Trafalgar Square 10/04/1958; BBC Radio 4, PM - Cardinal Basil Hume interview 27/04/1983; BBC News, Troops Erect Fence Around RAF Molesworth Base 06/02/1985; CND - YouTube Channel, Bruce Kent - Why I joined CND 18/02/2018; BBC Radio 4, Desert Island Discs - Hilary Devey 02/11/2012; BBC Radio 4, Woman's Hour - Hilary Devey interview 24/05/2012; BBC One, Dragons' Den (Season 10) 2012; ITV Studios - YouTube Channel, Loose Women - Hilary Devey interview 03/06/2015.

Square Mile of Murder
113: The Hollywood Blacklist

Square Mile of Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 74:42


We're doing something a little bit different this week, because why not?! A few months ago in a Patreon bonus episode we rambled our way into talking about McCarthyism and the Red Scare in the USA during the Cold War as well as the Hollywood Blacklist and since we spoke about early Hollywood a bit a few months ago, we figured we should devote a whole episode to the Hollywood Blacklist. So this is that episode! Listen in as as talk about the state of the film industry in the 1940s and 50s, communism (or lack thereof), and the infamous Hollywood Blacklist. FURTHER READING: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollywood_blacklist (Hollywood blacklist - Wikipedia) http://www.youmustrememberthispodcast.com/episodes/2016/06/21/blacklistarchive (The Blacklist Archive — You Must Remember This) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_Un-American_Activities_Committee (House Un-American Activities Committee - Wikipedia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalton_Trumbo (Dalton Trumbo - Wikipedia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollywood_blacklist#Red_Channels_list (Hollywood blacklist - Red Channels List) https://www.mtsu.edu/first-amendment/article/984/blacklists (Blacklists | The First Amendment Encyclopedia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldorf_Statement (Waldorf Statement in full) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKIfTXRUYwE (Elon's Version of the First Amendment (Leeja Miller. Youtube)) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution (First Amendment to the United States Constitution - Wikipedia) https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-51398165 (How Kirk Douglas helped break the Hollywood blacklist - BBC News) https://screenrant.com/show-business-careers-ruined-hollywood-blacklist/ (9 Careers That Were Ruined By The Hollywood Blacklist) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Channels (Red Channels - Wikipedia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counterattack_(newsletter) (Counterattack (newsletter) - Wikipedia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_McCarthy (Joseph McCarthy - Wikipedia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McCarthyism (McCarthyism - Wikipedia) http://www.youmustrememberthispodcast.com/episodes/2021/9/1/gossipgirlsarchive (GOSSIP GIRLS ARCHIVE — You Must Remember This) ----------------------------------------------- https://square-mile-of-murder.captivate.fm/listen (Like the show? Give us a rating and review!) Join our Patreon: https://patreon.com/squaremileofmurder (Patreon) Check out our merch store: https://squaremileofmurder.store/ (Square Mile of Murder Merch) Get our newsletter: https://squaremileofmurder.com/newsletter (Newsletter) Send us an email: info@squaremileofmurder.com Follow us on social media: https://www.facebook.com/pg/squaremilepod/ (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/squaremileofmurder/ (Instagram) https://twitter.com/squaremilepod (Twitter) https://squaremileofmurder.com/ (Squaremileofmurder.com) Music provided by https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary?feature=blog (YouTube Audio Library) and https://artlist.io/Taylor-2050697 (Artlist.io)

Today with Claire Byrne
Orla Guerin on the Ukraine war

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 12:37


Orla Guerin, International Correspondent, BBC News

Stories of our times
The biggest rail strike in 30 years

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 32:55


Next week, much of the country's rail system will grind to a halt, as more than 40,000 rail workers join a national walkout. It's the biggest rail strike since 1989. So why are they striking? And how did the strikes of the 1970s and 80s bring us here?This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Guest: Patrick Maguire, Red Box Editor, The Times.Host: Jenny Kleeman. Clips: ITV News, Sky News, 10 Downing Street, Socialist Party, BBC News, Channel 4 News, Parliament TV, Thames TV See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Stories of our times
Monkeypox: What you need to know

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 23:59


Monkeypox cases in the UK are now in the hundreds, and 1,600 cases have been reported around the world in recent weeks. What do we know about it and how it spreads? And can it be contained? This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Guest: Tom Whipple, Science Editor, The Times.Host: Jenny Kleeman. Clips: NewsNation, Sky News, WION, BBC News, CNBC, Fox 5 News, GB News, talkTV. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Heumann Perspective
Disabled & Queer Pride with Spencer West

The Heumann Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 38:55


This episode, Judy chats with Spencer West about his role in improving representation, the intersections of being gay and disabled, as well as the access differences he has discovered going from growing up in the U.S. to now living in Canada. The transcript for this podcast episode is available here. Follow Spencer on TikTok and Instagram @spencer2thewest After losing both legs from the pelvis down at the age of five due to a genetic disease, Spencer West tackled challenge after challenge, learning to navigate a world set against those with disabilities. Spencer is a successful global keynote speaker, content creator, and activist. He is known for summiting Mount Kilimanjaro, opening for Demi Lovato's 2014 World Tour, starring in the documentary Redefine Possible: The Story of Spencer West, which debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival, and author of the best selling book Standing Tall: My Journey. He has over 3-million Tik Tok followers and has appeared countless times in the media including, ABC News, Buzz Feed, 60 Minutes, CTV, BBC News, TMZ, CNN, Forbes, and The Globe & Mail, CBS This Morning, Bloomberg, and was a featured guest on Season 2 of Karamo The Podcast, hosted by Karamo Brown. Related Links: Spencer's Website Every Body Curious Spencer x Crest Pride Campaign Spencer's Memoir This episode's Ask Judy question came from Keira Thompson. Check out her book, Mila and the Too Hard Hoop. If you'd like to submit a question for Ask Judy, send it to media@judithheumann.com or DM Judy on Instagram or Twitter. Find a shortened video version of this interview on Judy's YouTube channel.  Intro music by Lachi. Outro music by Gaelynn Lea.

What is Innovation?
Innovation is a new idea implemented at the right time :: Chris Skinner

What is Innovation?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 35:44


Chris Skinner is a bestselling author, independent commentator, and globally sought-after expert on financial markets and technology through his critically acclaimed website, The Finanser.More about our guest:Chris has been voted one of the most influential people in financial technology by the Wall Street Journal's Financial News, and has been an advisor to the White House, the World Bank, the World Economic Forum, and the United Nations. He is a visiting lecturer with Cambridge University as well as a TEDx speaker and is Chair of Nordic Future Innovation and a non-executive director of 11:FS.  Chris is also the author of sixteen best-selling books, including Digital Bank, ValueWeb and Digital Human as well as a children's book series, Captain Cake and the Candy Crew. His newest book, Digital For Good: Stand for something…or you will fall has recently been released last June 1, 2022.  He is also a regular commentator on BBC News, Sky News, CNBC and Bloomberg, Chris serves on various financial and fintech advisory boards, including B-Hive, Bankex, empowr, IoV42, Innovate Finance, Life.SREDA, Moven, Meniga, Pintail, Project Exscudo and Token Fund.  ------------------------------------------------Episode Guide:1:34 - What is Innovation?3:12 - Innovation before primetime5:20 - Financial Services, 3G-to-5G evolution, cloud computing, 3d printing7:33 - Facial Recognition: Mastercard and Alipay8 :36 - Defining 'Innovation Reapplication'9:58 - Wallet applications14:19 - Cash Machines: Why online banks still open physical branches17:28 - Upcoming Trends: Technology in Financial Industry21:01 - Blog post: "The best job in banking: Chief Cannibal"23:24 - What isn't innovation?  26:12 - Changes in the music industry28:15 - FinTech: innovations behind the scenes29:35 - Brazil's Nubank31:01 - China's Alipay and WeChat Pay33:20 - "Bankenstien"3402 - Advice for innovators-------------------------Resources Mentioned: Companies/Institutions: AlipayWeChat PayBrazil's NubankBlogs:The FinanserThe best job in banking: Chief Cannibal by Chris Skinner--------------------------OUTLAST Consulting offers professional development and strategic advisory services in the areas of innovation and diversity management.

The Heumann Perspective
Disabled & Queer Pride with Spencer West

The Heumann Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 38:55


This episode, Judy chats with Spencer West about his role in improving representation, the intersections of being gay and disabled, as well as the access differences he has discovered going from growing up in the U.S. to now living in Canada. This episode is sponsored by Fable Pathways. The transcript for this podcast episode is available here. Follow Spencer on TikTok and Instagram @spencer2thewest After losing both legs from the pelvis down at the age of five due to a genetic disease, Spencer West tackled challenge after challenge, learning to navigate a world set against those with disabilities. Spencer is a successful global keynote speaker, content creator, and activist. He is known for summiting Mount Kilimanjaro, opening for Demi Lovato's 2014 World Tour, starring in the documentary Redefine Possible: The Story of Spencer West, which debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival, and author of the best selling book Standing Tall: My Journey. He has over 3-million Tik Tok followers and has appeared countless times in the media including, ABC News, Buzz Feed, 60 Minutes, CTV, BBC News, TMZ, CNN, Forbes, and The Globe & Mail, CBS This Morning, Bloomberg, and was a featured guest on Season 2 of Karamo The Podcast, hosted by Karamo Brown. Related Links: Spencer's Website Every Body Curious Spencer x Crest Pride Campaign Spencer's Memoir This episode's Ask Judy question came from Keira Thompson. Check out her book, Mila and the Too Hard Hoop. If you'd like to submit a question for Ask Judy, send it to media@judithheumann.com or DM Judy on Instagram or Twitter. Find a shortened video version of this interview on Judy's YouTube channel.  Intro music by Lachi. Outro music by Gaelynn Lea.

Apple News Today
Why 49 million people face famine now

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 8:36


A South Carolina congressman who voted for impeachment will fall to a Trump-backed challenger, while another incumbent who defied Trump will survive the primary, CNN projects. The Washington Post reports on how worsening climate disasters and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine are among the reasons 49 million people are facing famine. Florida recently passed some of the nation’s most restrictive abortion laws. It also has one of the highest rates of abortion nationally. Politico looks at the coming clash between politics and practice. Data shows that American adolescents aren’t getting enough sleep, in part because many schools start very early. California educators are making a big move to require later start times. The Atlantic has more. One of the world’s most unusual land disputes, between Canada and Denmark, has concluded peacefully. BBC News has the story of the end of the “Whisky Wars.”

The Eventful Entrepreneur with Dodge Woodall
#90. Zuby: The Joe Rogan Experience and THAT Viral Video

The Eventful Entrepreneur with Dodge Woodall

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 68:41


Zuby is an independent rapper, author, podcast host, public speaker, creative entrepreneur, and an Oxford university graduate with over 1 million followers on social media. He became a viral sensation in 2019 when he filmed himself breaking the British women's deadlift record while "identifying as a woman"Since then he has appeared on The Joe Rogan Experience, BBC News, Fox News, Sky News and countless other media outlets. Zuby hosted the Urban Tent at Bournemouth 7s, and I've known him for many years, so it's been wild watching his global success over the past few years. Website: DodgeWoodall.comInstagram: @Dodge.WoodallLinkedIn: Dodge WoodallYouTube: Dodge Woodall See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Jessica Firger and That Time I Was on the Cover of Newsweek

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 34:02


Remember that time I was on the cover of Newsweek? Great. If not, well, you do. Several people were responsible for taking the risk of bringing the young adult cancer movement's cause to the national spotlight, and Jessica Firger sits on that "Mount Rushmore." At the time, Jess was a senior health writer at Newsweek, but this award-winning health journalist has a storied career, having held posts at CBS News, CNN, Everyday Health, and others. On today's show, Jess joins me live in-studio for a genuine conversation about our current state of healthcare journalism, her perspective on society living with COVID-19, and the enormous burden patient advocates have laid in front of them to make healthcare suck less. Jess' writing has been featured in numerous national media outlets, including The Wall Street Journal, newyorker.com, Elemental, TIME, New York Times, Marie Claire, Elle and Salon, and others. And she made appearances as an expert on MSNBC, BBC News, Fox & Friends, and NPR. In her time, she's covered a significant range of topics: The heavy burden of infectious diseases on public health; research that's altering how we understand and treat chronic medical conditions; the innovations that prove the future of medicine is happening right now; the social determinants of health; and the science behind wellness. Follow Jess on Twitter @JessFirger and enjoy the show.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Stories of our times
The Grenfell fire, five years on (Pt 2): The cladding scandal

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 43:44


When a fire broke out at Grenfell tower in west London in 2017, it led to the deaths of 72 people – and a search for answers. Five years on, what have we learned from the inquiry about the companies who made the cladding that helped spread the fire?This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Guest: Martina Lees, Senior Property Writer, the Sunday Times.Host: Manveen Rana.Clips: ITV News, Grenfell Inquiry, BBC News, ABC News Australia, OnDemand News, AP See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

scandals sunday times bbc news grenfell cladding fire five years host manveen rana
Stories of our times
The Grenfell fire, five years on (Pt 1): Stories from the tower

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 37:00


When a fire broke out at Grenfell tower in west London in 2017, it led to the deaths of 72 people – and a search for answers. Five years on, we revisit that night through the stories of three families who called the tower home. This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Guest: Martina Lees, Senior Property Writer, the Sunday Times.Host: Manveen Rana.Clips: Channel 4 News, ITV News, BBC News, Grenfell Tower Inquiry. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Intelligence Squared
The Sunday Debate: We Were Right To Brexit

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 73:12


It was always going to be a disaster. Queues of HGVs stretching miles from Dover. The Good Friday Agreement threatened by the controversial Northern Ireland Protocol and increased support for Scottish Independence. That's the argument of the doomsayers in this debate. But others claim that while short-term damage is inevitable – there is always blowback from a jilted partner – Brexit is a long-term project, one that is tied to the fundamental principle of sovereignty. Which side is right? To debate the issue, we welcome back Conservative politician Daniel Hannan, Labour MP Stella Creasy, and are joined by Robert Tombs, the historian of France and Britain, whose most recent book is This Sovereign Isle: Britain In and Out of Europe. Plus, Dominic Grieve, former Conservative MP and former Attorney General for England and Wales. Chairing the debate is Johnny Dymond, BBC News presenter and Royal Correspondent.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Last Word
Amanda Claridge, Sidhu Moose Wala (pictured), Mark Sykes, Paul Vance

Last Word

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 28:04


Matthew Bannister on Amanda Claridge, the archaeologist who was a leading expert on ancient Rome. Sidhu Moose Wala, the acclaimed Indian rapper who was shot dead at the age of 28. Mark Sykes, the upper-class gambler, con man, gun smuggler and playboy. Paul Vance, who wrote the song 'Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini' and whose death was announced prematurely in 2006. Producer: Neil George Interviewed guest: Richard Hodges Interviewed guest: Professor Richard Alston Interviewed guest: Bobby Friction Interviewed guest: Lady Colin Campbell Interviewed guest: Douglas Thompson Archive clips used: BBC Radio 3, Night Waves - Roman Empire Exhibition 20/10/2000; BBC One, Nationwide - Pompeii 19/11/1976; BBC News 31/05/2022; ABP Sanjha / YouTube Channel, Sidhu Moose Wala in Big Trouble 04/05/2020; BBC Radio 4, Last Word 29/09/2006.

Anthems
Freddie Lewis | AGENCY

Anthems

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 5:48


Freddie Lewis is a musician who's received support from the likes of BBC Radio 1, BBC 6 and Spotify editorial playlists. BBC News and Pink News have also highlighted his discussion of self-love as a Trans person. His word of the day is AGENCY. CONNECT WITH FREDDIE: T: @freddielewiss #AnthemsPride is a collection of 30 original manifestos, speeches, stories, poems and rallying cries written and voiced by exceptional LGBTQIA+ contributors and allies. It was created, sound designed and executive produced by Hana Walker-Brown with lead producer Bea Duncan, producer Francesca Turauskis and production manager Rory Boyle. The artwork is by Mars West and Eleanore Bamber. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Apple News Today
What Uvalde and Buffalo families want Congress to do on guns

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 9:21


The son of a Buffalo mass-shooting victim testified in Congress, calling for lawmakers to do more to prevent future killings. ABC News has the story. Vox explains why new weapons the U.S. is sending to Ukraine indicate that the conflict there is entering a more difficult phase. Wall Street Journal reporting reveals that hundreds of Russian soldiers have resisted orders to join the war in Ukraine. Thousands of British workers are taking part in the world’s largest trial of a four-day workweek. BBC News takes a closer look. USA Today reports on how figure skating’s governing body is raising the minimum age for the 2026 Olympics to 17, following the doping controversy centered on 15-year-old Kamila Valieva.

Stories of our times
The wounded victor: What next for Boris Johnson?

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 34:46


The prime minister's narrow win in a confidence vote on Monday night has left his political authority dented and his party even more deeply divided. Can Boris Johnson rebuild public trust and regain authority over his party, or is this the beginning of the end of his time in Downing Street?This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Guest: Caroline Wheeler, Political Editor, The Sunday Times.Host: Manveen Rana.Clips: Times Radio, Sky News, BBC News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mongabay Newscast
Mongabay Reports: Palm oil investigation with BBC and Gecko Project exposes corporate theft from communities

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 7:43


Our featured article this week summarizes a joint investigation Mongabay recently conducted with BBC News and The Gecko Project, uncovering how companies have cut local & Indigenous communities out of the profits from Indonesia's palm oil boom, despite being required to do so by law. Major brands including Kellogg's, Johnson & Johnson, Pepsi, and numerous others have sourced palm oil from these plantations.  To also read & share the story, go here: 'A hidden crisis in Indonesia's palm oil sector: 6 takeaways from our investigation.' https://news.mongabay.com/2022/05/a-hidden-crisis-in-indonesias-palm-oil-sector-6-takeaways-from-our-investigation/ Read the responses from consumer goods firms to our plasma investigation: https://thegeckoproject.org/articles/responses-from-consumer-goods-firms-to-our-plasma-investigation/ Read the full investigation here: 'The promise was a lie': How Indonesian villagers lost their cut of the palm oil boom. https://news.mongabay.com/2022/05/the-promise-was-a-lie-how-indonesian-villagers-lost-their-cut-of-the-palm-oil-boom/ Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to have access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy this series, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Photo Credit: A bag of oil palm fruitlets gathered by the Suku Anak Dalam. Image by Nopri Ismi. Please send feedback to submissions@mongabay.com, and thank you for listening.

ArchaeoAnimals
Where in the World? Part Three: The Zooarchaeology of the Americas - Ep 47

ArchaeoAnimals

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 60:57


Welcome to episode three of a miniseries focusing on the zooarchaeology of various world regions. This episode is centered around American zooarchaeology, focusing on the natural history and anatomy of the most prominent wild and domesticated species found throughout North and South America. Tune in for beaver-pretenders, bison-cattle hybrids and even more moose/elk arguments! Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code ANIMALS. Click this message for more information. For rough transcripts of this episode go to https://www.archpodnet.com/animals/47 Links Anning, C. (2011) Inca success in Peruvian Andes 'thanks to llama dung'. BBC News. Crader, D. C. (1997). Prehistoric use of beaver in coastal Maine (USA). Anthropozoologica, 25(26), 225-236. - Halbert, N. et al. (2007). "Where the buffalo roam: The role of history and genetics in the conservation of bison on U.S. federal lands". Park Science. 24 (2): 22–29. Hirst, K.K. (2018) Llamas and Alpacas: The Domestication History of Camelids in South America. ThoughtCo. Hubbard, T. (2014). Buffalo Genocide in Nineteenth-Century North America. Colonial genocide in indigenous North America, 292-305. Petrigh, R. S., & Fugassa, M. H. (2013). Molecular identification of a Fuegian dog belonging to the Fagnano Regional Museum ethnographic collection, Tierra del Fuego. Quaternary International, 317, 14-18. Miller, G. R. (2003). Food for the dead, tools for the afterlife: Zooarchaeology at Machu Picchu. In Burger, R. L., and Salazar, L. C. (eds.), The 1912 Yale Peruvian Scientific Expedition Collections from Machu Picchu: Human and Animal Remains. Saunders, N. J. (1994). Predators of Culture: Jaguar Symbolism and Mesoamerican Elites. World Archaeology, 26(1), 104–117. Speller, C. F. et al. (2010). "Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals complexity of indigenous North American Canham domestication". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 107 (7): 2807–2812. Turner, B. L., and Armelagos, G. J. (2012). "Diet, residential origin, and pathology at Machu Picchu, Peru". American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 149 (1): 71–83. https://historicjamestowne.org/collections/artifacts/faunal-material/ https://blog.nature.org/science/2017/11/20/tracing-the-wild-origins-of-the-domestic-turkey/ Contact Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Where in the World? Part Three: The Zooarchaeology of the Americas - Animals 47

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 60:57


Welcome to episode three of a miniseries focusing on the zooarchaeology of various world regions. This episode is centered around American zooarchaeology, focusing on the natural history and anatomy of the most prominent wild and domesticated species found throughout North and South America. Tune in for beaver-pretenders, bison-cattle hybrids and even more moose/elk arguments! Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code ANIMALS. Click this message for more information. For rough transcripts of this episode go to https://www.archpodnet.com/animals/47 Links Anning, C. (2011) Inca success in Peruvian Andes 'thanks to llama dung'. BBC News. Crader, D. C. (1997). Prehistoric use of beaver in coastal Maine (USA). Anthropozoologica, 25(26), 225-236. - Halbert, N. et al. (2007). "Where the buffalo roam: The role of history and genetics in the conservation of bison on U.S. federal lands". Park Science. 24 (2): 22–29. Hirst, K.K. (2018) Llamas and Alpacas: The Domestication History of Camelids in South America. ThoughtCo. Hubbard, T. (2014). Buffalo Genocide in Nineteenth-Century North America. Colonial genocide in indigenous North America, 292-305. Petrigh, R. S., & Fugassa, M. H. (2013). Molecular identification of a Fuegian dog belonging to the Fagnano Regional Museum ethnographic collection, Tierra del Fuego. Quaternary International, 317, 14-18. Miller, G. R. (2003). Food for the dead, tools for the afterlife: Zooarchaeology at Machu Picchu. In Burger, R. L., and Salazar, L. C. (eds.), The 1912 Yale Peruvian Scientific Expedition Collections from Machu Picchu: Human and Animal Remains. Saunders, N. J. (1994). Predators of Culture: Jaguar Symbolism and Mesoamerican Elites. World Archaeology, 26(1), 104–117. Speller, C. F. et al. (2010). "Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals complexity of indigenous North American Canham domestication". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 107 (7): 2807–2812. Turner, B. L., and Armelagos, G. J. (2012). "Diet, residential origin, and pathology at Machu Picchu, Peru". American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 149 (1): 71–83. https://historicjamestowne.org/collections/artifacts/faunal-material/ https://blog.nature.org/science/2017/11/20/tracing-the-wild-origins-of-the-domestic-turkey/ Contact Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

Deconstructing Disney
The Lion King

Deconstructing Disney

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 97:51


Episode SummaryAnother critical and commercial success of the Disney Renaissance, The Lion King (1994) was a beast at the box office and on home video. It was also the first animated Disney animated film set in Africa. Despite (relatively) diverse casting and the incorporation of authentic African music, there's still plenty of racism to discuss, with some homophobia and questionable political commentary thrown in! Episode BibliographyBBC NEWS | Entertainment | Disney settles Lion song dispute. (2006, February 16). BBC News. Retrieved May 14, 2022, from http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/4721564.stmBradley, B. (2015, January 27). Was 'The Lion King' Copied From A Japanese Cartoon? Here's The Real Story. HuffPost. Retrieved May 15, 2022, from https://www.huffpost.com/entry/lion-king-kimba_n_6272316Carter Jackson, K. (2019, July 17). The true story behind ‘The Lion King.' The Washington Post. https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2019/07/17/true-story-behind-lion-king/Červinka, P. (2015, April 24). The Making of The Lion King. YouTube. Retrieved May 21, 2022, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFL5xbxc0AYDaly, S. (1994, July 8). Mane Attraction. Entertainment Weekly, (230). https://web.archive.org/web/20140904092026/http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,302837,00.htmlDeneroff, H., & Ladd, F. (2009). Footnote to History: Kimba versus Simba - The Uproar. In Astro Boy and Anime Come to the Americas: An Insider's View of the Birth of a Pop Culture Phenomenon (pp. 62-64). McFarland, Incorporated, Publishers.Denham, H. (2019, July 26). Lion King: There's a 25-year-old intellectual property dispute surrounding the Disney film. The Washington Post. Retrieved May 16, 2022, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2019/07/26/lion-king-has-been-clouded-by-intellectual-property-controversy-years-heres-story-behind-it/Ebert, R. (1994, June 24). The Lion King movie review & film summary (1994). Roger Ebert. Retrieved May 15, 2022, from https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/the-lion-king-1994Elahi, B. (2001). Pride Lands: The Lion King, Proposition 187, and White Resentment. Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory, 57(3), 121-152. doi: 0.1353/arq.2001.0001Fallon, K. (2014, June 24). 'The Lion King' Turns 20: Every Crazy, Weird Fact About the Disney Classic. The Daily Beast. Retrieved May 28, 2022, from https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-lion-king-turns-20-every-crazy-weird-fact-about-the-disney-classicGavin, R.  (1996). "The Lion King" and "Hamlet": A homecoming for the exiled child. The Universe of Literature, 85(3), 55-57. Giddings, S. (1999). The circle of life: Nature and representation in Disney's The Lion King. Third Text, 49, 83-92. doi: 10.1080/09528829908576825Giles Coren, G. (1994, July 20). Disney's Heart of Darkness. The Times, 12.Gooding-Williams, R.  (1995). Disney in Africa and the inner city: On race and space in The Lion King. Social Identities, 1(2).Hahn, D. (Director). (2011). The Lion King A Memoir Don Hahn [Film]. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KoaPT4ijS-UHinson, H. (1994, June 24). WashingtonPost.com: 'The Lion King'. The Washington Post. Retrieved May 14, 2022, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/longterm/review96/lionkinghin.htmJapanese animator protests 'Lion King'. (1994, August 18). UPI.com. Retrieved May 15, 2022, from https://www.upi.com/Archives/1994/08/18/Japanese-animator-protests-Lion-King/4250777182400/Klass, P. (1994, June 19). A ‘Bambi' for the 90's, via Shakespeare. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/1994/06/19/movies/film-view-a-bambi-for-the-90-s-via-shakespeare.htmlKelts, R. (2007). Japanamerica: How Japanese Pop Culture Has Invaded the U.S. St. Martin's Publishing Group.King, S. (2011, September 15). A 'Lion's' Tale. Los Angeles Times. https://web.archive.org/web/20111024102445/http://articles.latimes.com/2011/sep/15/entertainment/la-et-lion-king-20110915Knolle, S. (2014, June 14). 'The Lion King': 20 Things You Didn't Know About the Disney Classic. Moviefone. Retrieved May 14, 2022, from https://web.archive.org/web/20140617142313/http://news.moviefone.com/2014/06/14/lion-king-facts/Kring, J. (2019, July 19). How the Original 'Lion King' Came to Life. The Ringer. Retrieved May 15, 2022, from https://www.theringer.com/movies/2019/7/19/20699678/the-lion-king-original-animation-1994The Lion King. (n.d.). Wikipedia. Retrieved May 14, 2022, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lion_KingThe Lion King. (2000, December 8). Rolling Stone. https://web.archive.org/web/20080429201931/http://www.rollingstone.com/reviews/movie/5947315/review/5947316/the_lion_kingThe Lion King (1994). (n.d.). Box Office Mojo. Retrieved May 14, 2022, from https://www.boxofficemojo.com/title/tt0110357/The Lion King (1994). (n.d.). Box Office Mojo. Retrieved May 15, 2022, from https://www.boxofficemojo.com/title/tt0110357/?ref_=bo_se_r_1Maslin, J. (1994, June 15). Review/Film; The Hero Within The Child Within. The New York Times. Retrieved May 25, 2022, from https://www.nytimes.com/1994/06/15/movies/review-film-the-hero-within-the-child-within.htmlMasters, K. (2014, April 9). The Epic Disney Blow-Up of 1994: Eisner, Katzenberg and Ovitz 20 Years Later. The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved May 17, 2022, from https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/general-news/epic-disney-blow-up-1994-694476/Mikkelson, D. (1996, December 31). Is the Word 'Sex' Hidden in 'The Lion King'? Snopes.com. Retrieved May 16, 2022, from https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/the-lion-king/Minkoff, R., & Allers, R. (Directors). (1994). The Lion King [Film]. Walt Disney Pictures.Morton, J. (1996). Simba's revolution: Revisiting history and class in The Lion King. Social Identities, 2(2).Movieclips. (2016, August 16). In the Heat of the Night (4/10) Movie CLIP - They Call Me Mr. Tibbs (1967) HD. YouTube. Retrieved May 25, 2022, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6n8VyqaCQ4Orenstein, N. (2014, September 15). Berkeley's colony of spotted hyenas closes after 30 years. Berkeleyside. Retrieved May 16, 2022, from https://www.berkeleyside.org/2014/09/15/berkeleys-captive-colony-of-spotted-hyenas-closes-after-30-years?doing_wp_cron=1652051660.0969309806823730468750Rachele. (n.d.). "The Lion King," - an adult film? ENG 1131 Shakespeare Through Media. Retrieved May 25, 2022, from http://plaza.ufl.edu/r.harvey/finalpaper.htmlRicker, A.  (1996). The Lion King animated storybook: A case study of aesthetic and economic power. Critical Arts, 10(1).Rob Minkoff. (n.d.). Wikipedia. Retrieved May 17, 2022, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rob_MinkoffRoth, M. (1996, March). The Lion King A short history of Disney-fascism. Jump Cut, (40), 15-20. http://www.ejumpcut.org/archive/onlinessays/JC40folder/LionKing.htmlRoth, M. (2005). Man is in the Forest: Humans and Nature in Bambi and The Lion King. Invisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture, (9). Retrieved May 22, 2022, from https://www.rochester.edu/in_visible_culture/Issue_9/roth.htmlSiskel, G., & Ebert, R. (2019, February 22). Speed, The Lion King, The Endless Summer II, City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold, 1994 – Siskel and Ebert Movie Reviews. Siskel and Ebert Movie Reviews. Retrieved May 16, 2022, from https://siskelebert.org/?p=5412Stenberg, D. (1996). The circle of life and the chain of being: Shakespearean motifs in “The Lion King.” Shakespeare Bulletin, 14(2), 36-37.Strzelczyk, F.  (2008). Fascism and family entertainment. Quarterly Review of Film and Video, 25(3), 196-211. doi: 10.1080/10509200601091433Takeuchi, H. (n.d.). Kimba the White Lion. Wikipedia. Retrieved May 16, 2022, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kimba_the_White_LionTLKCoL. (2017, March 24). Pride of The Lion King | Behind the Scenes Documentary (Making of). YouTube. Retrieved May 21, 2022, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5bLD2gZhmoUVisram, T. (2019, July 19). Disney replaced the first Lion King's racist hyenas. Fast Company. Retrieved May 22, 2022, from https://www.fastcompany.com/90379067/critics-said-the-first-lion-kings-hyenas-were-problematic-disney-revamped-themWard, A. R.  (1996). The Lion King's mythic narrative. Journal of Popular Film & Television, 23(4).Willman, C. (1994, May 15). SUMMER SNEAKS '94 : You Can't Hide His Lion Eyes : It's no coincidence that Disney's latest jungle villain bears a wicked resemblance to Jeremy Irons; just ask the animator. Los Angeles Times. https://web.archive.org/web/20141109000340/http://articles.latimes.com/1994-05-15/entertainment/ca-57883_1_jeremy-ironsWong, V.  (1999). Deconstructing Walt Disney's “The Lion King.” Kinema: A Journal for Film and Audiovisual Media, 1-7. doi: 10.15353/kinema.vi.895Thanks to Katie Seelen for her research assistance.