Podcasts about law firms

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  • 1,310PODCASTS
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  • May 19, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about law firms

Show all podcasts related to law firms

Latest podcast episodes about law firms

Legal Marketing 2.0 Podcast
Podcast Episode 163: How Attorneys Can Raise Their Profiles Through Industry Associations and Events

Legal Marketing 2.0 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 24:06


In this episode of the Legal Marketing 2.0 Podcast, Guy is joined by Michael Janovici to discuss how attorneys can raise their profiles through industry associations and events. ​​Michael is the Client Relations Director in the Los Angeles office of Kimball, Tirey & St. John – a California based real estate law firm with a concentration on landlord-tenant law. Michael has close to 15 years experience in professional services marketing and business development.  During his time at Kimball, Tirey & St. John, he's helped attorneys (as well as himself) raise their profiles through association involvement.

UBC News World
Top Portland, OR Law Firm: Get Full Compensation For Medical Malpractice Claims

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 2:33


Looking for the best law firm in Portland, OR? Call Shlesinger & deVilleneuve Attorneys, P.C. today (503-334-3523) for personal injury attorneys that will fight aggressively for your case! Learn more at https://letusfightforyou.com/portland (https://letusfightforyou.com/portland)

HPS Macrocast
Crypto Convos With Grayscale's Craig Salm

HPS Macrocast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 29:18


On the latest episode of Crypto Convos, host Bryan DeAngelis is joined by Grayscale's Chief Legal Officer, Craig Salm. The pair discussed Craig's background in law and his interest in crypto, how Grayscale combines crypto with traditional investing, the company's campaign for a Bitcoin spot ETF, and what's next in crypto.Show NotesGrayscale's SEC Comment Letter Submission PageCNBC: Grayscale Tells SEC That Turning Biggest Bitcoin Fund Into ETF Will Unlock $8 Billion For InvestorsUpdated SEC Comment Letter From Davis Polk, Grayscale's Law Firm'A New Argument for a Bitcoin ETF' By Craig Salm@CraigSalm on Twitter

In House Warrior
Random Acts of Marketing with Law Firm Marketing Legend Deborah Farone of Farone Advisors and Host Richard Levick of LEVICK

In House Warrior

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 37:38


Random Acts of Marketing with Law Firm Marketing Legend Deborah Farone of Farone Advisors and Host Richard Levick of LEVICK: For more than 20 years, Deborah Farone has been a leading light in law firm marketing, having been the Chief Marketing Officer of two of the country's most successful law firms, Cravath and Debevoise. She shares best practices and how she overcame the traditional resistance of lawyers to the marketing efforts that would support their business development. She is the author of Best Practices in Law Firm Business Development and Marketing and discusses how most lawyers engage, at best, in “random acts of marketing” when they should be putting a system in place and practicing it like daily exercise. She addresses the unique marketing and business development needs of litigators, the future of law firms, the differences among legal markets around the world, the impact of the war in the Ukraine and more. Deborah is fond of quoting Margaret Mead, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.” To received Deborah's Current Client Diagnostic, contact her at deborah@faroneadvisors.com.

The Todd L. Levitt Law Show
Judd from M66 Group delivers Strain of the week, Law Firm phone calls and legal disputes, FUN SHOW!!

The Todd L. Levitt Law Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 45:16


Law Firms around the country specilaize in various areas of the law. Todd runs down some of the more frequent calls coming into Levitt Law over the decades. These calls range from land disputes to contractor disputes. Levitt Law Firm handles Drunk Driving & License Restoration cases yet still fields hundreds of calls a year that get referred out to other firms. Judd, from M66 Group is back delivering the strain of the week. Fun, fast paced enegetic episode   Enjoy!!

The Maximum Lawyer Podcast
How I Run a Law Firm, Hair Salon, and Family at the Same Time w/ Alycia Kinchloe

The Maximum Lawyer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 22:20


Today we're excited to share a presentation by Alycia Kinchloe from MaxLawCon 2021! Tune in to learn about running two businesses at the same time.Alycia is the founder of Kinchloe Law.  She earned her law degree from Temple University's Beasley School of Law. In law school, Alycia was a member of student government and was a member of Temple's prestigious Trial Advocacy Program.  She also worked as a teaching assistant for the Program.  Alycia later attended St. Joseph's University Haub School of Business, where she earned an Executive MBA and expanded her knowledge of business. 1:58 Blazer is my baby6:20 that's a skillset10:00 moving things forward14:14 a lot of reflection18:03 they have your time, your full attentionWatch the podcast here. Join the Guild: www.maxlawguild.comMaxLawCon tickets are on sale now! Grab your ticket today at www.MaxLawCon2022.com

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
REPLAY - Best Practices For A Small Law Firm (Feat. Elizabeth Miller)

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 32:19


In this episode, we speak with Elizabeth Miller, MBA, Independent Law Firm Administrator and Best Selling Author of “From Lawyer to Law Firm-How to Manage a Successful Law Business”. Liz is the Owner and Founder of Managing the Business of Practicing Law(R), which helps solo, small and mid-size law firms handle administrative matters, including billing time, collection procedures and a host of other business functions.   In this episode we discuss: How delay in billing creates calamity Ways to structure effective retainer agreements Smoothing out the “billing edges” Automating retainer replenishments in software Flexibility in client billing Ethical and expedient ways to raise hourly rates Testing the waters to ensure clients have the ability to pay Running interference between clients and attorneys when collecting fees Extracting lawyers from billing to improve the collections process   and much, MUCH more!   Guest Bio: Elizabeth Miller. MBA is an independent law firm administrator and best-selling co-author of “From Lawyer to Law Firm - How to Manage a Successful Law Business”.  Her book was published on May 11, 2017 and was #4 on the best seller list by May 23, 2017.  Elizabeth Miller has been working with the legal profession for over 40 years.  She started her career in NYC as a paralegal and relocated to Tampa, Florida with her husband in 1985.  After working a few years as a paralegal, she opened a paralegal business contracting paralegal work with attorneys, especially trial attorneys. In 1994 she transitioned her career into law office administration when one of her clients from her paralegal business needed an on-staff office manager.  She subsequently earned her Bachelor's Degree from Eckerd College in 2007, with a major in business administration and a minor in finance.  She earned her 4 year degree in 2 years and 4 months with no prior college credit while working full-time and taking care of her disabled husband.  She immediately pursued in an MBA with a specialty in finance which she earned in June 2009.  She continued working as a law firm administrator for several years, before opening her business named after her bestseller - From Lawyer to Law Firm.  Since December 2015, Liz has been working as an independent law firm administrator for solo, small and a few medium-sized firms on a retainer basis providing them with the administrative services they need but cannot afford to pay a full-time on-staff administrator to handle. This includes everything from vetting, hiring, staff management, performance reviews, systematizing processes, billing, collections, trust account management and reconciliation in accordance with Bar guidelines, financial analysis, and management of cash flow, including annual and monthly budgeting, client development and marketing among other duties.    Guest Contact Info: Email – liz.managementconsultant@gmail.com Website – https:// www.fromlawyertolawfirm.com  Telephone – 813-340-9569   To learn more about From Lawyer to Law Firm, visit Liz's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/lawfirmadmin/   Allison Bio: Allison C. Williams, Esq., is the Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney, and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law. Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest-growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm by 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017. In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest-growing companies among graduates of Florida State University. In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers. She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money. Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining, and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications, and money management in law firms.   Allison Contact Info: To check out the FREE training on law firm collections hosted by Law Firm Mentor, download the video training here: https://williams-law-group.lpages.co/collections/

Econix Talks
How To Trademark Your Business with Antoine Wade

Econix Talks

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 65:47


Today we had Antoine Wade, a trademark attorney from the Law Firm of Lawson McKinley come by and break down the trade marking process. Wade breaks down why business owners would need a trademark, costs and length of time it takes to finalize it. We also touch on Wade's story as a kid from Prince George's County, Maryland all the way to becoming an NBA agent. Check out Antoine's links below!Antoine Wade Linkshttps://instagram.com/antoinewadeesq/https://www.antoinewadeesq.com/Econix Linkshttps://linktr.ee/econix_Domino NFT Project Linkhttps://linktr.ee/dominonftFinally, if this show has impacted you in a positive way please consider supporting below. Thanks!Support the show

Law Firm Marketing Decoded
Your Website: How It Powers Your Law Firm's Growth

Law Firm Marketing Decoded

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 14:57


Law firm websites can be powerful marketing tools – but their value can go beyond marketing when they're used strategically. Your website can help you run your practice more efficiently, eliminate the overhead costs associated with having a physical office, and even help to manage client expectations. In this episode of the Law Firm Marketing Decoded Podcast we explain how to make your website work harder for your law firm -- and benefit your practice and clients at the same time.

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
* Andrew Abood, Abood Law Firm

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 7:31


Michigan's Big Show
* Andrew Abood, Abood Law Firm

Michigan's Big Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 7:31


LSAT BOSS
S2E14: Parallel the Flaw, TikTok, and LGBTQ & Disability Representation in Law Firms

LSAT BOSS

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 23:17


In this episode, Shana and Trudel tackle Parallel the Flaw questions using Ginsburg Advanced's easy-to-learn "MITS" analysis. The two also discuss putting together Ginsburg's first TikTok video series since Covid, and analyze statistics about low visibility among disabled and LGBTQ associates in law firms. Mnemonic: MITS The MITS mnemonic is designed to ensure you that you have checked for the different ways that the argument and the answer choice must parallel: M Modifiers (adjectives, adverbs, prepositional phrases, that/which phrases) I Intensifiers (degree of likelihood and degree of certainty language from the inference lessons) 7 Abductive reasoning is a form of logical inference which starts with an observation or set of observations then seeks to find the simplest and most likely explanation for the observations. This process yields a plausible conclusion but does not positively verify it. This is different than deductive reasoning, which yields a definite and verifiable conclusion. You will use deductive reasoning in the Logic Games section. T Transition words [conjunctions (correlative; subordinating; coordinating), as well as transition words that denote cause/effect or illustration] S Structure (ensuring that roles are in the same place in the reasoning of the argument, and that any logical or conditional sequences go in the same direction and are not reversals (the converse of an implication). Only contrapositives will maintain the same structure. Hosted by Shana Ginsburg, Esq., CEO of Ginsburg Advanced Tutoring. This podcast is developed, edited and mixed by Shana Ginsburg. Music by Taha Ahmed. Podcast listeners take 15% off our LSAT Boss course on Teachable with offer code GAT15 at checkout. Ginsburg Advanced Tutoring is a full-service tutoring, accommodations and admissions company designed to support the needs of the anything-but-average student. For tutoring and accommodations inquiries, find us on the web at ginsburgadvancedtutoring.com or email us at hello@ginsburgadvancedtutoring.com. Like what you hear? Leave us a review! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lsatboss/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lsatboss/support

The Construction Record Podcast
The Construction Record Podcast: Episode 170: Construction law firm owner Karalynn Cromeens

The Construction Record Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 11:29


This week on the Construction Record podcast digital media editor Warren Frey speaks with Cromeens Law Firm LLC owner and managing partner Karalynn Cromeens about her Houston-based law practice which also boasts a nearly all-woman staff. Cromeens delved into the nature of construction law in Texas and throughout the United States, and explained she specialized in construction out of necessity when her and her husband started a construction business in her last year of law school.  She also pointed out while an all-woman construction law firm is at present not the norm. construction companies have always had women in administrative positions making sure companies ran smoothly in the background. You can listen to The Construction Record and TCR Express on the Daily Commercial News and Journal of Commerce websites as well as on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Amazon Music's podcast, and you can listen to last week's interview with Clever Samurai president and CEO Stuart Lewis about construction and marketing here. Thanks for listening and we'll see you next week.

Michigan's Big Show
* Michael Nichols, Co-Founder of the Nichols Law Firm

Michigan's Big Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 11:02


SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
* Michael Nichols, Co-Founder of the Nichols Law Firm

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 11:02


Profit with Law: Profitable Law Firm Growth
Your Law Firm's Secret Weapon - 312

Profit with Law: Profitable Law Firm Growth

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 17:06


Shownotes can be found at https://www.profitwithlaw.com/312.   A secret weapon is one that is not obvious, it is the thing you do behind the scenes that often you cannot measure but when put into practice, can have major long term positive benefits and literally fuel the growth of your law firm.   In this episode Moshe Amsel shares a recent personal experience to demonstrate what you can do to engage Your Law Firm's Secret Weapon. Resources mentioned:   Get access to the Framework that our clients use to achieve massive success at thelawfirmgrowthformula.com Join our Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/lawfirmgrowthsummit/   To request a show topic, recommend a guest or ask a question for the show, please send an email to info@dreambuilderfinancial.com.   Connect with Moshe on: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/moshe.amsel LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/mosheamsel/

On Record PR
How to Prepare for a Media Interview with Gina Rubel, Founder of Furia Rubel Communications

On Record PR

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 20:05


In this episode of On Record PR, we flip the script and interview Gina Rubel on how the court of public relations is different from the court of law, the art of working with the media, and how you get your message out. If you're an attorney or an executive, and you suddenly have an interview thrust upon you with no time to prepare, this discussion covers everything you need to know quickly. Learn More Gina Rubel is the host of On Record PR, the founder and CEO of Furia Rubel Communications, and the author of Everyday Public Relations for Lawyers. Founded in 2002, Furia Rubel is a leading national PR agency which helps top businesses and law firms with high-stakes public relations, reputation management, crisis planning, and incident response including high profile litigation media relations.

Stanford Radio
Law Firms and Russian Profits with guest Robert Daines

Stanford Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 27:03


Since Russia's illegal invasion of Ukraine, hundreds of the world's leading companies, from investment banks to consumer goods, have shuttered their Russian operations. But Law firms have been slower to respond. Join us for a discussion with business law expert Robert Daines who has been leading an effort to expose leading American and British law firms about their status of work for Russian interests. Originally aired May 7, 2022 on SiriusXM.

Stanford Legal
Law Firms and Russian Profits with Robert Daines

Stanford Legal

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 27:03


Since Russia's illegal invasion of Ukraine, hundreds of the world's leading companies, from investment banks to consumer goods, have shuttered their Russian operations. But Law firms have been slower to respond. Join us for a discussion with business law expert Robert Daines who has been leading an effort to expose leading American and British law firms about their status of work for Russian interests.

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts
The Dishwashing Liquid Case_Tobias Comer Law Firm

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 8:51


ICYMI: Desi Tobias of Tobias & Comer Law visited Mobile Mornings to tell Dalton Orwig about an interesting case involving dishwashing liquid and a repo man.  Listen to the story on our podcast: 

Legally Speaking Podcast - Powered by Kissoon Carr
The Weightlifting Lawyer - Troy Atkin - S5EP28

Legally Speaking Podcast - Powered by Kissoon Carr

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 38:15


This week on the Legally Speaking Podcast, our host Robert Hanna welcomes Trainee Solicitor, Troy Atkin... or The Weightlifting Lawyer as you may know him!Troy is currently in the first seat of his Training Contract and is based in the Commercial Department in the Portsmouth office of Biscoes Solicitors. Troy is due to qualify in March 2023. Alongside this (and given the name!), Troy is a national level powerlifter, taking 3rd place at the British Bench Competition, 2022 and 2021. Troy documents his fitness and mental health journey on his popular Instagram page, @the_weightlifting_lawyer.In this episode, we discuss the following:What it means to have an 'elite' mindset in lawThe importance of mental healthTroy's weightlifting journey and how it's documented on his InstagramBalancing fitness training and solicitor trainingProtecting yourself in the digital worldOut now on the Legally Speaking Podcast website and all major audio platforms!Sponsored by Clio: Clio is a legal case management software that work in partnership with the Law Society of England and Wales and is an approved Support the show

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
* Mike Nichols, Member at the Nichols Law Firm

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 7:30


Michigan's Big Show
* Mike Nichols, Member at the Nichols Law Firm

Michigan's Big Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 7:30


Personal Injury Marketing Mastermind
121. Sam Mollaei, Legal Funnel — Building Blocks: Create a Virtual, Automated and Scalable Law Firm

Personal Injury Marketing Mastermind

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 33:19


When it comes to scaling virtual law firms, Sam Mollaei is the go-to guy. In five years he has founded three virtual law firms, earned over 3,000 Google five-star reviews, earned over seven figures annually and grew his caseload from 23 to over 7,000. Founder of Mollaei Law, Sam shares with us his formula for success. We cover what it takes to build a law firm - or three - that are automated, run virtually, and scalable. There is so much to unpack in this episode. For more about Sam and how to replicate his results, look for his YouTube channel and forthcoming book of the same name: Virtual Law Firm Secrets. What's in This Episode: Who is Sam Mollaei? Why are the two largest leverage points content and technology? How did Sam go from 23 to 7,000 clients in five years? What three essential elements go into setting up a scalable virtual law firm? What is a legal funnel? What tools are best suited to set them up? What goes into an amazing client experience in light of technology and automation? Why are Google reviews and the actions after a case settlement so important?

The Price of Football
UEFA's proposed changes to the Champions League, Premier League cuts ties with FA chairman's law firm

The Price of Football

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 58:24


Kevin and Kieran look at UEFA's proposed changes to the Champions League, which look to many people like a Super League by the back door, and find out why the Premier League is cutting ties with the FA interim chairman's law firm. The second Price of Football LIVE is now booked in for Tuesday May 10th at the Wham Stadium, home of Accrington Stanley. Tickets go on sale at 10:00 on Monday April 18th here:  https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-price-of-football-with-kieran-maguire-and-kevin-day-live-tickets-317531403977 Follow Kevin on Twitter - @kevinhunterday Follow Kieran on Twitter - @KieranMaguire Follow The Price of Football on Twitter - @pof_pod Support The Price of Football on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/priceoffootball Check out the Price of Football merchandise store: https://the-price-of-football.backstreetmerch.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Law Firm Growth Podcast
Balancing Your Law Firm's Money Vs. Your Money with Wendy Brookhouse

Law Firm Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 39:52


Balancing Your Law Firm's Money Vs. Your Money with Wendy Brookhouse>> Get the newest LFG episodes delivered to your inbox when you Sign Up for our Newsletter.Resource Links:Fast track your marketing efforts while avoiding common marketing mistakes in our new trainingEstate planning attorney? Stop guessing how to get results from online ads and grow your firm with our client-generating Seminar 3.0About Wendy Brookhouse:Wendy Brookhouse knows how to find, keep and grow your wealth. She is the Founder and Chief Strategist of Black Star Wealth where she weaves in her experience in business consulting, business ownership, and focusing on simplification to achieve outstanding results. Knowing that creating wealth takes more than just math, Wendy addresses the baggage and behaviors that keep people from doing what is in their own financial interests.Wendy is a Certified Financial Planner with an Executive MBA and she's the author of Burn Your Budget: How to Spend Your Way to Financial Freedom. She serves on the faculty of the Women's Leadership Intensive; served as chair and a director of Junior Achievement of Nova Scotiaand Junior Achievement of Canada. She is a media ambassador for FP Canada and the host of The Real Bottom Line, a podcast featuring entrepreneurs for entrepreneurs. She loves Rugby and is always ready to travel for a good concert.If you liked this episode, please don't forget to subscribe, tune in, and share this podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Better Law Firm Marketing
How to market a new law firm

Better Law Firm Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 15:46


A client booked a coaching call recently.  She was starting a law firm and needed a roadmap (e.g. online marketing, websites, getting referrals, etc). Here's a summary of my advice. Obviously, I won't be giving away any personal information. But I'm hoping this episode will help people who need clarity.***How's your law firm going?Download our free law firm marketing plan (PDF)Apply for a coaching call with Brendan KelsoVisit our 'recommendations' pageThis podcast is brought to you by legalsites.com.au

Cybersecurity Quiz
Deifilia Diaz On The Power of a Niche

Cybersecurity Quiz

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 30:32


Too few attorneys understand the value of targeting a client niche. A legal niche can be a practice area, demographic or any other segment of a market. It's when an attorney brings together a very narrow focused niche they often become well-known and sought after by their clients as is the case with our guest Deifilia Diaz.  Being an immigrant herself well positions Deifilia to serve her community and has made her the go-to attorney for their legal needs. Even as Deifilia provides a much need and fantastic service for her niche clients, she's equally and rightfully earned a place as a model to other attorneys on the power of creating a niche practice.  We're happy to have Deifilia join No Law Firm Left Behind this week to talk about how other attorneys can create niches for themselves.  Connect with Deifilia at https://www.linkedin.com/in/deifilia-m-diaz-057a9238/ Find all our videos at: https://www.youtube.com/c/NoLawFirmLeftBehind Catch our podcast on your favorite platform: https://linktr.ee/splicenet/

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
How to Use Free Marketing to Build Your Law Firm

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 23:22


I'm a big proponent of investing in the right marketing strategy, and including having a digital marketing company on your team at some point. But, if you build your law firm solely through one marketing avenue and focus on-page strategies, or you're throwing your money behind SEO/ pay per click marketing, you are going to be far more vulnerable when there are economic changes. In this episode we discuss: Low-cost and free marketing tools to expand your opportunities in marketing. How important is having a topic of interest to educate your ideal clients. Having a free piece of follow-up content to the initial communication will draw attention. By having 5 to 10 touch points about one and only one topic will engage people easily. One of the most effective ways that we leverage free marketing is by talking to people.   Allison Bio: Allison C. Williams, Esq., is the Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney, and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law. Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest-growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm by 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017. In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest-growing companies among graduates of Florida State University. In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers. She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money. Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining, and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications, and money management in law firms.   Contact Info: Lawfirmmentor.net My favorite excerpt from the episode: TIME:  00:10:33(35Seconds) The indecision that a lot of people persevere in oftentimes comes from the fact that there is somuch information that people believe that they have to go out and seek 15 different pieces ofinformation in orderto consume it all and create a strategy for themselves. And that oftentimescomes from the fact that dealing with the problem feels like a much bigger burden than simplyallowing the inertia to continue. So you have to give a pattern interrupt of that inertia by invitingpeople to have a conversation with you, by asking them to do something about their problem.

On Top of PR
What to do if illegal activity occurs in your organization with Gunster Law Firm's Jonathan Osborne

On Top of PR

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 29:40


Our episode guest is Jonathan Osborne, business shareholder and co-chair of White Collar Defense and Investigations with Gunster law firm. Jonathan  tells what to do after alleged or confirmed illegal activity in your organization.Five things you'll learn from this episode:The first step you need to take when you are aware of the investigationThe difference between a subpoena and a search warrant and what you're allowed to knowThe rights whistleblowers have with your company after communicating an issue with the governmentWhat companies can do to establish communication with employees so they bring up the issue before taking it to the government What you can do with client privilege during an ongoing investigationQuotables“The first call you make is to your trusted legal adviser, whether that's in-house counsel or outside counsel. Even if they're not a criminal attorney or have any experience with these matters, they know through a referral network or just their training and otherwise, their network, to be able to quickly get somebody available.”  — @JonathanOsborne“Having a really robust compliance program that includes training, either from your in-house attorney's team or a compliance team or external counsel and compliance professionals, is key.” — @JonathanOsborne“However, it is important in that moment for everyone that's in that premises to know that they still have their constitutional rights, which include the right to remain silent. They don't have to speak with the agents without an attorney present.” — @JonathanOsborne“The first thing that, you know, even if the government isn't willing to provide any information, is that there's a serious problem at your business.” — @JonathanOsborneAbout Jonathan OsborneJonathan K. Osborne began his practice at Gunster and later returned to the firm after serving in the U.S. Department of Justice as an Assistant United States Attorney in the Southern District of Florida.Guest's contact info and resources:Jonathan Osborne's LinkedIn Jonathan Osborne's Bio & Contact Info Additional resources:Gunster Law Firm's WebsiteManaging Public Relations in a Crisis e-bookCrisis Management Webinar Axia's Crisis Management Services 3 Key Ways to Use Social Media for Crisis CommunicationsWhat to Do After a CrisisDefining a Corporate CrisisPrepare Your Company for a Crisis5 Critical Steps to Repairing Your Reputation After a CrisisEpisode recorded: Jan. 20, 2022Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/OnTopofPR)

In House Warrior
How Haynes Boone Is Leading Law Firm DEI Efforts With Sharon Jones, Chief DEI Officer at the Firm With Host Richard Levick of LEVICK

In House Warrior

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 31:10


How Haynes Boone Is Leading Law Firm DEI Efforts With Sharon Jones, Chief DEI Officer at the Firm With Host Richard Levick of LEVICK: As much as law firms have wanted to lead with Diversity, Equity and Inclusion efforts, a number of firms still find their efforts falling short. Haynes Boone seems to have figured a lot of it out. On this show, Sharon Jones, Chief DEI Officer and a partner in the firm's Labor and Employment Practice Group joins host Richard Levick of LEVICK to describe some of the firm's initiatives, including the critical importance of leadership from the top, weekly meetings to ensure progress and an 11-point set of recommendations that people work hard to meet and surpass.

Three Cartoon Avatars
EP 14: Lux Capital's Josh Wolfe Talks Musk, Adobe's Scott Belsky Talks Twitter, Bolt and Breslow Again, and Entering The Golden Age of Fraud Lawyers

Three Cartoon Avatars

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 78:49


(00:00) Introducing Josh Wolfe(02:41) Elon Musk Buys Twitter Because No One Told Him He Can Buy Other Stuff(39:58) Bolt, Katara, and the World's Greatest Time to be a Law Firm(56:53) Introducing Scott Belsky(57:18)  Trying to Explain Twitter(67:55) Algorithms and Free Speech Follow the show:https://twitter.com/3cartoonavatarshttps://www.instagram.com/3cartoonavatars/https://www.tiktok.com/@3cartoonavatars Follow the hosts:https://twitter.com/loganbartletthttps://twitter.com/wolfejoshhttps://twitter.com/scottbelsky Mixed and edited: Justin HrabovskyProduced: Andrew Nadeau and Rashad AssirExecutive Producer: Josh MachizMusic: Griff Lawson Musk buys Twitter: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/25/technology/twitter-employees-elon-musk.htmlSam Lessin article: https://www.theinformation.com/articles/elon-musk-is-silicon-valleys-new-hero-for-better-or-worseJack Dorsey's tweet on Musk's purchase: https://twitter.com/jack/status/1518772753460998145?s=20&t=njyqUGHJChL4oAQdEkkTCwBolt Sued by Forever 21: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-04-26/forever-21-parent-authentic-brands-sues-bolt-startupKatera sues ex-CEO: https://www.theinformation.com/articles/bankrupt-startup-that-blew-2-billion-from-softbank-sues-ex-ceo-board-directors-over-self-dealingSoftbank cuts spending: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-04-25/softbank-cuts-back-spending-leaving-startups-desperate-for-cash

Diversified Game
LA-ZONDRA C. RANDOLPH P.A. ESQ. GIVES THE GAME ON HER LAW FIRM, BEAUTY SUPPLY STORE, & NONPROFIT

Diversified Game

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 60:57


Check out http://lcrlegal.com/ https://www.thelcrproject.org This is the Diversified Game Podcast with Kellen "Kash" Coleman a podcast giving entrepreneurial advice from a diverse and inclusive perspective. Submit to Be Our Guest: Send your bio, epk, one sheet, and decks to diversifiedgame@gmail.com Book Consulting Time with Kellen www.cprfirm.com Buy Our Swag/Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/my-store-10057187 https://diversifiedgame.bigcartel.com/ Support Us On Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/gamediversified Follow the Diversified Game Experience: http://diversifiedgame.com https://teespring.com/stores/my-store-10057187 http://instagram.diversifiedgame.com http://facebook.diversifiedgame.com http://twitter.diversifiedgame.com http://youtube.diversifiedgame.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/diversifiedgame/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/diversifiedgame/support

Non-Eventcast
Law Firm Financial Management

Non-Eventcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 30:19


I talked with Brooke Lively about strategies for managing law firm finances using software and business intelligence tools. Highlights Who is Brooke Lively? The place she enjoys the most. - 4:02 What Key Performance Indicator is and what does it have to do with law firms? - 5:01 The importance of knowing your firm's Key Performance Indicators. - 6:11 Are attorneys getting more savvy in improving their process and do they have a better understanding of finances? - 7:40 What law firms should be looking at and monitoring. - 8:41 The AR is created in the sales call: How does that work? - 12:05 Creating the process of having a fee agreement in your contract. - 13:27 What's an evergreen retainer? - 14:36 The types of technology that lawyers should be looking at in terms of managing their finances and managing reports. - 19:13 What's the best accounting tool for law firms? - 23:11 Episode Resources Connect with Jared Correia jared@redcavelegal.com https://redcavelegal.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/jaredcorreia https://twitter.com/RedCaveLegal Connect with Brooke Lively https://www.cathcap.com/ https://www.cathcap.com/brooke-lively-bio https://www.linkedin.com/in/brookelively 

Law Firm Marketing Hacks Podcast
Ep. 156 - Google Is Changing Everything [Don't Let Your Firm Get Left Behind]

Law Firm Marketing Hacks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 13:19


Google is about to make one of the biggest changes in the past decade… You have two choices. Get onboard and adapt… Or watch your competition pass you by.  Listen today to find out how your firm can thrive with these new changes.

Legal Marketing 2.0 Podcast
Podcast Episode 160: How You Can Raise Your Law Firm's Brand Awareness with Podcasts and Videos

Legal Marketing 2.0 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 19:05


In this episode of the Legal Marketing 2.0 Podcast, Guy is joined by Rosa Colón to discuss how law firms can use video and podcasting to reach their marketing goals. Rosa is the marketing technology manager at Lowenstein Sandler LLP where she manages the firm's day-to-day digital marketing needs. This includes their website, website development, maintenance, optimization, analytics, email marketing, experience management CRM, and multimedia production. She also works both in-house and as a vendor helping professional services firms garner and streamline their technologies. Lastly, she is also the vice chair of the New York Local Steering Committee.

Profit with Law: Profitable Law Firm Growth
Breaking Diversity Barriers in Law Firms with Noemi Puntier - 310

Profit with Law: Profitable Law Firm Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 48:52


Shownotes can be found at https://www.profitwithlaw.com/310.   Law is and always will be about service — service to the clients and even our colleagues in the workplace. However, diversity and inclusion remain a struggle, especially within the law profession.    In this episode, Noemi Puntier joins us to discuss her practice and how she strives to break diversity and inclusion barriers in her firm. She builds on her experiences as a struggling immigrant social worker to a lawyer who strives to bring positive change to the law profession. Listen as Noemi also shares about finding the balance between her passion for serving the underserved and earning money as a lawyer.     If you're struggling with incorporating diversity and inclusion in your law firm, this episode is for you!  Resources mentioned:   Join the Law Firm Growth Summit's Facebook community  Learn more about the Puntier Law Firm.  Listen to Noemi's morning radio show, Café Con Leyes, through her Facebook.   Get to know more about Noemi through her LinkedIn Join our Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/lawfirmgrowthsummit/   To request a show topic, recommend a guest or ask a question for the show, please send an email to info@dreambuilderfinancial.com.   Connect with Moshe on: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/moshe.amsel LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/mosheamsel/

BE THAT LAWYER
Amy Mariani: Growing a Business Focused Law Firm

BE THAT LAWYER

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 32:10


In this episode, Steve Fretzin and Amy Mariani discuss:Transitioning to mediation from another role. Getting efficient with networking. Providing value in networking and in connecting. Calendering in your business development tasks, not just your law related tasks.  Key Takeaways:Even if you have a large network, it takes time to grow and cultivate the relationships needed to grow your book of business. Be direct in asking for introductions. It may work, it may not, but there's nothing to lose. Qualify your networking partners. Follow through is important for both you and the person you are trying to refer or introduce. Develop your business acumen. If you learn how to build your business (and treat your firm as if it is a business), you will be more successful and be in a better position to grow your own firm.   "You do need to get that networking going, that is going to be the most critical element of your success. You also have to establish that you are a subject matter expert." —  Amy Mariani Connect with Amy Mariani:  Website: https://www.marianimediation.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarianiMediateLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/amy-cashore-mariani/ Thank you to our Sponsors!Legalese Marketing: https://legaleasemarketing.com/Moneypenny: https://www.moneypenny.com/us/ Connect with Steve Fretzin:LinkedIn: Steve FretzinTwitter: @stevefretzinFacebook: Fretzin, Inc.Website: Fretzin.comEmail: Steve@Fretzin.comBook: The Ambitious Attorney: Your Guide to Doubling or Even Tripling Your Book of Business and more!YouTube: Steve FretzinCall Steve directly at 847-602-6911  Show notes by Podcastologist Chelsea Taylor-Sturkie Audio production by Turnkey Podcast Productions. You're the expert. Your podcast will prove it. 

LawHer
09. Noemi Puntier, Puntier Law Firm - Finding Yourself: The Hidden Power of Building a Law Firm

LawHer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 32:37


Noemi Puntier is a fierce advocate and tenacious in the courtroom. The founder of Puntier Law Firm, Noemi faced many roadblocks to becoming an attorney. But with the right mentor, she came to see her youth in the Bronx, gender, and culture as superpowers on the path to becoming the first in her family to attend law school. She loves being a lawyer and promised to be a voice for the voiceless. She relied on hard work and discipline, guided by faith, to help build the table for minority woman lawyers for generations to come. I sat down with Noemi to discuss becoming a lawyer as a second career, finding the right mentors and attitude, and empowering her community through social media. What's In This Episode Who is Noemi Puntier? What drew her to work with the Legal Aid Society? How did she see roadblocks as opportunities? How does she handle burnout? How can young lawyers get the experience necessary to become a great advocate? How can beginning a law firm help women find themselves?

Grow Your Business and Grow Your Wealth
EP 093 Sabrina Shaheen Cronin, Founder – The Cronin Law Firm

Grow Your Business and Grow Your Wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 32:02


Show Notes   - The Grow Your Business and Grow Your Wealth podcast with Gary Heldt  - EP 093 Sabrina Shaheen Cronin, Founder – The Cronin Law Firm Sabrina Shaheen Cronin is a true role model for today's single working parent. She began her career as a musician, and soon afterward, she began her rise as a successful attorney. Sabrina is now a nationally recognized motivational and public speaker, life and business strategist coach, writer, mentor, businesswoman, top Lawyer, and television personality. Sabrina is known as the “Shared Parenting Expert” for her workshops helping families cope with co-parenting dilemmas in today's challenging environment.​ Her expertise and legal background have her uniquely qualified to meld her knowledge of human nature, 20 years as a family law specialist and background as a prosecutor, to create and develop her own specialized, proprietary curriculum in the form of weekly workshops. Sabrina's goal is to get acrimonious parents out of the courtroom and into her workshops, so they can develop the tools necessary to achieve happy and healthy homes for their family. Sabrina is licensed to practice law in Michigan, New York & Illinois. She is a certified Life Coach and Family Law Specialist. Sabrina is a graduate of the University of Michigan and received her Law Degree and MBA at University of Detroit Mercy.  Sabrina's insights include:  What led Sabrina to become a lawyer  The impact of divorce for the whole family  The common mistakes people in business make through their divorce The importance of being in the moment professionally and personally  The conflict of differing opinions in today's society Enjoy the show! Connect with Sabrina: Website: https://www.croninlawfirm.com/bio/sabrina-cronin.cfm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sabrinashaheencronin/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sabrinashaheencronin/?hl=en   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sabrina-shaheen-cronin-a9ab7738/    Connect with Gary: Website: https://sbadvisors.cc/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SmallBusinessAdvisors LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gary-d-heldt-jr-388a051/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cybersecurity Quiz
Brian Redden, COO Buechner Haffer Meyers & Koenig, Thought Leader

Cybersecurity Quiz

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 37:08


There's a little-known secret to being considered by others as a thought leader in an area of law.And of the few that know the secret they practice it often without knowledge in subtle and nearly unnoticed ways.Our guest this week, Brian Redden is an excellent example of this secret marketing trait.Let's talk on Tuesday on how Brian uses marketing for himself and others and how you can leverage similar for yourself.Find Brian at https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianrredden/Find all our videos at:https://www.youtube.com/c/NoLawFirmLeftBehindCatch our podcast on your favorite platform:https://linktr.ee/splicenet/

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst
Episode 100: Why Now Is the Perfect Time to Refresh Your Law Firm Policies with Marcia Watson Wasserman, Founder and President of Comprehensive Management Solutions

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 26:23


What you'll learn in this episode: What law firm culture is, and why it affects clients as much as it affects staff Why law firms should look at their policies with fresh eyes post-pandemic How firms can use technology to enhance communication When it makes sense for firms to use a hybrid work model, offer hoteling, or open smaller satellite offices How to maintain firm culture when staff is remote About Marcia Watson Wasserman Marcia Watson Wasserman is a published author and co-author of the books: Law Office Policy, Procedures, and Operations Manual – Seventh Edition (ABA 2022), and Lawyers as Managers: How to Be a Champion for Your Firm and Employees (ABA 2017).  She is a Fellow in the College of Law Practice Management, one of an elite number of consultants who have earned this honor. Marcia serves as Columns Editor on Law Practice magazine's editorial board and is a member of the Publishing Board of the ABA's Law Practice Division. Additionally, Marcia frequently presents law practice management topics for legal and business conferences while also contributing articles on law practice management to leading legal publications. Prior to founding Comprehensive Management Solutions, Inc. in Los Angeles, Marcia served for over 15 years as Chief Operating Officer and Executive Director for several national and local law firms, including an AmLaw 200 firm. Earlier in her career, she served as Director of Law Firm Services and Director of Client Advisory Services for two, mid-sized CPA firms in Southern California. Additional Resources:   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marciawwasserman/ Website: www.comprehensivemgmt.com Law Office Policies, Procedures, and Operations Manual, Seventh Edition  Lawyers as Managers: How to Be a Champion for Your Firm and Employees    Transcript: After decades of incremental change, the pandemic forced many law firms to embrace technology, rethink work traditions, and evaluate their culture almost overnight. According to law practice management consultant Marcia Watson Wasserman, these changes have been a net positive, even though they've raised new questions about how to manage a law firm in the post-pandemic landscape. She joined the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast to talk about how firm culture trickles down to clients; what technology firms should be investing in; and how firms can embrace remote work. Read the episode transcript here.  After decades of incremental change, the pandemic forced many law firms to embrace technology, rethink work traditions, and evaluate their culture almost overnight. According to law practice management consultant Marcia Watson Wasserman, these changes have been a net positive, even though they've raised new questions about how to manage a law firm in the post-pandemic landscape. She joined the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast to talk about how firm culture trickles down to clients; what technology firms should be investing in; and how firms can embrace remote work. Read the episode transcript here.     Sharon: Welcome to the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast. Today, my guest is Marcia Watson Wasserman, Founder and President of Comprehensive Management Solutions. Her company provides COOs with to-go law practice management consulting and coaching services to boutique and midsize law firms and their managing partners. Marcia is also coauthor of several books on the subject of law firm management. Her most recent book, coauthored with consultant Cynthia Thomas, is the seventh edition of “Law Office Policy, Procedures, and Operations Manual,” published by the American Bar Association. Today, we'll look at how efficient law office management facilitates good marketing. Marcia, welcome to the program.   Marcia: Thanks for having me, Sharon,    Sharon: So glad to have you. As I was saying, it's such an accomplishment to have not only coauthored this book, but to have a list of books you've coauthored. Tell us about your career. You have an impressive track record in the area of law office management. Tell us about your career track.    Marcia: It all started accidentally when I was an undergrad at UCLA. When I was a sophomore, I saw a job on the job board. It was a part-time job working for an attorney. I took that job and learned how to be a legal secretary and a paralegal. I was the backup bookkeeper and office manager and eventually became Executive Director of several law firms back in the 1990s. I was also COO of an AmLaw 200 firm. I decided I wanted to be an entrepreneur and that consulting was far better suited to me, so that's what I started doing, consulting to law firms. For the last 20 years, I've led a managing partners roundtable of boutique and midsize law firms and enjoy doing that, too.   Sharon: I remember when you started it. That's how long we've known each other. Even before that, but I do remember when you were starting that.    Tell me about law firm culture. How does that affect employee satisfaction, and how does employee satisfaction affect or facilitate good marketing?   Marcia: I want to quote a law firm futurist, Jordan Furlong, because he says it so well. Culture is what people at the firm actually do every day. In harsher terms, it's what people get away with. Culture is what actually happens. So, what type of culture you have has an impact on who you hire, whether people are happy, whether they stay with you and how you communicate with clients. If you don't have motivated employees, your clients are not going to be happy with you. If you have people phoning it in and not really dedicated to serving clients, it's going to have a huge impact on your clients.    If you have a great positive culture, then you not only have good employees, but you have clients who are drawn to you as well. You become known for your brand and people seek you out because it's an important part of your own attempts at business development and marketing. If you have a good culture, it gets known. Suddenly, you're on the best law firm list for employees and your client base expands.   Sharon: Is that the way law firms should review and assess their current policies? Especially post-pandemic, when everybody's ramping up again, how should law firms assess their policies and procedures?   Marcia: They need to look at them with fresh eyes. You may have done something for many years because it made sense, but after the pandemic, when law firms discovered we could work virtually—least most positions could—you need to look at every single thing you do with fresh eyes. There were certain things that were temporary, governmental regulations that you had to put in place because of the pandemic, like mask wearing and cleaning and not allowing clients to come to our offices. Now a hybrid workplace is the new normal. We'll see how that plays out over time, but people reevaluated what they wanted, which has an impact on culture and has an impact on clients.    It isn't just the firm that has that in mind; it's the clients as well. Clients don't necessarily want to get in the car for an hour and drive to you. I heard family lawyers and estate planning lawyers say, “Oh no, it will never work. They're used to coming in. It's a very close relationship, and they want to come to the office. We have to have these really nice, big offices for them.” The reality is that's not what the clients necessarily want. The clients can do a Zoom or a Facetime or whatever works for them, and they're very happy to have a relationship with you that way. There may be a time and place where they do want to meet with you in person, but not necessarily as much as lawyers would have assumed they would. So, you have to have policies in place that take all of those things into account.    Demand has changed as to what clients' expectations are. Some of it has to do with the age of your clients. A lot of this is generationally driven, namely the younger lawyers and staff and clients who are Gen Z or Millennials, who have a very unique spin on what work and work/life balance means. If they're a client, they want to work with a law firm that understands that, so you'd better be marketing appropriately to your clients, know who your clients are and have the right people there. A Gen Z client or even a Millennial will not necessarily want a near-retirement Baby Boomer as their attorney, so you've got to pay attention to relationships.   There are certain policies you have to have that are formal, like leaves of absence and antidiscrimination, but if you're looking forward, what do you want your firm to look like? Make those policies to take into account a hybrid workplace. Be culturally and otherwise diverse and have fun things in your policies, too. Have a fun committee, whether it's virtual fun or nonvirtual fun. It makes a difference.   Sharon: I know a lot of companies learned how to use technology because they were forced to learn how to use technology, whether it's a law firm or a different kind of business. They said, “This will never work with virtual or a hybrid law firm.” What kind of technology have firms been implementing? How are they going to be doing this differently? What have they learned during the pandemic, and how are they going to be operating differently in terms of technology?   Marcia: There's so much available with technology. Even the Zoom we're doing today, if the pandemic had happened 10 years ago, we wouldn't have had a good medium like this to communicate. Communication is so important, and technology is right there with us, leapfrogging ahead of what the law firms were expecting. I know of immigration law firms and certain plaintiffs' firms that are using chat boxes and fillable forms. That's how they do their prescreening; they've designed their software to prescreen potential new clients. It makes it a little more seamless for the client. They can go on to somebody's website and fill out a form, so they don't waste time waiting for somebody to call them back. They're able to immediately get that information to the firm. Somebody reviews it and gets back to them much more rapidly at the intake stage.    There are document management systems that some firms were lazy about; they didn't want to make the investment. If you have those systems in place, you can share documents with clients much more easily. When you're setting up workflow and processes, usually firms look at it totally from an internal viewpoint of what's easy for them. They need to be outward-facing and think, “How will this work for our clients? How can we be more efficient so that our fees are fair, we can get things done faster for our clients and we can share documents with our clients?” Even if you've got a brainstorming session with a client on Zoom, you can use a whiteboard on Zoom or whatever other software you're using. You're able to communicate that way and use technology to enhance communication that you wouldn't otherwise have.    Sharon: That's an interesting point about the fact that if the pandemic had happened pre-Zoom, I wonder if it would have lasted as long. Everybody would have pushed to be able to get back into the office. It's an interesting question. I saw some ads recently for law firm marketers. They talked about the fact that it was a hybrid environment and I thought, “If you had suggested that 10 years ago, five years ago, the employers would have said, ‘Forget it! We're not going to do it that way.'”   Marcia: There are still employers who are behaving that way. I know of law firms that said, “We're important because we're employment lawyers and our clients really need us; hence, everyone needs to come back to the office one month into the pandemic. We'll spread people out and do our best to do what we can do, but everybody needs to be back in the office. My legal secretary has to be outside my door to do the things I need. It can't be done remotely.” The firms that took that position lost a lot of their lawyers and staff who said, “No, it's not safe, and that's not what I want to do.”    Sharon: In terms of lawyers working remotely or in hybrid environments, is that going to remain, especially with younger lawyers? Have they seen the way it might be and said, “I'm not going back to what it was”? What do you think?   Marcia: Some of it depends on where you live. In a congested area like Los Angeles, where both of us live, yes, hybrid will happen because people realize, “Wow, I don't have to be in a car two or three hours a day commuting. I'm so much more productive. I can get more work done. I can be with my kids. I can have more of a balanced life.” The younger lawyers are driving that and demanding it and saying, “As long as I'm getting the work done, what does it matter?”    Now, when hybrid comes in, there's a time and place where getting together makes sense. If you're onboarding new people, you can do it virtually; there are best practices for doing it, but there's a lot to be said for a brand-new person to come in and actually meet people and get walked through things. There's a time and a place for a team meeting. If there's a group of people that work together on a particular client and an important event is coming up, a trial or whatever, it makes sense for them to be in the office the same day. Even though a lot of clients say, “We don't need to come in,” there may be a client that wants to come into the office, and that's also the time the team should be there.    But I'm seeing a lot more willingness to let people adjust their schedules, and everybody's a lot happier. It depends. Your older lawyers who are accustomed to coming to the office all the time swear they can't work at home; they just can't do it, so they've been going into the office throughout the pandemic. There are younger lawyers, too, who say, “I have roommates; I have a one-bedroom; I can't work and live in the same place. I don't have enough space. I can concentrate better in the office,” and they've been going to the office the entire time. The great majority of them say, “Hey, I want some balance in my life. This is really working, and as long as I get the work done, give me the autonomy and the authority to get it done my way, as long as I'm meeting deadlines.” A lot of that has to do with how well your communication systems are in place. I do hear that people are worried about losing their culture because everybody's operating more in a silo. So, you have to work at that.   Sharon: How do firms have to operate differently? You mentioned communication. How about telecommunication? Do law firms have to strengthen or change their management policies around that communication? You have to work harder, I presume, to keep a culture.   Marcia: You do, and that's why firms are having things like happiness committees where they come up with events, virtual or otherwise. There are firms I know that have done walks on the beach during the pandemic just to keep people engaged, or they had everyone met at a park and bring their own lunch and stay socially distanced just to see one another. I know a few firms that had retreats at remote locations during the pandemic. They had everyone take Covid tests and made sure they were O.K., and nobody got sick because they were very careful about what they were doing. A lot of it depends on what your culture was to begin with and how friendly an environment you were. Are you a new firm? Are you a firm that's been institutionalized for 40, 60 years and you're used to doing things one way and you don't like change?    Lawyers don't like change anyway, so you need to manage a little bit differently, and communication is an important part of that. Everyone likes to be communicated with in a different way. Some people are happy to text one another and use Slack, and other people want to use video more. Every circumstance requires a different situation for communicating, both as to what the individuals' preferences are and the circumstances of what you're communicating about. People shouldn't just endlessly do Zooms. Everybody is burned out on Zoom. Meetings should be intentional. They should have agendas. There's a time and place for people to meet in person, and a time and place to have a group Zoom meeting or a one-on-one.    Sharon: I like the idea of the fun committees and walks on the beach. Those are great ideas in terms of keeping something cohesive during the time when you're supposed to be spread apart.    I've read about law firms opening more branch offices, little satellite offices of one or two people. Is that happening, or is that an exception? What's the scoop on that?   Marcia: I'd say, again, it depends where you live. If you're in a small town where everything is close by in Middle America, you don't need it. But in suburban areas that are spread out, yes, I'm definitely seeing it for a variety of reasons. One is to serve clients. It's to open an office closer to where your major clients live so they don't have a big commute to come see you. That's one reason. One firm I know, the senior partners live in the suburbs and they don't want to drive to the home office all the time, so they opened a branch near where they live to make it convenient. Now they don't have to come to the main office all the time.    Another firm I'm aware of—and this happened a lot—when people were working virtually, many of the employees, staff and the lawyers decided they were going to move because they wanted more space. They moved farther away, in some cases another county away. We have L.A. lawyers who've moved to Orange County and San Diego County. We have lawyers from the west side who had a small apartment and said, “No, I want something bigger for my family.” They bought a house out in the suburbs, an hour and a half drive from their office. Suddenly the firms are finding out about it later, after the fact, and saying, “O.K., what can we do to keep these people?” One firm I know has downsized their main office in L.A. and built a big branch because so many of their people moved into the area where they've opened the branch. The branch office is probably as large as the main office now. They did it to accommodate people's lifestyle and commute and to make sure their employees were happy.    Sharon: Are you seeing established law firm offices in Century City or downtown shrinking their spaces?   Marcia: Absolutely. They're doing more hoteling. It depends where they are in their lease. If their lease came up during the pandemic, almost universally they've reduced their space. If they still had time to go, they put up with it or renegotiated with their landlords to extend the term and make it less expensive, or they gave up some of their space. A lot of people are subleasing space. I have a client that is looking to move into subleased space because their lease is up. Just in their own building, they've had offers from several different law firms to move into subleased space. These other law firms—that are well-established law firms—have too much space.   They're doing a lot more hoteling for lawyers, just like CPA firms have done for a long time and commercial real estate brokers started doing a number of years ago. It was always, “Oh no, lawyers can't do that.” Well, lawyers can do that. If you want to work at home three days a week and be in the office two days a week, if you don't need your own dedicated office with your plaques on the wall, you can have an office or a conference room. There's scheduling software that firms are buying that accommodates this. The receptionist has scheduling software so that when people come, it arranges an office for them, and they know where to go. That's another place where technology is helping, so you don't have three people showing up to share the same office on the same day.    Sharon: When you say these are things that other industries have been doing for a long time, I worked for a large accounting firm 25+ years ago and they were starting hoteling. I guess it takes a pandemic to get the world to move.    Tell us more about the book. I was looking at the information about the book on the jacket, and it looks like you can tear it apart, make your own templates and really use the book.   Marcia: The main part of the book is an employee handbook. It's a multijurisdictional handbook because we weren't writing it for California or New York. We have readers in the ABA who live in Canada and elsewhere in the world, so we tried to make it as general as possible, while reminding people that you'd better make sure what the laws are before you adopt a policy that won't work where you are. We made that part of the book available online in Word format so you can take it if you don't have an employee handbook. It covers all the legal things you have to have about antiharassment and overtime and those kinds of things, but it also covers how to deal with technology and cybersecurity. We reached out to SMEs to write some of the chapters for us.   Sharon: SMEs being?   Marcia: Subject matter experts. My coauthor and I certainly aren't IT/technology/cybersecurity experts. That's such an important area. We reached out to four individuals from two companies who actually wrote that chapter for us, which includes model cybersecurity guidelines and policies for law firms. You can just take that and put in your handbook.    That's one part of the book, and the book has been around since 1982. The original book was written by a lawyer in L.A. named Bernie Ralston. Bernie was a mentor and a friend to me along the way. I met him through Bar Association volunteerism over the years, and he would refer clients to me. Bernie is just about 100 years old, and he's still licensed to practice law in California and does arbitrations. I don't think he does a lot of work anymore; it's probably pro bono. He was the one who came up with the idea of doing this book, and here we are at the seventh edition. It's pretty special.    Sharon: Wow! The seventh edition must have a lot of changes from the last version in terms of how you deal with post-pandemic issues and how you deal with cybersecurity. That has become such a huge area.    Marcia, thank you so much for telling us about this. You've given us a lot of food for thought and ideas about where we can get answers, such as your book. The templates sound like a fabulous benefit for law firms. Once again, thank you very much. We greatly appreciate you being here today.   Marcia: Thank you, Sharon, for giving me the opportunity to speak with you.  

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
Marketing Your Law Firm Associates

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 30:06


Are you supposed to market your associate? Many have expressed concerns about marketing other lawyers because it takes time to market and there is a risk the lawyer could eventually leave with all of their clients. In the grand scheme though, while it does exist, the risk is nowhere near as omnipresent as people believe. Here's why…   In this episode we discuss: Three major considerations to figure out the right strategy for marketing. Consider the turn rate of the average employee attorney. Whether or not it is economically worth it to invest in having your team members marketed. The compensation plan could be universal.   Allison Bio: Allison C. Williams, Esq., is the Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney, and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law. Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest-growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm by 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017. In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest-growing companies among graduates of Florida State University. In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers. She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money. Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining, and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications, and money management in law firms.   Contact Info: https://www.lawfirmmentor.net/speak-with-a-growth-strategist   My favorite excerpt from the episode: TIME: 00:04:20 (27 Seconds)  So for a lot of lawyers that have that fear that they are going to be producing their next best competitor by virtue of training and developing and cultivating a rainmaking attorney in their law firm, they very much are short-sighted in this belief. They are oftentimes catastrophizing and not really looking at the essence of the employee. And by the way, you can have lawyers that have not yet learned how to be rainmakers who very much have that entrepreneurial spirit.

On the Brink with Andi Simon
312: Amy Gardner—How Can A Great Law Firm Build Better Teams?

On the Brink with Andi Simon

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 29:52


Hear how when teams work together, everybody succeeds You may have not paid much attention to the cultures inside law firms. Law firms are really no different than other firms. Some have strong cultures that seem to work smoothly. Others need a hand. One hand they often reach for is Amy Gardner, our interviewee in today's podcast. Amy is charming. A smart woman who has worked in law firms and now with them to help them reimagine their organizations and create teams that work better together than alone. In our conversation, you will hear ideas that are as relevant to your company or non-profit as they are to Amy's clients. As we all try to navigate our new work culture, her story is well worth a listen.   Watch and listen to our conversation here It doesn't matter what type of company you have today—you need strong collaborative teams that are looking to help each other succeed No longer can we all be competing for position, power and promotions. Today, we have to find ways to talk to each other, build relationships, and know whom to trust and count on. That is what Amy does so well. Connect with her on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and her website Apochromatik, or email her at amy@apochromatik.com. Want to learn how to form better teams that work great together? Start here. Blog: How Storytelling Can Transform Your Culture And Energize Your Team Blog: How To Help Your Team Stop Mourning The Old And Love The New Podcast: Kathy D'Agostino—Can A Great Performance Coach Build Your Team And You? Additional resources for you My award-winning second book: Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business My award-winning first book: On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights Simon Associates Management Consultants    Read the transcript of our podcast here Andi Simon: Welcome to On the Brink with Andi Simon. Hi, I'm Andi Simon. And as you know, I'm your host and your guide. And my job is to get you off the brink. And I can't do that any better than by bringing wonderful people to you. Amy Gardner is one today who's going to tell you about some major things you should think about as we come out of a pandemic. But you know, this is not easy, and everybody's brains are fighting it. You don't quite know how to do it so you're making it up, not quite well. And I always believe in over-determining success. So if you can overthink what we're doing a little bit and begin to plan for it, and realize that not everyone's going to do it exactly the way you want. Then all of a sudden, you're going to find new ideas, turning into great new ways to work together. Amy comes out of Chicago with lots of offices there looking for people to come back into them. I don't know, it's lonely at home, but it's easier. I have a client with 70 employees, all of whom don't want to commute, all kinds of things going on. But let me tell you about Amy so she can help you see, feel and think in new ways. That's our job because if you can see something and you can feel it, you'll decide, I can do that too. So that's what we want to share today. Amy Gardner is a certified career development and career transitions coach. She'll tell you about that, and she's a team development and leadership consultant. The company she's with is Apochromatik. And she's going to say that better than I have. Her work draws on her unique experience as a Dean of Students at the University of Chicago Law School, which is pretty cool. And a successful career practicing law. At first, as a big law litigation associate and later as an associate and then partner at a midsize photographer, she received her BA from Luther College, her JD from the University of Chicago Law School and her MA in public policy from Northwestern University. Amy's got great credentials for you today. But the most interesting part is that she's working with people like you right now to help them see,  feel, and think in new ways. The times they are changing. Amy, thank you for joining me today.  Amy Gardner: Thank you for having me. I'm so glad to be here.   Andi Simon: It's such a pleasure to meet you. Please tell the audience who's Amy Gardner? What's your whole journey been like? And how does that bring us to where we are today?  Amy Gardner: Well, I grew up in Ames, Iowa and my first jobs were working in Wisconsin delis, where I learned a lot about leadership and team development by running, wait for it, Big Kahuna Café at Noah's Ark Waterpark. America's largest waterpark, land of the free and home of the wave. It was a fantastic experience, actually. So after I graduated from Luther, I worked in political campaigns in Iowa before going to law school. And as you said, I graduated from law school and went straight into a large law firm. I worked at Skadden's Chicago office for just about five and a half, not quite six years. And then from there, I went to a midsize firm. And when the opportunity arose to return to my law school as the Dean of Students, I really viewed it as an opportunity to better prepare students for the practice of law in ways that an excellent classroom education doesn't necessarily cover. And as part of doing that work, I kept talking to law firms that were saying, Wow, this is really great and nice things that you're doing. So I was talking to law firms to get them to subsidize the things I was doing. And the firm would say, We need this, we need this. And so finally I decided, okay, here's this opportunity. And so initially, our work was focused on legal employers, but now we work with lots of different industries. And my husband and I founded Apochromatik five years ago and we've been married for just over 20 years. And today, I get to work with smart people every day. I get to work with teams that want to be better. And I get to work with lawyers who want to love their careers more. So it's a pretty good gig.   Andi Simon: What a nice journey, what a nice balance. You know, learning comes from doing experientially as opposed from sitting in a classroom and hearing. And unless we've done it, we don't really know what it is. But these are very challenging times, I'm sure you're seeing. So tell us two things. One a little bit about what you do, how you do it, and a little bit about what you see going on in the markets today that can be helpful for others who are experiencing it. What do you do?  Amy Gardner: So about half my time is spent with our one-on-one and small group mastermind-to-attorney clients. And then the other half of my time is spent working with teams. It doesn't matter who I'm working with, the approach is always first to listen, to understand where people are coming from, and then to really collaborate with them to create solutions. And you know, when you're coaching an attorney on their career, you might be using a strictly coaching approach. But when it comes time to tell them what to do with their résumé, you're not coaching them, you're being very directive. And with a team, you're trying to understand the issues. The issues are often not what appears on the surface. And then you're working with the team members to improve the situation for everyone. And sometimes that involves one-on-one coaching with some leaders. Other times, it involves a series of group workshops, but it's fun, because you can see the results of your work. And because you never know. When Keith and I are doing a workshop together, I often comment that it's a lot like riding a bucking bronco, right? You know in your mind how it might go and you've seen it before, but it's always going to be a different experience. And at the end, the goal is really just for the team to achieve their goals.  Andi Simon: So as I'm listening, I'm thinking about my own leadership academy, I have several. And in the process, the word "team" comes up often. But folks, fascinatingly enough, they may have played on a soccer team, or lacrosse team or a football team, but they're all different teams. And I use the metaphor of sports because it resonates. But I have a hunch, you see the difficulties without a general manager or coach or a model for people to know what it is. What is the goal? Why are we doing this? And on the other hand, being an anthropologist, I tell them, You can't solo it, unless you have a group, call it a team, you can't get anywhere. Humans can't do it alone. Maybe a little but not really. How do you build the right kinds of teams?  Amy Gardner: Well, to start, I think one thing that occurred to me as you were talking is, I don't know if you know Michael Hyatt, but he's been really influential on our business and very helpful. And Michael often says, Vision leaks. What we often see is that we might talk with the leaders of a team and say, what are the team's goals? and they can recite them in their sleep. But the average team member may feel as though the only real goal is to bring in more revenue, cut costs, and bring in more money. And so you really have to start with, what is the vision, and some of that is, of course, going to be handed down. But other vision needs to come from the people on the team. And because you can do all the trust exercises and communication exercises in the world, but if people aren't working toward at least some common goals that are a little bit more motivating than helping someone else become wealthier, they're not really going to get anywhere.  Andi Simon: That's an interesting way to talk about purpose and mission.  Amy Gardner: I remember when I was practicing law, I had a client where I had to keep going to New York every three weeks for this particular case. And it was a great case. But I was sitting at LaGuardia all the time. And the client made a comment to me that maybe he should name a condo for me. And I said, What do you mean? And he said, Well, every time we get a disbursement from this fund, my wife and I buy another condo because we're sort of building a compound of properties down in Florida. And I was like, wait, I'm spending...of course I was being compensated well for this, right? but you're thinking, I spent how many hours on the tarmac at LaGuardia and you're telling me that that's what this is about? I mean, it just has to be more motivating than that, right? And different things are motivating to different people. But you have to understand the members of the team, why they get up in the morning and who they are and what they have to offer.  Andi Simon: Well, but I'm laughing because often we really aren't sure what our job is, or its purpose and meaning. There's a huge great resignation right now, a huge discussion about young people wanting purpose. They don't just want profits. And I'm not quite sure, we haven't figured out that the young people are just telling others what it is that people really want, which is to have a purpose in life beyond simply a job. And it isn't working for someone, it is working with them. And what does that actually mean? So you have a really big business here. Are there some illustrative cases where you can show like the before and after or some of the challenges that you're facing? Because, you know, people have to visualize, not envision it, but visualize it because that's how we decide with our eyes and your stories, very powerful stories to share.  Amy Gardner: So let's talk about a team that we worked with not too long ago where we were approached because the new leader had inherited a team that was doing great in many respects, but he discovered they'd never had any sort of team development, nothing formal, never had a retreat, nothing like that. And so initially, our charge was just to come in and do something so that the team understands it's a new day and the new leader really cares about this development. But everything's great. So as we start talking to people, we learn that in fact, there are a couple members of this, again, very high functioning team in a very well known company, who these two members hadn't spoken to in 10 years. And I mean, imagine if you are in a large company, and you are a senior leadership team and two members don't speak. It doesn't matter how great the numbers are, and how lovely the human beings are but, there's still that what is happening here. And there had been a recent situation where the communication was so siloed, that one person is sitting in a meeting, and overhears the engineering team talking about a new development and realizes or should have realized they better talk to the IP folks but doesn't connect them. Because it just doesn't occur. And none of these were disasters, right? It's kind of like, oh, yeah, they didn't let us know, now we got to scramble. Oh, yeah, those two don't talk. But whatever, it's their deal. But when you can get to the root causes, and when you can address those things that just brings in a new lightness. It just makes people happier logging out for those interminable zoom meetings, right? If it's people that you actually don't mind spending time with, and you understand where they're coming from, and it was great because at the end of the engagement, we were told it was a resounding success. And more than that, we also saw just how people were talking when we did an icebreaker.  The very first of four workshops, people had no engagement, like wondering, Why do we have to do this. And by the end, people are excited. On their own, people had come up with a schedule so everybody would have coffee with everybody else at least once a quarter to get to know each other better. All these sorts of things that we all know in our heads we should be doing, but you get so busy with all the meetings and all the things that you can check off your to-do list, that so often it's those personal relationships, and the developing the team and developing the leadership within the team that just gets set aside for the next quarter, right?   Andi Simon: Let's dig into this a little bit because we do a lot of cultural change work. Humans have only survived because of groups. It's a really interesting phenomenon, set people off on their own in the wilderness, and they don't quite know what to do. But you know, you put them in these cubicles, or these jobs, and they really don't know what to do either. They do what they do to keep their job and to feel they have some reason for being there. You went to LaGuardia and sat on the tarmac, you weren't quite sure the purpose or the meaning. But you did it, you made a nice income. And that seemed to be what the job was supposed to be. But now we're at a point where people are asking some profound questions, particularly as we're coming back from being remote. Particularly, Why are we together? And why is being remote so unhealthy for humans, because it is. The incidence of illness goes up, and that's not just COVID. People experience anger, loneliness that turns into all kinds of psychological and behavioral health issues. We're supposed to be critters, we're herd animals. We're supposed to hang out together, supposed to tell stories with each other. But the trend is now to begin to see this as valuable, not incidental. And now the question is, well, it's valuable, but I don't know how to do it. You don't know how to talk to each other. You don't know how to set up some time to have coffee together. It's like we're working with a bunch of children, as opposed to grownups. They need new habits to be formed. And habit building takes 30 days or plus or minus, you gotta keep doing it before it becomes ingrained. As you're watching the reemergence of people going back into the office, I've been dying to ask you, what do you see happening? Are some working well, some not? Where are there opportunities for others to benefit from what your insights are?  Amy Gardner: I think one of the things that you have to remember if you're asking people to come back to the office is that you can't ask them to come back to the office just to sit on zoom all day. And this is something that we're seeing again and again. Particularly for offices, where for good safety reasons, they only want a certain percentage of the people there on any given day, then the people who are in the office are often just in their office on zoom with people who aren't there. There has to be a reason to be back in the office. I mean, if you want me to get on the L or get on the subway or drive somewhere and pay for parking to go in there, there should be a reason, right? And especially as we've seen, so many people have moved farther away from their offices over the last two or three years to get out of inner city cores and move into suburbs and stuff where they have yards and things like that.  I have a client who she and her husband have a couple of little kids and they moved an hour and a half from downtown Chicago and now they both are expected to be coming back into downtown Chicago. And it's like, what does that do to your life? This is a choice they made but if all of a sudden they add a three hour commute, three hours of commuting each day, so there better be a reason to be in the office. And I think the employers who put out doughnuts or a box breakfast to welcome everybody back one day, and then think it's going to go back to the same way. This is a real opportunity to reset, and smart leaders are taking advantage of that opportunity to reconsider. Do we need to be here every day? Do we need to have more open work spaces? Do we need to have fewer open workspaces? Some people have learned that they can concentrate better without the chaos around them, right? Should we rethink what we were doing for backup childcare? If people's kids are suddenly out of school because of a COVID exposure, how do we want to support them? This is a real opportunity. I was talking to someone the other day, and we were both talking about what if employers think about it, and leaders think about it in terms of not going back, but how can we go forward from here. I think that reset, and that reframe can be really helpful and thinking through what kind of workplaces we want to have.  Andi Simon: Yes, well, I'll add to that, because I've been doing research on what does work mean and what is the workday. I coached a bunch of folks who during the COVID period early on were now at home, and they were trying to figure out what is work? They were really delighted to be able to take a morning meeting and get the wash done. Then take a noon collaboration with their colleagues or friends. Then they could work at eight or nine at night when the kids went to bed. And they were saying, what is work? When do we do work? There were profound questions about the transformation that was opening up opportunities, unfamiliar in the past, but really important ones about what is the meaning of work. Where do we do it? And then that wonderful little article that I saw of the gal who finished at one o'clock and said, Well, pay me to 5 o'clock because I have nothing else to do. And her question wasn't about her willingness to do more but what I had to do, I did it fast. Don't penalize me for being efficient. But how do you reward me? What does this mean, in terms of what I do? Now, this is different from being on a factory floor where the machines keep going. But so much of our societies are our knowledge workers. We're managing their minds and their time. Now, the question is, do we manage them? Are they managing us? Are they all gig economy folks? It's a real interesting time. What do you see? Amy Gardner: I think one of the complications of people working at different times throughout the day is the brain science tells us that you actually need more extended periods away from work for your brain to relax. And so if you decide, I'm going to work another segment from 6pm to 9pm, fine, but then your brain can only reset from 9pm until you start again. You don't have that extended time off. And particularly with weekends, we've seen that a lot, and it just leads to more burnout. But there's also the effect that if you are a leader who decides that works for you, great. But if you are then sending an email at eight o'clock at night, and not scheduling it to go out tomorrow morning, then you are sending messages to your team. And so what might work for you and be great for you, you have to think about how that's affecting other people. And we worked with a team where a number of changes had been made to accommodate parents who were trying to supervise homeschooling kids, which, thank goodness they did. Of course, they need to do that because you cannot have six-year-olds trying to school themselves at home without supervision, right? I think we can all agree that was a good thing. But what happened was that it didn't acknowledge that other people on the team might have other activities that they prioritized. And because things have been shifted to later in the day, we talked with one person who said, Look, you know, I don't have kids, I don't feel like I can say anything. But throughout the pandemic, the one thing that has kept her going has been this one workout that she was doing online, five or six o'clock every day. And because they shifted things back, she couldn't do that. And she didn't want to say, My workout isn't as important as supervising the next generation of our leaders, right? But it was really causing consternation and frustration for her. So some of it is creating an environment where everybody can say, Hey, I know this isn't the same, but I sure would like it if we could, you know, honor my activity and my priority right now. So I think that some of the flexibility has been great in a lot of ways. I worked remotely right after I got out of college when I was working for political campaigns. And let's just say that remote work in 1998 was a lot different than it is now. And then I worked remotely for a national legal nonprofit organization when I left the law school, and now with our business we've worked from all over the world. And I've seen some of these changes, I've made all the mistakes there are, I think, at different points. And we have to allow ourselves to experiment and understand. It doesn't have to stay the same way, but some of these things that can seem great in the moment, once you get going and do them for weeks and weeks and months and months, may not be a long term solution for everyone.  Andi Simon: That takes me to the point, Is going into the office necessary? You just raised a very important point. I want to have people think about the complexity of that person who's working with you, and give them the right or the option to work in ways that make sense to them. Because as you follow the logic, is going back into the office the solution? It is a very profound question about how we are going to invent the next stage. Because to your point, some worked, some didn't, so what have we done? It's going to happen all over again. And how do I measure working? Is it working or not? How will we know?  Amy Gardner: We've seen that there are some generational differences among some teams about being in the office. I just spoke with somebody, maybe a week ago, who had a lot of resentment and said, Look, they were fine with me working from home when they were either going to have no one work, or we were all going to work from home, right? And now they don't want people working from home. I mean, it is this thing of everybody pitched in and could work from home and readjust. If you think back to March 2020, nobody got to say that's correct. And so if you have team members who pulled it off and have done a good job, for you to turn around and say, Oh, we have a blanket policy. Of course, people are going to be frustrated, right? And especially right now where you can have other options. We were involved in a common mentoring program and one of the people I've been fortunate to work with in that program went to his boss and said, I'm really burned out. I've been working all these hours and I need something to give. And her response was to talk about how she works on weekends. And this is somebody who's in high demand, who sent out two résumés and got two interviews, right? I mean people have other options and they've always had other options. But it's much more stark now, I think. And so some of it is employers have to figure out what works for the workplace. But they've got to be reasonable about it. And everybody's definition of reasonable might be different based on where they're sitting.  Andi Simon: In the work that we do, and I suspect in yours too, we think about it backwards. That platinum rule, do unto others as they want to be done to. And that little illustration you had, you couldn't care less if you work weekends, a couple of weeks off without any penalty to go on a hiking tour or something that made sense. So let's flip this a little bit around and not get so angry that the employees are defining what it is that we will be doing. You can't do without them. I mean, I often talk about leaders needing followers because if you don't have anyone following you, you can't lead anywhere. And so don't diminish the power of that follower. They will either embrace you or they will abort you. And those are the two folks who didn't talk to each other. This is such fun. So we're about ready to wrap up. Please share two or three things that you'd like our listeners not to forget. Because we tend to remember the ending even better than that lovely beginning. What should they remember?  Amy Gardner: I think one thing to keep in mind is that just because you did it one way before doesn't mean you can't get a fresh start.  And so if you can seize this as an opportunity to reconsider how things are working, whether it's in your own career or whether it's with a team that you're leading, or a team where you are a member of the team. This is an opportunity for everyone to pitch in, and reset and consider what we want things to look like. And I think the second thing is to give yourself and the people around you some grace. None of us have ever come back from being home for two years before. None of us have been here before. And so it is very much giving each other grace and understanding that different people have had different things happen over the last two years. I've said many times, we're all in the same storm, but we're not in the same boat. And so the staff person who has not had backup childcare and may have lost a family member in the last two years is in a very different position than the person who may have moved to their vacation home and had lots of space, maybe been with a spouse and without small children running around. It's just a different experience. So give everybody including yourself some grace. And then the last thing is to get help. There are lots and lots of resources. You can start by sitting and listening to Andi's podcast for a day. How much could you get out of that. But there are so many things, so many resources out there that you can draw on. You do not have to go through this alone if you really want to seize this moment.  Andi Simon: I love Amy's point. You got to seize the moment. It is a really unusual gift to you to rethink, reboot, redesign, but figure out what matters to you. And I often use a little exercise. What do you want to do more of or less of? You make a list. And every time I do that with the folks I work with, they say, Oh yes. Nobody's stopping you from doing more of that, or doing less of this. You got to take control of what you're thinking. Your mind does exactly what it thinks it wants you to do and the habits take over. It's a time for you to rethink what you're doing and have a good time doing it. Why not? If people want to reach you, where can they do that?   Amy Gardner: You can always find me on LinkedIn if you search for Amy M Gardner. There are many other Amy Gardners out there. And you can also always email me: amy@Apochromatik.com.  Andi Simon: So for all of you who come to our web, to our website who come to our podcasts and are a part of our great audience, we are in the top 5% of global podcasts, whatever that might mean. I'm always honored. I love your emails. Send them to info@andisimon.com. Tell me what you want to hear more about. Amy was perfect for today because I can only tell you that a bunch of folks out there, clients of ours and others, are trying to figure out how to figure this out. And humans are clever creative creatures, but they also get stuck in the stories of yesterday and right now we need to craft new ones for tomorrow. It's a new chapter of your sitcom and it's fun. My books are there on Amazon. Rethink: Smashing The Myths of Women in Business has done really well. And On the Brink: A Fresh Lens to Take Your Business to New Heights is still clicking away there. It has won an award and it's bringing us great clients who did change and that's what we're all about. So On the Brink with Andi Simon is here to help you see, feel and think in new ways. Amy, I'll let you say goodbye and then I'll say goodbye.   Amy Gardner: I just hope people will know that they can feel free to reach out always. I am glad to hop on the phone or hop on Zoom and chat through whatever issue you may be encountering. Always glad to hear from folks.  Andi SImon: And don't forget, there's no reason you have to do this alone. There is nothing better than picking each other's brains and having some time to laugh over a cup of coffee. It's a good time to do it. Although someone asked me if having wine every night with a friend is a good hobby. I said I'm not sure what your hobbies are. Bye everybody.

The Florida Bar's LegalFuel Podcast
The Florida Bar Tech Helpline

The Florida Bar's LegalFuel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 32:14


In 2021 The Florida Bar Board of Governors launched a three-month beta test of a tech support helpline. After much success, the non-emergency Florida Bar Tech Helpline was added to the Member Benefits catalog in February 2022. The Tech Helpline offers routine remote services, including basic troubleshooting, operating system support, and technical setup for home and remote offices.In today's episode host Christine Bilbrey welcomes Adriana Linares, owner of LawTech Partners, operator of The Florida Bar Tech Helpline.Adriana Linares is a legal technology consultant and trainer. She is a frequent speaker at national technology conferences and a regular contributor to legal blogs, publications, and podcasts. In 2013 she was selected as a Fastcase 50 honoree, recognizing “the law's smartest, most courageous innovators, techies, visionaries, and leaders.” She served as Chair of the American Bar Association TECHSHOW 2017 and was profiled as a Legal Rebel Trailblazer by the ABA Journal in 2018. She is also the Technology & Practice Management Advisor of the San Diego County Bar Association. She has served as a technology consultant the Florida Bar Board of Governors and operates The Florida Bar Tech Support Helpline.This podcast has been approved by The Florida Bar Continuing Legal Education Department for .5 hours of General CLE credit including .5 hours of Technology CLE credit. Course #­­5911.REFERENCED RESOURCES:The Florida Bar Tech HelplineLegalFuel Technology ResourcesTechnology CLEs 

Legally Speaking Podcast - Powered by Kissoon Carr
A Day in the Life of a High Profile Personal Injury Attorney - Frederick Penney - S5EP26

Legally Speaking Podcast - Powered by Kissoon Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 27:29


This week on the Legally Speaking Podcast, our host Robert Hanna welcomes high profile Personal Injury (PI) Attorney, Frederick Penney!Fred is the CEO and Founder of the law firm, Penney & Associates. He is of the highest AVVO rated Personal Injury Attorney (a rating of 10 - ''Superb Lawyer'') and has featured on top media platforms such as Forbes (Fred's Forbes Interview) and Entrepreneur (Fred's Entrepreneur Interview). He has experience handling high profile cases and this has enabled him to become quite the 'famous' PI lawyer and has over 1 million followers on Instagram! Fred is appointed as a Settlement Conference Judge to the Placer County Superior Court and is a member of the United States Supreme Court Bar.Alongside his busy law career, Fred also founded Radio Law Talk, a popular radio station offering educational and motivational conversations with other legal professionals in the industry!In this episode, you can catch us chatting about:What a PI attorney is and what type of cases they typically deal withHow Fred built his law firm and his journey to expansion across different statesFred's popular radio show, Radio Law Talk and how this is making waves in the industryHis investment in racing, which earned Fred the nickname 'Super Lawyer Frederick'What Fred gets up to over on Instagram and how he built such a large followingWhat's next for Fred and his team at Penney & AssociatesOut now on the Legally Speaking Podcast website and all major audio platforms!Sponsored by Clio: Clio is a legal case management software that work in partnership with the Law Society of England and Wales and is an approved supplier of the Law Society of Scotland.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/legallyspeakingpodcast)

Reinventing Professionals
The Rise of Hospitality and Hoteling in Law Firms

Reinventing Professionals

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 13:49


I spoke with Anthony Davies, the Chief Revenue Officer for Forrest Solutions, an onsite outsourcing, flexible staffing, and alternative legal services provider. We discussed how the move to a hybrid work model has impacted attorney retention, recruitment, and collaboration, the “rise of hospitality” in law firms, and the changing expectations of working in an office.

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
Confronting Fear, High Functioning Anxiety and Insecurity For A Better Law Firm

Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 48:09


What happens when you are faced with fear and high anxiety? Attorneys are used to being highly powered and powerful and empowered and in control. So when something happens in their sphere of experience that feels a bit out of control, they try to just push it down or push it to the side or ignore it. So I find that this is a group because they have a lot of their esteem based on their skills and how they show up in the world. They oftentimes feel very, very insecure about even admitting to insecurity.   Let's discuss a better way to approach these triggers…   In this episode we discuss: How to manage anxiety in front of groups. Deeper mindset skills around how we are showing up in our profession. How to manage emotions and feelings effectively. If we're not moving our bodies our mental health suffers.   Guest Bio: Ingela Onstad is a Performance Anxiety Coach for performing artists and professionals who are in the public eye. Her coaching business, Courageous Artistry, supports high-performing individuals in their quest to perform at the top of their abilities when in front of the public by working on skills to target voice, body, anxiety management, and mindset.  Ms. Onstad is a board-certified coach, a licensed psychotherapist, and a professional opera singer who has enjoyed a varied international career in opera, concert work, and contemporary music. In addition to her coaching, she maintains an active performing career.   Guest Contact Info: www.courageousartistry.com. Facebook: Courageous Artistry Instagram: @Courageous Artistry Tik-Tok: Courageous Artistry LinkedIn: Ingela Onstead   Allison Bio: Allison C. Williams, Esq., is the Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney, and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law. Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest-growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm by 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017. In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest-growing companies among graduates of Florida State University. In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers. She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money. Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining, and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications, and money management in law firms.   Allison Contact Info: Podcast: Intake Training Strategies https://www.lawfirmmentor.net/podcast/2022/04/01/intake-training-strategies   My favorite excerpt from the episode: TIME: 00:30:39 (37 Seconds)  We fear that if we're not seen as hardworking or that we're not in our desk as long as other people take a lunch break forbid that we will be judged, that we will no longer be successful, that we won't be welcomed into the group. It's so important for us humans, whether we like this or not. It's very important from a biological level to be embedded within community. And this hearkens back to our earliest days in evolution of survival, and we were running with smaller groups or tribes, and had we been kicked out from our group or our tribe that we were with, that could have meant death for us.

The Maximum Lawyer Podcast
Law Firm Finance w/ Jessica Gonifas

The Maximum Lawyer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 27:36


In today's episode, Jim and Tyson chat with CPA, Jessica Gonifas! They dive into the journey behind the finances of your law firm. If you're interested in learning more about normalizing the talk around money, feeling more confident in your financial situation, and strategically planning for the future, check out this week's episode.Jessica is a CPA and the owner of Silver Peaks Accounting Services. Before starting her own firm in 2018, her accounting career adventures included working in a public accounting firm, for a large publicly traded company and in both local and state governments.Most recently, she spent over a decade working as a deputy city manager, finance director, and treasurer for the city of Evans, Colorado. During her time with the city, she tripled the cash reserves from $10M to $30M, acted as project manager for a $40M wastewater treatment plant, and managed the finances of a $12M flood recovery project.Jessica is also a mom of three kiddos. Her home base is in Colorado, where she spends most of her free time watching her active teenage boys play sports and travel around the country showing their Quarter Horses – Banjo and Jake.4:35 climbing the ladder7:06 vision and planning10:13 point A to point B14:14 potential tax consequences17:22 driven by the way you run your firm21:18 mastermind approach23:52 not sure how to get thereJim's Hack: The Obstacle Is The Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph by Ryan Holiday is a good intro to the Stoics. Jessica's Tip: The mindset work is the most critical piece when it comes to accomplishing any goals in your business.Tyson's Tip: If you have a Mac and iPad, you can use the iPad as a second screen. It's very handy when you travel or if you're working from home.Watch the podcast here.Join the Guild: www.maxlawguild.comMaxLawCon tickets are on sale now! Grab your ticket today at www.MaxLawCon2022.com

Legal Mastermind Podcast
EP 152 - Andrew Finkelstein - Defining the Paradigm for Law Firms in the Future

Legal Mastermind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 23:11


Andrew Finkelstein is the Managing Partner of Finkelstein & Partners LLP, a renowned consumer activist, and an accomplished litigator. and is the author of "I Hope We Never Meet." Andrew defines himself as a deterrence lawyer and holds wrongdoers accountable when they violate various safety rules that expose people to catastrophic injuries and harm. On This Episode, We Discuss...- What is a Deterrence Lawyer?- Changing the Precedent in the Legal Industry- Moving Away from Using Email as Your Company's Internal Communication- The Story Behind the Newly-Released Book "I Hope We Never Meet"