Podcasts about Inflation Reduction Act

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Best podcasts about Inflation Reduction Act

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Latest podcast episodes about Inflation Reduction Act

The Energy Gang
What Does a Split US Congress Mean for the Energy Transition?

The Energy Gang

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 60:45


The year is quickly coming to a close and there's a lot going on in the world of energy. On this episode of the Energy Gang, host Ed Crooks is joined for the first time by Jackie Forrest of the ARC Energy Research Institute and returning guest Robbie Orvis of Energy Innovation. The gang starts off the discussion by answering the question, what does a split US Congress mean for the energy transition. Under the current administration, a lot of progress has been made in the advancement of meeting our clean energy goals with the implementation of The Inflation Reduction Act. Now that the Republicans have taken control of the House what does this mean for US energy policy over the next couple of years? Will it now fall on individual states to implement reform, like California passing their ZEV mandate?The Inflation Reduction Act includes significant incentives for companies to establish clean energy manufacturing, which has motivated companies in other countries to pressure their government to make similar advancements. The Canadian government has introduced tax incentives for clean energy projects for the first time as companies threaten to move their manufacturing to the US. Lastly, the gang discusses the role of natural gas in the energy transition. Can natural gas be a bridge fuel that will help us meet our energy needs? The release of the International Energy Agency report shows that there is need for significant investment in new gas wells to meet net-zero goals. With peak demand for heat in Northern climates, the gang explores why fully replacing gas might be hard and why we should consider low-carbon gas as an option.As always, check out our Twitter to let us know your thoughts and any future topics you want us to discuss. We're @TheEnergyGang. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Outrage and Optimism
181. A U.S. Special: Making The Irresistible Irreversible!

Outrage and Optimism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 77:00


Welcome to another episode of Outrage + Optimism, where we examine issues at the forefront of the climate crisis, interview change-makers, and transform our anger into productive dialogue on building a sustainable future. In this episode, co-hosts Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac go deep into U.S. domestic energy policy with guests U.S. Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm and White House Deputy National Climate Advisor Ali Zaidi. First up, the critical topic of energy justice: Granholm updates the team on the Justice40 Initiative, in which an unprecedented 40 percent of federal energy investments are earmarked for disadvantaged and historically underserved communities that are overburdened by pollution. The plans, which seek to reckon with deep-seated inequities, are ambitious, exciting, and groundbreaking. Speaking of action, Tom and Christiana's next guest is optimist and White House Climate Advisor Ali Zaidi. He contends the U.S. is on a positive linear trajectory and accelerating exponentiallyーnot just in clean energy or emissions reduction but in terms of the political economy backing these actions. Get the scoop on how federal agencies and departments are pushing forward together.  We finish the episode with the beautiful track “Until the Day” by Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter BEL. Additional details are included in the show notes below.    You won't want to miss a second of this electrifying episode!   Listeners, please take a minute to complete our listener survey. Your feedback is important to us, and we're deeply grateful for your ongoing support. Thank you!   NOTES AND RESOURCES    To learn more about our planet's climate emergency and how you can transform outrage into optimistic action subscribe to the podcast here.   Please complete our listener survey here   Jennifer M. Granholm, Secretary U.S. Department of Energy. Twitter | LinkedIn | Instagram | Facebook   Find out more about the Justice40 Initiative Ali Zaidi, White House Deputy National Climate Advisor  Twitter | | LinkedIn Learn about the National Climate Task Force   Here's more on the Inflation Reduction Act 2022 and the 2022 Budget Resolution And Reconciliation: How We Will Build Back Better legislation   It's official, we're a TED Audio Collective Podcast - Proof! Check out more podcasts from The TED Audio Collective   MUSIC   BEL Spotify | Twitter | Instagram | SoundCloud | YouTube   Please follow us! Twitter | Instagram | LinkedIn | Facebook

Catalyst with Shayle Kann
Unpopular solar opinions, 2022 edition

Catalyst with Shayle Kann

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 46:31


We want your feedback! Fill out our listener survey for a chance to win a $100 Patagonia gift card. In a funny twist of fate, solar's success has made it old news. It's the fastest-growing source of electricity in the world and one of the cheapest. But it's far from the hot topic it was a decade ago when utility-scale photovoltaics were still an emerging technology. Now that it's a more mature tool in the climate fight, we take it for granted. And yet there's so much more we need to do. To reach net zero by 2050, we likely need to quadruple global solar capacity by 2030, according to projections by BloombergNEF (BNEF). But labor shortages, high material costs and interconnection bottlenecks stand in the way.  So how do we get there? In this episode Shayle talks to Jenny Chase, who managed BloombergNEF's solar insights team for 17 years before leaving the role this month. Every year she tweets a thread of 50 not-always-popular opinions on solar, covering the state of the industry and the challenges it needs to solve. For this episode, Shayle picked the opinions he found most interesting and unpacked them with Jenny.  They cover Jenny's opinions on: The biggest bottlenecks holding back solar deployment, like labor shortages, high polysilicon prices and grid interconnection backlogs Why we don't need new technology breakthroughs in solar  Perovskite and building-integrated photovoltaics   How residential solar and battery salespeople are making up their savings projections How the U.S. Inflation Reduction Act could spur an unsustainable boom in solar and hydrogen equipment manufacturing Why leading forecasts could be underestimating solar deployment Recommended Resources: Twitter: Jenny Chase's 2022 opinions-on-solar thread  Canary Media: What's behind solar's polysilicon shortage — and why it's not getting better anytime soon Canary Media: Perovskites can make solar panels more efficient than silicon alone Bloomberg: Solar Outshines Wind to Lead China's Clean-Energy Transition Bloomberg: Solar Growth Estimates for 2050 Are Aggressive, But Not Unrealistic Catalyst is a co-production of Post Script Media and Canary Media. Catalyst is supported by Scale Microgrid Solutions, your comprehensive source for all distributed energy financing. Distributed generation can be complex. Scale makes financing it easy. Visit scalecapitalsolutions.com to learn more. Catalyst is supported by CohnReznick Capital, a trusted source for renewable energy investment banking servicing the US sustainability sector. Visit cohnreznickcapital.com to learn more.

Transition Virginia
Congressman Bobby Scott: What Democrats Got Done in Congress

Transition Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 16:57


Congressman Bobby Scott (D-VA 3rd) returns to the show to discuss his time spent as chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, his work on the American Rescue Plan and the Inflation Reduction Act helping to protect worker pensions and reduce drug costs, as well as investments in historically Black colleges and school meal plans.Learn more at http://linktr.ee/JacklegMediaSponsored by the Substance Abuse and Addiction Recovery Alliance of Virginia

Political Climate
Retooling Old, Polluting Infrastructure for the Clean Economy

Political Climate

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 43:31


The Inflation Reduction Act is the largest investment in clean energy ever made by the federal government. Among the bill's more than 700 pages is a lesser-known provision that could play a pivotal role in transforming existing dirty energy infrastructure to serve the clean energy economy of the future. The new Energy Infrastructure Reinvestment Program — also known as the Section 1706 program — gives the Department of Energy's Loan Programs Office $5 billion, with the authority to provide up to $250 billion in low-interest loans. These loans could radically change the energy landscape. The program could fund efforts to repurpose old coal and gas plant sites to deploy clean energy projects, leveraging existing infrastructure to save on costs while delivering economic benefits to communities. Political Climate hosts Julia Pyper, Shane Skelton and Brandon Hurlbut are joined by two guests to discuss this new program: Alexander Bond, deputy general counsel for climate and clean energy at the Edison Electric Institute, and Uday Varadarajan, a principal at the clean-energy nonprofit RMI. They discuss the innovative structure of the Section 1706 program, challenges the Loan Programs Office will face as it rolls out the funding, and the opportunities for the program to help clean up the U.S. electric grid. Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or pretty much wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Canary Media: How will DOE loan out $250B to make dirty energy systems clean?Canary Media: What challenges will confront DOE loan program for energy retrofits?RMI: The Most Important Clean Energy Policy You've Never Heard AboutDOE: Energy Infrastructure Reinvestment***Political Climate is brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice as much renewable energy as the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it's the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org.Support for Political Climate also comes from Climate Positive, a podcast from Hannon Armstrong, the first U.S. public company solely dedicated to investing in climate solutions. The Climate Positive podcast features candid conversations with the leaders, innovators and changemakers driving our climate-positive future. Listen and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Talking Tax
Energy Companies Weigh New Rules for Tax Credit Boosts

Talking Tax

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 13:52


Clean energy developers and investors trying to make the most of the credits in President Joe Biden's tax-and-climate law are evaluating how new requirements to get the boost are impacting projects. The tax-and-climate law devotes $374 billion to support climate and energy measures, including adding more and expanding on existing tax credits for the clean energy industry. One of the energy credit adders in the law, also known as the Inflation Reduction Act, is the domestic content requirement. It allows energy companies to get a 10% increase in the credit amount if all of the steel and iron from a facility is produced in the US and 40% of the manufactured products is produced in the US. However, one hurdle is that the US supplies to meet the manufacturing threshold is limited. On this episode of Talking Tax, our weekly podcast, Bloomberg Tax reporter Erin Slowey speaks with Amish Shah, a partner at Holland & Knight, about the value of the credits to companies and who's interested in the getting the domestic content adder. Do you have feedback on this episode of Talking Tax? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.

POLITICO Energy
Could regenerative agriculture generate a bipartisan Farm Bill breakthrough?

POLITICO Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 8:41


Starting next year, Congress will need to pass the farm bill, a large funding bill renewed every five years that has a major impact on the agriculture industry and farmers' livelihoods. Democrats are fighting to make farming more climate-friendly - a proposition Republicans are likely to reject. A farming practice called regenerative agriculture might satisfy both parties' interests. POLITICO's Garrett Downs explains regenerative agriculture and its bipartisan appeal. Plus, the Treasury Department has unveiled labor guidance for companies seeking clean energy tax credits under the Inflation Reduction Act.   Josh Siegel is an energy reporter for POLITICO.  Garrett Downs is a food and agriculture reporter for POLITICO. Nirmal Mulaikal is a POLITICO audio host-producer. Raghu Manavalan is a senior editor for POLITICO audio. Jenny Ament is the executive producer of POLITICO's audio department.

Washington Post Live
Impact of historic new investments in climate and energy spending

Washington Post Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 46:47


Washington Post deputy editor Juliet Eilperin speaks with Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M) and Cathy Zoi, CEO of the electric charging company EVGo about how massive investments made by the Inflation Reduction Act could help combat the climate crisis.

The Clean Energy Show
When Electric Cars Aren't Reliable; The Benefits of Processed Foods

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 53:49


Brian talks about Wired.com's story on the benefits of processed foods. James is depressed because his beloved Nissan LEAF needs a new PTC cabin heater with a hefty price tag. The city of Houston has a boil water advisory because of a blip in their power grid. The Tesla Semi seems to be for real. Musk says it completed a 500 mile journey pulling an 81,000 pound load. The upcoming Sizewell C nuclear power plant in the UK was in need of public funding. Why the Saudis have electric buses.  There's a new record size for off-shore wind turbines and it's 16 megawatts. Ebike subsidies expand across the United States. GM dealerships are repairing Teslas. Will they also fix James's LEAF? Buy us a cup of coffee with PayPal Donate! Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow   Transcript Hello, and welcome to episode 141 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. I finally come clean this week about a secret I've been keeping for two months. And, no, I'm not pregnant. And, yes, I would make an excellent mother. The city of Houston is under a boil water advisory. Because of power outages. Everything is bigger in Texas, including grid problems. The Tesla semi completed a 500 miles journey with a load weighing 81 £0, or roughly half the weight of Elon Musk's eagle. The upcoming Sewell Sea nuclear power plant in the UK was in need of funding. Ultrawealthy prime Minister Rishi Sunak has stepped in with a cash infusion. Oh, wait, I'm being told it's taxpayer money. He's not an idiot. All that and hopefully borrow this edition of the Clean Energy Show. Brian I'm sweating like a hog and I'll tell you why. Yes, I'm not a sick. I was shoveling the driveway because it blew in. And before the show, I frantically tracked down a plug in electric snow blower. My partner was coming home for lunch and I said, can you swing by the Walmart because there's one left. It was like $100 less than if I made this decision a few days ago. I would have had all the Cyber Monday Friday deals, but I missed out on that. But I found one with specs that was really good. Now, I've got a battery operated snow shovel. Not cutting it. What's going to happen now is we're going to get trace amounts of snow for the next five years, but I say, fine, it's worth spending the money for that to happen, because it's worth it. We've been snowed in and my partner had to park on the street and the driveway was daunting. So I quickly assembled it at lunchtime. While you were having your happy nap. Yeah. And I went out there with a short extension cord and did what I could. And now I'm sweating like a crazy. I'm soaked in sweat because my heart was going maximum, which doesn't take much these days, but when you're doing anything clearing snow, it gets the heart rate going, unfortunately. So, like a plug in kind rather than battery operated, I guess, is a lot cheaper. It is cheaper. I did splurge, though, and get pretty much the most powerful one you can get. It's about 14 amps. You can get a 15 amp one, but then you have problems with your extension cords overheating and blowing breakers and things. It's kind of the maximum that it will handle on an ongoing basis. But I went out there with, I would say, a 15 inch drift and went right through it like it does a foot of snow. But it will go under the drift and it will still keep going under the drift and you just go over it a second time. So, yeah, I'm happy with it. Those are a pain in the ass. I've had them before because the extension cord but I knew that I wanted power, and this was a bigger unit, and it was a couple of couldn't really afford it, but I said, man, because we got to clean the sidewalks this year by city by law. By city by law. Yeah. Well, just a quick update. Last week I was complaining about GoComics.com, this website I go to every day to read daily comic strip. It was down for a full five days and finally came back online. They offered no explanation of exactly what happened. It was supposedly a cyber security issue, which I had read on another website. But anyway, our long nightmare is over. It's back. And coincidentally, this week on Saturday, it was Charles Schultz's, what would have been his 100th birthday, the creator of the Peanuts comic strip, the legend of newspaper comic strips. It was his 100th birthday, so a lot of the comic strips had special tributes to him on Saturday. So that was a lot of fun to read. All the cartoonists got together and decided to do that. And then the last thing, comic strips do you remember the soap opera comic strips when you were a kid? There were only a couple of comic strips that were not funny. Yeah. Give me an example of one, can you? Well, there's two main ones. Mary worth. Okay. And Rex Morgan, MD. And these trips have both been around for, like, 100 years by this point. Anyway, I started reading them a couple of months ago because I was looking for new, exciting things to follow, and I'd always avoided them like the plague when I was a kid because it's like, this is ridiculous. There's no joke here. What's the point of this anyway? I've been reading for a couple of months now, and I'm starting to get into it. It's kind of fun. A bit speechless here. You're reading soap opera comic strips after resisting them your whole life. My whole life. I mean, I thought, is it a gossipy? Pleasure, man, what's going on here? Yes. I don't know. I just like comic strips, and there's not enough good ones, so I just been looking to expand my horizons. What happened to the creators? Did their kids take over? I mean, if these are 100 years old yeah, often that is the case. I don't think that's the case with Mary. We are Rex Morgan, but yeah, often it's passed on to a son or a daughter or a nephew or a niece or something. I don't know. They've all been around now, a lot of them, for 100 years. I don't know. It's a weird thing. All right, Brian, I've got an announcement to make. I've been hiding something from you for two months. Wow. You and the listeners. Wow. And it is regarding my leaf. Oh, yeah. My leaf has major problems. It happened just before we recorded a show about two months ago, and I was so distraught, I couldn't bring it up, and I couldn't bring it up for two months. I was just so unhappy about it. That's terrible. I don't know how the hell I made it through that episode. But if you could find a very glum James about two months ago trying to struggle through an episode, I guess it's all muscle memory. That's how we've done so many of these shows already. Yeah. And also, it doesn't have to be that good. No, I mean, well, we try. We do try for our listeners, don't we? Every week a good show. Come on. Okay. Now, I know that we have a lot of long time listeners, but we also have a lot of new listeners. And I wanted to just talk about electric cars with you for a little while, about the reliability. And I don't want to just jump into it without talking about what model I have, because it's going to probably be different than what you are considering. Although a friend of ours texted me the other night and was asking me about the Leaf, wanting to buy one. And I said, well, here's what happened, and you can make up your own mind. What had happened is my 2013 Nissan Leaf. Now, remember, this is the first mass produced allelectric car by a car company. They started making them at the end of 2010, and they made them for a couple of years in Japan, and then they opened up a Tennessee factory, and one in the UK as well. Mine comes from Tennessee, and it comes from the United States and was imported into Canada. So there's a few little things like daytime running lights that had to be added, and a bigger washer tank for some reason. It's just one of those weird things just to get up to Canadian standards. So it was imported already. And Quebec, the problems with Quebec, they had just terminated at that time, but they had incentives for used vehicles that lowered the used market for Leafs. And that's how I got one as cheap as I did. It was about $10,000 in change, and that was a pretty good price at the time. But it was a base model, so it was the base model S. It had no cruise control. And just when I started making those models, they put a heat pump in them in the upper trim levels. They had three trim levels. I had the low one, so I didn't even have a fast charger on mine, or a reverse camera. Or there was some things I gave up to get a really cheap one, because everyone was designing the other ones. Had I gotten one that was one of the other trim levels, I would have had a heat pump and a PTC heater. PTC heater is basically like a toaster. Now, these suckers and electric cars heat up fast. They connect rate to the high voltage battery, and it's a heater that gets red hot and air blows through it. So you have instant heat in your car, which is wonderful. And when I preheat my car in the winter time even -40 I'll get into it and it feels like a toaster oven. It just feels hot and dry and completely warm and habitable in there. It's wonderful feeling. If you leave it long enough, it'll melt all the snow that's on the car. Right. And that's what I do. So in the leaf it will preprogram itself. You just give it a departure time and based on the weather and how long it took to get to temperature and previous days, it will add more time. I think up to 2 hours. I'm not sure about that. So I probably abused it and I lost my PTC heater. So I have no heater in the car for two months now. A month ago you were talking about getting your heater replaced under warranty, which I did. Went up to Saskatoon and yeah, they replaced that under warranty and it was the same thing. Your car and I and mine are the same in that sense. That they just have a PTC heater. Later models may have had both or at least a heat pump and yours for more efficiency. Heat pump is like reverse air conditioner if you're new to the show. And it works a lot more because a great deal of power goes into these. I think 5000 watts goes into mine. That's more than the car driving. So your range goes down. So since my heater broke, my winter range is excellent, by the way. It only goes down based on denser or cold air. Do you have a little bonfire going in there or something? No, I eat some beans sometimes before. It's not a great experience. And what I've done, we have an SUV that I thought initially I thought I would just place the SUV for the winter and it's going to be expensive and it'll heat up and it will be, you know, but then even without the damn heater, Brian, I just love that bloody car. Like, I just love it. I just love driving it. I hate getting into the Prius, which is a combustion engine in the wintertime, it's cold anyway, unless your destination is a long ways away or you've warmed it up. That thing takes a while to warm up too. And it's not like an electric car and it just doesn't feel the same as an electric car. And I finally got the wheel bearings fixed, so it was nice and quiet. And I've decided that one of the great things about electric cars is after I had my wheel bearing fixed, because they were very loud, is when you get up to speed in the city, it's almost like you can feel the wind in your hair. Like you could just feel and hear the wind and nothing else. And it's just such an exhilarating feeling to just hear that. And there's something I don't know, just beyond anything a gas car can do. When I looked at yours, was covered under warranty. I found somebody who spent $1200 in Canada, basically, to do it. And the part was about six or $700, $700 for the part. And then they did some labor. Now, in the Leaf, I looked at doing it myself, but it's very complicated. Basically, the whole inside of the car has to be taken apart. And it's a $4,000 job in most cases. Oh, no. I spent ten on the car. I just spent 2100 that I didn't have, fixing the front wheel hubs, which cost way more than they should have because I got screwed by a local shop because there's no Nissan dealer here to fix it. I also need some front suspension work. Now, the car is one month short of ten years old. This is something important because we're talking about electric cars not needing maintenance. And that is true for the most part. And people say, well, it's electric car. Something weird can go wrong in it. Well, I guess this is it. Aside from the battery, which are covered under eight year warranties. Always. Always. You know, there's the charger, I suppose, could go in the car, that there's a built in charger that can wear out over time. I would have to worry about that. I could have some bad battery cells, so you might have to replace some modules at some point. But the cars would have been great. But some people put in diesel heaters. Like, there's a guy in Swift Current who bought a brand new F 150 pickup truck, and he put in a diesel heater so that he wouldn't lose any range. Like, you have a diesel heater in an electric truck? That's right. It's basically this unit that you have to exhaust, and it just kind of burns away. It is crazy. And it's got electronic controls. This is what people are doing. And I don't know, did you ever know somebody who had a really old Volkswagen Beetle? Because I think, like, some of those had a propane heater because the Volkswagen Beetles were air cooled. So you don't get that circulating fluid that you normally use for your heater in your car. So old Beetles had a propane heater, which often apparently also did not work. So, yeah, I knew a guy who had to drive around in the winter and a Beetle scraping the inside of the window because there was no heat. Well, here's what I've done. Okay, first of all, the part, it wouldn't be so bad if I was a Tesla out of warranty. Twelve hundred dollars to go from an unusable car to a usable car. Great. I actually put in a space heater, like the one you have with a cottage into my car on a timer. Like it's a plug into the lighter? No, it plugs into an extension cord. Okay, so you just run an extension cord in there because when I was a kid, my parents had in their car a block heater. A lot of people listening don't know what a block heater is. That is a heater that heats the oil in a car in a very cold climate so that it will turn over, that it's viscous enough to turn over. And we have them in all of our cars here. But yes, my parents also had an interior warmer as well. And you plugged it in with the block heater. Yes, that's what my parents did. Yeah. And so same thing like, you can have your car warm in the morning. I seem to remember it running overnight. Do you remember my parents did that too? Just left both the heater and the interior one plugged in overnight. Yeah, different times. Because it would have been like a thousand watts, probably. Yes, it would have been extremely wasteful. And for what? I don't remember the snow being melted on the windows. That's not something that I remember. Yeah, no, I know somebody who used to do that, lived in an apartment building where the plugins in the parking lot were free. Like you didn't have to pay for the electricity. So I know somebody who did that kept it plugged in all night and all the snow melted on the car just because he didn't have to pay for the electricity. It is warming up to the interior and at least getting it usable. The problem is you have to run some air on the window to defog it at the lowest setting. And if it's cold out, that feels really bad because we're talking what temperatures have we had here? Minus ten celsius -20, and it's going to get colder. It's going to be high -20 in a few days. I was hoping for a naturally warm winter and a lottery ticket win. A couple of things that I was hoping for. And if I got it fixed, I would have to ship the car all the way up to a city called Prince Albert, which is the closest Nissan dealer that is certified to do electrical work. So basically when people do these fixes, they take out the front car seats and all the dash and they have to unplug the high voltage system underneath the car. And there's also this fuse that is hard to get at, that always blows. I confirmed it because I have sort of the computer connection to my phone app and it has the right error codes on there so that the heater is seen on the phone. Now, I knew this was something that I worried about because I've seen it with other people. I've seen it online a few times, but now that I'm really looking, I haven't seen it that much at all. Like, there's a few references to it and there's people saying, well, it was bad welding and there should be a class action suit but there really isn't that many people. I think a lot of people actually had them done under warranty because I'm only a couple of years off the warranty actually. Well that's not true. I don't know if this would have qualified for that, but a lot of the high voltage stuff did and the battery and stuff like that. So I'm very depressed Brian, because and I haven't even told my partner yet. My kids know, my partner does not. She just thinks I spilled something in the car and I've got a heater going in there. I'm just so ashamed of myself because I'm an electric car advocate. I've been telling everybody they don't break down and I put my family at risk of this and now we don't have a car that's working. So I drive my kid to school, it's a ten minute drive. She doesn't complain. Well, I don't know if this makes you feel any better and you've certainly told me this as well, like you crunched the numbers when you bought that car and it's basically probably already paid for itself. If you think of all the fuel that you've saved, that was on all numbers, that was before gas went up. Before gas went up. So first of all, the car has been free so far? Basically, yes. Another way I could look at it is that these things are selling for 6000 more than I paid for it. Yeah, prices are up since when you bought it, so there's that incentive to fix it and not feel so bad about it or sell it to somebody in the summer. No, well, I would never do that. Never. That would be awful. Well, now that the evidence is out there by the way, you can't here's a tip for your kids out there. If you buy an electric car in the summer that's used check the heater just because you want to make sure it works. Now, if I had one of those models that wasn't the base model I would have had in my case a heat pump and a PTC heater. Yeah. So the heat pump, I don't know what they work efficiently at in a leaf. It might only be -15, or something like that. And it gets much colder where we are. But I would have had some heat and I could've preheated it for a couple of hours and it would have got somewhat comfortable in there, you know, and that would have been fine. Maybe not on every day, but most of our winter days aren't necessarily brutal. Hopefully it would work out, I don't know. Warm days are only five months away. Shut up, shut up, shut up. It can't be that long. There's heated seats and front and back in the Prius or in the Prius and the leaf that helps. There's a heated steering wheel. That's great. Now I've ordered off of Amazon for $30 a dinky little electric cigarette lighter, heated defroster. So I will see how that works. Is going to come in a couple of days. I'll tell you next week if it does anything. I had one many years ago when I was a teenager because my rear defrost didn't work my $300 car. So I bought one at the hardware store, and I think it sort of did something. So it's a little portable heater, like just 100 watts or something. Just a cheap yes, about 100 watts. But hopefully it will be better than just blowing cold air as far as the feeling of it. But we'll see how I survive. Actual really cold temperatures that are coming up this week, I may not you know how teenage girls dress for school? My daughter doesn't dress very warm to get her into school and even with the car, not have producing heat and try to convince her to put things on so she doesn't get hypothermia. But on the bright side, Brian, I'm feeling better. Yeah, well, like we were talking about last week, we sometimes don't dress for the climate anymore because we're just used to going from one warm environment to another warm environment. I don't have a lot of stuff this week because Twitter has gone haywire, and I get a lot of my information from climate people and various activists on Twitter. They've all left for mastodon and other places. Like, they're all completely gone, and I hope they come back. But there's talk of Tesla shareholders getting upset with Musk doing what he's doing because that seems to be affecting the Tesla stock. Just the fact that he had to sell a bunch to buy that social media platform is a little crazy. Anyway, I'm on the Chevy Voltage group. I thought it was interesting. Every now and again I see an interesting story that really talks about the economics of electric cars. We talked about how mine for $10,000 covered the gas and my SUV. That would have been five years of gas. And that's just incredible. And plus, you're saving the environment a little bit too. Obviously, it's a lot more pleasurable too, but so somebody's paying $520 for a Chevy bolt. This is one of the cheapest EVs. You can buy the monthly payment for five years with no money down or anything like that. And he's saying that he saved 175 gallons of gas, and at $4 a gallon, minus $60 a month increase in electricity, he's saving $580 a month. Both has over two months. Over two months. It's like getting a car for very little money, and it will basically pay for itself in eight to ten years. So in his case, he's buying a brand new car and getting it free after eight to ten years. The more you drive, the better deal it is. Yeah, that's for sure. And as they come down in price, this is going to be more and more things especially if you're dealing with fleets that do a lot of driving. And free is one thing, but you're still saving you're still saving over a gas car. So that's something. The New York Times had an interesting piece about how the Saudis are trying to keep gas alive. And one of the ways that they're doing it is they're buying a whole bunch of EVs and Ebuses for Saudi Arabia so that they can get this burn less gas. They want to sell the gas to other people. They don't want to waste any of it using it themselves. That's a really good point, doing that. That just struck my craw, like it's stuck in there. Well, there's going to be sort of EV have countries and EV have not countries and yeah, that's keep selling them your oil, I guess. So the Texas grid, what's going on there? Yeah, we talked about that occasionally. Texas in the US. Has its own electricity grid that tends to be cut off from the rest of the country. And they've had problems lately and I just thought this was an interesting problem there's currently, and it should be ending today, but a boil watery advisory in the city of Houston, which is a massive city for the whole city. For the whole city. And so school has been canceled. Yeah, that's first nation reserve up north kind of territory, or small town at least. And it's because they had power outages at their water filtration system when the power goes out and they were supposed to have power backup and for some reason it didn't work. But the water pressure drops within the filtration plant and once the water pressure drops down past a certain amount, they basically have to put out a boil water advisory so it's entirely possible the water is still safe to drink. It's a precautionary thing. It's a precautionary thing. And they need to let it go for a couple of days, test the water again. And they will probably lift the boil water advisory today. But I just thought it was interesting because it's just one of those things where we don't think about necessarily in terms of the grid, why it's important to have a reliable grid. And this is just one of those instances where a bad grid with frequent power outages can lead to things like a boil water advisory for a massive city like Houston. These are things that I worry about with armageddon scenarios. If there's some sort of war or something, we really need to have our water because we don't have a well in our backyard. And I'm not currently collecting rainwater. You're talking about doing that at the new cottage. But I guess we could melt some snow during the winter. Oh, yeah, not the yellow. I'll just blow it into a big pile of my new snow blower and melt it. Melt it with what, though, right? I have to collect firewood on the prairies. That's no fun. Burned gopher carcasses or something like that, I thought. I would also mention these two Chinese companies announced that the production of the largest offshore wind turbine to date has been announced. Because this is something we talked about before, so I thought I'd bring it up again. You love a big turbine. I do love my turbines to be setting records, Brian. And we knew that this would be broken because there was rumors of it. The previous record is 14 MW. This is something that can power a house for two days with one rotation of the blade. One little rotation can power your home and your family for two days, and now they've gone up to 16. There's two companies in China that have developed 16 MW. It's interesting to watch when professionals have discussions online about what the theoretical limit is. But a lot of times in the clean energy space, people think that nothing can go any further, and it does. There's always some sort of development or some sort of technique. Some of it is just a placement where you place it. They have better modeling now than they used to 20 years ago. The groups on November 24 showed off the turbine factory in Fujian Province. And the turbine has a 252 meters rotor diameter with 50,000 meters sweep area. That is a large sweep area. If you want to compare sweep areas, it's a large 146 meters. The hub of it, the middle, the turning point, 146 meters. One and a half football fields off the ground. And I saw another wind turbine blade on the highway the other day, which is always an amazing sight to see. Those checks right here. Blades? Yeah, it was heading towards Moose Jaw. That's interesting. I wonder where from, because that's kind of where it was going. Not sure. That is actually the biggest restriction on this wind turbine size, is that you physically can't turn corners on any sort of roads with those wind turbines. It was right here you saw when I saw one of Colorado was amazing. It was just blocks long, and it's just, you know, the largest man made item I think I've ever seen up close. It was like looking at a massive rocket or something. Okay, so I've got a great story here from Hannah Ritchie, who is the head of research at Our World in Data. And she is still on Twitter, and I would recommend following her. She's a great follow on Twitter, amazing information. So she's the head of research at Our World in Data. Fabulous website that just collects all kinds of data and presents it in website form. A lot of people have been going there through the COVID pandemic because it's a great place to go for sort of COVID statistics and stuff like that. So she wrote this amazing article at Wired magazine, and it's about processed foods. Every once in a while, people stop me on the street. And they say, hey, are you the guy from the Clean energy show? Why are you promoting processed foods all the time? Go on. The idea of processed food, it just has a really bad rap. We all know, I think, that we should eat raw vegetables from the garden or whatever, and processed foods can be bad. It turns out that there's sort of two categories. There's processed foods and then there's ultraprocessed foods. There's literally two categories to describe them based on how much processing. It's just a massive oversimplification. And this fantastic article summarizes everything, and it's things that we basically kind of talked about on the show before, but I just thought the article was great because it really explains it really nicely. One example of a good instance of processed food would be iodised salt. So iodine is a thing that we all need in our bodies. And iodine deficiencies used to be a really common problem around the world, and increased risk of stillbirth and miscarriages reductions in IQ from lack of iodine. That's why I'm so smart. All the processed foods I've been eating, all that. Yeah. So reduce cognitive development. But many years ago, we started adding iodine to salt. So most salt is iodized, and this kind of fixes that problem. But it's really the ultra processed foods that tend to be the problems, like, you know, snack foods like Twinkies and stuff like that. So where would we get iodised salt in nature to keep us healthy before? I'm not sure where that even comes from. Yeah, presumably our meat paleolithic cells were eating the right roots and vegetables or whatever. I'm not sure it's the ultra processed foods that we really should be railing against. Technically, something like Beyond Meat is ultra processed, but it's not that simple. It's just an oversimplification to say it's bad because it's processed well. So when I think of processed foods, Brian, I think of losing the nutritional value because of the way it's processed. I think of added salts, and I think of added sugars. That's a very common thing, too. And spaghetti sauce. And practically everything has sugar that doesn't need it. No. And as you said on the show many times before, it's not intended to be health food. Like Beyond Meat is not intended to be health food. It's intended to be a substitute for meat. So ground beef. So what you really need to compare it against is ground beef. So when you do that, meat substitutes tend to be lower in calories, lower in saturated fat, and higher fat fiber. Yes. Really? Because I thought some of the criticism of these Beyond Meat and what's the other one called? What's the other one called? Yes. Impossible Burger. Impossible Burger. That they were worse than regular meat. Or maybe that's the beef industry saying that it could all be tweaked. I mean, it can be whatever you want it to be. We're still early stages here, right? I mean, we're still developing stages. If people are saying, oh, this tastes like crap, well, then they can add in more fat. They can add in more sugar or whatever. So meat substitutes lower in calories and saturated fat and higher in fiber, which is good to their detriment. Some are lower in protein and often contain lower quality protein, meaning they contain less of the essential amino acids that we need. I didn't know there were different levels of protein. That's something new for me. Yeah. When it comes to sodium, it's sort of a mixed bag substitute. Burgers tend to be comparable to meat. When it comes to sodium, the substitute sausages have less salt than their pork equivalents. A lot of these substitute products are now fortified with B Twelve, iron and calcium, which is something you're not necessarily going to get from the meat. The Impossible burger has more B Twelve and iron than beef does. Really many plant based milks are fortified as well. So on balance, they're probably a bit better for your health than the meat equivalent. And I see this as just the beginning because we talk about the concept of food software that you can program the food that you're going to be making with precision. Fermentation in the future will be inventing new foods that have protein in them and different tastes and different flavors that don't necessarily come from an animal or plant. Or we can just tweak the things that are mimicking what we already eat, but to our taste, to what we like. And chefs, I think a chef 20 years from now could be a bit of a computer programmer and just experimenting with different things, and it could be an interesting world. Well, I've always been fascinated by that. I think I saw, like, a documentary one time about somebody who was a chef at a fast food restaurant, and it's just the idea of that I find interesting. Like somebody has to do, even if it's just regular meat, and somebody has to design that stuff to be then replicated literally billions of times. It's a fascinating sort of thing. It is. And you go to the McDonald's campus and you see they've got all these chefs making a lot of money there. And every time they come up with a new product, I always think of them and I think, you stupid buggers, you really screwed up. You know, I'm very disappointed in this rap that you made. This rap so that teenagers can put it together when they're hungover and use basic ingredients, and it's just crap. All these chefs are making these things that are disappointing and everything that you eat. I was talking to my family about Tim Hortons. What a compromise of a restaurant that is. Yes, everything is bad. Even the donut. It's a donut shop, and they can't even make a decent donut. I don't want to be the old man here, but when I was a kid donuts were pretty damn good. They're a lot better than they are. There no. And even Tim Hortons. It was about 20 years ago, they switched, and they forced all of their franchises to buy basically frozen dough or frozen donuts. Well, they make them in a factory. I've seen the news stories on them. They make them in a centralized factory, and they have baked them. They just finished the baking process and specialized ovens here, which make them somewhat fresh. But they're not a good product, which is not. No, but up until that point, they were made in the restaurants, and they were slightly better. So there's a couple more issues raised from this article. First, the idea that food processing could alleviate malnutrition for billions of people. So meat substitutes are mostly targeted at wealthy consumers. But the implications of a backlash to process food are just as harmful for people with less money. More food processing, not less, could improve health and nutrition in developing countries. So there's a lot of countries that can't afford to eat a lot of meat, and in some ways, that's good. In other ways, it's bad. There are certain things that you lack in your diet, perhaps if you're not eating meat. And some of those things could be added, like iodine to salt could be added into the thing. And plus, there's an appetite for people that they may want to eat more meat in countries where they can't afford it, and this gives them an option that is like that that's similar to meat. If you're new to the podcast, I should tell you that we talk about food on the show because it affects the climate. The new technologies and food are lower. Carbon, like, Impossible Burger is 25 times less carbon per gram than the hamburger. No, the final point from the article is the carbon footprint. I mean, it's absolutely insane how much lower the carbon footprint is from the substitute food than regular meat. The environmental toll can be ten to 100 times lower than beef or lamb, beef being the most carbon intensive. I came across another one the other day. People often complain about almond milk. Milk substitute made of almond because it uses a lot of water, you need tons of water. It's growing in places that doesn't have water. It doesn't have a lot of water. And this is true of the milk substitutes. Almond is the one that uses the most water, but it's like a 10th or 100th of the water needed if you get the milk from a cow. Like, the water needed for the beef industry is insane. So I would have assumed the opposite. Wow. It's not even close. You're saying it's not even close? Well, because I've driven by those almond farms, and you see all the irrigation, and you see the outside the border, it's a desert. So to join them in the desert and you think, wow, this is not a good idea. No, but you see the chart for the carbon footprints, and beef is the most carbon intensive of all of the meats. And one last thing here and again, it's from our World in Data. There was a really nice graph of meat consumption per person around the world. And so, quick quiz. What country do you think eats the most meat per person? My initial response would be the United Kingdom or the United States. It is the United States. Yeah, that's kind of almost a stereotype. It's a stereotype that appears to be true. Argentina eats a lot of meat. Australia eats a lot of meat. So in the US. It's 124 year per person, which is a lot. Canada is now at 82. Lot less in Canada. That was surprising to me. Now, why would that be? We have a lot of agriculture here. We have a lot of land. Why would we I don't know, except I know that anytime I've been to the States and you go to a restaurant and you order a meal in a restaurant, it always seems to be a very large portion of meat. Yeah. Yeah. But there's a wonderful graph there on our World in Data, meats applied per person. This is 2017, so the data is a bit out of date, perhaps. Well, the article is on wired.com and it's called The World Needs Processed Food. I'll put a link to it in our show notes, and you can check it out there. So the Tesla semi, according to a tweet by the CEO of Tesla, did its 500 miles trip with a full load. Now, Tesla a few years ago announced that it was making a semi allelectric semitruck. The CEO of Nicola, who is now, like, in prison, I remember reading his tweets. He was really upset that this was against the law of physics. There's no way you could carry an 18,000 pound load, which is kind of like the load that you want to carry. The Tesla semi carry this 18,000 pound load 81,000 pardon me, 81,000 for 500 miles, which is, Bill Gates said, not possible. I don't know why these people say these things, Brian. Why do they doubt us? Why do they put themselves on the record saying it's not possible? Now, lots of people said that at the time that the Tesla announcement was suspicious because people didn't think it was possible. But it's been so long since they made that announcement that battery density, the energy density, the more you can get more energy in the same weight of battery and volume than you could back then, it tends to improve by something like 18% a year. But we're kind of there now, and it sounds well, we'll know in a couple of days, right? Because on December 1 of having an event. Yeah, but apparently they've done it, and they've decided that he's invited Bill Gates to come have a ride. And, you know, I was thinking that would be a fun thing to own. And I know a lot of Tesla fanatics are actually got orders in for the semi just to have other driveway, some YouTube channels, which will be fun. Yeah, definitely fun if they buy one and drive it around because they're fast without a load. They're just really fast and quiet and tall and just such a weird thing for somebody to own. And probably not that much more expensive than some of the highly spec pickup trucks that are out there for $120,000, be a couple of hundred thousand dollars, it sounds like. But yeah, we'll learn more on December 1. And looking to learn more about the charging speeds and the infrastructure and stuff. Yeah, we'll learn how they plan to do it. But it sounds like this is for real now. If it is for real, this is a big deal because there's lots of people making electric semis, but they're making them for shorter scenarios, okay? They don't have the battery technology or the efficiency that Tesla has with their motors, their inverters, and the way that they have their batteries. And plus they've just done pretty serious design with the aerodynamics and everything and maximize everything they can get and wait. So we'll see. But this is a game changer. A lot of people are saying the cost per mile is going to be significantly lower enough that it will pull triggers on a lot of people will pull triggers on it right away once they see the difference in the cost per mile. So it's very interesting. Just as your Nissan Leaf basically paid for itself with the gasoline savings, these will pay for themselves with the diesel savings. I'd love to have one to pull. You could pull an RV right? There's people talking about that. And I'm sure somebody will make an RV based off the platform. That will probably take a while, but they'll turn one of these units into just a kickass RV, which will it'll have a massive battery, which you can power off the grid and do all kinds of amazing things. Plaster the RV part with the solar panels and charge it up as well. It just seems like a great way to RV because towing is such a pain in the butt. And a Tesla semi or pickup truck, I guess, would do a great job too. Yeah, so from Power Magazine, the UK government steps up as a 50% owner of the 3.2 gigawatt sizewell C nuclear reactors. So they've been building this nuclear reactor for a while, planning it, and guess what? It turned out to be more expensive than they expected. So they really needed the government to step in. And the government has stepped in with a 679,000,000 pound investment that's $815,000,000. So yeah, they're going to own half of it from that. But as we've discussed many times, government really has to own these because they are not profitable for any private industry there, especially by the time these get built. And I hate to go on about nuclear. We tend to bash nuclear every episode or so, but especially by the time this is finished, it will be years from now. Years, as we all know, the cost of solar and batteries, my cars will be cold and dust like so it's already a bad monetary investment now, but that's just going to get worse as time goes on. And we have a story coming up in the lightning round that says that the cost of uranium is really going up. So that's making the economics of all this very it's getting worse, I'm afraid. But yeah, private ownership and investment pardon me, in nuclear, it's not happening because governments have to do it. Then when governments do it, that makes you and I the investor. We're suffering. We're going to waste money because they don't listen to our podcast. If they only listen to our podcast, everyone would be the world would be a better place. And there was a story from Japan, too, on Bloomberg. They're looking to extend the life of their 60 year old nuclear plants, which they were planning to phase out at age 60. And keeping nuclear running that we already have is probably a good idea, but 60 seems a bit pushy. It's kind of pushing it, but they're studying it now to see if it's going to be worthwhile. Okay, well, I have no problem, as long as it's safe of extending nuclear, if that's what it takes. So Electric says that there are more electric bike subsidies coming to the United States. I guess it was in the Inflation Reduction Act, but then it got taken out like there was going to be a killer ebike subsidy that everyone would have got in the states, but that's not there anymore. So individual cities and states have since picked up the slack. They say. Vermont launched the first state incentive program in the US. Denver, Colorado, also launched the very popular ebike rebate program that repeatedly sold out and they had to renew it. New York is now considering its own ebike rebate, and now we can add Oregon to the list. It could become the latest date. They're talking about $200 off an ebike that costs, well, at least $950. But Brian, that would be free. I mean, my math isn't so good, but if all you have to spend is 950 and you get up to 1200 off, I assume if you spent 950, they'd give you 950. Yes, I know, but still, that's a free. That's free. That's what I'm saying. It goes to zero. Free bike. That's crazy. I mean, who wouldn't buy one? I mean, even if you didn't want one, it would be sitting around the house and then the bikes are going to be sold. I don't know. They have to do something about that. They can't do 100% of the purchase, but maybe it's prorated. Maybe somebody in Colorado can tell me the details. But also they would go right up to $700 if it's an electric cargo bike. I think I forgot a friend in Vancouver has an electric cargo bike. Yeah, basically, it's a cargo bike not because you're a courier, but because you're living your life off the thing. So you're getting all your groceries and your snow blowers from Walmart. And by the way, it's going to snow in Vancouver. If you're in Vancouver look good for the snow. It doesn't usually snow there. Electric cargo bikes are going to be huge. Okay, so Ireland and France are going to connect their electricity grids. How is that possible, Brian? Physically, it's with a giant extension cord. Really? Does it go underwater? It goes underwater. So it is a massive cable that is 575 km long. And so this is the first time that France has been connected to a grid in the UK. And it's for sharing power back and forth between Ireland and France. They're just beginning it now, so it will be operational by 2026. It'll be 700. MW can go through the cable, which is enough to power 450,000 households. So, yeah, I'm just always interested in these kind of stories. We need to make our grids smarter and more interconnected to share the power. Ireland and France seems like an odd combination. How did these two hook up? What's going on there? What would their accent be like? No, I'm not sure, but I'm just glad to hear it. Well, it's time for the Tweet of the Week. Well, the Tweet of the week comes from Said Razuk this week, and he says building new solar is three to ten times cheaper than operating existing gas fired power. So you have a gas fired power in a lot of places in the world. It is cheaper, like the United States, southern United States, three to ten times cheaper to build new solar than just to operate the gas. Yes. We're not talking gas this building solar, we're talking building a whole new thing is three to ten times cheaper just than existing gas. So if gas funds were invested in renewables like they're not right at the moment, europe would get rid of gas by 2028. And this is via PV magazine that he quotes data from. Well, it is time for the lighting round. Short one for you this week, Brian. General Motors dealerships have repaired thousands of Tesla electric cars, says GM, and it's annual Investor Day presentation. I have not heard this before, but apparently people are taking their Teslas to GM dealership. Maybe I could take my Leaf to the GM because they fixed. Screw you, Nissan. I'll just take it to the GM dealership. Yeah, that might work. I mean, if you could take a Tesla, why couldn't you take a Nissan? Yeah, no, that's the first time I've heard of this. First booked on Barons. A slide in the presentation simply reads eleven 180 repairs and Teslas, but they did not elaborate. So GM Volvo say that EVs won't cost more than gas vehicles by 2025. Both automakers see the Inflation Reduction Act as a key for achieving price parity by middecade, despite recent supply chain challenges. So that's good news. If true, the UK government will bolster a proposed OK, that's something we already talked about, so I'm going to skip that. It's time for what is it time for? A CES, a clean energy show. Fast fact. The International Atomic Energy Agency said 437 nuclear power reactors were operational throughout the world at the end of 2021. And that has a total net capacity of 389 gigawatts. So it's less than a gigawatt per reactor on average. The agency said 56 additional units were under construction. Some of those are in China, most of those are not other places. And as I said before, uranium prices are on the rise, thus making nuclear even less competitive. And Russia is partially the thing for that. They're raising the prices of gas and oil and also uranium. So we screwed everything up. The Department of Energy is to test rapidly deployable portable wind turbines for military use. I remember once we had on the show a story about the military with rapid deployment of solar panels that would sort of be like a transformer and unfold on a portable truck that would give energy into the field. Well, this is good for disaster relief and military use. So disaster relief and military use. A team of three labs will use remote communities to study the efficacy of turbines designed to fit into 20 foot shipping containers, perhaps towed by a Tesla. Semi clean energy jobs now outnumber jobs in fossil fuels, according to a new IEA report. Now, I'm going to continue to keep my eye open for reports like this and studies, because it seems like we are at the point now where the transition is happening, where the clean energy jobs are way overtaking fossil fuel jobs. So, by the way, France's first offshore wind farm, which is about half a gigawatt, is now fully online. So France has never had an offshore wind farm before. And speaking of offshore wind, our final story this week, before we go, is Denmark is helping India identify 15 offshore wind zones. And apparently India has some sweet wind zones, Brian, and they need electricity. We talked about huge solar developments in India, while offshore wind is next up on the list, and that will be a huge boon for them. Nice. That is our time for this week. It's more than our time. We'd like to hear from you. Please, for God's sake, contact us. Cleanenergy Show@gmail.com. That is our email address. Cleanenergyhow@gmail.com. Anything that's on your mind. Some criticism, some doubts, some things you like, some things that you're doing. Some questions about EV purchases. Let us know. We are on social media at the handle at Clean Energy Pod. And we have a YouTube channel which we have special features on. You can see me looking a bit more sweaty than usual this week. You can leave us a voicemail at speakfight. Comcleenergyow. And now, Brian, you can actually donate to the clean energy show. Buy us a coffee or PTC heater using the PayPal link on our website or in the show notes. If you're new to the show, remember to subscribe. Subscribe on your podcast app. Because our new shows, they come every week. Because we're machines. We're clean Energy machines, and we're here every week. We'll see you next time, Brian. you.

ARC ENERGY IDEAS
Canadian Energy, Politics and Western Alienation

ARC ENERGY IDEAS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 34:08


This week our podcast was recorded at the Bennet Jones Lake Louise World Cup Business Forum. Our podcast guest  is the Honourable A. Anne McLellan, who was a speaker at the event and is currently Senior Advisor, Public Policy Group at Bennet Jones. Ms. McLellan joined Bennet Jones after a distinguished career in federal politics.  Ms. McLellan served four terms as the Liberal Member of Parliament for Edmonton Centre, holding numerous Minister positions during that time and was Deputy Prime Minister from 2003 to 2006. Here are some of the questions that Jackie and Peter asked Ms. McLellan: How does the United States Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) impact Canadian clean energy? Do you think Canada should develop plans to increase LNG exports to help Europe with their energy shortage? How do you view the growing divide between Western provinces and Ottawa?  Any thoughts on Alberta's Sovereignty Act? Please review our disclaimer at: https://www.arcenergyinstitute.com/disclaimer/      

Raising Your Antenna
Shaping the Future of Equitable Transportation

Raising Your Antenna

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 38:18


This week on Raising Your Antenna, we welcome Mayor of Truckee, CA and Head of Market Strategy for Resource Innovations Courtney Henderson, alongside her colleague Kelly Helfrich, Vice President of Resource Innovations' Electric Vehicle Practice. Resource Innovations is a women-led and controlled organization making clean energy more accessible and affordable for everyone. Both Mayor Henderson and Kelly have committed to careers in sustainability to ensure solutions are accessible and equitable – both in the public and private sectors. This work, however, is not without its challenges. Tune in for the discussion where we cover: The rollout of electric vehicles at scale and the transformative market technologies needed to get thereThe development of an intelligent transportation-electrification ecosystemMobility justice and the transition to sustainable energy and transportation solutions in light of the Inflation Reduction ActMarketing and communication challenges as we move forward in the energy transition to an Age of Climate Tech AdoptionFollow Resource Innovations here and listen to the rest of our series on the Inflation Reduction Act by subscribing to Raising Your Antenna.

Factor This!
Climate tech takes on clean energy's biggest headaches

Factor This!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 53:35


Clean energy is in broad agreement: the Inflation Reduction Act is a game-changer for the industry and our goals of staving off the worst effects of climate change. But underneath the optimism is a shared anxiety that significant headwinds still plague the industry. Costly and time-consuming permitting and interconnection processes remain poison pills for projects. On Episode 27 of the Factor This! podcast, we introduce you to two climate tech entrepreneurs who are taking on these challenges. Robin Laine, CEO and co-founder of Transect, used her background as an environmental engineer to shrink the environmental assessment process down from weeks or months to just minutes. James McWalter, CEO of Paces, is developing what he calls the "Google for site selection," which allows developers to start with a set of criteria, like distance to an interconnection point, to find available parcels for development in just minutes. The platform also tracks ever-changing policies that could impact projects all the way down to the local level. Factor This!  is produced by Renewable Energy World and Clarion Energy. Connect with John Engel, the host of Factor This!, on LinkedIn and Twitter.Registration is now open for the GridTECH Connect Forum, a new event bringing together distributed energy developers and utilities to tackle the critical issue of interconnection. Join us in San Diego on Feb. 6, 2023 for an event focused on the California market, like interconnection collaboration, vehicle-to-grid integration, demand response, and more. Learn more at GridTECHConnect.com.

Boomer Health Group - the Medicare gurus
Medicare AEP is ending and 2023 changes are coming!

Boomer Health Group - the Medicare gurus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 10:02


The Medicare Annual Election Period (AEP) is coming to an end on December 7th. Now is the time to start finalizing your decisions for your 2023 Medicare coverage. In this episode, we will remind you what you should do to find the right coverage for next year. There are also some important changes coming to Medicare for 2023, and here are the links so you can learn about those changes in more detail: Link to the 2023 Medicare premiums and out-of-pocket costs: https://www.cms.gov/newsroom/fact-sheets/2023-medicare-parts-b-premiums-and-deductibles-2023-medicare-part-d-income-related-monthlyLink to an overview of the BENES Act that will be implemented for the first time in 2023: https://www.cms.gov/newsroom/fact-sheets/implementing-certain-provisions-consolidated-appropriations-act-2021-and-other-revisions-medicare-2Link to the prescription drug benefits being implemented by the Inflation Reduction Act starting in 2023: https://www.kff.org/medicare/issue-brief/explaining-the-prescription-drug-provisions-in-the-inflation-reduction-act/Giardini Medicare is an independent insurance agency specializing in helping Medicare beneficiaries enroll in the Medigap or Medicare Advantage plan that fits their needs during their transition to Medicare. We are licensed and work virtually in the following states:  AZ, CA, FL,  IL, IN, KY, MI, MD, NC, OH, PA, SC, TX  If we do NOT work in your state, we can refer to agents that we know, like & trust across the country. Fill out the form linked to our map.Check out our website at  https://gmedicareteam.com/Also, see our additional educational content over on our YouTube ChannelYou can also connect with and learn more on TikTok and our private Facebook Group and while you're at it, check out our Google Reviews!  And, please get added to our mailing list so that we can remain in touch with you.

Not So Different: a Podcast from The Center for Biosimilars
S5 Ep11: What Amgen's Biosimilar Trends Report Says About the Future of Biosimilars

Not So Different: a Podcast from The Center for Biosimilars

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 19:53


Show notes: To read more about Amgen's Biosimilar Trends Report, click here. To learn more about the Inflation Reduction Act's impact on biosimilars, click here. To see more of Chad's takeaways from older version of Amgen's Biosimilar Trends Report, click here. To learn more about tender systems, click here. To check out the last episode of Not So Different, click here.

My Climate Journey
Startup Series: Helio

My Climate Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 44:02


Today's guest is Eric Reinhardt, CEO and co-founder of Helio, which makes it simple for customers to transition off fossil fuels and fully electrify their homes. The home electrification process in most of the U.S. is not a seamless experience. Homeowners approach electrification with different needs. Some have to upgrade broken equipment, whereas others opt for a total rehab. But having to piece together a variety of seemingly related projects requires working with multiple contractors, contracts, and challenges that could limit widespread adoption. Helio is making a bet that there is a growing segment of homeowners who are motivated to electrify the whole stack of their homes, from rooftop solar and HVAC to water heaters, EV chargers, and more. The company aims to provide customers with a roadmap for achieving that while also doing the actual installation work. Given all of the tax credits and rebates coming online for home electrification as part of the Inflation Reduction Act and other local programs, more homeowners will likely be looking at this problem. And with a third of emissions coming from residential buildings, Helio's solution could make a significant dent in their goal of electrifying millions of homes. Their roadmap solution educates homeowners and helps them plan for the amount of power they'll need as they pursue home improvement projects. In this episode, Eric and Cody have a great chat about his background as well as his co-founders, what he's learned from customer interest thus far, how they can provide home estimates at scale, and how he sees Helio growing in the future. We're honored that our venture fund at MCJ Collective is an investor in Helio, and I hope you enjoy the conversation.In this episode, we cover: [3:39] Eric's background at Sunrun and personal electrification journey [7:08] How he met Helio's co-founders and started the company [9:56] The home electrification process today and Helio's net zero roadmap solution [13:56] Need for customer education [16:41] The risk for contractors to take on new technology like heat pumps [19:41] Helio's estimating process and accurate design[23:22] An overview of ducted vs ductless or mini split systems [28:21] Helio's customer experience and how they manage handoffs with contractors [31:57] Financing projects and Helio's vision of moving to a subscription model [35:02] Role of insulation and sealing [40:54] Job opportunities at Helio and how to applyGet connected: Cody's TwitterHelio TwitterMCJ Podcast / Collective*You can also reach us via email at info@mcjcollective.com, where we encourage you to share your feedback on episodes and suggestions for future topics or guests.Episode recorded on October 7, 2022. 

SVN | On The Go
SVN | On The Go - Season 3 Ep. 1 ft. Raphael Rosen from Carbon Lighthouse

SVN | On The Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 22:18


In this episode, Julian Banuelos and Cameron Williams connect with Raphael Rosen, CoFounder, and CEO of Carbon Lighthouse, an American environmental organization that makes it profitable for commercial and industrial buildings to reduce carbon emissions. We'll be diving into the effects of the Inflation Reduction Act, building regulations, and how to get into the green technology space.

RARECast
Examining the Legislative Landscape for Rare Disease Drug Development

RARECast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 29:33


In October, Alnylam said it would halt development of a therapy for a rare eye disorder to evaluate the impact of the Inflation Reduction Act. The decision is a reflection of the unintended consequences that policies can have on rare disease drug development. We spoke to Amanda Malakoff, executive director of the Rare Disease Company Coalition, about the policy landscape for rare disease therapies, unfinished business from the recent passage of a lean Prescription Drug User Fee Act, and policy priorities for 2023.

The Clean Energy Show
Oil's Last Lavish Party: The 2022 World Cup in Qatar

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 64:34


Two hundred billion dollars of oil and gas money to through The World Cup in Qatar. Turns out Qatar is 'new money' and yet has a huge sovereign fund of $300B. Even they know the transition is coming. The governor of Tokyo suggests turtleneck sweaters for saving on energy. Will the trend take off? Donate to The Clean Energy Show via PayPal! COP27 was a big, fat compromise and we need to do better but it does seem the world is slowly coming together to oppose fossil fuels. The sexy new Prius is fast and sporty. Too bad it isn't an electric vehicle. We predict continued bad sales for Toyota. Biden pours billions into aiding the U.S. power grid to transition to renewable energy. Canada begins a program to replace oil furnaces on the East coast with heat pumps. Other topics: GoComics, Carlos Ghosn, Unilever to make precision fermented ice cream could be the blow to dairy we've been predicting, Mazda might be the only Japanese auto company to get serious about EVs and Volkswagen may be dropping the ball. A listener bought his first EV and is worried his reduced winter range won't come back. Don't worry, it will! Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Transcript------------ Hello, and welcome to episode 140 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week, with the World Cup underway in Qatar, we look at what might be the peak of petrol state decadence. I mean, what does $200 billion even get? Dennis a soccer tournament without beer. Hell, even my kids pee wee soccer tournaments had beer. The governor of Tokyo has solved the energy crisis. The solution? Turtleneck sweaters. Speaking as a Canadian, wait until they hear about Tukes and woolly socks. Well, the Cop 27 climate summit was a bit of a wash. You know, like standing in the middle of Miami. Domino's Pizza is moving to Chevy Bolt electric delivery vehicles. They've ordered 800 bolts from GM, and if they don't receive the cars in 30 minutes, they're free. All that and more of this edition of the Clean Energy Show. Holy brian we're back with another show, another week. We're nonstop robotic machines here. Yeah, a lot is going on. And also this week, will I fit into the surprisingly sexy new Prius? The answer will sadden you, I think. Biden gives billions to the US power grid, and Canada follows the US. And installing heat pumps in regions where oil furnaces are popular. And I still can't figure out why oil furnaces are popular. They just didn't want to run the they just became popular, I think. Rural areas where it's hard to get them on the grid, I guess. And how are you this week? I'm going to tell you right now that I'm not well. I've been sick. You sound terrible, James. No, I'm not possessed. That is, my lungs. I've had illness. I flu since last we met. Brian pretty much okay, but it's not going well. Here's what I did. I tested my family because they're all sick. They gave it to me. My daughter brought it home from high school, and I knew I was going to get sick, so I just tested they tested. My wife and my daughter tested, and they're negative. So I thought I'm like I was singing at my nose. It's not like I have something different. I don't go anywhere, as you know. Anyway, I've had a hellish number of days, so I am barely able to be here today. And by the end of the show, I will be soaked in sweat. Oh, dear. Because I'm still doing anything is like a chore. I skipped lunch yesterday because I couldn't go downstairs. Oh, no. That maybe answers my question, because the pet peeve of mine. People often say they have the flu when what they really mean is that they have a cold. So you said you have a flu. Do you really believe it's, the damage, or is it a bad cold? I was going to jokingly bring the CDC chart on this to the show, and I thought, no, I'm not going to. But now I wish I did. Yeah, well, people say that all the time. Oh, I had the flu. And no, you just had a bad cold. If you've got the flu, it typically means you cannot go to work or go downstairs for lunch. Yeah, well, there's overlaps, okay? But having fever and severe aches is very uncommon for colds. You can have a mild fever. You can have a brief fever. But to have a long fever and severe aches, which I did, even with pills, I've been thrown down pills left and right until yesterday when I decided I've had enough. But I took one for the show, so maybe it'll kick in halfway through. We'll see. Anyway, I had to do some harrowing things, like go drive my family home from the gray cop, the super bowl of Canada, because they were volunteering there, because my daughter is going on a school trip, and that was one way to fundraise. Well, it killed my wife. She was a little bit sick still, and she had to work 10 hours one day serving rich people, which is always fun. Then my daughter asks, dad, is it legal to quit high school and go get a job? And I said, look, young lady, you want to be the people getting served, not the servers, okay? You want to stay in school. You want to be those rich bastards getting horse Durham served to them by people like you raising money for school trips. You don't want to be the person who's 30 years old, has six kids, and is trying to serve. I mean, we need those people. Those people will exist school and becomes an entrepreneur and starts a million dollar web company. Well, sure. I think she's more likely to start a bakery or something. Yeah. Not a huge amount of money in that. No, but people do do that. There's a lot of people who do that. In fact, there's a number of successful local businesses which are at least popular with people who rave about their goods. Yeah, there's some great bakeries. Finally, there's great bakeries here. There never used to be. It was always ironic because we're surrounded by fields of wheat. There's just nothing but wheat around here. But 20 years ago, you could not get a decent loaf of bread in the city. It was crazy. But now there's some really great places. Okay, so breaking news. I think we're probably the first podcast to deal with this important topic. There is an important website on the internet that has been down for four days now. It's not Twitter. It's not Twitter. It's more important than twitter. It's GoComics.com. GoComics.com. Yes. This is a website I go to every single day to get my daily comic strips. You know, I was always a newspaper guy, and one of the reasons I like newspapers was reading the daily comics. Now, many years ago, I switched to reading the comics online because you can get whatever comics you want. You don't have to just settle for the ones that are in your newspaper. So I go to this website every single day, GoComics.com to read a handful of comic strips, and it's been down for four days. When was the last time you had a website you visited and it was down for four days? People don't have patience for that anymore. No, 4 hours would be pushing the limits for most people. Four days. And you can get a lot of the comic strips in other places, but there's a handful that are only on GoComics.com. It drives me crazy. I've been looking into it, and cyber security apparently is the issue. And there's not a huge amount of information on the web, which is why we're an important news source now for this story. But getting the word out there. Yeah. Anyway, it's driving me crazy. Go to homes.com. Do you want to explain what a comic strip is to people under 45? Briefly, a few panels in a newspaper, usually with a punchline. The one I'm really missing is Nancy and Nancy classics. And this was a comic strip I didn't know about really much in my youth, but Nancy by Ernie Buschmiller, which ran like in the they do reprints of this on Go comics as well as the new strip, which is quite good. So I don't know. I'm having withdrawals. Another problem I have is I don't have enough fluids to get through the show. Okay. I was about to start the show and I have this giant water bottle from Costco that I've got. Electric pump on the top with a lithium battery. And it shows now to quit. What? It's got a pump on it? No, I bought the pump on Amazon. You could basically use these things in water coolers, although they're not quite water cooler size bottles. They're a little below that, but they're still as much as a human can carry and maybe beyond. I had my son happened to be home for Thanksgiving, canadian Thanksgiving in the head. So we decided we're only going to buy it when our kid is home from college to lift it upstairs because it's crazy heavy. Like one of those giant water bottles with a pump on it. Yeah, I put the pump on it. You can buy these pumps on Amazon for like $18. And mine just went dead right when I needed it most. Before that, I was going to help a water bottle before the show. And now I'm like, I'm going to have to be careful, very careful. Any coffee fits and I'm done. The show's going to come to an abrupt end. Well, if you have to pause, let me know. I certainly can't go downstairs for water. I'm not, you know, that strong. No. Well, at least I mean, it sounds like you're in better shape than you were yesterday. What have you been watching on TV? Well, I've been sick. Yes. Well, it's time for Brian's movie corner. Brian's movie corner. You mentioned this last week. There's a documentary on Netflix called Fugitive the Curious Case of Carlos Gon. And have you watched it yet? No, I skimmed it a bit because I was trying to see if they talked about the leaf in his history. Okay. Sadly, there's no real information about electric cars, but it was a nice refresher in who Carlos Gon is. I'd kind of forgotten what a superstar he was in the automotive world. He was originally the CEO of Renault, like 20 years ago or something. Turned around, renew. And then he became the CEO of Nissan at the same time. Turned around Nissan? They were heading into bankruptcy as well, that he made both companies very profitable. And then he got arrested for allegedly embezzling funds from Nissan and then very famously, escaped the country in a giant case on a private jet. He literally snuck out of the country after he was released on bail. So. Yeah, it's a pretty good dock. It was interesting. Yeah. Unfortunately, there was really nothing about electric cars. He was one of the proponents of the original Nissan Leaf. So maybe they're lagging in electric cars because he's no longer there. I'm not sure. You know, in the documentary. Well, first of all, there was a documentary. Who killed the electric car? This is about the EV One program. The first attempted car company making EVs. Yes. General Motors EV. One like 99 2000 in that area. Then they destroyed them all. They didn't let anyone buy them. Legendary. And that was a good documentary. And then there was the revenge electric car, which came at the point where Tesla was getting launched and starting to get the S off the ground. Their first mass produced car, I believe. And there was Carlos talking to Elon at the auto show and they were kind of awkward. It was very cool encounter because it was awkward to Egomaniacs who didn't want to give anything away. Carlos had said at that time that we're doing this just to hedge our bets. If Latter Eagles take off, we'll be prepared. But he didn't really get behind them. He didn't make them compelling enough. He basically looked at the car for the first time without approving it. He just looked at it at the auto show. Oh. This is what it looks like. Okay. And it was not a great looking car. It was divisive. I don't hate it. There's a lot of you know, it's iconic in a way because it's designed with big buggy headlights to deflect the wind so that you don't hear them on the mirrors because you would in an electric car because they're so quiet. And then who else was there with Chevrolet? There was what's his name? With GM. The cigar smoking what's his name? I can't remember. Bob Lutz, the legendary Bob Lutz, who always said that EVs would fail and the Tesla would fail. But then he was the guy sort of behind the Volt, which was coming out. So there were three things. There was a trifecta, this is history now. This used to be just my daily life, but it was the Volt with a V, which was a plugin hybrid. Essentially. It was an EV with a backup engine. And then there was Tesla getting off the ground. This was all happening in 2010, and this is when this documentary was made. And the first model years were eleven. By the way, there is a Cadillac ELR, I think it's called, for sale in Vagina, which was based on the Volt platform. They only made a couple thousand of these things, so they're kind of rare. But it's a really good kind of plug in hybrid Cadillac with all the luxurious Cadillac. What's it going for? I'm not sure. It was still kind of incoming. I saw a little thing on the web. But anyway, so Carlos Gon, a controversial figure, and there's no particular conclusion in the documentary because he managed to escape Japan and go to Lebanon, where he is originally from. And he has, I guess, not been extradited or anything, so he's never gone on trial. So no one really knows what the full story is. But there was another executive at Nissan that was sentenced to, for helping to COVID up his salary. They were trying to keep his salary quiet because it was quite high. So somebody at Nissan did do time for that. And then the pilot, like the guy who was like a US special forces guy who got him out of the country, he ended up doing a couple of years of time. I hope it was worth it, buddy. Yeah, I hope it was worth it. I don't know. I mean, I assume he was well paid. Carlos has got a lot of money. When you're that rich, you're going to throw it to millions really quickly. Just take them, just get into freedom. Quite clear on why he ended up back in Japan and in jail when Carlos Gonz has managed to not go back. Well, I think the pilot, he probably had a business there. He probably had a relationship with Japan if he was able to. I mean he could be, but he was an American. But they didn't really explain that. But yeah, so they made the point a couple of times that in Japan the conviction rate is 99%. Wow. If you are arrested in Japan, there is a 99% chance that you will be convicted. So the documentary sort of implies that there's something kind of hinky with the Japanese justice system. Well, that's why you flee. You don't wait for your trial and that's why you flee. Basically the charge is the yes. Like as soon as you're arrested, it's game over. And Carlos Gon, in an interview after he got out, he barely did 150 days in solitary confinement when they first arrested him, what he says were inhumane conditions. No butler. It's inhumane. No butler. But, like, his hands were cuffed in solitary confinement for, like, 150 days. Yeah, I probably would have done the same thing. Guilty or not guilty? Yes. He felt like he wasn't going to get a fair trial and very luckily managed to escape. So he was in a case that they said was an instrument case. They pretended that they were musicians and it was a big square case, but they said it was some type of an instrument and it couldn't go through the scanner because it was sensitively tuned, like it had just been tuned or something. And you can't put it through the scanner. I can just picture them putting it through the scanner and seeing the Carlos Scone in there, all curled up. All curled up. So? Yeah. I don't know. It's only about 90 minutes. It's an interesting little dog. Well, he is guilty, Brian. I've looked at the evidence and it seemed pretty over. Pretty compelling case. I don't know what the punishment would have been for him, but why was he in solitary confinement? I don't understand that if he was, but also, why would he need to embezzle money? Like, his salary was nine, he was making €9 million a year. Why would he need to embezzle money? I don't know. Maybe a gambling dance. Maybe he was paying for the Leaf program. I don't know. Who does? I don't know. Well, let's get out of the show. Cop 27, wrapped up in Egypt, and that's been a mixed bag of stuff for them. I'm not going to talk about it too much, but what did you think about how that went? Well, it's how these things usually go is that there's lots of optimism and then it's ultimately a compromise. There's always a compromise at the end of it, because this is a UN climate summit with hundreds of countries and getting everybody to agree. I don't know, sounds like it was not the best, but also not the worst. I see this as a very crucial time because there's a lot of fossil fuel bad things going on. They're trying to claw at what they can to make as much money as they can, and they would be happy to throw the climate down and our targets with it. So Bloomberg had a story on it. They said the United Nations climate summit just barely avoided ending in a deadlock. They went into extra a day or so afterwards. And the final compromise left big doubts over the prospect for new efforts to curb emissions. I quote, despite attempts by big powers like the United States, India and the European Union, the agreement failed to raise ambitions on reducing emissions. That could mean the world misses the one five degree Celsius warming target that enshrined the 2015 Paris agreement calls to phase out all fossil fuels, not just coal. Which is all they could come up with. They couldn't touch fossil fuels and to peak global emissions by 2025, which is likely to happen anyway according to the IEA. We're shot down by many nations who export oil, and I'm proud to say we have a bad record, Canada on this, but we didn't oppose it. Even though we are a big oil exporter. I'm sure it had a different government been in power. That would have been the case, probably. So while the phase down of all fossil fuels didn't make it to the final text, momentum grew around the idea that wasn't even in the cars before the summit. As many as 80 countries now support it. So we're moving towards banning fossil fuels, basically. We're getting closer to that. There was like a damage fund as well, right? That was a big part. I agreed to put in money to a fund for the countries most affected by climate change. Yeah. And that's all I'll talk about on that. But we'll update some more stories as we go. Here what's happening with $250,000,000 in Canada, right? Yeah. So I think we mentioned this before. There's a few more details. So there is a Greener Homes grant here in Canada that I've applied for, and they have now expanded the program with another component to it, which is to switch people from heating oil to a heat pump. So there's an extra $250,000,000 now in Canada. It's a separate stream in the Greener Homes grant, and it won't technically be available until early 2023. But this is mostly for people in Atlantic Canada, where heating oil is apparently a fairly common thing, rural properties, and everybody gets heating oil delivered. It's not a thing around here at all. We don't have this here. No, even though we have lots of rural properties. We have natural gas. We have the government who did that. Right. We have a government utility. That's kind of why we have government utilities here. But if you're in a rural property, I think it's mostly propane here. You can get your propane tank filled up. But anyway, this is up to $5,000. It's only for middle and lower income Canadians. And the twist on this, too, is you can get the money upfront, usually with this program. Wow. You apply and you spend all the money and then you get a reimbursement. But just because it's meant for middle income and lower income Canadians, you can actually get the money up to $5,000 upfront to switch you. And the potential is to save, like, according to them, as much as $4,700 a year on your heating costs. So what would a heat pump cost? Have you done any looking into it for your own house? As much as like 2025 grand. But I think for a heat pump, it depends. We need, of course, these super frigid cold heat pumps. I think in Atlantic Canada it's not as cold, and hopefully it wouldn't cost as much, maybe 10,000 or $15,000. But yeah, you get the money up front. And I checked in on the this is sort of similar and in line with what's happening in America with the biden. What's that called? The IRA. The Era. The IRA. The inflation Reduction act that starts on January 1, 2023. If you want to get a rebate on your heat pump in the US. It's anything installed after January 1 so you can get after the factory bait for yourself. Not going from an oil furnace. Right? Yeah, I'm going to go through the normal program, and I think I'll get up to 5000 as well for myself. It's too bad, though, because that would be hard for somebody low middle to finance ten grand if they weren't pressing. Yeah, and I guess that's why this program is that way. In Atlantic Canada, rural properties are probably fairly inexpensive, so you can have lower income people that own houses and they're going to be in trouble. But yeah, you can get the money upfront, which is very cool. And yeah, very much in line with what's happening in the US with the Inflation Reduction Act. So I encourage everybody to check your local jurisdiction, your local state, your local province to see what rebates are available. And things are really going to get rolling in 2023. So basically, they're starting with the biggest bang for the buck is so the biggest savings would be for people with oil furnaces, so they would be most compelled to make that switch. Right. And heating oil is one of the things that's really gone up in price with the recent inflation that we've been having. I was doing some research on this this morning, and I said that heating oil heats up twice as fast as you get more bang for your BTU, basically that it really heats up fast anyway, but probably causes more pollution than natural gas. Yes, natural gas is relatively clean as far as fossil fuels go, although there's a lot of methane in there. The new priest finally was announced on Wednesday in Tokyo and in the La auto Show, and there's been lots of speculation about it, so I've been kind of curious. Ultimately, though, there are actually Prius fans out there who are saying, wow, it's great, look at this. And what do you think? I've got a picture of it up. Well, I love the styling. Like the design road that Toyota has been going down the last few years, I just do not like. And they reached a kind of an apex with that excessively angular design of the Prius. So I think they had kind of no choice but to go in the opposite direction. But it almost looks to me like they designed it to be an EV. Like, EVs are often designed for aerodynamics. That's right. That's right. Yeah, they did. They cut down the roof line for that very reason, because there was no other way to gain efficiency. So it's just a huge shame it's not a full EV, because it looks like it could be. It looks a lot like the original Hyundai Ionic, which was a very aerodynamic shape. So I love the direction they're going. This is a huge improvement in terms of the style, I think, of the Prius. But just a shame it's not fully electric. It just feels like that would have been the correct move on it. Yeah. Obviously, you refresh the models every few years and it's totally time for a full EV refresh. And that's not what this is. Now, some people make the argument that at the moment in time that we're in right now, that a plug in hybrid, which there's a version of that right? There's a plug in version of the Prius. Some people think they all plug in. They don't. They're basically just a hybrid power train, which utilizes an electric motor to be more efficient. But it's all gas during the energy. So the plug in version has gone up in range from pretty significantly. Basically, the energy density of the batteries have gone up. It's taking up the same space to go from, I think it was, 40 range, which is a lot more usable. And in Canada, we would get the full $5,000 off. So that means you've heard it here first, because no one else has said this. The plugin. Prius prime PSE e v will be cheaper than the normal prius So why would anyone buy a Prius rebate? This is the situation that was like that in California when the Prius Prime first, there was no point. I mean, even if you don't care about plugging it in, why would you buy it? Because you have to resell it. You have to have a residual value. You might as well have the one that costs more. So it makes no sense for them to sell anything but the Prius Prime in Canada, and they also went with more horsepower, which I thought was a bit weird. Yeah, they really bumped up the horsepower. Finally, after 20 years of being mocked by truckers, by bumper stickers on truckers. Yeah. So it's quite a lot faster now. But of course, that cuts into the miles per gallon a little bit, but not too bad. Yes. Overall, though, I think it could be more efficient than it is. But the zero to 60 is a lot faster. Way faster. Yeah, that's fun. But here's my big problem with it, and that is that it sits lower. And then my wife has a Prius if you're new to the show. And that's her work car that she has to have inspected constantly because it's used for work. She takes social work clients around in it. They're not going to even talk about pricing or announcing it until sometime in the first half of next year as far as the prime is concerned. So that doesn't do me I need a car now. Brian should go buy that. Buy that Caddy. Yeah, you should actually look into it. It could be fun. You'll ever may launch ice cream from cow free dairy in a year. This is an update to a previous store because we've been talking about precision fermentation. And here it is, Brian. Here's the headline. You wait for things to happen and then there it is in front of you. Yeah. And the dairy industry likely to be the very first of the animal based products to be severely disrupted. Here's a clip from the robot who reads the Bloomberg stories. The company is working on a process called precision fermentation that uses substances like yeast and fungi to produce milk proteins in a VAT. A product could be available in about a year. If successful, unilever could be the first major food company to create an ice cream made from cow free dairy, dubbed lab grown milk. In a burgeoning industry dominated by smaller startups, a consumer giant like Unilever developing a precision fermentation version of one of its major brands raises hopes that the technology can scale up and be cost effective. The idea is that it's going to be cheaper and then also cleaner. Much cleaner. Yeah. I think a version of this ice cream already exists because there was a picture of Tony Siba eating some of it in that last YouTube video that he put up. So I think this does exist, but it's probably kind of expensive and only in health food stores. Whereas Unilever would make it a mass market product. It would probably be quite expensive. Yeah. So right now, the ideas he says by 2030 that the proteins in milk is going to be replaced by fake stuff, precision fermentation, and it's going to be cheaper and dairy is going to go bankrupt. And this is the first sign of that happening. They're doing it. Maybe they'll advertise it as an expensive but greener option, I'm guessing. At first, yeah. And more expensive at first, but I think eventually, ultimately cheaper. And unlike beyond meat, there really will not be a difference. It will be identical. It'll be very identical. Yeah. Because you're mostly tasting the fat and the sugar. The milk protein is a minor part. I think most of it is water. It's 10%. That's not water.   That's the part you replace. The others are fats and sugars, which are easily replaced, obviously. Yeah. Anyway, speaking of Japanese automakers, Mazda looks like it could be, and I'm not convinced of this, but it could be doing something significant. They could be the first of the Japanese automakers to actually set a target. That is reasonable. Mazda is raising its EV sales target to 40% by 2030 and they're investing $11 billion to accelerate this transition. Sounds like they got the memo. Yeah, well, we were making fun of them for their MX 30, which is. A very low range electric car. They are down to selling, like, only a handful of them. So they've been a real laggard. And so this is their first step up to the plate. I mean, it's not maybe what it should be, but it sounds like they're getting the idea. Right. That's something. It's probably too late. I don't want to be a naysayer, but at least they have a target. Hopefully they survive. Brian 505. I've sold more brownies at bake sales than they have in these cars. It's 100 miles of range, 160 range, which is in today's market, no good unless it's a cheap car. But it's 33,000 us. Yeah, that's a lot of money. You expect something for that. I mean, you can get a Leaf, you can get a Chevy Bolt that does way more mileage than that and probably is a more capable car. Yeah, for maybe only slightly more money. And they even said this EV has been sold out, so you can't find one. So there was a demand there. There's going to be some Mazda fans who want to go EV. But anyway, this is a story about VW maybe delaying their EV plans. Like, VW was maybe one of the great hopes of the EV transition. And now the CEO's been replaced, right? Yeah. As we reported, they're on track to deliver 500,000 EVs this year, which is a significant amount. That's way ahead of everybody else except for Tesla. Herbert Dies was their CEO that put all this in motion. He really had a radical vision for VW and really felt like it had to be a radical remaking of the company or, you know, they were going to run into problems. And so yeah, so he started a lot of ambitious programs that have gotten them to 5000 EVs a year, which is significant. But he was sort of moved out recently as CEO, and the new CEO is definitely scaling back these plans to be much less ambitious. I don't like that. No, I think Herbert Dees was on the right track. And you what, like with Mazda? So Mazda wants to sell 40% EVs by 2030, but that means there's going to be people to buy the 60% of EVs that are gas in 2030. No, it doesn't work that way. Doesn't work that way. When EVs are available, people are not going to want the gas cars. So I don't know. The new CEO of VW seems to be betting that such things are possible. And every car commercial on television is electric. Can you buy the cars? Not so much. Not so much. But for some reason, we're in this weird time where, yeah, all the car companies are vying to look like. Then there's Toyota, who says, we're electrified. That's enough. Right? Electrified. So, VW, they've got the second generation platform that they were planning to come out in 2026. They call this their trinity. EV. And now it's going to be more like 2030. Under the new CEO, 26 might have been difficult to actually achieve, but if you're moving the goal post down to 2030, even 2030 may not be moving it up to 2024. And hey, you may not make the deadline, but the commission should be moving up anyway. So that's a three year delay, basically. Or worse. Let's hope not. And that's no good. We can't deal with that. And it was already a kind of a target that wasn't even as gracious as it should be. They've got a lot. It takes a lot to turn a giant ship like VW around. I don't know. They're the best at it. The biggest car company in the world are the best at it. They are manufacturing in and out well. They do really well to get up to 5000. That's impressive. I think what they're not getting is what you said, that once the pendulum sort of swings towards EVs and that the weight starts to get on the teeter totter on the EV side, look out, it's not going anywhere else. It's going to chip way over and then you're going to be caught with your pants down. So who's going to be able to provide those cars? Hopefully? Well, Tesla, you and I are already at the point where we would never in a million years consider buying another gasoline car. But we're still kind of the outliers. But every year the percentage of people who won't consider a gas car just goes up. Yeah, and it is regular people are considering EVs. And there's people around here with pickup trucks. I'm reading about them all the time. Their neighbors are, their business associates are, their clients are. This becomes normalized very quickly now. It's really going to pick up. Yeah. So, moving on to Tokyo, the governor of Tokyo, this is Eureka Koiki, has suggested everybody wear turtlenecks to help reduce their energy bills. Okay. It's sort of a funny thing and a fun thing to make a joke about off the top of the show, but I'm in favor of this. There's an energy crisis going on. Everybody's going to be struggling to make enough power, make enough heat. Can I make a turtleneck work? I mean, not everybody can. Yeah, I don't think I own any turtlenecks, but everybody. The idea is that dress warm and you can save money on your electricity bills, which are going up in Tokyo, just like they're kind of tending to go up everywhere is in my neck. That's the coldest thing, though. I mean, really. Well, the idea is here's the quote, warming the neck has a thermal effect. I'm wearing a turtleneck myself. And wearing a scarf also keeps you warm. This will save electricity. This is what the governor of Tokyo said around the house is true. He wants people around their tiny little Tokyo apartments to wear a scarf. I mean, it sounds radical, but why not? We have a problem here. I don't know what it's like in other places, but we often have this problem in North America where like, office buildings particularly often have very poor heating or cooling that can't be controlled very well. So there's often a problem around here where people have to wear sweaters in the summer because the air conditioning is ranked too high and nobody can seem to turn it down. Or I've actually heard of people who have electric space heaters under their roof. Yeah, I've seen that it's really bad in the summer. I've seen that it's too cold because the air conditioning is too high. That's not good. Yeah, so you're overusing the air conditioning and then some poor employee has to use UTC heater to sort of gain back the energy. So I think this in many ways, used to be like a common sense thing where people just dressed warmer in the winter because it was kind of common sense. But then you go to work in an office building where the heat is all wonky, so maybe it's too hot in your office in the wintertime and then you just end up wearing a Tshirt instead in the winter. It's all messed up. I wear fleeces and sweaters inside the house now, but that's because I'm getting old, right? Yeah. I'm still turning up the temperature tin more than it should be. And then I'm also wearing those things. That's not good. I do the same thing. Yeah, it's not good at all. I can't laugh, by the way. Otherwise I'll go into a coffee and fits. I don't sound anything funny. Well, Brian, as you know, the World Cup has started. And I know you don't have world cup fever, but I do. Is that what you're suffering from? Sure. I took a title for my World Cup fever this morning. Argentina lost to Saudi Arabia and the biggest upset in World Cup history. Some people say, wow, I'm sorry, Argentina, if you're listening. In fact, this is probably way too soon for me to even bring it up, but I apologize anyway. Of course, all the coverage, it's been announced like ten years ago that they were getting this. So a Qatar, which is a small nation state with oil, was accused of using their oil money to spend on the World Cup and bribe. And there's been some people who've actually been, you know, charges and so forth. There's a new Netflix documentary. I won't make you watch it, but it's there. OK on FIFA. This is a tiny Middle Eastern autocracy with a population of barely 3 million people. How do they get the world's biggest sporting event? You know, like, this is by far the world's biggest sporting event. It happens only every four years, but the temperatures there in the summer are 50 degrees Celsius or 122 Fahrenheit. And that's when the World Cup you normally played during that time and I, as you know, was in Death Valley when it was that temperature. And I could only get out of my healthier, man then, and I could only get out of my car for ten minutes at a time. My kids could do 1213. But then you're like facing the Grim Reaper. He starts to encroach on your area, looking for you, to kill you, because you can't play soccer in that, I guess. They spent $200 billion of their petrol money on this games. They've built eight stadiums. One of them I'll talk about in a minute. That's a little bit different than the other ones. It's recyclable, we'll just put it that way. But yeah, they've got air conditioning. The temperature is only 24 degrees with like 64% humidity. These games have been checking on them. So, yeah, it's perfectly reasonable for soccer. But I read you a bit from the Atlantic here. It says Qatar might now be home to about 3 million people, but the proportion of actual Qatari citizens who lived there is a little more than 10%. So there's hardly any. The rest compromised some very rich expatriates of other nations and a huge army of poor migrants up to 6000. And some may have died, by the way. This is a whole separate issue which is not part of our show. But my God. My point is that this is the pinnacle of oil decadence. And to think that thousands of lives were not cared about and lost from other countries to make this destruction of everything and we'll never have this again. This is peak oil. I don't think we'll see crap like this ever again. This is the moment in time where it's all going to fall apart. They did not have any infrastructure, they're not a sporting nation, they didn't have a fan base, they had nothing. But they were very rich with their oil money. But Brian, their new money, they haven't had this money for very long at all. Guitar has had huge reserves of natural gas, which was discovered, I think, quite a while ago, maybe the by Shell, but they just left it there because they couldn't do anything with it. They had all this natural gas and nowhere to get it anywhere. So in the was this coup, I think the leader of the country, the King or whatever the term they use for it, left to go on vacation to England and his son took over. Which is why if I'm ever in that situation, I'm never leaving because my son would take over in a second. He was just sorry, Dan. But he did a good thing for the country in a way, because he invested in liquefied natural gas tank so that it could be transported on a ship. So when you cool it natural gas. It's like transporting oil on a tanker. But it's ridiculous how much -165 degrees celsius or something like that they are now the third richest country in the world. And they learned how to extract natural gas from the ground much more cheaply. So even after they cool it and put it on a ship, a tanker full of natural gas is four times cheaper from Qatar than if it originated in the United States through their normal channels. That's why they are so rich, is because their gas is cheap, even though they have to do that. So they started a sovereign wealth fund, though this is the shocking part that I didn't know about. Even though they blew 200 billion on these Games to make them a respectable country, which is not working out, by the way, because all we're doing is talking about how crappy they are, the LGBTQ rights and everything like that, and the fact that they can't serve beer at the games. And they yanked that privilege two days before. So they started a sovereign wealth fund like Norway did, and they have $300 billion in it because they saw the writing on the wall. They knew that our Canadian jurisdictions here who have oil in the provinces don't think that way at all. They think spend, spend oil forever. But when you had something they didn't always used to have this. So they've only had it since the 90s. So in that short time, they've got a 300 billion dollar sovereign wealth fund and they're building up infrastructure. Part of the game spending is that to make it for an investment possible. And I don't know that that's going to work, especially with their human rights problems, that a whole lot of people are going to go there, but they are planning for the end of oil by diversifying their investments around the world. So, yeah, that fund is going to do all kinds of things around the world. So there's been of course, it's supposed to be a carbon neutral World Cup. And it's a joke. It's a bloody joke. Here's a clip from Bloomberg. Organizers estimate that the World Cup will emit three six megatons of carbon dioxide. International flights in and out of Doha will account for the majority of emissions. However, organizers argue that this World Cup will be more energy efficient than others, since fans won't have to fly to different venues and can instead just take public transit. The sticking point is always the flights. Most Olympics and World Cups, it accounts to more than 85% of total emissions. So that surprised me. I guess it makes perfect sense when you hear it, but it's not the building of these eight giant stadiums and you know, all the infrastructure around it, it's the flights and during the actual Games. And it's the same with the Olympics. It's a very carbon intense thing when all these people do that. Yeah, when you got to travel so many people around the world, that's what you do, you fly. Now, the game today was in stadium nine seven four, which is built with shipping containers it's not entirely shipping containers. It's like steel girders and shipping containers. But the 400 seat stadium can be disassembled and rebuilt elsewhere. So this is the world's first tear down build a back stadium, supposedly, and apparently, if everything goes on shipping containers, it can be shipped anywhere. Yes. So this will be available for my Ikea soon. Quite the price, but yes, it was designed by a French architectural firm. Other things they're trying to do is they have built solar farms to offset the emissions from the games. They're using electric buses, an electric mass transit. So that's good. They're not burning their own product, and they are supposedly buying carbon offsets, but they're way behind on that. Brian yeah. So Domino's Pizza has announced, and this sort of falls into that category of story that we're going to have to stop reporting soon, because this is just going to be business as usual very soon and maybe is already. But Domino's Pizza in the US. Has ordered 800 Chevy bolts, and they're kind of custom painted with the Domino's logo and everything. And they've got about 100 of them so far. And these are going out to Domino's Pizza locations in the US. So they will eventually have 800 fully electric delivery vehicles for the fleet of pizza delivery vehicles. And of course, they're doing this because it just makes sense. And the bolt is not a particularly expensive car. So imagine all the money they'll save on gas. This is just the EV calculation that every business in the world is going to be making when it comes to fleet vehicles. I wish on your Domino's app, if you could select an EV to have it delivered like you can on other apps for a ride sharing, that would be nice. Do you ever eat domino's? Never. I would think he would hate Domino's. That would be an anti Brian pizza right there. No, when we have excellent pizza to choose from in our city, I don't see a reason to use donald okay, well, I agree. The pizza shows up in advance a lot of times where people have some there. Okay, so Joe Biden has promised $13 billion for the US. Power grid. So this is part of the green spending from the US. And as we talk about frequently on the show, the grid all over the world is going to need some upgrades. And so this is a decent amount of money, $13 billion to upgrade the grid. And as we go greener in the next couple of decades, it's important to get the foundation correct first before we do that. So this is a nice, like, really forward looking thing. I think that the US government is doing $13 billion available to do grid upgrades around the country. So I think that's great. It is subsidizing what they could probably do themselves, though. How do you feel about that? Yeah, well, I mean, it's a weird thing about all of this spending. Right. Because companies like Tesla don't even need subsidies, really. Their cars are profitable already and yet they're going to benefit from these subsidies. So it's always a bit weird and taxing fossil fuels. A carbon tax, it would probably have been the better way to go with all of this. But however it gets done, there are certain things politically that are difficult to do. Like a carbon tax. Yes. It wouldn't necessarily be my first choice for how to deal with it, but at least they're dealing with it. Let's dip into the mailbag. Brian. This is a message from Nick. Hello, Brian and James. I live in New England, and recently got a 2022 Ford Mac E. That is an electric vehicle, small crossover. Right. My battery life, as he calls it, was originally at 230 miles. He means range. So the range of that car when he first got it was 230 miles or 370 colder out. It is 170 miles and 274. So it's a lot. About 100, roughly of range. So I know about range decreasing in colder weather. My question is, does the range come back when the weather gets warmer? With the cost of new EVs, a range of 170 miles is not acceptable. Fan of the show since day one. Thanks. Wow. Thanks. How many episodes? 140. Congratulations, Nick. Thank you for sticking with us. So, yes, I would be bold. Enough to say that I think, James, you and I are the two leading experts in the world on EVs and cold weather. Yes. You've come to the right place, Nick, because Alaska has nothing on us. We're in the Southern Canadian prairies where it gets to -40 and it has recently not this year, but it has and -40 celsius is the same as -40 fahrenheit that's where the two scales cross over. Yeah, it does get that cold here. So I don't know everything about how the mach e battery meter works, but yeah, usually the range on any car is calculated on your recent trips. So if your recent trips have been in the cold then your car is going to be smart enough to figure, okay, well, the next trip is going to be so I assume that range will come back in the summer. Of course it will. But in a way, Brian, this is a stupid question for us, to us, for people like us. But that concerns me that the people buying EVs, really, that there are things that this would be scary to somebody nick's, obviously an EV enthusiast, but a regular person who doesn't care, who just goes out and buys their next car, might be very concerned about this if they don't know about it. That's right. You're going to look at the range thing. Now, the one thing I can recommend is I don't know if you can do this in your car, but in a Tesla you can change the battery to percentage rather than miles. Or kilometers. So when I first bought my car, it would give me the range in kilometers and started around 400 km. But then you tend to get obsessed about that range and every time you plug it in, it's like, oh, it's 5 km less than it was last time I charged it. So I just switched it to percentage. And so then you don't end up obsessing about that mileage. But then if you're going on a trip, you use the trip calculator. And the trip calculator will tell you in a Tesla that gives you a graph that says, okay, you'll get at your destination and your battery will be 20%. And that's what you monitor. And sometimes it's a little bit off in a Tesla. Now these days, about 5% error. Is that's pretty good though? Actually for this they are getting better. It used to be about a 10% error where it would tell you, oh, your battery will be 20% at your destination and then you'd get there and it would be more like 10%. Yeah, is way worse though. So we're slowing down that's one tip. Yeah, it's switching it to percentage and not worrying about it. Now when you get to the summer and it is not giving you the same range, it is always possible that your battery has cells that have deteriorated or something. So it is something you have to keep an eye on, but presumably that will come back. Yeah. And the way we do it on the Leaf is you put in the little data reader you buy on Amazon. It's a bluetooth device. For $20. It hooks up to an app for your car that's made by a third party. Mine is called Leaf Spy. Tesla is a little different because they have a different connector. I don't know how you guys do it or even if you need to, but there would be if you got into this, you can see how your battery is doing and know the state of health of it, but this means nothing. Okay, so let's say you lived in Hawaii where it's the same temperature every day. If you drove like a mad person for a day or two, it would show that you have a lesser battery, right. Because you're driving with a heavy lead foot. But if you're driving like a nun, then you're going very slow and gentle and that's going to show a higher range. It's not really showing what your battery is capable of, it's just what it's capable of based on your recent driving. And that is a weird concept to get around to people. And also I mentioned too, it is typical for batteries to lose range like battery degradation. And the typical formula seems to be you are going to lose about 5% of your battery in the first couple of years and then it kind of slows out. So I assume my battery has lost about 5% of its capacity but I don't know exactly how I would confirm that. Yeah, and it's not something you should obsess about. You should know that when you buy the evidence, buy bigger than you think you need, and then you don't worry about that. Right. That's always a good thing. But there's lots we can talk about here very quickly. Okay. Now, the first thing is that in winter, a gas car loses range. You just don't notice it. You're not thinking about that. Right. There's many factors. There is the dense winter air, so your aerodynamics are off. This affects EVs a little bit more because they're more efficient. And they're also usually more dependent on the aerodynamics of the vehicle for efficiency. So if you put winter tires on, that's going to be less efficient, for sure. That could lose you 10%. It could lose even more depending on what your tires there's the snow on the ground or ice on the ground. The fact that it's just not a smooth, rolling surface. It's like if you're pedaling a bike through snow, it's going to be harder to pedal that bike. There are different factors like that the battery becomes less strong in cold weather. When the battery is cold, it's chemically not capable of holding as much of a charge. It can't hold as much of a charge, the battery, in colder weather. And don't forget that you're using your battery to heat your cabin. That is a lot of heat. Even if it's a heat pump, even if it's just not that cold, but a little bit cold, you're still using a lot of energy. In fact, it's different in every car. Your car is a PTC heater. Mine is, too. So it's just like a toaster. It's like red hot elements heating up. That's the least efficient. And then the heat pumps. Sometimes there's both a heat pump and a PTC heater. Sometimes there's just a heat pump that uses less energy, but it's still using energy. Brian yeah. When I checked in, the Mustang Machoe does not have a heat pump heater. So it has a normal oh, really? Heater, which is not as energy efficient. So you're definitely going to lose range with that. Yeah, you're definitely going to use range. Unless you're using it to make these long trips on the highway, then that's when the only time you really need to concern yourself. Unless you have a long commute, for the most part. If you can charge every night at home, just don't think about it. Nick. Don't think about it. Enjoy your fast heating car and your efficiency and how wonderful it is. And, you know, keep us up to date, too, as you drive it through the winter, because we're not in the worst part of winter yet. Drop us a line again and how you like the car and how it made it through the winter. Yeah. And it's really only on road trips that you ever need to think About It. If you're just driving around the city like you said, you charge at home, you're always going to have enough. With Tesla, they spaced the superchargers about 150 km apart. Roughly. It varies a bit. So that's about 100 miles apart. If you're going to go nick on a road trip. You want to make sure that there is a charging station. Roughly every 100 miles and you should be fine like around here when it does get -40 I don't think it's going to get to -40 where nick is so he's probably not going to have to worry about it. But they based on about right. So mine. I've got the standard range. Tesla model. Three and it can just barely make it between chargers when it's -40. If it's only -20. -15 celsius. I mean it's not constantly -40 but we call that the worst case scenario around here. Okay. EV drivers call that you want to be prepared for the worst case scenario. We've gone years without it getting that cold. Yeah. And then the last couple of years, it's gotten a few days. That cold. So you want to be prepared for those days. And it's usually only that cold overnight. But last winter, and this was covered on the podcast, I drove up to Saskatoon and The Daytime Temperatures was -36 Celsius, which is about -32 Fahrenheit daytime Temperatures. This was at Noon, and that's what I had to drive through and just kind of barely made it in my Standard Range car. Yeah. So that's an issue. And another thing to keep in mind is if you are doing highway trips so that in winter it charges slower, the battery can't take the charge as fast because it's like regenerative braking too. You can't put your brakes back into the battery pack as well when it's cold. No, that's kind of the biggest thing for me because summer road trips, I'm only spending about 20 minutes at the charger. But the winter road trips in these cold conditions, it's more like you're spending an hour at the charger. And at that point, it gets annoying. And I'm at the point now where if this winter, I have to drive up to Saskatoon and it's -40, I'm going to take a gas car because I just don't want that. I have to wait an hour at the charging station. The worst case scenario in the worst place in the world is what we're talking about. And we tell people around here that you could lose up to 50%. It varies from car to car. I've heard somebody talking to about 17% in his ionic five when it wasn't too cold. Okay, but that's, like, the worst worst case scenario. Now, if you're driving around the city and you do 60 miles in a day, at the very worst, and you have 170 miles, who cares? You plug in at night, it's going to charge the same way as it always does. If. You're on the highway and it takes you a half hour to charge, it might take you an hour to charge. And that's a major change, too, in habits to be aware of. Yeah. And of course, electric cars, they're not as efficient on the highway as they are in the city. Higher speeds are tougher for electric cars. You drain the battery a lot faster. And I really wish that when they publicized the range for electric cars, that they did a highway figure and a city figure. I think that's the way it should be done. But they don't do that. They pick a number kind of somewhere in between the two. Yeah, but you'll get used to this, Nick. There's a lot of weird little things that people fret about when they try something new. I did it. Brian did it. It's normal. We EV owners tend to think too much, but just enjoy the car. You'll get used to it. And tell your friends about it. Time for the lightning round of fast paced look at the rest of the news. And Brian, we've overstayed her welcome, which is good because I don't have a lot of stories. This week. Rivian starts international deliveries of the R one T, rather, and the R one S in Canada. So you've seen one here, right? Yeah. It must have been an American one that drove up over the border, because I saw one on the road. But yeah, officially, deliveries of the Ribbean just started in Canada. Now, post the IRA, the inflation reduction at next era expects wind with storage will cost $14 per megawatt hour United States later this decade. This is only because this act was passed. And solar with batteries, $17 per mega, 1 hour. This is down because of this act. This is how much the IRA is going to affect everything and speed things up, if I may say. Yeah, for sure. This is a Brian story. I can't believe you didn't see this one, Brian. There's a induction oven maker who has added a battery to their stoves. Lithium battery. This is because, I guess some of these induction stoves use a lot of draw, right? Yeah. And some places aren't wired for it. And you'd have to get an extra panel if your panels full. So they've solved that problem. Interestingly with putting a battery in a stove. That makes a lot of sense. Yeah. So the big draw when you need it comes from the batteries. Well, we talked about this before in terms of heat pump, water heaters, because that's a similar problem with those, because you tend to need a few thousand watts to run those, I think up to 7000 watts to run an induction cooktop. So that's a lot of juice. It's one of the reasons I did a panel upgrade on my house. But it cost a few thousand dollars to go from 100 amp to 200 amp. So I guess the idea is you can charge up this battery and so it can draw more power. You can sort of just plug it into in a regular outlet, as it was, but with the battery have much bigger output. Right. So that solves that problem. But it's just weird, that sort of appliance with a battery in it. And I imagine it adds to the price, but it's cheaper than maybe rewiring your house, if you want to do that. So I thought I thought it was quite interesting BYD the Chinese, mostly EV maker and bus maker has sold as 3,000,000th, Bee, V or PHEV. I thought that was an interesting milestone. Some are plug in hybrids, but that's still an impressive number. Oh, it's time for a CS. Past 636 fossil fuel lobbyists were preying on government delegations at Cock.   Oily bastards. That's a lot. Scotland approves a 38 megawatt solar plant next door to a closed nuclear plant. And guess how much the objections were in the community? Zero. No objects were their objections. Will they put up a nuclear plant? Probably. Probably. Some concern solar. Not so harmful, not so scary. A village in the French Alps this is from CNN demolishes its ski lift because there's no snow left. It hasn't snowed in years. lack of snow meant that the last time it ran was about 15 years ago, and just for one weekend. And since then, it has not been. This is sad. Sad. This is why the Winter Olympics will now be held in Qatar with fake snow and perhaps potato flakes. Finally, this week, India is looking to produce its own solar modules to meet all of its demand and then some. That's right. India requires a lot of solar, and they want to make it themselves. You know, it makes sense. Perfectly capable country of ramping up something like this. I'm looking for takers for a $2.4 billion in government aid to offer stimulation to domestic manufacturing of solar equipment. They want to do all of their solar and export all as well. That's great news. That is our time for this week and a bunch more. I apologize to myself more than anything. My body wasn't ready to go long. It was ready to go short this week, and I went long. So see you next week. See you next week. Bye.

Climate Positive
Michelle Moore | Building Clean and Equitable Rural Community Power

Climate Positive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 40:28


In this episode, Hilary Langer speaks with Michelle Moore, CEO of the nonprofit Groundswell and author of the recently published book, “Rural Renaissance. Revitalizing America's Hometowns Through Clean Power.” Michelle has spent her career advocating for equitable power.  Her accomplishments range from delivering programs that cut energy use by $11 billion and led to the deployment of 3.2 Gigawatts of new renewable energy production while leading sustainability for the Obama Administration; to developing LEED into a globally recognized brand as Senior Vice President of USGBC. Hilary and Michelle discuss the values that motivate her, why Groundswell is revitalizing rural areas, and how the Inflation Reduction Act will change America. Links:Order “Rural Renaissance”Michelle Moore BioGroundswellMichelle Moore on TwitterInflation Reduction Act and DOE Loan ProgramInterfaceNational Rural Electric Cooperative AssociationUS Green Building CouncilEpisode recorded:  November 9, 2022 Email your feedback to Chad, Gil, and Hilary at climatepositive@hannonarmstrong.com or tweet them to @ClimatePosiPod.

Green Gab Podcast – Green Homes, Green Living and Green Companies
Green Community and Resources at Rate It Green with Allison Friedman

Green Gab Podcast – Green Homes, Green Living and Green Companies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 44:58


What is the green home industry? If you'd like to learn more about it, find out how to connect with people within it, and get to know about all the new things coming out in it, you're in the right place because you will hear all of that today!  I'm Marla, the Green Home Coach, and I am excited to have Allison Friedman from Rate It Green with me today to talk about all the wonderful work she is doing! I love what Allison has built by tying her product, company, and service together!  Rate It Green Rate It Green is an open directory network for the green building industry or anyone interested in green building, from beginners to experts, including trade professionals, consumers, and advanced DIY-ers. They are both residential and commercial and have individual members, as well as organizational and company members. The aim is to get people together to shorten the learning curve by engaging, collaborating, sharing information online, and talking about their experiences building sustainable and healthier places to live. It's all connected People are finally beginning to understand that health, sustainability, and living better lives are all connected. It is a learning process, and we all need to know that we are not alone and can help each other. Where it all started for Allison It all started in 2006 when Allison decided to renovate her home. It did not start out as a green project, and she made several mistakes along the way. She learned that it is hard to renovate sustainably while learning on the job- particularly back when it was hard to find any information on sustainable building practices. A learning process  Renovating her home was a learning process for Allison. If she had known when she started the project what she now knows, she would not have done it. However, she hopes all she has done and is still doing make her the best steward for building green homes. The future Allison is optimistic about everyone living healthier and more sustainably in the future, but moving the needle has been more difficult than was predicted. Sharing information    Allison would like to make the experience of sharing information online more human. However, she still prefers to engage with people and share information in person whenever possible. Sharing her journey Allison would like to use her resource to share her journey with others. She would like to talk more about improving indoor air quality, reducing the energy load, having clean water, and the things we are unaware of that could endanger us or cause health problems. Health and energy assessments The Inflation Reduction Act requires energy audits and assessments for some rebates. Unfortunately, there are very few companies doing those assessments. Free energy audits are available in Massachusetts.  Tighter homes and indoor air quality People have been getting excited about energy efficiency over the last few decades. Many have been tightening up their homes and learning to make do using less energy. As a result, better indoor air quality management is necessary to avoid any health risks associated with air pollutants getting trapped inside tighter homes.  Advancing indoor air quality systems Advancing indoor air quality systems happens on a level above the regular kind of energy audit, and Allison is working toward finding that. Initial energy assessments For an initial assessment, find someone with either a BPI or a HERS certification. Many utilities also offer some type of energy assessment, but they tend to vary from municipality to municipality or state to state. You can also go to www.energystar.gov  and www.energy.gov to learn more and find resources. Content Rate It Green has five key types of content: Discussions Groups Articles News Open Events Calendar Feedback and member content Rate It Green is a member-driven community that depends on member content and questions to thrive. So they like to know which features, information, and resources the members want.  How to get started on Rate It Green To get started on Rate It Green, go to www.rateitgreen.com and click “Join the Community”. Have a great green day! Links: Rate It Green website  Email Allison at afriedman@rateitgreen.com Rate It Green on Twitter @rateitgreen (Twitter) Rate It Green on Facebook  Rate It Green on LinkedIn  Email Allison at afriedman@rateitgreen.com    Allison on LinkedIn

Columbia Energy Exchange
U.S. Climate Policy After Midterm Elections

Columbia Energy Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 46:05


The November midterm elections proved better than expected for Democrats, in spite of many predictions of a Republican wave sweeping across the United States. Regardless of what happens in the Georgia run-off in December, Democrats will hold a majority in the Senate.  Republicans, however, have taken a narrow majority in the House of Representatives, where they can contest President Biden's climate and energy agenda. Most notably, they could try to minimize the impacts of the Inflation Reduction Act and other new laws through oversight and investigations into its funding for various agencies.  How will climate and energy policy shake out over the last two years of President Biden's term? Will the administration look to regulatory agencies like the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Securities and Exchange Commission to move the needle on climate action with a split Congress?  This week host Bill Loveless talks with Rich Powell and Aliya Haq.  Rich is the CEO of Clear Path and Clear Path Action. Both are DC-based organizations advancing policies that accelerate innovations to reduce emissions in the energy and industrial sectors. He is also the co-chair of the Conservative Climate Foundation. Aliya is the vice president of U.S. policy and advocacy at Breakthrough Energy. Her team pushes for ambitious climate and clean energy policy to help the U.S. achieve its goal of net-zero emissions by 2050. Previously, she was the federal climate policy director for the Natural Resources Defense Council. Bill spoke with Rich and Aliya about the election results and how they will impact policy over the next two years. They discussed the possibility of bipartisan action and how a Republican House could influence energy and environmental agencies.

Plugged In
S3E10: What will a split government mean for energy in 2023?

Plugged In

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 20:53


On this special edition of the "Plugged In" podcast, hosts Neil Chatterjee and Breanne Deppisch discuss the outcome of the midterm elections and what a Democratic-led Senate and Republican-led House will mean for the energy space in the new year.   The two also dive into the 11th-hour decisions of COP27 in Egypt and NERC's 2022 Winter Reliability Assessment.  Happy Thanksgiving! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Navigating Our World
The Energy Transition: Why Solar?

Navigating Our World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 29:41


I'm recording this as tens of thousands of people and more than 100 heads of state are gathering in Egypt for the COP27 climate summit – the United Nations “conference of the parties.” In his opening remarks at COP27, the UN Secretary General framed the fight against global warming as a battle for human survival; he said “We are on a highway to climate hell with our foot on the accelerator... Humanity has a choice: cooperate or perish.”I'm Erika Pagel. I'm the Chief Investment Officer for Sustainable Investing and a portfolio manager at Brown Advisory. As investors, we know that climate risk is real. And we know that we cannot achieve real climate action without a material shift to renewable energy sources. So, as we think about driving toward a lower carbon economy during this NOW series on the energy transition, we want to understand different opportunities and different perspectives across the energy landscape. In this episode we are diving into renewable infrastructure – as it stands today, as well as the opportunities going forward – in the US, in Europe, and in developing economies.Among renewables, solar power is growing rapidly. In the US, solar is expected to account for almost half of new electric generating capacity this year. Meanwhile, the Inflation Reduction Act is expected to create significant job growth to build out solar and other renewable infrastructure.Against this backdrop, I sat down with Raghu Belur, the Co-founder and Chief Products Officer of Enphase Energy.Enphase has revolutionized the solar industry through its super-efficient microinverter technology. The company dominates the US solar residential market and has evolved to focus on “smart” systems that enable homeowners to manage their own energy usage – to save money and create climate resilience.Raghu is at heart an innovator and – as you will hear – is passionate about the opportunities that solar offers – in terms of economics, job creation, and energy security – as well as climate action. Raghu says “first and foremost, coal needs to go away” and prescribes a future where solar and other renewable energy sources enable people around the world to thrive while decreasing our reliance on fossil fuels.Let's dive into the conversation.---As investors, we know that climate risk is real—and that we cannot achieve real climate action without a material shift to renewable energy sources. So, as we think about driving toward a lower carbon economy, we want to understand different opportunities and perspectives across the energy landscape. In this episode we are diving into renewables and, specifically into solar power. Brown Advisory's Erika Pagel sits down with Raghu Belur, the Co-founder and Chief Products Officer of Enphase Energy, which has revolutionized the solar industry through its super-efficient microinverter technology and dominates the U.S. solar residential market. Erika and Raghu explore solar—in terms of economics, job creation, energy security and climate action.---The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the speaker(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of Brown Advisory. These views are not intended to be and should not be relied upon as investment advice and are not intended to be a forecast of future events or a guarantee of future results. The information provided in this podcast is not intended to be and should not be considered a recommendation or suggestion to engage in or refrain from a particular course of action or to make or hold a particular investment or pursue a particular investment strategy, including whether or not to buy, sell, or hold any of the securities mentioned. It should not be assumed that investments in such securities have been or will be profitable. There is a risk that some or all of the capital invested in any such securities may be lost. This piece is intended solely for our clients and prospective clients, is for informational purposes only, and is not individually tailored for or directed to any particular client or prospective client.ESG considerations are one of multiple informational inputs into the investment process, alongside data on traditional financial factors, and so are not the sole driver of decision-making. ESG analysis may not be performed for every holding in every strategy. ESG considerations that are material will vary by investment style, sector/industry, market trends and client objectives. Certain strategies seek to identify issuers that they believe may have desirable ESG outcomes, but investors may differ in their views of what constitutes positive or negative ESG outcomes. As a result, certain strategies may invest in issuers that do not reflect the beliefs and values of any particular investor. Certain strategies may also invest in companies that would otherwise be screened out of other ESG oriented portfolios. Security selection will be impacted by the combined focus on ESG assessments and forecasts of return and risk.

Roofing Road Trips with Heidi
Mark Gies - How the Inflation Reduction Act is Affecting Solar

Roofing Road Trips with Heidi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 27:59


Heidi J. Ellsworth sits down with Mark Gies of S-5! in this very relevant Roofing Road Trip to talk about how the recently passed Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) will be affecting the solar and metal roofing markets.  Mark has seen firsthand that metal roofs are the best place to install solar panels because of their long service life.  The team at S-5! is seeing a growing interest in solar since the announcement of the many incentives now available through the Inflation Reduction Act and subsequently expect to see the metal roofing sector continue to grow as a result.  Don't miss this leading-edge podcast that can help you prepare your business for more solar and more metal roofing. Learn more at RoofersCoffeeShop.com! Sign up for the Week in Roofing!

My Climate Journey
Jill Tauber, Earthjustice

My Climate Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 56:50


Today's guest is Jill Tauber, Vice President of Litigation for Climate and Energy at Earthjustice. Earthjustice is the premier nonprofit public interest environmental law organization. They wield the power of law and the strength of partnership to protect people's health, preserve magnificent places and wildlife, advance clean energy, and to combat climate change. The work they do is not only extremely important, but also in the thick of relevant topics we're seeing at the moment. One that comes to mind is permitting. We need to move quickly on building clean infrastructure, but at the same time we need to be mindful of communities where this infrastructure is being built. Community members should have a voice in these projects and we have to build them in a way that's not harmful to people living around them. This is just one example. In this episode, we cover Jill's journey to doing the work that she does, and we also dig into Earthjustice and their criteria for projects they take on. We cover Jill's views on the role of fossil fuels in the clean energy transition, and of course the Inflation Reduction Act bill permitting, barriers holding us back, changes that could unlock faster progress, and where Earthjustice fits into all of this now and in the future. The earth certainly needs a good lawyer and we're stoked to have Jill share her journey with us. In this episode, we cover: [3:14] An overview of Earthjustice[4:18] Jill's background and climate journey[7:43] How Earthjustice determines which projects to take on[9:34] Jill's thoughts on the role of fossil fuels[12:48] Balancing energy stability and reliability as we usher in the clean transition[20:01] Unintended consequences of regulation[25:10] Need for better government and developer planning[30:26] How Earthjustice works with experts to evaluate various projects[34:23] Example case on a new gas plant in Indiana[38:39] Jill's thoughts on the IRA[43:03] Systems level changes that would be impactful to Earthjustice's work[47:03] The role of innovation and technology that will help clean energy win[49:32] Jill's thoughts on activismGet connected: Jason's TwitterJill's TwitterEarthjustice Twitter / TikTokMCJ Podcast / Collective*You can also reach us via email at info@mcjcollective.com, where we encourage you to share your feedback on episodes and suggestions for future topics or guests.Episode recorded on October 27, 2022.

Canusa Street - Intersecting the Canada U.S. Relationship
The Wild North American Marketplace

Canusa Street - Intersecting the Canada U.S. Relationship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 29:52


Autos are back on the agenda as Chris and Scotty welcome Rob Wildeboer, Executive Chairman and Co-Founder of Martinrea International Inc., for a private sector perspective on supply chain near-shoring, electric vehicles, and North American opportunity in the wake of the Inflation Reduction Act and the Russian Invasion of Ukraine.

Strap on your Boots!
Episode 164: Zero to CEO: The national security aspects of the nuclear industry with John Cash

Strap on your Boots!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 16:46


In this episode of Zero to CEO I speak to Uranium Industry Expert John Cash about the national security aspects of the nuclear industry and the ongoing uranium bull market despite near-term geopolitical volatility. John is the thought leader in the uranium industry, with nearly 30 years of experience in uranium exploration, radiation safety, regulatory and legislative affairs, uranium recovery operations, and international trade, as well as extensive management experience. He will be discussing about the uranium geopolitics and national security aspects of the nuclear industry Green energy. We also discuss the anticipated growth in the Uranium industry as Europe and Asia move to a greater reliance on nuclear energy for domestic and carbon-free power needs. Lastly, we discuss the innovations to improve safety and reduce our environmental footprint while reducing costs.

WISterhood
42. Breaking Down Major Climate Legislation in the Inflation Reduction Act

WISterhood

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 40:28


This week, we break down the measures in the Inflation Reduction Act passed this summer to help move towards climate resilience, and what that can mean for us as individuals! You can email us at podcast@womeninsciencepdx.org and follow us @women_in_science_pdx on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

Tax Chats
How will corporations respond to the tax on book income? A chat with Todd Castagno

Tax Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 37:38


Todd Castagno, an equity research analyst at Morgan Stanley, responds to a list of possible ways corporations might  react  to the tax on book income recently passed as part of the Inflation Reduction Act.  

The Alan Sanders Show
Biden's BS energy tax credits and fighting a weaponized federal government

The Alan Sanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 38:57


Today I open with a prepared speech President Joe Biden delivered regarding all of the wonderful tax credits we will be able to get if we renovate our homes. With a gleam in his eye and drool from the corner of his mouth, Biden sang the praises of the start of the Inflation Reduction Act. As part of it's incentives, you can qualify for a $600 tax credit for installing new, energy efficient windows. You can get $500 credit for new doors. If you install a brand new heat pump, you could qualify for up to $2000 in tax credits. Replacing your electric panel could be worth $600 in credits. And, to top it all off, you can get 30% credit off the total cost of installation, up to $7500, for installing solar panels. On top of that, Biden asks you to think about all of the energy savings you'll have when you get rid of all those drafty windows and doors. Yes, folks, savings of a few hundred dollars a year. It will only cost $20,000 in renovation costs for just the windows, doors and heat pump, but you'll qualify for up to $3100 in tax credits that you won't even be able to claim until you file you 2023 taxes, which is before April 15 of 2024! These people in Washington, D.C. live in an insulated bubble, which seems devoid of any semblance of reality. Joe...can I call you Joe? Joe, if I had $20,000+ lying around, don't you think I wouldn't be worrying about how to pay the monthly energy bill in the first place? Now, let's add a solar panel project that would likely run north of $25,000 just to qualify for the full 30% tax credit, worth $7500 the following year. The utter stupidity on display is astounding. Congressman Chip Roy (R-TX) has had it with the Biden Administration who has 'weaponized the federal government against the American people.' He's right. It's no longer just against the right or political opposition. If this is allowed to continue, it is going to affect all Americans. Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO) demonstrates just how weaponized the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security have become with just a few comments to FBI Director Wray and Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. It's almost like he's reading from a dystopian novel, not describing the current Standard Operating Procedures for the federal government. Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) also added to the conversation, reminding us of the blatant corruption of the Biden Crime Family. I had also wanted to go into the Elon Musk story and how so many Twitter employees were leaving, but I ran out of time. I wanted to give a shout out to my buddy, Sam Janney who is an editor with Twitchy. I promise I'll get into that next week as we lead up to Thanksgiving. Take a moment to rate and review the show and then share the episode on social media. You can find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GETTR and TRUTH Social by searching for The Alan Sanders Show. You can also support the show by visiting my Patreon page!

Political Climate
What a Divided Government Means for Climate Policy

Political Climate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 30:34


The 2022 midterm elections are officially behind us. Democrats overcame historical trends to keep control of the Senate, while Republicans won a majority in the House by a surprisingly narrow margin. Ultimately, there was no red wave. There wasn't really a “green wave” either. Democrats ushered through an ambitious legislative agenda, with President Biden signing historic bills to tackle climate change, build resilient infrastructure, and accelerate the deployment of American-made clean energy. Yet these issues got relatively little play this election cycle – for or against.Have we entered a new era for climate politics? Could there even be room for collaboration? Or will a divided government post-election give new life to old debates? Political Climate hosts Julia Pyper, Shane Skelton and Brandon Hurlbut dig into the midterm results, discuss what they got right — and wrong — in their election predictions, and break down what it all means for the future of climate policy in America. Listen and subscribe to Political Climate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or pretty much wherever you get podcasts! Follow us on Twitter at @Poli_Climate.Recommended reading:Wesleyan Media Project: Advertising Issue SpotlightThe Atlantic: Wait, Why Wasn't There a Climate Backlash?Canary Media: How Democratic state wins in the midterms could rev up climate progressWaPo: How different groups voted according to exit polls and AP VoteCast***Political Climate is brought to you by MCE. Today, MCE offers nearly 40 Bay Area communities almost twice as much renewable energy as the state average. The power of MCE is about more than clean energy — it's the power of people over profit. Learn more at mceCleanEnergy.org.Support for Political Climate also comes from Climate Positive, a podcast from Hannon Armstrong, the first U.S. public company solely dedicated to investing in climate solutions. The Climate Positive podcast features candid conversations with the leaders, innovators and changemakers driving our climate-positive future. Listen and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Building Local Power
Breaking Bad Energy

Building Local Power

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 40:27


The three members from ILSR's energy team engage in a riveting conversation on the biggest energy stories from 2022, including the Inflation Reduction Act's big funding for solar, the antimonopoly focus in the Biden administration, how utility companies are continuing to use their financial power to lobby against energy, and a new tool designed to bring distributed solar to more communities.… Read More

Hi 5
Trending News – Nov 17, 2022

Hi 5

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 15:59


In this minisode, Mindy and Ryan take a break from the 2023 sector trends to discuss the initial midterm election results and potential impacts on healthcare. This episode begins with a breakdown of the current state of the Senate and House before the election (0:48). Ryan then provides an overview of the initial midterm election results as we understand them (1:11) before diving into the healthcare topics that were front and center in this election cycle (2:00), specifically noting surprise outcomes in Kentucky (4:05) and South Dakota (4:55). With this new congress in mind, Mindy and Ryan discuss the potential future of the Inflation Reduction Act (5:55) and other healthcare impacts in 2023 and beyond (8:15). The conversation transitions to focus on election results at the state level (11:40) before summarizing key takeaways from the midterm elections overall (14:00).  Podcast Tags: healthcare, healthcare news, public health, election, Medicaid, midterm elections Source Links:  https://www.statnews.com/2022/11/07/health-science-midterms-what-were-watching/ https://www.statnews.com/2022/10/27/republican-ideas-to-reform-medicare-could-rile-health-care-industry/ https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payers/what-divided-congress-could-mean-healthcare-next-year https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-most-urgent-science-health-and-climate-issues-in-the-2022-midterm-elections/  For additional discussion, please contact us at TrendingHealth.com or share a voicemail at 1-888-VYNAMIC.  Mindy McGrath, Healthcare Industry Advisor  mindy.mcgrath@vynamic.com  Ryan Hummel, Executive and Head of Provider Sector ryan.hummel@vynamic.com

The Clean Energy Show
Fossil Fuel Assets Worthless by 2036; Hydroponic Wheat; Electric Truck Stops

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 56:43


Electric truck stops will need as much power as a small town. Heat pumps mandatory in new homes in Washington State. Indoor hydroponic wheat produces 6 crops per year on the same land. LaGuardia Airport will host a pilot project that uses a flywheel to speed up EV charging. SpaceX buys ads on Twitter. Could Tesla be next? Battery espionage in Canada by China.  Tesla proposes a North American charging standard. Should ICE trucks pay highway tolls? New study could show how batteries can have 20% more life cycles (and therefore lower prices). Half the world's fossil fuel assets could become worthless by 2036. The price of hydrogen at the pump in California has risen 33%. We compare gas and electric alternatives. Tony Seba has our Tweet of the Week: Percision fermentation land area to replace all the cows. Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Transcript Hello, and welcome to Episode 139 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. This week, an indoor wheat experiment is a big success. A new crop is harvested six times a year. Wish my hair did that. Heat pumps are now mandatory in new homes in Washington state. Also mandatory cheering for the Seattle Kraken electric truck stops will need more power than a small town. What about the same amount of meth? LaGuardia Airport will host a pilot project that uses a flywheel to speed up EV charging. This partnership makes perfect sense, because if there's one thing LaGuardia is known for, its speed. All that and more on this week's edition of The Clean Energy Show. Welcome, everyone, to what I think is the best podcast on the Internet everywhere. It's objectively true. Objectively true. I think so. Right now, this is a particular moment. And also on this week's show, Brian, we also have stuff about SpaceX. It's buying ads on Twitter because it's CEO bought Twitter. And we wonder if Tesla could be next, because Tesla has never advertised near her SpaceX. So maybe this could break ground for that. We'll see. The first case of battery espionage has been discovered in Canada. Hydrogen pump prices are going up 33% in California, half the world's fossil fuel assets could become worthless by 2036. So keep that in mind when investing today. How are you? I'm good. So just an update on my house. So I applied for the Greener Homes grant here in Canada to do energy upgrades to my house. All right. Hoping to put in an air source heat pump, get rid of my natural gas. And so the first step of that is the blower door test and kind of home energy evaluation. And that all happened today. So that was fun. They put the big blower in the door. They test the air tightness of the house. So they got this doorshaped mass that goes all over the door with a hole for the blower. And the blower only, right? Yeah. And it blows air in or out, I can't remember. And then they could also go around the house with the sort of infrared camera thing and with the blower on, kind of show you where the leaks are in the house. It's wintertime now. It's super cold out. Oh, well, then it will be sucking. It will be sucking it. And the air will be coming in through the window cracks and things like that. Yeah. So did they go around with a smoker? No smoker. Just this infrared thing. Maybe they use a smoker more in the summer. Okay, well, they didn't use a smoker on mine, and they didn't do that on mine. They didn't go around. So what did you find out? Not too much yet. They have to sort of crunch all the numbers because they do a volumetric assessment of the house where they calculate the interior volume of the house. So then they have to go and take the measurements that they got from the blower door, do some calculations, figure it out, and you get kind of like an Energy Star rating for your home. And we did this about ten years ago when we did some upgrades. It was a similar program. So they give you a number, I think it's out of 100 of what your energy efficiency is, and then as you make improvements, you hope to they do the blower door test again when you're all done, and you hope to increase the sort of Energy Star rating of your house. This is mostly for air ceiling, right? Yeah, and we could see that a little bit with the infrared camera. But we will hopefully do some more upgrades. It's the main thing we want to do is the air source heat pump, and we should get the grant for that kind of regardless of what the blower door result is. I told you last week there's a TV series shooting across the street from me, and they were actually outdoors shooting today, so I was worried the blower would they come knock on our door. Because you're a film, you know, the film community. Old man stalked and wanting money to shut down his blowers so we could continue our production, because people do that on the streets. They'll run their muscle cars and have to get paid off get paid off to shut it down because the film crew needs quiet. And I watched The Godfather yesterday, which I hadn't seen in many, many years. Let me guess. Blue Ray, 4k? Exactly. It's this restored version. It's quite cool. They did extensive restoration, but a lot of that movie is ADR. I sort of didn't remember that, but ADR being dialogue replacement, where a lot of the dialogue was replaced in post production. Like, a lot of it, like, way more than half, I think. Wow. So it was a low budget film, more or less, wasn't it? Yeah, I guess that would be the reason. Like, lots of location shooting and lots of extraneous noises. But yeah, that was sort of the surprise on that one for me. Did you just notice it more this time, or what? Yes, I haven't seen it in 2030 years. You were just a child then, really. I mean, you naive. You accepted everything as reality. Yes. I wish I was that. It's a fascinating if you're interested, on the Bluray, and there's these special features about how they had to restore it because the film, when it came out in 72, was just wildly more popular than anybody expected. And whenever that happens, they have to run more prints so that they have to make more prints of the film. So the original negative, even though it's only 50 years old, I ended up getting totally ruined. And the restoration that they had to do was to the point where they were going and taking outtakes they were taking outtakes and cutting them back into the film because certain shots were damaged. And with the approval of the director, you can do that kind of weird thing. Oh, wow. I don't know how I feel about that. You get used to a film that would stand out to you. It shouldn't be in any way that you notice it's like literally like just a shot of somebody walking down the hallway or okay, that's different. It's nothing important. You know, my childhood home has been destroyed. There was an explosion in Regina. That was your childhood home. No, it wasn't, but it was built next to my childhood home. And when I say childhood home, I mean I lived there for three months with great eight. My brother lived there, and I left home in grade eight and went and lived with him and found out he had a girlfriend who became his wife, who eventually became his ex wife. That building, which is a brick, three story apartment building with, I think, you know, twelve suites, and it was, has to be demolished now because the house next door blew out. Well, it was kind of like an apartment building that they were building right when I was living there, I think. And it's like a four suite housing, but nobody was living there. The whole thing blew up, rain off the ground, boom. And the only person who was injured was somebody who didn't live there, who lived somewhere. That window broke. But this is a story. Kids at Natural Gas caused this explosion with solar and wind have never caused an explosion. You know, I had my first clean energy show dream the other night, and it was a paraphrase in the first one. Brian, I was in the backseat of your Tesla. You got out and I was concerned. Did he hit the brake? You got in front of the car and the car ran over you. And I think I was watching Breaking Bad because I'm just now watching Breaking Bad, and there was a scene of a car running over somebody. So the same crunch for Breaking Bad was there, and I didn't think it went well for you. There's another part of the dream. For some reason, I was in this giant mansion with all kinds of celebrities around people, and I was ready to record my end of the podcast. And we couldn't find you. It was just not to be found. Like I said earlier, SpaceX, as a guest, has bought a package to advertise its Starlink Internet service on Twitter. Now, SpaceX has never advertised before. Starlink has never advertised before. Tesla famously does not advertise because its CEO has always said that the car sells itself. Until this point, it continues to do so. But I wonder, Brian, I wonder if either to prop up the company he bought, or could this be the first time that Tesla actually buys advertising on Twitter? Could that happen one of these days. Well, the explanation I heard was that he wanted to test the efficacy of advertising on Twitter. So they also bought ads on, like, Facebook and Instagram at the same time to kind of see how the Twitter kind of advertising scheme works. But it is a sort of demand lever that Tesla could employ. They still have a big backlog of orders, so demand is super strong. But if demand ever starts to slip, once they start producing more and more vehicles, they could start advertising to if the demand ever does start to slip, I guess the first thing they would probably do is lower prices because they've been raising prices because the demand has been too high. The first thing they would do is back off in those price increases and maybe go even a bit further if they had to. I imagine they're going to I mean, they've got three factories around the world which are going to hit their stride pretty soon, right? Or is it more than 03:00 a.m. I counting wrong, I guess technically four, if you count three months. Yeah. And there was an Arranium, what people think is an Iranians report that Tesla was going to sell the Chinese made cars in the United States. Some of them. I've long predicted that ever since I saw what's his name? Sandy Monroe. Sandy Monroe live his channel. Yeah, he said that from what he understood and he has expertise in Chinese manufacturing and has consulted with automakers over there that 20% less is what the Tesla can make in China. Like, they'll save 20% on the price of the car. And it turns out that the Chinese manufacturing is really good because they're bringing the Chinese manufacturing people over to the States to say, why can't we be as productive as you? Did you ever see that documentary called what was it called? I don't know. It was a factory. It was produced by Obama, and it was about Chinese companies that decided to take advantage of tax breaks in Ohio or somewhere to bring back an automotive factory or a factory that was in an automotive town in, I don't want to say Ohio, somewhere like that. And they just could not get the productivity. They couldn't understand it, but they couldn't no matter what they did, they finally threw in the towel, I think, and went home, and they visited the factory in China and man, what a different culture. What a different work culture. Everything is like calisthenics and unanimity and one team. I don't like that. I wouldn't want to work there. But as a manufacturer, it seems like quite an advantage, and it seems to be effective. Yeah. Well, the Tesla Shanghai factory is now operating at a run rate of about a million vehicles a year, so it is likely the largest car factory in the world. And they've gotten there in pretty short time. It's only been a couple of years that they've been producing cars. And it's true that demand in China is down a little bit, and they did cut the prices in Japan a little bit, or sorry, in China a little bit too, because the demand is slipping. But yeah, and they export those cars currently to Europe, but the Germany factory is going to start filling those orders. So those Chinese cars, if there's too many of them for the Chinese market, will have to go somewhere. I don't think it would be North America, because the Texas factory will start filling that in, but more cars to go to Australia or Japan or wherever. But on the other hand, Brian, you've got the Cyber truck coming and the Tesla semi. So maybe you could take one of those lines and start spitting out Model YS or something from China. Or maybe you make the X and the S, which are lower volume. It's more likely, like the next model that's coming, like they'll eventually be a lower cost model. So I assume they're planning for that in China, and they could start making more variants, too, like longer range variants as well. Sure. So, from Bloomberg, a 35 year old Hydro Quebec employee who worked on battery materials research has been charged with espionage for allegedly obtaining trade secrets for China. Well, he's in Kandiac, Quebec. He has a Chinese sounding name. So I don't know if he was originally from China or if he's an immigrant worker or what his nationality is for sure, but he was arrested following an investigation that they get in August. I'm concerned about the Chinese government. They have no shame when it comes to these things. There's some car companies in China accused of duplicating Tesla's, blatantly copying them, and a lot, even down to the software, this is the first time this happened. But it seems like they'll do anything to be competitive. And as we've mentioned before so Hydro Quebec, that's the electricity utility in Quebec, the provincially owned utility, but they've done a lot of research into batteries and battery materials, and they own a lot of patents in that. So I guess whatever they own there at Hydro Quebec was valuable enough to be espionaged. And it's a highly competitive batteries are highly competitive. But if they have, who knows what hasn't been caught? Because it seems like there's been more and more instances of this. And of course there's computer espionage and all that sort of thing. That's a concern for all countries, it seems like you have to put a lot of money into that. What do you think? This is why I asked, Brian. What do you think about things that I don't know what to think about? So, Brian Tesla has proposed a North American charging standard. Now, those of you who are new to the game, there is basically two charging ports in North America, CCS and Tesla. Tesla has its own charging network, which is the largest and most consistent, but it's got a different connector, so that's a problem. But it's amazing how great that connector is, right? Because it's small. If you compare it side by side to what everybody else is using for all the other cars, my car included, it's like half the size, but it's basically when you charge your car, you can do DC Direct, fast current fast charging at public charging stations, or you can AC charge at home. But what I didn't realize until today is they only have two pins on there that does both. So that's why it's lighter and smaller. They've figured out a way to do both now and the connector, it's more like a quarter the size of the CCS connector. So I think it'd be a fantastic idea. It's definitely the better standard of the two. So if North America were to standardize on the Tesla charging socket, I think that would be fantastic. Question is it might be a bit too late. Like Tesla could have maybe released this a couple of years ago, a couple of years ago, five years ago. A better chance at this. Yeah. So disappointing. Too little, too late, because it's probably not going to happen now. Probably not. But what Tesla said in their press release was that some of the, they've been talking already to the companies that make the charging networks, the chargers for the third party networks that normally are CCS. And it sounds like they have some plans already to incorporate the Tesla connector onto those. So, I don't know, there is some hope, but it's probably too late. And CCS will likely be two standards in North America, CCS and Tesla. Part of this is the federal government in the United States is giving a lot of money to expand the charging networks. But when you do that, you have to have more than one charging standard, more than one car company that uses it. So if just one car company, any car company that sells maybe ten cars a year adopted Tesla's in the clear, they don't have to make the GCs ones, and they could get all the government subsidies for just making their charges that they already make. Now the government could go and tweak that fine print. Okay, so here's another one for you. This is a clean technical op ed. It says Tolling the highway to green trucking. Should tolls be implemented on combustion semi trailers once EVs are on the road. Do you think that would be an effective way to do it? Well, I don't think you'll have to. It's kind of like the cost of running a combustion truck will already be more expensive, so there's already a kind of a penalty just for using one. So an extra toll probably not needed. I mean, what's needed is faster production of the electric trucks and get those on the road. That's the thing. This is assuming price parity, that the cost of ownership is going to be the same, right? Well, charging lithium ion cells at different rates boost the lifetime of battery packs for electric vehicles. So says yet another Stanford study. We have so many Stanford studies on the show. According to the study, batteries managed with this new technology could handle at least 20% more charge discharge cycles, even with frequent fast charging, which puts an extra strain on the battery. So basically they're saying don't charge each of the individual cells at the same rate all the time. And that actually gives you 20% longer life. And 20% longer life if you're talking about a fleet of cars of a million cars and a robotxis, or storage for the electrical grid that lasts twelve years instead of ten, the costs on those greatly changes with doing this basically a software tweak. So that seems quite to me, it seems like it's got a lot of potential if it works, yes. That's exciting. There's a lot that can be done with software. It isn't just the hardware components of a battery or the chemistry's, or the chemistry is where you can improve the life. Yeah, the software can have a big benefit. So Ford is officially the number two electric vehicle seller in the United States. And if you extrapolate out the twelve months of a year, based on what they had in October, ford would achieve 75,000 EV sales. Which is what's, Tesla right now? Close to a million. Close to a million. So that's not much, but that's what your number two is. A lot of people wouldn't have picked for it to be number two right now. They would have took GM or more likely Volkswagen. And that points back to our previous conversations about the connectors. Standardizing on the Tesla connector has a fighting chance just because Tesla vehicles are so ubiquitous in North America in terms of EVs. Another thing I wanted to talk about is electric truck stops will need as much power as a small town. So as Tesla rose out, it's semi next month, hopefully, I think December 1 is when they're having the release. Are you looking forward to that one? Yeah. Do you think something special could roll out of the back of that truck? I hadn't thought of that. The tesla ebike. The robotic musk. I don't know. I do. Social media platform and we'll roll out the back of the truck. Yeah. So it's adding pressure on the truck industry to go green. But the grid upgrades must start now if the new era is to last. This is from Bloomberg, and sometimes these stories make me wonder if that is all accurate. But a sweeping new study. This is another study of highway charging requirements conducted by utility company National Grid Plc. Researchers found that by 2030 electrifying, a typical highway gas station will require as much power as a professional sports stadium. And I would think sports stadiums use less now with all the Led lighting, but it's probably better. But I know our city built a new football stadium a few years ago, and I don't know if you noticed, but they're all kinds of electrical transformer boxes outside the stadium. They hid them in the park. There's a park next to the stadium and they had to try and hide all of these electrical transformer boxes. And there's a lot of them. And the power used to go out on the old stadium we had here. This is a stadium we have for the Canadian Football League, by the way. Okay, so this is just for electrified passenger vehicles. As more electric trucks hit the road, the projected power needs for a big truck stop by 2035 will equal that of a small town. And they think that lots of wiring will have to be done. Nobody really knows how this is going to play out with trucks. Like, is there going to be specialized newly built truck stops? Because truck stops are a thing. You have a shower, you park the truck for a while. It's a truck resting stop as well. So I don't know. How do you think that will play out, if you had to guess? Well, there's usually a decent amount of space at existing truck stops, so I assume there's enough room at the existing truck stops to kind of transform them and have both fuel and electric. Hopefully they have started working on that already. Now, just to tag onto that, I want to skip ahead to the story about LaGuardia Airport. Sure. Because I think it sort of makes me think of the same issue. So there's a story here from Electrac about zoo's power that's got this machine with a flywheel. And this is being installed at LaGuardia Airport to facilitate fast charging of cars, rental cars particularly. And yeah, I bring it up because the reason this machine exists is that the power available in certain locations can be limited. Right. Like if these truck stops are going to need all the power of a small town, well, you don't necessarily have the grid infrastructure where you need it. I don't think this does an enormous amount. Like, it's not going to triple or quadruple the amount of power available. But the idea behind this zoos flywheel machine is that it literally uses flywheels. And we talked about this before. Some power plants use flywheels as well. It's literally just the momentum of a spinning wheel to help kind of even the power output of your hydroelectric dam or whatever. Anyway, so I guess the idea being that you take a limited amount of power that might be available in a parking lot at an airport, and then you use this flywheel machine. And some by spinning up the flywheels, you can increase the amount of power available. It's sort of similar to having batteries on site. I would think that's going to be the more normal solution. Like at these truck stops, would be to put a big battery pack, a grid storage battery pack at a truck stop. But this is a kind of a smaller and cheaper way to add just a bit more power to what's available for your fast chargers. So with hertz ordering a couple of hundred thousand electric vehicles from Tesla and GM, I wonder how the infrastructure at airports is going to go. I mean, nobody is panicking about that, but I mean that's going to have to be built up presumably, and larger airports will have a lot of cars sitting there with batteries. You would have the chance in the low demand because most flights happen 06:00 a.m. To midnight or whatever. You could have 6 hours to when people aren't taking those cars, maybe to charge off the batteries for the next day. And that would yeah, I can see that being an important thing unless they have some off site, like just off the airport type of parking spaces for charging. Yeah, and like our parking spaces here in Canada at our airports, a lot of them are probably already electrified where we live because it's super cold in the winter and so you have plugins for block heaters. So at least there's power running to these parking lots. Whereas of course, in many places there would be no power running there at all. Half the world's fossil fuel assets could become worthless by 2036 in a net zero transition. So says an article in the Guardian that I read. $11 Trillion in Fossil Fuel Asset Crash could Cause a 2008 financial crisis, warrants a new study. I don't care. Yeah, that's my hot. Take it. Yeah. It's something I really wonder about and think about. Like, obviously these assets are going to become stranded and worthless at some point or at least the value start crashing at some point. But what point does that start to happen? Is it two years from now? Is it six years from now? Is it 20 years from now? It's hard to say, but I wouldn't want to be holding a lot of fossil fuel investments longer than the next couple of years, that's for sure. I think the big question is when will EVs really take off where there's not a battery constraint? And it sure seems like it's going to be within five years. It could be two years, it could be five years, but somewhere in that period I think it's really going to grab momentum. Yeah, but also too, like, as we've discussed, like last week and other weeks, there's not a lot of new money being spent on new oil exploration because they can kind of foresee, okay, there's not really going to be the demand. It's not worth it to spend this money building. So that does mean that the supply of oil will be kind of naturally constrained if the system doesn't expand. So it could be that as the oil industry shrinks, the production shrinks and if the production shrinks enough, then the price stays up. So countries that are slow to decarbonise will suffer, but early movers will profit. This is something we say on the show all the time. You have to move now. And our jurisdiction is not great where we live. We live in fossil fuel country with a mentality thereof and our country as a whole starting to make some moves. But we're basically a fossil fuel country in Canada and even the United States to some extent. But it finds that renewables that are freed up investment will more than make up for the losses of the global economy. You're freeing up a whole lack of investment that was going into fossil fuels that can go into other things and expand the economy that way. And just the renewables themselves will save money, of course. So it highlights the risk of producing far more oil and gas than required for future demand, which is estimated to leave 11 trillion to 14 trillion in stranded assets, which is a lot of stranded assets. Brian. Also, as we always say, we predict that governments are going to have to, and therefore you and I are going to have to pay for the clean up of some of these wells as well. So the most vulnerable assets are those in remote regions are technically challenging environments. Most exposed are Canadian tar sands in northern Alberta, us shale and the Russian Arctic, followed by deep offshore wells in Brazil and elsewhere. And North Sea oil is also relatively expensive to extract and it's going to be hit when demand falls. I'm worried about this because it could affect us as being an oil part of the world, it says. In contrast, current oil, gas and coal importers such as the EU, japan, India and South Korea will reap hefty economic dividends from the transition because they will be able to use the money they save on spending those places, spending gobs of money. We get our gas cheap here in North America, but they're spending gobs of money on fuel purchases and they'll be able to use that money to invest in their own economies. The lead author of the report said in the worst case scenario, people will keep investing in fossil fuels until suddenly the man they expected does not materialize and they realize that what they own is worthless. And we could see a financial crisis on the scale of 2008. Houston Detroit could have the same phase detroit did in the car industry collapsed earlier in this century. So yeah, it's got to be carefully managed. If you don't accept that all this is going to happen like people around here, yeah, it's going to be a problem. That's what I have to say about that. Yeah. And when your oil is expensive to extract like it is in the Alberta oil sands, that stuff will be the first to go because you won't be able to sell it at. A profit. So you've got another heat pump story. Heat pumps are the item of the year. I say yes, absolutely. No, it's amazing how even when this podcast started a couple of years ago, it was barely in our vernacular. It was barely in the vernacular. Yes. And now it's everywhere. So yes, electric is reporting heat pumps are now mandatory in Washington State for new homes and apartments as well from July 2023 onward. But the thing that I think is interesting about this, and it's not really mentioned in the story, we talked about the incredible heatwave that happened last summer on the west coast of North America. So Seattle area, Vancouver area, they're just an unprecedented heatwave because of climate change. And so many of those homes and places and businesses and apartments are not cooled. So this is the other benefit of this. So not only do you start heating your homes with electricity, but you also in Washington State now are adding essentially mandatory air conditioning, which, especially if it's low income apartments or something, would be a godsend for people who are hopefully won't. I mean, there was literally thousands of people died from the heat stroke on the west coast last summer. Well, that's an interesting take in a region that doesn't have air conditioning. And yet with climate change, we can see this happening a lot more often and now they'll be prepared. That's an interesting aspect of the story and I have to wonder if it was even part of the planning. No, I'm not sure. I mean, it depends on when they started talking about this. But one of the great benefits is of a heat pump heating and cooling. You get both in the same machine. So why just put in an air conditioner when you can put in an air conditioner that also runs in reverse and can heat your home as well? And for people who are new to the podcast or this type of thing, heat pumps are reverse air conditioners, essentially that transfer heat from one place to another, like inside the house to outside. And air conditioning or outside, even if there's a little bit of energy in that area, it takes it out. And the idea is to use electricity, which instead of natural gas, right, if you're heating, you want to use electricity and this is the most efficient way to do it. Yes, and in a place like Washington State, a lot of homes are already heated with electricity. Like it's not a frigid cold place like here. So there are more like 99% of homes where we live are heated by natural gas because it's so ridiculously cold. But in a milder climate, you might have electric baseboards in a lot of homes. So it is something like 50% already are heated with electricity in Washington state and this will eventually get it up to 100%. Yeah, that's very interesting. And a very interesting side effect of going green using solar and wind and so forth for your heating, that you will actually probably save lives from a government policy in future heatwaves. Who knows when those heat waves will come, but they're going to come more often, those once in a century type heat waves, or once in a thousand years or 500 years, whatever it was. I want to talk about indoor wheat because we live in a heart of wheat country. You can't swing a cat with a wheat chief. It's on symbols for everything. Where we live, we're the breadbasket of Canada. And what was the name of your first feature film? I made a film called Wheat Soup. There you go. It had to be in the title. It had to be. So this is interesting to us because you know how there's hydroponics like indoor gardening, which I'm fascinated with. They do it in containers, they do it in buildings where they're basically using fertilized water and no soil to grow tomatoes or whatever in greenhouse like conditions. And I find that very interesting, especially when they can do it up north. And by the way, I saw another article in Blueberg about the Yukon. The climate changing, and the people are up there growing potatoes and things that they never used to grow before, and wheat as well, which required a lot of cabbage. And things like that require a lot of sunlight when they have 20 hours sunlight days in June. But, you know, it costs a lot to transport fresh food up there. So it's very expensive and very not fresh. Carrots is another thing that they're growing a lot of potatoes and carrots. So that's great. It's great in one sense because there's an advantage to them. But in this case, indoor wheat. Amsterdam based startup In Farm grew wheat without using soil or chemical pesticides, which is nice, and with far less water than conventional farming, which is also nice. So the first indoor farming company to grow a stable staple crop in a milestone for an Asian industry that has attracted venture capital funding on its promise that its technology can help feed the planet if delivered at scale. Growing a staple crop indoors has the potential to become a game changer. Supplies have increasingly been challenged by climate change and logistical issues. So you could grow well, you could grow wheat in Antarctica if you wanted to, right? If you got this technology down. And Infarm says that its first trial shows that projected annual wheat yields of 117 tons a hectare, okay? Now, that compares to the average 2022 yields of 5.6. So let me give you that again. Indoors, 117 tons hectare annually. Outdoors, 5.6. And in the European Union, it's 3.1. So that's in the European Union, it's actually less than the United States, which surprises me. It's only 3.1. Now, part of that reason of the higher yields is they have six crops a year. Okay? But if you times 3.1 times six, you still don't get 117 tons. So it's just a lot more dense and efficient to do it that way. I mean, it's not easy. We're probably decades away from this being a regular thing and getting the efficiencies and the cost down maybe a couple of decades, it's hard to tell. But, you know, it depends on what the need is, too. But this is interesting. It's going to be perfect, right? You don't spread pesticides on it. You're not going to have to worry about weeds. It's just going to be pure indoor stuff and locally delivered. No. And the more things, of course, you can do locally, then the more transportation that you can eliminate. You know, so many things now that, you know, our produce at the grocery stores just shipped in from incredible distances here. But if all that stuff could be grown locally, it would just be so much more efficient and just kind of save all that energy. I mean, theoretically, you could, in the middle of a desert in Africa, start up an operation like this and make flour or make proteins for food. Basically, you would need water, but you wouldn't need as much of it. So if you could use solar to desalinate water, you could put it anywhere. You could put it in there because we transport all of our grain by ship, which goes by train from the center of the continent out to the coasts and then onto ships. I don't think that this is going to completely replace green farming, but it could augment it. Maybe 100 years from now, it could replace it, but in the near term, this is basically saying that it could just fit in, reduce the challenges of supply, and in certain situations, a lot of land will be required to produce this. Wheat cultivation takes more than 216,000,000 land, more than any other crop. So, yeah, wheat takes a lot of land, which we have a lot of land here. A lot of land. Most of our province is filled with wheat fields. It's kind of insane. So, yeah, they would require very large indoor farms exceeding the area of all the wheat in France, I think. But they said it could potentially increase its yield by another 50% in the coming years, thanks to better technology. So it could even be 200 times or 200 tons instead of three tons. So that's interesting. Yeah. Once they learn what they're doing and tweak it and software can play a part, perhaps. Yeah, it could be amazing. Okay, so starting here from Hydrogen Insight, and this is about hydrogen pump prices in California. So this was something I just had never thought about before now. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles do exist. James, take a guess. How many hydrogen fuel cell vehicles do you think there are in California, which is currently one of the main markets for them? 410. There's $10,000. Okay. Which is not bad. It's kind of more than I expected. And there's a series of hydra. They're not all the Toyota Mariah. What are these vehicles? There's a Toyota Mirai there's a Hyundai. That's really nice. I forget the name of it, but there's a big Hyundai SUV. That's a hydrogen vehicle. They've sold a few of those for sure. Okay. But yeah. So there's hydrogen fueling stations in California, not in too many other places. But I just was interested in this because, yes, recently they had to hike up the price at the pump of these hydrogen, up 33% in California. This is a fairly big price jump. So just in terms of the price per mile, I thought this was really interesting. So right now is basically what it costs you to drive a hydrogen vehicle in California, roughly in a gasoline vehicle down to California has the most expensive gasoline in North America. Yeah, well, no, it's probably more expensive here in Canada. Is it? Because I went there, it was pretty damn expensive. That was a few years ago. So $0.22 for gas per mile and for hydrogen. Plus, you spend a whole bunch more money on your hydrogen car than you do a gas car. It's a serious technology. And then if you're driving an EV and you charge it off the grid, you're down to if you have to use a fast charger like a Tesla Supercharger, then you're up to but that's compared to for driving a hydrogen car. So I just wasn't totally clear on that until now. The actual cost of driving a hydrogen vehicle is more than gas, way more than electricity. Now, theoretically, if we were to SuperBuild out the hydrogen infrastructure and kind of get that all pumping again, locality is a key to that. Like, if each city had its own hydrogen plant or whatever, you had even smaller ones at the filling stations, making the hydrogen there, that would reduce costs a lot. But for right now, it's super expensive to fill up with hydrogen. And I don't see that coming down anytime soon. And the days of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles is probably numbered. If we had no other option, we would be going full steam ahead with hydrogen and trying to get that that still take a while, but we would be trying to get green hydrogen, and then we'll be trying to get that green hydrogen price down so that it would be cost effective. But since we have an alternative to that called battery electric vehicles, electricity is also expensive in California. So if you compare it to other places, it would be even a larger variation there. And as we said, so obviously the electricity for charging your electric car comes from the grid. And there are certain shortfalls at places, perhaps like truck stops that don't have enough grid infrastructure. So it's far from perfect. But any electrical outlet anywhere in the world can charge an electric vehicle. So that's just an insane advantage over these very rare hydrogen stations. Yeah, they're expensive. And transportation and processing of hydrogen is also an issue. So Amazon is getting heat. We get heat for not talking about ebikes sometimes. Well, Amazon is getting heat for selling kits to override speed limits of ebikes. Now, this is mostly happening in Europe, right? Because there's more restrictions in Europe. Europe has strict electric bike laws that limit electric bicycles to a sluggish 25 km an hour or 15.5 mph. Even an old man like me can go well, I can't go 25, actually. It takes the work to go 25. Yeah, that is kind of cool. But solutions range from an electromagnetic modifications or chipping, quote unquote, that can remove digital speed limits. So people do that with cars sometimes, to hardware hacks to trick the bike speed sensors into thinking it's going slower than it truly is. And I haven't been able to find out exactly how that works. So I'm kind of curious. Yeah, I thought maybe you had done that on your bike where it's like you change the setting and it messes up the speedometer, so it ends up sending you faster than it's what you do is you change the wheel size on your bike. Didn't work for mine. It was supposed to, but my bike manufacturer has been kind of savvy to all the tricks, so by the time I get to them, they've figured it out and have eliminated that. But yeah, if you have like a 29 inch wheel and then you tell that it's a kid's wheel of half that size, then it thinks that one rotation is actually going a shorter distance and yes, and then you won't have a proper speed. And I have that FETO electric folding bike and I looked on the Internet and apparently there is a hack that you can do by pressing a certain combination of buttons on the little kind of remote screen there where you can hack it to go faster. But I haven't tried it. And with mine it was a code. It was like an eight digit code that you could type in at a certain place. And that one also did not work. I was curious, but I think the longevity of James is more important than the thrill of maybe trying out a 50 kilometer an hour. That's probably all my bike could do if it really wanted to. It would take a while to get there too. The important thing to remember in all this is you probably don't need your bike to go any faster. No, but what does my bike do? My bike does 32 instead of 25. So that's the next level. I think that's about what mine does. And that's pretty fast. And like I've said before in the show, I get kind of uncomfortable at that speed, and yet some other bastard on an ebike passes me and I think, I wish I had more speed. I start pedaling, which you can do. Apparently you can pedal and use the Ebike part. Well, anyway, I guess Ebike hot rodding as it's called, is much less common in the United States, where E bikes are permitted to go up to 45 km an hour. That's the United States. You can have guns and fast Ebikes or whatever you want. Tanks, cruise missiles, no. And modifying your car. Take out the pollution controls, although they have been cracking down on that lately. Oh, it's time for the Tweet of the week. This is where we pick a Tweet. And this last week was for Tony Siba. It's going to be for Tony Siba again. Okay, I'm sorry. Tony Siba is kind of one of our main people that we follow on the show here. Now, this was a person who was responding to how 5 million, what Tony calls precision fermentation. This is the future of food. He believes that will be disruptive based on price. This is one of the ways that is like beyond meat, that's one aspect. And then there's cellular meat, which will actually resemble steak and the texture of steak in the future, maybe ten years from now, that will be viable financially. But dairy is the first one that's going to be disrupted because glass of milk is 90% water and 3% of that is protein from the milk. So that's really all you're dealing with is that protein because the rest is fat and sugars, which you can get from other places. It doesn't have to be from a cow. So as they make these things in like brewery like buildings and disrupt milk. He says there are 5 million dairy cows in New Zealand. And so that would require 100 precision fermentation factories to replace all the cows. Less if they're bigger, which they will be. So it's just a matter of time and probably less time than most people expect. And Tony. Steve assisted that tweet. Correct. The total land needed to replace all the cows in New Zealand, 5 million of them, which is more than Canada, by the way. I believe we only have a million cows in Canada. I haven't counted lately, but I'm told that it's around a million. The total land needed would be around 1700 acres. But you compare that with the Auckland airport, it's 3700 acres. So basically half the Auckland airport could replace all the dairy cows the land wise. And then you have all that land. You can put solar on and do other things. This is a huge disruption of the world. Yes. If you think of a cow as basically a type of food technology, well, it can be delicious. It's the least efficient food technology. In fact, I think Tony said that the cow in particular is the least efficient of all of the kind of animal food technologies. So we get a lot of things from a cow, but the resources and the land and everything needed to get that is kind of insane and is ripe for disruption. So, as Tony points out, the first disruption will happen in just a few years. And he thinks that dairy will be bankrupt by 2030. And the reason is 30% of his business is business to business. So if you buy a protein shake, you're buying protein powder. Okay? And if it's cheaper to come from this fake stuff, if you can call it that, fermentation than it is from a real dairy cow, and you're greener people are just going to go, where the cheapest? If you want to buy bulk for a protein bar or a protein shake or whatever, all these things that have chocolate bars and everything and all kinds of foods that are processed will have first that will go and then 30% of dairy's gone. Yeah. No. And he mentioned, too, in his latest video, just the switch, like Coke and Pepsi switched from cane sugar to corn sugar back in the 80s. Basically, their entire product lines switching over to corn as the source for sugar. And while there is probably some taste difference, they was definitely not enough taste difference to stop what they were doing, because they completely four years. Four years. They did it in just both yeah. In four years. Complete switch over. And this is the main ingredient in their products? Yes. That means it's time for the lightning round. A quick look at fast paced energy news and climate news from this past week. Growing EV dem demand helps Volkswagen reach half a million ID deliveries one year early. Brian, that is a good news story, isn't it? Yeah, we talked about that a few weeks ago. They're on track for 500,000 deliveries. That's Volkswagen this year of EVs, and that's a huge number. Volvo debuts its first electric trucks made with fossil free steel. That is steel made with green electricity, and it is also 90% recyclable. So that's cool. Yeah. So Volvo was trying to green their whole lineup of vehicles, and they're doing it partly by switching over to electric, but they're also doing it by going with fossil free steel in their cars, which increasingly more and more manufacturers are going to do. Cough 27 news, 41 signatories have joined the pledge to stop funding fossil fuels by the end of year. But problematically. Brian, four large signatories are not signing. Germany, Italy, the United States and your favorite country in the world, canada. No, I'm sorry. Damn, it just sad. Can't overuse that, can I? Okay, it's time for a CS festival. Toyota has sold 4.7 million Priuses to date. That's no easy feat. Tesla did 3 million. But total yeah, that's to date, over the last ten plus years, 4.7 million Priuses are on the road, but nobody buys them anymore. No. Did you see the stat of, like, at one time they were selling 500,000 Priuses a year and it's down to 86,000? Yeah. People who bought them initially wanted an environmentally friendly car or to save money. Best way to be environmentally friendly or to save money is to buy electric now. Or at least electric hybrid. But anyway, solar power already saved China, India, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, the Philippines and Thailand. $34 billion American in potential fossil fuel costs went in the first half of this year. First half of 2022. We're just getting started. That's astonishing. Yeah. I mean, spend your money on solar and then you won't have to spend it on fossil fuels. The US will finance about a third of the $9 billion rooms romania needs to build two nuclear reactors. That's a lot of money. They're getting it from the United States, which seems like a bad investment. I thought I would mention this. Globally up 13%. Okay. That's everywhere in the world. Europe is up 35%. I wonder why. Vladimir, the US is up 15% and China 13%. So this heat pump thing is, whoever makes the most of the best heat pumps, put your money in them because they're going to pay back. No, and I assume that I haven't seen announcements, but I assume that there are heat pump factories being built as we speak. And I don't know, we always hear battery factory announcements and things like that. I don't hear heat pump factory announcements, but presumably it's going on. The demand is huge. Inflation Reduction Act had money for developing better heat pumps, too, so there's going to be some R and D in there. Friend of the show, Greta Thuneburg thoonberg rather. I'm kidding. She's not a friend of the show, but we're working on it slowly. Global Witness found that more than 600 people are at the talks in Egypt at Cop 27. They're linked to fossil fuels. And, Brian, that is more than the combined delegations from the ten most climate impacted countries. Barf, we're at a critical stage now where we got to say no to fossil fuels. Just say no. And we got to stop the green washer, we got to stop the BS right now. Right now. No time left. From Tennessee Valley Authority, that is one of the grids in the southern US. The three giant cooling towers at the retired paradise coal plant in Kentucky came down this morning, was a few mornings ago now as demolition efforts continued at the site. And they say we are striving for a cleaner and more efficient energy future as we are building the energy system of the future. And by God, Brian, we have a clip. Fantastic. Here's the initial charge. The towers are collapsing. They're coming down completely now. And they're gone by the doctor. Goodbye, coal plants. Three cooling towers in Kentucky, a grave risk of winter blackout speaking of nuclear, is happening in France because electricity prices have surged past $1,000 or, pardon me, €1000 per megawatt hour as more nuclear reactors, more are closing in France, as if enough hadn't closed already. What this means, Brian, is, on a cold January day, france needs around 45 gigawatts of nuclear energy, and one day last week, there was only 25 available. Yeah, and there was a lot of reactors down, or at least down partially for repairs. So the amount of electricity from nuclear in France dropped 34% year over year in October. Just less power available from nuclear, which everyone always says it's like reliable base load power. That's one of the reasons it's promoting this is not reliable here. But it's not exactly that. You know, it's the pipes, the cooling pipes that are structurally problematic and cracked, and they realize that they're all bad. So they have this, and it apparently takes a while. They've hired like, 100 contractors to go in and fix this, but it's not that easy. Finally this week, Brian japan's government wants to remotely control private air conditioners to avoid power outages. The Japan Time points out that the government committee is currently working under the concept that the government would only be able to turn down AC units if individual owners have agreed in advance to grant them that authority. This is something we've seen, or, what, the third time now on the show? Yeah. And in Ontario, they're working on this. Here in Canada where remote control california, they do it with text messages where they just tell everybody to stop using so much AC. But this works. And no one really suffers if you shave a degree or two off your air conditioning for an hour and say it's much better than a blackout where you have no air conditioning. So that's not so bad. That is our show for this week. Next week I'll be talking about the new Toyota Prius lineup that will be announced between now and then and what excitement that will be. Because I need a car badly, Brian. Mine's starting to fall apart. My FUS is getting long on the tooth. How disappointed will I be? Tune in to find out. Maybe I should sell you my car. Would you buy my Tesla? Well, the street price for that Tesla, unless there's a murder in it, is not going to be good for me. What if I gave you a really good deal? I'll take two. Why would you want to? It's not the form factor you want, I guess, but I don't care. I would take a Tesla. What would you do for a new car? Buy a why? Yeah, something like that. You think I want to start? What's interesting, what are your interest rates? How quickly do you break legs? We'll sign over. Like making a 20 year loan? Pretty much what it would have to be, I think. Anyway, everyone out there, we thank you for listening. We do appreciate you and we'd love to hear from you. So contact us with anything that's on your mind Cleanenergy show@gmail.com. We are on social media with the handle Clean Energy Pod. We're on TikTok. Check out our TikTok channel. Don't forget to check out our YouTube channel, too, because you know why not? Sometimes you might want to look at things that are shiny. And you can even leave us a voicemail where we get to hear your voice, which is always a thrill for us. Speakpipe.com cleanenergyshow. Remember, subscribe if you're new to the podcast so that you can get new episodes delivered every week. And, Brian, I look forward to next week. you.