Podcasts about Barker

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  • 1,555PODCASTS
  • 4,576EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 1, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Barker

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Latest podcast episodes about Barker

America's Next Top Best Friend
ep 244: the girls go on birthright

America's Next Top Best Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 53:52


join us as we recap australia's next top model, cycle 7, episodes 12 & 13 including: desert heat, DUBAI, georges antoni, the souk, shit stack, bleached brows and drama HSCs.  https://blacklivesmatters.carrd.co/ https://www.the-audacity.com/ https://www.patreon.com/nexttopbestfriend?fbclid=IwAR1YTWcyipBLyEgpj82Ap7f9S5xrRWwZN58Q3ATGQFX3eRbKflizEXQV9wQ nexttopbestfriend@gmail.com https://www.americasnexttopbestfriend.com/ https://www.paypal.me/nexttopbestfriend https://www.instagram.com/nexttopbestfriend/ https://www.facebook.com/nexttopbestfriend/ https://twitter.com/nexttopbestpod amanda: @lochnessmanda (twitter, instagram) hillary: @hillaryous123 (twitter, instagram)

Providence College Podcast
Breaking hearts and minds — Joan Barker '04

Providence College Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 39:03


Joan Barker '04, who majored in French and history, spent much of her career abroad as a government consultant for language and cross-cultural training. Her experience includes two years teaching English to members of the Afghan Air Force, where she got to know many Afghan interpreters. After the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan in August, Barker became an advocate for these vulnerable Afghans left behind, writing op-eds calling for government accountability and organizing aid and assistance. She discussed how her time in the Peace Corps and how The Cowl alumni network helped her get published. Subscribe to the Providence College Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Play, and YouTube.  Visit Providence College on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. 

Bollotta-FIDE
“Turkey Lurkey Time” The Thanksgiving Special with Wayne Barker

Bollotta-FIDE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 69:54


It's Thanksgiving week and we are THANKFUL for all of you that listen to us. Instead of taking the holiday off the crew got Anthony's good friend (Broadway Musical Composer/Arranger/Musical Director/Performer/Educator) Wayne Barker on the line for a grab bag of topics. Anthony and Alex start off with chatter about their travel peeves and experiences. Wayne Barker (Composer of Peter and The Starcatcher) joins us from his personal light tunnel. Anthony puts Wayne on the spot when he asks for his personal knowledge on Thanksgiving and he also delights us with some stories from his theatrical experiences. They talk about Wayne's involvement with the San Francisco Silent Film Festival and gives us some insight on what inspires the musical storytelling as they have live music at every screening. They talk about forward motion on a project with his pal BD Wong, being a plant dad, composing music, his passion for the of the musical improvisation process, famous thanksgiving songs, reading books and bone broth in the bedroom…it's Thanksgiving, people! ASK ANTHONY at www.bollotta.com/podcastFollow @BollottaEntertainment on InstagramJOIN THE LIVE EVENTS COALITION at www.liveeventscoalition.org

Wendys Whinnies
No. 96. Nic Barker, Nutrition for Equines or Feeding Horses 101

Wendys Whinnies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 70:15


Nic owns and runs Rockley Farm, where we specialize in equine lameness rehabilitation, particularly working with horses who have DDFT, collateral ligament, and navicular bone injuries. Since 2004 we have had several hundred horses come through the farm and we have a good success rate in returning horses to the same level of work or higher than before they were injured. Our own horses hunt over the rugged terrain of Exmoor and have hard-working, high performing hooves which I believe have helped to keep them sound over many years of high mileage work. I've written 2 books: "Feet First" and "Performance Hoof, Performance Horse" and have also presented numerous workshops in the UK, US, and New Zealand.

Holiness Preaching Online
Rev. Mark Barker- “pride”

Holiness Preaching Online

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 19:11


Rev. Mark Barker --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/holinesspreachingonline/message

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy
"Thankfulness" - Dr. Jonathan Barker - Sunday Morning - 11/21/2021

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 39:33


Church Podcast – Scandia Bible Church
Our Great Reward [Hebrews 11:5-6]

Church Podcast – Scandia Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


Sermon Notes Date: 11/21/2021 Preacher: Monty Simao, pastor Series: Hebrews Key Text: Hebrews 11:5-6 Description: [Voice Compilation] So all the days that Adam lived were… So all the days of Seth were… So all the days of Enosh were… So all the days of Kenan were… So all the days of Mahalalel were… So all […]

The Ark Fellowship
11-21-2021 Brokenhearted - Rev. Tim Barker

The Ark Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 49:22


Organization: The Ark Fellowship Speaker: Pastor Goodluck Okotie-Eboh City: Cypress State: TX

Not in a Huff with Jackson Huff
#063- Ron Barker: Inside the World of College Sports Scandals From a Former NCAA/Pac-12 Investigator

Not in a Huff with Jackson Huff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 59:21


This week we speak with Ron Barker who was at the forefront of many of the college athletics scandals of the past 20 years. He investigated and uncovered infractions and scandals of athletic programs for the NCAA and later the Pac 12 conference and shares more about that very interesting world. This was a role that he was unable to discuss even with his family for almost two decades. In this interview he talks about his career in this sometimes complicated world and what the experience was like. We also talk about the fictional book he has now written about a very non-fictional situation that happened during his time as an enforcer. This is a must listen for anyone who loves college sports and one that even those who know nothing about college sports will enjoy the mystery and true crime aspects of.--------------------------------------------"The Reluctant Player" book on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B098LXBL49/ref=dbs---------------------------------------------Podcast's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/notinahuffpodcast/Please follow and/or subscribe to the podcast to get the new episodes when they come out each week and rate us on Apple Podcast! :)Have a comment? Email me at NotInAHuffPodcast@gmail.com

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy
"Leaving a Goodly Heritage" - Dr. Jonathan Barker - Sunday Evening - 11/14/2021

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 32:40


Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy
"Stilling the Storms" - Dr. Jonathan Barker - Sunday Morning - 11/14/2021

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 30:28


Enneagram and Marriage
Building Long-Lasting Passion in Marriage with the Enneagram with Kirsten and Jeshua Barker

Enneagram and Marriage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 71:50


When two expressive types come together, there's pure passion no matter the result. It's truly a journey to find balance with all the big love and feelings going on. Today Christa takes a journey with Kirsten and Jeshua Barker (2-8 Glow) as they help couples with lots of emotions process the ins and outs of dealing with the codependency that can occur with passionate pairings. They also share the blessing of the Enneagram across the family, and the process of their own healing journeys as they learned to come back together in marriage, now bringing their glow of love to others. To work with Kirsten, see her relationship and life coaching work details below! livebetterwithenneagram@gmail.com www.livebetterwithenneagram.com 865-585-5789 Kirsten Barker's coaching line For E + M Resources, Podcasts, Your Glow Pairing, and our Brand New Glow Planners, visit us at www.EnneagramandMarriage.com  

Church Podcast – Scandia Bible Church
Acceptable Through Faith [Hebrews 11:4]

Church Podcast – Scandia Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


Sermon Notes Date: 11/14/2021 Preacher: Monty Simao, pastor Series: Hebrews Key Text: Hebrews 11:4 Description: Two brothers went before the Lord to offer a sacrifice. One was accepted…the other, rejected. Today on Scandia Bible Church Podcast, Pastor Monty Simao continues with our study in the book of Hebrews in which we examine this perplexing situation. […]

IT Career Energizer
318: Learn From Your Communities and Remember That Learning Is Fun with Michelle Barker

IT Career Energizer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 36:47


In this week's show, Phil talks to Michelle Barker, a Lead Front End Developer for Atomic Smash and the author of front-end blog CSS In Real Life. She likes to build fun, creative websites and side projects that are also performant and accessible. She has written articles and regularly speaks about front end development at web conferences and meetups, covering topics such as CSS Grid Layout and CSS Custom Properties. Michelle talks about the value of community and how it can energise your career development. She also discusses why learning should always be fun, and the value of taking time out to realign with what lights you up.   KEY TAKEAWAYS:   TOP CAREER TIP Find a community – online or offline – and allow the people there to help and guide you. This can greatly accelerate your personal development and growth.   WORST CAREER MOMENT When returning from maternity leave, Michelle an extra sense of pressure in terms of proving herself, along with being exhausted and overwhelmed by new parenthood. Since then, she has recognized the value of not adding pressure to oneself unnecessarily.   CAREER HIGHLIGHT Working on a project for The Grand Appeal, a Bristol children's charity, a cause close to Michelle's heart due to her own experiences with her son.   THE FUTURE OF CAREERS IN I.T The IT community itself and the many ways in which people are innovating and pushing the sector forward. Community is everything in IT, and finding the right one is a constant source of inspiration.   THE REVEAL What first attracted you to a career in I.T.? – The intersection between creativity and technical knowhow. What's the best career advice you received? – Write down your accomplishments. What's the worst career advice you received? – That we must always be coding, even in our spare time, and make work our life. What would you do if you started your career now? –Michelle would put less pressure upon herself. Your career is not a race. What are your current career objectives? – Michelle is spending far more time on writing, particularly on her blog, and now in partnership with other publications. What's your number one non-technical skill? – Working in customer services and in the events industry so as to get a better understanding of how to interact with others. How do you keep your own career energized? – Michelle enjoys creative coding as an outlet. What do you do away from technology? – Netflix and playing the drums. FINAL CAREER TIP Learning should always be fun. If you're struggling to get motivated, put down the tutorials and try to build something for fun!   BEST MOMENTS (4:00) – Michelle - “A good way to learn is to pick things up and just keep building little side projects. Follow the paths that interest you” (5:52) – Michelle - “I made so many connections just through taking the time to learn from others” (13:24) – Michelle – “You need to push past things, keep going, keep learning, and know that there aren't any shortcuts. It's not a race” (20:41) – Michelle – “Every time I make something come to life on the screen I feel that sense of accomplishment”   ABOUT THE HOST – PHIL BURGESS Phil Burgess is an independent IT consultant who has spent the last 20 years helping organizations to design, develop, and implement software solutions.  Phil has always had an interest in helping others to develop and advance their careers.  And in 2017 Phil started the I.T. Career Energizer podcast to try to help as many people as possible to learn from the career advice and experiences of those that have been, and still are, on that same career journey.   CONTACT THE HOST – PHIL BURGESS Phil can be contacted through the following Social Media platforms: Twitter: https://twitter.com/_PhilBurgess LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/philburgess Instagram: https://instagram.com/_philburgess Website: https://itcareerenergizer.com/contact Phil is also reachable by email at phil@itcareerenergizer.com and via the podcast's website, https://itcareerenergizer.com Join the I.T. Career Energizer Community on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/ITCareerEnergizer   ABOUT THE GUEST – MICHELLE BARKER Michelle Barker is a Lead Front End Developer for Atomic Smash and the author of front-end blog CSS In Real Life. She likes to build fun, creative websites and side projects that are also performant and accessible. She has written articles and regularly speaks about front end development at web conferences and meetups, covering topics such as CSS Grid Layout and CSS Custom Properties.   CONTACT THE GUEST – MICHELLE BARKER Michelle Barker can be contacted through the following Social Media platforms: Twitter: https://twitter.com/MicheBarks LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michelle-barker-02819230/ Website: https://michellebarker.co.uk/ Website: https://css-irl.info/

Northeast Athlete
Strength Coach Will Barker

Northeast Athlete

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 71:01


Strength Coach Will Barker is the co-founder of "Strength Trained - Dunamis" and he is also the creator of "Strength and Conditioning for Ultimate Frisbee."  His facility is located at 33 Slayton Ave, Spencerport NY 14559. Check out the website at https://www.strengthtrained.com/and follow Will on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/wjbarks/

Out Of The Blank
#970 - Jane Barker (Archaeologist & Researcher)

Out Of The Blank

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 58:02


Jane is an archaeologist and PhD researcher in Iron Age Britain charioty and one of the most fundamental components to the timeline of history which are ponies. The world has a deep history and its hard to incorporate all the tools used to forge a future and it seems one of the least talked about except in myth is the power of a horse or pony. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/out-of-the-blank-podcast/support

America's Next Top Best Friend
ep 242: the girls are amarvelous and amazel

America's Next Top Best Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 61:37


join us as we recap australia's next top model, cycle 7, episodes 8 & 9 including: NIDA, telstra, crying on cue, great gatsby, lincoln lewis, breast cancer, simon uptown and recycled fashion.  https://blacklivesmatters.carrd.co/ https://www.the-audacity.com/ https://www.patreon.com/nexttopbestfriend?fbclid=IwAR1YTWcyipBLyEgpj82Ap7f9S5xrRWwZN58Q3ATGQFX3eRbKflizEXQV9wQ nexttopbestfriend@gmail.com https://www.americasnexttopbestfriend.com/ https://www.paypal.me/nexttopbestfriend https://www.instagram.com/nexttopbestfriend/ https://www.facebook.com/nexttopbestfriend/ https://twitter.com/nexttopbestpod amanda: @lochnessmanda (twitter, instagram) hillary: @hillaryous123 (twitter, instagram)

Invictus Mindset
Heidi Barker: Wildly You | Permission to Fail Forward into Self-Awareness and Acceptance

Invictus Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 116:18


Author, Wellness Consultant, Veteran, and “Invictus” Healer Heidi Barker, shares about the release of her first book “Wildly You: Permission to Fail Forward into Self-Awareness and Acceptance”. Heidi takes us through how the book “A Year to Live” by Stephen Levine inspired her to take on the challenge of writing her book that will impact others as a way to help them find their joy. Bryce and Heidi dive into the principles and mindsets that shaped the book. "Wildly You" will allow yourself permission to fail forward and find success in who you become along the way. (1:43): What made Heidi write her very first book?(4:07): Where the Drive for Discipline Came From(20:15): “What do you want to be when you grow up?”(25:46): Learning How and When to Let Go(27:06): Self-acceptance(36:21): Explaining emotion is hard(37:52): Human Compassion(42:39): Exploring the Different Chapters of “Wildly You”(51:40): Visualization and Mental Rehearsal As a Drug of Choice(55:22): “Bag of Rocks”(01:00:38): Being Addicted to Proving People Wrong(01:06:24): The Power of Complimenting Yourself(01:15:22): Holding Space to Heal(01:19:43): Why would we seek discomfort?(01:27:15): What does “healing” mean to Heidi?(01:38:22): Ego discussion(01:48:25): Why “Weird” Was the Final Chapter

Rolling Stone's Musicians on Musicians
Rolling Stone's Musicians on Musicians: Willow + Travis Barker

Rolling Stone's Musicians on Musicians

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 23:54


This past spring, Willow Smith released a song called “Transparent Soul," which found her getting away from the pop-and r&b-influenced sound of her earlier work and diving headlong into punk-rock. Willow had an important collaborator along for the ride: Travis Barker, someone who's also reinvented himself over the years. He's gone from Blink-182 drummer to songwriter to producer to label owner and, most recently, a kind of pop-punk mentor for a younger generation of artists. Willow and Barker sat down in September to talk about everything from skateboarding to the advantages of a shaved head to what they see as a rock revival in recent years. 

Atlanta Startup Podcast
Accelerator or Not? Meet Derrick Barker, Nectar founder + new Techstars grad

Atlanta Startup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 32:56


Meet Derrick Barker, CEO of Nectar, an Atlanta startup providing upfront cash for short-term rental operators and unlocking real estate cashflows for investors. Hear Derrick's story of exiting his first venture during undergrad, building a 4500+ unit real estate portfolio with his payout, and his strategic advice for early-stage founders thinking of participating in an accelerator. Derrick just graduated from Techstars in Atlanta.

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy
"Some Things Our Children Need to be Taught" - Dr. Jonathan Barker - Sunday Evening - 11/7/2021

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 33:54


Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy
"Reminded by the Shoe" - Dr. Jonathan Barker - Sunday Morning - 11/7/2021

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 39:28


Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy
"Impossibilities" - Dr. Jonathan Barker - Wednesday Night - 11/3/2021

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 18:47


Church Podcast – Scandia Bible Church
Faith in Action [Hebrews 11:1-3]

Church Podcast – Scandia Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


Sermon Notes Date: 11/07/2021 Preacher: Monty Simao, pastor Series: Hebrews Key Text: Hebrews 11:1-3 Description: SBC Host: To live by faith — what does it mean?? Avg Guy: …It means, mustering the courage and taking a leaping step into the dark. Avg Gal: …It's channeling the power that comes from positive thinking to bring about […]

Blessing and Cursing
Jonathan Barker tells us about it.

Blessing and Cursing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 62:29


Jonathan tells us about his experience at the Couples Advance.Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/PJClay)

Baseball Central @ Noon
Blair & Barker's Offseason Deep Dive

Baseball Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 96:42


With the 2021 postseason completed and the Atlanta Braves crowned World Series champions, the focus now shifts to Major League Baseball's offseason. Jeff and Kevin are joined by Sportsnet's Shi Davidi (1:38) and go in-depth on the Toronto Blue Jays: who is more likely to re-sign: Robbie Ray or Marcus Semien, if any of the […]

Baseball Central @ Noon
What Can Baseball Learn From the 2021 Braves?

Baseball Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 51:37


It's the final edition of Blair and Barker before the guys take a well-deserved winter break (stay tuned for weekly pods!). The guys open the show by discussing the Jays' offseason and what the organization's priorities should be (7:37). Then they take some calls from listeners regarding Jays' offseason wants, needs, and desires (22:46). Next, […]

Oxford Adult ESL Conversations Podcast
Episode 11: Library Literacy Programs with Rebecca Barker

Oxford Adult ESL Conversations Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021


In this episode, Jayme is joined by Rebecca Barker, Programs Officer at the Oklahoma Department of Libraries. They discuss how library and community literacy programs are continuing to pivot to meet the changing needs of their communities and learners. This … Continue reading →

Writer's Routine
Xanthi Barker, author of 'Will This House Last Forever' - Memoir writer talks about poetry, art as a world view, and her father, Sebastian.

Writer's Routine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 35:31


Xanthi Barker has published novelettes and short stories, penned columns and articles, and has just released her debut book, 'Will This House Last Forever'.It's a memoir of her time with her dying father, the poet Sebastian Barker. She is also the granddaughter of George Barker and the cult novelist, Elizabeth Smart. We discuss whether because of her highly and successfully creative family, she was destined to be a writer.Her relationship with her father was troubled, and we talk about whether his view of the world passed down to her. Also, you can hear how she planned such a personal book, how her writing routine has changed dramatically in the last year, and why her flatmate is a hero.Get the book here - https://amzn.to/3qaqx1wSupport the show here - patreon.com/writersroutine@writerspodwritersroutine.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Inside Source
Anna Barker: From Startup to Glo Up

Inside Source

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 29:57


Anna Barker didn't know she was interested in STEM until she'd almost completed college, but that didn't stop her from becoming one of the founders of Glo, an innovative company that developed water-reactive light-up cubes. Inside Source talks with Anna about entrepreneurship, being a woman in STEM, and the idea that took her company all the way to Sesame Street.

How Writers Write
Episode 95 - How J.D. Barker Writes

How Writers Write

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 42:22


Welcome to Episode 95 - How JD Barker WritesI continue my deep dive with horror writers with this week's guest, JD Barker. JD is such a master of storytelling, and in this episode, we dive into the horror genre, how he has collaborated with James Patterson, and his path to becoming a storyteller. I have to say, I've found a new appreciation and interest in reading horror. In fact, I picked up Dracula as a response to this interview, I'm loving it, and I cannot wait to read JD Barker's "Dracul" which is the prequel to Dracula. Support the show (http://www.howwriterswrite.com)

Blinde sehen mehr. Krimi-Podcast mit Bastian Pastewka

"Kein Mucks!" – der Krimi-Podcast mit Bastian Pastewka (Neue Folgen)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 61:48


Ein Fall aus den FBI-Akten: Ein Polizistenmord beschäftigt die Beamten Ripley und Barker; anscheinend ist ein entflohener Sträfling verdächtig. Ausgerechnet eine blinde Zeugin wird zur wichtigsten Partnerin bei der Jagd nach dem Täter. Bastian Pastewka präsentiert dieses Hörspiel von 1956, geschrieben vom Autorenduo The Gordons.

Baseball Central @ Noon
What Now for the Astros?

Baseball Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 48:19


Blair & Barker react to Brian Snitker's post-game availability and share their final thoughts on the World Series: notably Max Fried and Jorge Soler's MVP performance and violent swing (0:07). They also discuss what the loss means for the Astros and how they were unable to pair their tainted 2017 championship with another one in […]

America's Next Top Best Friend
ep 241: the girls are banned from a-list events

America's Next Top Best Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 58:14


join us as we recap australia's next top model, cycle 7, episodes 6 & 7 including: thick necks, star jumps, cartier, dud challenges, kangaroo island, adverts, double double eliminations and nick leary. https://blacklivesmatters.carrd.co/ https://www.the-audacity.com/ https://www.patreon.com/nexttopbestfriend?fbclid=IwAR1YTWcyipBLyEgpj82Ap7f9S5xrRWwZN58Q3ATGQFX3eRbKflizEXQV9wQ nexttopbestfriend@gmail.com https://www.americasnexttopbestfriend.com/ https://www.paypal.me/nexttopbestfriend https://www.instagram.com/nexttopbestfriend/ https://www.facebook.com/nexttopbestfriend/ https://twitter.com/nexttopbestpod amanda: @lochnessmanda (twitter, instagram) hillary: @hillaryous123 (twitter, instagram)

Money Talks Radio Show - Atlanta, GA
Case Study: Establishing a Legacy of Giving Through Donor-Advised Funds and Family Foundations

Money Talks Radio Show - Atlanta, GA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 14:45


Chief Investment Officer Troy Harmon, CFA, CVA, Managing Associate D.J. Barker, CWS®, and Senior Financial Planner Giuliana Barbagelata, CFP®, take a closer look at donor-advised funds and family foundations for significant charitable giving. They compare the two in terms of ongoing fees, donor control, and tax benefits. Read the Article: https://www.henssler.com/establishing-a-legacy-of-giving-through-donor-advised-funds-and-family-foundations 

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy
"Prayer" - Dr. Jonathan Barker - Wednesday Night - 10/27/2021

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 35:31


Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy
"Redeemed, How I Love to Proclaim It" - Dr. Jonathan Barker - Sunday Morning - 10/31/2021

Amazing Grace Baptist Church Mount Airy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 42:21


House Of Kayfabe with Brian Reznor and Stephen P. New
House Of Kayfabe Special Edition: The Greatest Championships

House Of Kayfabe with Brian Reznor and Stephen P. New

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 128:13


Join us for the House Of Kayfabe Special Edition: The Greatest Championships where we will discuss our picks for the greatest belts in history! Join Brian Reznor, Steve New, Barker, Matt Mullins and Derek Jones. Check it out! www.houseofkayfabe.com

Church Podcast – Scandia Bible Church
The Scope of Scripture [Luke 24:13-27; John 2:13-22, 5:39-47]

Church Podcast – Scandia Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021


Sermon Notes Date: 10/31/2021 Preacher: Monty Simao, pastor Series: Reformation Sunday Key Text: Luke 24:13-27; John 2:13-22, 5:39-47 Description: “Christ-Centered.” It's an adjective that has become more and more popular in recent years when describing any number of activities either in the church or in the lives of God’s people. And while this descriptor is […]

Money Talks Radio Show - Atlanta, GA
Henssler Money Talks - October 30, 2021

Money Talks Radio Show - Atlanta, GA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 45:19


This week on “Money Talks,” Chief Investment Officer Troy Harmon, CFA, CVA, is joined by Managing Associate D.J. Barker, CWS®, and Senior Financial Planner Giuliana Barbagelata, CFP®, to cover the week's market action, including the Conference Board's Consumer Confidence survey and Durable Goods orders. The financial experts take a closer look at donor-advised funds and family foundations for significant charitable giving. They compare the two in terms of ongoing fees, donor control, and tax benefits. The experts round out the show answering listeners' questions on high deductible health plans and health savings accounts, plus stocks UPS and FedEx. Check out the show segments using the chapter controls in the player above.Market Roundup: Covering the week of October 24—October 29, 2021Case Study: Donor-Advised Funds and Family FoundationsQ&A Time: High Deductible Health Plans, Health Savings Accounts, UPS, and FedEx. 

Baseball Central @ Noon
Game 3: Welcome to Atlanta

Baseball Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 49:28


Mark Bradley, columnist at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, examines Game 3 from a Braves' perspective and how this year's team compares to the great Braves teams of the 1990s (3:50). MLB insider Jeff Passan joins Blair & Barker for his weekly segment and discusses the Braves' tomahawk chop, how weather could effect Game 3, tonight being […]

Ten Cent Takes
Issue 18: Horror Comics & Terror, Inc.

Ten Cent Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 95:44


Happy Halloween! We're joined by comics scribe Daniel "D.G." Chichester to talk about the history of horror comics, Marvel's return to the genre in the early 1990s, and the macabre anti-hero Terror (whom Chichester co-created).  ----more---- Issue 18 Transcript   Mike: [00:00:00] It's small, but feisty, Mike: Welcome to Tencent Takes, the podcast where we dig up comic book characters' graves and misappropriate the bodies, one issue at a time. My name is Mike Thompson, and I am joined by my cohost, the Titan of terror herself, Jessika Frazer. Jessika: It is I. Mike: Today, we are extremely fortunate to have comics writer, Daniel, DG Chichester. Dan: Nice to see you both. Mike: Thank you so much for taking the time. You're actually our first official guest on the podcast. Dan: Wow. Okay. I'm going to take that as a good thing. That's great. Mike: Yeah. Well, if you're new to the show, the purpose of our [00:01:00] podcast as always is to look at the weirdest, silliest, coolest moments of comic books, and talk about them in ways that are fun and informative. In this case, we looking at also the spookiest moments, and how they're woven into the larger fabric of pop culture and history. Today, we're going to be talking about horror comics. We're looking at their overall history as well as their resurrection at Marvel in the early 1990s, and how it helped give birth to one of my favorite comic characters, an undead anti-hero who went by the name of Terror. Dan, before we started going down this road, could you tell us a little bit about your history in the comic book industry, and also where people can find you if they want to learn more about you and your work? Dan: Absolutely. At this point, people may not even know I had a history in comic books, but that's not true. Uh, I began at Marvel as an assistant in the mid-eighties while I was still going to film school and, semi quickly kind of graduated up, to a more official, [00:02:00] assistant editor position. Worked my way up through editorial, and then, segued into freelance writing primarily for, but also for DC and Dark Horse and worked on a lot of, semi-permanent titles, Daredevil's probably the best known of them. But I think I was right in the thick of a lot of what you're going to be talking about today in terms of horror comics, especially at Marvel, where I was fiercely interested in kind of getting that going. And I think pushed for certain things, and certainly pushed to be involved in those such as the Hellraiser and Nightbreed Clive Barker projects and Night Stalkers and, uh, and Terror Incorporated, which we're going to talk about. And wherever else I could get some spooky stuff going. And I continued on in that, heavily until about 96 / 97, when the big crash kind of happened, continued on through about 99 and then have not really been that actively involved since then. But folks can find out what I'm doing now, if they go to story maze.substack.com, where I have a weekly newsletter, which features [00:03:00] new fiction and some things that I think are pretty cool that are going on in storytelling, and also a bit of a retrospective of looking back at a lot of the work that I did. Mike: Awesome. Before we actually get started talking about horror comics, normally we talk about one cool thing that we have read or watched recently, but because this episode is going to be dropping right before Halloween, what is your favorite Halloween movie or comic book? Dan: I mean, movies are just terrific. And there's so many when I saw that question, especially in terms of horror and a lot of things immediately jumped to mind. The movie It Follows, the recent It movie, The Mist, Reanimator, are all big favorites. I like horror movies that really kind of get under your skin and horrify you, not just rack up a body count. But what I finally settled on as a favorite is probably John Carpenter's the Thing, which I just think is one of the gruesomest what is going to happen next? What the fuck is going to happen next?[00:04:00] And just utter dread. I mean, there's just so many things that combined for me on that one. And I think in terms of comics, I've recently become just a huge fan of, and I'm probably going to slaughter the name, but Junji Ito's work, the Japanese manga artist. And, Uzumaki, which is this manga, which is about just the bizarreness of this town, overwhelmed with spirals of all things. And if you have not read that, it is, it is the trippiest most unsettling thing I've read in, in a great long time. So happy Halloween with that one. Mike: So that would be mango, right? Dan: Yeah. Yeah. So you'd make sure you read it in the right order, or otherwise it's very confusing, so. Mike: Yeah, we actually, haven't talked a lot about manga on this. We probably should do a deep dive on it at some point. But, Jessika, how about you? Jessika: Well, I'm going to bring it down a little bit more silly because I've always been a fan of horror and the macabre and supernatural. So always grew up seeking creepy media as [00:05:00] a rule, but I also loves me some silliness. So the last three or so years, I've had a tradition of watching Hocus Pocus with my friend, Rob around Halloween time. And it's silly and it's not very heavy on the actual horror aspect, but it's fun. And it holds up surprisingly well. Mike: Yeah, we have all the Funkos of the Sanderson sisters in our house. Jessika: It's amazing watching it in HD, their costumes are so intricate and that really doesn't come across on, you know, old VHS or watching it on television back in the day. And it's just, it's so fun. How much, just time and effort it looks like they put into it, even though some of those details really weren't going to translate. Dan: How very cool. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Yeah. So, but I also really like actual horror, so I'm also in the next couple of days is going to be a visiting the 1963 Haunting of Hill House because that's one of my favorites. Yeah. It's so good. And used to own the book that the movie was based on also. And seen all the [00:06:00] iterations and it's the same storyline the recent Haunting of Hill house is based on, which is great. That plot line has been reworked so many times, but it's such a great story, I'm just not shocked in the least that it would run through so many iterations and still be accepted by the public in each of its forms. Mike: Yeah. I really liked that Netflix interpretation of it, it was really good. Dan: They really creeped everything out. Mike: Yeah. There's a YouTuber called Lady Night, The Brave, and she does a really great summary breakdown explaining a lot of the themes and it's like almost two hours I think, of YouTube video, but she does these really lovely retrospectives. So, highly recommend you check that out. If you want to just think about that the Haunting of Hill House more. Jessika: Oh, I do. Yes. Mike: I'm going to split the difference between you two. When I was growing up, I was this very timid kid and the idea of horror just creeped me out. And so I avoided it like the plague. And then when I was in high [00:07:00] school, I had some friends show me some movies and I was like, these are great, why was I afraid of this stuff? And so I kind of dove all the way in. But my preferred genre is horror comedy. That is the one that you can always get me in on. And, I really love this movie from the mid-nineties called the Frighteners, which is a horror comedy starring Michael J. Fox, and it's directed by Peter Jackson. And it was written by Peter Jackson and his partner, Fran Walsh. And it was a few years before they, you know, went on to make a couple of movies based on this little known franchise called Lord of the Rings. But it's really wild. It's weird, and it's funny, and it has some genuine jump scare moments. And there's this really great ghost story at the core of it. And the special effects at the time were considered amazing and groundbreaking, but now they're kind of, you look at, and you're like, oh, that's, high-end CG, high-end in the mid-nineties. Okay. But [00:08:00] yeah, like I said, or comedies are my absolute favorite things to watch. That's why Cabin in the Woods always shows up in our horror rotation as well. Same with Tucker and Dale vs Evil. That's my bread and butter. With comic books, I go a little bit creepier. I think I talked about the Nice House on the Lake, that's the current series that I'm reading from DC that's genuinely creepy and really thoughtful and fun. And it's by James Tynion who also wrote Something That's Killing the Children. So those are excellent things to read if you're in the mood for a good horror comic. Dan: Great choice on the Frighteners. That's I think an unsung classic, that I'm going to think probably came out 10 years too early. Mike: Yeah. Dan: It's such a mashup of different, weird vibes, that it would probably do really, really well today. But at that point in time, it was just, what is this? You know? Cause it's, it's just cause the horrifying thing in it are really horrifying. And, uh, Gary Busey's son, right, plays the evil ghost and he is just trippy, off the wall, you know, horrifying. [00:09:00] Mike: Yeah. And it starts so silly, and then it kind of just continues to go creepier and creepier, and by the time that they do some of the twists revealing his, you know, his agent in the real world, it's a genuine twist. Like, I was really surprised the first time I saw it and I - Dan: Yeah. Mike: was so creeped out, but yeah. Dan: Plus it's got R. Lee Ermey as the army ghost, which is just incredible. So, Mike: Yeah. And, Chi McBride is in it, and, Jeffrey Combs. Dan: Oh, oh that's right, right. right. Mike: Yeah. So yeah, it's a lot of fun. Mike: All right. So, I suppose we should saunter into the graveyard, as it were, and start talking about the history of horror comics. So, Dan, obviously I know that you're familiar with horror comics, Dan: A little bit. Mike: Yeah. What about you, Jess? You familiar with horror comics other than what we've talked about in the show? Jessika: I started getting into it once you and I started, you know, talking more on the [00:10:00] show. And so I grabbed a few things. I haven't looked through all of them yet, but I picked up some older ones. I did just recently pick up, it'll be more of a, kind of a funny horror one, but they did a recent Elvira and Vincent Price. So, yeah, so I picked that up, but issue one of that. So it's sitting on my counter ready for me to read right now. Mike: Well, and that's funny, cause Elvira actually has a really long, storied history in comic books. Like she first appeared in kind of like the revival of House of Mystery that DC did. And then she had an eighties series that had over a hundred issues that had a bunch of now major names involved. And she's continued to have series like, you can go to our website and get autographed copies of her recent series from, I think Dynamite. Jessika: That's cool. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Nice. Mike: Speaking of horror comedy Elvira is great. Jessika: Yes. Mike: I recently showed Sarah the Elvira Mistress of the Dark movie and she was, I think really sad that I hadn't showed it to her sooner. Jessika: [00:11:00] That's another one I need to go watch this week. Wow. Don't- nobody call me. I'm just watching movies all week. Dan: Exactly. Mike: It's on a bunch of different streaming services, I think right now. Well it turns out that horror comics, have pretty much been a part of the industry since it really became a proven medium. You know, it wasn't long after comics became a legit medium in their own, right that horror elements started showing up in superhero books, which like, I mean, it isn't too surprising. Like the 1930's was when we got the Universal classic movie monsters, so it makes a lot of sense that those kinds of characters would start crossing over into comic books, just to take advantage of that popularity. Jerry Siegel and Joel Schuster, the guys who created Superman, actually created the supernatural investigator called Dr. Occult in New Fun Comics three years before they brought Superman to life. And Dr. Occult still shows up in DC books. Like, he was a major character in the Books of Magic with Neil Gaiman. I think he may show up in Sandman later on. I can't remember. Jessika: Oh, okay. Dan: I wouldn't be surprised. Neil would find ways to mine that. [00:12:00] Mike: Yeah. I mean, that was a lot of what the Sandman was about, was taking advantage of kind of long forgotten characters that DC had had and weaving them into his narratives. And, if you're interested in that, we talk about that in our book club episodes, which we're currently going through every other episode. So the next episode after this is going to be the third episode of our book club, where we cover volumes five and six. So, horror comics though really started to pick up in the 1940s. There's multiple comic historians who say that the first ongoing horror series was Prized Comics, New Adventures of Frankenstein, which featured this updated take on the original story by Mary Shelley. It took place in America. The monster was named Frankenstein. He was immediately a terror. It's not great, but it's acknowledged as being really kind of the first ongoing horror story. And it's really not even that much of a horror story other than it featured Frankenstein's monster. But after that, a number of publishers started to put out adaptations of classic horror stories for awhile. So you had [00:13:00] Avon Publications making it official in 1946 with the comic Erie, which is based on the first real dedicated horror comic. Yeah. This is the original cover to Erie Comics. Number one, if you could paint us a word picture. Dan: Wow. This is high end stuff as it's coming through. Well it looks a lot like a Zine or something, you know it's got a very, Mac paint logo from 1990, you know, it's, it's your, your typical sort of like, ooh, I'm shaky kind of logo. That's Eerie Comics. There's a Nosferatu looking character. Who's coming down some stairs with the pale moon behind him. It, he's got a knife in his hand, so, you know, he's up to no good. And there is a femme fatale at the base of the stairs. She may have moved off of some train tracks to get here. And, uh, she's got a, uh, a low, cut dress, a lot of leg and the arms and the wrists are bound, but all this for only 10. cents. So, I think there's a, there's a bargain there.[00:14:00] Mike: That is an excellent description. Thank you. So, what's funny is that Erie at the time was the first, you know, official horror comic, really, but it only had one issue that came out and then it sort of vanished from sight. It came back with a new series that started with a new number one in the 1950s, but this was the proverbial, the shot that started the war. You know, we started seeing a ton of anthology series focusing on horror, like Adventures into the Unknown, which ran into the 1960s and then Amazing Mysteries and Marvel Tales were repurposed series for Marvel that they basically changed the name of existing series into these. And they started doing kind of macabre, weird stories. And then, we hit the 1950s. And the early part of the 1950s was when horror comics really seemed to take off and experienced this insane success. We've talked about how in the post-WWII America, superhero comics were kind of declining in [00:15:00] popularity. By the mid 1950s, only three heroes actually had their own books and that was Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman. Which, I didn't realize that until I was doing research. I didn't, I just assumed that there were other superhero comics at the time. But we started seeing comics about horror and crime and romance really starting to get larger shares of the market. And then EC Comics was one of those doing gangbuster business during this whole era. Like, this was when we saw those iconic series, the Haunt of Fear, the Vault of Horror, the Crypt of Terror, which was eventually rebranded to Tales from the Crypt. Those all launched and they found major success. And then the bigger publishers were also getting in on this boom. During the first half of the 1950s Atlas, which eventually became Marvel, released almost 400 issues across 18 horror titles. And then American Comics Group released almost 125 issues between five different horror titles. Ace comics did almost a hundred issues between five titles. I'm curious. I'm gonna ask both of you, what [00:16:00] do you think the market share of horror comics was at the time? Dan: In terms of comics or in terms of just like newsstand, magazine, distribution. Mike: I'm going to say in terms of distribution. Dan: I mean, I know they were phenomenally successful. I would, be surprised if it was over 60%. Mike: Okay. How about. Jessika: Oh, goodness. Let's throw a number out. I'm going to say 65 just because I want to get close enough, but maybe bump it up just a little bit. This is a contest now. Dan: The precision now, like the 65. Jessika: Yes. Mike: Okay. Well, obviously we don't have like a hard definite number, but there was a 2009 article from reason magazine saying that horror books made up a quarter of all comics by 1953. So, so you guys were overestimating it, but it was still pretty substantial. At the same time, we were also seeing a surge in horror films. Like, the 1950s are known as the atomic age and media reflected [00:17:00] societal anxiety, at the possibility of nuclear war and to a lesser extent, white anxiety about societal changes. So this was the decade that gave us Invasion of the Body Snatchers The Thing from Another World, which led to John Carpenter's The Thing eventually. Um, and the Creature from the Black Lagoon. Hammer horror films also started to get really huge during this time. So we saw the beginning of stuff like Christopher Lee's, Dracula series of films. So the fifties were like a really good decade for horror, I feel. But at the same time, violent crime in America started to pick up around this period. And people really started focusing on juvenile criminals and what was driving them. So, there were a lot of theories about why this was going on and no one's ever really come up with a definite answer, but there was the psychiatrist named Frederick Wortham who Dan, I yeah. Dan: Oh yeah, psychiatrist in big air quotes, yeah. Mike: In quotes. Yeah. [00:18:00] Yeah. And he was convinced that the rise in crime was due to comics, and he spent years writing and speaking against them. He almost turned it into a cottage industry for himself. And this culminated in 1954, when he published a book called Seduction of the Innocent, that blamed comic books for the rise in juvenile delinquency, and his arguments are laughable. Like, I mean, there's just no way around it. Like you read this stuff and you can't help, but roll your eyes and chuckle. But, at the time comics were a relatively new medium, you know, and people really only associated them with kids. And his arguments were saying, oh, well, Wonder Woman was a lesbian because of her strength and independence, which these days, I feel like that actually has a little bit of credibility, but, like, I don't know. But I don't really feel like that's contributing to the delinquency of the youth. You know, and then he also said that Batman and Robin were in a homosexual relationship. And then my favorite was that Superman comics were [00:19:00] un-American and fascist. Dan: Well. Mike: All right. Dan: There's people who would argue that today. Mike: I mean, but yeah, and then he actually, he got attention because there were televised hearings with the Senate subcommittee on juvenile delinquency. I mean, honestly, every time I think about Seduction of the Innocent and how it led to the Comics Code Authority. I see the parallels with Tipper Gore's Parent Music Resource Center, and how they got the Parental Advisory sticker on certain music albums, or Joe Lieberman's hearings on video games in the 1990's and how that led to the Electronic Systems Reading Board system, you know, where you provide almost like movie ratings to video games. And Wortham also reminds me a lot of this guy named Jack Thompson, who was a lawyer in the nineties and aughts. And he was hell bent on proving a link between violent video games and school shootings. And he got a lot of media attention at the time until he was finally disbarred for his antics. But there was this [00:20:00] definite period where people were trying to link video games and violence. And, even though the statistics didn't back that up. And, I mean, I think about this a lot because I used to work in video games. I spent almost a decade working in the industry, but you know, it's that parallel of anytime there is a new form of media that is aimed at kids, it feels like there is a moral panic. Dan: Well, I think it goes back to what you were saying before about, you know, even as, as things change in society, you know, when people in society get at-risk, you know, you went to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Right. Which is classically thought to be a response to communism, you know, and the feelings of communist oppression and you know, the different, you know, the other, and it's the same thing. I think every single one of these is just a proof point of if you want to become, suddenly well-known like Lieberman or Wortham or anything, you know, pick the other that the older generation doesn't really understand, right? Maybe now there are more adults playing video games, but it's probably still perceived as a more juvenile [00:21:00] thing or comics or juvenile thing, or certain types of movies are a juvenile thing, you know, pick the other pick on it, hold it up as the weaponized, you know, piece, and suddenly you're popular. And you've got a great flashpoint that other people can rally around and blame, as if one single thing is almost ever the cause of everything. And I always think it's interesting, you know, the EC Comics, you know, issues in terms of, um, Wortham's witch hunt, you know, the interesting thing about those is yet they were gruesome and they are gruesome in there, but they're also by and large, I don't know the other ones as well, but I know the EC Comics by and large are basically morality plays, you know, they're straight up morality plays in the sense that the bad guys get it in the end, almost every time, like they do something, they do some horrific thing, but then the corpse comes back to life and gets them, you know, so there's, there's always a comeuppance where the scales balance. But that was of course never going to be [00:22:00] an argument when somebody can hold up a picture of, you know, a skull, you know, lurching around, you know, chewing on the end trails of something. And then that became all that was talked about. Mike: Yeah, exactly. Well, I mean, spring boarding off of that, you know, worth them and the subcommittee hearings and all that, they led to the comics magazine association of America creating the Comics Code Authority. And this was basically in order to avoid government regulation. They said, no, no, no, we'll police ourselves so that you don't have to worry about this stuff. Which, I mean, again, that's what we did with the SRB. It was a response to that. We could avoid government censorship. So the code had a ton of requirements that each book had to meet in order to receive the Comics Code Seal of Approval on the cover. And one of the things you couldn't do was have quote, scenes dealing with, or instruments associated with walking dead or torture, which I mean,[00:23:00] okay. So the latter half of the 1950's saw a lot of these dedicated horror series, you know, basically being shut down or they drastically changed. This is, you know, the major publishers really freaked out. So Marvel and DC rebranded their major horror titles. They were more focused on suspense or mystery or Sci-Fi or superheroes in a couple of cases, independent publishers, didn't really have to worry about the seal for different reasons. Like, some of them were able to rely on the rep for publishing wholesome stuff like Dell or Gold Key. I think Gold Key at the time was doing a lot of the Disney books. So they just, they were like, whatever. Dan: Right, then EC, but, but EC had to shut down the whole line and then just became mad. Right? I mean, that's that was the transition at which William, you know, Gains - Mike: Yeah. Dan: basically couldn't contest what was going on. Couldn't survive the spotlight. You know, he testified famously at that hearing. But had to give up all of [00:24:00] that work that was phenomenally profitable for them. And then had to fall back to Mad Magazine, which of course worked out pretty well. Mike: Yeah, exactly. By the end of the 1960s, though, publishers started to kind of gently push back a little bit like, Warren publishing, and Erie publications, like really, they didn't give a shit. Like Warren launched a number of horror titles in the sixties, including Vampirilla, which is like, kind of, I feel it's sort of extreme in terms of both sex and horror, because I mean, we, we all know what Vampirilla his costume is. It hasn't changed in the 50, approximately 50 years that it's been out like. Dan: It's like, what can you do with dental floss, Right. When you were a vampire? I mean, that's basically like, she doesn't wear much. Mike: No, I mean, she never has. And then by the end of the sixties, Marvel and DC started to like kind of steer some of their books back towards the horror genre. Like how some Mystery was one of them where it, I think with issue 1 75, that was when they [00:25:00] took away, took it away from John Jones and dial H for Hero. And they were like, no, no, no, no. We're going to, we're going to bring, Cain back as the host and start telling horror morality plays again, which is what they were always doing. And this meant that the Comics Code Authority needed to update their code. So in 1971, they revised it to be a little bit more horror friendly. Jessika: Scenes dealing with, or instruments associated with, walking dead or torture shall not be used. Vampires, ghouls and werewolves shall be permitted to be used when handled in the classic traditions, such as Frankenstein, Dracula, and other high caliber literary works written by Edgar Allen Poe, Saki, Conan Doyle, and other respected authors whose works are read in schools around the world. Mike: But at this point, Marvel and DC really jumped back into the horror genre. This was when we started getting books, like the tomb of Dracula, Ghost Rider, where will finite and son of Satan, and then DC had a [00:26:00] bunch of their series like they had, what was it? So it was originally The Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love, and then it eventually got retitled to Forbidden Tales of the Dark Mansion. Like, just chef's kiss on that title. Dan: You can take that old Erie comic and throw, you know, the Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love as the title on that. And it would work, you know. Mike: I know. Right. So Dan, I'm curious, what is your favorite horror comic or comic character from this era? Dan: I would say, it was son of Satan, because it felt so trippy and forbidden, and I think comics have always, especially mainstream comics you know, I've always responded also to what's out there. Right. I don't think it's just a loosening the restrictions at that point, but in that error, what's going on, you're getting a lot of, I think the films of Race with the Devil and you're getting the Exorcist and you're getting, uh, the Omen, you know, Rosemary's baby. right. Satanism, [00:27:00] the devil, right. It's, it's high in pop culture. So true to form. You know, I think Son of Satan is in some ways, like a response of Marvel, you know, to that saying, let's glom onto this. And for a kid brought up in the Catholic church, there was a certain eeriness to this, ooh, we're reading about this. It's like, is it really going to be Satanism? And cause I was very nervous that we were not allowed even watch the Exorcist in our home, ever. You know, I didn't see the Exorcist until I was like out of high school. And I think also the character as he looks is just this really trippy look, right. At that point, if you're not familiar with the character, he's this buff dude, his hair flares up into horns, he just wears a Cape and he carries a giant trident, he's got a massive pentacle, I think a flaming pentacle, you know, etched in his chest. Um, he's ready to do business, ya know, in some strange form there. So for me, he was the one I glommed on to the most. [00:28:00] Mike: Yeah. Well, I mean, it was that whole era, it was just, it was Gothic horror brought back and Satanism and witchcraft is definitely a part of that genre. Dan: Sure. Mike: So, that said, kind of like any trend horror comics, you know, they have their rise and then they started to kind of fall out of popularity by the end of the seventies or the early eighties. I feel like it was a definite end of the era when both House of Mystery and Ghost Writer ended in 1983. But you know, there were still some individual books that were having success, but it just, it doesn't feel like Marvel did a lot with horror comics during the eighties. DC definitely had some luck with Alan Moore's run of the Swamp Thing. And then there was stuff like Hellblazer and Sandman. Which, as I mentioned, we're doing our book club episodes for, but also gave rise to Vertigo Comics, you know, in the early nineties. Not to say that horror comics still weren't a thing during this time, but it seems like the majority of them were coming from indie publishers. Off the top of my head, one example I think of still is Dead World, which basically created a zombie apocalypse [00:29:00] universe. And it started with Aero comics. It was created in the late eighties, and it's still going today. I think it's coming out from IDW now. But at the same time, it's not like American stopped enjoying horror stuff. Like this was the decade where we got Friday the 13th, Nightmare on Elm street, Evil Dead, Hellraiser, Poltergeist, Child's Play, just to name a few of the franchises that we were introduced to. And, I mentioned Hellraiser. I love Hellraiser, and Dan, I know that you have a pretty special connection to that brand. Dan: I do. I put pins in my face every night just to kind of keep my complexion, you know? Mike: So, let's transition over to the nineties and Marvel and let's start that off with Epic Comics. Epic started in the eighties, and it was basically a label that would print, create our own comics. And they eventually started to use label to produce, you know, in quotes, mature comics. So Wikipedia says that this was your first editorial job at Marvel was with the [00:30:00] Epic Line. Is that correct? Dan: Well, I'll go back and maybe do just a little correction on Epic's mission if you don't mind. Mike: Yeah, yeah. Dan: You know, first, which is it was always creator owned, and it did start as crude. And, but I don't think that ever then transitioned into more mature comics, sometimes that just was what creator-owned comics were. Right. That was just part of the mission. And so as a creator-owned imprint, it could be anything, it could be the silliest thing, it could be the most mature thing. So it was always, you know, part of what it was doing, and part of the mission of doing creator-owned comics, and Archie Goodwin was the editor in chief of that line, was really to give creators and in to Marvel. If we gave them a nice place to play with their properties, maybe they would want to go play in the mainstream Marvel. So you might get a creator who would never want to work for Marvel, for whatever reason, they would have a great Epic experience doing a range of things, and then they would go into this. So there was always levels of maturity and we always looked at it as very eclectic and challenging, you know, sometimes in a good [00:31:00] way. So I'll have to go back to Wikipedia and maybe correct them. My first job was actually, I was on the Marvel side and it was as the assistant to the assistant, to the editor in chief. So I would do all of the grunt work and the running around that the assistant to the editor in chief didn't want to do. And she would turn to me and say, Dan, you're going to go run around the city and find this thing for Jim Shooter. Now, then I did that for about five or six months, I was still in film school, and then left, which everyone was aghast, you don't leave Marvel comics, by choice. And, but I had, I was still in school. I had a summer job already sort of set up, and I left to go take that exciting summer job. And then I was called over the summer because there was an opening in the Epic line. And they want to know if I'd be interested in taking on this assistant editor's job. And I said, it would have to be part-time cause I still had a semester to finish in school, but they were intrigued and I was figuring, oh, well this is just kind of guaranteed job. [00:32:00] Never knowing it was going to become career-like, and so that was then sort of my second job. Mike: Awesome. So this is going to bring us to the character of Terror. So he was introduced as a character in the Shadow Line Saga, which was one of those mature comics, it was like a mature superhero universe. That took place in a few different series under the Epic imprint. There was Dr. Zero, there was St. George, and then there was Power Line. Right. Dan: That's correct, yep. Mike: And so the Shadow Line Saga took his name from the idea that there were these beings called Shadows, they were basically super powered immortal beings. And then Terror himself first appeared as Shrek. He's this weird looking enforcer for a crime family in St. George. And he becomes kind of a recurring nemesis for the main character. He's kind of like the street-level boss while it's hinting that there's going to be a eventual confrontation between the main character of St. George and Dr. Zero, who is kind of [00:33:00] a Superman character, but it turns out he has been manipulating humanity for, you know, millennia at this point. Dan: I think you've encapsulated it quite well. Mike: Well, thank you. So the Shadow Line Saga, that only lasted for about what a year or two? Dan: Probably a couple of years, maybe a little over. There was about, I believe, eight to nine issues of each of the, the main comics, the ones you just cited. And then we segued those over to, sort of, uh, an omni series we call Critical Mass, which brought together all three characters or storylines. And then try to tell this, excuse the pun, epic, you know story, which will advance them all. And so wrapped up a lot of loose ends and, um, you know, became quite involved now. Mike: Okay. Dan: It ran about seven or eight issues. Mike: Okay. Now a couple of years after Terror was introduced under the Epic label, Marvel introduced a new Ghost Rider series in 1990 that hit that sweet spot of like nineties extreme with a capital X and, and, you know, [00:34:00] it also gave us a spooky anti heroes like that Venn diagram, where it was like spooky and extreme and rides a motorcycle and right in the middle, you had Ghost Rider, but from what I understand the series did really well, commercially for Marvel. Comichron, which is the, the comic sales tracking site, notes that early issues were often in the top 10 books sold each month for 91. Like there are eight issues of Ghost Rider, books that are in the top 100 books for that year. So it's not really surprising that Marvel decided to go in really hard with supernatural characters. And in 1992, we had this whole batch of horror hero books launch. We had Spirits of Vengeance, which was a spinoff from Ghost Rider, which saw a Ghost Rider teaming up with Johnny Blaze, and it was the original Ghost Writer. And he didn't have a hellfire motorcycle this time, but he had a shotgun that would fire hell fire, you know, and he had a ponytail, it was magnificent. And then there was also the Night Stalkers, [00:35:00] which was a trio of supernatural investigators. There was Hannibal King and Blade and oh, I'm blanking on the third one. Dan: Frank Drake. Mike: Yeah. And Frank Drake was a vampire, right? Dan: And he was a descendant of Dracula, but also was a vampire who had sort of been cured. Um, he didn't have a hunger for human blood, but he still had a necessity for some type of blood and possessed all the attributes, you know, of a vampire, you know, you could do all the powers, couldn't go out in the daylight, that sort of thing. So, the best and worst of both worlds. Mike: Right. And then on top of that, we had the Dark Hold, which it's kind of like the Marvel equivalent of the Necronomicon is the best way I can describe it. Dan: Absolutely. Yup. Mike: And that's showed up in Agents of Shield since then. And they just recently brought it into the MCU. That was a thing that showed up in Wanda Vision towards the end. So that's gonna clearly reappear. And then we also got Morbius who is the living vampire from [00:36:00] Spider-Man and it's great. He shows up in this series and he's got this very goth rock outfit, is just it's great. Dan: Which looked a lot like how Len Kaminsky dressed in those days in all honesty. Mike: Yeah, okay. Dan: So Len will now kill me for that, but. Mike: Oh, well, but yeah, so these guys were all introduced via a crossover event called Rise of the Midnight Sons, which saw all of these heroes, you know, getting their own books. And then they also teamed up with Dr. Strange to fight against Lilith the mother of demons. And she was basically trying to unleash her monstrous spawn across the world. And this was at the same time the Terror wound up invading the Marvel Universe. So if you were going to give an elevator pitch for Terror in the Marvel Universe, how would you describe him? Dan: I actually wrote one down, I'll read it to you, cause you, you know, you put that there and was like, oh gosh, I got to like now pitch this. A mythic manifestation of fear exists in our times, a top dollar mercenary for hire using a supernatural [00:37:00] ability to attach stolen body parts to himself in order to activate the inherit ability of the original owner. A locksmith's hand or a marksman, his eye or a kickboxer his legs, his gruesome talent gives him the edge to take on the jobs no one else can, he accomplishes with Savage, restyle, scorn, snark, and impeccable business acumen. So. Mike: That's so good. It's so good. I just, I have to tell you the twelve-year-old Mike is like giddy to be able to talk to you about this. Dan: I was pretty giddy when I was writing this stuff. So that's good. Mike: So how did Terror wind up crossing into the Marvel Universe? Like, because he just showed shows up in a couple of cameos in some Daredevil issues that you also wrote. I believe. Dan: Yeah, I don't know if he'd showed up before the book itself launched that might've, I mean, the timing was all around the same time. But everybody who was involved with Terror, love that Terror and Terror Incorporated, which was really actual title. Love the hell out of [00:38:00] the book, right. And myself, the editors, Carl Potts, who was the editor in chief, we all knew it was weird and unique. And, at one point when I, you know, said to Carl afterwards, well I'm just gonna take this whole concept and go somewhere else with it, he said, you can't, you made up something that, you know, can't really be replicated without people knowing exactly what you're doing. It's not just another guy with claws or a big muscle guy. How many people grab other people's body parts? So I said, you know, fie on me, but we all loved it. So when, the Shadowline stuff kind of went away, uh, and he was sort of kicking out there is still, uh, Carl came to me one day and, and said, listen, we love this character. We're thinking of doing something with horror in Marvel. This was before the Rise of the Midnight Sons. So it kind of came a little bit ahead of that. I think this eventually would become exactly the Rise of the Midnight Sons, but we want to bring together a lot of these unused horror characters, like Werewolf by Night, Man Thing, or whatever, but we want a central kind of [00:39:00] character who, navigates them or maybe introduces them. Wasn't quite clear what, and they thought Terror, or Shrek as he still was at that point, could be that character. He could almost be a Crypt Keeper, maybe, it wasn't quite fully baked. And, so we started to bounce this around a little bit, and then I got a call from Carl and said, yeah, that's off. We're going to do something else with these horror characters, which again would eventually become probably the Midnight Sons stuff. But he said, but we still want to do something with it. You know? So my disappointment went to, oh, what do you mean? How could we do anything? He said, what if you just bring him into the Marvel Universe? We won't say anything about what he did before, and just use him as a character and start over with him operating as this high-end mercenary, you know, what's he going to do? What is Terror Incorporated, and how does he do business within the Marvel world? And so I said, yes, of course, I'm not going to say that, you know, any quicker and just jumped into [00:40:00] it. And I didn't really worry about the transition, you know, I wasn't thinking too much about, okay. How does he get from Shadow Line world, to earth 616 or whatever, Marcus McLaurin, who was the editor. God bless him, for years would resist any discussion or no, no, it's not the same character. Marcus, it's the same character I'm using the same lines. I'm having him referenced the same fact that he's had different versions of the word terrors, his name at one point, he makes a joke about the Saint George complex. I mean, it's the same character. Mike: Yeah. Dan: But , you know, Marcus was a very good soldier to the Marvel hierarchy. So we just really brought him over and we just went all in on him in terms of, okay, what could a character like this play in the Marvel world? And he played really well in certain instances, but he certainly was very different than probably anything else that was going on at the time. Mike: Yeah. I mean, there certainly wasn't a character like him before. So all the Wikias, like [00:41:00] Wikipedia, all the Marvel fan sites, they all list Daredevil 305 as Terror's first official appearance in. Dan: Could be. Mike: Yeah, but I want to talk about that for a second, because that is, I think the greatest villain that I've ever seen in a Marvel comic, which was the Surgeon General, who is this woman who is commanding an army of like, I mean, basically it's like a full-scale operation of that urban myth of - Dan: Yeah. Mike: -the dude goes home with an attractive woman that he meets at the club. And then he wakes up in a bathtub full of ice and he's missing organs. Dan: Yeah. You know, sometimes, you know, that was certainly urban myth territory, and I was a big student of urban myths and that was the sort of thing that I think would show up in the headlines every three to six months, but always one of those probably friend of a friend stories that. Mike: Oh yeah. Dan: Like a razor an apple or something like that, that never actually sort of tracks back. Mike: Well, I mean, the thing now is it's all edibles in candy and they're like, all the news outlets are showing officially [00:42:00] branded edibles. Which, what daddy Warbucks mother fucker. Jessika: Mike knows my stand on this. Like, no, no, nobody is buying expensive edibles. And then putting them in your child's candy. Like, No, no, that's stupid. Dan: No, it's the, it's the, easier version of putting the LSD tab or wasting your pins on children in Snickers bars. Jessika: Right. Dan: Um, but but I think, that, that storyline is interesting, Mike, cause it's the, it's one of the few times I had a plotline utterly just completely rejected by an editor because I think I was doing so much horror stuff at the time. Cause I was also concurrently doing the Hellraiser work, the Night Breed work. It would have been the beginning of the Night Stalkers work, cause I was heavily involved with the whole Midnight Sons work. And I went so far on the first plot and it was so grizzly and so gruesome that, Ralph Macchio who was the editor, called me up and said, yeah, this title is Daredevil. It's not Hellraiser. So I had to kind of back off [00:43:00] and realize, uh, yeah, I put a little too much emphasis on the grisliness there. So. Mike: That's amazing. Dan: She was an interesting, exploration of a character type. Mike: I'm really sad that she hasn't showed back up, especially cause it feels like it'd be kind of relevant these days with, you know, how broken the medical system is here in America. Dan: Yeah. It's, it's funny. And I never played with her again, which is, I think one of my many Achilles heels, you know, as I would sometimes introduce characters and then I would just not go back to them for some reason, I was always trying to kind of go forward onto something new. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Is there anything about Terror's character that you related to at the time, or now even. Dan: Um, probably being very imperious, very complicated, having a thing for long coats. Uh, I think all of those probably, you know, work then and now, I've kind of become convinced weirdly enough over time, that Terror was a character who [00:44:00] and I, you know, I co-created him with Margaret Clark and, and Klaus Janson, but I probably did the most work with him over the years, you know? So I feel maybe a little bit more ownership, but I've sort of become convinced that he was just his own thing, and he just existed out there in the ether, and all I was ultimately was a conduit that I was, I was just channeling this thing into our existence because he came so fully formed and whenever I would write him, he would just kind of take over the page and take over the instance. That's always how I've viewed him, which is different than many of the other things that I've written. Mike: He's certainly a larger than life personality, and in every sense of that expression. Jessika: Yes. Mike: I'm sorry for the terrible pun. Okay. So we've actually talked a bit about Terror, but I [00:45:00] feel like we need to have Jessika provide us with an overall summary of his brief series. Jessika: So the series is based on the titular character, of course, Terror, who is unable to die and has the ability to replace body parts and gains the skill and memory of that limb. So he might use the eye of a sharpshooter to improve his aim or the arm of an artist for a correct rendering. And because of the inability for his body to die, the dude looks gnarly. His face is a sick green color. He has spike whiskers coming out of the sides of his face, and he mostly lacks lips, sometimes he has lips, but he mostly lacks lips. So we always has this grim smile to his face. And he also has a metal arm, which is awesome. I love that. And he interchanges all of the rest of his body parts constantly. So in one scene he'll have a female arm and in another one it'll sport, an other worldly tentacle. [00:46:00] He states that his business is fear, but he is basically a paid mercenary, very much a dirty deeds, although not dirt cheap; Terror charges, quite a hefty sum for his services, but he is willing to do almost anything to get the job done. His first job is ending someone who has likewise immortal, air quotes, which involves finding an activating a half demon in order to open a portal and then trick a demon daddy to hand over the contract of immortality, you know, casual. He also has run-ins with Wolverine, Dr. Strange Punisher, Silver Sable, and Luke Cage. It's action packed, and you legitimately have no idea what new body part he is going to lose or gain in the moment, or what memory is going to pop up for him from the donor. And it keeps the reader guessing because Terror has no limitations. Mike: Yeah. Dan: was, I was so looking forward to hearing what your recap was going to be. I love that, so I just [00:47:00] want to say that. Jessika: Thank you. I had a lot of fun reading this. Not only was the plot and just the narrative itself, just rolling, but the art was fantastic. I mean, the things you can do with a character like that, there truly aren't any limits. And so it was really interesting to see how everything fell together and what he was doing each moment to kind of get out of whatever wacky situation he was in at the time.So. And his, and his quips, I just, the quips were just, they give me life. Mike: They're so good. Like there was one moment where he was sitting there and playing with the Lament Configuration, and the first issue, which I, I never noticed that before, as long as we ready this time and I was like, oh, that's great. And then he also made a St. George reference towards the end of the series where he was talking about, oh, I knew another guy who had a St. George complex. Dan: Right, right. Right, Mike: Like I love those little Easter eggs. Speaking of Easter eggs, there are a lot of Clive Barker Easter eggs throughout that whole series. Dan: [00:48:00] Well, That's it. That was so parallel at the time, you know. Mike: So around that time was when you were editing and then writing for the HellRaiser series and the Night Breed series, right? Dan: Yes. Certainly writing for them. Yeah. I mean, I did some consulting editing on the HellRaiser and other Barker books, after our lift staff, but, primarily writing at that point. Mike: Okay. Cause I have Hellraiser number one, and I think you're listed as an editor on it. Dan: I was, I started the whole Hellraiser anthology with other folks, you know, but I was the main driver, and I think that was one of the early instigators of kind of the rebirth of horror at that time. And, you know, going back to something you said earlier, you know, for many years, I was always, pressing Archie Goodwin, who worked at Warren, and worked on Erie, and worked on all those titles. You know, why can't we do a new horror anthology and he was quite sage like and saying, yeah. It'd be great to do it, but it's not going to sell there's no hook, right? There's no connection, you know, just horror for her sake. And it was when Clive Barker [00:49:00] came into our offices, and so I want to do something with Archie Goodwin. And then the two of them said, Hellraiser can be the hook. Right. Hellraiser can be the way in to sort of create an anthology series, have an identifiable icon, and then we developed out from there with Clive, with a couple of other folks Erik Saltzgaber, Phil Nutman, myself, Archie Goodwin, like what would be the world? And then the Bible that would actually give you enough, breadth and width to play with these characters that wouldn't just always be puzzle box, pinhead, puzzle box, pinhead, you know? And so we developed a fairly large set of rules and mythologies allowed for that. Mike: That's so cool. I mean, there really wasn't anything at all, like Hellraiser when it came out. Like, and there's still not a lot like it, but I - Jessika: Yeah, I was going to say, wait, what else? Mike: I mean, I feel like I've read other books since then, where there's that blending of sexuality and [00:50:00] horror and morality, because at the, at the core of it, Hellraiser often feels like a larger morality play. Dan: Now, you know, I'm going to disagree with you on that one. I mean, I think sometimes we let it slip in a morality and we played that out. But I think Hellraiser is sort of find what you want out of it. Right. You go back to the first film and it's, you know, what's your pleasure, sir? You know, it was when the guy hands up the book and the Centobites, you know, or angels to some demons, to others. So I think the book was at its best and the movies are at their best when it's not so much about the comeuppance as it is about find your place in here. Right? And that can be that sort of weird exploration of many different things. Mike: That's cool. So going back to Terror. Because we've talked about like how much we enjoyed the character and everything, I want to take a moment to talk about each of our favorite Terror moments. Dan: Okay. Mike: So Dan, why don't you start? What was your favorite moment for Terror [00:51:00] to write or going back to read? Dan: It's a great question, one of the toughest, because again, I had such delight in the character and felt such a connection, you know, in sort of channeling him in a way I could probably find you five, ten moments per issue, but, I actually think it was the it's in the first issue. And was probably the first line that sort of came to me. And then I wrote backwards from it, which was this, got your nose bit. And you know, it's the old gag of like when a parent's playing with a child and, you know, grabs at the nose and uses the thumb to represent the nose and says, got your nose. And there's a moment in that issue where I think he's just plummeted out of a skyscraper. He's, you know, fallen down into a police car. He's basically shattered. And this cop or security guard is kind of coming over to him and, and he just reaches out and grabs the guy's nose, you know, rips his arm off or something or legs to start to replace himself and, and just says, got your nose, but it's, but it's all a [00:52:00] build from this inner monologue that he's been doing. And so he's not responding to anything. He's not doing a quip to anything. He's just basically telling us a story and ending it with this, you know, delivery that basically says the guy has a complete condescending attitude and just signals that we're in his space. Like he doesn't need to kind of like do an Arnold response to something it's just, he's in his own little world moments I always just kind of go back to that got your nose moment, which is just creepy and crazy and strange. Mike: As soon as you mentioned that I was thinking of the panel that that was from, because it was such a great moment. I think it was the mob enforcers that had shot him up and he had jumped out of the skyscraper four and then they came down to finish him off and he wound up just ripping them apart so that he could rebuild himself. All right, Jessika, how about you? Jessika: I really enjoyed the part where Terror fights with sharks in order to free Silver Sable and Luke Cage. [00:53:00] It was so cool. There was just absolutely no fear as he went at the first shark head-on and, and then there were like five huge bloodthirsty sharks in the small tank. And Terror's just like, what an inconvenience. Oh, well. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Like followed by a quippy remark, like in his head, of course. And I feel like he's such a solitary character that it makes sense that he would have such an active internal monologue. I find myself doing that. Like, you know, I mean, I have a dog, so he usually gets the brunt of it, but he, you know, it's, it is that you start to form like, sort of an internal conversation if you don't have that outside interaction. Dan: Right. Jessika: And I think a lot of us probably relate to that though this pandemic. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: But the one-liner thoughts, like, again, they make those scenes in my opinion, and it gave pause for levity. We don't have to be serious about this because really isn't life or death for Terror. We know that, and he just reminds us that constantly by just he's always so damn nonchalant. [00:54:00] Dan: Yeah. He does have a very, I'm not going to say suave, but it's, uh, you know, that sort of very, I've got this, you know, sort of attitude to it. Mike: I would, say that he's suave when he wants to be, I mean, like the last issue he's got his whiskers tied back and kind of a ponytail. Dan: Oh yeah. Jessika: Oh yeah. Dan: Richard Pace did a great job with that. Mike: Where he's dancing with his assistant in the restaurant and it's that final scene where he's got that really elegant tuxedo. Like. Dan: Yeah. It's very beautiful. Mike: I say that he can be suave and he wants to be. So I got to say like my favorite one, it was a visual gag that you guys did, and it's in issue six when he's fighting with the Punisher and he's got this, long guns sniper. And he shoots the Punisher point blank, and Terror's, like at this point he's lost his legs for like the sixth time. Like he seems to lose his legs, like once an issue where he's just a torso waddling around on his hands. And so he shoots him the force skids him back. [00:55:00] And I legit could not stop laughing for a good minute. Like I was just cackling when I read that. So I think all of us agree that it's those moments of weird levity that really made the series feel like something special. Dan: I'm not quite sure we're going to see that moment reenacted at the Disney Pavilion, you know, anytime soon. But, that would be pretty awesome if they ever went that route. Mike: Well, yeah, so, I mean, like, let's talk about that for a minute, because one of the main ways that I consume Marvel comics these days is through Marvel unlimited, and Terror is a pretty limited presence there. There's a few issues of various Deadpool series. There's the Marvel team up that I think Robert Kirkman did, where Terror shows up and he has some pretty cool moments in there. And then there's a couple of random issues of the 1990s Luke Cage series Cage, but like the core series, the Marvel max stuff, his appearance in books like Daredevil and Wolverine, they just don't seem to be available for consumption via the. App Like I had to go through my personal [00:56:00] collection to find all this stuff. And like, are the rights just more complicated because it was published under the Epic imprint and that was create her own stuff, like do you know? Dan: No, I mean, it wouldn't be it's choice, right. He's probably perceived as a, if people within the editorial group even know about him, right. I was reading something recently where some of the current editorial staff had to be schooled on who Jack Kirby was. So, I'm not sure how much exposure or, you know, interest there would be, you know, to that. I mean, I don't know why everything would be on Marvin unlimited. It doesn't seem like it requires anything except scanning the stuff and putting it up there. But there wouldn't be any rights issues. Marvel owned the Shadow Line, Marvel owns the Terror Incorporated title, it would have been there. So I'm not really sure why it wouldn't be. And maybe at some point it will, but, that's just an odd emission. I mean, for years, which I always felt like, well, what did I do wrong? I [00:57:00] mean, you can find very little of the Daredevil work I did, which was probably very well known and very well received in, in reprints. It would be like, there'd be reprints of almost every other storyline and then there'd be a gap around some of those things. And now they started to reappear as they've done these omnibus editions. Mike: Well, yeah, I mean, you know, and going back the awareness of the character, anytime I talk about Terror to people, it's probably a three out of four chance that they won't have heard of them before. I don't know if you're a part of the comic book historians group on Facebook? Dan: I'm not. No. Mike: So there's a lot of people who are really passionate about comic book history, and they talk about various things. And so when I was doing research for this episode originally, I was asking about kind of the revamp of supernatural heroes. And I said, you know, this was around the same time as Terror. And several people sat there and said, we haven't heard of Terror before. And I was like, he's great. He's amazing. You have to look them up. But yeah, it seems like, you know, to echo what you stated, it seems like there's just a lack of awareness about the character, which I feel is a genuine shame. And that's part of the [00:58:00] reason that I wanted to talk about him in this episode. Dan: Well, thank you. I mean, I love the spotlight and I think anytime I've talked to somebody about it who knew it, I've never heard somebody who read the book said, yeah, that sucks. Right. I've heard that about other things, but not about this one, invariably, if they read it, they loved it. And they were twisted and kind of got into it. But did have a limited run, right? It was only 13 issues. It didn't get the spotlight, it was sort of promised it kind of, it came out with a grouping of other mercenary titles at the time. There was a new Punisher title. There was a Silver Sable. There was a few other titles in this grouping. Everyone was promised a certain amount of additional PR, which they got; when it got to Terror. It didn't get that it like, they pulled the boost at the last minute that might not have made a difference. And I also think maybe it was a little bit ahead of its time in certain attitudes crossing the line between horror and [00:59:00] humor and overtness of certain things, at least for Marvel, like where do you fit this? I think the readers are fine. Readers are great about picking up on stuff and embracing things. For Marvel, it was kind of probably, and I'm not dissing them. I never got like any negative, you know, we're gonna launch this title, what we're going to dismiss it. But I just also think, unless it's somebody like me driving it or the editor driving it, or Carl Potts, who was the editor in chief of that division at that point, you know, unless they're pushing it, there's plenty of other characters Right. For, things to get behind. But I think again, anytime it kind of comes up, it is definitely the one that I hear about probably the most and the most passionately so that's cool in its own way. Mike: Yeah, I think I remember reading an interview that you did, where you were talking about how there was originally going to be like a gimmick cover or a trading card or something like that. Dan: Yeah. Mike: So what was the, what was the gimmick going to be for Terror number one? Dan: What was the gimmick going to be? I don't know, actually, I if I knew I [01:00:00] can't remember anymore. But it was going to be totally gimmicky, as all those titles and covers were at the time. So I hope not scratch and sniff like a, uh, rotting bodies odor, although that would have been kind of in-character and cool. Mike: I mean, this was the era of the gimmick cover. Dan: Oh, absolutely. Mike: Like,that was when that was when we had Bloodstrike come out and it was like the thermographic printing, so you could rub the blood and it would disappear. Force Works is my favorite one, you literally unfold the cover and it's like a pop-up book. Dan: Somebody actually keyed me in. There actually was like a Terror trading card at one point. Mike: Yeah. Dan: Like after the fact, which I was like, shocked. Mike: I have that, that's from Marvel Universe series four. Dan: Yeah. we did a pretty good job with it actually. And then even as we got to the end of the run, you know, we, and you can sort of see us where we're trying to shift certain aspects of the book, you know, more into the mainstream Marvel, because they said, well, we'll give you another seven issues or something, you know, to kind of get the numbers up. Mike: Right. Dan: And they pulled the plug, you know, even before that. So, uh, that's why [01:01:00] the end kind of comes a bit abruptly and we get that final coda scene, you know, that Richard Pace did such a nice job with. Mike: Yeah. I mean, it felt like it wrapped it up, you know, and they gave you that opportunity, which I was really kind of grateful for, to be honest. Dan: Yeah. and subsequently, I don't know what's going on. I know there was that David Lapham, you know, series, you did a couple of those, which I glanced at, I know I kind of got in the way of it a little bit too, not in the way, but I just said, remember to give us a little created by credits in that, but I didn't read those. And then, I know he was in the League of Losers at one point, which just didn't sound right to me. And, uh. Mike: It's actually. Okay. So I'm going to, I'm going to say this cause, it's basically a bunch of, kind of like the B to C listers for the most part. And. So they're called the Legal Losers. I think it's a really good story, and I actually really like what they do with Terror. He gets, she's now Spider Woman, I think it's, Anya Corazon, but it was her original incarnation of, Arana. And she's got that spider armor that like comes out of her arm. And so she [01:02:00] dies really on and he gets her arm. And then, Dan: That's cool. Mike: What happens is he makes a point of using the armor that she has. And so he becomes this weird amalgamation of Terror and Arana's armored form, which is great. Dan: Was that the Kirkman series? Is that the one that he did or. Mike: yeah. That was part of Marvel Team-Up. Dan: Okay. Mike: it was written by Robert Kirkman. Dan: Well, then I will, I will look it up. Mike: Yeah. And that one's on Marvel unlimited and genuinely a really fun story as I remembered. It's been a couple of years since I read it, but yeah. Dan: Very cool. Mike: So we've talked about this a little bit, but, so

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Baseball Central @ Noon
Braves' Game One Win & Tough Break

Baseball Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 48:53


The Atlanta Braves prevailed in Game One of the World Series as they picked up a 6-2 win despite starter Charlie Morton leaving the game with a broken leg. Blair & Barker break down the game and touch on Morton's injury and what it means for the Braves, Brian Snitker's decision to put Jorge Soler […]

America's Next Top Best Friend
ep 240: the girls go on an inter-dimensional hair journey

America's Next Top Best Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 67:39


join us as we recap australia's next top model, cycle 7, episodes 4 & 5 including: halloween candy, sunday mag, graveyards, antm copycats, micro aggressions, charlotte dawson/dodson and MAKEOVERS. https://blacklivesmatters.carrd.co/ https://www.the-audacity.com/ https://www.patreon.com/nexttopbestfriend?fbclid=IwAR1YTWcyipBLyEgpj82Ap7f9S5xrRWwZN58Q3ATGQFX3eRbKflizEXQV9wQ nexttopbestfriend@gmail.com https://www.americasnexttopbestfriend.com/ https://www.paypal.me/nexttopbestfriend https://www.instagram.com/nexttopbestfriend/ https://www.facebook.com/nexttopbestfriend/ https://twitter.com/nexttopbestpod amanda: @lochnessmanda (twitter, instagram) hillary: @hillaryous123 (twitter, instagram)

Baseball Central @ Noon
Astros-Braves: Who Ya Got?

Baseball Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 47:23


Blair & Barker ask for fan reaction on the World Series and who they'd like to see to win before Jeff explains that he's sick of seeing of seeing pitchers hit in the postseason (3:09). Atlanta Braves legend, two-time NL MVP and restauranteur Dale Murphy weighs-in on the World Series matchup, what he expects from […]

Baseball Central @ Noon
Reuniting with Rick Sweet

Baseball Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 50:39


The World Series starts tonight! Jeff and Kevin open up the show discussing Atlanta manager Brian Snitker's relationship with GM Alex Anthopoulos, why they are selecting the Astros to win it all, and expecting more from Houston's Alex Bregman (4:50). Later in the hour, Barker's former manager currently with the Nashville Sounds, Rick Sweet joins […]

The Left Page
Episode 47 - Pod B Gone. Gay Demons, Videogames & Clive Barker. W/ Horror Vanguard and Labor Kyle

The Left Page

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 88:56


For this year's Halloween episode (a bit early, but hey, you deserve it!) I bring in an expert team and we create something unholy and magnificent. This was nothing short of a masterpiece, as, joined by Jon and Ash of the Horror Vanguard and Labor Kyle from, among many things, AGAB Pod, join me in talking, for the very first time: of Clive Barker!!! We chat, with Mr. B Gone, of gay demons, of love and secrets, or writing and videogames, of possibility, creativity, horror, and how we love Clive Barker, truly one of my favourite episodes ever and, hopefully, one of the best The Left Page has ever done, enjoy!!! Support the Horror Vanguard, Jon TheLitCritGuy and Labor Kyle! https://www.patreon.com/horrorvanguard https://www.patreon.com/TheLitCritGuy https://www.patreon.com/laborkyle   And, if you can, please support us on Patreon, where you can find our Reading Corners and Writer's Desks! https://www.patreon.com/leftpage Intro Music: Grave Encounter, by Karl Casey at White Bat Audio. Check them out here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7uWrhWtRggM  Outro Music: Downtime, Vistas, Miracle of Sound, 2014 -> Check out his Bandcamp! https://miracleofsound.bandcamp.com/

Baseball Central @ Noon
Chris Taylor Makes Postseason History

Baseball Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 48:17


Blair & Barker discuss the Dodgers extending the NLCS after their 11-2 win over the Atlanta Braves in Game 5. The guys break down Chris Taylor's phenomenal game where he became the first player in MLB history to hit three-home runs in the postseason while facing elimination, Albert Pujols' significance to the club, and what […]

Brussels Sprouts
The Trade and Technology Council, with Tyson Barker and Frances Burwell

Brussels Sprouts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 56:53


What are the key takeaways from the first meeting of the U.S.-EU Trade and Technology Council? Tyson Barker and Frances Burwell join Carisa Nietsche and Jim Townsend to discuss the goals of the TTC and how it fits into the broader transatlantic technology relationship. Tyson Barker is head of the Technology and Global Affairs at the German Council on Foreign Relations, or DGAP. He previously worked at Aspen Germany where, as deputy executive director and fellow, he was responsible for the institute's digital and transatlantic programs. Frances G. Burwell is a distinguished fellow at the Atlantic Council and a senior director at McLarty Associates. Her work focuses on the European Union and U.S.-EU relations as well as a range of transatlantic economic, political, and defense issues.

Dare to Leap
Jackie Barker — Optimize Your Website

Dare to Leap

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 53:24


Jackie Barker is the Owner and Founder of the Barefoot Design Collective, a web and graphic design firm. In this episode, you'll learn a little bit about Jackie, how she got started, and how she's different from other web development firms. Jackie provides an all-encompassing look at your website and makes sure it's optimized and running to its full efficiency, and then some! Find out more in this week's episode.   Key takeaways: Jackie shares a little bit about how she got started in graphic and web design. How does Jackie provide a “website in a day”? She breaks down her service offering. Jackie shares how she makes it super easy for clients to get the knowledge and skillsets that they need to have a professional website. What does website maintenance look like with a pre-built WordPress template? People might complain about WordPress, but it is a very solid platform to be on! They are constantly updating their platform. Jackie shares how she saved her client $300 a month in maintenance fees! And, improved her site speed. If your website is down or broken, how many customers would you lose? Not many people would reach out to tell you that your website contact form is broken. What tips does Jackie have to help attract the attention of your ideal client on your website? How knowledgeable is Jackie about SEO? What is a meta description? Jackie explains how easy it is to get started working with her. Bundle your website elements together and Jackie takes care of the rest! Kathy is so glad she has people like Jackie. She can easily spend hours on a website, and not even understand what went wrong!   Resources: Barefootdc.com Jackie on LinkedIn   Quotes:   “If you're a small business owner, $10,000 for a website that is going to constantly need to be changed and updated, that's a lot of money!”   “At least go out to your site once a week just to make sure everything is updated, security plugins and backups running, that's what somebody that maintains your site should be doing.”   “[With your words], it's about having a call to action. It's all about psychology and where the eyes go around the screen.”