Podcasts about AEA

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 178PODCASTS
  • 331EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 1WEEKLY EPISODE
  • Dec 22, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about AEA

Latest podcast episodes about AEA

Voice Is
MORE with Casey Erin Clark: Lessons from musical theater, the graveyard of f*cks, and communicating in Technicolor

Voice Is

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 47:36


Julie chats with Casey Erin Clark (her co-founder) about her winding path from “small town girl trying to make it in Broadway” perfectionist to multi-hyphenate rebel. Along the way, they cover the profound joy of using your voice, embracing your edges, seeing possibility all around you, and finding your “I want” song.    Thank you to our Season 3 sponsor, Armoire! If you're ready to try a new look, Armoire's high-end clothing rental service (full of amazing women-owned brands) will hook you up! For 50% off your first month's rental + a free item, go to http://armoire.style/voiceis and use VOICEIS in the referral box!   TOP TAKEAWAYS Casey was born a classic people-pleasing perfectionist. It took her years, a few serious bumps in the road, and one devastating election to finally clarify what was really important. (Hint: the answer was not “what other people think.”) Articulating what you want is powerful. An “I want” song in musical theater tells us about the character's desires and ambitions and needs…and spending your life and career exploring this kind of material is awfully helpful when you need to express your own wants. (Try finding your own “I want” song!) Every human being contains infinite possibility and potential—seeing more in ourselves and each other requires self-exploration, curiosity, a supportive community, and a willingness to see what's beyond the surface.      Casey Erin Clark is a voice, public speaking, and communication coach, performer, author, entrepreneur, podcast host, and leader in both the entertainment and business worlds. She is a fierce advocate for gender justice and spends her days speaking, teaching, and writing about the power of women's voices, while seizing fulfilling opportunities to perform on screen and stage. In 2014, Casey and Julie Fogh co-founded Vital Voice Training, a voice and speech coaching company on a mission to change the conversation about what leaders are “supposed” to sound like and empower everyone to own the power of their full vocal instrument and presence. Casey hails from the cornfields of southern Illinois (where she grew up singing with her family Von Trapp-style) and has a BFA in musical theater from Illinois Wesleyan University. She also coaches musical theater pros of all ages, is a member of SAG-AFTRA and AEA, performed on the 2021 Tony Awards and at the 2013 Oscars with the Les Miserables movie cast, and sings with the Grammy-nominated and Tony-honored Broadway Inspirational Voices choir. Recommending books and breakfast restaurants is her love language. Will perform the Lafayette speed rap from Hamilton on demand.

Black Like Me
S6 Ep143: Black Joy Is About Authenticity...Everywhere!: A Candid Conversation With Tyler Perry's The Haves & The Have Nots Star Angela Robinson

Black Like Me

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 52:39


Dr. Alex Gee welcomes his friend and actress Angela Robinson to continue his exploration of the many sides of Black Joy. For Robinson, Black Joy means embracing your culture with a lack of pretense. Robinson also provides advice on having a strong career and the importance of life experience, as she share about her own career. This is an inspiring conversation that you don't want to miss. A native of Jacksonville, FL, Angela Robinson is best-known as The Ice Queen Veronica Harrington of Tyler Perry's The Haves and The Have Nots. For her work as Veronica she is the 2015 recipient of the Gracie Award (Best Female Actress - One to Watch). Angela has worked on Broadway, off Broadway and on stages throughout the US and abroad. Broadway productions include The Color Purple with Fantasia, Wonderful Town, Bells Are Ringing, and Play On! She has participated in National Tours of The Color Purple, Dreamgirls, and The Wizard of Oz with Eartha Kitt. Her television/film credits include Law & Order: SVU, Another Bed and several regional and national commercials. She is the Winner of an Independent Reviewers of New England (IRNE) award for her work as Shug Avery in The Color Purple, Angela has been nominated twice for a Black Theatre Alliance Award (The Color Purple, Dreamgirls), and for an Audelco Award (Radiant Baby). She is also a member of the Tony Award winning Broadway Inspirational Voices. In 2008 Angela and her husband Scott founded the WhiteRobin Group. WhiteRobin Group is a consulting firm for aspiring and seasoned artists; providing training, inspiration and direction via acting workshops, private acting coaching, blogs and mentorship programs. Angela is a graduate of Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University (BA) and The William Esper Acting Studio where she studied with master teacher William Esper. She is a proud member of AEA, SAG-AFTRA. Angela currently resides in New Jersey with her husband, Scott Whitehurst, and son Robbie. alexgee.com Support the Show: patreon.com/blacklikeme

Addictive Eaters Anonymous

My Path to Meditation in AEA

RECO12
Leonie T - A New Way of Living - Meeting 79

RECO12

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 53:21


Guest Intro and Bio for Leonie T:  She joined Alcoholics Anonymous and a 12 step food fellowship in August 1980.   Sobriety commenced for her in November of that year and she lives in Christchurch, New Zealand.Welcome to Reco12.  We are an organization whose addictions include alcohol, drugs, lust and sex, food and gambling, just to name a few.  We come together from all places, faiths and backgrounds to learn the similarities of addiction and to gain tools and hope from others who are walking a similar path.  We invite recovering addicts with at least 1 year sobriety and who are actively working their recovery in their respective fellowships to share their experience, strength and hope on a live Zoom webinar, each Friday at 12:00 pm central time, for 20-25 minutes.  Then, we, the live audience, get the opportunity to ask questions of the speaker for another 20-25 minutes.  If you are hearing this meeting in recorded podcast form and would like to participate as a live audience member in the future, please go to www.reco12.com to learn more and submit your email address there to receive weekly invitations.  Reco12 is a self-supporting service and we appreciate your help in keeping us working our Step 12 in this manner.  We gratefully accept contributions.  If you choose to contribute, you can go to https://www.reco12.com/support  or you can click the link to PayPal (https://www.paypal.me/reco12)  in the chat of the live meeting.  When you contribute, please specify the meeting number.  This is meeting number 79.Resources mentioned in this meeting:Alcoholics AnonymousAddictive Eaters AnonymousOutro music is “Standing Still” by Cory Ellsworth and Randy Kartchner, performed by Mike Eldred and Elizabeth Wolfe.  This song, and/or the entire soundtrack for the future Broadway musical, “Crosses:  A Musical of Hope”, can be purchased here:  https://music.apple.com/us/album/crosses-musical-hope-by-cory/528476262  This song is used with the  permission of Cory Ellsworth.Support the show (https://www.reco12.com/support)

EvaluLand
30: Eval21Reflections with Radical (Re)imagining

EvaluLand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 38:16


I chat with Libby Smith and Tiffany Tovey, two of the three hosts of the Radical Re(imagining) (https://radicalreimagining.com/) podcast, to chat about what felt radical about the 2021 AEA virtual conference. We'd love to hear from you! What felt radical to you about the conference? Feel free to add your reflections on LinkedIn or Twitter. Be sure to use the #Eval21 hashtag, and tag us in your reflections! Twitter accounts: * @RadReImagining (https://twitter.com/RadReImagining) * @workwithlibby (https://twitter.com/work_with_libby) * @Tiffany7001 (https://twitter.com/Tiffany7001) * @EvaluLand (https://twitter.com/EvaluLand) * @danawanzer (https://twitter.com/danawanzer)

Consistently Off
Ep. 123 "I Buy Work For Myself" Featuring Nathan Bowers

Consistently Off

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 107:32


This week the boys sit down with Bur Burgman himself aka Nathan Bowers and talk about: Tiki drinks, Consistently Broken, Bowers Audio, AEA, 4.3.21, Machining, Family, Growing up. Pink Floyd, The Decemberists, Hendrix, Bass, Building stuff, buying work, and much much more.

Black, Educated & Broke
BEB Szn4 Eps 18: 'Raising Dion' Star Tracey Bonner Kicks it w/ Black Educated & Broke

Black, Educated & Broke

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 63:16


On this episode of Black Educated & Broke: Mike B's having a BABY BOY !!!! We are so excited and although he didn't make a big fuss about it .. WE SURE ARE!! The crew holds down the show w/out Randi O and Ron and of course the jokes had to commence. Mike B has your Melanin News. MTT: How do you feel about boys having kitchen play sets? SAG/AFTRA & AEA actress, Tracey Bonner chops it w/ BEB and talks about her new projects and we fan out over her past roles in Black Lightning!! As always, like, share, subscribe and follow @BlackEducatedandBroke

RECO12
Tony S - How Addiction Swapped in Recovery - Meeting 78

RECO12

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 53:21


Tony S from New Zealand in his own words:  I came into Alcoholics Anonymous in a very dark state in 1989, and while I was grateful when the craving to drink and drug was removed by a power greater than me, the obsession to eat I'd been battling all my life got more powerful by the day. I continued to eat addictively, and, as a result, didn't experience the freedoms of AA's promises. (Sponsoring myself for eight years didn't help!). In a Paris hotel in 2002, after a deeply shameful episode, I finally accepted I was as powerless over food as I was over alcohol, and that I must seek help from sober members following the principles now practised by Addictive Eaters Anonymous (AEA). Since getting a real sponsor and starting to work the Steps, I haven't had to eat addictively or use any mind-altering substance and my life continues to get better day by day.Welcome to Reco12.  We are an organization whose addictions include alcohol, drugs, lust and sex, food and gambling, just to name a few.  We come together from all places, faiths and backgrounds to learn the similarities of addiction and to gain tools and hope from others who are walking a similar path.  We invite recovering addicts with at least 1 year sobriety and who are actively working their recovery in their respective fellowships to share their experience, strength and hope on a live Zoom webinar, each Friday at 12:00 pm central time, for 20-25 minutes.  Then, we, the live audience, get the opportunity to ask questions of the speaker for another 20-25 minutes.  If you are hearing this meeting in recorded podcast form and would like to participate as a live audience member in the future, please go to www.reco12.com to learn more and submit your email address there to receive weekly invitations.  Reco12 is a self-supporting service and we appreciate your help in keeping us working our Step 12 in this manner.  We gratefully accept contributions.  If you choose to contribute, you can go to https://www.reco12.com/support  or you can click the link to PayPal (https://www.paypal.me/reco12)  in the chat of the live meeting.  When you contribute, please specify the meeting number.  This is meeting number 78.Resources mentioned in this meeting:Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)Addictive Eaters Anonymous (AEA)Outro music is “Standing Still” by Cory Ellsworth and Randy Kartchner, performed by Mike Eldred and Elizabeth Wolfe.  This song, and/or the entire soundtrack for the future Broadway musical, “Crosses:  A Musical of Hope”, can be purchased here:  https://music.apple.com/us/album/crosses-musical-hope-by-cory/528476262  This song is used with the  permission of Cory Ellsworth.Support the show (https://www.reco12.com/support)

AEA Amplified
Ep. 15 – Gogo 5G ready to go in 2022

AEA Amplified

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 36:45


Sergio Aguirre, president of Gogo Business Aviation, has all the details on Gogo's 5G air-to-ground network and onboard equipment in this episode of AEA Amplified. Gogo is the world's largest provider of broadband connectivity services for the business aviation market. An AEA member company since 1992, Gogo offers a customizable suite of smart cabin systems for highly integrated connectivity, in-flight entertainment and voice solutions. The company's products and services are installed on thousands of business aircraft of all sizes and mission types. This episode is sponsored by Genesys Aerosystems, a Moog Company.

Tu Chey
Land of By Any Means Necessary

Tu Chey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 66:37


Tu Chey Season 2 is HERE! Cheyanne Marie kicks off the season premiere talking deep with Kordai J'avance Harris about some of the world's most current controversial issues. Topics ranging from AEA's new rules to mother's rights will be sure to make you think. But don't be so serious, grab a glass of wine or smoke that vape, just make sure to relax & enjoy this episode's unique perspective. Featured Music: "New 80s" by Kordai J'avanceSpecial Thanks to Kordai J'avance! Follow him on Instagram @kordaijavanceSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/cheyannemarie)

Effetto giorno le notizie in 60 minuti

Anche nel 2019 l'Italia si conferma tra i paesi Ue dove sono più alti i rischi per la salute, in termini di morti e anni di vita persi, per l'esposizione allo smog. Secondo il Rapporto 2021 sulla qualità dell'aria dell'Agenzia Europea dell'ambiente (Aea), nel 2019 il nostro paese era il primo per numero di morti per biossido di azoto, ed è il secondo dopo la Germania. Per parlare di questo e anche per fare un primo bilancio sulla Cop26 appena conclusa sentiamo Riccardo De Lauretis, responsabile dell'area per la valutazione delle emissioni, la prevenzione dell'inquinamento atmosferico e cambiamenti climatici per l'ISPRA. Oggi i lavoratori precari del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) tornano a Roma per chiedere di essere assunti dopo anni e anni di contratti a termine. Si tratta di circa 350 idonei in graduatorie concorsuali di stabilizzazione che scadranno tra meno di un mese. Il vertice del CNR ha manifestato più volte la volontà di assumere i precari ma ad oggi non ha ancora avviato tali procedure. Collegato con noi Lorenzo Marconi, coordinatore del movimento precari uniti CNR.

Scary Stories Around the Fire

How do you describe a missing world? Crystal Skillman's chilling THE NEW WORLD follows a mysterious speaker's audio diary after she wakes up to find her partner missing. Directed by Sarah Storm, the story is told by Ali Bailey. SUPPORT: https://gofund.me/89dd0e77 https://twitter.com/scarystoriespod http://instagram.com/thescarystoriespodcast https://facebook.com/scarystoriespod https://www.youtube.com/randomacts thescarystoriespodcast AT gmail.com Crystal Skillman is a four-time New York Times Critics Pick. She is the book writer for the musical MARY AND MAX and co-writer of KING KIRBY from the Broadway Podcast Network. She has also written for both Marvel and Adventure Time. Her new audio drama THE MAGICIAN'S MAGICIAN launches this fall. THE NEW WORLD is directed by Sarah Storm, co-founder of BOOM Integrated. Sarah is the producer of both the award-winning "Hello Monday with Jessi Hempel" and "This is Working with Daniel Roth" podcasts. She appears weekly with host Jessi Hempel on "LinkedIn Live" for Hello Monday Office Hours. Sarah is a member of SAG-AFTRA, AEA, and The Dramatists' Guild. are you afraid of the dark? maybe you should be. SCARY STORIES AROUND THE FIRE is an ongoing audio horror anthology. Writers include Bryan Renaud, Savanna Rae, Bianca Phipps, and Crystal Skillman. Each campfire story features full sound design and a professional cast. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scarystoriesra/support

RECO12
Pamela G - Going Deeper in Challenging Times - Meeting 74

RECO12

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 59:38


In Pamela's own  words:  I came into AEA and AA broken in 2008, my life wasn't working anymore! I felt like a big fat oversized childish oaf.  Totally dependent of other people's opinions of me. I was so relieved when my sponsor offered me a complete change of my life and thinking if only I was able to go to any length to get it! I said yes and I've found life get's better and better with this new Way of Life; despite outside circumstances!Welcome to Reco12.  We are an organization whose addictions include alcohol, drugs, lust and sex, food and gambling, just to name a few.  We come together from all places, faiths and backgrounds to learn the similarities of addiction and to gain tools and hope from others who are walking a similar path.  We invite recovering addicts with at least 1 year sobriety and who are actively working their recovery in their respective fellowships to share their experience, strength and hope on a live Zoom webinar, each Friday at 12:00 pm central time, for 20-25 minutes.  Then, we, the live audience, get the opportunity to ask questions of the speaker for another 20-25 minutes.  If you are hearing this meeting in recorded podcast form and would like to participate as a live audience member in the future, please go to www.reco12.com to learn more and submit your email address there to receive weekly invitations.  Reco12 is a self-supporting service and we appreciate your help in keeping us working our Step 12 in this manner.  We gratefully accept contributions to help cover the costs of the Zoom platform, podcast platform, web hosting, and administrative costs.  To contribute, you can go to https://www.reco12.com/support  or you can click the link to PayPal (https://www.paypal.me/reco12)  in the chat of the live meeting.  When you contribute, please specify the meeting number.  This is meeting number 74.Resources mentioned in this meeting:Alcoholics AnonymousAddictive Eaters Anonymous12 & 12As Bill Sees ItTo connect with Pamela, please email reco12pod@gmail.com and I can facilitate that connection.Outro music is “Standing Still” by Cory Ellsworth and Randy Kartchner, performed by Mike Eldred and Elizabeth Wolfe.  This song, and/or the entire soundtrack for the future Broadway musical, “Crosses:  A Musical of Hope”, can be purchased here:  https://music.apple.com/us/album/crosses-musical-hope-by-cory/528476262  This song is used with the  permission of Cory Ellsworth.Support the show (https://www.reco12.com/support)

Tech Intersect™ with Tonya M. Evans
Tech Intersect #88: Melanie McClain-Music NFTs, New Revenue Streams & the Future of Fan Engagement

Tech Intersect™ with Tonya M. Evans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 43:47


In this episode of Tech Intersect, I welcome Melanie McClain to the show. Melanie is a New York based publishing A&R at Secretly Group, founder of the Blurred Lines community, and blockchain strategist with a focus on Web3 world-building for international creatives and brands. Melanie is a music industry veteran with over 10 years of professional experience as an early supporter of emerging talent and international household names like Lizzo, G-Eazy, Lil Nas X, Burna Boy, J Balvin, and Megan Thee Stallion. In 2021, Melanie was honored on Billboard Magazine's Change Agent list in publishing alongside music industry leaders like Ryan Press, John Platt, Justin Shukat and Josh Gruss. She also became a member of the Music Business Association's junior board. Her experience includes roles as the U.S. hip-hop and African music content specialist at YouTube Music, experiential music manager at Budweiser, staff writer at Solange's Saint Heron and the first publicist for G-Eazy. She is a highly sought-after and globally recognized professional speaker and an all-around awesome human. Vibes!I invited her to come onto the show to talk about how and why NFTs are a viable option for artists to not only survive but thrive, especially indie artists, and about her work to educate and empower historically marginalized artists to explore and excel in monetizing their work in the new economy via NFT creation and sales. SPONSORED BY ADVANTAGE EVANS™ ACADEMY Are you ready for your advantage? Visit AdvantageEvans.com to learn how to buy, store and trade crypto and NFTs and to access DeFi safely, legally and confidently.  AEA offers ON-DEMAND and cohort-based courses, as well as an exciting, engaging, informative and FUN membership club, AE EXPLORE LIVE for as little as $99.Regulation is an essential component of a healthy, thriving crypto ecosystem. And the legal implications of crypto, DeFi and NFTs sometimes seem as volatile and unpredictable as the price of Bitcoin. And speaking of Bitcoin, it will likely be the world reserve currency at some point and will certainly be recognized as legal tender in some countries (oh hey, El Salvador!). So, building your digital cash wealth on a solid legal foundation is critical to creating and cultivating sustainable generational wealth with crypto assets.  Professor, and leading expert, Tonya M. Evans helps you make it all make sense so that you can get off the sidelines and into the future. Because the future is now!Guest:Web:  Blurred Lines DiscordClubhouse and Twitter: @Melkneesendmelmusic@gmail.com Contact:Questions and requests: hello@techintersectpodcast.com Follow: Twitter @AtTechIntersect | Instagram @TechIntersect Web: Tech Intersect Podcast  Connect for exclusive content: http://eepurl.com/gKqDyP Rapternal Music (Regulate and The Rabbit Hole) by Notty Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.Produced by Tonya M. Evans for FYOS Entertainment, LLC, and Stephanie Renee for Soul Sanctuary, Inc.Support the show (https://tinyurl.com/techintersectvip)

Tech Intersect™ with Tonya M. Evans
Tech Intersect #87: Lamar Wilson-Black Bitcoin Billionaires and the Great Wealth Transfer

Tech Intersect™ with Tonya M. Evans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 65:47


In this episode of Tech Intersect, I welcome Lamar Wilson aka BIG MARH to the show. He co-founded the Black Bitcoin Billionaire Club with friend of the show, previous guest and author of Bitcoin and Black America, Isaiah “Bitcoin Zay'' Jackson, BBB is now one of the largest cryptocurrency groups on Clubhouse. The club encourages members to invest in crypto through educational dialogue on Clubhouse and Marh and his amazing team of instructors also share invaluable information on Twitter about how to get your entire Bitcoin and future of money life together.  Please take a moment to follow this podcast and then like, share and comment so that others who would benefit from this content can find it. SPONSORED BY ADVANTAGE EVANS™ ACADEMY Are you ready for your advantage? Visit AdvantageEvans.com to learn how to buy, store and trade crypto and NFTs and to access DeFi safely, legally and confidently.  AEA offers ON-DEMAND and cohort-based courses, as well as an exciting, engaging, informative and FUN membership club, AE EXPLORE LIVE for as little as $99.Regulation is an essential component of a healthy, thriving crypto ecosystem. And the legal implications of crypto, DeFi and NFTs sometimes seem as volatile and unpredictable as the price of Bitcoin. And speaking of Bitcoin, it will likely be the world reserve currency at some point and will certainly be recognized as legal tender in some countries (oh hey, El Salvador!). So, building your digital cash wealth on a solid legal foundation is critical to creating and cultivating sustainable generational wealth with crypto assets.  Professor, and leading expert, Tonya M. Evans helps you make it all make sense so that you can get off the sidelines and into the future. Because the future is now!Guest:Web:  BlackBitcoinBillionaire.comClubhouse and Twitter: @BigMarhContact:Questions and requests: hello@techintersectpodcast.com Follow: Twitter @AtTechIntersect | Instagram @TechIntersect Web: Tech Intersect Podcast  Connect for exclusive content: http://eepurl.com/gKqDyP Rapternal Music (Regulate and The Rabbit Hole) by Notty Productions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. Produced by Tonya M. Evans for FYOS Entertainment, LLC, and Stephanie Renee for Soul Sanctuary, Inc.Support the show (https://tinyurl.com/techintersectvip)

Empowerography
Linda Glick Episode S01 EPS 246

Empowerography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 40:44


In the latest episode of the Empowerography Podcast, my guest is Linda Glick. Linda Glick, actress and singer (AEA, SAGAFTRA) has been in front of audiences all of her adult life either by teaching, coaching or performing. Linda's area of expertise is: Voice for Singers, Speaking Skills and Vocal Presence. She has led seminars, classes and intensives, working  both privately and with groups of all sizes.Linda has over 30+ years of performing ‘across the boards' in Film, TV, andTheatre. Notable roles include Nancy Pelosi in HBO's “Too Big To Fail”, Madonna's “W.E.” and Mrs. Brice in “Funny Girl”. Recently, she appeared in “The Incredible Jessica James” and “The Blacklist”. Her One Woman Concerts have taken her around the world and into top NYC Supper Clubs including Feinstein's 54Below and Rainbow and Stars. The combination of both teacher and performer creates a great dynamic. Linda coaches a very specific craft and skill set, synthesized from her many years as both performer, director and instructor. In this episode we discuss acting, singing, performing, innate abilities, teaching and having impact. Website - https://lindaglick.com IG - http://www.instagram.com/lindajglick "I think it was just something that called to me, I was very shy on the inside" - 00:02:14 "I like to say that voice is the original social media" - 00:22:12 "Be proud of the risks you've taken, don't play it safe" - 00:38:10 Empowerography would like to offer you a discount code to one of our exclusive partners, Quartz & Canary Jewelry & Wellness Co. Please use CODE EMPOWER15 to receive 15% off upon check out at www.quartzandcanary.com. Quartz & Canary is truly the place, where spirituality meets style.

Actorcast
To Join the Union or Not to Join the Union | Episode 039

Actorcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 10:29


In this episode of Actorcast, we discuss the new Open Policy for AEA, the debate about this new policy, and whether receiving the coveted equity card still holds the same clout. But, more so than that, we talk about whether to join the union or not and when might be the opportunity time to do so in your career.Sign up for the Actorcast Newsletter at Actorcast and join our membership to gain access to exclusive content at Become an Actorcast Premium Member | Actorcast.

The Actor CEO Podcast: Acting Business | Interviews | Motivation
What’s Next – Exploring Actors Equity Open Access and Future Inclusion with Bliss Griffin

The Actor CEO Podcast: Acting Business | Interviews | Motivation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 36:11


Discussing Actors Equity Open Access and what actors inclusion in the union looks like with DEI Strategist for AEA, Bliss Griffin The post What's Next – Exploring Actors Equity Open Access and Future Inclusion with Bliss Griffin appeared first on Actor CEO.

Shock Your Potential
It's All About Who You Know - Nathan Perez

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 27:30


"The overall point in sharing information is that you're giving people something that they can be able to relate to, and you're doing it in a way that they can understand." Nathan Perez Regardless of your profession or where you are in your career progression, the importance of networking can not be overlooked. When done right, networking can bring tremendous benefits both professionally and personally. For some people, networking may feel uncomfortable, but our guest today, Nathan Perez, insists that networking is not as complex as it has been portrayed and involves exchanging information. Besides being a genuine and hardworking introvert, Nathan Perez is also an award-winning author, a national speaker, and an executive and job search career coach at career innovation. He comes from unusually unique and diverse professional backgrounds himself and has a rare viewpoint on networking and how that relates to job search and career development. Nathan is a formerly trained actor with a bachelor's degree in fine arts and theatre. His 20-year career in the arts was supported by simultaneously developing a business career, which involved an inordinate amount of resumes, networking meetings, and interviews in multiple businesses and industries. Utilizing that background, Nathan ties together his deep live audience experience with almost 15 years in the executive search industry, delivering dozens of webinars, seminars, and guest speaking engagements each year on the topics of networking, job search, and career development. Before his work as an executive career coach, Nathan held the title of Vice President of Research in the retained search industry, where he was responsible for the first step of the executive recruitment process, devising strategies of "where and how to find" qualified candidates for all national and global search engagements. Consequently, networking was and continues to be a day-to-day function of his job. As a result, and because of his combined professional expertise, Nathan regularly works with professionals from different backgrounds and experience levels. This includes everyone from Hollywood movie stars and producers to sound engineers, fashion designers, new college grads, non-profit and civic leaders, veterans, and senior global executives. He has been cited by The Huffington Post as one of the most connected people on LinkedIn worldwide. He is a member of the Actors Equity Association union (AEA); a voting union member of The Screen-Actors Guild (SAG-AFTRA); the Author's Guild; and served as Vice Chair at The Loft Literary Center, the nation's largest literary and writing organization. He is an Honorary Commander with the 934th Airlift Wing, U.S. Air Force Reserve, home of the Global Vikings. In today's episode, our guest will talk about why networking is the most important skill you need for career development. He will also provide us with insightful tips on how to get the best out of networking meetings. Listen in! Social Media https://www.linkedin.com/in/nathanperez/   https://www.linkedin.com/company/cipress   https://www.facebook.com/Career-Innovations-Press-100479695381379/ I'm a professional speaker, an executive career coach, and I've been doing that for about eight years. [3:44] Before that, I was in the executive retained search industry, where I found the executive candidates for the executive recruiters to go and recruit, so networking was a major function of my overall job. [3:49] Before that, I spent 20 years in the entertainment industry as a professional actor and writer, formally trained in BFA Theatre Arts. [4:22] In 2012, the last firm that I had joined, I met my co-author for the book, "20 Minute Networking Meeting," which eventually turned into three more editions. [4:41] A combination of her experience in the retained executive search industry and my experience in the retained executive search industry combined with the entertainment industry, networking was a topic that she had brought up as a bucket list idea for a book, and we jumped all over it. [4:53] All this has led to all the professional speaking in the workshops I do, where I give around 70 webinars and workshops per year. [5:12] Most of my speaking is geared around networking, not just job search, but networking for anything, including sales, business development, marketing, whatever it may be. [5:21] Currently, I work with universities, the military particularly the veterans, senior executives, and corporations, both for the corporations themselves and internally on building relationships. [5:33] Sometimes we call it networking, but at the heart of networking is relationship building, and I work with them one-on-one and in groups. [5:48] Networking is essential to just about everything, and I don't think we necessarily think about what we're doing to be [6:37] The word networking has gained sort of this negative connotation because of the behaviors that have been associated with it over time. [6:48] Networking is just the obtainment and exchange of information, and so we are doing it every day in every discussion that we ever have. [7:10] When doing an elevator pitch, you can have something general for someone you don't know anything about. [11:45] If you're intentional about your networking, you've hopefully researched someone and talk about your background in a way that's relevant to that person you're speaking to. [11:55] The overall point in sharing information is that you're giving people something that they can relate to, and you're doing it in a way that they can understand. [13:36] Commercial break. [15:08] Networking is just about the obtainment of information. [16:47] When it comes to running a meeting, there are five steps to it based on the 20-minute networking meeting. [17:06] The first step is just a great first impression of you in the meeting. This could be over the phone or virtual, but basically, it's just a Hello. [17:23] The next step is a 30-60 second snapshot of your background or your professional experience. [17:45] Step number three is the great discussion and is the bulk of your meeting. This is about 12 to 15 minutes long, and it's comprised of five key questions. [18:11] The first three questions are very specifically formulated for your contact from the research that you've done on your contact beforehand. [18:33] Question number four is about expanding your network where you ask for more names because people want to help and because they said yes to your meeting, more often than not, people will give up those names. [19:24] Question number five is the kind that takes your contact by surprise but in the best possible way. That question is, "how can I help you?" [20:15] Step number four is wrapping up the meeting. [21:32] Step number five is following up afterward, which can be immediate or ongoing follow-up. Ongoing follow-up is about keeping your network alive with time. [21:38] Every little piece of information that we exchange eventually kind of adds up into a big pile, and that big pile can be reserved for a continued discussion with that person, or that bigger pile could be informing other little piles that inform other discussions with other [24:31] There is never bad information, just what you do with it. [24:49] Understand that this networking thing is just the obtainment and exchange of information, and we're doing it all the time. [25:55] If you can look at it this way, then every discussion you're having is networking, and if you do something with the information, you will carve out a path for you wherever you want to go. [26:10] …..….……………… Thank you to our January sponsor!  KukuaBiz can provide dedicated and affordable talent from Kenya to help you grow and scale your business. Virtual employees are skilled in administrative functions, sales, podcast management, video editing, marketing, social media marketing, website design and management, and more. Learn more: https://www.kukuabiz.com  

AEA Amplified
Ep. 13 – AMI software from WBParts improves shop efficiency

AEA Amplified

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 17:06


WBParts is on a mission to help avionics shops be more productive and profitable. Headquartered in Palm Bay, Florida, the company offers a free work-order software called AMI – Aircraft Maintenance & Inventory System – that helps AEA members streamline their business. Learn how AMI works and how it can enhance the bottom line for avionics shops from Jaramey Ham, the company's business development manager, in this episode of AEA Amplified, sponsored by Genesys Aerosystems, a Moog Company.

Casting Actors Cast
Should I Join the Union(s)?

Casting Actors Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 19:08


I get this question all the time. It is especially prevalent with actors' equity association (AEA) as well as SAG-AFTRA, The performers union for film, television, and recorded media. There are many variables for an actor to consider when joining the union. Not only about it being a good decision for your career, but is it the right time for you to join? To be sure, it is an investment. It is a financial burden but that preclude her from finding non-union meaningful full employment. Let's take a look at the pros and cons that you need to consider when pursuing your dreams as an actor or actress.

GTG The Podcast
You Deserve To Be Paid a Fuck Ton with Brooke Benson

GTG The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 66:46


On this episode of F*ck Wellness, Brooke Benson, a financial wellness coach and AEA actor, absolutely blows our minds with her intentional, logical, and joyful perspective to money, finance, all the $$$ things. She breaks down why she doesn't like the term "budgeting"; she gives tools to break out of the money mindset (and why it's totally ok if you are in it right now); and she talks Lara through some of her big limiting beliefs about money. This episode is pure gold (get it?!) and worth every second of your time.Notes: Brooke's WebsiteBrooke's InstagramAlly bankBrooke's Free ResourcesErin Lowry: Broke MillennialNew to F*ck Wellness? Click here for our blog post on the best episodes to start with!Follow us on Instagram at @generationthreegirls or visit our website: generationthreegirls.com for more information on upcoming offerings and blog posts.Personal instas:Mallory: @mallorycmwLara: @laravanderb22Makena: @makenasherwoodJoin our free private book club! Sign up here and we will add you to the community.

Think Bigger Actors Podcast
Episode 212: Heidi Dean - Social Media Expert for Actors

Think Bigger Actors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 63:34


Today's podcast guest is one of my good friends and social media expert, Heidi Dean. Heidi Dean is known as the industry's top social media expert for actors. She's a social media writer for Backstage Magazine and a frequent speaker at film festivals, conferences, SAG-AFTRA, AEA, podcasts and universities across the country. So listen up because she knows what she's talking about and TRUST me ... this conversation will help you in ways you can't even imagine!  (Don't forget to stick around for the D-12 shot at the end!) ---------- Watch the video podcast on Youtube + Subscribe: DaJuan Johnson - Think Bigger Coaching for Actors  www.thinkbiggercoaching.com Follow me on the ‘gram! @thinkbiggercoaching and @dajuanjohnson Join the Think Bigger Tribe Facebook group – where a Tribe of like minded actors come to take their career to the next level. #Skiptheline #seeyouonset          

AEA Amplified
Ep. 12 – Avidyne unveils its Vantage Flight Display System

AEA Amplified

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 21:32


Avidyne Corp. recently introduced its all-new Vantage Flight Display System. Designed for forward-fit and retrofit applications in a variety of display formats, the company's first certification of Vantage displays will be as a retrofit for Cirrus aircraft equipped with the Entegra PFD and MFD flight deck. An AEA member company since 1995, Avidyne's Vantage features synthetic vision, hybrid touch user interface, dual-AHRS MFD reversion, and more. Avidyne President Dan Schwinn has all the details in this episode of AEA Amplified, sponsored by Genesys Aerosystems, a Moog Company.

Off Stage and On The Air

Listen to the Show Right Click to Save GuestsTexas Performing Arts Season - Bob BurseyWhat We Talked AboutWest Side Story not coming Back (giving back money) Schmigadoon AEA – no 10/12 .. prorated weeks Titus – Rooster - Annie Jersey Boys Film – Andy Carl joins Nick Jonas Serenbe Playhouse Lort Commercial (The Wolves) Angela's Ashes Musical Rent 25th Aniversary Assassins pulled from Shaw Festival Funny Girl Osnes Fired Paramount and State require VaccineThank you to Dean Johanesen, lead singer of "The Human Condition" who gave us permission to use "Step Right Up" as our theme song, so please visit their website.. they're good! (that's an order) 

theater performance broadway state opera accent dark dance musical paramount stuart msonormal normal allowpng worddocument zoom rent times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shiro west side story colorful signature assassins aea vaccines right click koop showtunes moulton nick jonas name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table name mention name hashtag name unresolved mention msonospacing shaw festival human condition what we talked about relyonvml name smart link dean johanesen step right up scheps funny girls serenbe playhouse aniversary schmigadoon
Regenerative Agriculture Podcast
Episode #75: James Johnson

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 97:17


James Johnson is a fourth-generation farmer in New Mexico and the Vice President of Carzalia Valley Produce. When James finally took over the family farm in the early 2000s the outlook of his operation seemed grim. After many years of trial and error with various practices, James found the Advancing Eco Agriculture team where he discovered the benefits of regenerative agriculture. Thanks to his partnership with AEA, James achieved an outstanding yield of 1,490 lbs/acre for Pima Cotton at the end of harvest season 2020 while his county average was 880 lbs/acre! In this episode, James and AEA founder John Kempf discuss: The shift in agronomy management on James' farm over the last 20 years. James' first encounter with John Kempf and the similarities in their personal stories. The long-term effects of herbicide, insecticide, and pesticide use on crops from the perspective of a self-declared “recovering glyphoholic” Solving onion thrips and western flower thrips pressure with regenerative foliar applications, rather than insecticides. James' observations on chlorpyrifos and diazinon—how their use affects non-target species and overall soil biology. The technology James uses as a self-proclaimed early adopter, including evapotranspiration platforms and an AI robot that pulls weeds.

Guys Who Like Musicals
So You Wanna Join Actors Equity?

Guys Who Like Musicals

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 51:23


This week Dan and Joe chat about the new Open Access policy just announced by Actor's Equity. The guys take questions, respond to social media comments, and talk about their experience as union and non-union actors. Every stage actor eventually asks the question "when should I join Equity?" It's a wildly personal decision as to when an actor chooses to go from being non-union to being union. This step taken by AEA now allows anyone who has ever worked professionally as an actor or stage manager to join Actor's Equity. What does that mean for you or the actor in your life? Tune in to find out. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

AEA Research Highlights
Bonus: The case for paying college athletes

AEA Research Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 23:12


**Editor's note: This is a rebroadcast of an interview from 2019. College sports have become big business, and everybody's making money except the players. The National Collegiate Athletic Association prohibits “student athletes” from receiving a cut of the millions of dollars in revenue that schools collect from games and product licensing. Instead, players get scholarships, the value of which pales in comparison to what they might earn on the open market. But that may be changing. Repeated court challenges and bribing scandals involving star athletes have cast a pall on the two most popular sports of men's basketball and football. The introduction of legalized gambling this year has intensified the pressure to pay players what they are worth, lest they fall prey to the influence of betters hoping to sway the outcome of a game. Allen Sanderson and John Siegfried have been arguing for years that the system needs to change. In 2015, they published a paper in the Journal of Economic Perspectives that made the case for opening college sports to the free market. Sanderson and Siegfried spoke with the AEA about why they think college athletes should be paid, the potential consequences of doing so, and how the landscape could change over the coming decade.

AEA Research Highlights
Ep. 31: More than a few bad apples

AEA Research Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 12:35


Police officers have a lot of discretion in how they enforce the law, but they are not always evenhanded in how they employ their judgement. In a paper in the American Economic Review, Dartmouth College economist Steven Mello examined variations in speeding enforcement by officers with the Florida Highway Patrol.. He and coauthor Felipe Goncalves found that nearly half of the officers practiced racial discrimination and identified the types of officers who discriminated the most. The results undercut claims that racial bias is confined to a few bad apples. Professor Mello recently spoke with the AEA's Tyler Smith about how economists study discrimination and what policies might help to address disparate outcomes for minorities.

Dulcimerica with Bing Futch
Episode 551 - "Home on the Range"

Dulcimerica with Bing Futch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021


 Direct DownloadBing brings a baritone mountain dulcimer into The Stark Sessions tuned AEA and performs a simple breakdown of “Home on the Range.” Tablature available during the ongoing Patreon Open House at: www.Patreon.com/BingFutch Bing Futch is endorsed by Folkcraft Instruments, V-Picks and Zither Stands.Enjoy "Dulcimerica"? Consider supporting the program by becoming a patron!

Embark
Episode17: Body Image, Gender Identity and Creativity with Actor and Filmmaker Lyralen Kaye

Embark

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 32:02


So, what does a creative do when a pandemic cancels their gigs? If you're Lyralen Kaye, you stay home, devise a web series, then collect accolades, including an award from the the Los Angeles Internation Film Festival's Indie Short Fest. Kaye brought 23 actors from around the world together through Zoom to create Assigned Female at Birth: A Web Series about Some Bodies.A hybrid narrative/documentary series Assigned Female at Birth (AFAB) is the story of 23 AFAB people fighting everything they've been taught about their bodies never being good enough.Season One of the docu-dramedy is on YouTube. Season Two drops later this month.Creative director, executive producer and founder of Another Country Productions , Lyralen talks with me about body image, gender identity, connection and creativity. Lyralen Kaye, SAG-AFTRA, AEA, is an actor, screenwriter, playwright, and director.  Their acting film/web credits include Assigned Female at Birth, The Last Poker Game, 27 Dresses, The Naturals, The Man at the Door and Mama's Boy.  In Theatre they have played such classic roles as Emma in Betrayal, Lulu in The Dutchman and Polina in The Seagull.  Assigned Female at Birth has five times won Best Web and New Media in film festivals world wide. Lyralen's first screenplay for Saint John the Divine in Iowa won them a place in the 2015 Writers Lab supported by Meryl Streep, was a finalist for the 2018 Blacklist Women in Film Lab and 2011 Roy W. Dean Award and was a semi-finalist for the 2011 Pride Plays and Films Award.  In 2018 Lyralen won the San Francisco Best in Fringe and Techie Best in Fringe for their solo show, My Preferred Pronoun Is We. Lyralen has also been nominated for the 1997 Pushcart Prize in fiction and won the 1998 Boston Amazon Slam Poetry Finals. They are a radical queer activist and social justice artist. 

Misfit Pandemia
Beyond the Follower Counts | Heidi Dean - Social Media Marketing Expert

Misfit Pandemia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 56:07


Heidi Dean | Social Media Marketing Expertwww.Marketing4Actors.comHeidi Dean is the industry's top social media expert for actors and content creators. She's a social media writer for Backstage Magazine and a frequent speaker at film festivals, conferences, SAG-AFTRA, AEA, podcasts and universities across the country.Heidi was a proud member of SAG-AFTRA & AEA and a working professional actor for over 20 years. Now she combines her years of industry experience with cutting edge social media strategy to help actors and content creators open more doors for their careers. Her clients include Emmy Award-winners, Broadway stars, recording artists, directors, producers, and filmmakers. Heidi turns social media rookies into ROCKSTARS!

Inbound Success Podcast
Ep. 200: Rethinking your approach to B2B lead gen ft. Chris Walker

Inbound Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 54:10


What would happen if marketers forgot about leads and demo requests, and focused solely on pipeline and revenue? This week on The Inbound Success Podcast, Refine Labs founder and CEO Chris Walker breaks down his unorthodox approach to B2B marketing and explains why he believes most marketers are doing it wrong. Refine Labs hasn't been around long (it was founded in early 2019), but in the few short years since Chris launched the company, it has experienced what most would term hypergrowth and now boasts more than 30 high growth SaaS brands as clients. At the same time, Chris has become somewhat of a household name in marketing circles due to his consistent content creation on LinkedIn and his often contrarian, but always thought provoking, takes on B2B marketing best practices. In this episode, Chris breaks down his approach to marketing and shares insights on why B2B companies should rethink how they approach lead gen. Check out the full episode to get the details.  Resources from this episode: Check out the Refine Labs website Connect with Chris on LinkedIn Transcript Kathleen (00:00): Welcome back to the Inbound Success Podcast. I'm your host, Kathleen Booth and my guest today is Chris Walker who's the CEO of Refine Labs. Welcome to the podcast, Chris. Chris (00:32)Great to be on here. It feels like just recently you were on our podcast and looking forward to diving into some topics today. Kathleen (00:39)I love, I love the podcast guest swap. No, I'm, I'm really excited to talk to you because your name comes up a lot. LinkedIn is my favorite platform these days. It's the one I'm the most active on. I really enjoy it. And I hear your name all the time and I'm so glad we're finally getting a chance to get to know each other. So before we jump into deeply to our topic, for those who may be, haven't heard of you, or don't know you, can you just give a brief synopsis of who you are, what you do and how you came to be doing what you're doing today, Chris (01:19)For sure. Yeah. Hey everyone. My name is Chris Walker. I've been in B2B marketing for almost decade now and have done almost all types of marketing for product marketing, field marketing, demand gen and brand. And I use them all together in a lot of different venture funded companies, both as an employee and now as a, a consultant or business owner. At the moment I run a company called Refine Labs. We've been growing rather quickly and we currently work with about 30 enterprise SaaS organizations throughout the US, EMEA and APAC to transform their demand generation programs with the core understanding or belief that the marketing game has changed dramatically, or the go to market game has changed dramatically from lead gen, high volume lead generation to feed sales with people that don't want to buy right now to marketing, executing demand generation, to generate high intent leads that want to buy for sales at a lower volume. Chris (02:12)And that is the core thesis about how we operate, which requires a lot of different changes inside of companies, changing your metrics, changing tactically what you're doing, changing what success looks like at a campaign level, from leads or conversions to something that matters a little bit more deeply like qualified pipeline or revenue. And so that is what we do. I've been operating in this sort of like demand gen framework for the past five years, both as an employee and now as a business owner with a lot of different companies and just find that, objectively, the way we work works way better. Kathleen (02:46)Love it. And what I think is really interesting about your journey is, so my background is I used to own a marketing agency for 11 years, and marketing marketing agencies is challenging, right? Because you're, you're trying to stand out in a very crowded field of all people who are good at marketing. Right. And it is, it's an interesting challenge. And that is why I think when we talk about the inbound success podcast and my profiling people who are doing inbound really well, you really stand out to me because, you know, you're, when did you start Refine Labs? Chris (03:24)April of 2019. Kathleen (03:26)Oh, okay. So this is not, you know, a company that's been around for 10 years. This is a relatively new company that came out of nowhere. And in just a very few short years, it has a ton of buzz. As you said, you've got 30 clients. Kathleen (03:39)Your name is getting talked about a lot throughout the industry. So I feel like if you can, in two years managed to do what you've done and stand out in arguably one of the most competitive industries in which to try and stand out against, you know, a playing field of people who know by and large, what they're doing. If you can do this, then there are massive lessons to be learned for anybody. So I want to talk about how you've done it. And then at some point dive into what you do with your clients, which I suspect is... Chris (04:13)Sorry to interrupt you, but I actually don't find it to be competitive, which I think is the challenge. Like, I don't think that marketing agencies are very good at marketing themselves. And a lot of one's not very good in operating for their clients because they execute a service that is, gets measured on top of funnel metrics that don't matter to a business, which is why the agency doesn't do it for themselves to grow their company. And so I think it's pretty easy when you start scoring on pipeline and revenue and looking at it that way and then reversing back to the activities that are required. One, it creates a massive product development pipeline for our company. And two, we know very clearly it's driving the business because we can measure it in our own revenue. And so it's weird. Like a lot of people say that it's competitive, but I think that from, for the most part, marketing agencies are actually quite poor at marketing themselves. Kathleen (05:04)So let's break this down. You say that the problem has been a focus on top of funnel metrics. And so I'm assuming you're referring to, you know, website, visitor traffic, and then just leads like in a broad category. Is that accurate? Chris (05:19)Yeah. Marketers tend to not spend time in the CRM where actual business data gets generated and tracked. And so anything pre CRM is what I'm talking about. Kathleen (05:30)So, so what does that look like? You're, you're focused on the CRM. You're focused on pipeline opportunities, revenue. What does that look like in terms of how you then market differently? Chris (05:42)So by focusing on pipeline and revenue in the CRM, it actually frees marketers from optimizing for top of funnel metrics. You can get scored later funnel, which gives you a lot more flexibility on what to do. If you're a marketer and you come into a company and they say, we need 3000 MQLs. So this month, and here's your budget and it we're projecting, it's going to cost $30 per lead. Then you actually have no money to do anything else, no money, no time, no mindshare to actually go and figure out how to do a podcast or figure out how to do LinkedIn by scoring on a metric that actually matters to a business. You give your marketers a lot more flexibility to do things that could actually work better from an experimentation standpoint. I think you also free marketers from channel attribution performance marketing, which is really I think hurt marketers over the past decade to a level where it's highly transactional and easy to track. Chris (06:32)And therefore they love doing it because they can track it. But if they actually looked at the stuff that they're tracking, they would realize that they shouldn't be doing it that way. I do that with enough companies and analyze the data of performance marketing lead gen campaigns and how bad it is at a customer acquisition cost payback standpoint period. And like, like, I, I don't, people love to do those things because they can say we got a bunch of leads from LinkedIn, but they never look at how much that customer costs that we got from LinkedIn with all those leads. And that's what I'm suggesting that people do. And so once you get over that that path and you're measuring on qualified pipeline, for instance, one, the numbers get smaller, right? So I don't need to go out and generate 3000 leads. I actually just need to generate 10 leads that convert to a two qualified pipeline. And so it changed once you change the volume metric, you can actually change the tactical level things to having a high intent buyers that convert to qualified opposite 80% versus low intent leads that convert at 1%. And that's what I'm suggesting people do. Kathleen (07:33)So when you come in and I'm assuming you've done this with your own business as well, but like when you look at at a company and you take this approach, you I'm, I'm guessing you start by looking at the deals. They have one to try to look at what has driven those, is that, is that where it starts? Chris (07:54)Yeah. So most of the companies that are operating today from a SaaS standpoint because they get measured on top of funnel and they are obsessed with attribution, everything is tracked. And so it's very, very simple to go into the CRM and track all the different lead sources, all the way to revenue and then calculate things like sales cycle length, lead to win rate, average deal, size, different things like that. That gives you a sense about what is the efficiency of that lead source. Should we even start, keep doing that? You could, if you're doing advertising, you could do direct customer acquisition costs on those things. And what we find is that almost everything that a company is doing from a paid standpoint or a lead gen standpoint is not generating a customer acquisition cost that's anywhere near acceptable. And so once we present that data, it allows executives to help change away from this lead gen mindset. Chris (08:41)And when you look at where the actual revenue came from, which from a marketing source revenue, or however you want to say it, inbound revenue, it's very clear the way that people come in to you to buy stuff, it's they come there on their own to your website. And they ask for a demo or ask to talk to a sales rep, or they have to get pricing. If you don't publish your pricing. And I would say almost any company could do that analysis and at least 70% of their revenue comes through that way. And so it's, how do you use all of the wasted money in advertising? That's happening over here to collect leads and change how that's being used to influence more people to come through your website and ask for a demo or to talk to a sales rep and is ready to qualify and ready to buy. And that's what we're focused on. Kathleen (09:22)And I believe if I'm not mistaken that you call this the revenue growth optimization framework. Chris (09:28)We call that part of the process, split the funnel. So what I find is that companies build their you know, demand waterfall from serious decisions in 2009 and put together one spreadsheet and say, we have to get 30,000 leeds and have blanket conversion rates across the whole funnel. Not respecting that different conversion sources have dramatically different intent levels from buyers and therefore converted significantly different rates. And so by splitting it out by lead source, it helps you identify what are the actual winners here. Kathleen (09:55)So what has worked really well for, for your, how you market your business because you're drinking your own champagne. I don't like to say Kool-Aid, it's sort of a dark metaphor. What's working for you guys? Chris (10:11)Podcasts, LinkedIn events, influencers, organic social. Kathleen (10:16)So dig into that a little bit for me. Let's start with podcast. Chris (10:20)There's a couple of things that work for us here. And I think that what people miss is I just laid out tactics. And I think that people miss on the strategy side, like we are a, we have air quotes for the listeners here of "marketing agency" with a highly differentiated product, sold to a very specific niche that I know needs it that's strategy, right? And so if you don't have a differentiated product and you don't identify your ICP and you start doing these tactics, they may not work as well for you. Strategy first right? And so we have that strategy walked in on who we're selling to, why they need us, why we're uniquely differentiated amongst their alternatives and different things like that. And then we think about it, just content marketing with effective distribution across the channels where people pay attention. Chris (11:08)It's like basically what it comes down to. And so while other agencies continue to write blogs for SEO and spend a hundred dollars a click on marketing agency pricing and all the tactics that people have been doing for 10 years that are mature, expensive and flooded. We continue to do marketing on LinkedIn and still, I don't see any marketing agencies executing well on it. Linkedin and podcasts has been a gold mine for us over the past two years and will continue to be because companies are very slow to react to new opportunities and they have the wrong mindset when it comes to content marketing, which creates a huge opportunity for people that do like our content marketing. I'm not, I'm not measuring on how many leads that I got. I'm not measuring it on transactional. And so just the mindset about how we approach content marketing is the, is the secret advantage for us. Kathleen (12:01)There are a lot of marketing agencies with podcasts. What makes yours different? Chris (12:07)It actually makes an impact for the people that listen to it. I think it's, it's way more actionable, distributed at a much higher frequency from people that actually do progressive stuff. And I think that's why people tune into it. And we get plenty of notes. I would say probably at this point 20 a week from people said, Hey, I listened to your podcast at the beginning. I thought you were full of. And then six months later, I started doing those things and we stopped running ebook downloads on LinkedIn. And we started doing it more like the way that you said, and our pipeline went up by 300% this quarter, the first quarter of this year. And that's what people say. And so I know that it's making an impact. I'm not sure that you get that on other podcasts. So, Kathleen (12:49)So for those who haven't heard of it the name of the podcast, state of demand gen, and it's published how often three times a week, and it is available it's video and audio video Chris (13:03)On YouTube micro video on LinkedIn and long form audio on apple, Spotify, and all those other different channels. A key thing for people to think about there. And I've been talking about, we consult for a lot of people that are doing a podcast, and I hear this thing a lot. We need to make it short because people's attention spans are slowing down or blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. So we want to do the seven minute podcasts. We, our average podcast length of somewhere between 60 and 90 minutes. Yeah. And so it has nothing to do with the length it has all to do with, is your content good enough to justify someone listening to it for that long? And I want people to think about that if they're getting ready to start a podcast as well. Kathleen (13:42)You're preaching to the choir on that one, cause I, mine are usually 45 to 60 minutes and I always tell people it's going to be as long as it needs to be. Yeah. It's, it's the boring guests that, that would be a really short interview. Try to avoid getting those lines. Chris (13:59)Okay. We'll try and get the 60 minutes that are misaligned. Yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly. Kathleen (14:04)So, okay, so that's the podcast. Now I want to talk about LinkedIn because that is such a core part of your strategy. That's where I, at least to me, I feel like you've been very visible and very successful. So can you kind of break down how you think about LinkedIn and how you advise others to think about LinkedIn? Chris (14:22)So when it comes to LinkedIn, I consider it a a highly effective content distribution, medium, and by acknowledging and understanding how dynamics of social platforms work, it can give you an advantage on how to use them. And so I'll give you a couple of examples about, and people think that if you like execute on LinkedIn, that you might miss on something else, but what they, what they don't understand that you build skills that you take with you to new platforms, right? And so in 2014, I spent time on Instagram. One of the most important things was trying to build an audience on Instagram. I figured out how to do that. And in 2019, when I saw LinkedIn working, I knew how to take the learnings of how to build an audience and move that over there, which is not just wait for people to follow you. Chris (15:10)It's having a proactive strategy to get more people into your community audience. And so one of the things that we started doing probably in may of maybe for the past two years, is 30 people a day and connect with, with people that are active on the platform have posted in the last 30 days like content. That is like the stuff that we pump, we publish that's one, one consideration. The next consideration that we see across a lot of different channels is that I try and do all of the work in the feed, meaning that I'm not looking for someone to click on a link. I'm not looking for someone to comment. They're like, blah, blah, blah, like some algorithm hack to make a comment so that you can send them an email with a PDF. I'm trying to get to places where people consume and anyone that's listening to this you'll know that you're much more likely to consume something that's in the feed versus a link that moves off the platform. Chris (15:59)And it's also better for LinkedIn. And so inside of the feed and the last one is 100% selfless, just con giving away the best stuff that we do. I publish stuff that people pay us a lot of money for. And I publish it on the internet because I know that it creates a huge inbound interest for us because we are considered the best, the smartest, the most forward-thinking because of the content that we produce. And so we publish that. I also know that a majority of people will never use it. And so those are a couple of key pillars in how we operate LinkedIn. And then the last one is just pure consistency. Like I don't think that marketers really understand. I think maybe they get, they get bored of doing the same thing. I've been posting videos on LinkedIn almost every day for 18 to 24 months. Chris (16:46)And I'm not, I'm not bored of it at all. It's pure marketing is about finding something that works and then being incredibly consistent at delivering it while also innovating on a micro level. So you've known, you'll notice that we've changed up how we actually do the videos and how we film them and what quality it's in and how we cut them in different things like that. But we're still leaning into video mainly because a lot of people don't do it. And so I think it's just a huge, huge white space as a marketer on LinkedIn, it might feel like a lot of people are using LinkedIn and publishing content. They're good, but go look at other channels, go look at how competitive it is an SEO. Go look at how competitive it is and Google search ads for a trade show booth. Like all the places where you spend money are way more competitive from a cost of maturity standpoint than places like LinkedIn or a podcast. Kathleen (17:33)So I'm interested to know how you work with clients on this, because I think as marketers, in many cases, we are naturally more comfortable putting ourselves forward on a platform like LinkedIn. But I do hear from a of executives, a lot of subject matter experts, this reluctance, and sometimes it's driven by, I think, fear that they don't have enough to say, you know, I think, you know, somebody can be an expert in something, but still have that almost imposter syndrome of like, well, am I do I know enough to really, to really put it out there? And then sometimes it's also driven by I can't come up with something every day. How do you do that? So like, how do you, how do you counsel somebody who, who doesn't come from a marketing background to develop this muscle memory, to be able to do this regularly? Chris (18:24)Yeah. So I know how to do this because I've done it before at a company, as an employee in 2017, we were selling into hospitals and we had our subject matter expert VP of medical education. That was a practicing physician. That was our subject matter expert that people in the community found credible that had was an evangelist that had used the technology as a physician for more than 10 years. And so we had, and then became an employee of our company afterwards. And so we had that person. And the way that you figure this out is instead of trying to have forced that person to create information everyday, where they have to think about it, it's a marketer shop to put them in situations where they're going to demonstrate expertise anyway, create a fireside chat, do a round table, have them present on a webinar, on a new clinical trial, whatever those things are. Chris (19:11)And then you record that event. And so I liked that also from the subject matter experts side, those people prefer that than recording a podcast in a, in a zoom on their own. They want to be out in engaging with people and talking with people. We had some of the most success, cause I, I heard people say, Hey, like this isn't worth my time to write this blog. But then when you say, Hey, we actually got you a spot to talk about the same thing that, you know, I didn't say this, but the same thing that we were going to write the blog about, but we're actually going to do it in Tulsa, Oklahoma with 12, you know, the best physicians in Oklahoma. And you're going to be speaking at that dinner and then we're going to record it. And it's a completely different story. And so people need to, I think, change the way that they set up their subject matter expert to allow it to work. Kathleen (20:00)That's interesting. And then are you, are you publishing those recordings through that person's profile? Chris (20:09)It was mostly through the brand in 2017. I think dynamics have changed quite a bit since then. But we could go just straight brand on Facebook, organic and a crushed back then. And like, it's just not, it's just not like that anymore. And so the distribution mechanisms over the past almost five years now have changed a lot. And I would at this point switch to some combination of brand and personal, depending on the platform. Yeah. Kathleen (20:33)I mean, I really feel like today the power, the real potential is in marketing through personal brands. I mean, you can just from my company, you know, we publish a lot of stuff through our company, LinkedIn page, but I find it gets just dramatically less traction than anything put out by our CEO or head of product. The, you know, and so one thing is how do you get the content out of them, what you just addressed. But then the interesting challenge that, that introduces if you are going through the personal brand is how do you, how do you then make sure there's engagement on the backend, right? Because a great post with really good content is going to get engagement. It's going to get responses and questions. And so it's one thing if you, as the marketer are going in through the company page and engaging with comments, but then when it's on, you know, your CEO's personal profile, are you training that CEO to engage? Are you somehow gaining access to their account so that you can engage on their behalf? How, how do you, how do you think that should work? Chris (21:34)So I'll talk about the ideal way and then maybe like a different, the ideal way is that whoever it is, it could be the CEO. It could be another person in your company recognizes how important this is and does all of it, right? Like I've never had someone else leave a comment for me or answer a message or anything. That's all me, the reason is because I recognize how valuable it is. I recognize that at the moment I can have, you know, a thousand touch points with different potential buyers in the market on my own by myself, and have 50 conversations this morning through comments on a LinkedIn post that I made versus what other CEOs might do, which is like go to a dinner once every couple of weeks to meet with one person. And it just get way more scalability of interaction this way. Chris (22:20)I wish people would understand that. And so presenting that to people because I did this as an employee in 2007, around the same timeframe as I would run Facebook ads of the content of that this person was creating. And then I would engage in the comments and I recognize, Hey, I'm having a hundred conversations a day with buyers. Our sales, our sales team gets three connections when they go outbound in a day, like what what's going on here? Why doesn't the company recognize that this is a way better way to do what we're business development. What we're trying to do is connect with buyers in a way that they want. And so yeah. Yeah. I Kathleen (22:57)Mean, I think it's really interesting to me because I don't think you can underestimate the importance of engaging. What I always say is like, you might get comments you could have a great post and you might get comments, but people aren't going to continue coming back to comment and engage with you. If you don't respond to them, you know, it's like a one-way conversation at that point. Chris (23:18)Yeah, because people think that social media is about pushing out, not, you know, being social. Kathleen (23:26)Yeah. so we've talked about the podcast, we've talked about LinkedIn, I'm curious to know how you approach written content on your website. You know, what are your thoughts around the classic kind of written blog? Are you doing much of that or is most of it like repurposed podcasts content? Chris (23:50)We don't, we don't even repurpose podcast content on the website. It's just like, I believe that the the idea of what a website is for, for companies should change and we're trying to pave the way on it. And I'm also interested cause I'm very interested. It'll probably be within the next, you know, it'll be soon where we can say that we hit 10 million ARR and we didn't spend a second on SEO and companies can understand that there's a different way than writing long form blogs and different stuff like that. I'm interested in proving some points there. And so, no, we haven't done almost anything from a written blog content standpoint. Because I just feel like the way that people discover and research products has changed and they're doing it in specific places that are different than Google in 2009. And so our website and what I think companies should consider for their website is buyer enablement and a path to a high intent conversion. And that's it. And so if those, if we're serving those two things on our website, publishing pricing, case studies messaging about what we do, how we work and a way to get in touch with us to start a scale sales conversation and everything else that we're doing is in places where people actually are. Kathleen (25:00)So you talked about how the way people buy has changed. What, how would you describe the modern customer journey? Chris (25:08)I think the key that people I think the key that people need to understand in, in the difference in change is the access to trusted peers that B2B professionals have, that they didn't have five to seven years ago. And so I can interact with 30 marketers and understand what tool they use and what tactics they're doing in different things like that on LinkedIn and on Twitter in revenue collective through a text message through a private slack message through call through a zoom, all those different things that were much more difficult to do in 2014 as a B2B professional, you know, that you didn't interact with your peers in the way that you do today in 2014. And because you didn't have access to trusted peers, you trusted a couple of sources. You trusted analyst firms, you trusted conferences and you trusted Google search because you didn't have access to people. And that's the major change that's going on here is that now people get their information through their peers that they trust. And so leaning into that as the core shift is what I'm talking about, which I think would be very heavy on customer success and very heavy on effective content marketing and what I would consider the dark funnel, AKA social and other places that are difficult to track in attribution. So Kathleen (26:27)Where do you review sites fit into all this? Because that is sort of a, a way people get peer feedback, but it's not the same as your connections on LinkedIn or the people in the slack channel. I know there's a lot of companies, especially in the software space that spend a lot of money on peer review sites. I'm curious what your take is. B2B Chris (26:46)Companies love every channel that is lower funnel filled with intent. So because they can easily track it, the person's in buy mode and they can run performance marketing against it, which is why review sites, Google paid search. I don't even think contents indication fits into there because there's no intent, but review sites and Google paid search are lowest funnel, high intent. And that's where people are going to going to do things. What I think is actually more impactful is getting to the people before they have intent. And then they're not looking for a review site. They're just going to Google and searching your brand. And that's what I think people need to think about people. People fight companies fight over the small amount of buyers that are actively buying that have no preferred brand. So you're just competing with three vendors for somebody that doesn't care, it's going to be shopping on price. Doesn't have certain features, you're going to win some of them, but you're gonna lose a lot of them to, as opposed to figuring out what you need to do at the top of the funnel so that people don't even compare other vendors. And that's what we do. Kathleen (27:44)Yeah. You gave me the perfect segue into my next question. Cause you talked about people going on to Google and searching for your brand for refined labs. What percentage of your traffic is direct? Chris (27:56)I don't, I don't know. And I don't care. Kathleen (27:59)I mean, I have a theory. I'm so curious to know if it's, if it's true. And that's something that I've seen. It's really interesting, even just with the company I'm at that, that the, the percentage of direct traffic as, as a part of the overall mix is, is growing. And I would think that yours would be a very large percentage direct Chris (28:18)Or direct organic search. Yeah. I'm not sure how Google chucks it up. I honestly like what I'm looking at is something that's way further down the funnel than where it's being sourced from. Cause I it's weird as a marketer, when you get to this level, it's just you, I don't need data. Like I can, you can just feel what's going on at qualitative insights. What's happening in the CRM, inbound volume qualified pipeline where our conversations starting, we have conversations started in LinkedIn, DM through our website revenue collective through a text message through inbound emails from buyers. And so like, you can just feel where this stuff coming from, why what's going on. And I love being in that spot. Of course we use data. But nowhere near to the level that marketers obsess about it today. Kathleen (29:04)Yeah. I feel like we spend a lot of time and waste a lot of time just on tracking and reporting. And a lot of times we're tracking and reporting on metrics that even by traditional marketing logic are a waste of time. So that's really interesting. You talked earlier about having started out on Instagram and then moved to LinkedIn and I sort of put a mental pin in that and I wanted to come back because I do feel like marketers by and large suffer from shiny penny syndrome where like a new channel is hot. Like in the last year it's tick talk and it's clubhouse and this and that. And all of a sudden everybody's like we have to be there, right. Because everybody's talking about it. I have really strong opinions on that, but I'm really curious to know what your take is. Chris (29:56)So I think what people obsess about is they look at a channel or tactical level, not looking deeply at whether their content strategy was working. If you're, if you can't produce content that people like on LinkedIn, you have no business trying to go to Tik TOK right now, at least for B2B marketing. And so I think people should think about those different things. When I mentioned being an Instagram, it was Instagram in 2014, selling a $60 product, organic yeah. Influencer marketing posting every day, building an audience, engaging with the community and watching sales grow. And so I just had a clear understanding of what that dynamic was in that channel. And LinkedIn's no different, right? And so once you understand the dynamics of one platform, you can move them to another one, which leads me to a place like if Tik Tok does become a place where it's important for B2B to go, we have a content strategy, we have the operational infrastructure and capabilities to support it. And we know how social networks work and we're going to be able to win there. And so that's the way that I look at it. But I think the companies look at it too at a channel level and not holistically at like their organizational capabilities. Kathleen (31:03)Yeah. Amen. I mean, that's my whole thing. Somebody asked me when clubhouse first came out, you know, what my thoughts on it were. And, and I, I, my thing was like, it's not for me. Right. It could be for somebody else, but I am. I'm all in on LinkedIn. I know I don't have the bandwidth to do two channels really well. Like you gotta, I, I think you gotta kind of pick your, pick your channels and it doesn't have to just be one for other people. It could be more, but you have to understand your bandwidth and your ability to really dominate and master the channels that you've chosen before you start to spread yourself. Chris (31:37)Yeah. And it was just clear, like I'll find, I'll find the clip. I think it was late 2020 where I said this, where it was very obvious that some but that other platforms would copy the clubhouse feature because that's the same thing that happened with Snapchat, right. Instagram and Facebook, and all of the other platforms now have stories and clubhouses audio thing is now getting rolled already rolled out in Twitter and it's coming out on LinkedIn. And it was very obvious that that was going to happen from that standpoint and other people that don't understand those dynamics, stop doing everything else. And when all pot committed on clubhouse and now you watch your user growth fall to the floor because it's available and put channels that are far more popular. And that's what I think that people need to think about. I think that the scariest part is that companies stopped doing things that are working in order to chase something else. Kathleen (32:31)There seems to be this like weird feeling that you have to be in the early adopter crowd. Of all things. I don't know if you, if you know Chris (32:41)That it's gonna work. Then being an early adopter is when I would consider myself an early adopter on LinkedIn, at least from a high activity standpoint. And it certainly benefited me, the algorithm reaches nowhere near what it was two years ago. And so if you know that it's going to work, then, then I think it's a good move to be early. But I don't think that I think a lot of marketers just read a report or some, see some ad or see some content about a new platform without knowing whether or not it's going to work or how it's going to work for them and then just try and do stuff. And that's, I think that the difference is having the experience to really know how it's going to work. Yeah. And you Kathleen (33:18)Talked about that when, when we spoke on your podcast about you test things on yourself and on your own marketing, kind of you use, you use yourself as, as a Guinea pig, if you will, before we roll things out to clients, can you talk a little bit about that? Chris (33:34)So at the moment we have a system where we can experiment more with a lot of things underneath the Refine Labs brand. Test, measure, characterize. Show companies what good looks like. And basically it becomes an R&D arm for our company to roll in new quote unquote products for our customers, which bleeds into our idea of just continuous innovation, which is not something that marketing agencies do. Marketing agencies get married to one channel and then try and make it as profitable as possible, which is why you see SEO agencies that still don't do anything else. And so ours is, we are trying to constantly disrupt ourselves when there's a day where Facebook ads don't work anymore, then I'm going to be pumped to have six more things that we can roll into the mix, other companies aren't. So they're going to keep telling their clients to run Facebook ads along the lines of why there's a lot of agencies that still tell their customers to run display ads. Chris (34:26)And so we have tested a lot of different things from the beginning. The reason that we, that I know is because people told me that they weren't going to work. So podcasts, LinkedIn, the way that we execute events, the way that our top level content strategy with a subject matter expert works, influencer marketing, both for other, with other people, with us and myself, with other brands direct mail account based marketing in a thoughtful way, not like, you know, the way basically it's sales driven way. The companies execute it today. There's a million different things that we're incubating and testing here, and then we'll eventually productize. Kathleen (35:05)So let's talk about a couple of those. You talked about events, the way you run them. So what makes it different? Chris (35:13)It's driven on ex in-person experiential combined with digital amplification to create, reach and awareness of a content strategy versus collecting leads to try and sell people. And so B2B companies run events to co to have people register so that they can do sales to those people versus having people register to create an experience for them so that they can participate in content creation so that you're creating content that other people want so that you can amplify it on the internet and the more people see it. And that's the core difference about the way that we look at events. And I would say that a lot of companies don't even execute events at all. They're too busy building trade shows at least events in the way that I've stated them. And so just completely have been doing that since 2017 as well, just looking at our trade show booth expenditures and saying, how else can we spend this money to get a dramatically better return? Chris (36:08)And I think the key is creating real life experiences that then get amplified digitally. And then once they get amplified digitally, it can feed the future in person experiences. Kathleen (36:20)Give me an example of what that looks like. Chris (36:24)Back in the day in like February to February, 2020, we were, we were heavy on these. We're going to do one a month, the whole year of 2020. Obviously we couldn't do that, but we did one in January and February. At that point, like Justin Welsh was operating as CRO at a high growth SaaS company, him and I got together and I invited him to do a fireside chat. We handled the event, you know, 40, 50 CEO, CRO, CMOs were there. We presented in person. Yeah. How to scale out your revenue team to 50 million. Like what Justin did. Chris (36:59)We talked through different things between sales and marketing, and what's changed since he started there in 2015 to 2020. And if he could change things, what he would do, we went to Q and A for 30 minutes. We had high production, film and audio there. We created a nice video with B roll. We created the whole long form interview. It became a podcast. We had people come inbound to us five months later that were attending that event, but we didn't try and sell them right there. And doing that at a specific cadence to feed your top level content strategy, I think is a really smart idea. Kathleen (37:34)Does that only work if you are, well let me rephrase that. So you're, you're in Boston, correct? Chris (37:43)Yeah. Kathleen (37:44)Did you hold the event in Boston? Chris (37:46)No. Kathleen (37:47)Okay. Okay. So the, where I'm going with this as, like, if you're somebody who's in some small market where, you know, 50 of your ICPs are not within 50 miles, do you, I'm assuming you need to hold these events in a, in a location where it's pretty easy to get folks, because generally they're not traveling for this. I would assume. Chris (38:08)I would say that generally people aren't traveling for them, but you should travel to them. You're, you're traveling to a trade show booth and spending $150,000 to build a structure that gets torn down three days later. And so what's a flight to LA to put on an event. And so that's, that's what I'm thinking is you go to the places where you think that there's a high, a high density of potential people and the, you mentioned 50, I think these can be properly executed 12. I think that people get caught up in numbers a lot as well. Yeah. Kathleen (38:39)That makes sense. A couple other things you mentioned. So you've talked a few times about influencers and I think a lot of times when marketers hear the phrase influencer marketing, they have a very rigid, traditional definition for that, right? They think about, well, a lot of people think Kardashians. But they think about traditional paid influencer partnerships, which I think is only one subset. How do you look at influencer as part of your mix? Chris (39:06)I want every B2B company to listen to this real quick, to understand that they all do influencer marketing right now. And the way that B2B companies do it right now is analyst relations. And an analyst firm is an influencer. They just had a lot more influence 10 years ago than they do right now. And so what I'm suggesting is if you were going to have a, what I would consider a brand collaboration or a sponsorship with somebody else that wasn't an analyst firm that you actually consider structuring it, like you do with an analyst firm where they, you know, have, you know, make a video and content about how to use your product, they review it, they interact with people. They maybe take a couple of calls with people that are interested in purchasing it. Like that's an interesting thing to do with 20 people that influence buying decisions in your market. Chris (39:57)The people look at it and say, it's influencer marketing and blah, blah, blah, blah. And we haven't even gotten to the measurement point, which is another reason why companies don't do it, but I would challenge them to try and quantify the impact of their relationship with Gartner. Yeah. And so I'd never said that clearly before, but a lot of companies just look at it in the, I think in the wrong way. And so from an influencer standpoint, yes, there is like the strict, like paid, you know, paid promotion, post type of thing, which I don't think is the way that this is going to play out. I think there's this like analyst firm relationship with people that are smart, that can, that I just laid out that I think is a very open area, collaborating on content, whether that be an in-person like physical event, digital content on a podcast, you know, whatever, from that standpoint, there's an interesting one with evangelists that I think companies consider, which is like basically making a, like a VIP customer list with people that are influential. Chris (40:52)Some people call it a customer advisory board, whatever you want to do, where these people get more stuff. Maybe they get flown out to a specific event that's hosted by your company, that they, that they get a lot of different stuff. They already love your products. Why don't you just do surprise and delight so that they're more likely to tell people how great your stuff is. And so those are some of the potential open opportunities that I see there. And again, like when it comes to measurement companies won't do this because they can't track attributable ROI. They want to have affiliate marketing, not influencer marketing. And that's the part. Kathleen (41:31)You talked about direct mail and piqued my interest. Tell me your thoughts about direct mail. What's the way to do it right? Chris (41:41)I think that companies and people listening to this should consider the differences between direct mail and gifting. I think that most companies that are executing what they think is direct mail are actually doing gifting, which is just sending a gift to someone either to say, thank you, but most likely just to bribe them into having a meeting. And I think there's a different way to run direct mail where it's more experiential and actual marketing that can still be driven toward conversion. That's more easily measurable. And that's what I would, I would consider what would be an example of that. So let's see here, let me try and figure out one that we're not actively running. So you, you're a company that sells to massive banks. And at the moment you have bank of America and chase, and you're trying to get whoever the other six top banks are. Chris (42:38)And so you put together a, a package that has, you know, a thing, maybe a nice bottle of wine, a QR code on that thing, somebody who receives it scans the QR code, there's a video of how Bank of America implemented your product and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And they have an opportunity to book a meeting there. And I think that there's some micro then companies go for such scale and not thoughtfulness that they wouldn't do something that can only send a six people, even though those accounts are million-dollar accountants. And so I think that that's an interesting one. I think that you also could go for scale as a different conversion mechanism than outbound sales that might work better too. Kathleen (43:15)So are you suggesting then that gifting is the, the way to look at it? Chris (43:22)No, I'm suggesting that companies consider a different way of running direct mail, which I would say is more marketing than gifting. Kathleen (43:30)Okay. Yeah. It's interesting that you mentioned the smaller scale because, and this was one of the reasons I wanted to ask you about direct mail. When I had my agency one half of what we did had to do with promotional products, which I hate calling it that because it sounds super cheap, but my husband became really, really good at what you're describing. We called it dimensional mail, but I'm sending to small lists, like really curated packages with, and like tying what was in the package and with the messaging. And it was amazing how he was able to get meetings for people with that approach. And I think part of it is like, nobody likes, nobody likes to throw away a box, right? If you get a box, even if you have a gatekeeper, like a secretary, generally you're opening in that box to see what's inside. Chris (44:15)And I think from a direct mail standpoint, what companies need to look at is not the conversion to a meeting, but the conversion after that, I think it's pretty, pretty easy to get a, to get a meeting. I think it's really hard to get a meeting with somebody that wants to buy an actually bought. And I think specifically on direct mail companies will optimize to the meeting by giving people a a hundred dollars gift card to sit on it or to do all the other dumb stuff that they asked to do. And all those people move immediately to close loss and it does the business. No good. And so I think companies should just think about when I'm mean when we're doing our tests with direct mail over the next three to six months, it's not about the meeting conversion rate. It's about the, it's the met the meeting to proposal, we're meeting the closed won rate that I care about. Kathleen (44:58)Right. you just said a word that I'm really interested to probe a little bit more on, which is gift cards. Kathleen (45:08)This is another one that I have a lot of strong feelings about, but I want to hear what you have to say. Cause there's, there seems to be this like movement that has happened, especially during COVID, it's gotten much more widespread, like get a gift card for sitting through a demo of something. What do you think about that? Chris (45:23)It's just, it's companies optimizing for a metric that doesn't matter and, and building it into their customer acquisition costs and considering it, and probably not looking at it afterwards and just measuring it on demos. And what I've always been interested in from for a very long time is instead of having to bribe someone with a gift card to sit on a demo, how do we do great marketing so that they want that demo? And that that's the difference between giving away a gift card and doing marketing. I don't consider giving away a gift card doing marketing. I consider it a way to do sales, buying a lead or doing sales. Kathleen (46:04)Yeah. I feel like there's also a perverse incentive there where like, you, you, people are doing your demo because they want the gift card. Chris (46:10)I know I've audited enough Salesforce instances to do this. All of them go to closed lost after the demo, your sales team hates it. I don't know why. I don't know why people still do this, but in the only place that I've seen, I've seen it or heard about it work is in MarTech and that's great. But when you're selling to it or finance or HR or any of the other functions that are not revenue generating, I think that you're going to struggle in the data that I've seen shows that. Kathleen (46:38)Yeah, I would, I would agree. I always feel like it attracts the wrong kind of buyer. And it sort of cheapens what you're doing. It is, it is very like transparently pay to play. Chris (46:54)No, but, and again, I, I think that when a lot of companies move on dumb stuff like this, it creates a massive opportunity. I just don't think that people consider the opportunity of going in a different direction. Whereas I want, I'm going to earn my demos. When people sit on those demos, I'm going to earn them. And so in the future, I'm not going to need to give away gift cards and more people are going to do that. And so companies don't look at that. They look at the hack to get to the next round versus building something that's sustainable with IP and talent and operational infrastructure to actually execute on that longterm and continue to build on it. And that's the way I think companies should look at it. Kathleen (47:31)All right. We are rapidly coming up on our 60 minute mark. So we're going to go rapid fire for the next few questions. And on time the first one is you talked about getting companies to shift the way they think about marketing and to focus on, you know, pipeline generation or you know, revenue generation really is better put it. I would assume in the short term, then that there's, while that shift is happening how can I put this? It might make a lot of people very uncomfortable because many of their leading indicators, if they're changing the way they're doing marketing and they're doing some of the things you suggest like many of what they think of as leading indicators to pipeline are going to start to dry up. And so how do you handle that panic that I have to believe sets in initially and convince people to stick it out, to see the results? Chris (48:23)First showing the company that what they're doing right now and what they're measuring, doesn't align to what they're trying to accomplish. So getting aligned that I get that you're hitting your MQL target. I've had these conversations 50 times marketing continues to hit their MQL target. We continue to miss our qualified pipeline and revenue targets on the sales side. And just by surfacing that information and then knowing why that's happening. I think the key is that a lot of people keep doing that because they don't know why, or they don't know what to change. And so by first showing them that what they're doing right now, isn't working. And second centering on sales, qualified opportunities, because when you center on sales qualified opportunities at a stage that matters not you advance with an SDR and book the meeting, but the AEA had the meeting, there's still an amount attached to it and that's qualified. And so in that case, and you sent her on that, that number should never go down. When you change your marketing model, when you shut off your performance marketing, it will have no impact on that number. And that's why if you center on sales qualified opportunities, there's nothing to be afraid of. Kathleen (49:22)Yeah, that, that's interesting that you said that because my next question was going to be, and I assume one of the people that panics the most is the sales leader, because they want to keep their sales team busy. But if you're focused on SQLs that.. Chris (49:33)Right? The wrong sales leader, the sales leader with the 2011 mindset would panic that way. The smart sales leaders that I interact with are pumped that their SDRs don't have to follow up with 3000 leads a month that don't close and they can do strategic outbound using intent data or a million other higher productivity activities than following up with content downloads that don't want to talk to you. And so smart sales leaders should, should appreciate this. Should enjoy it. It's like a path to building a better company. Yeah. Kathleen (50:00)All right. Shifting gears. I always ask my guests two questions at the end of the interview. So I want to hear what you have to say. This podcast is all about inbound marketing, which I define kind of loosely. It's not the traditional, you know, put an ebook up and wait for leads to come in. It's basically pretty much what you're talking about, which is doing your marketing in a way that your ideal customer seeks you out and comes to you. When you think about inbound marketing defined in that way, other than Refine Labs or yourself, who is doing it really well right now? It can be a company or it can be an individual person. Chris (50:47)I'm trying to think. Hmm. I don't really have a lot and on, and honestly, I don't want to shout someone out as like a, as endorsement of someone that I don't think is doing an awesome job. And so I'm going to pass on this one. Chris (51:04)Yeah. I could shout out a customer. Kathleen (51:08)You're the first person I've interviewed who hasn't given me a name. I don't know how I feel about that. Chris (51:15)I definitely don't follow the grain, so I get it. Kathleen (51:19)Alright. Second question. I hear marketers say all the time that one of the biggest challenges they have is just staying up to date on everything that's changing with the world of digital marketing. How do you personally stay up to date and keep yourself educated by doing it? Chris (51:39)And so by by consistently pushing boundaries in places where I don't need a report to tell me what to do that I went and did it. And then I would be the one that publishes the report on what to do. That's where I think marketers should strive for. I think that a lot of marketers just get information and copy tactics from people. Like I imagine that there's plenty of people that take B2B enterprise, SaaS marketing and copy what's happening with ClickFunnels to sell a $60, $99 course and then try and sell that, do that, to sell a 100K ACV SaaS and fail. And so I think the company people should really like look deeply at what they're doing. And the reason that I know something's working, something's noticed because I've tried them. And then I understand the dynamics from the buyer standpoint. And I know, and so, and it builds experience to know in the future, if you're thinking about something, whether or not something's going to work based on past experiences. And so I would encourage people to listen to customers and then start executing and testing new things for themselves. All right. So learn by doing yeah. Kathleen (52:45)Well this has been great. I can't believe 60 minutes has passed so quickly. I feel like we could have definitely gone longer, but I have another five minutes that we're going to wrap up. So if somebody is listening to this and they want to learn more about you or connect with you or ask you a question, what's the best way for them to do that? Chris (53:04)So you can you can connect with me on LinkedIn, Chris Walker, and then questions feel free to shoot them in the LinkedIn DM. And we will cover them on a future episode, or I'll just answer you there Kathleen (53:15)And definitely check out the podcast as well for lots of really interesting conversations. And if you're listening to this episode and you liked what you heard or you're learning something new and I hope you did, cause I sure did. Please take a moment and head to Apple Podcasts or the platform of your choice and leave the podcast a review so other folks can find us. And if you know somebody else who's doing amazing inbound marketing work, tweet me at @workmommywork, which is my Twitter handle, as bizarre as that is. And I would love to make them my next guest. That is it for this week. Thanks for joining me, Chris. Chris (53:50)Nice. Thank you, Kathleen. This was a blast.

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON
Working To Preserve WI Farmland

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 50:00


AEA's - they've been available in Wisconsin for a few years, but there's not many that have been established.  Agricultural Enterprise Areas are designed to keep farmland from being developed.  Wednesday Jordan from the WI Department of Agriculture says there's still time to submit plans. Wisconsin farmers continue to face new challenges in weed eradication.  Dr. Rodrigo Werle, UW-Madison Weed Scientist is our WI Soybean Podcast guest focused on this year's challenges See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cause an Effect
S2/Ep 6: What does a Safe Theatre Space Look Like?

Cause an Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 67:12


RTA family for years, BIPOC Delegate for AEA, GREAT actor Mental Health advocate, Carla Martinez DeNicola sits down with Elijah to talk about what a safe theatre space really looks like and what it's going to take to make it happen. You can find Carla @_cmdnicola, Elijah at @thisiscaldwell You can find the RTA Team at @rocktheaudition www.rock-the-audition.com. Find more info about the podcast via bpn.fm/CauseAnEffect. Produced by Dori Bernstein, Alan Seales, and Brittany Bigelow. Edited by Kyle Moore. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

That's How We Role
Just Be Your Authentic Self with Jill Dalton

That's How We Role

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 34:59


Jill Dalton is a actor and writer.  Jill's memoir, My Life in the Trenches ofShow Business: Escape to New York - Act 1  onAmazon.com.  It has a five star rating and was #1 in Acting andAuditioning for several days. Her essays have been published in AuntieBellum Magazine, Delmarva Review, Evening Street Review, TheMacGuffin, Pine Hills Review, and Progressive Activists Voice.Her plays, Collateral Damage (2014) and Whistle-blower (2015)were both semi-finalist in the Eugene O'Neill National PlaywrightsConference. Her solo play, Lizzie Borden Live! was commissioned bythe East Lynne Theater Company in Cape May, NJ, where it had itsworld premiere (August 2007), and a successful and critically acclaimedsix-week run. Tony and 4 time Emmy winning Orchestrator andComposer, Larry Hochman, did original music for the piece, and Ms.Dalton won the 2007 Jacoby Award for her portrayal of Lizzie.Jill has also written and performed two other solo plays: MyLife in the Trenches and Calling on God. These works wereperformed at: Surf Reality, Dixon Place, Womenkind Festival, SoloArts, Hudson Guild, The Field, New York Fringe Festival,Ensemble Studio Theatre, the Int'l, l Midtown Festival (best of thefest), 78th Street Theater Lab, the Kitchen Theatre (Ithaca, NY).Her acting credits include: FBI, Things Heard & Seen, The LoomingTower, Succession, Braid, Too Big to Fail, Law & Order, All MyChildren, As the World Turns, Another World, One Life to Live,Saturday Night Live, Veronika Decides to Die, Rachel GettingMarried, and Oliver Stone's Wall Street.She consulted with William Hurt on his portrayal of Hank Paulson in theHBO film, Too Big to Fail and he was nominated for an Emmy.She spent 4 1⁄2 years honing her skills as a stand-up comic, and is therecipient of the Mary Jo Comedy Show Award for most promisingnewcomer in NYC.In 2019, Jill was selected to be a part of the PERFORMING ARTSLEGACY PROJECT (PAL) developed at the Actors Fund. PAL is anonline platform to document and represent performers' careers and saveour national legacy.https://performingartslegacy.org/daltonPrior to coming to New York she was an Artist-in-Residence with theMetropolitan Arts Council in S.C. Her mime troupe, HOMEMADEMIME, toured the southeast and Puerto with grants from the NationalEndowment for the Arts and the S.C. Arts Commission.Jill is a member of SAG/AFTRA, AEA, and the Dramatist Guildof America.https://jilldalton.nychttps://www.jilldaltonwriter.comhttps://performingartslegacy.org/dalton/My Life in the Trenches of Show Business: Escape to New York - Act 1You'd Be Great At What I DoI Was a Cheerleader in Hitler's Stadium (Will appear in a year in Evening Street Review)No Business Like Show Business  (Will appear in Vol. 14 - November '21 of The DelMara Review)What's Your Porno Name?  (Will appear in Vol. 37.3. of The MacGuffin)The Performing Arts Legacy ProjectSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/ThatsHowWeRole)

Is that really legal? with Eric Ruben
Season 2 begins: Eric Ruben gets interviewed

Is that really legal? with Eric Ruben

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 78:09


Before I started this podcast, I grew up in the same area as Jerry Seinfeld and Alec Baldwin. I graduated from New York City's Cardozo School of Law and have represented New York Times bestselling authors, screenwriters, actors, Oscar-nominated producers, and theatrical and film production companies. I've worked as an actor and performer with experience that includes commercials, film, and New York theater. I'm a proud member of SAG-AFTRA and AEA, the film, television, and stage acting unions. Support the show (https://www.facebook.com/ReallyLegalPodcast)

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Patrick Riviere (6/04/2021)

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2021 63:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here:  https://youtu.be/yByc1zbtbtA Patrick Riviere has been in the entertainment industry for over forty years beginning as a young boy with a touring road show for the Bicentennial in 1976. He has had the great honor of cajoling Robert De Niro to laugh between takes on Being Flynn; sung with the incomparable Patti LuPone in Don't Monkey With Broadway and co-starred with the late Bruno Kirby in an episode of the Network Television series, The Jury. He’s had the pleasure of working with Michael Greif (NYTW), Gemze de Lappe (ArtPark), RSC director Maurice Daniels, and Tony, Grammy and Emmy Award winning composer Charles Strouse on both the North American Premiere of I And Albert, and a production of Rags. Patrick was the first Industry/Professional Liaison at NYU';s TISCH School of the Arts; Education Coordinator for Second Stage Theater; Program Coordinator for Arts Horizons; Associate Director and Education Coordinator at The Hudson Riverfront Performing Arts Center; Co- Founder of The Emerging Artist's Project, Inc. and Founding Artistic Director of All Seasons Theatre Company. He is the creator and Executive Director of P.I.E. (Projects In Education) Story TheatreTM which has been produced from coast to coast since 1991 where it debuted in New York City's Central Park. He is featured in the book, Legendary Locals of Orleans County, and is a proud member of AEA, SAG-AFTRA and The Dramatists Guild. He resides in Provincetown with his husband. https://www.patrickriviere.com

Before The Break
11. David LaMarr "We Need A Complete Rehaul"

Before The Break

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 73:55


This week on BEFORE THE BREAK, the boys sit down with musical theatre actor, and social activist, David LaMarr. We discuss growing up in Compton, finding sobriety, the joy of moving away from home to NYC, holding people accountable for social change, and all the piping hot tea that's going on with Actors Equity Association. All that and much more! Follow Before The Break - on Instagram at @beforethebreakpodhttps://beforethebreak.buzzsprout.com/Follow David -on Instagram at @davidlamarrFollow Tommy -on Instagram at @tommybeyondhttps://www.tommybeardmore.com/Follow Adam -on Instagram at @thatadamdecarlohttp://adamdecarlo.com/Don't forget to subscribe, leave a review, and give us a rating!

AEA Research Highlights
Ep. 28: The Pros and Cons of Collaboration

AEA Research Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 24:30


There was a time not long ago when most economists tended to work by themselves.  In 1960, fewer than one in five economics journal articles had more than one author. Today, about three quarters of all papers are produced by research teams. The shift toward collaboration has a lot of upsides for economists, including producing higher impact papers, sharing the division of labor, and enjoying creative partnerships.  Northwestern University economist Benjamin Jones says that there are some downsides too. In a paper in the Journal of Economic Perspectives, Jones says that the rise of teams has made it more difficult to identify individual contributions. This can muddy tenure decisions, hinder grant funding opportunities, and even expand inequality in the field at a time when economics is trying to boost representation of women and minorities. Jones spoke with the AEA’s Chris Fleisher about the rise of research teams, the pros and cons of collaboration, and a few reforms that could help ensure coauthors are getting fair treatment.

How To Business In Show Business
19. Season Finale Pt2

How To Business In Show Business

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 27:40


Clayton Howe (IG:@inclaynation)(IG:-entertainmentx_) https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/clayton-howes-entertainmentx/id1341953326 had me on his podcast and we talked about a variety of things. You've heard his voice before as he was the very first episode of HTBISB. He is also the intro and outro for my podcast. In our discussion, we talk about the evolution of my career, how I'm staying positive during this time, how I've gotten better at listening, we talk about our views on the feature of the theater industry and what that looks like going forward, we talk about Moderna and the Covid vaccine, being better at asking questions, and the AEA union as it stands currently. Here's the show notes from my episode. CorBen Williams(corbenwilliams.com)(IG:@corben_w)(IG:@htbisb) is an actor based professionally out of New York City. Born and reared in North Pole, Alaska he attended New York Film Academy professional conservatory program, where he majored in Musical Theatre and Acting for Film. With additional schooling and training from UNCSA school of Dance (High School), NYCDA, Edge Performing Art Center, Millenium Dance Complex, Broadway Dance Center, and Steps on Broadway. He most recently made his debut at Goodspeed Musical in their production of Meredith Wilson’s production of The Music Man as Davey Brit featured ensemble dancer. Via RWS workshopped Night Spot dir/chor. by Jesse Robb, His Song dir/chor. by Robin Levine, and Million Dreams dir/chor. by Chip Abbott for RWS Entertainment Group. He performed the role of T.J. in Westchester Broadway Theatre’s production of Sister Act. Working with the iconic Disney Cruise Line aboard the Disney Wonder, portrayed Simba in the Golden Mickeys, and Grand Pabbie in Frozen A Musical Spectacular.

How To Business In Show Business
18. Season Finale Pt 1

How To Business In Show Business

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 30:31


Clayton Howe (IG:@inclaynation)(IG:-entertainmentx_) https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/clayton-howes-entertainmentx/id1341953326 had me on his podcast and we talked about a variety of things. You've heard his voice before as he was the very first episode of HTBISB. He is also the intro and outro for my podcast. In our discussion, we talk about the evolution of my career, how I'm staying positive during this time, how I've gotten better at listening, we talk about our views on the feature of the theater industry and what that looks like going forward, we talk about Moderna and the Covid vaccine, being better at asking questions, and the AEA union as it stands currently. Here's the show notes from my episode. CorBen Williams(corbenwilliams.com)(IG:@corben_w)(IG:@htbisb) is an actor based professionally out of New York City. Born and reared in North Pole, Alaska he attended New York Film Academy professional conservatory program, where he majored in Musical Theatre and Acting for Film. With additional schooling and training from UNCSA school of Dance (High School), NYCDA, Edge Performing Art Center, Millenium Dance Complex, Broadway Dance Center, and Steps on Broadway. He most recently made his debut at Goodspeed Musical in their production of Meredith Wilson’s production of The Music Man as Davey Brit featured ensemble dancer. Via RWS workshopped Night Spot dir/chor. by Jesse Robb, His Song dir/chor. by Robin Levine, and Million Dreams dir/chor. by Chip Abbott for RWS Entertainment Group. He performed the role of T.J. in Westchester Broadway Theatre’s production of Sister Act. Working with the iconic Disney Cruise Line aboard the Disney Wonder, portrayed Simba in the Golden Mickeys, and Grand Pabbie in Frozen A Musical Spectacular.

AEA Research Highlights
Ep. 27: American capitalism and incarceration

AEA Research Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 19:21


The first private prison in the United States opened in 1984 amidst the war on drugs and overcrowding in public prisons. Now a multi-billion dollar industry, private prisons incarcerate about 8 percent of all America's inmates. In a paper in the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, University of Wisconsin-Madison economist Anita Mukherjee examined the impact of private prisons on the length of time that inmates serve. She found that inmates in Mississippi served an average of 90 extra days if they were sent to a private facility. The results undercut the industry's claims that private companies provide correctional services more efficiently and at lower cost to governments. Professor Mukherjee recently spoke with the AEA’s Tyler Smith about why private prisons tend to hold inmates longer and how private prison contracting could be reformed.

Mind Matters
The Power of #OwnVoices in Autism Advocacy

Mind Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 40:07


In this episode we’re talking with two of the editors of Sincerely, Your Autistic Child, a book about what autistic people wish their parents knew. Emily Paige Ballou and Morénike Giwa Onaiwu join Emily Kircher-Morris to talk about autism, neurodiversity, and ways to better understand your autistic child’s unique view of the world. ABOUT THE GUESTS - Emily Paige Ballou is a Senior Editor, Online Content Moderator, and is on the Publications Committee at the Autistic Women and Nonbinary Network. She is a self-described old Millennial from the midwest who graduated from the University of Georgia and now lives in NYC, where she primarily works as an AEA stage manager of new plays and new musicals. She was diagnosed with autism in her late 20s. Her writing has been published at the Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism, Barking Sycamores, and NeuroQueer, among others. Morénike Giwa Onaiwu is an American educator, author, and autism and HIV advocate. She is an editor of All the Weight of Our Dreams, an anthology of art and writing entirely by autistic people of color published by the Autism Women's Network in June 2017. Giwa Onaiwu received a BA in International Relations from United States International University in San Diego, California, and a Masters in Special Education from the University of Texas of the Permian Basin. You can support the podcast and receive subscriber-only benefits at www.patreon.com/neurodiversity. The Neurodiversity Podcast is available on Facebook and Instagram, and on Twitter @NeurodiversePod. For more information go to www.NeurodiversityPodcast.com

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast
Episode #69: Jason Hobson

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2021 47:03


Jason Hobson is one of the initial Regenerative Agriculture Consultants at AEA, working alongside John Kempf in the early years and becoming the Chief Executive Officer in 2015. Jason joined AEA in 2011 and quickly became the lead consultant for larger scale operations, building relationships with distributors and other partners along the way. He gained his knowledge of soil fertility and plant nutrition through hands-on experience, developing a passion for agronomy and regenerative practices that fuels him today. Throughout their conversation, Jason and John discuss: How one Wendell Berry book would change Jason’s career path forever. AEA’s approach to nutrient and crop management, how it differed from conventional wisdom. Highlights from the last decade of working together: organizational victories and new agronomic discoveries. Jason’s thoughts on the “layering of silver bullet solutions” and how farms can degrade in search of a cure. Common themes among growers and organizations that have seen success while working with AEA. The fallacy of nitrogen and other limiting factors for healthy crops.

Color of Success
Stephanie Jae Park: Representation Matters

Color of Success

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 53:31


Stephanie Jae Park is a New York City based actor/singer. She plays Eliza in the Philip national tour of Hamilton, which will resume when theaters open again. She was in the original Broadway cast of King and I (Tuptim u/s, featured dancer, Lincoln Center) and War Paint (Nederlander Theatre).  When she's not on stage, Stephanie is a songwriter with an upcoming EP in summer/fall 2021. She is also a vocal coach, and a member of Range Music NYC. She holds a BFA: University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music (CCM). Stephanie is a proud member of AEA and SAG-AFTRA.  Join us in talking about how she coped with the pandemic while the tour was paused, the therapeutic value of crying and energy work, and preparing herself to play any of the three sisters in Hamilton. For more credits, pictures, check out her website at www.stephaniejaepark.com. Produced by: Ronald Palarca & Victor Nguyen; Marketing: Elizabeth Park

BroadwayRadio
Today on Broadway: Thursday, April 22, 2021 + Interview With Ollie Jones, Co-Founder of Swamp Motel

BroadwayRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 36:59


AEA and Hugh Jackman Release New Statements Regarding Rudin Plus, Matt and Grace talk with Swamp Motel co-founder Ollie Jones about the immersive theatrical thriller “Plymouth Point.” “Today on Broadway” is a daily, Monday through Friday, podcast hitting the top theatre headlines of the day. Any and all feedback is read more

BDE||big disney energy
PETER PAN || pure magic, pixie dust and the real mermaids of neverland

BDE||big disney energy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 72:55


Tyler and guest Nikki Blue (@ Chicago based resident AEA stage manager at The Goodman Theatre) sit down to chat about their all time fav Disney film. listen, first and foremost this film is PROBLEMATIC—so much of this film has us asking questions about how this was ever made. The highs are so high and the lows are so low. And yet, it is filled with pixie dust, some of the best and most classic animation in the entire canon, and the hottest fairy around. Also Peter Pan is a total narcissist, and is like the ex boyfriend we all try to forget—like how DARE call Wendy a dumb girl?! her bow is perfection, her sweet nightgown she wears as a dress, HER PERFECT CURLS?? ICONIC. Peter pan is secretly the worst, but we show up time and time again not for him but for our queens Nana, Tink and Wendy—and also smee. Never forget about smee. Magical music by Eric Backus.

The Ensemblist
#499 - Chris Chats With (Actors Equity Association)

The Ensemblist

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 16:37


This month’s topic took host Christine Shepard on a full quest. She felt like Harriet the Spy gathering info this time around. Half this episode was honestly for her. She learned a lot about stuff she should have years ago, but luckily her learning experience can be somebody else’s. Today we are talking about union membership, specifically AEA or Actors' Equity Association.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

You Booked It - How to create a successful entertainment career!
Melody A. Betts - B'Way WAITRESS | Nat'l Tour THE SOUND OF MUSIC | JCS LIVE on NBC

You Booked It - How to create a successful entertainment career!

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2021 38:11


From the National Tour of The Sound of Music (Mother Abbess)... Melody was last seen in the world premiere of Secret of My Success as Rose Lockhart. She was recently Becky/Nurse Norma on Broadway & the first National Tour of Waitress the Musical directed by Tony Award Winner, Diane Paulus. Melody received her Masters of Fine Arts degree from WIU and then went on to play in regional theaters all over the nation. She cultivated her professional acting career in Chicago where she was last seen in the Jeff Award winning production of Ragtime as Sarah's Friend. You may also recognize her from appearances on the following TV shows: Chicago Code, Chicago PD, Power on STARZ and Jesus Christ Superstar LIVE on NBC with John Legend! She is also a proud member of AEA, SAG-AFTRA, BMI.   @Melodybettspage @sky_children_apparel melodyabetts.com   ANNOUNCING THE 'YOU BOOKED IT COMMUNITY' Jump inside for free, and see if it's a good fit.   20+ LIVE Masterclasses | Develop Industry Relationships | Create a Successful Career