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The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
HORMONES: ESTROGEN & MENSTRUATION - CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY #442

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 6:40


Joe and Eric Helms recently discussed how to support hormonal balance and capacity in the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind. Today, Joe takes the conversation to Adam to explain step by step how three sets of hormones impact hunger, fat loss, and muscle mass. You don't want to miss this series! For an in-depth conversation on this topic, Dr. Joe and Dr. Eric Helms discuss what happens with our hormones in dieting, in the pursuit of our best health, maintaining or gaining lean body mass, and maintaining as much metabolic capacity as we can when dieting. It's Session 19 of the NUTRITION COACHING GLOBAL MASTERMIND webcast series, available for $9.99 here: https://nutritioncoachingglobal.com/session-19-hormones CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY - THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative daily video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! Together, Klemczewski and Atkinson have helped clients win more than 500 pro cards, 200 pro titles, and 25 world championships. It's time for your best condition and your biggest win! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY COMPLETE PLAYLIST: https://thedietdoc.com/contestprepu THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep The Diet Doc, LLC, is the parent company to many health, fitness, nutrition, and behavioral projects. Founded 25 years ago by Joe Klemczewski, PhD, known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting, The Diet Doc is equipping the next generation of nutrition coaches. Joined by health psychologist Kori Propst, PhD, Joe has created the Flexible Dieting Institute, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, and Contest Prep University. Whether you're listening to a podcast or interview as a life transformation client, a physique sport competitor, a performance athlete, a fitness entrepreneur, or just need some life motivation, Joe and Kori won't disappoint! SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheDietDoc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dietdocglobal Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/thedietdoclife Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

The Leading Voices in Food
What Food Policy Advocates Can Learn from Tobacco Industry Strategies

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:43


This is "The Leading Voices in Food" podcast but today we're speaking with a leading voice in tobacco control. "How come," you might ask, "why?" So I believe for many years that the parallels between the tobacco industry and food industry practices are nothing short of stunning, and that our field would do very well to learn lessons learned from the pioneers in the tobacco wars. Our guest today is Dr. Kenneth Warner, Distinguished Emeritus Professor and former Dean of the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. Ken's research focuses on the economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Interview Summary   So Ken, you and I have a long history, and I thought it might be instructive to mention just a little bit of it because you really helped shape some of the ways I think about addressing food policy. So I first became familiar with your work long before I met you in person, when I was teaching classes at Yale. I was assigning papers you wrote on tobacco control and I was especially interested in work that you'd done on tobacco taxes. It really gave me the idea of pushing ahead with food-related taxes. Then finally I got a chance to meet you in person at a meeting that was hosted by the first President George Bush in Kennebunkport, Maine, on cancer control. You and I got to talking about similarities between the tobacco industry behavior and the way the food industry was behaving. We were both struck by the similarities. That led us to write a paper together that was published in 2009 in "The Milbank Quarterly." And I have to say, of all the papers I've published over my career, this was one of my favorites because I really enjoyed working with you. I learned a ton from it, and it really, I thought, made some very important points. And I'd just like to mention the title of that paper because it pretty much summarizes what it found. So the title was, "The Perils of Ignoring History: Big Tobacco Played Dirty and Millions Died. How Similar Is Big Food?" In my mind, the playbooks are still very similar, and that's why it's really interesting to talk to you today, get a little sense of what's happening more recently, and importantly, think about what lessons are learned from tobacco control. I wanted to bring up one thing from that paper that I always found fascinating, which was the discussion about something called "The Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers." Could you describe what that was and what role you think it played in history?   Sure. Just to give you some context for it, the first two major papers that implicated smoking in lung cancer were published in major medical journals in 1950. In December of 1952 there was an article in the "Reader's Digest," which incidentally was the only major magazine that did not accept cigarette advertising, that was entitled, "Cancer by the Carton." And this was the American public's first real exposure to the risks associated with smoking, and it led to a two-year decline in cigarette smoking, a very sharp decline, something that was unprecedented in the history of the cigarette. Following that there was some research published on mice and cancer. And needless to say, the tobacco industry was getting pretty nervous about this. So the executives of all the major tobacco firms met in New York City in December of 1953, and they collaborated on what became a public relations strategy, which drove their behavior for many years thereafter. The first thing they did was to publish "A Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers" in January of 1954. This "Frank Statement" was published in over 400 magazines and newspapers, and it reached an estimated audience of some 80 million Americans, which would be a very good percentage of all Americans in those years. And they talked about the fact that there was this evidence out there, but they said, "We feel it is in the public interest," this is a quote, "to call attention to the fact that eminent doctors and research scientists have publicly questioned the claimed significance of this research." Then they went on to say, and I quote again, "We accept an interest in people's health as a basic responsibility, paramount to every other consideration in our business. We believe the products we make are not injurious to health and," and this is the kicker, "we always have and always will cooperate closely with those whose task it is to safeguard the public health," end quote. They went on to say that they would support research on smoking and health, and, of course, that they would always be the good guys in this story. This was designed as part of a strategy to obfuscate, to deceive the public, basically, to lie about what they already knew about the health hazards associated with smoking. And it was essentially a first very public step in a campaign that, one could argue, in many ways has persisted ever since, although, obviously, now the tobacco companies admit that they're killing their customers and they admit that smoking causes cancer and heart disease and lung disease and so on. But that was kind of the beginning of the strategy that drove their behavior for decades.   You know, that was one of the issues we raised in our paper. How similar were the big food companies in talking about concern for the health of their customers, planting doubt with the science, pledging to make changes that were in the interest of public health, agreeing to collaborate with public health officials? All those things played out in the food arena as well. And that's just one of many places where the food industry behave very, very similar to what the tobacco industry has done. But boy, is it interesting to hear that particular anecdote and to learn of the cynical behavior of the industry. So fast forward from there, and you think about the tobacco industry executives testifying before Congress that nicotine wasn't addictive, and you have that same process playing out many years later. These similarities are really remarkable.   So let's talk about your work and some of the issues that I think apply to the food area, and let's talk about taxes at the beginning. So I worked for years on the issue of soda taxes, and these taxes now exist in more than 50 countries around the world and in a number of major cities in the US, including San Francisco, Philadelphia, Seattle, and Oakland. And these taxes have been shown to have really positive effects, and they seem to be growing around the world. And I'd like to understand what you see as the overall findings from the work on tobacco taxes. But before we do that, you have a very interesting story to tell about how the tobacco control community responded when you first began speaking about taxes. It turns out to be taxes on tobacco have had whopping effects. But what was the initial reaction to people in that field?   Yeah, it is kind of an interesting story. So around 1980, when I first started writing and talking about tobacco taxation as a method of reducing smoking, I used to have public health audiences booing me. If they had rotten tomatoes with them, they would have been throwing them.   You know, Ken, it's hard to imagine because now these taxes are completely routine and accepted.   Yes, they're not only routine and accepted, they are a first principle of tobacco control. They are enshrined in the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. So they really are kind of the first thing we turn to because we know that they work. We know that they reduce smoking.   But let me give you a story about how I learned that this is not only a phenomenon with people smoking. It's a phenomenon with people using all other drugs, and it turns out it's a trans-species law, the Law of Demand. And that law says, basically, that if you increase price, the demand for the commodity will decrease. Well, in the beginning, the public health audiences believed two things. They believed that smokers were so addicted that they would not be affected by price, so it was ridiculous to even think about it. And they said, you have to have intrinsic motivators to get people to quit smoking. They have to care about their kids. They want to see their kids grow up, their spouses, and so on, and not extrinsic forces like a tax. So those were their two objections. So the story that I think is really kind of fun. I was on a plane flying to a small conference in Kansas City. This is sometime in the early '80s. And I happened to be seated next to Jack Henningfield, who is probably the preeminent psychopharmacologist dealing with nicotine, maybe in the world. And we were talking about price response, the fact that cigarette taxes work. And he said, "You know, I've got something I want to show you here." And he pulled out some what are called response cost curves from the psychology literature. And this is where you take a laboratory animal, in this instance addicted to narcotics or other addictive substances, and you give them a challenge to get their drugs. So first, I should note that these animals are so addicted that if they're given the choice between food and their drug, they will choose their drug, and they will in fact end up dying because they place a preference for the drug over food. But it turns out that when you increase the price of the drug to them, they decrease the amount that they consume. So what do I mean by that? If they have to push a lever, a bar, a certain number of times to get a dose of their drug, and you raise the number of bar pushes per dose, they will dose themselves with fewer doses. I took a look at these curves, and basically, a response cost curve for these lab animals is essentially a demand curve as we economists see it. And I calculated the price elasticity of demand, which is our standard measure of the responsiveness to price. And it turns out that addicted laboratory rats have essentially the same price elasticity of demand, the same price responsiveness that human beings do to cigarettes.   That's an absolutely fascinating story. And, you know, I know Jack, and have admired his work, as you have, and it's amazing to think about that conversation on a plane, and what sort of scientific work it led to, and how that, in turn, found its way into policies that exist around the world. So tell us then about tobacco taxes, and how high do they have to be in order to affect consumption in an appreciable way, and have they worked in reducing tobacco use, and what's your overall take on that?   So we have, quite literally, hundreds of studies in countries around the world, and we know a lot but we don't know everything. So we don't know, for example, if there's a particular price above which, you know, nobody will use the product. We don't have even really good data suggesting of, you know, what's the minimum increase in price that you have to have to have a noticeable impact. Overall, the literature suggests that if you increase the price of cigarettes by 10%, you will decrease the quantity demanded by 3 to 4%. Now, what this means is that roughly half of that decreased demand reflects decreases in the number of cigarettes that continuing smokers use, while the other half represents decreases in smoking, people quitting or kids not starting. So the demand is what we call price inelastic. The price change itself is larger, proportionately, than the decrease in consumption. But that decrease in consumption is still substantial and it's enough to have a large impact.   Now, cigarette prices vary all over the world, and cigarette prices vary primarily because of taxation differences. So if you go to the Scandinavian countries, you'll find that a pack of cigarettes will run $15 or more. If you go to Australia, you're looking at $30 or more a pack. In the US, currently, we're looking at an average price in the range of about 7 to $8. In some jurisdictions, like New York City, it's $10 or more. But the prices in the US are actually relatively low among the more developed nations in the world. Any tax increase will have an impact but obviously the larger tax increases will have larger impacts. And there's some good and bad news in tobacco taxation, particularly in a country like ours, and this is, again, true for most of the developed world. Smoking is now concentrated in marginalized populations. I'm talking about low socioeconomic groups, the LGBTQ community, and racial minorities, in particular. If you think of this as an economic phenomenon, when you raise the price on cigarettes, you're going to hit the worst-off economically segments of the population hard. That's the bad news. The good news is that those people, precisely because they are poor, tend to be much more price responsive than high-income smokers, and more of them will quit. So we have this problem that the tax is regressive, it imposes a larger burden on the poor, but the health effect is progressive. It will reduce the gap between the rich and poor in terms of smoking rates. And of great importance, there's an enormous gap between the rich and poor in this country in life expectancy, and as much as half of that may be differences in smoking rates.   Ken, there's a hundred follow-up questions I could ask, and I find this discussion absolutely fascinating. One thing that came into my mind was that some years ago I looked at the relationship of taxes, state by state in the US, and rates of disease like lung cancer and heart disease. And there was plenty of data because there was a huge range in tobacco taxes. Places like New York and Rhode Island had very high taxes, and the tobacco Southern states, like North Carolina, had very low taxes. But what's the sort of recent take on that, and the relationship between taxes and actual disease?   Well, it's still true. And there are, in fact, what you suggest, the southeastern block of tobacco states have unusually low rates of taxation. And I haven't seen any recent data but one presumes that they are suffering more from smoking-related diseases because their smoking rates are higher. I mean, that has to be true. So I don't know that we have any particularly good data recently, but there have been studies that clearly relate tobacco or cigarette prices to health outcomes associated with smoking.   I'm assuming US scientists have played a prominent role in producing the literature showing the negative health consequences of using cigarettes, and yet you said the United States has relatively low taxes compared to other developed countries. Why, do you think?   I think we're going to get into a very philosophical discussion about the US right here. It has to do with individual responsibility. We know for sure that the initial reason the taxes were so low was that the tobacco block was so influential in the Senate, particularly in the days when Jesse Helms, the senator from North Carolina, was in the Senate. He was the most feared senator by the other senators, and if you wanted to get anything done for your cause, you had to go along with his cause, which was keeping cigarette prices low and doing everything they could to support smoking. So there's clearly been a built-in bias in the Senate, and basically in the Congress as a whole, against tobacco policy. You see a huge variation from state to state in tobacco policies, and it's reflective of basically their political leanings in general.   You brought up this issue of personal responsibility, and boy, does that apply in the food area. You know, the food companies are saying: if you have one sugar beverage every once in a while, it's not going to be harmful. And it's not use of the products but it is overuse of the products. Thereby saying, it's not corporate responsibility we're talking about here, it's personal responsibility. That same argument was made by the tobacco industry, wasn't it?   It was. They would be less inclined to do that today, for a couple of reasons. One is that we know that even low levels of smoking are harmful and indeed cause many of the diseases that we were referring to earlier. And I think all the companies have now admitted publicly that smoking does cause all of these diseases that we've long known it causes. And all of them are claiming that they would like to move away from a society with smoking to one that has alternative products that would give people choices and ways to get their nicotine without exposing themselves to so much risk. I mean, we have to remember, the fact that cigarettes kill their consumers is a real drawback as far as the industry is concerned because they're losing a lot of their consumers, you know, 10, 20 years before they normally would, and they have to deal with all these lawsuits. So it's unfortunate for them. Having said that, cigarettes are the goose that lays the golden egg. They cost very little to manufacture. The industry is sufficiently oligopolistic that the profits are enormous, and their profitability has continued even while smoking has dropped rather precipitously ever since the mid-1960s.   Is that because the markets outside the US have been growing?   They certainly have helped. Although now, and this is only true within the last few years, the aggregate cigarette sales in the world are declining. They've actually started dropping. So we were seeing a relatively stable situation as smoking decreased in the developed world and was rising in the developing world. The only place now where we're seeing increases in smoking are areas in Africa, which, by the way, is the one place in the world where we might be able to forego the tobacco epidemic because smoking rates are still quite low in most of the countries, not all of them, and also parts of the Middle East. But elsewhere we've been seeing smoking declining all over the world. That doesn't mean the profits have to drop because one thing that the companies can do, is, they can raise their prices. Now, if prices go up because of taxes that hurts the companies. But if they raise their own prices because demand is inelastic, what that means is that the percentage increase in the price is larger than the percentage decline in the demand for cigarettes. So they're actually adding to their profitability by doing that. They've always played this very interesting game for years of keeping price below what we would think to be the profit-maximizing price. And I think the reason for that has to do with addiction because they know that they have to have what are called replacement smokers, kids coming in to take the place of the smokers who are dying or quitting. And for years, I think, they kept their prices down because they didn't want to discourage young people from smoking. Now, I think they see the writing on the wall. Smoking is declining very rapidly. Smoking prevalence, which was 45% in the mid, early-1960s, is now a little over 12% in the US, and I think they're raising their prices with the understanding that they want to take as much advantage of the opportunity with the addicted smokers, the adults, as they possibly can, even though smoking among kids is becoming vanishingly small.   I think of so many parallels with the soda taxes that now exists in a number of places, and the companies have responded somewhat differently. And perhaps it's the level of addiction issue that kicks in here, and the need to have replacement customers. Maybe that's another key difference. But with the soda taxes, the companies have not increased prices beyond the level of the tax. You know, to delight of public health experts, the companies have tended to pass along the entire tax so the companies are not eating that difference in order to keep prices the same. Higher tax gets reflected in the ultimate price that they charge, but they're not increasing prices beyond that. Do you think it might be the addiction issue that's different here?   I don't know. I mean, that certainly could be an element of it. The other thing is that they're manufacturing other drinks that are being used in place of some of the sodas. So they've got waters, they've got juices. I mean, obviously these sugary juices are no better, but they do make other products. They make the diet drinks. And to the extent that they can find substitutes for those products within their own companies, it may be that they're content to allow people to make those substitutions.   Interesting comment. The results so far on the soda tax suggest that the most common substitution as people drink less soda, is water, which is of course better than a lot of the alternatives that people might be consuming, so that's a bit of really good news. Even though the companies do sell water, Coke and Pepsi have Aquafina and Dasani, for example, they face a basic problem. Number one is that these companies are the biggest sellers of sugary beverages but not bottled water. That happens to be Nestle. So if people migrate to bottled water, they're likely to migrate from the big companies, like Coke and Pepsi, to Nestle. Also, people tend not to be very brand-loyal to water. They tend to buy whatever is on sale or whatever they find available to them, and that creates a problem for these companies like Coke and Pepsi that do rely on brand loyalty for their marketing. So it's very interesting. And also, I wonder, based on the research on food and addiction, if the companies don't take a hit if people switch from full sugar beverages even to diet beverages that they might sell because there wouldn't be as much addictive potential, and therefore the customers wouldn't have to have as much just to keep the habit going. So it's really interesting to think this through.   That's certainly very plausible. The whole thing would also depend on the price elasticity of demand for sodas, and specifically for the brands that they're concerned about. If there is greater elasticity there than what we observe for cigarettes, then raising those prices aren't necessarily going to help them all that much.   You mentioned that the elasticity estimates for tobacco suggested that a 10% increase in price led to a 3 to 4% reduction in consumption, and the numbers are even more positive in the case of the sugar beverages, where if you get a 10%, 15% increase in price, you end up with 10, 15% reduction in consumption. So that's good news in the food arena.   That's good news but it also means that they can't do as easily what the tobacco industry can do, which is to raise their prices and expect to see profits rise. Because if they're losing as much in sales as they're gaining in price, it's no win.   So Ken, let's talk about product formulation because you mentioned that earlier, and this is a really interesting issue that, again, connects tobacco and food products. So you think about the tobacco companies mainly selling cigarettes, but now there's vaping, there's cigarettes with things like menthol and other flavors, or low-fat foods, or artificial sweeteners. The list of product reformulations in order to attract customers goes on and on and on. So I know a controversial topic in your field has been e-cigarettes. Can you explain what these are?   E-cigarettes have been around now for about a decade, let's say. Basically, they're devices that allow people to inhale nicotine and other substances, but the purpose is to give them their nicotine without combustion. And we know that the major problem associated with smoking is the products of combustion. There's 7,000 chemical compounds in cigarette smoke. 70 of them are known human carcinogens, causes of cancer in humans. Many of them are cardiotoxic. They cause lung disease and so on. The e-cigarettes have about two orders of magnitude fewer toxins in their emissions than do cigarettes. And it turns out that the amount of the comparable toxins, when they are in fact comparable, that you find in the e-cigarette emissions is much lower, usually a 10th to a 400th, of what you find in cigarette smoke.   So logically, and based on a fair body of evidence at this point, vaping, use of e-cigarettes to get nicotine, is substantially less dangerous than is cigarette smoking. However, the controversy here is incredible. This is the most divisive issue that I have witnessed in my 45 years of working in the tobacco control field. It has torn the field asunder. The mainstream of public health, and by that I'm including governmental agencies, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the Truth Initiative, the American Cancer Society, heart and lung associations, all of mainstream public health is strongly opposed to e-cigarettes, and for one reason. They're concerned about kids' uptake of e-cigarettes, which has been substantial. It's been decreasing the last couple of years, but it has been substantial. And there are a number of things they're concerned about in that regard, and they're completely ignoring the fact that there's pretty good evidence that e-cigarettes are increasing smoking cessation for a subset of smokers. And a number of us on the science side of this, believe that the net effect of e-cigarettes is beneficial, that it's actually, possibly, a tool to add to the armamentarium of things like cigarette taxation, like smoke-free workplaces, like restrictions on advertising, and that it will help a group of inveterate smokers, those who either can't quit nicotine or don't want to, to move to a less dangerous alternative to smoking. I am not saying that e-cigarettes have no risk associated with them. They almost certainly do. But it is substantially lower.   Now, historically, this is divisive within the field in part because all of the earlier attempts at, quote-unquote, tobacco harm reduction have been produced by the major cigarette companies, and they've been fraudulent. So cigarette filters were manufactured and sold, starting in the 1950s, in response to the scare that I referred to earlier about cancer. And they were sold with a message that the filters block the dangerous stuff but let the flavor through. And people bought this. That decrease in smoking in the early 1950s reversed, smoking went up sharply, as sales of filtered cigarettes went up. By the way, the first successful filtered cigarette was Kent, and it used what it referred to as the miracle Micronite filter. Well, that miracle Micronite filter turns out to have been made of asbestos. And there are lawsuits continuing to the present day by workers in the factories that made the filter tips for Kent cigarettes, who themselves ended up with lung cancer or other diseases due to the asbestos. Then came low-tar and nicotine cigarettes, and we actually have ample evidence from the documents that had been revealed by lawsuits, that the industry knew that this was a public relations device. It was not a harm reduction device. And in fact, because people believed that low-tar and nicotine cigarettes were less dangerous, it's likely that it actually increased the toll of smoking because people who would have quit, switched to low-tar and nicotine cigarettes instead. So there's some pretty awful history here that makes people legitimately concerned about alternative products. A critical element of this story is that the alternative products, in this case, the e-cigarettes were introduced by non-cigarette, non-tobacco companies, and their goal was to replace smoking. Now the major companies are all making their own e-cigarettes as well because they have to do it from a defensive point of view, but basically they don't have any great interest in slowing up the sale of cigarettes. They want to benefit from that as long as they can.   So I should know the answer to this but I don't, but are e-cigarettes taxed? And wouldn't it be optimal to tax e-cigarettes but less than regular cigarettes so you discourage use of both but discourage the use of regular cigarettes more?   That is very insightful. Two colleagues and I actually published a paper saying that in 2015 in "The New England Journal of Medicine," that we should be taxing e-cigarettes modestly, the reason being that we want to discourage kids from using them, and kids are far more price-sensitive than our adults. Kids have a very elastic response to cigarette prices. Adults do not, and in particular, older adults have even lower price responsiveness. So yes, there should be some taxation of e-cigarettes to discourage youth use of it but that taxation should be dramatically lower than the taxation of cigarettes. Some states are now taxing e-cigarettes. Not all of them. The federal government is actually looking into a proposal to double the tax, the federal tax, on cigarettes, which would take it up to $2.01 a pack, and at the same time, to establish an equivalent tax, similar to the $2 tax, on all vaping products. This would be a disaster because it would definitely discourage kids from vaping, but it would also discourage adults from using e-cigarettes as an alternative to smoking, and the most addicted, the inveterate smokers, those are the ones that need these alternatives. So that's a bad policy proposal. A much better one would be to increase the cigarette tax by more than a dollar, raise it to 3 or $4 or something, and impose a modest tax on e-cigarettes. This would discourage people from smoking, both adults and kids, but especially kids. It would discourage kids from using e-cigarettes but it would create a price differential that would encourage the inveterate smokers to switch to e-cigarettes. Now, part of the problem, and this has gotten worse over time, is that the American public believes that e-cigarettes, that vaping, is as dangerous and even maybe more dangerous than cigarette smoking. Nothing could be further from the truth but so far the mainstream of public health has sold that message to the public, and the public, including smokers, believe it.   That's a fascinating story about how the public health field might be getting in its own way with this.   And maybe doing damage to public health.   So let's loop back a little bit to the behavior of the tobacco industry. So in 2017, the Phillip Morris Company funded and launched an organization called Foundation for a Smoke-Free World. So I think, hmm, a tobacco company saying they want less smoking, and one could view this with pretty high cynicism but what do you think about it?   I've always shared your sense of cynicism about it. There's an interesting anecdote related to this. The individual who negotiated the deal by which Phillip Morris offered $1 billion over a 12-year period to establish this foundation, that individual was the main actor in the World Health Organization during the development of the global treaty on tobacco control, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. He also became director of the organization and served in that capacity until just the other day. He has stepped down from being director. But let me give you a little context for it. Philip Morris International that needs to be distinguished from Altria and Philip Morris Domestic, but Philip Morris International sells the leading brand of what is known as heated tobacco products, HTPs. These are products that actually have tobacco in them. E-cigarettes have no tobacco in them but these products actually have tobacco in them. But instead of burning the tobacco, they heat it. They volatilize it, and the nicotine is inhaled. Like e-cigarettes, they appear to be substantially less dangerous than smoking, although it's not clear that they're as less dangerous as, than, e-cigarettes. But they're produced only by the major cigarette companies. Philip Morris is now selling these products successfully in many countries, many cities around the world. While they actually have the authorization to sell an older version of the product in the US, it's not very popular at this point. But in Japan, over the last four years there's been a drop in cigarettes sold of about a third at the same time that there's been this great increase in the use of these heated tobacco products manufactured by Philip Morris International and by Japan Tobacco. They have a product called Ploom. Philip Morris' product is called IQOS, I-Q-O-S, which, I was told, originally stood for I Quit Ordinary Smoking. So they are the leader of the theme song that the industry is singing these days about how they want a smoke-free world and they want to move toward one. But the only way they're ever going to do that, willingly, is if they can sell other products like these heated tobacco products and make large sums of money on them. Philip Morris has a good start at that. They claim that about a third of their revenue now is coming from IQOS, this heated tobacco product.   So whether that foundation ultimately has beneficial effects or not, forget corporate beneficial effects but on the public good, would pretty much depend on who's choosing to use these e-cigarettes, I'm imagining. That if it's people switching from normal cigarettes to them, or using them instead of normal cigarettes, it's one thing. But if they're recruiting new people who otherwise wouldn't smoke, then it would be a bad thing. So how do you think that'll all play out?   That's actually a critically important question, Kelly. And one of the great concerns that the opposition to e-cigarettes has, is that they're addicting lots of kids to nicotine, and that many of them will go on to smoke, and that that will reverse the progress that we made on smoking. Now, it turns out that there is no evidence to support the latter contention. And in fact, there's evidence to the contrary. I think it's entirely possible that some kids who would not have touched a cigarette otherwise are vaping and then trying cigarettes in the future. Whether they become regular smokers, remains to be seen. But I think there certainly are some kids like that. But what we do know is that the rate of smoking among kids, what we call current smoking, and smoking among kids means that they've had at least one puff on a cigarette in the last 30 days, that number has plummeted over the last quarter century, and, and this is the interesting thing, it has gone down at its fastest rate precisely during the period in which vaping has been popular among kids.   So one theory is that vaping is displacing smoking to some extent. That kids who would've smoked are vaping instead. It's a very complicated area and we don't know the answer. Among adults who vape, and they are relatively few in number except for very young adults, we observe mostly dual use, but the question is how much of this is a transition to vaping only, and then, maybe, a transition to nothing after that. In the UK, where vaping has been advertised by the health organizations as a way to quit smoking, and they have encouraged its use, and they use it in their smoking cessation clinics, and you'll even find it in hospitals, in the UK we have seen that more than half of the people who have quit smoking by using e-cigarettes have also quit vaping. So it is no longer the case in the UK that a majority of the people who vape are also currently smoking.   In the US, the data have been moving in that direction but it's still a majority who are dual users rather than vaping only. But we have evidence of four or five completely different kinds of studies, commercial data, other products in other countries, that all lead to the conclusion that vaping is already increasing the rate of smoking cessation in the US and in the UK by probably 10 to 15%. That's a hard thing to see in the data but it is something that, if you dig into the data, you will see it, and as I say, we see it all over the place. Let me give you one example of the tobacco harm reduction story that's fabulous. 40 to 50 years ago, large numbers of Swedish males started using a smokeless tobacco product called snus, S-N-U-S. It's a relatively low nitrosamine product, nitrosamine being a carcinogenic element, and they substituted it for cigarettes largely because cigarette taxes were going way up and there weren't any significant taxes on snus. So what you observe today, some three, four decades or more later, is that Swedish males have the lowest male smoking rate of any country in Europe, and maybe in the world. They do not have a low tobacco use rate. Their tobacco use rate is pretty typical but it consists mostly of snus. And they also have by far the lowest rate of tobacco-related diseases, like lung cancer, of men in all of the European Union countries, and the second lowest is typically a rate twice or more that of what you see in the Swedish males. Swedish females, who did not quit smoking in large numbers and did not take up snus until fairly recently, have rates of lung cancer and other diseases that are average or above-average for the European Union. So that's a great example of tobacco harm reduction in action, and it's one that's been around now, as I say, for decades.   Ken, this is a remarkable history and you're just bringing it alive beautifully. But let me ask you one final question. So given that you've been working in this field for more than four decades now, and have really been a pioneer, a leader, a warrior, and a hero, all those things could be applied to you and your work, if I asked you to sum up what's been learned from all these decades of work on tobacco, what would you say?   There are a lot of lesson. Certainly, we have learned specific kinds of interventions that really matter. You and I spoke about tax at some length. That's the preeminent one. Smoke-free workplaces, including smoke-free restaurants and bars, have not only themselves had a direct impact on health but have also set the tone for a more smoke-free society. So we have seen quite dramatic changes. I mentioned we're going from a 45% rate of smoking for the nation as a whole down to a little over 12%. That, however, has taken us six to seven decades. So it's kind of a good news, bad news story. It's a very complicated area. Tobacco control was ranked by CDC as one of the 10 most important public health measures of the 20th century, and also the first decade of the 21st century. And I think that's completely legitimate, and it is something about which all of us who care about public health can feel very proud about. The problem still remains. It is an enormous problem, as you alluded earlier, in many parts of the developing world, the low- and middle-income countries, and it's a growing problem in some of those countries, and it's just not going to disappear real fast. The lesson that I've taken most recently has been a discouraging one, and that's how divisive our field has become. We really have a chasm between the people who are opposed to tobacco harm reduction and those who are supportive of it. They're good people on both sides, they believe what they're saying, but they can't talk to each other civilly at this point. I hope that that will not become the case for those of you who are fighting the good fight in dealing with unhealthy foods.   Bio   Kenneth E. Warner is the Avedis Donabedian Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Public Health and Dean Emeritus at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. A member of the faculty from 1972-2017, he served as Dean from 2005-2010. Presented in over 275 professional publications, Dr. Warner's research has focused on economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Dr. Warner served as the World Bank's representative to negotiations on the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, WHO's first global health treaty. He also served as the Senior Scientific Editor of the 25th anniversary Surgeon General's report on smoking and health. From 2004-2005 he was President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT). He currently serves on the FDA's Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. In 1996 Dr. Warner was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. He is a recipient of the Surgeon General's Medallion, the Luther Terry Award for Exemplary Achievement in Tobacco Control, and the Doll-Wynder Award from SRNT. Dr. Warner earned his AB from Dartmouth College and MPhil and PhD in economics from Yale University.  

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
HORMONES: TESTOSTERONE & LBM - CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY #441

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 7:42


Joe and Eric Helms recently discussed how to support hormonal balance and capacity in the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind. Today, Joe takes the conversation to Adam to explain step by step how three sets of hormones impact hunger, fat loss, and muscle mass. You don't want to miss this series! For an in-depth conversation on this topic, Dr. Joe and Dr. Eric Helms discuss what happens with our hormones in dieting, in the pursuit of our best health, maintaining or gaining lean body mass, and maintaining as much metabolic capacity as we can when dieting. It's Session 19 of the NUTRITION COACHING GLOBAL MASTERMIND webcast series, available for $9.99 here: https://nutritioncoachingglobal.com/session-19-hormones CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY - THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative daily video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! Together, Klemczewski and Atkinson have helped clients win more than 500 pro cards, 200 pro titles, and 25 world championships. It's time for your best condition and your biggest win! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY COMPLETE PLAYLIST: https://thedietdoc.com/contestprepu THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep The Diet Doc, LLC, is the parent company to many health, fitness, nutrition, and behavioral projects. Founded 25 years ago by Joe Klemczewski, PhD, known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting, The Diet Doc is equipping the next generation of nutrition coaches. Joined by health psychologist Kori Propst, PhD, Joe has created the Flexible Dieting Institute, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, and Contest Prep University. Whether you're listening to a podcast or interview as a life transformation client, a physique sport competitor, a performance athlete, a fitness entrepreneur, or just need some life motivation, Joe and Kori won't disappoint! SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheDietDoc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dietdocglobal Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/thedietdoclife Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

Marketplace All-in-One
Dementia’s rising price

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 8:16


All facets of care for people with dementia come with an avalanche of costs, and they’re going to get higher, according to a report from the National Academy of Sciences. Senior economics contributor Chris Farrell helps explain what those costs are in a discussion. We check in on the another effort to unionize for Amazon workers in Alabama, as the National Labor Relations Board has gotten involved after an earlier attempt resulted in a “no” vote. Giving Tuesday challenge: Give now to help us reach $100k in donations and unlock another $100k from the Investors Challenge Fund.

Marketplace Morning Report
Dementia’s rising price

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 8:16


All facets of care for people with dementia come with an avalanche of costs, and they’re going to get higher, according to a report from the National Academy of Sciences. Senior economics contributor Chris Farrell helps explain what those costs are in a discussion. We check in on the another effort to unionize for Amazon workers in Alabama, as the National Labor Relations Board has gotten involved after an earlier attempt resulted in a “no” vote. Giving Tuesday challenge: Give now to help us reach $100k in donations and unlock another $100k from the Investors Challenge Fund.

The Good Practice Podcast
273 — Hybrid (net)working

The Good Practice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 40:11


What are the challenges of managing a team who are sometimes present and sometimes not? How do we make sure hybrid working is inclusive? Is a hybrid meeting - that's effective for everyone - actually possible? In this week's episode of The Mind Tools L&D Podcast, speaker and writer Gary Cookson joins Ross G and Owen to share insights from his research. We discuss: what hybrid working is the hybrid working challenges faced by employees, managers and organisations strategies for developing networks within organisations Show notes For background, see 'Most people in the UK did not work from home in 2020, says ONS' at:  theguardian.com/world/2021/may/17/home-working-doubled-during-uk-covid-pandemic-last-year-mostly-in-london  And, from the ONS: 'Coronavirus (COVID-19) latest insights: Work 19 November 2021' at: ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/articles/coronaviruscovid19latestinsights/work#homeworking  Gary's book will be published by Kogan Page in June 2022. You can find him at: epichr.co.uk/  In WILTW, Owen discussed how Google has made us feel overconfident: Ward, A. F. (2021). People mistake the internet's knowledge for their own. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(43). Available online at: pnas.org/content/118/43/e2105061118  This paper is discussed at: phys.org/news/2021-10-online-overconfident.html  Ross shared insights into the Sheldon Spectrum, covered by Wired at: wired.co.uk/article/ocean-creature-size  For more from us, including access to our back catalogue of podcasts, visit mindtoolsbusiness.com. There, you'll also find details of our award-winning performance support toolkit, our off-the-shelf e-learning, and our custom work.  Connect with our speakers  If you'd like to share your thoughts on this episode, connect with our speakers on Twitter:  Ross Garner @RossGarnerMT Owen Ferguson @OwenFerguson Gary Cookson @Gary_Cookson

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors
Lennart Anderson: A Retrospective-Tour of the Exhibition with Rachel Rickert

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 48:13


Curated by Graham Nickson and Rachel Rickert in collaboration with the artist's estate, the exhibition features works from both public and private collections as well as Anderson's gallery, Leigh Morse Fine Arts. Ranging from figurative works like Mrs. Suzy Peterson (1959) to the unfinished painting Three Nymphs on a Bluff left on his easel in 2015, the exhibition brings together a variety of genres, such as the human form, still life, portrait, landscape, and streetscape. Viewed together, the works attest to Anderson's lifelong interest in the interplay of tone, color, and light. Speaking with Jennifer Samet in 2002, Anderson explained, “When you look at nature from a distance, you can see how it all fits together. There is a harmony, and that is what interests me.” The presentation also demonstrates the singular approach that informed his artmaking, which defied trends such as Abstract Expressionism. Described in the New York Times as one of the “most prominent and admired painters to translate figurative art into a modern idiom,” Anderson had a profound interest in formalism and an appreciation for both Old and New Masters, especially Piero della Francesca, Diego Velázquez, and Edgar Degas, and his work was directly inspired by this knowledge of art history. For instance, Idyll 4 (2012) is one of four paintings inspired by Claude Poussin that depict pastoral bliss, a subject Anderson began exploring in the 1970s. Born in Detroit, Anderson earned an undergraduate degree at the Art Institute of Chicago, a Masters at Cranbrook Academy, and later studied briefly at the Art Students League in New York with Edwin Dickinson. Anderson taught at several prestigious schools, including Columbia University, Princeton University, and Yale University, before serving as a distinguished professor of Brooklyn College. He received numerous awards, including the Prix de Rome, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Tiffany Foundation. Anderson was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the National Academy of Design. Anderson's work is represented in the permanent collections of the Brooklyn Museum, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Fralin Art Museum, Palmer Museum of Art, and Delaware Art Museum, among others. This exhibition has been spearheaded by the artist's daughter, Jeanette Anderson Wallace, who manages the estate for the artist's family. Of the process of bringing together this collection of works to show the scope of Anderson's practice, she says “It has been particularly meaningful to bring out paintings that have not been seen by the public for many years, and introduce a new generation of painters, curators, and collectors to his work.” Co-curators Graham Nickson, Dean of the NYSS, and Rachel Rickert, Exhibitions Coordinator, comment “Lennart Anderson was a terrific painter; his works are pure obsession made palpable in paint. He mused constantly about tone, surface abstraction and measure. He painted things, people, and places in relationship. Anderson's work is never exactly what one expects. Perceptual works transcend observation and synthetic move into territory of belief. In this exhibition, we pull together a collective force of his slow works for the unacquainted to understand and revel in their profundity. Lennart was a great wit, so serious it allowed for surprises in his painting. He had an absolute passion for Degas and yet an attraction to DeKooning. He shaped his own vision with links to the great tradition from Roman times to present day. Lennart painted firmly and resolutely to the end. His warm shadow in the cool landscape is still with us.” NYSS will present a virtual lecture the evening of Tuesday, October 26, 2021 to delve into Anderson's work: “The Unexplained is Irresistible: A Discussion On the Work of Lennart Anderson with Jennifer Samet, Brian Schumacher, Amy Weiskopf & John Yau, Moderated by A'Dora Phillips.” The exhibition is accompanied by a scholarly catalogue that pairs more than fifty full color reproductions of Anderson's work with essays by art historians Martica Sawin and Jennifer Samet and painters Susan Jane Walp and Paul Resika. It is available for pre-order now from New York Studio School and independent bookstores. An in-person catalogue launch will be hosted by the Milton Resnick and Pat Pasloff Foundation on Saturday, November 13, 2021, a fitting location as Anderson, Resnick and Pasloff worked together in the Lower East Side and remained life-long friends. David Cohen, the publisher of artcritical, will moderate a conversation with curator Rachel Rickert and painters Kyle Staver and Steve Hicks. Following its presentation at the New York Studio School, the exhibition will travel to other venues, including the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts and the Southern Utah Museum of Art. Generous support for this exhibition is provided by the American Macular Degeneration Foundation (AMDF), BNY Mellon, Center for Figurative Painting, Charina Foundation, Emily Mason | Alice Trumbull Mason Foundation, Morris and Alma Schapiro Fund, Richard T. Spurzem, The William Louis-Dreyfus Foundation, Wolf Kahn | Emily Mason Foundation, private collectors, individuals, and anonymous patrons of the arts. Restoration for work in the Estate of Lennart Anderson has been generously donated by Simon Parkes Art Conservation in New York, NY.   LINKS:   https://nyss.org/exhibition/lennart-anderson-a-retrospective/ Submit Work I Like Your Work-The Works- Year Membership Exhibitions Studio Visit Artists I Like Your Work Podcast Instagram Observations on Applying to Juried Shows Studio Planner

#Clockedin with Jordan Edwards
Vikrant Shaurya - How to Write a Book in 5 days

#Clockedin with Jordan Edwards

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 47:06


Vikrant Shaurya joins #Clockedin with Jordan Edwards and discusses about his life story of writing best selling books and doing that for their clients. Vikrant Shaurya is the CEO and Founder of BestsellingBook.com. He's also the author of two #1 bestsellers: P.O.W.E.R: The Success Mantra, and How to Write a Bestseller: Become a Bestselling Author, Attract High-Value Clients, and Skyrocket Your Authority. Vikrant is the most-viewed author for “eBook Publishing” on Quora and is recognized by the National Academy of Bestselling Authors.3 Biggest Mistakes of Book Writing:Start with book outline - business plan for book Make every chapter perfect before moving to the next - get first draft ASAPPEOPLE THINK YOU NEED TO SIT DOWN and write a bookTo learn more about Vikrant:Website: https://bestsellingbook.comArtificial Intelligence to help write book: Jarvis.aiTo Distribute Audiobook: findawayvoices.com 5 Day Book Challenge: https://challenge.bestsellingbook.comHope you find value in this. If so please provide a 5-star and drop a review. Complimentary Edwards Consulting Session: https://calendly.com/jordan-555/intro-call

D.O. or Do Not: The Osteopathic Physician's Journey for Premed & Medical Students
Episode 61: Dr. Julieanne Sees D.O. Orthopedic Surgery

D.O. or Do Not: The Osteopathic Physician's Journey for Premed & Medical Students

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 56:59


Dr. Julieanne Sees, DO, FAAOS, FAOA, FAOAO, is an AOA board-certified osteopathic orthopedic surgeon with dual fellowship training in pediatric orthopedic surgery and neuro-orthopedic surgery and, notably, has been recently named a 2021 Top Doc of America. She currently is the National Academies of Medicine, Science and Engineering Fellow in Osteopathic Medicine serving on the National Academy of Medicine Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience and Committee on Accelerating Progress in Traumatic Brain Injury Research and Care.Dr. Sees received her degree in osteopathic medicine from Midwestern University Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine in Downers Grove, Illinois. During medical school she received several honors, including the Illinois Medical Society Student of the Year Award and the National Medical Council of Student Government Presidents Student DO of the Year, and received AOF's Outstanding Resident of the Year Award. She went on to complete a combined internship and orthopedic residency at the former University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Osteopathic Medicine. Her passion for promoting clinician resiliency and traumatic brain injury research, prevention, and care are at the forefront of her practice. An active member of the osteopathic medical profession, Dr. Sees serves on the AOA's Committee on Governance and Organizational Structure as Vice Chair, the American Osteopathic Foundation (AOF) Board of Directors, and the American Osteopathic Academy of Orthopedic Surgery Publications and Communications as Chair. Currently she is President of the Delaware State Osteopathic Medical Society and President of the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine Alumni Association (CCOMAA) Board of Governors. Tune in to hear how Dr. Sees share her story about how she went from working in development at a major pharmaceutical company to CCOM student, and her advice to students interested in pursuing pediatric orthopedic surgery and neuro-orthopedic surgery.

Honestly with Bari Weiss
Lose the Mask! Eat the Turkey! And Other Sane Advice For Thanksgiving

Honestly with Bari Weiss

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 64:20


If your family is anything like mine, Thanksgiving is an opportunity to take a break from work, to bask in one others' presence, and to fight savagely over the hottest political issues of the day. And nothing is more contentious than Covid: mask policies; vaccine mandates; whether kids should be confined to the backyard; and, most urgently, whether we can safely--and finally--call time on the pandemic. To answer those questions and more, I called up Marty Makary, a professor at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health of nearly 20 years and a member of the National Academy of Medicine. Dr. Makary has published over 250 scientific articles and is the author, most recently, of “The Price We Pay: What Broke American Health Care and How to Fix It.” He offers a no-nonsense approach to the two pandemics he sees plaguing the country; the coronavirus and the “pandemic of lunacy.”  Veteran Honestly listeners will notice that this episode may sound a bit different. We're piloting a new format, which we're calling “Quick Question.” So email your burning ones-- even if they're not quick--to tips@honestlypod.com. Please include “QQ” in the subject line.  Happy Thanksgiving! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Health Detective Podcast by FDNthrive
95. Triumph After Tragedy w/ Steve Baum, FDN-P, CHEK |||

The Health Detective Podcast by FDNthrive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 61:03


In what is arguably the most heart-wrenching episode of the The Health Detective Podcast to date, our guest tonight, Steve Baum, will teach you exactly what it means to persevere.  Steve has been helping people get into the best shape of their lives for almost 40 years.   When he was a kid, he idolized a boy that he thought was ripped and muscular, and he wanted to look like him. Then, on a family float trip, he took his shirt off, and the boy said, "OMG, you have tits!"   Steve could think of nothing else but transforming himself and getting lean and muscular from that moment on. So, he talked his parents into buying a weight set and devoured the muscle mags, following every program he could find.   Fortunately, his parents didn't want him to hurt himself, and they hired a professional to work with him.  This person taught Steve how to lift weights and eat right to reach his goals.   Learning from a pro had an immediate impact and set the stage for the rest of his life. After that, fitness and nutrition became his passion at 14 years old.   At 16 years old, Steve started coaching and training clients.  He got certified as a personal trainer by the American College of Sports Medicine. Then, he went on to earn certifications from The National Strength and Conditioning Association, The National Academy of Sports Medicine, Poliquin Strength Systems, Cross Fit, The Aerobics and Fitness Association of America, Precision Nutrition, Metabolic Typing, Functional Diagnostic Nutrition, Performance Enhancement Therapy, and The CHEK Institute.     In 1997, Steve moved to Scottsdale, AZ to open his dream training facility, including an incredible gym and a state-of-the-art physical therapy clinic.     While in Arizona, he got married and had a beautiful baby boy named Steven Austin Nicholas Baum. Being a dad was a whole new ball game! Austin followed him everywhere and was always around the gym, even in diapers!  He taught Steve what unconditional love was all about.  In 2004 Steve and his family moved to St. Louis, and he opened a new gym. Then, in 2010, tragedy struck, and he learned the definition of the word "persevere." He faced the most significant battle any parent could ever have to face, the death of his precious little boy.     The stress from this had a devastating impact on Steve. He became so exhausted that he could barely get out of bed. Steve gained over 70 pounds in less than six months, and regardless of how healthy he ate or how hard he exercised, nothing he had learned up to this point was helping him. He went from doctor to doctor searching for answers, only to hear everything looked fine and maybe he was "depressed."  He knew deep down something other than depression was causing his issues, but he couldn't figure out what. That's when a colleague introduced Steve to Reed Davis and Functional Diagnostic Nutrition®.  Reed had Steve run some functional lab tests, and he finally identified some weak links in his metabolism that were causing his health issues.  Correcting these helped Steve get back into the best shape of his life. After that, he knew he could use FDN to help other exhausted business owners and entrepreneurs regain their health, so he became a certified FDN practitioner.   In 2020, Steve decided to sell his gym to focus 100 percent on functional health coaching.   Now, he's using all of the tools he's gathered, including FDN, to help other entrepreneurs and professionals identify and correct their health issues.    Steve is also happy to report that he's happily remarried and has an awesome wife who's a great mom to FIVE kids and a soon-to-be certified ADAPT health coach. Together they're helping burned-out professionals increase their energy, lose stubborn fat, and get in phenomenal shape so they can create more success and live life instead of feeling like zombies.   Steve has given our audience both his personal e-mail AND phone number. They are sbfitness@mac.com and 3142653503, respectively.  You can find out more about FDNthrive by going to www.fdnthrive.com. 

The Healthcare Policy Podcast ®  Produced by David Introcaso
250th Podcast: Harvard's Dr. Aaron Bernstein Discusses COP 26, the National Academy's Climate Crisis Effort and Related Issues (November 19th)

The Healthcare Policy Podcast ® Produced by David Introcaso

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


Listen Now Concerning the recent United Nation's COP 26 meeting in Glasgow, again unverifiable pledges were made moreover to cut...

Exploring Mind and Body
EMB #518: Malin Method

Exploring Mind and Body

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 30:00


Scott Malin is a best-selling health and fitness expert. Scott's extremely popular fitness, rehab and nutrition videos have received over 11.5 million views on You Tube. Scott has an extensive background in personal training (National Academy of Sports Medicine), working with celebrities and athletes for many years. He has been featured on the news as a fitness expert and most recently appeared on ABC, KTLA News and KDOC TV. Scott first became obsessed with health and fitness when he sustained a serious low back injury playing basketball about fifteen years ago, which left him laid up in bed for six months. He began a long journey of learning how to heal himself without drugs or surgery. Along the way, he realized that the best way to rehab the body is to work with its natural healing process instead of against it. Scott developed MALIN METHOD, a revolutionary way to heal the body naturally and safely. Using scientific research as his guide and real world training as his testing ground, Scott stripped away the long held beliefs of ineffective treatments like ice and prolonged rest and replaced them with scientifically backed healing strategies that quickly and effectively reduce swelling, bruising and pain. MALIN METHOD also dramatically increases strength, stability and healthy range of motion, which significantly reduces the risk of future injury. MALIN METHOD has taught over 100,000 people of all ages how to rehabilitate their bodies and get out pain naturally and safely. Scott's system is super easy to do at home and does not require any equipment.

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Mind Health Matters with Dr. Bernie Siegel

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 57:42


Tenacity in Children: Nurturing the Seven Instincts for Lifetime Success In reviewing many studies and writings, Pediatric Neuropsychologist Sam Goldstein, PhD and Harvard Medical School Professor Robert B. Brooks, PhD identified 7 instincts present from birth that have proven to be of the greatest significance in our development. They have evolved over thousands and thousands of years, ensuring the success and survival of our species.   For example, the early manifestations of such attributes as optimism, motivation, empathy, and altruism are present at birth, waiting to be nurtured and brought to fruition by parents and other caregivers.    In light of the role that these instincts play throughout our lives, the doctors believe that it is imperative for parents, educators, mental health and childcare professionals to strive to identify and reinforce them in children Intuitive Optimism is the belief that gratifying and successful outcomes can be achieved despite existing challenges. Children retain the belief that with perseverance as well as assistance when necessary from parents and educators, they will ultimately experience success. Strategies to foster Intuitive Optimism include: reinforcing a sense of personal control from an early age, teaching problem-solving strategies, identifying strengths to build confidence, and helping children view setbacks and mistakes as experiences they can learn from. Intrinsic Motivation posits that children are motivated to engage in tasks when certain inner needs are being met without the presence of contingent rewards. These needs include: belonging and connecting with others, providing a feeling of security; self-determination and autonomy, reinforcing a belief that they are being heard, respected, and that they have input into situations impacting their lives; competency as the source of a child's ability to successfully perform, master tasks, and reach goals in their world; and a sense of purpose, often represented by children subscribing to a greater good. Compassionate Empathy is composed of two main dimensions: empathy is the ability to understand the world of another person both on an affective and cognitive level, while compassion involves using that understanding to initiate actions that express caring towards others. This instinct serves our deepest needs to survive, to connect, and to find our partners in life. Using empathic communication with our children can secure important benefits, including having enriched relationships with them. This provides the opportunity for children to nurture this instinct in themselves and thereby connect in a more gratifying way to others. Simultaneous Intelligence is how different pieces of information fit together into a whole in order to understand, interpret, and solve problems. Children become more effective critical thinkers and problem solvers when they create categories and classify items, identify relevant information, construct and recognize valid deductive arguments, recognize reasoning fallacies, and distinguish between evidence and interpretations of evidence. Parents and teachers can reinforce this instinct whenever children are navigating through problems by encouraging them to consider alternative explanations and solutions, talk about biases, ask open-ended questions, and encourage thinking in new ways. Genuine Altruism is an unselfish concern for others, represented by acting to alleviate their distress with no expectation of reciprocation. Altruism is an instinct worthy of cultivation through socialization and modeling. Children benefit from helping others. These actions improve mood, behavior, and self-image; reinforce positive relationships with others; and encourage a sense of purpose. As children observe and practice altruistic words and actions, they are inspired for this instinct to reach its full expression. Virtuous Responsibility is the ethical and moral responsibility we have to enhance the lives of family, friends, and members of our society. This instinct extends beyond the scope of helping others, because it involves making decisions and engaging in behaviors that demonstrate that we can be trusted and accountable for our actions.  Assuming responsibility is rooted in the ways in which parents and caregivers discipline children in order to nurture qualities of self-discipline and accountability. Measured Fairness is an important foundation of morality and the evolution of cooperation in human beings. It is allied to pro-social behaviors such as effective communication, empathy, cooperation, problem-solving skills, and forgiveness as the basic underpinnings of connected, generous, and successful lives.  This instinct is nurtured in children by helping them develop a sense of personal control. They learn to believe that while they may not always have control over challenging situations, they do have control over their attitude and behavior. Sam Goldstein, Ph.D. is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, the University of Utah School of Medicine (USA). and certified School Psychologist in the State of Utah. He is also Board Certified as a Pediatric Neuropsychologist and listed in the Council for the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the National Academy of Neuropsychology. He has authored, co-edited or co-authored over fifty clinical and trade publications, three dozen book chapters, nearly three dozen peer-reviewed scientific articles and eight psychological and neuropsychological tests. Since 1980, he has served as Clinical Director of The Neurology, Learning and Behavior Center in Salt Lake City, Utah.  Robert Brooks Ph.D. is currently on the faculty of Harvard Medical School (part-time) and is the former Director of the Department of Psychology at McLean Hospital, a private psychiatric hospital.  He is Board Certified in Clinical Psychology, as well as listed in the Council for the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology. He has authored, co-edited or co-authored 18 books and, in addition, authored or co-authored almost three dozen book chapters and more than three dozen peer reviewed scientific articles. https://tenacityinchildren.com/ ​Learn more about Dr. Bernie here:  http://berniesiegelmd.com/

Macro Hive Conversations With Bilal Hafeez
Edward Glaeser on Will Cities Survive After COVID

Macro Hive Conversations With Bilal Hafeez

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 60:48


Edward Glaeser is Professor of Economics at Harvard University. He is perhaps the world's leading expert on cities. He recently authored, along with David Cutler, Survival of the City – Living and Thriving in the Age of Isolation. Edward leads the Urban Economics Working Group at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and co-leads the Cities Programme at the International Growth Center. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Public Administration. In this podcast we discuss: What defines a city? How have pandemics impacted cities across history? Why are people healthier in cities than in rural areas? Why is there large inequality within cities? Importance of education What led to the urban renaissance of the 1990s Why didn't tech revolution end cities? Will Zoom revolution change cities? What lead to growth of Silicon Valley Factors that drive gentrification Three recommendations for helping cities. Edward's book recommendations: The Death and Life of Great American Cities (Jacobs), Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West (Cronon), Regional Advantage: Culture and Competition in Silicon Valley and Route 128 (Saxenian), Framing the Early Middle Ages (Wickham) and Origins of the European Economy (McCormick)

This Day in History Class
Pop duo Milli Vanilli is stripped of their Grammy Award - November 19th, 1990

This Day in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 14:07


On this day in 1990, The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences rescinded the Grammy Award for Best New Artist from pop duo Milli Vanilli. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
THE MIND-MUSCLE CONNECTION - Ep. 2 - Passion Versus Obsession

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 24:47


We've got big goals. We know it takes superhuman effort. Sports figures with hundred-million-dollar contracts don't get to the top playing it safe. Rock stars, business titans...they do what they have to do. But is it worth it? Maybe there's a way to channel your passion with 100-percent abandon but still have a sense of balance. Maybe you can enjoy other parts of life and still nurture relationships while pursuing ultimate physique sport status and goals. Listen in as Joe and Tyler dip into character trait and personality psychology, addiction therapy parallels, and even marital concepts to give you tangible strategies to live the best of both worlds! Joe Klemczewski, PhD, and Tyler Wiebe, BSc, have teamed up to connect the grind of the iron to the power of your mind. {~} Klemczewski is the founder of The Diet Doc, LLC, The Flexible Dieting Institute, the National Academy of Metabolic Science coaching certification program, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, Apex Coach nutrition professional mentorship program, and Contest Prep University. Known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting and macronutrient tracking, Klemczewski, a former WNBF professional bodybuilder, has helped almost 500 clients win pro cards and more than 150 pro titles. {~} Tyler Wiebe was selected by Paul Revelia as one of Pro Physique's original coaches. Wiebe's expertise in kinesiology and his dedication to the client experience sets him apart as a model to the next generation of coaches. {~} Together, Klemczewski and Wiebe will take you through the real life challenges and strategies to make your training and competition experience a mental force that powerfully matches your effort in the gym. The Mind-Muscle Connection podcast is your source to build a winning mindset, unleash powerful mental growth, and make the world of physique and strength sport endlessly rewarding! OUR OTHER PODCAST: THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative topical video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLaFD0Y6EtWHOqNOa5UFFs1QOH2CTrWw2W THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/joe.klemczewski Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joeklemczewski Audio Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
OFFSEASON OPTIONS: TRAINING PROGRESSIONS - CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY #448

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 8:32


What are the best ways to manage your offseason if your goal is maximum lean body mass gain and/or strength? What if you struggle to get lean enough during prep? How long should your offseason be? How do you manage the entirety of your career goals when it comes to how much time you spend in offseasons versus contest preps? Listen in as Joe and Adam discuss different paths that might be perfect for your goals, but remember one thing: you have great options! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY - THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative daily video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! Together, Klemczewski and Atkinson have helped clients win more than 500 pro cards, 200 pro titles, and 25 world championships. It's time for your best condition and your biggest win! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY COMPLETE PLAYLIST: https://thedietdoc.com/contestprepu THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep The Diet Doc, LLC, is the parent company to many health, fitness, nutrition, and behavioral projects. Founded 25 years ago by Joe Klemczewski, PhD, known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting, The Diet Doc is equipping the next generation of nutrition coaches. Joined by health psychologist Kori Propst, PhD, Joe has created the Flexible Dieting Institute, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, and Contest Prep University. Whether you're listening to a podcast or interview as a life transformation client, a physique sport competitor, a performance athlete, a fitness entrepreneur, or just need some life motivation, Joe and Kori won't disappoint! SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheDietDoc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dietdocglobal Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/thedietdoclife Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. - On Leadership and Pearls of Life with Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmann (Part 2)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 20:10


In the second part of this Oncology, Etc. episode Drs. Patrick Loehrer (Indiana University) and David Johnson (University of Texas) continue their conversation with Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmann, exploring the prominent leadership roles she held, from first female Chancellor at UCSF to CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and member of Facebook's Board of Directors. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts | Additional resources: education.asco.org | Contact Us Air Date: 11/18/21   TRANSCRIPT SPEAKER 1: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. PAT LOEHRER: Hi, Everybody. I'm Pat Loehrer. I'm director of the Centers of Global Health at Indiana University, Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center. DAVE JOHNSON: And I'm Dave Johnson. I'm Professor of Medicine here at UT Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas. So Pat, we're back for another episode of the award winning "Oncology Et Cetera." PAT LOEHRER: Just seems like last month we were here time, you know? Time just flies. DAVE JOHNSON: Exactly. Before we get started, you were telling me about an interesting book you were reading-- something about friends or something. Can you elaborate? PAT LOEHRER: Sure, sure, yeah. This book I picked up-- actually, my wife picked it up. It's called First Friends. It's written by Gary Ginsburg. It's a really interesting book. It was-- basically talks about-- it probably has about eight or nine presidents but the importance of having a friend that guides him. And these were people that were, in many ways, unelected people that were close to the presidents that helped change the face of what we see today, and some of them are stories of really good friends and some of them are, I think, opportunistic friends. But it gives you a background of people like Madison and Lincoln and Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson. It's actually a fun read. DAVE JOHNSON: I'll definitely put it on my reading list. It sounds like a pretty exciting one. Well, speaking of influential people, we're really excited to jump back into our interview with Dr. Helman. In our last episode, we covered her early life and career, her work in Uganda, her views on global oncology, and her experiences in private practice and industry. In the next half of our interview, we'll learn more about her incredible career and her multiple leadership roles. Let's start by hearing about her time as chancellor of UCSF. PAT LOEHRER: Let me transition a little bit. What I'd like to do is talk a little bit about your leadership. One Of the next big roles you had, you became chancellor at UCSF, correct? SPEAKER 2: Mm-hm. PAT LOEHRER: And so as Dave said, I think you were the first woman in that role. SPEAKER 2: I was. PAT LOEHRER: You were a groundbreaker from that capacity. So now instead of working for people-- obviously, I understand that there's people you work for when you're chancellor too, but tell a little bit about that transition from industry back into academics and how that felt in the role of being a leader and then maybe the responsibility of being the first female chancellor. SPEAKER 2: There were parts of being the chancellor at UCSF, I would say most parts of it, that I just thought were fantastic. I loved being back at a hospital and clinics. Just the way the hospital and clinical enterprise at UCSF works, the chancellor is the board. And so once a month, you'd have neurology or cardiology come and tell you about what had happened, quality control, things that had gone on and I would have done that all day long. I mean, it was just so interesting. It was so important to run a great clinical enterprise that getting back closer to patients and medicine I thought was fantastic. The other thing was the educational enterprise, and UCSF, as you know, has medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, nursing. I always tell people, no undergraduates, no English majors, no marching band. And the other chancellors reminded me, no athletic director, which apparently is a very good thing. So UCSF is a very special and unusual place. And I loved the science. I would show up at research seminars and things like that as often as I could. So there were so many parts of being at UCSF that I thought were just off the charts great. The hardest thing about being at UCSF-- being the first female chancellor, I think, was challenging but not in ways that you might expect. I was used to being a woman leader in medicine and biotech, which was unusual. So being the only woman in the room, being the first, wasn't new to me. But the thing that was hard on our family was there are roles for the spouse of the chancellor that fit more neatly into more of a classic female role, hosting things. There was a tea party for the wives of the faculty that the wife of the chancellor typically had. And for some reason, Nick didn't think that that suited him. We sort of laughed about that. DAVE JOHNSON: He can't make tea? SPEAKER 2: He can't make tea to save his life. And he's a strong introvert, which made it worse. I will tell you, some of the under-recognized, underreported people in life are spouses of chancellors and presidents of universities. And talk about unpaid labor-- my goodness! And so we sort of struggled with how did Nick show up, what did that look like. Because we didn't have any role models for what that looked like. I still laugh that Bill Clinton said he would be First Laddie. So when you have a pattern recognition, life is easier. And then being one of 10 chancellors at the UC system, I struggled a little bit with the UC Regents just because it felt-- I became chancellor in 2009, and we had some fiscal realities that we were dealing with. And the pace of the UC Regents and the format of the UC Regents, I actually made a proposal for UCSF to kind of break off from the other 9. And that was not well-received, got me in the newspaper. And I did not do that again. People saw it as disloyal and not very smart. But all in all, I thought then and think now that our public universities are absolutely-- they're treasures in America. And I was really proud to be a part of it and hope that I had made a contribution. DAVE JOHNSON: Speaking of leadership, what was it like to be CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation? What caused you to step away from chancellor to philanthropy? PAT LOEHRER: It's not a step down. It's not a step down, basically. DAVE JOHNSON: It is not a step down. SPEAKER 2: So I would say a couple of things. First of all, Bill and Melinda pushed me hard to take the job. I was not looking to change. My husband worked at the Gates Foundation for a couple of years on HIV. So they knew us, and they knew Nick better than me. But they knew both of us. We awarded Melinda the University medal at UCSF. And to my great surprise and happiness, she accepted and came. I later think that she was using that as a reason to talk to me about the CEO job, but she got a twofer. And I was really compelled by the mission. Who wouldn't be? I was really compelled by the mission and the chance to get back into global health after the experience I had had in Uganda. But I'll tell you, it is the ambition of the Gate Foundation, the scope of the Gates Foundation, the resources, and the need to get something done. I tell you, it is hard work. It is really hard work-- from China to India to all of the continent of Africa and then US education. Throw that in on top of things. So I was thrilled to be a part of driving the agenda and the mission. Some really talented people who are working very hard at the Gates Foundation-- I was surprised, especially on US education, with the amount of pushback. And I worked really hard to be successful at working with Bill, who's known as a tough character and lived up to that mutation. DAVE JOHNSON: Good to know, just in case he calls Pat or me. PAT LOEHRER: Yeah, yeah, I'm not going to get a medal at UCSF either. So that's a-- DAVE JOHNSON: You never know, Pat. PAT LOEHRER: It's a non-starter. And this may not apply to you, but there's a lot of maybe disproportionate number of women who feel they suffer from this imposter syndrome. To be honest, Dave and I have talked about that. We both feel in that syndrome too. But along the way, I mean, if you think about growing up in Reno, Nevada, and suddenly now being a chancellor and head of the Gates Foundation, the National Academy of Science, was there ever this sense of the, wait a minute, you know, what's going on? Is this real? SPEAKER 2: For me, there has always been that sense. There has always been that sense, and I look at it as I hope there always will be that sense-- that the kind of need to demonstrate your value. And there's a part of the imposter syndrome that is humility and not overestimating what you can do. And so on my best days, I think that leads me to say I've got to work with really terrific people. My job is to bring out the best in others. If I lead, it's because there's a great thing we're going to accomplish, and I can help people see where we're going together. And so I definitely have had imposter syndrome. But the one thing that I probably overused and kind of grew to like too much was the thing of people underestimating me and then proving them wrong. That gets a little wearying after a while. It's like, OK, we're going to waste some time while you decide whether I'm worthy or whether I can do this. And let's not waste that time. Why don't you assign to me-- give me some confidence, and I'll live up to that. And I mentioned Art Levinson was my boss for most of the time I was at Genentech. And he had no time for imposter syndrome. He was like, look, how many promotions do you have to get before you think, OK, I can get this done? He thought that was sort of-- he just didn't have time for it. We have things to do, and he had jobs to get done. And one of the things I loved about him is he would constantly push me to say, you're capable of more than you think you are, which I think is the sign of a fantastic manager, which he was and is. And so I've tried to push myself to do that. And the thing is, like, you can do this. Come to me for help. We'll make sure you succeed, but don't underestimate yourself. And I think that's a consequence of imposter syndrome is both wasting time proving yourself and not taking on something that you think, actually, let me give that a try and stack the deck in favor of succeeding. And so I think that's the thing that-- there's a certain fierceness that I've always had that I like about myself that, like, of course we will succeed. Failure is not an option. Of course we will succeed. And I think that comes from working on things that I value a lot and care about a lot. PAT LOEHRER: You have been on a number of different boards, including Pfizer as well as Facebook. And in that capacity, you've seen a lot of leaders. Can you talk a little bit about the strengths and the weakness of various leaders as well as serving on the boards and the capacities of the different companies? SPEAKER 2: Yeah, well, first, let me say I know ASCO is actually a really good about being careful about conflicts of interest and things like that, and I am too. So when I became chancellor at UCSF and then CEO at the Gates Foundation, I avoided being on life sciences boards. And so I got asked a lot by Biotech and pharma boards to be on their boards. Initially, I joined Procter Gamble's board, where I served for, I think, about six years. And then I joined Facebook's board. And those were both fantastic experiences. And I actually joined the boards for two very different reasons. One, P&G's board, I wanted to learn about branding and consumers. And I felt like in medicine, I didn't really learn about consumers or branding as much as I needed to or might. And then Facebook's board I joined because as Dave mentioned, I was with Charles Sawyers. We wrote the precision medicine report for the National Academy. And I really love-- to this day, I love the concept of using the social network to connect people. There was sort of an infamous story or famous story-- it's actually a good story-- of patients with a certain form of myeloma who found each other on Facebook and went to Genentech and said, make a new medicine for those of us with this genetic abnormality. And we'll all enroll in a trial. And so these connections to me felt really powerful on precision medicine. And so getting to work with CEOs at Procter and Gamble, the CEO Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook, I do see the really different attributes of leaders. But when you're a board member, you see those attributes of leaders with a very different lens. What's the return to shareholders? How does the community think about them? What's the impact-- and increasingly for Facebook, what's the impact on the world? What's the impact on our social discourse and our ability to have a free and fair election? A lot of those things became much more operative on the Facebook board while I was on the board and really tough social issues that continue to this day. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah, so we could go on for another hour, hour and a half, but I have one question to ask you which may seem a little bit silly in retrospect. But if you could look back on your youthful self at 21 or 22 knowing what you know now, with all the things that you've done during the course of your career, what advice would you give yourself? And perhaps I'll addend that by saying what advice would you give particularly to young women in the medical profession who are trying to balance that work-life balance that everyone talks about and worries about and struggles with, quite frankly. SPEAKER 2: I'll give you one thing I should have done better and one thing that I think I did well. So the advice on the one thing I should have done better, I think slow down a little bit and take a bit more time for fun and enjoyment. I was extremely worried about money when I was in college, and being number two of seven-- every summer, I worked. I remember at one point in medical school, I had three weeks off, and I got a job for those three weeks at a deli making sandwiches. And I went to college for three years, crammed it into three years so I wouldn't have to pay for the fourth year. So I just think that I could have taken on more loans. I could have done some things to just dial it down a bit because you don't get those years back. And that's such a great time of your life when you're 21, 22, something like that. So I wish I'd have just slowed down a bit and not been so driven for those seven years of university and medical school that I really just either worked or studied all the time. The thing that I feel like I did well, and I would say this to anybody who's going into medicine, is there's so many opportunities. There's so many wonderful things to do. But whoever your spouse is, whoever your partner in life is, take the time and energy to make sure that's the right person for you. I feel so blessed. Actually, my husband, who I've mentioned several times in this discussion, Nick, was my roommate in San Francisco when I was an intern, like real roommate. And we've been roommates ever since. And we're very compatible. He's one of seven kids too. It's another Catholic school kid. And we just have fun together and support each other. And there's no way I could have taken these crazy jobs or done the kinds of things I've done without Nick. So having a wonderful, supportive partner makes everything better. DAVE JOHNSON: That definitely resonates with Pat and me. We're both very blessed to have wives and spouses of, for me, it's 52 years. I can't remember, Pat. Yours is close. PAT LOEHRER: I had my first date with my wife 50 years ago, yeah. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. SPEAKER 2: OK, so you guys know what I'm talking about. PAT LOEHRER: Absolutely. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. PAT LOEHRER: Yeah. DAVE JOHNSON: Go ahead, Pat. PAT LOEHRER: I was going to ask a question that you probably may have already answered there, but Bob Woodward just came out of an interview with Colin Powell. One of the last questions he asked him was if he could reflect on that one person that was a moral compass for him. And so for you, that one person, alive or dead, that has been not the most powerful person you've met but the one that's really influenced you the most in terms of giving you direction, who would that be for you? SPEAKER 2: Probably, if I look at through line the entire time I've been alive, it would be my dad. He had the ability to look at a room and find the person who was struggling and go over to them. And I really loved that about my dad. PAT LOEHRER: I love it. DAVE JOHNSON: One last question. So we're at the top of the hour, and I know you're a very busy person. Pat and I love to read, but we're also documentary fiends and whatnot. We're interested. What have you read recently that really resonated with you? Do you have a recommendation for us? SPEAKER 2: I will say during the pandemic, I've gotten back into reading biographies, which I love. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. SPEAKER 2: So I did the Caro, Lyndon Baines Johnson, which, Master of the Senate is really good. But my favorite book of the last two years is The Code Breaker, Walter Isaacson's book about Jennifer Doudna. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah. SPEAKER 2: One of the things I love about Walter Isaacson is he teaches you science through his biographies. Like, I think I understand relativity based on his Einstein biography, which is great. But The Code Breaker is really super good. DAVE JOHNSON: Yeah, we both read it. We couldn't agree with you more. PAT LOEHRER: Love it. Love it. DAVE JOHNSON: So Sue, again, it's been a real honor to have you as our guest, and we really appreciate the time you've taken. Thank you so much, and we hope you enjoy the beautiful weather in Alamo California, and I hope it does turn green and the rain continues for you. SPEAKER 2: Thank you so much. It's been my pleasure. Thank you both. DAVE JOHNSON: Take care. SPEAKER 2: Bye. DAVE JOHNSON: I want to take the moment to thank our listeners for tuning in to "Oncology Et Cetera," an ASCO educational podcast where Pat and I really will talk about anything and everything. So if you have an idea or a topic you'd like to share with us and like for us to pursue, please email us at education@asco.org. Thanks again, and keep in mind that Pat is a giant in oncology, but he's a short instructor. Thanks, everybody. SPEAKER 1: Thank you for listening to this week's-- to make us part of your weekly routine, click Subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive e-learning center at elearning.asco.org.

Just Law
In Studio with ABC Channel 5's Mike Beaudet

Just Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 56:48


Just Law Co-Host Tom Blakely sits down with Mike Beaudet, the Emmy award-winning investigative reporter, to discuss the state of journalism and the media in today's world. Mike brings years of groundbreaking reporting to Boston's most experienced investigative unit, 5 Investigates. As a multimedia investigative journalist, Mike is teamed with reporters Kathy Curran and Karen Anderson in the market leading investigative unit on WCVB NewsCenter 5. Before joining WCVB in 2015, Mike spent nineteen years at WFXT as an investigative reporter and anchor and also worked as an anchor/reporter for WCVB's sister station WMUR. Mike left his last position at WFXT in September 2015 to become a full-time journalism professor at Northeastern University. Mike continues his teaching position at Northeastern and taps the talents of his students to assist in the in-depth investigations that dually serve as case studies in the classroom. Over the course of his distinguished career, Mike has received national and regional awards including twenty National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS) Boston/New England Emmy awards. His most recent Emmy came in 2021 when he was named Outstanding Investigative Reporter. Mike and his team have also won numerous Associated Press and Edward R. Murrow Awards for coverage of topics ranging from wrongful convictions to organized crime. Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) awarded Mike and his investigative unit the national Award of Excellence for their coverage of repeat drunk drivers who continue getting behind the wheel.

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
THE MIND-MUSCLE CONNECTION - Ep. 1 - Self - Awareness & Emotional Intelligence

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 20:57


What is self-awareness? What is emotional intelligence? What do they do for me? How do I build more? Listen in as Joe and Tyler discuss how improved self-efficacy can change every aspect of your life. If you don't believe you can control substantial aspects of life, you're a slave to making the same mistakes and living in the same stagnant loops. As Nietzsche said, you can be part of the herd or you can narrate your own life as a literal superman. Recall the way Viktor Frankl described how you can insert your will into the gap between what's happening to you and how you react. But it takes a strategy. It takes learning how to think about thinking. Dig into the podcast and let us know your thoughts and questions. We'll see you next time in the Mind-Muscle Connection as we continue to explore topics that can help you live the life you have imagined. Joe Klemczewski, PhD, and Tyler Wiebe, BSc, have teamed up to connect the grind of the iron to the power of your mind. {~} Klemczewski is the founder of The Diet Doc, LLC, The Flexible Dieting Institute, the National Academy of Metabolic Science coaching certification program, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, Apex Coach nutrition professional mentorship program, and Contest Prep University. Known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting and macronutrient tracking, Klemczewski, a former WNBF professional bodybuilder, has helped almost 500 clients win pro cards and more than 150 pro titles. {~} Tyler Wiebe was selected by Paul Revelia as one of Pro Physique's original coaches. Wiebe's expertise in kinesiology and his dedication to the client experience sets him apart as a model to the next generation of coaches. {~} Together, Klemczewski and Wiebe will take you through the real life challenges and strategies to make your training and competition experience a mental force that powerfully matches your effort in the gym. The Mind-Muscle Connection podcast is your source to build a winning mindset, unleash powerful mental growth, and make the world of physique and strength sport endlessly rewarding! OUR OTHER PODCAST: THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative topical video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLaFD0Y6EtWHOqNOa5UFFs1QOH2CTrWw2W THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/joe.klemczewski Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joeklemczewski Audio Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

Scaling the Summit-- Radio Gold
S2, E12: Stephanie Canada-Phillips

Scaling the Summit-- Radio Gold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 57:56


Stephanie has a career of service, serving in positions such as: Past Oklahoma Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (OAHPERD) President (2014), and continues to serve the OAHPERD Board and Council as a committee member for Professional Development. Oklahoma National and State Teachers of the Year Chapter President. Southern District, Leadership Council as a Member at Large, and Professional Development coordinator. SHAPE America Physical Activity Leader Trainer Committee member in the development of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards in Physical Education (Second Edition, 2014). Program manager for the Oklahoma Academic Standards for Physical Education Committee and the subsequent curriculum framework development committee. Recently she worked with the Center for Curriculum Redesign participating in their Context in Competencies Study for the 21st Century Learner. Currently serving as Co-Chair of the Membership Committee for the National Academy of Health and Physical Literacy. She has also received several prestigious honors and awards: Oklahoma Teacher of the Year Betty Ambercrombie Scholar Award, Oklahoma Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, October, 2018 Virginia Peters Higher Education Award, Oklahoma Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, October, 2016 East Central University Distinguished Alumnae, East Central University, February, 2011 Honor Award, Oklahoma Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, October, 7, 2010 East Central University Education Hall of Fame Inductee, College of Education, East Central University, April, 2008 Shawnee Public Schools Teacher of the Year, Shawnee Public Schools, February, 2007 Masonic Teacher of Today, Oklahoma Masonic Lodge, September, 2007 Certified Employee of the Month, Shawnee Public Schools, December, 2006 Teacher of the Year, Will Rogers Elementary, Shawnee Public Schools, 2006 Best Practices Award, State Department of Education Healthy and Fit Schools, November, 2005

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
OFFSEASON OPTIONS: PRE PREP TARGET - CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY #449

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 7:26


What are the best ways to manage your offseason if your goal is maximum lean body mass gain and/or strength? What if you struggle to get lean enough during prep? How long should your offseason be? How do you manage the entirety of your career goals when it comes to how much time you spend in offseasons versus contest preps? Listen in as Joe and Adam discuss different paths that might be perfect for your goals, but remember one thing: you have great options! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY - THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative daily video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! Together, Klemczewski and Atkinson have helped clients win more than 500 pro cards, 200 pro titles, and 25 world championships. It's time for your best condition and your biggest win! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY COMPLETE PLAYLIST: https://thedietdoc.com/contestprepu THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep The Diet Doc, LLC, is the parent company to many health, fitness, nutrition, and behavioral projects. Founded 25 years ago by Joe Klemczewski, PhD, known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting, The Diet Doc is equipping the next generation of nutrition coaches. Joined by health psychologist Kori Propst, PhD, Joe has created the Flexible Dieting Institute, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, and Contest Prep University. Whether you're listening to a podcast or interview as a life transformation client, a physique sport competitor, a performance athlete, a fitness entrepreneur, or just need some life motivation, Joe and Kori won't disappoint! SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheDietDoc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dietdocglobal Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/thedietdoclife Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

The Creative Process Podcast
(Highlights) GARY GRIGGS

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


Gary Griggs received his B.A. in Geological Sciences from the University of California Santa Barbara and a Ph.D. in Oceanography from Oregon State University. He has been a Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of California Santa Cruz since 1968 and was Director of the Institute of Marine Sciences from 1991 to 2017. His research and teaching have been focused on the coast of California and include coastal processes, hazards and engineering, and sea-level rise. Dr. Griggs has written over 185 articles for professional journals as well as authored or co-authored eleven books.In 1998 he was given the Outstanding Faculty Award at UC Santa Cruz and the Alumni Association honored him with a Distinguished Teaching Award in 2006. The California Coastal Commission and Sunset Magazine named him one of California's Coastal Heroes in 2009. He has served on three National Academy of Sciences Committees. He has served on the Science Advisory Team to the Governor's Ocean Protection Council since 2008 and in 2015 was appointed to the California Ocean Sciences Trust.· eps.ucsc.edu/faculty/Profiles/fac-only.php?uid=griggs· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

The Creative Process Podcast

Gary Griggs received his B.A. in Geological Sciences from the University of California Santa Barbara and a Ph.D. in Oceanography from Oregon State University. He has been a Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of California Santa Cruz since 1968 and was Director of the Institute of Marine Sciences from 1991 to 2017. His research and teaching have been focused on the coast of California and include coastal processes, hazards and engineering, and sea-level rise. Dr. Griggs has written over 185 articles for professional journals as well as authored or co-authored eleven books.In 1998 he was given the Outstanding Faculty Award at UC Santa Cruz and the Alumni Association honored him with a Distinguished Teaching Award in 2006. The California Coastal Commission and Sunset Magazine named him one of California's Coastal Heroes in 2009. He has served on three National Academy of Sciences Committees. He has served on the Science Advisory Team to the Governor's Ocean Protection Council since 2008 and in 2015 was appointed to the California Ocean Sciences Trust.· eps.ucsc.edu/faculty/Profiles/fac-only.php?uid=griggs· www.oneplanetpodcast.org · www.creativeprocess.info

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
OFFSEASON OPTIONS: BODY WEIGHT CYCLING - CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY #447

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 6:27


What are the best ways to manage your offseason if your goal is maximum lean body mass gain and/or strength? What if you struggle to get lean enough during prep? How long should your offseason be? How do you manage the entirety of your career goals when it comes to how much time you spend in offseasons versus contest preps? Listen in as Joe and Adam discuss different paths that might be perfect for your goals, but remember one thing: you have great options! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY - THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative daily video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! Together, Klemczewski and Atkinson have helped clients win more than 500 pro cards, 200 pro titles, and 25 world championships. It's time for your best condition and your biggest win! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY COMPLETE PLAYLIST: https://thedietdoc.com/contestprepu THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep The Diet Doc, LLC, is the parent company to many health, fitness, nutrition, and behavioral projects. Founded 25 years ago by Joe Klemczewski, PhD, known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting, The Diet Doc is equipping the next generation of nutrition coaches. Joined by health psychologist Kori Propst, PhD, Joe has created the Flexible Dieting Institute, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, and Contest Prep University. Whether you're listening to a podcast or interview as a life transformation client, a physique sport competitor, a performance athlete, a fitness entrepreneur, or just need some life motivation, Joe and Kori won't disappoint! SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheDietDoc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dietdocglobal Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/thedietdoclife Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

DVBIC Presents: Picking Your Brain
CUBIST S4E10: Is cognitive rehab effective regardless of the number of concussions?

DVBIC Presents: Picking Your Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 9:35


In this episode of CUBIST, Amanda, and Don discuss the article, “Number of concussions does not affect treatment response to cognitive rehabilitation interventions following mild traumatic brain injury in military service members.” The study was authored by Anna Ord and her colleagues and was published in the Journal of Neurotrauma in July 2021. Article Citation: Ord, A. S., Shura, R. D., Curtiss, G., Armistead-Jehle, P., Vanderploeg, R. D., Bowles, A. O., Kennedy, J. E., Tate, D. F., & Cooper, D. B. (2021). Number of Concussions Does Not Affect Treatment Response to Cognitive Rehabilitation Interventions Following Mild TBI in Military Service Members. Archives of clinical neuropsychology: the official journal of the National Academy of Neuropsychologists, 36(5), 850–856. https://doi.org/10.1093/arclin/acaa119 Article LINK: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33264387/ CUBIST is a podcast for health care providers produced by the Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence. We discuss the latest research on traumatic brain injury (TBI) most relevant to patient care. For more about TBI, including clinical tools, go to www.Health.mil/TBICoE or email us at dha.ncr.j-9.mbx.tbicoe-info@mail.mil. The views, opinions, and/or findings in this podcast are those of the host and subject matter experts. They should not be construed as an official Department of Defense position, policy, or decision unless designated by other official documentation. Our theme song is “Upbeat-Corporate' by WhiteCat, available and was used according to the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 license.

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24
Korea 24 - 2021.11.12

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021


Korea24 – 2021.11.12. (Friday) News Briefing: An expert panel to analyze the possible link between COVID-19 vaccines and adverse effects was launched on Friday. The independent vaccine safety committee, consisting of 22 members from the National Academy of Medicine of Korea, will conduct a comprehensive review of local and overseas cases and clinical studies. (Koo Hee-jin) In-Depth News Analysis (Weekly Economy Review): Last month marked the second consecutive month that more than 600-thousand jobs were added according to government figures. Meanwhile, another round of COVID-19 relief payouts have been discussed in political circles. And a US request from Korean chipmakers for data pertaining to the global chip shortage has caused controversy. To provide analysis of these developments, Economics Professor Yang Jun-suk from the Catholic University of Korea joins us in the studio. Korea Trending with Walter Lee: 1. The US Embassy in Seoul has vowed to closely cooperate with local police on suspicions that a diplomat had been involved in a hit-and-run incident. (정부, 美외교관 차량사고 이탈 논란에 "미, 긴밀히 잘 협조키로") 2. The South Korean men’s national football team defeated the United Arab Emirates (UAE) 1-0 in a World Cup qualifier on Thursday. (‘골대만 세 차례’ 벤투호, 황희찬 PK 골로 UAE에 1대0 승리) 3. Two pensive Bodhisattva statues are now on permanent display at the National Museum of Korea in an exclusive exhibition room. ('한국 대표 유물' 국보 반가사유상 2점 한자리서 본다) Movie Spotlight: Darcy Paquet joins us this week to introduce the 16th edition of the London Korean Film Festival, recognised as the biggest showcase of Korean cinema outside of Korea. This year’s programme features a Special Focus section on the Oscar winning actress, Youn Yuh-jung, showcasing several films from her career. Next Week From Seoul with Mark Wilson-Choi: - High school seniors are set to take the college scholastic ability test, or Suneung (수능), next Thursday. - On Sunday, the Doosan Bears will face off against the KT Wiz in Game 1 in the Korean Series of the Korea Baseball Organization(KBO). - U.S. President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping are expected to hold a virtual meeting next Monday.

Fit Rx
Malin Method

Fit Rx

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 46:54


Scott Malin is a best-selling health and fitness expert. Scott's extremely popular fitness, rehab and nutrition videos have received over 11.5 million views on You Tube. Scott has an extensive background in personal training (National Academy of Sports Medicine), working with celebrities and athletes for many years. Scott   We discuss his method of preventing injuries and then fixing them if they arise.  Go to www.malinmethod.com and use discount code: fitrx for a 25% discount. 

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
OFFSEASON OPTIONS: BODY COMP - CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY #446

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 6:08


What are the best ways to manage your offseason if your goal is maximum lean body mass gain and/or strength? What if you struggle to get lean enough during prep? How long should your offseason be? How do you manage the entirety of your career goals when it comes to how much time you spend in offseasons versus contest preps? Listen in as Joe and Adam discuss different paths that might be perfect for your goals, but remember one thing: you have great options! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY - THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative daily video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! Together, Klemczewski and Atkinson have helped clients win more than 500 pro cards, 200 pro titles, and 25 world championships. It's time for your best condition and your biggest win! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY COMPLETE PLAYLIST: https://thedietdoc.com/contestprepu THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep The Diet Doc, LLC, is the parent company to many health, fitness, nutrition, and behavioral projects. Founded 25 years ago by Joe Klemczewski, PhD, known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting, The Diet Doc is equipping the next generation of nutrition coaches. Joined by health psychologist Kori Propst, PhD, Joe has created the Flexible Dieting Institute, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, and Contest Prep University. Whether you're listening to a podcast or interview as a life transformation client, a physique sport competitor, a performance athlete, a fitness entrepreneur, or just need some life motivation, Joe and Kori won't disappoint! SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheDietDoc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dietdocglobal Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/thedietdoclife Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

See You Now
60: Reporting Powers: Rehearsing The Future

See You Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 51:57


While the recent pandemic caused devastating loss of life and strained health systems, it also brought into sharp focus nurses' pivotal role in healthcare and their enormous, and largely untapped potential to shape patient care, rethink how healthcare is organized, and where it's delivered.  Moved by the unprecedented stress and strain on nurses and our health systems, Johnson & Johnson, in partnership with the American Nurses Association and the American Organization for Nursing Leadership, set out to understand the various ways that the nursing profession evolved amidst the pandemic. From the stories and data emerged the pointed Accelerating Nursing, Transforming Healthcare report -- one that offers a deeper understanding on how the pandemic transformed nursing practice and how the momentum of these innovations can steer us to a much better and preferred future of the profession. In this first of a multi episode series, we center on the Accelerating Nursing, Transforming Healthcare Report and how it coincides with the National Academy of Medicine's Future of Nursing Reports, and The Future Today Institute's Tech Trends Report to serve as relevant, actionable playbooks for reducing uncertainty, managing complexity, and building on the momentum of positive change emerging from the COVID pandemic to accelerate nursing and transform healthcare.  Email us at hello@seeyounowpodcast.com. For additional resources, visit our website at www.seeyounowpodcast.com.

Seismic Soundoff
132: The essential role of industry for long-term CO2 storage

Seismic Soundoff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 30:02


Mark Zoback discusses his Honorary Lecture, "Geomechanical Issues Affecting Long-Term Storage of CO2." In this episode, Mark highlights how oil and gas companies are best positioned to address the needs for large-scale carbon storage. He discusses the role of depleted oil and gas reservoirs for CO2 storage, as well as the geomechanical issues that have to be considered. Mark also shares what is most essential to unlocking long-term CO2 storage and how government officials and companies can work together. This is a timely conversation that addresses real-world needs with the geophysical knowledge to solve problems. Visit https://seg.org/podcast to find the link to listen to Mark's lecture. BIOGRAPHY Mark D. Zoback is the Benjamin M. Page Professor of Geophysics at Stanford University, Director of the Stanford Natural Gas Initiative, and Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity, and the Stanford Center for Carbon Storage. Zoback conducts research on in situ stress, fault mechanics, and reservoir geomechanics with an emphasis on shale gas, tight gas, and tight oil production as well as CO2 sequestration. He is the author of two textbooks and the author/co-author of approximately 400 technical papers. Zoback has received a number of awards and honors, including election to the U.S. National Academy of Engineering in 2011 and the Robert R. Berg Outstanding Research Award of the AAPG in 2015. He was the 2020 chair of the Society of Petroleum Engineers Technical Committee on Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage. SPONSOR This episode is brought to you by CGG. Question: What is key to safe, long-term CO2 storage? Answer: A good understanding of subsurface site integrity. Making more-informed decisions while developing your sub-surface storage calls for the kind of integrated geoscience expertise CGG can provide. Our multi-discipline approach delivers assessments of containment risks such a cap rock failure, fault reactivation and surface deformation. Our coupled reservoir, geomechanics and fracturing simulations can incorporate thermal effects and a full range of non-linear material models to ensure a rigorous assessment of injection and storage risks. With CGG, gain greater insight for your carbon and energy storage projects with our unique range of geoscience expertise that helps you see things differently. Visit https://www.cgg.com/ to learn more. CREDITS Original music by Zach Bridges. This episode was hosted, edited, and produced by Andrew Geary at 51 features, LLC. Thank you to the SEG podcast team: Ted Bakamjian, Kathy Gamble, and Ally McGinnis. You can follow the podcast to hear the latest episodes on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and Spotify.

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
OFFSEASON OPTIONS: TIMING - CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY #445

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 6:51


What are the best ways to manage your offseason if your goal is maximum lean body mass gain and/or strength? What if you struggle to get lean enough during prep? How long should your offseason be? How do you manage the entirety of your career goals when it comes to how much time you spend in offseasons versus contest preps? Listen in as Joe and Adam discuss different paths that might be perfect for your goals, but remember one thing: you have great options! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY - THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative daily video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! Together, Klemczewski and Atkinson have helped clients win more than 500 pro cards, 200 pro titles, and 25 world championships. It's time for your best condition and your biggest win! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY COMPLETE PLAYLIST: https://thedietdoc.com/contestprepu THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep The Diet Doc, LLC, is the parent company to many health, fitness, nutrition, and behavioral projects. Founded 25 years ago by Joe Klemczewski, PhD, known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting, The Diet Doc is equipping the next generation of nutrition coaches. Joined by health psychologist Kori Propst, PhD, Joe has created the Flexible Dieting Institute, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, and Contest Prep University. Whether you're listening to a podcast or interview as a life transformation client, a physique sport competitor, a performance athlete, a fitness entrepreneur, or just need some life motivation, Joe and Kori won't disappoint! SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheDietDoc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dietdocglobal Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/thedietdoclife Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

Tech Transfer IP
From Sales to Technology Transfer with Todd Keiller

Tech Transfer IP

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 28:19


Today's guest started his career as a salesman, and his many years of experience in the sales world equipped him with skills that have been indispensable throughout his journey as the director of Worcester Polytechnic Institute's (WPI) Office of Technology Commercialization. Todd and his two team members are responsible for the commercializing effort at WPI, and since 2009 they have taken the technology transfer metrics at the university from zero to off the charts in relation to the size and financial standing of their office.  In today's episode you'll hear about the various technology transfer related programs that they run at the university, their well developed relationships with corporate partners, the unique way that Todd's office celebrates receipts of patent licenses, and the invention which they helped to facilitate which is on track to make a global-scale positive impact!   In This Episode: [00:53] A rundown of Todd's educational and professional background.  [02:14] Todd's original career path, and what led him to veer into the technology transfer field.   [04:39] What WPI specializes in, and the important role being filled by Todd's small yet powerful Office of Technology Commercialization.  [07:50] The unique way that Todd's office celebrates receipts of patent licenses (which has been adopted by other chapters of the National Academy of Inventors) [09:50] Radical increases in the technology transfer metrics at WPI since Todd's appointment, and how his previous career influenced his ability to create such meaningful change.  [11:57] One of the most important lessons that Todd learned about how to deal with an overwhelming workload.  [13:10] WPI's close ties to its corporate partners, and how these benefit the university.  [15:27] How Todd manages expectations of the companies that they deal with.  [16:50] The incredible story about an invention that Todd helped facilitate. [20:50] How WPI will benefit from the invention.   [21:51] Challenges that Todd is currently facing.  [22:44] WPI's high percentage of women inventors and students.  [24:43] Value Todd sees in technology transfer organizations.  [25:57] Todd's thoughts on credentialing at different stages of a person's career.  [26:40] What Todd loves most about his job, and his hope for the future of the field.   Find Todd: Email  

Curiosity Daily
Why Asthma Gets Worse at Night, Earth's Largest Living Thing

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 10:17


Learn about a heroic experiment that helps explain asthma getting worse at night; and the largest living thing on earth. A heroic experiment has shed light on the centuries-old mystery of why asthma gets worse at night by Grant Currin Harrison, S. (2021, September 21). Why Does Asthma Get Worse at Night? Wired; WIRED. https://www.wired.com/story/why-does-asthma-get-worse-at-night/  Study explores why asthma worsens at night. (2021). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/09/210906151456.htm  Scheer, F. A. J. L., Hilton, M. F., Evoniuk, H. L., Shiels, S. A., Malhotra, A., Sugarbaker, R., Ayers, R. T., Israel, E., Massaro, A. F., & Shea, S. A. (2021). The endogenous circadian system worsens asthma at night independent of sleep and other daily behavioral or environmental cycles. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(37), e2018486118. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2018486118  The largest living thing on earth is not the blue whale by Cameron Duke Fishlake National Forest - Home. (2021). Usda.gov. https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/fishlake/home/?cid=STELPRDB5393641 Lydia Ramsey Pflanzer. (2017, May 6). Largest living organism the Armillaria ostoyae fungus. Business Insider; Business Insider. https://www.businessinsider.com/largest-living-organism-the-armillaria-ostoyae-fungus-2017-5 Marshall, M. (2018). Humongous fungus is older than Christianity and weighs 400 tonnes. New Scientist. https://www.newscientist.com/article/2182291-humongous-fungus-is-older-than-christianity-and-weighs-400-tonnes/ Prepelka, B. (2019). Sequoia Giants - General Sherman - California. Scenicusa.net. https://scenicusa.net/032906.html Schmitt, C. (n.d.). The Malheur National Forest Location of the World's Largest Living Organism [The Humongous Fungus]. https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_033146.pdf Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.05.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 59:44


Sins Of Omission: The AZT Scandal By Celia Farber Spin Nov. 1989 On a cold January day in 1987, inside one of the brightly-lit meeting rooms of the monstrous FDA building, a panel of 11 top Aids doctors pondered a very difficult decision. They had been asked by the FDA to consider giving lightning-quick approval to a highly toxic drug about which there was very little information. Clinically called Zidovudine, but nicknamed AZT after its components, the drug was said to have shown a dramatic effect on the survival of Aids patients. The study that had brought the panel together had set the medical community abuzz. It was the first flicker of hope - people were dying much faster on the placebo than on the drug.  But there were tremendous concerns about the new drug. It had actually been developed a quarter of a century earlier as a cancer chemotherapy, but was shelved and forgotten because it was so toxic, very expensive to produce, and totally ineffective against cancer. Powerful, but unspecific, the drug was not selective in its cell destruction.  Drug companies around the world were sifting through hundreds of compounds in the race to find a cure, or at least a treatment, for Aids. Burroughs Wellcome, a subsidiary of Wellcome, a British drug company, emerged as the winner. By chance, they sent the failed cancer drug, then known as Compound S, to the National Cancer Institute along with many others to see if it could slay the Aids dragon, HIV. In the test tube at least, it did.  At the meeting, there was a lot of uncertainty and discomfort with AZT. The doctors who had been consulted knew that the study was flawed and that the long-range effects were completely unknown. But the public was almost literally baying at the door. Understandably, there was immense pressure on the FDA to approve AZT even more quickly than they had approved thalidomide in the mid-60s, which ended up causing drastic birth defects.  Everybody was worried about this one. To approve it, said Ellen Cooper, an FDA director, would represent a "significant and potentially dangerous departure from our normal toxicology requirements."  Just before approving the drug, one doctor on the panel, Calvin Kunin, summed up their dilemma. "On the one hand," he said, "to deny a drug which decreases mortality in a population such as this would be inappropriate. On the other hand, to use this drug widely, for areas where efficacy has not been demonstrated, with a potentially toxic agent, might be disastrous."  "We do not know what will happen a year from now," said panel chairman Dr. Itzhak Brook. "The data is just too premature, and the statistics are not really well done. The drug could actually be detrimental." A little later, he said he was also "struck by the facts that AZT does not stop deaths. Even those who were switched to AZT still kept dying."  "I agree with you," answered another panel member, "There are so many unknowns. Once a drug is approved there is no telling how it could be abused. There's no going back."  Burroughs Wellcome reassured the panel that they would provide detailed two-year follow-up data, and that they would not let the drug get out of its intended parameters: as a stopgap measure for very sick patients.  Dr. Brook was not won over by the promise. "If we approve it today, there will not be much data. There will be a promise of data," he predicted, "but then the production of data will be hampered." Brook's vote was the only one cast against approval.  'There was not enough data, not enough follow-up," Brook recalls. "Many of the questions we asked the company were answered by, 'We have not analyzed the data yet,' or 'We do not know.' I felt that there was some promising data, but I was very worried about the price being paid for it. The side effects were so very severe. It was chemotherapy. Patients were going to need blood transfusions. That's very serious.  "The committee was tending to agree with me," says Brook, "that we should wait a little bit, be more cautious. But once the FDA realized we were intending to reject it, they applied political pressure. At about 4 p.m., the head of the FDA's Center for Drugs and Biologics asked permission to speak, which is extremely unusual. Usually they leave us alone. But he said to us, 'Look, if you approve the drug, we can assure you that we will work together with Burroughs Wellcome and make sure the drug is given to the right people.' It was like saying 'please do it.'"  Brad Stone, FDA press officer, was at that meeting. He says he doesn't recall that particular speech, but that there is nothing 'unusual" about FDA officials making such speeches at advisory meetings. "The people in that meeting approved the drug because the data the company had produced proved it was prolonging life. Sure it was toxic, but they concluded that the benefits clearly outweighed the risks."  The meeting ended. AZT, which several members of the panel still felt uncomfortable with and feared could be a time bomb, was approved.  Flash forward: August 17, 1989. Newspapers across America banner-headlined that AZT had been "proven to be effective in HIV antibody-positive, asymptomatic and early ARC patients," even through one of the panel's main concerns was that the drug should only be used in a last-case scenario for critically-ill AIDS patients, due to the drug's extreme toxicity. Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was now pushing to expand prescription.  The FDA's traditional concern had been thrown to the wind. Already the drug had spread to 60 countries and an estimated 20.000 people. Not only had no new evidence allayed the initial concerns of the panel, but the follow-up data, as Dr. Brook predicted, had fallen by the waysite. The beneficial effects of the drug had been proven to be temporary. The toxicity, however stayed the same.  The majority of those in the AIDS afflicted and medical communities held the drug up as the first breakthrough on AIDS. For better or worse, AZT had been approved faster than any drug in FDA history, and activists considered it a victory. The price paid for the victory, however, was that almost all government drug trials, from then on, focused on AZT - while over 100 other promising drugs were left uninvestigated.  Burroughs Wellcome stock went through the roof when the announcement was made. At a price of $8,000 per patient per year (not including blood work and transfusions), AZT is the most expensive drug ever marketed. Burroughs Wellcome's gross profits for next year are estimated at $230 million. Stock market analysts predict that Burroughs Wellcome may be selling as much as $2 billion worth of AZT, under the brand name Retrovir, each year by the mid-1990s - matching Burroughs Wellcome's total sales for all its products last year.  AZT is the only antiretroviral drug that has received FDA approval for treatment of AIDS since the epidemic began 10 years ago, and the decision to approve it was based on a single study that has long been declared invalid.  The study was intended to be a "double-blind placebo-controlled study," the only kind of study that can effectively prove whether or not a drug works. In such a study, neither patient nor doctor is supposed to know if the patient is getting the drug or a placebo. In the case of AZT, the study became unblinded on all sides, after just a few weeks.  Both sides of the contributed to the unblinding. It became obvious to doctors who was getting what because AZT causes such severe side effects that AIDS per se does not. Furthermore, a routine blood count known as CMV, which clearly shows who is on the drug and who is not, wasn't whited out in the reports. Both of these facts were accepted and confirmed by both the FDA and Burroughs Wellcome, who conducted the study.  Many of the patients who were in the trial admitted that they had analyzed their capsules to find out whether they were getting the drug. If they weren't, some bought the drug on the underground market. Also, the pills were supposed to be indistinguishable by taste, but they were not. Although this was corrected early on, the damage was already done. There were also reports that patients were pooling pills out solidarity to each other. The study was so severely flawed that its conclusions must be considered, by the most basic scientific standards, unproven.  The most serious problem with the original study, however, is that it was never completed. Seventeen weeks in the study, when more patients had died in the placebo group, the study was stopped short, and all subjects were put on AZT, no scientific study can ever be conducted to prove unequivocally whether AZT does prolong life.  Dr. Brook, who voted against approval, warned at the time that AZT, being the only drug available for doctors to prescribe to AIDS patients, would probably have a runaway effect. Approving it prematurely, he said, would be like "letting the genie out of the bottle."  Brook pointed out that since the drug is a form of chemotherapy, it should only be prescribed by doctors who have experience with chemotherapeutic drugs. Because of the most severe toxic effects of AZT - cell depletion of the bone marrow - patients would need frequent blood transfusions. As it happened, AZT was rampantly prescribed as soon as it was released, way beyond its purported parameters. The worst-case scenario had come true: Doctors interviewed by the New York Times later in 1987 revealed that they were already giving AZT to healthy people who had tested positive for antibodies to HIV.  The FDA's function is to weigh a drug's efficacy against its potential hazards. The equation is simple and obvious: A drug must unquestionably repair more than it damages, otherwise the drug itself may cause more harm than the disease it is supposed to fight. Exactly what many doctors and scientists fear is happening with AZT.  AZT was singled out among hundreds of compounds when Dr. Sam Broder, the head of the National Cancer Institutes (NCI), found that it "inhibited HIV viral replication in vitro." AIDS is considered a condition of immune suppression caused by the HIV virus replicating and eating its way into T-4 cells, which are essential to the immune system. HIV is a retrovirus which contains an enzyme called reverse transcriptase that converts viral RNA to DNA. AZT was thought to work by interrupting this DNA synthesis, thus stopping further replication of the virus.  While it was always known that the drug was exceedingly toxic, the first study concluded that 'the risk/benefits ratio was in favour of the patient."  In the study that won FDA approval for AZT, the one fact that swayed the panel of judges was that the AZT group outlived the placebo group by what appeared to be a landslide. The ace card of the study, the one that cancelled out the issue of the drug's enormous toxicity, was that 19 persons had died in the placebo group and only one in the AZT group. The AZT recipients were also showing a lower incidence of opportunistic infections.  While the data staggered the panel that approved the drug, other scientists insisted that it meant nothing - because it was so shabbily gathered, and because of the unblinding. Shortly after the study was stopped, the death rate accelerated in the AZT group. "There was no great difference after a while," says Dr. Brook, "between the treated and the untreated group."  "That study was so sloppily done that it really didn't mean much," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, a leading New York City AIDS doctor.  Dr. Harvey Bialy, scientific editor of the journal Biotechnology, is stunned by the low quality of science surrounding AIDS research. When asked if he had seen any evidence of the claims made for AZT, that it "prolongs life" in AIDS patients, Bialy said, "No. I have not seen a published study that is rigorously done, analyzed and objectively reported."  Bialy, who is also a molecular biologist, is horrified by the widespread use of AZT, not just because it is toxic, but because, he insists, the claims its widespread use are based upon are false. "I can't see how this drug could be doing anything other than making people very sick," he says.  The scientific facts about AZT and AIDS are indeed astonishing. Most ironically, the drug has been found to accelerate the very process it was said to prevent: the loss of T-4 cells.  "Undeniably, AZT kills T-4 cells [white blood cells vital to the immune system]" says Bialy. "No one can argue with that. AZT is a chain-terminating nucleotide, which means that it stops DNA replication. It seeks out any cell that is engaged in DNA replication and kills it. The place where most of this replication is taking place is the bone marrow. That's why the most common and severe side effect of the drug is bone marrow toxicity. That is why they [patients] need blood transfusions."  AZT has been aggressively and repeatedly marketed as a drug that prolongs survival in AIDS patients because it stops the HIV virus from replicating and spreading to healthy cells. But, says Bialy: "There is no good evidence that HIV actively replicates in a person with AIDS, and if there's isn't much HIV replication in a person with AIDS, and if there isn't much HIV replication to stop, it's mostly killing healthy cells."  University of California at Berkeley scientist Dr. Peter Duesberg drew the same conclusion in a paper published in the Proceedings, the journal of the National Academy of Sciences. Duesberg, whose paper addressed his contention that HIV is not a sufficient cause for AIDS, wrote: "Even if HIV were to cause AIDS, it would hardly be legitimate target for AZT therapy, because in 70 to 100 percent of antibody positive persons, proviral DNA is not detectable... and its biosynthesis has never been observed."  As a chemotherapeutic drug, explained Duesberg, explained Duesberg, AZT "kills dividing blood cells and other cells," and is thus "directly immunosuppressive."  "The cell is almost a million-fold bigger target than the virus, so the cell will be much, much more sensitive," says Duesberg. "Only very few cells, about one in 10,000 are actively making the virus containing DNA, so you must kill incredibly large numbers of cells to inhibit the virus. This kind of treatment could only theoretically help if you have a massive infection, which is not the case with AIDS. Meanwhile, they're giving this drug that ends up killing millions of lymphocytes [white blood cells]. It's beyond me how that could possibly be beneficial."  "It doesn't really kill them," Burroughs Wellcome scientists Sandra Lehrman argues. "You don't necessarily have to destroy the cell, you can just change the function of it. Furthermore, while the early data said that the only very few cells were infected, new data says that there may be more cells infected. We have more sensitive detection techniques now."  "Changes their function? From what - functioning to not functioning? Another example of mediocre science," says Bialy. "The 'sensitive detection technique' to which Dr. Lehrman refers, PCR, is a notoriously unreliable one upon which to base quantitative conclusions."  When specific questions about the alleged mechanisms of AZT are asked, the answers are long, contradictory, and riddled with unknowns. Every scientific point raised about the drug is eventually answered with the blanket response, "The drug is not perfect, but it's all we have right now." About the depletion of T-4 cells and other white cells, Lehrman says, "We don't know why T-4 cells go up at first, and then go down. That is one of the drug mechanisms that we are trying to understand."  When promoters of AZT are pressed on key scientific points, whether at the NIH, FDA, Burroughs Wellcome or an AIDS organization, they often become angry. The idea that the drug is "doing something," even though this is invariably followed with irritable admissions that there are "mechanisms about the drug and disease we don't understand," is desperately clung to. It is as if, in the eye of the AIDS storm, the official, government-agency sanctioned position is immunized against critique. Skepticism and challenge, so essential to scientific endeavour, is not welcome in the AZT debate, where it is arguably needed more than anywhere else.  The toxic effects of AZT, particularly bone marrow suppression and anemia, are so severe that up to 50 percent of all AIDS and ARC patients cannot tolerate it and have to be taken off it. In the approval letter that Burroughs Wellcome sent to the FDA, all of 50 additional side effects of AZT, aside from the most common ones, were listed. These included: loss of mental acuity, muscle spasms, rectal bleeding and tremors.  Anemia one of AZT's common side effects, is the depletion of red blood cells, and according to Duesberg, "Red blood cells are the one thing you cannot do without. Without red cells, you cannot pick up oxygen."  Fred, a person with AIDS, was put on AZT and suffered such severe anemia from the drug he had to be taken off it. In an interview in the AIDS handbook Surviving and Thriving With AIDS, he described what anemia feels like to the editor Michael Callen: "I live in a studio and my bathroom is a mere five-step walk from my be. I would just lie there for two hours; I couldn't get up to take those five steps. When I was taken to the hospital, I had to have someone come over to dress me. It's that kind of severe fatigue... The quality of my life was pitiful... I've never felt so bad... I stopped the AZT and the mental confusion, the headaches, the pains in the neck, the nausea, all disappeared within a 24-hour period."  "I feel very good at this point," Fred went on. "I feel like the quality of my life was a disaster two weeks ago. And it really was causing a great amount of fear in me, to the point where I was taking sleeping pills to calm down. I was so worried. I would totally lose track of what I was saying in the middle of a sentence. I would lose my directions on the street."  "Many AIDS patients are anemic even before they receive the drug." Says Burroughs Wellcome's Dr. Lehrman, "because HIV itself can infect the bone marrow and cause anemia."  This argument betrays a bizarre reasoning. If AIDS patients are already burdened with the problems such as immune suppression, bone marrow toxicity and anemia, is compounding these problems an improvement?  "Yes AZT is a form of chemotherapy." Says the man who invented the compound a quarter-century ago, Jerome Horowitz. "It is cytotoxic, and as such, it causes bone marrow toxicity and anemia. There are problems with the drug. It's not perfect. But I don't think anybody would agree that AZT is of no use. People can holler from now until doomsday that it is toxic, but you have to go with the results."  The results, finally and ironically, are what damns AZT. Several studies on the clinical effects of AZT - including the one that Burroughs Wellcome's approval was based on - have drawn the same conclusion: that AZT is effective for a few months, but that its effect drops of sharply after that. Even the original AZT study showed that T-4 cells went up for a while and then plummeted. HIV levels went down, and then came back up. This fact was well-known when the advisory panel voted for approval. As panel member Dr. Stanley Lemon said in the meeting, "I am left with the nagging thought after seeing several of these slides, that after 16 to 24 weeks - 12 to 16 weeks, I guess - the effect seems to be declining."  A follow-up meeting, two years after the original Burroughs Wellcome study, was scheduled to discuss the long range effects of AZT, and the survival statistics. As one doctor present at that meeting in May 1988 recall, "They hadn't followed up the study. Anything that looked beneficial was gone within half a year. All they had were some survival statistics averaging 44 weeks. The p24 didn't pan out and there was no persistent improvement in the T-4 cells."  HIV levels in the blood are measured by an antigen called p24. Burroughs Wellcome made the claim that AZT lowered this level, that is, lowered the amount of HIV in the blood. At the first FDA meeting, Burroughs Wellcome emphasized how the drug had "lowered" the p24 levels; at the follow-up meeting, they didn't mention it.  As that meeting was winding down, Dr. Michael Lange, head of the AIDS program at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York, spoke up about this. "The claim of AZT is made on the fact that it is supposed to have an antiviral effect," he said to Burroughs Wellcome, "and on this we have seen no data at all... Since there is a report in the Lancet [a leading British medical journal] that after 20 weeks or so, in many patients p24 came back, do you have any data on that?"  They didn't.  "What counts is the bottom line," one of the scientists representing Burroughs Wellcome summed up, "the survival, the neurologic function, the absence of progression and the quality of life, all of which are better. Whether you call it better because of some antiviral effect, or some other antibacterial effect, they are still better."  Dr. Lange suggested that the drug may be effective the same way a simple anti-inflammatory, such as aspirin, is effective. An inexpensive, nontoxic drug called Indomecithin, he pointed out, might serve the same function, without the devastating side effects.  One leading AIDS researcher, who was part of the FDA approval process, says today: "Does AZT do anything? Yes, it does. But the evidence that it does something against HIV is really not there."  "There have always been drugs that we use without knowing exactly how they work," says Nobel Prize winner Walter Gilbert. "The really important thing to look at is the clinical effect. Is the drug helping or isn't it?"  "I'm living proof that AZT works," says one person with ARC on AZT. "I've been on it for two years now, and I'm certainly healthier than I was two years ago. It's not a cure-all, it's not a perfect drug, but it is effective. It's slowing down the progression of the disease."  "Sometimes I feel like swallowing Drano," says another. "I mean, sometimes I have problems swallowing. I just don't like the idea of taking something that foreign to my body. But every six hours, I've got to swallow it. Until something better comes along, this is what is available to me."  "I am absolutely convinced that people enjoy a better quality of life and survive longer who do not take AZT," says Gene Fedorko, President of Health Education AIDS Liaison (HEAL). "I think it's horrible the way people are bullied by their doctors to take the drug. We get people coming to us shaking and crying because their doctors said they'll die if they don't take AZT. That is an absolute lie." Fedorko has drawn his conclusion from years of listening to the stories of people struggling to survive AIDS at HEAL's weekly support group.  "I wouldn't take AZT if you paid me," says Michael Callen, cofounder of New York City's PWA coalition, Community Research Initiative, and editor of several AIDS journals. Callen has survived AIDS for over seven years without the help of AZT. "I've gotten the shit kicked out me for saying this, but I think using AZT is like aiming a thermonuclear warhead at a mosquito. The overwhelming majority of long-term survivors I've known have chosen not to take AZT."  The last surviving patient from the original AZT trial, according to Burroughs Wellcome, died recently. When he died, he had been on AZT for three and one-half years. He was the longest surviving AZT recipient. The longest surviving AIDS patient overall, not on AZT, has lived for eight and one-half years.  An informal study of long-term survivors of AIDS followed 24 long-term survivors, all of whom had survived AIDS more than six years. Only one of them had recently begun taking AZT.  In the early days, AZT was said to extend lives. In actual fact, there is simply no solid evidence that AZT prolongs life.  "I think AZT does prolong life in most people," says Dr. Bruce Montgomery of the State University of New York City at Stony Brook, who is completing a study on AZT. "There are not very many long-tern survivors, and we really don't know why they survive. It could be luck. But most people are not so lucky."  "AZT does seem to help many patients," says Dr. Bernard Bahari, a New York City AIDS physician and researcher, "but it's very hard to determine whether it actually prolongs life."  "Many of the patients I see choose not to take AZT," says Dr. Don Abrams of San Francisco General Hospital. "I've been impressed that survival and lifespan are increasing for all people with AIDS. I think it has a lot to do with aerosolized Pentamidine [a drug that treats pneumocystis carinii pneumonia]. There's also the so-called plague effect, the fact that people get stronger and stronger when a disease hits a population. The patients I see today are not as fragile as the early patients were."  "Whether you live or die with AIDS is a function of how well your doctor treats you, not of AZT," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, one of New York's City's first and most reputable AIDS doctor, whose patients include many long-term survivors, although he has never prescribed AZT. Sonnabend was one of the first to make the simple observation that AIDS patients should be treated for their diseases, not just for their HIV infection.  Several studies have concluded that AZT has no effect on the two most common opportunistic AIDS infections, Pneumocystic Carinii Pneumonia (PCP) and Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS). The overwhelming majority of AIDS patients die of PCP, for which there has been an effective treatment for decades. This year, the FDA finally approved aerosolized Pentamidine for AIDS. A recent Memorial Sloan Kettering study concluded the following: By 15 months, 80% of people on AZT not receiving Pentamidine had a recurring episode. "All those deaths in the AZT study were treatable," Sonnabend says. "They weren't deaths from AIDS, they were deaths from treatable conditions. They didn't even do autopsies for that study. What kind of faith can one have in these people?"  "If there's any resistance to AZT in the general public at all, it's within the gay community of New York," says the doctor close to the FDA approval, who asked to remain anonymous. "The rest of the country has been brainwashed into thinking this drug really does that much. The data has all been manipulated by people who have a lot vested in AZT."  "If AIDS were not the popular disease that it is - the money-making and career-making machine - these people could not get away with that kind of shoddy science," says Bialy. "In all of my years in science I have never seen anything this atrocious." When asked if he thought it was at all possible that people have been killed as a result of AZT poisoning rather then AIDS he answered: "It's more than possible."  August 17, 1989: The government has announced that 1.4 million healthy, HIV antibody-positive Americans could "benefit" from taking AZT, even though they show no symptoms of disease. New studies have "proven" that AZT is effective in stopping the progression of AIDS in asymptomatic and early ARC cases. Dr. Fauci, the head of NIH, proudly announced that a trial that has been going on for "two years" had "clearly shown" that early intervention will keep AIDS at bay. Anyone who has antibodies to HIV and less than 500 T-4 cells should start taking AZT at once, he said. That is approximately 650,000 people. 1.4 million Americans are assumed HIV antibody-positive, and eventually all of them may need to take AZT so they don't get sick, Fauci contended.  The leading newspapers didn't seem to think it unusual that there was no existing copy of the study, but rather a breezy two-pages press release from the NIH. When SPIN called the NIH asking for a copy of the study, we were told that it was "still being written." We asked a few questions about the numbers. According to the press release, 3,200 early AARC and asymptomatic patients were devided into two groups, one AZT and one placebo, and followed for two years. The two groups were distinguished by T-4 cell counts; one group had less than 500, the other more than 500. These two were then divided into three groups each: high-dose AZT, low-dose AZT, and placebo. In the group with more than 500 T-4 cells, AZT had no effect. In the other group, it was concluded that low-dose AZT was the most effective, followed by high-dose. All in all, 36 out of 900 developed AIDS in the two AZT groups combined, and 38 out of 450 in the placebo group. "HIV-positive patients are twice as likely to get AIDS if they don't take AZT," the press declared.  However, the figures are vastly misleading. When we asked how many patients were actually enrolled for a full two years, the NIH said they did not know, but that the average time of participation was one year, not two.  "It's terribly dishonest the way they portrayed those numbers," says Dr. Sonnabend. "If there were 60 people in the trial those numbers would mean something, but if you calculate what the percentage is out of 3,200, the difference becomes minute between the two groups. It's nothing. It's hit or miss, and they make it look like it's terribly significant."  The study boasted that AZT is much more effective and less toxic at one-third the dosage than has been used for three years. That's the good news. The bad news is that thousands have already been walloped with 1,500 milligrams of AZT and possibly even died of toxic poisoning - and now we're hearing that one third of the dose would have done?  With all that remains so uncertain about the effects of AZT, it seems criminal to advocate expanding its usage to healthy people, particularly since only a minuscule percentage of the HIV-infected population have actually developed ARC or AIDS.  Burroughs Wellcome has already launched testing of AZT in asymptomatic hospital workers, pregnant women, and in children, who are getting liquid AZT. The liquid is left over from an aborted trial, and given to the children because they can mix it with water - children don't like to swallow pills. It has also been proposed that AZT be given to people who do not yet even test positive for HIV antibodies, but are "at risk."  "I'm convinced that if you gave AZT to a perfectly healthy athlete," says Fedorko, "he would be dead in five years."  In December 1988, the Lancet published a study that Burroughs Wellcome and the NIH do not include in their press kits. It was more expansive than the original AZT study and followed patients longer. It was not conducted in the United States, but in France, at the Claude Bernard Hospital in Paris, and concluded the same thing about AZT that Burroughs Wellcome's study did, except Burroughs Wellcome called their results "overwhelmingly positive," and the French doctors called theirs "disappointing." The French study found, once again, that AZT was too toxic for most to tolerate, had no lasting effect on HIV blood levels, and left the patients with fewer T-4 cells than they started with. Although they noticed a clinical improvement at first, they concluded that "by six months, these values had returned to their pretreatment levels and several opportunistic infections, malignancies and deaths occurred."  "Thus the benefits of AZT are limited to a few months for ARC and AIDS patients," the Fench team concluded. After a few months, the study found, AZT was completely ineffective.  The news that AZT will soon be prescribed to asymptomatic people has left many leading AIDS doctors dumbfounded and furious. Every doctor and scientist I asked felt that it was highly unprofessional and reckless to announce a study with no data to look at, making recommendations with such drastic public health implications. "This simply does not happen," says Bialy. "The government is reporting scientific facts before they've been reviewed? It's unheard of."  "It's beyond belief," says Dr. Sonnabend in a voice tinged with desperation. "I don't know what to do. I have to go in and face an office full of patients asking for AZT. I'm terrified. I don't know what to do as a responsible physician. The first study was ridiculous. Margaret Fishl, who has done both of these studies, obviously doesn't know the first thing about clinical trials. I don't trust her. Or the others. They're simply not good enough. We're being held hostage by second-rate scientists. We let them get away with the first disaster; now they're doing it again."  "It's a momentous decision to say to people, 'if you're HIV-positive and your T4-cells are below 500 start taking AZT,'" says the doctor who wished to remain anonymous. "I know dozens of people that I've seen personally every few months for several years now who have been in that state for more than five years, and have not progressed to any disease."  "I'm ashamed of my colleagues," Sonnabend laments. "I'm embarrassed. This is such shoddy science it's hard to believe nobody is protesting. Damned cowards. The name of the game is protect your grants, don't open your mouth. It's all about money... it's grounds for just following the party line and not being critical, when there are obviously financial and political forces that are driving this."  When Duesberg heard the latest announcement, he was particularly stunned over the reaction of Gay Men's Health Crisis President Richard Dunne, who said that GMHC now urged "everybody to get tested," and of course those who test positive to go on AZT. "These people are running into the gas chambers," says Duesberg. "Himmler would have been so happy if only the Jews were this cooperative." 

Free Library Podcast
Antonio Damasio | Feeling & Knowing: Making Minds Conscious

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 59:08


Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Endowed Lecture One of the world's leading neuroscientists, Dr. Antonio Damasio has made watershed contributions to the understanding of how our brains process emotions, decisions, and conscious. He is the David Dornsife Professor of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Philosophy, and director of the Brain and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. His prolific body of work includes scores of scientific articles and several books, including Decartes' Error, The Feeling of What Happens, and The Strange Order of Things. A member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Damasio is the recipient of some of the scientific community's most prestigious awards. Feeling & Knowing is a guide to understanding the phenomenon of consciousness and how it relates to the physical brain. (recorded 11/4/2021)

Kentucky Author Forum
Kurt Andersen and Daron Acemoglu

Kentucky Author Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 43:53


Writer Kurt Andersen discusses his latest book “Evil Geniuses: The Unmaking of America: A Recent History,” with professor and author Daron Acemoglu. Kurt Andersen is the bestselling author of the novels “Heyday, “Turn of the Century,” and “True Believers.” He is also a contributor to Vanity Fair and The New York Times and was the host and co-creator of Studio 360, the Peabody Award-winning public radio show and podcast. Andersen writes for television, film, and the stage. He regularly appears as a commentator on MSNBC. Andersen co-founded Spy magazine, served as editor in chief of New York Magazine, and was a cultural columnist and critic for Time Magazine and The New Yorker. Daron Acemoglu is an Institute Professor at MIT and an elected fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, American Philosophical Society, the British Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Society of Labor Economists. Acemoglu is the author of five books. His academic work covers a wide range of areas, including political economy, economic development, economic growth, technological change, inequality, labor economics, and economics of networks. Daron Acemoglu has received numerous awards including the inaugural T. W. Schultz Prize from the University of Chicago, the Carnegie Fellowship in 2017, the Global Economy Prize in 2019, and the 'CME Group-Mathematical and Statistical Research Institute Prize in 2021.

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
HORMONES: REVERSE DIETING & MAINTENANCE - CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY #444

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 9:03


Joe and Eric Helms recently discussed how to support hormonal balance and capacity in the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind. Today, Joe takes the conversation to Adam to explain step by step how three sets of hormones impact hunger, fat loss, and muscle mass. You don't want to miss this series! For an in-depth conversation on this topic, Dr. Joe and Dr. Eric Helms discuss what happens with our hormones in dieting, in the pursuit of our best health, maintaining or gaining lean body mass, and maintaining as much metabolic capacity as we can when dieting. It's Session 19 of the NUTRITION COACHING GLOBAL MASTERMIND webcast series, available for $9.99 here: https://nutritioncoachingglobal.com/session-19-hormones CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY - THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative daily video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! Together, Klemczewski and Atkinson have helped clients win more than 500 pro cards, 200 pro titles, and 25 world championships. It's time for your best condition and your biggest win! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY COMPLETE PLAYLIST: https://thedietdoc.com/contestprepu THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep The Diet Doc, LLC, is the parent company to many health, fitness, nutrition, and behavioral projects. Founded 25 years ago by Joe Klemczewski, PhD, known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting, The Diet Doc is equipping the next generation of nutrition coaches. Joined by health psychologist Kori Propst, PhD, Joe has created the Flexible Dieting Institute, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, and Contest Prep University. Whether you're listening to a podcast or interview as a life transformation client, a physique sport competitor, a performance athlete, a fitness entrepreneur, or just need some life motivation, Joe and Kori won't disappoint! SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheDietDoc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dietdocglobal Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/thedietdoclife Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

Scaling the Summit-- Radio Gold
S2, E10: Dave Bellar

Scaling the Summit-- Radio Gold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 58:02


Dave Bellar currently serves as the UNC Charlotte Department of Applied Physiology, Health & Clinical Sciences Founding Chair and Professor, He received his BS Degree in Biology and Life Science Chemistry and his Master of Science in Secondary Education from John Carroll University. Dave earned his PhD in Exercise Physiology from Kent State University. His past professional involvement includes: Director Human Performance Lab, in the School of Kinesiology, at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Director of the School of Kinesiology, at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Volunteer Track and Field Coach at UL Lafayette Sport Scientist for the National Olympic Committee of Romania Membership committee - National Strength and Conditioning Association Executive Committee Coaching Education – USA Track and Field Contributing Editor – Louisiana AHPERD Journal Research Chair – Southern District AHPERD State Program Director Louisiana – National Strength and Conditioning Association Vice Chair – Executive Committee Coaching Education – USA Track and Field Board of Director – American Kinesiology Association Kids on the Geaux Program co-Developer, provided direction to a joint project between the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and Women's and Children's Hospital. Dave is the Co-Editor of the Journal of Health and Physical Literacy, the official journal of the National Academy of Health and Physical Literacy.

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
HORMONES: ADRENALINE & CORTISOL - CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY #443

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 7:09


Joe and Eric Helms recently discussed how to support hormonal balance and capacity in the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind. Today, Joe takes the conversation to Adam to explain step by step how three sets of hormones impact hunger, fat loss, and muscle mass. You don't want to miss this series! For an in-depth conversation on this topic, Dr. Joe and Dr. Eric Helms discuss what happens with our hormones in dieting, in the pursuit of our best health, maintaining or gaining lean body mass, and maintaining as much metabolic capacity as we can when dieting. It's Session 19 of the NUTRITION COACHING GLOBAL MASTERMIND webcast series, available for $9.99 here: https://nutritioncoachingglobal.com/session-19-hormones CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY - THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative daily video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! Together, Klemczewski and Atkinson have helped clients win more than 500 pro cards, 200 pro titles, and 25 world championships. It's time for your best condition and your biggest win! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY COMPLETE PLAYLIST: https://thedietdoc.com/contestprepu THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep The Diet Doc, LLC, is the parent company to many health, fitness, nutrition, and behavioral projects. Founded 25 years ago by Joe Klemczewski, PhD, known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting, The Diet Doc is equipping the next generation of nutrition coaches. Joined by health psychologist Kori Propst, PhD, Joe has created the Flexible Dieting Institute, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, and Contest Prep University. Whether you're listening to a podcast or interview as a life transformation client, a physique sport competitor, a performance athlete, a fitness entrepreneur, or just need some life motivation, Joe and Kori won't disappoint! SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheDietDoc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dietdocglobal Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/thedietdoclife Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc

Keen On Democracy
Sandro Galea on Preventing the Next Pandemic

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 37:07


In this episode of “Keen On”, Andrew is joined by Sandro Galea, the author of “The Contagion Next Time”, to discuss how investing in the healthiest population possible is literally an act of national security against a future pandemic. Sandro Galea, a physician, epidemiologist, and author, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. He has published extensively in the peer-reviewed literature, and is a regular contributor to a range of public media, about the social causes of health, mental health, and the consequences of trauma. He has been listed as one of the most widely cited scholars in the social sciences. He is past chair of the board of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health and past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and of the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto, graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow. Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Steel Magnolias - Holding on to the good of The South
Negro Spirituals feat. Fisk Jubilee Singers

Steel Magnolias - Holding on to the good of The South

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 27:39


Negro Spirituals consist of a set of songs that were created by slaves during their time of slavery and were sung from spirit to Spirit. They carry messages from God to us, and today we can still build inspiration from these songs.    The Fisk Jubilee Singers are an American a cappella ensemble that performs Negro spirituals originally sung by slaves prior to the Civil War. The first group of Singers arranged the music and took it on the road beginning in 1871 introducing the public to a new genre that remains a vibrant musical tradition today.   We had the chance to speak with Dr. Paul T. Kwami, Musical Director of the Fisk Jubilee Singers.   Kwami was born in Ghana, West Africa, one of seven children. His father, a musician, taught him piano, violin, theory, and conducting. He studied music at Ghana's National Academy of Music and taught there until immigrating to the US in 1983 as a student at Fisk University. He promptly joined the Fisk Jubilee Singers.After graduating Fisk in 1985 he continued to study music at Western Michigan University and graduated in 1987 with the Master of Music degree. In the spring of 1994 he was solicited to serve as part-time director of the Fisk Jubilee Singers. In the fall of the same year, he was promoted to full time faculty member in the music department and became the Musical Director of the ensemble. He is the first African to direct the Fisk Jubilee Singers, and the first to hold the Curb-Beaman Chair position. He is currently the Mike Curb Jubilee Singers Endowed Chair. Kwami received the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in conducting from the American Conservatory of Music.   Kwami, a composer and arranger, feels a deep connection between Negro spirituals and the music of his Motherland. “The music we sing today helps to bridge the gap between Africans and African-Americans,” he says. “I am reminded of my life in Ghana whenever I hear the Fisk Jubilee Singers sing the Negro spirituals.”   As the Fisk Jubilee Singers are celebrating 150 years this year, we thought this was the perfect time to cover this topic.  Check out the Grammy-award winning album here: https://amzn.to/3w3Vh4X   __ If you'd like to join our Patreon Community to support us monthly for perks and exclusive content check out https://www.patreon.com/steelmagnolias   Places to Connect: Sign up for mailing list HERE  https://mailchi.mp/e3cef217a5e7/sweetnews Instagram: @SteelMagnoliasPodcast Private Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/32Kna4T  

Budgetrek
Episode 88: Janet Ivey - President at Explore Mars, CEO of Janet's Planet

Budgetrek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 40:36


Janet Ivey, Creator and CEO of the award-winning children's series Janet's Planet is committed to enriching the lives of children via education and live performances, TV, and online programming. With over 29 years in the children's entertainment/education and space science outreach sector, Janet has captivated Nashville and beyond with her work. She has received 12 Regional Emmys and five Gracie Awards, for her children's series Janet's Planet that airs on 140+ public television stations nationwide. Her first TEDx Talk was in 2014 entitled, AWE,(Art, Wonder, and Experiential) Inspired Science, her second TEDx Talk entitled, “How To Inhabit Your Very Own Planet, #PlanetYou” was recorded in April 2019. In 2020, Janet was named a second-round citizen astronaut candidate for Space For Humanity and is awaiting news if she will progress in the process and get a chance to go to space. Janet is currently the president of Explore Mars, an advocacy group for the human exploration of Mars, is a NASA JPL Solar System Ambassador, is on the Board of Governors for the National Space Society, is the Educational Co-Director of the Midsouth Chapter of NATAS, (National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences), the recipient of the New World's Institute's inaugural Permission to Dream Award in 2016 and has won a STEM-FLORIDA Award for “Exploring Microgravity,” an educational video about gravity and microgravity that Janet wrote and produced for Space Florida. In 2020/2021 Janet's Planet did outreach under a NASA NextGEN STEM grant and shared NASA curriculum with students all over the world Janet's Planet travels at the speed of thought focuses on science, space, history, and the future of human space exploration. Janet's Planet can be seen on streaming sites, e360TV, YouTube, BatteryPop, Minnow, and HighBrow in the UK. Janet is a guardian and shepherdess of the next generation of space explorers and encourages students worldwide to stand in their inherent magnificence. Brady Morgan's Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/bradymorgan_/ John Trusty's Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/johntrusty/ Our Website - https://www.vastaffing.agency/

Fuel Her Awesome: Food Freedom, Body Love, Intuitive Eating & Nutrition Coaching
49 || Do men struggle with body image? How to support healthy habits and a positive relationship with food in men. Interview with Mike Doran CPT

Fuel Her Awesome: Food Freedom, Body Love, Intuitive Eating & Nutrition Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 39:03


In this weeks episode we get insight into what body image is like for men. If you are a mom of boys like I am, or even an aunt, grandma, teacher, or sister...you need to listen to this episode!  My guest this week is the fabulous Mike Doran, he has a degree in nutrition, currently working on his masters in nutrition and on his way to becoming a Registered Dietitian..he is also a level one and level 2 Precision Nutrition Certified Nutritionist, Functional Range Condition Coach, National Academy of Sports Medicine Certified Personal Trainer.  He shares his personal story of what it was like growing up as a male with an eating disorder. We discuss some of the societal factors that played a role in the development of his eating disorder, and how we can help our young boys today deal with these pressures.  If you want to connect more with Mike, you can find him at @mikeystsyfit.   Cheers, and happy eating, Jess

Latter Day Lives - Talking with Latter Day Saints
Ep. 187 - Del Parson - Iconic Artist

Latter Day Lives - Talking with Latter Day Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 58:30


Del Parson is an artist whose art has been seen by millions. From his portraits of Christ to historical figures such as Joseph and Hyrum Smith, his works hang in chapels, temples, and church sites around the world. Del grew up in Rexburg, Idaho where his father was an art professor at Ricks College and his mother taught second grade. His father often took his nine children on painting excursion campouts. He found his father's love of art to be contagious, as did two of his brothers, who became artists as well. After earning his MFA from BrighamYoung University, Parson became a gallery and portrait artist. In 1978, a tragedy changed his life. His wife and daughter were killed in a car accident. He felt the Spirit of God helping him through the tough times and began to paint religious subjects to give others the sense of hope that he found and to share with them his love of life. Parson now lives in Utah with his wife and six children. His paintings of Christ evoke a strong emotional response from viewers, and both his religious and historical paintings have received numerous regional and national awards. Parson's work has been exhibited at the Allied Artists of America, National Academy of Design, Knickerbocker Artist, American Artists Professional League, and the Amarillo Rotary Show. www.delparson.com

Curiosity Daily
Crowds Fix Fake News, Choking Under Pressure, Punching Robot Shrimp

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 12:38


Learn about crowdsourced fact checking; why humans and monkeys choke under pressure; and a mantis shrimp punching robot. Join Cody and Ashley for a special live stream celebrating Curiosity Daily's 1,000th episode! Leave us a voicemail at 312-596-5208 or email a voice recording to curiosity@discovery.com and share your favorite fact you've learned from the podcast, and you may hear your message on the stream! Register for free here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/curiosity-dailys-1000th-episode-celebration-tickets-191163133077  Crowdsourced fact checking might actually work on social media by Steffie Drucker  Study: Crowds can wise up to fake news. (2021, September). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/926824   Allen, J., Arechar, A. A., Pennycook, G., & Rand, D. G. (2021). Scaling up fact-checking using the wisdom of crowds. Science Advances, 7(36). https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abf4393   Edelman, G. (2021, September 9). Can the Wisdom of Crowds Help Fix Social Media's Trust Issue? Wired. Retrieved September 27, 2021, from https://www.wired.com/story/could-wisdom-of-crowds-help-fix-social-media-trust-problem  Monkeys choke under pressure just like humans do, which gives us a chance to better understand it by Grant Currin  Levy, M. G. (2021, September 2). You're Not Alone: Monkeys Choke Under Pressure Too. Wired; WIRED. https://www.wired.com/story/youre-not-alone-monkeys-choke-under-pressure-too/  Smoulder, A. L., Pavlovsky, N. P., Marino, P. J., Degenhart, A. D., McClain, N. T., Batista, A. P., & Chase, S. M. (2021). Monkeys exhibit a paradoxical decrease in performance in high-stakes scenarios. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(35), e2109643118. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2109643118  Scientists just built a mantis shrimp punching robot for the US Army by Cameron Duke Mantis Shrimps. (2021). Qld.gov.au. https://www.qm.qld.gov.au/Explore/Find+out+about/Animals+of+Queensland/Crustaceans/Common+marine+crustaceans/Mantis+Shrimps#.U7ZwLPmSxMg Small, mighty robots mimic the powerful punch of mantis shrimp. (2021, September 9). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/927975 Steinhardt, E., Hyun, N. P., Koh, J., Freeburn, G., Rosen, M. H., Temel, F. Z., Patek, S. N., & Wood, R. J. (2021). A physical model of mantis shrimp for exploring the dynamics of ultrafast systems. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(33), e2026833118. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2026833118 Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Todd Durkin IMPACT Show
Slowing Down the Aging Process | Ep. 220 with Pete McCall

Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 58:36


Does anyone else want the “aging process” to slow down? Me too! As much as I love the wisdom that comes with age, I don't love the fact that my body doesn't always feel like a young spring chicken anymore. Today's episode is all about slowing down the aging process with my good friend and entrusted colleague, Pete McCall.    Pete is an author, coach, podcaster, and he just released his new book called Ageless Intensity...Slowing the Aging Process. He is one of the top fitness experts in media publications and an avid researcher. This episode will deliver some great tips and information on how you can feel vibrant, healthy, and well as you age gracefully.   In this episode, “Slowing the Aging Process” Pete delivers great tips, hacks, and exercises to live your best life and defy age. Specifically, this is what we cover in today's episode: - Hacks to defy the aging process - Elastin, collagen, and fascia...research on slowing the aging process - Steady state workouts and how to effectively use them to help burn fat - 4 principles on ageless intensity - Top strength exercises for people who are “aging” - Final 5 tips to age gracefully   Please share this episode with your family, friends, and colleagues, and please share on your social media. Tag us at... IG/Twitter: @ToddDurkin, @AllAboutFitnesspodcast Twitter: @PeteMc_fitness FB: @ToddDurkinFQ10 #AgelessIntensity   ---   8:22 - Aging...what is it and why does it happen? Exercise creates new cells and helps slow down the aging process along with caloric intake.   10:20 - What are some of the hacks to defy gravity? Consistent exercise and HIT (High Intensity) training become a mechanism to slow the aging process.   14:16 - What has been your discovery in the research with Elastin, Collagen, and Fascia with slowing the aging process? Mixing it up the routine and adding in flexibility or bodyweight after a heavy training day. We need more yoga!   20:37 - How often do you recommend steady-state workouts? Sleep plays a big role.   27:17 - What technologies are you finding in your research that are things that combat aging or improve performance? Power training. Strength training. Kettlebells. Blood Flow restriction BFR training   33:72 - Ageless Intensity...give us a few key principles or thoughts. Metabolic fatigue. Mobility. Foundation movement patterns. Healthy Fats - HDL   40:57 - Top strength exercises. Hip thrust. Kettle Bell swings. Barbell RDL.   47:33 - One of the best things about COVID. Getting back outside into nature and going for good hikes   48:41 - Age gracefully, 5 tips to slow down the aging process.  #1. Exercise slows the aging process #2. Hydration #3. Sleep - Quality vs Quantity #4. Get good fats and lean proteins #5. Recovery    59:02 - Wrap up….Get Pete's book!   Ageless Intensity: Effective Workouts to Slow the Aging Process https://www.amazon.com/Ageless-Intensity-Effective-Workouts-Process/dp/1718200757/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=ageless+intensity&qid=1616015679&sr=8-2   ---   About Pete McCall:   Pete McCall is a personal trainer, author of Ageless Intensity: Effective Workouts to Slow the Aging Process and Smarter Workouts: The Science of Exercise Made Simple, international presenter and host of the All About Fitness podcast. Pete delivers education and content solutions for a variety of health and fitness organizations including the American Council on Exercise (ACE), the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) and Core Health & Fitness. Frequently quoted as a fitness expert in media publications, Pete is a sought-after media resource for accurate, in-depth insights on how to get results from exercise.    Based in Carlsbad, CA, Pete holds a master's degree in exercise science and health promotion, is a Certified Personal Trainer with ACE and NASM and a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association. In addition to his books, Pete has authored numerous articles for fitness trade publications, exercise-science blogs and is one of a few individuals who has written textbook chapters for ACE and NASM, the two largest fitness certification organizations.     Currently, Pete is the Senior Master Trainer for StairMaster and Nautilus for Core Health and Fitness the parent company of Nautilus and StairMaster, a blogger and writer for ACE (the largest accredited non-profit personal trainer certification organization in the country where he previously worked as an exercise physiologist) and both a content creator and an online instructor for the NASM (the largest for-profit personal trainer certification organization).   www.petemccallfitness.com   Author: Smarter Workouts - The Science of Exercise Made Simple https://us.humankinetics.com/products/smarter-workouts    Author: Ageless Intensity: Effective Workouts to Slow the Aging Process https://www.amazon.com/Ageless-Intensity-Effective-Workouts-Process/dp/1718200757/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=ageless+intensity&qid=1616015679&sr=8-2   Host of the All About Fitness podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/all-about-fitness/id1115101341?mt=2    ---   November is IMPACT Month - We will have an array of events throughout the month to raise funds for the Durkin IMPACT Foundation and to CREATE IMPACT!   #1. Todd Durkin's IMPACT SUMMIT (Nov 7-12th) Revitalizing the Fitness Industry in these Crazy Times…& Forging What's Next for our Industry!!! 5-Days, 10 Presentations… WHO: All Trainers, coaches, and fit-pros Sign-Up TODAY...It's completely FREE!!! Check out www.todddurkin.com for more details.   #2. A Day of IMPACT at Fitness Quest 10, Saturday, November 20th!  9 am PST--TD led workout  11 am PST TD IMPACT AMPLIFIED Talk Be there...   You can also give back and donate online - 100% proceeds go to the foundation to support college-bound athletes and families in need. Additionally, your donation is completely tax-deductible.  https://todddurkin.com/impact-foundation/   ---   Today's Podcast Episode is sponsored by CarnoSyn beta-alanine   CarnoSyn® bet-alanine is an ingredient within the top pre & post-workout supplements and I use it every day. A minimum dose of 3.2g per day and up to 6.4g for faster results. Only CarnoSyn® beta-alanine is backed by over 55 scientific studies and contains zero banned substances.   To see the full list of CarnoSyn® Verified brands and to purchase, visit https://www.carnosyn.com/td/   ---   Are you a Trainer, Coach, or Fitness Business Owner seeking to make even more IMPACT in your business & life?   You are only as good as the people you surround yourself with. Level up today with my “Best in Class” MASTERMIND program for fitness professionals. I invite you to connect, share, and grow with the top coaches, trainers, and entrepreneurs in the fitness industry. My MASTERMIND is for passionate and purpose-driven fitness professionals who want to create success & significance in their personal and professional lives. If that sounds like you, visit: ToddDurkinMastermind.com to enroll or apply today. If you do so within the next 24 hours, you will receive a FREE video of one of my recent “ALL MASTERMIND” coaching calls. There are so many lost souls right now that need “our” LIGHT.  Let's make a difference together, one life at a time!    ---   Please keep your questions coming so I can highlight you on the podcast!!    If you have a burning question and want to be featured on the IMPACT show, go to www.todddurkin.com/podcast, fill out the form, and submit your questions!    ---   Follow Todd… → Instagram & Twitter: @ToddDurkin → Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ToddDurkinFQ10 → FB: @ToddDurkinFQ10   Don't forget that if you want more keys to unlock your potential and propel your success, you can order my book GET YOUR MIND RIGHT at www.todddurkin.com/getyourmindright or anywhere books are sold.   Get Your Mind Right now available on AUDIO: https://christianaudio.com/get-your-mind-right-todd-durkin-audiobook-download   Want more Motivation and Inspiration?? Sign up for my newsletter The TD Times that comes out on the 10th of every month full of great content  www.todddurkin.com   ---   ABOUT: Todd Durkin is one of the leading coaches, trainers, and motivators in the world. It's no secret why some of the world's top athletes have trained with him for nearly two decades. He's a best-selling author, a motivational speaker, and owns the legendary Fitness Quest 10 in San Diego, CA, where he leads an amazing team of 42 teammates.   Todd is a coach on the Netflix show “STRONG” that is must-watch TV. He is a previous Jack LaLanne Award winner, a 2-time Trainer of the Year, and he runs his Todd Durkin Mastermind group of top trainers and fitness pros around the globe, coaching them with business, leadership, marketing, training, and personal growth mentorship.   Todd and his wife Melanie head up the Durkin IMPACT Foundation (501-c-3) that has raised over $250,000 since it started in 2013. 100% of all proceeds go back to kids and families in need. To learn more about Todd, visit www.ToddDurkin.com and www.FitnessQuest10.com.   Join his fire-breathing dragons' community and receive regular motivational and inspirational emails. Visit www.ToddDurkin.com and opt-in to receive his value-rich content.   Connect with Todd online in the following places: You can listen to Todd's podcast, The IMPACT Show, by going to www.todddurkin.com/podcast.

Health & Fitness Redefined
All About NASM CPT Certification and the OPT Model

Health & Fitness Redefined

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 52:37


In this episode, Rick looks at different certifications as options depending on the clientele you want to work with and shares his insights on several issues within the personal trainers industry. He outlines the pros of taking the NASM certification and concludes with his take on industry challenges that NASM and other certifications should address. TIMESTAMPS2:18   How Rick landed a role at the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM)9:59   Why NASM has the best personal training certifications 14:37 What is the Optimum Performance Training (OPT) Model?24:00 Defining the scope of personal trainers in nutrition29:48 Why do some personal trainers withhold information33:51 The Good and the Bad about NASM41:47 Rick's take on how NASM can improve the field 47:26 Attracting clients through trustRick Richey, DHSc, MS, LMT has been in the fitness industry since 2002 as a certified personal trainer, training manager, educator, orthopedic massage therapist, college and university professor, fitness industry presenter, as well as a subject matter expert and talent for fitness industry educational videos and written content. He is the host of the NASM CPT Podcast with Rick Richey. Rick is regularly used by media outlets for quotes and content regarding fitness and wellness. He has also written chapters in the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) Essentials of Personal Training and Corrective Exercise textbooks. He earned a Master's of Science in Exercise science and a Doctorate of Health Science and Exercise Leadership degree at the California University of Pennsylvania.

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast
HORMONES: THYROID & FAT LOSS - CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY #440

The Diet Doc Life Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 7:40


Joe and Eric Helms recently discussed how to support hormonal balance and capacity in the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind. Today, Joe takes the conversation to Adam to explain step by step how three sets of hormones impact hunger, fat loss, and muscle mass. You don't want to miss this series! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY - THE SCIENCE OF STAGE-READY Joe Klemczewski, PhD, founder of THE DIET DOC and legendary TEAM KLEMCZEWSKI PERFECT PEAKING, has joined Adam Atkinson, founder of SEE YOU LATER LEANER, to bring you the science of Peakology in an informative daily video catalog! Learn how to master the stage from the coach who pioneered the contest prep coaching industry! Together, Klemczewski and Atkinson have helped clients win more than 500 pro cards, 200 pro titles, and 25 world championships. It's time for your best condition and your biggest win! CONTEST PREP UNIVERSITY COMPLETE PLAYLIST: https://thedietdoc.com/contestprepu THE DIET DOC CONTEST PREP PROGRAM OPTIONS: https://thedietdoc.com/contest-prep The Diet Doc, LLC, is the parent company to many health, fitness, nutrition, and behavioral projects. Founded 25 years ago by Joe Klemczewski, PhD, known as the Godfather of Flexible Dieting, The Diet Doc is equipping the next generation of nutrition coaches. Joined by health psychologist Kori Propst, PhD, Joe has created the Flexible Dieting Institute, the Nutrition Coaching Global Mastermind, and Contest Prep University. Whether you're listening to a podcast or interview as a life transformation client, a physique sport competitor, a performance athlete, a fitness entrepreneur, or just need some life motivation, Joe and Kori won't disappoint! SUBSCRIBE TO THIS CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thedietdocweightloss HOW WE CAN HELP YOU IN YOUR FITNESS CAREER! * Become an exclusive license owner with The Diet Doc: https://thedietdoc.com/join-our-team * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Certified Nutrition Consultant: https://namscert.com/ * Become a National Academy of Metabolic Science Physique Sport & Transformation Coach: https://namscert.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Website: https://www.thedietdoc.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheDietDoc Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dietdocglobal Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/thedietdoclife Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/thedietdoc