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Best podcasts about public cloud

Latest podcast episodes about public cloud

Screaming in the Cloud
Saving the World though Cloud Sustainability with Aerin Booth

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 35:56


About AerinAerin is a Cloud Sustainability Advocate and neurodiverse founder in tech on a mission to help developers understand the real impact that cloud computing has on the world and reduce their carbon emissions in the cloud. Did you know that internet and cloud computing contribute over 4% of annual carbon emissions? Twice that of the airline industry!Aerin also hosts "Public Cloud for Public Good," a podcast targeted towards developers and senior leaders in tech. Every episode, they also donate £500 to charities and highlight organisations that are working towards a better future. Listen and learn how you can contribute towards making the world a better place through the use of public cloud services.Links Referenced: Twitter: https://twitter.com/aerincloud LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aerinb/ Public Cloud for Public Good: https://publicgood.cloud/ duckbillgroup.com: https://duckbillgroup.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Uptycs, because they believe that many of you are looking to bolster your security posture with CNAPP and XDR solutions. They offer both cloud and endpoint security in a single UI and data model. Listeners can get Uptycs for up to 1,000 assets through the end of 2023 (that is next year) for $1. But this offer is only available for a limited time on UptycsSecretMenu.com. That's U-P-T-Y-C-S Secret Menu dot com.Corey: Cloud native just means you've got more components or microservices than anyone (even a mythical 10x engineer) can keep track of. With OpsLevel, you can build a catalog in minutes and forget needing that mythical 10x engineer. Now, you'll have a 10x service catalog to accompany your 10x service count. Visit OpsLevel.com to learn how easy it is to build and manage your service catalog. Connect to your git provider and you're off to the races with service import, repo ownership, tech docs, and more. Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn and I am joined what feels like roughly a year later by a returning guest, Aerin Booth. How long have you been?Aerin: I've been really great. You know, it's been a journey of a year, I think, since we sort of did this podcast even, like, you know, a year and a bit since we met, and, like, I'm doing so much and I think it's doing, like, a big difference. And yeah, I can't wait for everything else. It's just yeah, a lot of work right now, but I'm really enjoying it. So, I'm really well, thank you.Corey: Normally, I like to introduce people by giving their job title and the company in which they work because again, that's a big deal for an awful lot of people. But a year ago, you were independent. And now you still are. And back when I was doing my own consulting independently, it felt very weird to do that, so I'm just going to call you the Ted Lasso of cloud at this point.Aerin: [laugh].Corey: You've got the mustache, you've got the, I would say, obnoxiously sunny disposition. It's really, there's a certain affinity right there. So, there we go. I feel like that is the best descriptor for what you have become.Aerin: I—do know what, I only just watched Ted Lasso over Christmas and I really found it so motivational in some ways because wow, like, it's not just who we'd want to be in a lot of ways? And I think, you know, for the work that I do, which is focused on sustainability, like, I want to present a positive future, I want to encourage people to achieve more and collaborate, and yeah, basically work on all these problems that we need to be worked on. And yeah, I think that's [laugh] [crosstalk 00:02:02]—Corey: One of the challenges of talking to you sometimes is you talk about these depressing things, but there's such a—you take such an upbeat, positive approach to it that I, by comparison, invariably come away from our conversations during, like, I'm Surly McBastard over here.Aerin: [laugh]. Yeah, you can be the bad cop of cloud computing and I'll try and be the good cop. Do you know, you say that the stuff I talk about is depressing, and it is true and people do worry about climate change. Like I did an online conference recently, it's focused on FinOps, and we had a survey, “Do you worry about climate change?” 70% of the people that responded said they worry about it.So, we all know, it's something we worry about and we care about. And, you know, I guess what I'm really trying to do is encourage people to care a bit more and start taking action and look after yourself. Because you know, when you do start taking action towards it, when you join those communities that are also working on it, it is good, it is helpful. And, you know, I've gone through some ups and downs and some of this, like, just do I throw in the towel because no one cares about it? Like, we spoke last year; I had attended re:Invent for the first time.This year, I was able to speak at re:Invent. So, I did a talk on being ethical in tech. And it was fun, it was good. I enjoyed what I delivered, but I had about 35 people sign up to that. I'm pretty sure if I talked about serverless or the next Web3 blockchain product, I would have got hundreds more. But what I'm starting to realize is that I think people just aren't ready to, sort of, want to do this yet. And yeah, I'm hoping that'll change.Corey: Let's first talk about, I guess, something that is more temporally pressing than some other things. Not that it is more important than climate change, mind you, but it feels like it's on a shorter timeline which is, relatively soon after this recording, there is a conference that you are kicking off called The State of Open. Ajar, Aerin. The State of Open is ajar. What is this conference? Is it in person? Is it virtual? Is it something where you and three friends are going to show up and basically talk to each other? How big? How small? What is it? What's it about? Tell me more, please. I'm riveted.Aerin: So, State of Open conference is a conference that's been in the works now for maybe about two weeks, a little bit longer in the planning, but the work we've been putting in over the last two weeks. It'll be on the seventh and eighth of February in London as a physical event in the QEII Conference Centre, but it will also be available online. And you know, when we talk about the State of Open, it's that question: what is the State of Open? The state of open-source, the state of open hardware, and the state of open data. And it is going to be probably the first and hopefully the biggest open-source conference in the UK.We already have over 100 confirmed guest speakers from Jimmy Wales, the co-founder of Wikipedia, to many of our great guests and headliners who haven't even announced yet for the plenary. So, I'm really excited. And the reason why I wanted to get involved with this is because one of the coolest things about this conference—compared to some others like re:Invent, for example—is that sustainability and diversity run through every single thing that we do. So, as the content director, I reviewed every single CFP for both of these things. I mean, you couldn't get a better person than someone like me, who's the queer person who won't shut up about sustainability to sort of do this thing.So, you know, I looked after those scorings for the CFPs in support of the CFP chairs. And now, as I'm working with those individual speakers on their content and making sure that diversity is included in the content. It's not just the diversity of the speaker, for example it's, who were the other people whose voice you're raising? What other people if you worked on this? Are there anyone that you've mentored, like, you know, actually, you know, let's have this as a wider conversation?Corey: Thank God. I thought you were about to say diversity of thought, and I was about to reach through the screen to strangle you.Aerin: [laugh]. No, no. I mean, we're doing really well, so of the announced speakers online, we are 40% non-male and about 18% non-white, which to be honest, for a fair sheer conference, when we didn't really do that much to specifically call this out, but I would probably raise this to Amanda Brock, who is the CEO of OpenUK, you know, she has built a community in the UK and around the world over the last few years which has been putting women forward and building these links. And that's why we've had such a great response for our first-year conferences, the work she's put in. It's hard.Like, this isn't easy. You know, we've had to do a lot of work to make sure that it is representative, at least better than other conferences, at least. So, I'm really excited. And like, there's so much, like, open-source is probably going to be the thing that saves the world. If we're going to end up looking at two different futures with monopolies and closed systems and all the money going towards cloud providers versus a fair and equitable society, open-source is the thing that's going to get us closer to that. So yeah, this conference will be a great event.Corey: Is it all in person? Is it being live-streamed as well? What is the deal here?Aerin: So, in person, we have loads of different things going on, but what will be streamed online if you sign up for virtual ticket is five different tracks. So, our platform engineering track, our security track, government law and policy, open data, and open hardware. And of course, the keynote and plenaries. But one of the things I'm also really proud about this conference is that we're really focusing on the developer experience, like, you know, what is your experience at the conference? So, we also have an unconference, we have a sub-conference run by Sustain OSS focused on workshops related to climate change and sustainability.We have loads of developer experience halls in the event itself. And throughout the day, over the two days, we have two one-hour blocks with no speaking content at all so that we can really make sure that people have that hardware track and are out there meeting each other and having a good time. And obviously, of course, like any good conference, the all-hands party on the first night. So, it really is a conference that's doing things differently from diversity to sustainability to that experience. So, it's awesome.Corey: One of the challenges that I've seen historically around things aiming at the idea of open conferences—and when we talk open-source, et cetera, et cetera—open' seems like it is a direction parallel to, we haven't any money, where it's, “Yes, we're a free software foundation,” and it turns out conferences themselves are not free. And you wind up with a whole bunch of folks showing up to it who are, in many cases, around the fringes of things. There are individual hobbyists who are very passionate about a thing but do not have the position in the corporate world. I'm looking through the lengthy list of speakers you have here and that is very much not this. These are serious people at serious companies. Not that there are not folks who are individual practitioners and passionate advocates and hobbyists than the rest. This is, by virtually any way you look at it, a remarkably diverse conference.Aerin: Mmm. You know, you are right about, like, that problem in open-source. It's like, you know, we look at open and whether we want to do open and we just go, “Well, it won't make me any money. I can't do that. I don't have the time. I need to bring in some money.”And one of the really unique things, again, about this conference is—I have not even mentioned it yet—we have an entrepreneurship room. So, we have 20 tables filled with entrepreneurs and CEOs and founders of open-source companies throughout the two days where you can book in time to sit at that table and have conversations with them. Ask them the questions that you want to ask about, whether it's something that you want to work on, or a company you want to found, and you'll be able to get that time. I had a very similar experience in some ways. It was re:Invent.I was a peer talk expert and you know, I had 15 or so conversations with some really interesting people just because they were able put that time in and they were able to find me on the website. So, that's something we are replicating to get those 20 also entrepreneurs and co-founders out to everyone else. They want to be able to help you and support you.Corey: That is an excellent segue if I do say so myself. Let's talk about re:Invent. It's the one time of the year you and I get to spend time in the same room. One thing that I got wrong is that I overbooked myself as I often do, and I didn't have time to do anything on their peer talk expert program, which is, you more or less a way that any rando can book time to sit down and chat with you. Now, in my case, I have assassination concerns because it turns out Amazon employees can read that thing too and some of them might work on billing. One wonders.So yeah, I have to be a little careful for personal reasons but for most people, it's a non-issue. I didn't get as much time as I wanted to talk to folks in the community. That is not going to repeat itself at the end of this year. But what was your take on re:Invent, because I was in meetings for most of them?Aerin: So, comparing this re:Invent to the re:Invent I went to, my first re:Invent when we met in 2021, you know, that was the re:Invent that inspired me to get into sustainability. They'd announced stuff to do with the shared responsibility model. A few months later, they released their carbon calculator, and I was like, “Yeah, this is the problem. This is the thing I want to work on and it will make me happy.” And a lot of that goes into, you know, finding a passion that keeps me motivated when things aren't that great.When maybe not a lot of money is coming in, at least I know, I'm doing everything I can to help save the world. So, re:Invent 2021 really inspired me to get involved with sustainability. When I look at re:Invent 2022, you might have Adam Selipsky on the main stage saying that sustainability is the problem of our generation, but that is just talk and bluster compared to what they were putting out in terms of content and their experience of, like, let's say the sustainability—I don't know what to call it—tiny little square in the back of the MGM Grand compared to the paid hall in the expo. Like, you know, that's the sort of thing where you can already see the prioritization of money. Let's put the biggest sponsors and all the money that we can bring it in the big hall where everyone is, and then put the thing we care about the most, apparently—sustainability—in the back of the MGM.And that in itself was annoying, but then you get there in the content, and it was like a massive Rivian van, like, an advert for, “Oh, Amazon has done all this to electrify Rivian and deliver you Prime.” But where was the people working on sustainability in the cloud? You know, we had a couple of teams who were talking about the customer carbon footprint tool, but there was just not much. And I spoke to a lot of people and they were saying similar things, like, “Where are the announcements? Where are the actual interesting things?” Rather than just—which is kind of what I'm starting to realize is that a lot of the conversations about sustainability is about selling yourself as sustainable.Use me rather than my competitors because we're 88% more, kind of, carbon neutral when it comes to traditional data centers, not because we are really going to solve these problems. And not to say that Amazon isn't doing innovative, amazing things that no one else can't do, because that is true, and cloud as part of the solution, but you know, sustainability shouldn't be about making more sales and growing your business, it should be about making the world a better place, not just in terms of carbon emissions, but you know, our life, the tech that we can access. Three billion people on this planet have never accessed the internet. And as we continue to grow all of our services like AI and machine learning and new Web3, bloody managed services come online, that's going to be more carbon, more compute power going towards the already rich and the already westernized people, rather than solving the problems we need to solve in the face of climate change.So, I was a little bit disappointed. And I did put a tweet thread out about it afterwards. And I just hope it can be different next year and I hope more people will start to ask for this. And that also what I'm starting to realize is that until more Amazon customers put this as their number one priority and say, “I'm not going to do business with you because of this issue,” or, you know, “This is what we really care about,” they're not going to make a change. Unless it starts to impact their bottom lines and people start to choose other cloud providers, they're not going to prioritize it.And I think up until this point, we're not seeing that from customers. We're kind of getting some people like me shouting about it, but across the board, sustainability isn't the number one priority right now. It's, like what Amazon says, security or resiliency or something else.Corey: And I think that, at least from where I set, the challenge is that if you asked me what I got out of re:Invent, and what the conversations I had—going into it, what are my expectations, and what do I hope to get and how's it going to end up, and then you ask you that same question—though maybe you are a poor example of this—and then you ask someone who works out as an engineer at a company that uses AWS and their two or three years into their career, why don't you talk to a manager or director or someone else? And the problem is if you start polling the entire audience, you'll find that this becomes—you're going to wind up with 20 different answers, at least. The conference doesn't seem like it has any idea of what it wants to be and to whom and in that vacuum, it tries to be all things to all people. And surprise, just like the shooting multifunction printer some of us have in our homes, it doesn't do well with any of those things because it's trying to stand in too many worlds at the same time.Aerin: You know, let's not, like, look at this from a way that you know, re:Invent is crap and, like, do all the work that everyone puts it is wasted because it is a really great event for a lot of different things for a lot of different people. And to be honest, the work that the Amazon staff put into it is pretty out of this world. I feel sorry though because you know, the rush for AWS sell more and do this massive event, they put people through the grinder. And I feel like, I don't know, we could see the cracks in some of that, the way that works. But, you know, there's so many people that I speak to who were like, “Yeah, I'm definitely not going again. I'm not even going to go anywhere near submitting a talk.”And, sort of, the thing is, like, I can imagine if the conference was something different; it was focused at sustainability at number one, it was about making the world a better place from everything that they do, it was about bringing diverse communities together. Like, you know, bringing these things up the list would make the whole thing a lot better. And to be honest, it would probably make it a lot more enjoyable [laugh] for the Amazon staff who end up talking at it. Because, you know, I guess it can feel a bit soulless over time is all you're doing is making money for someone else and selling more things. And, yeah, I think there's a lot more… different things we can do and a lot more things we can talk about if people just start to talk about, like you know, if you care about this as well and you work at Amazon, then start saying that as well.It'll really make a difference if you say we want re:Invent to look different. I mean, even Amazon staff, [laugh] and we've not even mentioned this one because I got Covid straight after re:Invent, nine days and staring at a wall in hotel room in Vegas was not my idea of a good time post-conference. So, that was a horrible, horrible experience. But, you know, I've had people call it re:Infect. Like, where are the Covid support?Like, there was hardly any conversation about that. It was sort of like, “Don't mention it because oh, s”—whatever else. But imagine if you just did something a little bit differently to look like you care about your customers. Just say, “We recommend people mask or take a test,” or even provide tests and masks. Like, even if it's not mandatory, they could have done a lot more to make it safer for everyone. Because, yeah, imagine having the reputation of re:Infect rather than re:Invent?Corey: I can only imagine how that would play out.Aerin: Only imagine.Corey: Yeah, it's it feels like we're all collectively decided to pretend that the pandemic is over. Because yeah, that's a bummer. I don't want to think about it. You know, kind of like we approach climate change.Aerin: Yeah. At the end of the day, like, and I keep coming across this more and more, you know, my thinking has changed over the last year because, like, you know, initially it was like a hyperactive puppy. Why are we caring about this? Like, yeah, if I say it, people will come, but the reality is, we have to blinker ourselves in order to deal with a lot of this stuff. We can't always worry about all of this stuff all of the time. And that's fine. That's acceptable. We do that in so many different parts of our life.But there comes to a point when you kind of think, “How much do I care about this?” And for a lot of people, it's because they have kids. Like, anyone who has kids right now must have to think, “Wow, what's the future going to look like?” And if you worry about what the future is going to look like, make sure you're taking steps to make the world a better place and make it the future you want it to look like. You know, I made the decision a long time ago not to have kids because I don't think I'd want to bring anyone into the world on what it might actually end up being, but you know, when I speak to people who are older in the 60s and they're like, “Oh, you've got 100 years. You don't need to worry about it.” Like, “Maybe you can say that because you're closer to dying than I am.” But yeah, I have to worry about this now because I'll still be eighty when all this shit is kicking off [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Strata. Are you struggling to keep up with the demands of managing and securing identity in your distributed enterprise IT environment? You're not alone, but you shouldn't let that hold you back. With Strata's Identity Orchestration Platform, you can secure all your apps on any cloud with any IDP, so your IT teams will never have to refactor for identity again. Imagine modernizing app identity in minutes instead of months, deploying passwordless on any tricky old app, and achieving business resilience with always-on identity, all from one lightweight and flexible platform.Want to see it in action? Share your identity challenge with them on a discovery call and they'll hook you up with a complimentary pair of AirPods Pro. Don't miss out, visit Strata.io/ScreamingCloud. That's Strata dot io slash ScreamingCloud.Corey: That I guess is one of the big fears I have—and I think it's somewhat unfounded—is that every year starts to look too much like the year before it. Because it's one of those ideas where we start to see the pace of innovation is slowing at AWS—and I'm not saying that to piss people at Amazon off and have them come after me with pitchforks and torches again—but they're not launching new services at the rate they once did, which is good for customers, but it starts to feel like oh, have we hit peak cloud this is what it's going to look like? Absolutely not. I don't get the sense that the world is like, “Well, everything's been invented. Time to shut down the patent office,” anytime soon.And in the short term, it feels like oh, there's not a lot exciting going on, but you look back the last five years even and look at how far we've come even in that period of time and—what is it? “The days are long, but the years are short.” It becomes a very macro thing of as things ebb and flow, you start to see the differences but the micro basis on a year-to-year perspective, it seems harder to detect. So longer term, I think we're going to see what the story looks like. And it's going to be satisfying one. Just right now, it's like, well, this wasn't as entertaining as I would have hoped, so I'm annoyed. Which I am because it wasn't, but that's not the biggest problem in the world.Aerin: It's not. And, you know, you look at okay, cool, there wasn't all these new flashy services. There was a few things are announced, I mean, hopefully that are going to contribute towards climate change. One of them is called AWS Supply Chain. And the irony of seeing sort of like AWS Supply Chain where a company that already has issues with data and conversations around competition, saying to everyone, “Hey, trust us and give all of your supply chain information and put it into one of our AWS products,” while at the same time their customer carbon footprint tool won't even show the full scope for their emissions of their own supply chain is not lost on me.And you do say, “Maybe we should start seeing things at a macro level,” but unless Amazon and other cloud hyperscalers start pulling the finger out and showing us how they have got a vision between now and 2040, and now in 2050, of how they're going to get there, it kind of just feels like they're saying, “It'll all be fine as long as we continue to grow, as long as we keep sucking up the market.” And, you know, an interesting thing that just kicked off in the UK back in November was the Competition and Markets Authority have started an investigation into the cloud providers on how they are basically sucking up all these markets, and how the growth of things that are not hyperscale is going. So, in the UK, the percentage of cloud has obviously gone up—more and more cloud spending has gone up—but kind of usage across non-hyperscalers has gone down over that same period. And they really are at risk of sucking up the world. Like, I have got involved in a lot of different things.I'm an AWS community builder; like, I do promote AWS. And, you know, the reason why I promote cloud, for example is serverless. We need serverless as the way we run our IT because that's the only way we'll do things like time shifting or demand shifting. So, when we look at renewable energy on the grid if that really high, the wind is blowing and the sun is shining, we want more workloads to be running then and when they're tiny, and they're [unintelligible 00:21:03], and what's the call it serverless generally, uh—Corey: Hype?Aerin: Function as a Code?Corey: Function—yeah, Function as a Service and all kinds of other nonsense. But I have to ask, when you're talking about serverless, in this context, is a necessary prerequisite of serverless that scale to zero when it's [unintelligible 00:21:19].Aerin: [laugh]. I kind of go back to marketing. What Amazon releasing these days when it relates to serverless that isn't just marketing and saying, “Oh, it's serverless.” Because yeah, there was a few products this year that is not scaled to zero is it? It's a 100-pound minimum. And when you're looking at number of accounts that you have, that can add up really quickly and it excludes people from using it.Corey: It's worse than that because it's not number of accounts. I consider DynamoDB to be serverless, by any definition of the term. Because it is. And what I like about it is I can have a separate table for every developer, for every service or microservice or project that they have, and in fact, each branch can have its own stuff like that. I look at some of the stuff that I build with multi-branch testing and whatnot, and, “Oh, wow. That would cost more than the engineer if they were to do that with some of the serverless offerings that AWS has put out.”Which makes that entire philosophy a complete non-starter, which means that invariably as soon as you start developing down that path, you are making significant trade-offs. That's just from a economics slash developer ergonomics slash best practices point of view. But there's a sustainability story to it as well.Aerin: Yeah. I mean, this sustainability thing is like, if you're not going to encourage this new way of working, like, if you're not going to move everyone to this point of view and this is how we need to do things, then you kind of just propagating the old world, putting it into your data center. For every managed service that VMware migrated piece of crap, just that land in the cloud, it's not making a real difference in the world because that's still going to exist. And we mentioned this just before the podcast and, you know, a lot of focus these days and for a lot of people is, “Okay, green energy is the problem. We need to solve green energy.”And Amazon is the biggest purchaser of power purchase agreements in renewable energy around the world, more than most governments. Or I think that the biggest corporate purchaser of it anyway. And that all might sound great, like, “Oh, the cloud is going to solve this problem for me and Amazon is going to solve it for me even better because they're bigger.” But at the end of the day, when we think about a data center, it exists in the real world.It's made of concrete. You know, when you pour concrete and when you make concrete, it releases CO2. It's got racks of servers that all are running. So, those individual servers had to be made by whoever it is in Asia or mined from rare earth metals and end up in the supply chain and then transported into the data centers in us-east-1. And then things go wrong. You have to repair you have to replace and you have to maintain them.Unless we get these circular economies going in a closed system, we can't just continue to grow like this. Because carbon emissions related to Scope 3, all those things I've just been talking about, basically anything that isn't the energy, is about 80 to 90% of all the carbon emissions. So, when Amazon says, “Oh, we're going to go green and get energy done by 2030”—which is seven years away—they've then got ten years to solve 90% of the problem. And we cannot all just continue to grow and think of tech as neutral and better for the world if we still got that 90% problem, which we do right now. And it really frustrates me when you look at the world and the way we've jumped on technology just go on, “Oh, it must be good.”Like Bitcoin, for example. Bitcoin has released 200 million metric tons of CO2 since its inception. And for something that is basically a glorified Ponzi scheme, I can't see how that is making the world a better place. So, when cloud providers are making managed services for Web3 and for blockchain, and they're selling more and more AI and machine learning, basically so they can keep on selling GPU access, I do worry about whether our path to infinite growth with all of these hyperscalers is probably the wrong way of looking at things. So, linking back to, you know, the conference, open-source and, you know, thinking about things differently is really important in tech right now.And not just for your own well-being and being able to sleep at night, but this is how we're going to solve our problems. When all companies on the planet want people to be sustainable and we have to start tackling this because there's a financial cost related to it, then you're going to be in the vogue. If you're really good developer, thinking about things differently can be efficient, then yeah, you're the developer that's going to win in the future. You might be assisted by ChatGPT three or whatever else, but yeah, sustainability and efficiency can really be the number one priority because it's a win, win, win. We save the world, we make ourselves better, we sleep better at night, and you just become a better developer.I keep monologuing at this point, but you know, when it comes to stuff like games design, we look at things like Quake and Pokemon and all these things when there's like, “How did they get these amazing games and these amazing experiences in such small sizes,” they had boundaries. They had boundaries to innovate within because they had to. They couldn't release the game if they couldn't fit into the cartridge, therefore, they made it work. When the cloud is sold as infinitely scalable and horizontally scalable and no one needs to worry about this stuff because you can get your credit card out, people stop caring about being innovative and being more efficient. So yeah, let's get some more boundaries in the cloud.Corey: What I find that is super helpful, has been, like, if I can, like, descri—like, Instagram is down. Describe your lunch to me style meme description, like, the epic handshake where you have two people clasping hands, and one side is labeled in this case, ‘sustainability advocates,' and the other side should be labeled ‘cloud economists,' and in the middle, it's, “Turn that shit off.” Because it's not burning carbon if it's not running, and it's not costing you anything—ideally—if it's not running, so it's one of those ideas where we meet in the middle. And that's important, not just because it makes both of us independently happy because it's both good for the world and you'll get companies on board with this because, “Wait. We can do this thing and it saves us money?” Suddenly, you're getting them aligned because that is their religion.If companies could be said to have a religion, it is money. That's the way it works. So, you have to make it worth money for them to do the right thing or you're always going to be swimming upstream like a depressed salmon.Aerin: I mean, look at why [unintelligible 00:27:11] security is near the top: because there's so many big fines related to security breaches. It will cost them money not to be secure. Right now, it doesn't cost companies money to be inefficient or to release all this carbon, so they get away with it or they choose to do it. And I think that's going to change. We see in regulations across you're coming out.So, you know, if you work for a big multinational that operates in Europe, by next year, you'll have to report on all of your Scope 3 carbon emissions. If you're a customer of AWS right now, you have no ability to do that. So, you know, this is going to be crunch time over the next 18 months to two years for a lot of big businesses, for Amazon and the other hyperscalers, to really start demonstrating that they can do this. And I guess that's my big push. And, you know, I want to work with anyone, and it's funny because I have been running this business for about, you know, a couple of years now, it's been going really well, I did my podcast, I'm on this path.But I did, last year, take some time, and I applied into AWS. And you know, I was like, “Okay, maybe I'll apply for this big tech company and help Amazon out.” And because I'll take that salary and I'll do something really good with it afterwards, I'll do my time for three years and attend re:Invent and deliver 12 talks and never sleep, but you know, at the end of it, I'll say, “Okay, I've done that and now I can do something really good.” Unfortunately, I didn't get the role—or fortunately—but you know, when I applied for that role, what I said to them is, “I really care about sustainability. I want to make the world a better place. I want to help your customers be more sustainable.”And they didn't want me to join. So, I'm just going to continue doing that but from the outside. And whether that means working with politicians or developers or anyone else to try and make the world better and to kind of help fight against climate change, then, yeah, that's definitely what I'm doing.Corey: So, one last question before we wind up calling it an episode. How do we get there? What is the best next step that folks can take? Because it's easy to look at this as a grand problem and realize it's too big to solve. Well, great. You don't need to solve the entire problem. You need take the first step. What is that first step?Aerin: Individuals, I would say it's just realizing that you do care about it and you want to take action. And you're going to say to yourself, “Even if I do little things, I'm going to move forward towards that point.” So, if that is being a more sustainable engineer or getting more conversations about climate change or even just doing other things in your community to make the world a better place than it is, taking that action. But one thing that I can definitely help about and talk a bit more of is that at the conference itself, I'll be running a panel with some great experts called the, “Next Generation of Cloud Education.” So, I really think we need to—like I said earlier in the podcast—to think differently about the cloud and IT.So, I am doing this panel and I'm bringing together someone like Simon Wardley to help people do Wardley Mapping. Like, that is a tool that allows you to see the landscape that you're operating in. You know, if you use that sort of tool to understand the real-world impact of what you're doing, then you can start caring about it a bit more. I'm bringing in somebody called Anne Currie, who is a tech ethicist and speaker and lecturer, and she's actually written some [laugh] really great nonfiction books, which I'd recommend everyone reads. It starts with Utopia Five.And that's about asking, “Well, is this ethical? Can we continue to do these things?” Can't—talks about things about sustainability. If it's not sustainable for everyone, it's not ethical. So, when I mentioned 3 billion people currently don't use the internet, it's like, can we continue to just keep on doing things the same way?And then John Booth, who is a data center expert, to help us really understand what the reality is on the ground. What are these data centers really look like? And then Amanda Brock, from OpenUK in the conference will joining as well to talk about, kind of, open-source and how we can make the world kind of a better place by getting involved in these communities. So, that'll be a really great panel.But what I'm also doing is releasing this as an online course. So, for people who want to get involved, it will be very intimate, about 15 seats on each core, so three weeks for you to actually work and talk directly with some of these experts and me to figure out what you want to do in the world of climate change and how you can take those first steps. So, it'll be a journey that even starts with an ecotherapist to help us deal with climate grief and wonder about the things we can do as individuals to feel better ourselves and be happier. So, I think that'd be a really great thing for a lot of people. And, yeah, not only that, but… it'll be great for you, but it also goes towards making the world a better place.So, 50% of the course fees will be donated, 25%, to charity, and 25% supporting open-source projects. So, I think it kind of just win, win, win. And that's the story of sustainability in general. It's a win, win, win for everyone. If you start seeing the world through a lens of sustainability, you'll save money, you'll sleep better at night, you'll get involved with some really great communities, and meet some really great people who care about this as well. And yeah, it'll be a brighter future.Corey: If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Aerin: So, if you want to learn more about what I'm up to, I'm on Twitter under @aerincloud, that A-E-R-I-N cloud. And then you can also find me on LinkedIn. But I also run my own podcast that was inspired by Corey, called Public Cloud for Public Good talking about cloud sustainability and how to make the world a better place for the use of public cloud services.Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:32:32]. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it, as always.Aerin: Thank you.Corey: Aerin Booth, the Ted Lasso of cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry and insulting comment that I will immediately scale to zero in true serverless fashion.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

To The Point - Cybersecurity
Time for the Cyber Walls to Come Down with Eric Trexler

To The Point - Cybersecurity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 53:51


This week we welcome back to the podcast former co-host Eric Trexler, Senior Vice President, U.S. Public Sector at Palo Alto Networks. We examine some hot security topics for the year ahead including growing prevalence of AI/ML automation used for preventative security, continued evolution and impact of ransomware (Did you know the average dwell time is 28 days?!), increasing adoption of people/process/technology approaches, industry consolidation, state and local cybergrants coming online and the opportunities those open up, Zero Trust pros and cons, attack surface management and what's been learned about cyberwarfare from the Ukraine conflict.   Eric Trexler, Senior Vice President, US Public Sector, Palo Alto Networks Eric joined Palo Alto Networks in September of 2022 and oversees the US Public Sector business. Most recently, Eric Trexler was the Vice President of Sales, Global Governments and Critical Infrastructure at Forcepoint. Eric was responsible for Global Go To Market operations to include all components of sales, sales enablement, and field and product marketing. While at Forcepoint, Eric's team doubled the size of the business over a five year period to nearly $400M in annual sales and strategically moved a large part of the business to the Public Cloud. Eric has nearly 30 years of experience in technology across the public and private sectors, including Department of Defense, Civilian, and Intelligence communities, along with International governments. Eric has combined his sales savvy and technical skills with practical knowledge of leadership fundamentals to solve global cybersecurity issues for his customers and the business. Prior to Forcepoint, Eric was the executive director for Civilian and National Security Programs at McAfee (formerly Intel Security). Earlier in his career, Eric worked at [Salesforce.com](http://Salesforce.com "‌"), EMC, and Sybase. He spent four years as an Airborne Ranger with the U.S. Army specializing in communications. Eric holds a Master's Degree in Business Administration and a Bachelor's of Science in Marketing from the University of Maryland at College Park. He was the co-host of the award winning “To The Point Cybersecurity” podcast with over 200 weekly episodes covering various cybersecurity topics, and he regularly writes bylines for cybersecurity and national periodicals. For links and resources discussed in this episode, please visit our show notes at https://www.forcepoint.com/govpodcast/e216

Cloud Do You Do?
SPCSS: Public cloud and cybersecurity at state institutions

Cloud Do You Do?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 49:15


We dived deep into cloud technology and cybersecurity topics with the team from our Czech public sector customer The State Treasury Shared Services Center (or hereinafter the SPCSS). SPCSS provides information technology services and specialises in the operation of the state's critical infrastructure. We talked with Jiří Krula (CTO) and Tomáš Šimeček (Head of UNIX/LINUX Technology) about the multi-cloud strategy, tech-trends they see and leverage, cloud and application operations and their security. SPCSS is a state-owned company which operates a national data centre, ensures the operation of state management applications and provides various ICT services that are intended solely for state administration entities with a high emphasis on cyber security.

CIO Exchange Podcast
The Challenge of Cloud Compliance and Security - Guest: Hillery Hunter, GM and CTO at IBM Cloud

CIO Exchange Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 24:39


Understanding the use of cloud, its context, and how things are quickly changing is top of mind for many companies today. Safety of information and management of risks are paramount when trying to keep up with the changes, while also making sure to not slow down important and necessary workflows. When it comes to compliance and security, Hillery Hunter has visibility across the challenges and success of some of the largest companies across multiple industries.In this episode, we interview the GM of Industry Clouds and Solutions and  CTO at IBM Cloud to learn more about storing sensitive data in the cloud. Hillery explains how radical cloud models can work to your advantage, including co-design and approaching compliance as a group. During the discussion, she names some challenges of cloud adoption, then describes how to overcome those barriers. Hillery also describes the best cloud adoption practices she's seen over the course of her career, and why these transformations are so important to the success of a business. ---------Key Quotes:“It's not just whether or not somebody has a cloud certification, right? It's the context in which they're doing their work and it's the skills of the CISO organization, it's the skill of the risk management organization, et cetera, in understanding the cloud context and how all those things are changing and have to be measured differently as well.”“Make sure that public cloud is an appropriate landing place even for the most sensitive data.  It is possible to take this security and compliance and put it into structured programs and ways of protecting things on the cloud. So that all of these inherent barriers to adoption can be overcome.”“When the metric is too narrow, and placed only on the IT organization for the outcomes of a cloud migration, you miss the opportunity to be talking about end to end value creation… When you're doing that, then everyone understands that the cloud migration and digital transformation is in service of a higher level objective, and it's not just trying to save money on the HR system or something else like that.”“When you make a public cloud choice, industry cloud contextualizes the requirements of that industry. It includes things like security and compliance, and enables the public cloud to be a safe enough and compliant enough place for you to grab other content that lives there. It also allows you to move your data there and trust that you are still upholding your responsibilities.”---------Time stamps:2:00 Barriers to cloud adoption3:00 Managing security and controls4:50 Cloud migration pitfalls5:20 Cloud adoption can be transformative7:30 Committees can lead a successful cloud deployment9:50 Creating an objective for cloud adoption11:20 Making the cloud a safe space for data13:20 Dealing with disruptors15:15 Exploring what's available in cloud17:00 Establishing trust in the industry19:40 Taking it to the board20:40 Future opportunities for cloud---------Links:Hillery Hunter on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hillery-hunter-97962a14/CIO Exchange on Twitter: https://twitter.com/vmwcioexchangeYadin Porter de León on Twitter: https://twitter.com/porterdeleon [Subscribe to the Podcast] On Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cio-exchange-podcast/id1498290907 For more podcasts, video and in-depth research go to https://www.vmware.com/cio---------Keywords: cio, cio exchange, VMware, innovation, leadership, DevOps, Developer, operations, IT, information technology, business, technology, cto, cloud, public cloud, privacy, security, cloud adoption

InfosecTrain
Cloud Deployment Model In Cloud Computing | Public Cloud vs Private Cloud vs Hybrid Cloud

InfosecTrain

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 10:47


This video on "Public vs Private vs Hybrid Cloud" will help you understand the major differences between these different type of cloud. Thank you for watching this video, For more details or free demo with out expert write into us at sales@infosectrain.com Subscribe to our channel to get video updates. Hit the subscribe button above. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Infosectrain/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Infosec_Train LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/infosec-train/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/infosectrain/ Telegram: https://t.me/infosectrains

InfosecTrain
Cloud Service and Deployment Models | Cloud Computing Deployment Models | InfosecTrain

InfosecTrain

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 16:36


Cloud provides its offerings in three service models and four deployment models. The three service models are SaaS (Software as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service) and IaaS (Infrastructure as s Service). The four deployment models are Public Cloud, Private Cloud, Hybrid Cloud and Community Cloud. Learn more about the service and deployment models of cloud. Thank you for watching this video, For more details or free demo with out expert write into us at sales@infosectrain.com Subscribe to our channel to get video updates. Hit the subscribe button above. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Infosectrain/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Infosec_Train LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/infosec-train/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/infosectrain/ Telegram: https://t.me/infosectrains

InfosecTrain
Cloud Deployment Models : Public Cloud vs Private Cloud vs Hybrid Cloud

InfosecTrain

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 9:01


A cloud deployment model is established based on who controls the infrastructure needed for the deployment and where it is located. Each cloud deployment option addresses a different organizational requirement and comes with a unique value proposition and set of prices. One of the most crucial cloud deployment decisions you will make is the deployment model to use. Learn more about the different cloud deployment models: Public, Private and Hybrid. Thank you for watching this video, For more details or free demo with out expert write into us at sales@infosectrain.com Subscribe to our channel to get video updates. Hit the subscribe button above. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Infosectrain/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Infosec_Train LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/infosec-train/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/infosectrain/ Telegram: https://t.me/infosectrains

Screaming in the Cloud
Crafting a Modern Data Protection Strategy with Sam Nicholls

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 37:26


About SamSam Nicholls: Veeam's Director of Public Cloud Product Marketing, with 10+ years of sales, alliance management and product marketing experience in IT. Sam has evolved from his on-premises storage days and is now laser-focused on spreading the word about cloud-native backup and recovery, packing in thousands of viewers on his webinars, blogs and webpages.Links Referenced: Veeam AWS Backup: https://www.veeam.com/aws-backup.html Veeam: https://veeam.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Chronosphere. Tired of observability costs going up every year without getting additional value? Or being locked in to a vendor due to proprietary data collection, querying and visualization? Modern day, containerized environments require a new kind of observability technology that accounts for the massive increase in scale and attendant cost of data. With Chronosphere, choose where and how your data is routed and stored, query it easily, and get better context and control. 100% open source compatibility means that no matter what your setup is, they can help. Learn how Chronosphere provides complete and real-time insight into ECS, EKS, and your microservices, whereever they may be at snark.cloud/chronosphere That's snark.cloud/chronosphere Corey: This episode is brought to us by our friends at Pinecone. They believe that all anyone really wants is to be understood, and that includes your users. AI models combined with the Pinecone vector database let your applications understand and act on what your users want… without making them spell it out. Make your search application find results by meaning instead of just keywords, your personalization system make picks based on relevance instead of just tags, and your security applications match threats by resemblance instead of just regular expressions. Pinecone provides the cloud infrastructure that makes this easy, fast, and scalable. Thanks to my friends at Pinecone for sponsoring this episode. Visit Pinecone.io to understand more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted guest episode is brought to us by and sponsored by our friends over at Veeam. And as a part of that, they have thrown one of their own to the proverbial lion. My guest today is Sam Nicholls, Director of Public Cloud over at Veeam. Sam, thank you for joining me.Sam: Hey. Thanks for having me, Corey, and thanks for everyone joining and listening in. I do know that I've been thrown into the lion's den, and I am [laugh] hopefully well-prepared to answer anything and everything that Corey throws my way. Fingers crossed. [laugh].Corey: I don't think there's too much room for criticizing here, to be direct. I mean, Veeam is a company that is solidly and thoroughly built around a problem that absolutely no one cares about. I mean, what could possibly be wrong with that? You do backups; which no one ever cares about. Restores, on the other hand, people care very much about restores. And that's when they learn, “Oh, I really should have cared about backups at any point prior to 20 minutes ago.”Sam: Yeah, it's a great point. It's kind of like taxes and insurance. It's almost like, you know, something that you have to do that you don't necessarily want to do, but when push comes to shove, and something's burning down, a file has been deleted, someone's made their way into your account and, you know, running a right mess within there, that's when you really, kind of, care about what you mentioned, which is the recovery piece, the speed of recovery, the reliability of recovery.Corey: It's been over a decade, and I'm still sore about losing my email archives from 2006 to 2009. There's no way to get it back. I ran my own mail server; it was an iPhone setting that said, “Oh, yeah, automatically delete everything in your trash folder—or archive folder—after 30 days.” It was just a weird default setting back in that era. I didn't realize it was doing that. Yeah, painful stuff.And we learned the hard way in some of these cases. Not that I really have much need for email from that era of my life, but every once in a while it still bugs me. Which gets speaks to the point that the people who are the most fanatical about backing things up are the people who have been burned by not having a backup. And I'm fortunate in that it wasn't someone else's data with which I had been entrusted that really cemented that lesson for me.Sam: Yeah, yeah. It's a good point. I could remember a few years ago, my wife migrated a very aging, polycarbonate white Mac to one of the shiny new aluminum ones and thought everything was good—Corey: As the white polycarbonate Mac becomes yellow, then yeah, all right, you know, it's time to replace it. Yeah. So yeah, so she wiped the drive, and what happened?Sam: That was her moment where she learned the value and importance of backup unless she backs everything up now. I fortunately have never gone through it. But I'm employed by a backup vendor and that's why I care about it. But it's incredibly important to have, of course.Corey: Oh, yes. My spouse has many wonderful qualities, but one that drives me slightly nuts is she's something of a digital packrat where her hard drives on her laptop will periodically fill up. And I used to take the approach of oh, you can be more efficient and do the rest. And I realized no, telling other people they're doing it wrong is generally poor practice, whereas just buying bigger drives is way easier. Let's go ahead and do that. It's small price to pay for domestic tranquility.And there's a lesson in that. We can map that almost perfectly to the corporate world where you folks tend to operate in. You're not doing home backup, last time I checked; you are doing public cloud backup. Actually, I should ask that. Where do you folks start and where do you stop?Sam: Yeah, no, it's a great question. You know, we started over 15 years ago when virtualization, specifically VMware vSphere, was really the up-and-coming thing, and, you know, a lot of folks were there trying to utilize agents to protect their vSphere instances, just like they were doing with physical Windows and Linux boxes. And, you know, it kind of got the job done, but was it the best way of doing it? No. And that's kind of why Veeam was pioneered; it was this agentless backup, image-based backup for vSphere.And, of course, you know, in the last 15 years, we've seen lots of transitions, of course, we're here at Screaming in the Cloud, with you, Corey, so AWS, as well as a number of other public cloud vendors we can help protect as well, as a number of SaaS applications like Microsoft 365, metadata and data within Salesforce. So, Veeam's really kind of come a long way from just virtual machines to really taking a global look at the entirety of modern environments, and how can we best protect each and every single one of those without trying to take a square peg and fit it in a round hole?Corey: It's a good question and a common one. We wind up with an awful lot of folks who are confused by the proliferation of data. And I'm one of them, let's be very clear here. It comes down to a problem where backups are a multifaceted, deep problem, and I don't think that people necessarily think of it that way. But I take a look at all of the different, even AWS services that I use for my various nonsense, and which ones can be used to store data?Well, all of them. Some of them, you have to hold it in a particularly wrong sort of way, but they all store data. And in various contexts, a lot of that data becomes very important. So, what service am I using, in which account am I using, and in what region am I using it, and you wind up with data sprawl, where it's a tremendous amount of data that you can generally only track down by looking at your bills at the end of the month. Okay, so what am I being charged, and for what service?That seems like a good place to start, but where is it getting backed up? How do you think about that? So, some people, I think, tend to ignore the problem, which we're seeing less and less, but other folks tend to go to the opposite extreme and we're just going to backup absolutely everything, and we're going to keep that data for the rest of our natural lives. It feels to me that there's probably an answer that is more appropriate somewhere nestled between those two extremes.Sam: Yeah, snapshot sprawl is a real thing, and it gets very, very expensive very, very quickly. You know, your snapshots of EC2 instances are stored on those attached EBS volumes. Five cents per gig per month doesn't sound like a lot, but when you're dealing with thousands of snapshots for thousands machines, it gets out of hand very, very quickly. And you don't know when to delete them. Like you say, folks are just retaining them forever and dealing with this unfortunate bill shock.So, you know, where to start is automating the lifecycle of a snapshot, right, from its creation—how often do we want to be creating them—from the retention—how long do we want to keep these for—and where do we want to keep them because there are other storage services outside of just EBS volumes. And then, of course, the ultimate: deletion. And that's important even from a compliance perspective as well, right? You've got to retain data for a specific number of years, I think healthcare is like seven years, but then you've—Corey: And then not a day more.Sam: Yeah, and then not a day more because that puts you out of compliance, too. So, policy-based automation is your friend and we see a number of folks building these policies out: gold, silver, bronze tiers based on criticality of data compliance and really just kind of letting the machine do the rest. And you can focus on not babysitting backup.Corey: What was it that led to the rise of snapshots? Because back in my very early days, there was no such thing. We wound up using a bunch of servers stuffed in a rack somewhere and virtualization was not really in play, so we had file systems on physical disks. And how do you back that up? Well, you have an agent of some sort that basically looks at all the files and according to some ruleset that it has, it copies them off somewhere else.It was slow, it was fraught, it had a whole bunch of logic that was pushed out to the very edge, and forget about restoring that data in a timely fashion or even validating a lot of those backups worked other than via checksum. And God help you if you had data that was constantly in the state of flux, where anything changing during the backup run would leave your backups in an inconsistent state. That on some level seems to have largely been solved by snapshots. But what's your take on it? You're a lot closer to this part of the world than I am.Sam: Yeah, snapshots, I think folks have turned to snapshots for the speed, the lack of impact that they have on production performance, and again, just the ease of accessibility. We have access to all different kinds of snapshots for EC2, RDS, EFS throughout the entirety of our AWS environment. So, I think the snapshots are kind of like the default go-to for folks. They can help deliver those very, very quick RPOs, especially in, for example, databases, like you were saying, that change very, very quickly and we all of a sudden are stranded with a crash-consistent backup or snapshot versus an application-consistent snapshot. And then they're also very, very quick to recover from.So, snapshots are very, very appealing, but they absolutely do have their limitations. And I think, you know, it's not a one or the other; it's that they've got to go hand-in-hand with something else. And typically, that is an image-based backup that is stored in a separate location to the snapshot because that snapshot is not independent of the disk that it is protecting.Corey: One of the challenges with snapshots is most of them are created in a copy-on-write sense. It takes basically an instant frozen point in time back—once upon a time when we ran MySQL databases on top of the NetApp Filer—which works surprisingly well—we would have a script that would automatically quiesce the database so that it would be in a consistent state, snapshot the file and then un-quiesce it, which took less than a second, start to finish. And that was awesome, but then you had this snapshot type of thing. It wasn't super portable, it needed to reference a previous snapshot in some cases, and AWS takes the same approach where the first snapshot it captures every block, then subsequent snapshots wind up only taking up as much size as there have been changes since the first snapshots. So, large quantities of data that generally don't get access to a whole lot have remarkably small, subsequent snapshot sizes.But that's not at all obvious from the outside, and looking at these things. They're not the most portable thing in the world. But it's definitely the direction that the industry has trended in. So, rather than having a cron job fire off an AWS API call to take snapshots of my volumes as a sort of the baseline approach that we all started with, what is the value proposition that you folks bring? And please don't say it's, “Well, cron jobs are hard and we have a friendlier interface for that.”Sam: [laugh]. I think it's really starting to look at the proliferation of those snapshots, understanding what they're good at, and what they are good for within your environment—as previously mentioned, low RPOs, low RTOs, how quickly can I take a backup, how frequently can I take a backup, and more importantly, how quickly can I restore—but then looking at their limitations. So, I mentioned that they were not independent of that disk, so that certainly does introduce a single point of failure as well as being not so secure. We've kind of touched on the cost component of that as well. So, what Veeam can come in and do is then take an image-based backup of those snapshots, right—so you've got your initial snapshot and then your incremental ones—we'll take the backup from that snapshot, and then we'll start to store that elsewhere.And that is likely going to be in a different account. We can look at the Well-Architected Framework, AWS deeming accounts as a security boundary, so having that cross-account function is critically important so you don't have that single point of failure. Locking down with IAM roles is also incredibly important so we haven't just got a big wide open door between the two. But that data is then stored in a separate account—potentially in a separate region, maybe in the same region—Amazon S3 storage. And S3 has the wonderful benefit of being still relatively performant, so we can have quick recoveries, but it is much, much cheaper. You're dealing with 2.3 cents per gig per month, instead of—Corey: To start, and it goes down from there with sizeable volumes.Sam: Absolutely, yeah. You can go down to S3 Glacier, where you're looking at, I forget how many points and zeros and nines it is, but it's fractions of a cent per gig per month, but it's going to take you a couple of days to recover that da—Corey: Even infrequent access cuts that in half.Sam: Oh yeah.Corey: And let's be clear, these are snapshot backups; you probably should not be accessing them on a consistent, sustained basis.Sam: Well, exactly. And this is where it's kind of almost like having your cake and eating it as well. Compliance or regulatory mandates or corporate mandates are saying you must keep this data for this length of time. Keeping that—you know, let's just say it's three years' worth of snapshots in an EBS volume is going to be incredibly expensive. What's the likelihood of you needing to recover something from two years—actually, even two months ago? It's very, very small.So, the performance part of S3 is, you don't need to take it as much into consideration. Can you recover? Yes. Is it going to take a little bit longer? Absolutely. But it's going to help you meet those retention requirements while keeping your backup bill low, avoiding that bill shock, right, spending tens and tens of thousands every single month on snapshots. This is what I mean by kind of having your cake and eating it.Corey: I somewhat recently have had a client where EBS snapshots are one of the driving costs behind their bill. It is one of their largest single line items. And I want to be very clear here because if one of those people who listen to this and thinking, “Well, hang on. Wait, they're telling stories about us, even though they're not naming us by name?” Yeah, there were three of you in the last quarter.So, at that point, it becomes clear it is not about something that one individual company has done and more about an overall driving trend. I am personalizing it a little bit by referring to as one company when there were three of you. This is a narrative device, not me breaking confidentiality. Disclaimer over. Now, when you talk to people about, “So, tell me why you've got 80 times more snapshots than you do EBS volumes?” The answer is as, “Well, we wanted to back things up and we needed to get hourly backups to a point, then daily backups, then monthly, and so on and so forth. And when this was set up, there wasn't a great way to do this natively and we don't always necessarily know what we need versus what we don't. And the cost of us backing this up, well, you can see it on the bill. The cost of us deleting too much and needing it as soon as we do? Well, that cost is almost incalculable. So, this is the safe way to go.” And they're not wrong in anything that they're saying. But the world has definitely evolved since then.Sam: Yeah, yeah. It's a really great point. Again, it just folds back into my whole having your cake and eating it conversation. Yes, you need to retain data; it gives you that kind of nice, warm, cozy feeling, it's a nice blanket on a winter's day that that data, irrespective of what happens, you're going to have something to recover from. But the question is does that need to be living on an EBS volume as a snapshot? Why can't it be living on much, much more cost-effective storage that's going to give you the warm and fuzzies, but is going to make your finance team much, much happier [laugh].Corey: One of the inherent challenges I think people have is that snapshots by themselves are almost worthless, in that I have an EBS snapshot, it is sitting there now, it's costing me an undetermined amount of money because it's not exactly clear on a per snapshot basis exactly how large it is, and okay, great. Well, I'm looking for a file that was not modified since X date, as it was on this time. Well, great, you're going to have to take that snapshot, restore it to a volume and then go exploring by hand. Oh, it was the wrong one. Great. Try it again, with a different one.And after, like, the fifth or six in a row, you start doing a binary search approach on this thing. But it's expensive, it's time-consuming, it takes forever, and it's not a fun user experience at all. Part of the problem is it seems that historically, backup systems have no context or no contextual awareness whatsoever around what is actually contained within that backup.Sam: Yeah, yeah. I mean, you kind of highlighted two of the steps. It's more like a ten-step process to do, you know, granular file or folder-level recovery from a snapshot, right? You've got to, like you say, you've got to determine the point in time when that, you know, you knew the last time that it was around, then you're going to have to determine the volume size, the region, the OS, you're going to have to create an EBS volume of the same size, region, from that snapshot, create the EC2 instance with the same OS, connect the two together, boot the EC2 instance, mount the volume search for the files to restore, download them manually, at which point you have your file back. It's not back in the machine where it was, it's now been downloaded locally to whatever machine you're accessing that from. And then you got to tear it all down.And that is again, like you say, predicated on the fact that you knew exactly that that was the right time. It might not be and then you have to start from scratch from a different point in time. So, backup tooling from backup vendors that have been doing this for many, many years, knew about this problem long, long ago, and really seek to not only automate the entirety of that process but make the whole e-discovery, the search, the location of those files, much, much easier. I don't necessarily want to do a vendor pitch, but I will say with Veeam, we have explorer-like functionality, whereby it's just a simple web browser. Once that machine is all spun up again, automatic process, you can just search for your individual file, folder, locate it, you can download it locally, you can inject it back into the instance where it was through Amazon Kinesis or AWS Kinesis—I forget the right terminology for it; some of its AWS, some of its Amazon.But by-the-by, the whole recovery process, especially from a file or folder level, is much more pain-free, but also much faster. And that's ultimately what people care about how reliable is my backup? How quickly can I get stuff online? Because the time that I'm down is costing me an indescribable amount of time or money.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or if you are looking to go beyond just caching and unlocking your data's full potential, these folks have you covered. Redis Enterprise is the go-to managed Redis service that allows you to reimagine how your geo-distributed applications process, deliver, and store data. To learn more from the experts in Redis how to be real-time, right now, from anywhere, visit redis.com/duckbill. That's R - E - D - I - S dot com slash duckbill.Corey: Right, the idea of RPO versus RTO: recovery point objective and recovery time objective. With an RPO, it's great, disaster strikes right now, how long is acceptable to it have been since the last time we backed up data to a restorable point? Sometimes it's measured in minutes, sometimes it's measured in fractions of a second. It really depends on what we're talking about. Payments databases, that needs to be—the RPO is basically an asymptotically approaches zero.The RTO is okay, how long is acceptable before we have that data restored and are back up and running? And that is almost always a longer time, but not always. And there's a different series of trade-offs that go into that. But both of those also presuppose that you've already dealt with the existential question of is it possible for us to recover this data. And that's where I know that you are obviously—you have a position on this that is informed by where you work, but I don't, and I will call this out as what I see in the industry: AWS backup is compelling to me except for one fatal flaw that it has, and that is it starts and stops with AWS.I am not a proponent of multi-cloud. Lord knows I've gotten flack for that position a bunch of times, but the one area where it makes absolute sense to me is backups. Have your data in a rehydrate-the-business level state backed up somewhere that is not your primary cloud provider because you're otherwise single point of failure-ing through a company, through the payment instrument you have on file with that company, in the blast radius of someone who can successfully impersonate you to that vendor. There has to be a gap of some sort for the truly business-critical data. Yes, egress to other providers is expensive, but you know what also is expensive? Irrevocably losing the data that powers your business. Is it likely? No, but I would much rather do it than have to justify why I'm not doing it.Sam: Yeah. Wasn't likely that I was going to win that 2 billion or 2.1 billion on the Powerball, but [laugh] I still play [laugh]. But I understand your standpoint on multi-cloud and I read your newsletters and understand where you're coming from, but I think the reality is that we do live in at least a hybrid cloud world, if not multi-cloud. The number of organizations that are sole-sourced on a single cloud and nothing else is relatively small, single-digit percentage. It's around 80-some percent that are hybrid, and the remainder of them are your favorite: multi-cloud.But again, having something that is one hundred percent sole-source on a single platform or a single vendor does expose you to a certain degree of risk. So, having the ability to do cross-platform backups, recoveries, migrations, for whatever reason, right, because it might not just be a disaster like you'd mentioned, it might also just be… I don't know, the company has been taken over and all of a sudden, the preference is now towards another cloud provider and I want you to refactor and re-architect everything for this other cloud provider. If all that data is locked into one platform, that's going to make your job very, very difficult. So, we mentioned at the beginning of the call, Veeam is capable of protecting a vast number of heterogeneous workloads on different platforms, in different environments, on-premises, in multiple different clouds, but the other key piece is that we always use the same backup file format. And why that's key is because it enables portability.If I have backups of EC2 instances that are stored in S3, I could copy those onto on-premises disk, I could copy those into Azure, I could do the same with my Azure VMs and store those on S3, or again, on-premises disk, and any other endless combination that goes with that. And it's really kind of centered around, like control and ownership of your data. We are not prescriptive by any means. Like, you do what is best for your organization. We just want to provide you with the toolset that enables you to do that without steering you one direction or the other with fee structures, disparate feature sets, whatever it might be.Corey: One of the big challenges that I keep seeing across the board is just a lack of awareness of what the data that matters is, where you see people backing up endless fleets of web server instances that are auto-scaled into existence and then removed, but you can create those things at will; why do you care about the actual data that's on these things? It winds up almost at the library management problem, on some level. And in that scenario, snapshots are almost certainly the wrong answer. One thing that I saw previously that really changed my way of thinking about this was back many years ago when I was working at a startup that had just started using GitHub and they were paying for a third-party service that wound up backing up Git repos. Today, that makes a lot more sense because you have a bunch of other stuff on GitHub that goes well beyond the stuff contained within Git, but at the time, it was silly. It was, why do that? Every Git clone is a full copy of the entire repository history. Just grab it off some developer's laptop somewhere.It's like, “Really? You want to bet the company, slash your job, slash everyone else's job on that being feasible and doable or do you want to spend the 39 bucks a month or whatever it was to wind up getting that out the door now so we don't have to think about it, and they validate that it works?” And that was really a shift in my way of thinking because, yeah, backing up things can get expensive when you have multiple copies of the data living in different places, but what's really expensive is not having a company anymore.Sam: Yeah, yeah, absolutely. We can tie it back to my insurance dynamic earlier where, you know, it's something that you know that you have to have, but you don't necessarily want to pay for it. Well, you know, just like with insurances, there's multiple different ways to go about recovering your data and it's only in crunch time, do you really care about what it is that you've been paying for, right, when it comes to backup?Could you get your backup through a git clone? Absolutely. Could you get your data back—how long is that going to take you? How painful is that going to be? What's going to be the impact to the business where you're trying to figure that out versus, like you say, the 39 bucks a month, a year, or whatever it might be to have something purpose-built for that, that is going to make the recovery process as quick and painless as possible and just get things back up online.Corey: I am not a big fan of the fear, uncertainty, and doubt approach, but I do practice what I preach here in that yeah, there is a real fear against data loss. It's not, “People are coming to get you, so you absolutely have to buy whatever it is I'm selling,” but it is something you absolutely have to think about. My core consulting proposition is that I optimize the AWS bill. And sometimes that means spending more. Okay, that one S3 bucket is extremely important to you and you say you can't sustain the loss of it ever so one zone is not an option. Where is it being backed up? Oh, it's not? Yeah, I suggest you spend more money and back that thing up if it's as irreplaceable as you say. It's about doing the right thing.Sam: Yeah, yeah, it's interesting, and it's going to be hard for you to prove the value of doing that when you are driving their bill up when you're trying to bring it down. But again, you have to look at something that's not itemized on that bill, which is going to be the impact of downtime. I'm not going to pretend to try and recall the exact figures because it also varies depending on your business, your industry, the size, but the impact of downtime is massive financially. Tens of thousands of dollars for small organizations per hour, millions and millions of dollars per hour for much larger organizations. The backup component of that is relatively small in comparison, so having something that is purpose-built, and is going to protect your data and help mitigate that impact of downtime.Because that's ultimately what you're trying to protect against. It is the recovery piece that you're buying is the most important piece. And like you, I would say, at least be cognizant of it and evaluate your options and what can you live with and what can you live without.Corey: That's the big burning question that I think a lot of people do not have a good answer to. And when you don't have an answer, you either backup everything or nothing. And I'm not a big fan of doing either of those things blindly.Sam: Yeah, absolutely. And I think this is why we see varying different backup options as well, you know? You're not going to try and apply the same data protection policies each and every single workload within your environment because they've all got different types of workload criticality. And like you say, some of them might not even need to be backed up at all, just because they don't have data that needs to be protected. So, you need something that is going to be able to be flexible enough to apply across the entirety of your environment, protect it with the right policy, in terms of how frequently do you protect it, where do you store it, how often, or when are you eventually going to delete that and apply that on a workload by workload basis. And this is where the joy of things like tags come into play as well.Corey: One last thing I want to bring up is that I'm a big fan of watching for companies saying the quiet part out loud. And one area in which they do this—because they're forced to by brevity—is in the title tag of their website. I pull up veeam.com and I hover over the tab in my browser, and it says, “Veeam Software: Modern Data Protection.”And I want to call that out because you're not framing it as explicitly backup. So, the last topic I want to get into is the idea of security. Because I think it is not fully appreciated on a lived-experience basis—although people will of course agree to this when they're having ivory tower whiteboard discussions—that every place your data lives is a potential for a security breach to happen. So, you want to have your data living in a bunch of places ideally, for backup and resiliency purposes. But you also want it to be completely unworkable or illegible to anyone who is not authorized to have access to it.How do you balance those trade-offs yourself given that what you're fundamentally saying is, “Trust us with your Holy of Holies when it comes to things that power your entire business?” I mean, I can barely get some companies to agree to show me their AWS bill, let alone this is the data that contains all of this stuff to destroy our company.Sam: Yeah. Yeah, it's a great question. Before I explicitly answer that piece, I will just go to say that modern data protection does absolutely have a security component to it, and I think that backup absolutely needs to be a—I'm going to say this an air quotes—a “first class citizen” of any security strategy. I think when people think about security, their mind goes to the preventative, like how do we keep these bad people out?This is going to be a bit of the FUD that you love, but ultimately, the bad guys on the outside have an infinite number of attempts to get into your environment and only have to be right once to get in and start wreaking havoc. You on the other hand, as the good guy with your cape and whatnot, you have got to be right each and every single one of those times. And we as humans are fallible, right? None of us are perfect, and it's incredibly difficult to defend against these ever-evolving, more complex attacks. So backup, if someone does get in, having a clean, verifiable, recoverable backup, is really going to be the only thing that is going to save your organization, should that actually happen.And what's key to a secure backup? I would say separation, isolation of backup data from the production data, I would say utilizing things like immutability, so in AWS, we've got Amazon S3 object lock, so it's that write once, read many state for whatever retention period that you put on it. So, the data that they're seeking to encrypt, whether it's in production or in their backup, they cannot encrypt it. And then the other piece that I think is becoming more and more into play, and it's almost table stakes is encryption, right? And we can utilize things like AWS KMS for that encryption.But that's there to help defend against the exfiltration attempts. Because these bad guys are realizing, “Hey, people aren't paying me my ransom because they're just recovering from a clean backup, so now I'm going to take that backup data, I'm going to leak the personally identifiable information, trade secrets, or whatever on the internet, and that's going to put them in breach compliance and give them a hefty fine that way unless they pay me my ransom.” So encryption, so they can't read that data. So, not only can they not change it, but they can't read it is equally important. So, I would say those are the three big things for me on what's needed for backup to make sure it is clean and recoverable.Corey: I think that is one of those areas where people need to put additional levels of thought in. I think that if you have access to the production environment and have full administrative rights throughout it, you should definitionally not—at least with that account and ideally not you at all personally—have access to alter the backups. Full stop. I would say, on some level, there should not be the ability to alter backups for some particular workloads, the idea being that if you get hit with a ransomware infection, it's pretty bad, let's be clear, but if you can get all of your data back, it's more of an annoyance than it is, again, the existential business crisis that becomes something that redefines you as a company if you still are a company.Sam: Yeah. Yeah, I mean, we can turn to a number of organizations. Code Spaces always springs to mind for me, I love Code Spaces. It was kind of one of those precursors to—Corey: It's amazing.Sam: Yeah, but they were running on AWS and they had everything, production and backups, all stored in one account. Got into the account. “We're going to delete your data if you don't pay us this ransom.” They were like, “Well, we're not paying you the ransoms. We got backups.” Well, they deleted those, too. And, you know, unfortunately, Code Spaces isn't around anymore. But it really kind of goes to show just the importance of at least logically separating your data across different accounts and not having that god-like access to absolutely everything.Corey: Yeah, when you talked about Code Spaces, I was in [unintelligible 00:32:29] talking about GitHub Codespaces specifically, where they have their developer workstations in the cloud. They're still very much around, at least last time I saw unless you know something I don't.Sam: Precursor to that. I can send you the link—Corey: Oh oh—Sam: You can share it with the listeners.Corey: Oh, yes, please do. I'd love to see that.Sam: Yeah. Yeah, absolutely.Corey: And it's been a long and strange time in this industry. Speaking of links for the show notes, I appreciate you're spending so much time with me. Where can people go to learn more?Sam: Yeah, absolutely. I think veeam.com is kind of the first place that people gravitate towards. Me personally, I'm kind of like a hands-on learning kind of guy, so we always make free product available.And then you can find that on the AWS Marketplace. Simply search ‘Veeam' through there. A number of free products; we don't put time limits on it, we don't put feature limitations. You can backup ten instances, including your VPCs, which we actually didn't talk about today, but I do think is important. But I won't waste any more time on that.Corey: Oh, configuration of these things is critically important. If you don't know how everything was structured and built out, you're basically trying to re-architect from first principles based upon archaeology.Sam: Yeah [laugh], that's a real pain. So, we can help protect those VPCs and we actually don't put any limitations on the number of VPCs that you can protect; it's always free. So, if you're going to use it for anything, use it for that. But hands-on, marketplace, if you want more documentation, want to learn more, want to speak to someone veeam.com is the place to go.Corey: And we will, of course, include that in the show notes. Thank you so much for taking so much time to speak with me today. It's appreciated.Sam: Thank you, Corey, and thanks for all the listeners tuning in today.Corey: Sam Nicholls, Director of Public Cloud at Veeam. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry insulting comment that takes you two hours to type out but then you lose it because you forgot to back it up.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Roaring Elephant
Episode 325 – Public Cloud: a BAD idea?

Roaring Elephant

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 26:33


Public cloud has been lauded for it's flexibility and potential cost savings, but recently some noteworthy companies have decided to say "good bye" to cloud... Do they have a point? This episode was inspired by this blog post: https://world.hey.com/dhh/why-we-re-leaving-the-cloud-654b47e0 Please use the Contact Form on this blog or our twitter feed to send us your questions, or to suggest future episode topics you would like us to cover.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Tech Bytes: Run On-Prem Infrastructure Like Public Cloud With vSphere+ (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 15:38


Today's Tech Bytes podcast, sponsored by VMware, dives into VMware's vSphere+. vSphere+ allows you to operate your on-prem workloads and infrastructure as if they were a public cloud. It supports VMs and Kubernetes, and provides admin, developer, and add-on services delivered via SaaS. The post Tech Bytes: Run On-Prem Infrastructure Like Public Cloud With vSphere+ (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Briefings In Brief
Tech Bytes: Run On-Prem Infrastructure Like Public Cloud With vSphere+ (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Briefings In Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 15:38


Today's Tech Bytes podcast, sponsored by VMware, dives into VMware's vSphere+. vSphere+ allows you to operate your on-prem workloads and infrastructure as if they were a public cloud. It supports VMs and Kubernetes, and provides admin, developer, and add-on services delivered via SaaS. The post Tech Bytes: Run On-Prem Infrastructure Like Public Cloud With vSphere+ (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Great Things with Great Tech!
Episode 53 - Verge.io

Great Things with Great Tech!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 39:30


In this episode I talk with Yan Ness, Chief Executive Officer at Verge.io. Verge.io is a single piece of hyper-converged virtualization software that makes it easy to use existing resources to create secure multi-tenant private clouds. Verge.io provides a simpler way to virtualize data centers and end IT infrastructure complexity. The company's Verge OS software is the first and only fully integrated virtual cloud software stack to build, deploy and manage virtual data centers. Verge-OS delivers significant capital savings, increased operational efficiencies, reduced risk, and rapid scalability. Yan and I talk about the shift from traditional de-coupled platforms like VMware and how even the Public Cloud is overly complex. Through simplicity of the stack, Verge.io is able to allow service providers and organizations function without the hassles associated with standard hardware platforms. Verge.io was borne from YottaByte, founded in 2010 as a replacement for on-premises infrastructure. Eventually, YottaByte rebranded to Verge.io and is head quartered out of Greater Detroit Area, Great Lakes. ☑️ But me a coffee? - https://ko-fi.com/gtwgt ☑️ Technology and Technology Partners Mentioned: VMware, KVM, Hyper-V, Nutanix, Veeam, Microsoft, AWS, Azure, Kubernetes, Containers, Storage, Networking ☑️ Raw Talking Points: Lead with the product Early years starting up... ISP/Dial Up to colo cloud - comparison Retirement Encapsulation of the datacenter above storage Art of simplcity Yottabyte Technology Virtualizing the Datacenter holistically Cost pressures of AWS/Azure Public cloud Verge.io Stack? Install? VMware replacement and Migrations Scale The Verge.io Recipe Engine Management and Dashboard and API MSP and SP space vs on-prem Modern Platforms Kubevirt Kubernetes Profile and impact of Verge.io ☑️ Web: https://verge.io ☑️ Sign up for a 14 day Test Drive: https://www.verge.io/test-drive ☑️ Interested in being on #GTwGT? Contact via Twitter @GTwGTPodcast or go to https://www.gtwgt.com ☑️ Subscribe to YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@GTwGTPodcast?sub_confirmation=1 ☑️ Music: https://www.bensound.com

Telecoms.com Podcast
Open RAN, metaverse and public cloud

Telecoms.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 106:01


The lads return to the studio after their jaunt to Amsterdam but reflect on another trip Iain took since then to Madrid for the Fyuz event. The main topic there was Open RAN so they start by going over what was discussed and what that says about the current state of play with that technology. Quarterly earnings season seemed to offer clues about how things are going with both the metaverse and the public cloud market so they conclude by meandering around those topics. Stay up to date with the most important telecoms stories from around the world with the Telecoms.com daily newsletter. Delivered FREE and direct to your inbox every day: ow.ly/XPA150KWZmO

The Razor's Edge
Meta's Crash And Tricky Position, and the Slowing of AWS and Public Cloud Growth

The Razor's Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 99:32


Last week was a big week in tech, so we're back with an episode on two of the biggest stories. First, (2:40 minute mark) we break down Meta Platforms' bummer of an earnings result and why it shouldn't have been so surprising. What choice does Zuck have and where is the business heading? We then (57:00) get into Amazon and AWS's disappointing quarter, and the future of public cloud. That opens up some space for talking about the generals no longer leading and what a downturn in VC funding means for big tech. We wrap up with a few minutes on Twitter (1:30:00) now that the Elon Musk deal is done and dusted. Check out Akram's post on these matters.  

iTrust-Podcast
Microsoft Azure Cloud: So hat sie unser Rechenzentrum-Business gekillt (#105)

iTrust-Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 17:24


Im April 2023 schliessen wir unser Rechenzentrum und Schuld daran hat die Microsoft Azure Cloud. ❌ Was uns zu dieser Entscheidung bewogen hat, welche Vorteile die Microsoft Azure Cloud für iTrust bietet und warum unsere Mitarbeitende mehr Mühe mit dem Wechsel hatten als unsere Kunden, erfahren Sie in dieser Podcast-Folge von Patrick Müller. Jetzt reinhören. Die Themen im Überblick: (00:00) – Intro – Microsoft Azure Cloud: So hat sie unser Rechenzentrum-Business gekillt (01:42) – So kam iTrust zum Rechenzentrum (03:34) – Was ist eine Public Cloud? (04:52) – Businessmodell «Private Cloud» (06:00) – Rechenzentrum wird geschlossen – die Gründe (10:00) – Wie haben unsere Mitarbeitenden reagiert? (11:21) – So haben unsere Kunden reagiert (12:36) – Microsoft Azure Cloud: Die grossen Vorteile (15:10) – Zusammenfassung Mehr zum Thema Cloud:

Staying Connected
Annual New York City Conference Returns

Staying Connected

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 7:07


On November 3, 2022, the annual LB3 and TC2 NYC Conference returns to New York City after a three-year pandemic hiatus!  Join Andrew and Joe as they walk through the agenda of topics planned for discussion, including: how to successfully source and deploy Unified Communications, how to structure and execute Network Transport RFPs and contract negotiations for SD-WAN and Internet First initiatives (as well as legacy services like MPLS), what you need to know about Public Cloud, Managed Services/Outsourcing, and hardware/equipment deals, as well as a critical look at sourcing and managing Telecom Expense Management platforms and Wireless services (including 5G).   All of this presented in the well-known and beloved LB3/TC2 conference format which is informal, interactive, and completely free of vendor attendees or presenters.

MSP-INSIGHTS (DE, german) - Cloud & Managed Service Impulse
Public Cloud bedeutet, das Business voranzubringen

MSP-INSIGHTS (DE, german) - Cloud & Managed Service Impulse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 48:01


Unsere Themen sind heute: Was unterscheidet die drei Hyperscaler? Wie argumentiert die Public Cloud Group bei Kunden? Wie ist das Geschäftsmodell aus Projekten und Managed Services? Welche Empfehlung hat Tom für Systemhäuser, die mit der Cloud starten wollen? Vielen Dank an Tom Simon, den Managing Director der 'Innovations ON GmbH' für das spannende Gespräch und den Austausch über seine Reise in und mit der Public Cloud. ----------------------- Und hier einige Links, wenn Ihr mehr über Tom wissen möchtet: https://publiccloudgroup.com ----------------------- Und mehr von Olaf Kaiser: www.linkedin.com/in/olafkaiser/ www.olaf-kaiser.coach/ www.ubega.de Direkt einen kostenfreien Termin mit Olaf buchen https://bit.ly/allgemeinen-termin-buchen

The Mark Bishop Show
TMBS E266: Jason McGee - General Manager of IBM's Public Cloud Platform

The Mark Bishop Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 9:48


Mark interviews Jason McGee, the GM and CTO for the IBM Cloud Platform. The new IBM Transformation Cloud found there is a strong correlation between hybrid cloud adoption and progress in digital transformation. ABOUT - Jason McGee Jason is a IBM Fellow and Cloud CTO focused on building strong and enduring technology that benefits clients, partners and IBM. As an IBM Fellow, Jason belongs to a handful of its top technologists, that IBM honors each year as its best and brightest who have helped to establish and maintain its reputation as the world's most responsible – and dependable – steward of technology. As General Manager of IBM's Public Cloud Platform, Jason is responsible for the technology development, business strategy, architecture, and successful delivery with clients of IBM's multi-billion-dollar Cloud franchise. With an IBM career that spans 25 years, Jason has held a variety of global, leadership roles and is a known and sought-after technical leader and international keynote speaker, with the ability to explain, understand, and address complex client needs with ease. For more information please visit: IBM.com/cloud IBM Transformation Index: State of Cloud

TechCentral Podcast
Impact Series | Maxtec and Orca Security – why public cloud is risky business

TechCentral Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 29:24


Unless you have 100% visibility and are continuously scanning your cloud environment, you are vulnerable. According to recent research by Orca Security, 78% of identified attack paths use known vulnerabilities (CVEs) as an initial access attack vector. This is significant because most entry points that are exploited can relatively easily be prevented since these CVEs are already known and the vast majority already have remediations available. Praven Pillay, MD of Maxtec and Sagy Kratu, director of enablement and an evangelist at Orca Security, joined James Erasmus for a brief but fascinating conversation about the harsh realities of public cloud security. Maxtec is the exclusive distributor for Orca Security in Southern Africa and has offered to guide anyone watching or listening to this episode of TechCentral's Impact Series through a free-risk assessment and a free 30-day trial of the Orca platform. With local support from Maxtec, the Orca platform connects to your environment in minutes and provides 100% visibility of all your assets. It detects and prioritises cloud risks across every layer of your cloud estate, including vulnerabilities, malware, misconfigurations, lateral movement risk, weak and leaked passwords, and overly permissive identities. The adoption of public cloud is accelerating. The security postures, which are your responsibility, have been radically innovated, automated and no longer depend on agents. Consider your cloud investment and ask if you are properly protected. * Impact Series episodes are sponsored by the party or parties concerned

The Mark Bishop Show
TMBS E266: Jason McGee - General Manager of IBM's Public Cloud Platform

The Mark Bishop Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 9:48


Mark interviews Jason McGee, the GM and CTO for the IBM Cloud Platform. The new IBM Transformation Cloud found there is a strong correlation between hybrid cloud adoption and progress in digital transformation. ABOUT - Jason McGee Jason is a IBM Fellow and Cloud CTO focused on building strong and enduring technology that benefits clients, partners and IBM. As an IBM Fellow, Jason belongs to a handful of its top technologists, that IBM honors each year as its best and brightest who have helped to establish and maintain its reputation as the world's most responsible – and dependable – steward of technology. As General Manager of IBM's Public Cloud Platform, Jason is responsible for the technology development, business strategy, architecture, and successful delivery with clients of IBM's multi-billion-dollar Cloud franchise. With an IBM career that spans 25 years, Jason has held a variety of global, leadership roles and is a known and sought-after technical leader and international keynote speaker, with the ability to explain, understand, and address complex client needs with ease. For more information please visit: IBM.com/cloud IBM Transformation Index: State of Cloud

Packet Pushers - IPv6 Buzz
IPv6 Buzz 111: IPv6 And The Public Cloud

Packet Pushers - IPv6 Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 28:01


What's the state of IPv6 in the public cloud? What support is available in which of the major providers? What are the cloud challenges of v6? How does v6 affect multi-cloud architectures? The latest episode of the IPv6 Buzz podcast examines these and other v6 questions for public cloud. The post IPv6 Buzz 111: IPv6 And The Public Cloud appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
IPv6 Buzz 111: IPv6 And The Public Cloud

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 28:01


What's the state of IPv6 in the public cloud? What support is available in which of the major providers? What are the cloud challenges of v6? How does v6 affect multi-cloud architectures? The latest episode of the IPv6 Buzz podcast examines these and other v6 questions for public cloud. The post IPv6 Buzz 111: IPv6 And The Public Cloud appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Software Defined Talk
Episode 379: TAMs are a Trap

Software Defined Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 62:05


This week we discuss the rate of Public Cloud adoption, Google's Simplicity Sprint and OKR's. Plus, some thoughts on slippers. Watch the YouTube Live Recording of Episode 379. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEU1uSOpu-c) Runner-up Titles You're not proud of the product You can have both Landing Pages It's just like Serial Don't bring me these unqualified deals It's a Floppy Disk Problem The better the metrics, the less useful they are The sooner you are successful, the longer yoy'are successful Highly Edited Focus on Earnings Rundown AWS CEO says the move to cloud computing is only just getting started (https://www.cnbc.com/2022/06/28/aws-ceo-says-the-move-to-cloud-computing-is-only-just-getting-started.html) Acquired Episode on AWS (Podcast) (https://www.acquired.fm/episodes/amazon-web-services) Google and Developer Toil Google CEO Pichai tells employees not to 'equate fun with money' in heated all-hands meeting (https://www.cnbc.com/2022/09/23/google-ceo-pichai-fields-questions-on-cost-cuts-at-all-hands-meeting-.html) Google CEO tells employees productivity and focus must improve, launches 'Simplicity Sprint' to gather employee feedback on efficiency (https://www.cnbc.com/2022/07/31/google-ceo-to-employees-productivity-and-focus-must-improve.html) Google CEO tells staff not to 'equate fun with money' (https://www.theregister.com/2022/09/23/ceo_google_austerity/) Google CEO Pichai: We need to get 20% more productive (https://www.theregister.com/2022/09/07/google_ceo_sundar_pichai_productivity/) Relevant to your Interests PaaS Is Not Dead (https://www.fermyon.com/blog/paas-is-not-dead) How devops in the cloud breaks down (https://www.infoworld.com/article/3674690/how-devops-in-the-cloud-breaks-down.html) Adobe thinks critics are getting its Figma deal wrong (https://www.axios.com/newsletters/axios-login-c8c3c313-8144-4de3-9499-a4334a6b8f76.html?chunk=0&utm_term=emshare#story0) The Dead End from RedMonk (https://redmonk.com/sogrady/2022/09/23/dead-end/) Building for the 99% Developers (https://future.com/software-development-building-for-99-developers/) Meta and Google cut staff via quiet layoffs (https://www.theregister.com/2022/09/21/meta_google_layoffs/) Slack canvas has officially entered the chat! (https://twitter.com/slackhq/status/1572717714522705923?s=46&t=EYrb_JytmT9CVPWd_8-tpw) Linus Torvalds talks Rust on Linux, his work schedule and life with his M2 MacBook Air (https://www.zdnet.com/article/linus-torvalds-talks-rust-on-linux-his-work-schedule-and-life-with-his-m2-macbook-air/) Keynote: Frozen DevOps? The not-so-technical Last Mile (https://www.slideshare.net/ManuelPais/keynote-frozen-devops-the-notsotechnical-last-mile-devopsdays-portugal-sep-2022) Penpot inks $8M, as signups for its open source spin on Figma jump 5600% after Adobe's $20B acquisition (https://twitter.com/TechCrunch/status/1574754640490536963?s=20&t=vQF0s31OdAS2p7-X373AzQ) Document onboarding startup Flatfile nabs $50M from investors, including Workday (https://techcrunch.com/2022/09/27/document-onboarding-startup-flatfile-nabs-50m-from-investors-including-workday/) Suborbital Extension Engine, and what's next for us (https://blog.suborbital.dev/suborbital-extension-engine-and-whats-next-for-us) What's Stopping WebAssembly from Widespread Adoption? (https://thenewstack.io/whats-stopping-webassembly-from-widespread-adoption/) Did We Overeat on Software? (https://future.com/did-we-overeat-on-software/) Someone is pretending to be me. (https://connortumbleson.com/2022/09/19/someone-is-pretending-to-be-me/) Broadcom's Golden Parachute For Top 5 VMware Execs May Total $337.8M (https://www.crn.com/news/cloud/broadcom-s-golden-parachute-for-top-5-vmware-execs-may-total-337-8m/6) For teens to do better in school, they need to sleep in (https://fortune.com/well/2022/08/18/how-later-school-start-times-for-teens-reduce-depression-and-improve-academic-performance/) Leading venture capital firms to provide up to $1.25 BILLION to back startups built on Cloudflare Workers (https://blog.cloudflare.com/workers-launchpad/) The Uber Hack Exposes More †Than Failed Data Security (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/26/opinion/uber-hack-data.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axioslogin&stream=top) Leading venture capital firms to provide up to $1.25 BILLION to back startups built on Cloudflare Workers (https://blog.cloudflare.com/workers-launchpad/) Nonsense The Science Behind NASA's First Attempt at Redirecting an Asteroid (https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/news/2022/9/22/the-science-behind-nasas-first-attempt-at-redirecting-an-asteroid) Ghoulish moans are haunting the intercoms of American Airlines flights (https://www.washingtonpost.com/travel/2022/09/26/flight-noise-american-airlines-intercom-lax/) Podcasters Are Buying Millions of Listeners Through Mobile-Game Ads (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-09-27/inside-podcasters-explosive-audience-growth) Conferences Sydney Cloud FinOps Meetup (https://events.finops.org/events/details/finops-sydney-cloud-finops-presents-sydney-cloud-finops-meetup/), online, Oct 13, 2022 Matt's presenting KubeCon North America (https://events.linuxfoundation.org/kubecon-cloudnativecon-north-america/https://events.linuxfoundation.org/kubecon-cloudnativecon-north-america/), Detroit, Oct 24 – 28, 2022 SpringOne Platform (https://springone.io/?utm_source=cote&utm_medium=podcast&utm_content=sdt), SF, December 6–8, 2022 THAT Conference Texas Call For Counselors (https://that.us/call-for-counselors/tx/2023/) Jan 16-19, 2023 Listener Feedback Happy to report that the world-class engineers at @grafana managed to make a @SlackHQ thread with more than 10,000 messages in it. (https://twitter.com/TwitchiH/status/1574522695399661584) SDT news & hype Join us in Slack (http://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/slack). Get a SDT Sticker! Send your postal address to stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com (mailto:stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com) and we will send you free laptop stickers! Follow us on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/sdtpodcast), Twitter (https://twitter.com/softwaredeftalk), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/softwaredefinedtalk/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/software-defined-talk/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3OJPV6h9tp-hbsGBLGsDQ/featured). Use the code SDT to get $20 off Coté's book, (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt) Digital WTF (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt), so $5 total. Become a sponsor of Software Defined Talk (https://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/ads)! Recommendations Brandon: Introducing PowerPoint Live in Microsoft Teams (https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/microsoft-365-blog/introducing-powerpoint-live-in-microsoft-teams/ba-p/2140980) and/or PowerPoint Reading Mode (https://www.thinkoutsidetheslide.com/use-reading-view-to-show-powerpoint-slides-in-a-window-instead-of-full-screen/) Photo Credits Banner (https://unsplash.com/photos/B2Y0zdSbR8U) CoverArt (https://unsplash.com/photos/ij5_qCBpIVY)

The Six Five with Patrick Moorhead and Daniel Newman
Replay: Conventional “Wisdom” on Multi-Cloud

The Six Five with Patrick Moorhead and Daniel Newman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 26:53


Tune in for a replay of The Six Five Summit's #Cloud #Infrastructure Spotlight Keynote with Matt Baker, SVP, Corporate Strategy, Dell Technologies.  Matt has been predicting a hybrid and multi-cloud world for many years. Dell Technologies -- and Matt -- fought the false notion that public cloud was cheaper than owning and operating your own and followed their conviction that cloud was more opportunity than a threat.  In this session, Patrick and Matt discuss that conventional wisdom mocked that conclusion, suggesting that Dell invented the concept to beat back the public cloud and change customer sentiment about it. A decade later, conventional wisdom is finally catching up. Even the public cloud players are enabling customers to run their cloud operating systems where they need them, allowing end-users to deploy on owned and operated hardware of their choice. Great call, Matt. The Six Five Summit is a 100% virtual, on-demand event designed to help you stay on top of the latest developments and trends in digital transformation brought to you by Futurum Research and Moor Insights & Strategy. With 12 tracks and over 70 pre-recorded video sessions, The Six Five Summit showcases an exciting lineup of leading technology experts whose insights will help prepare you for what's now and what's next in digital transformation as you continue to scale and pivot for the future. You will hear cutting-edge insights on business agility, technology-powered transformation, thoughts on strategies to ensure business continuity and resilience, along with what's ahead for the future of the workplace. More about The Six Five Summit: https://thesixfivesummit.com/

SMB Community Podcast by Karl W. Palachuk
Jonathan Seelig - Going beyond the public cloud with managed services on your own infrastructure

SMB Community Podcast by Karl W. Palachuk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 29:56


Host Karl chats with Jonathan Seelig. Jonathan Seelig is the Executive Chairman and Chief Evangelist of Ridge. He co-founded Ridge with the goal of building highly distributed cloud infrastructure, thereby enabling users to deploy cloud native applications on any infrastructure and in any location. He previously co-founded Akamai, the world's first and largest CDN. Jonathan has worked on distributed, low latency, high performance infrastructure for over 25 years. Description: With the rapidly increasing pace of digital transformation, many managed service providers (MSPs) and cloud service providers are at a crossroads: they need to decide how to best continue to support their customers as they continue to migrate to the cloud.  While the hyperscale public cloud model is an attractive proposition for some customers, there are many existing and planned use cases and business models for which local data centers and MSPs can be a better fit. These businesses' cloud computing environments may be a blend of server types: on-premises, bare-metal, co-located, and distributed across multiple continents. No single cloud architecture with preset locations can offer them a consistently optimized level of application performance and deployment flexibility. Companies need a cloud provider that can customize a cloud for evolving business needs. Local cloud service providers and MSPs should therefore consider how they convert digital transformation into a home-field advantage. By integrating modern cloud-native services into their offering, in addition to their traditional services, they will offer a robust alternative to the large public cloud and will be in an excellent position to fulfill evolving customer needs.  Today, Joanthan discusses some of the key benefits for managed service providers with existing cloud offerings to add modern cloud-native services to their existing portfolio, including: Monetize existing infrastructure Add new revenue streams Win business that will otherwise default to the public clouds Become the go-to service providers for emerging location dependent applications Ensure long-term customer retention Resources and Links: https://www.ridge.co/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/11808567/ https://www.youtube.com/c/RidgeCloud Sponsor Memo: SBTTC This podcast is sponsored by the Small Biz Thoughts Technology Community. Check us out at https://www.SmallBizThoughts.org Forms, templates, and checklists are just the start. Our Community includes ALL of the best-selling books on managed services in all available formats, plus free training, members-only programs, and the best business training available to managed service providers anywhere. Plus, we have weekly live members-only Zoom calls. The average member saves more than 200% of their membership cost each year. We are totally dedicated to YOUR success.  Just because you're in business for yourself doesn't mean you have to go it alone. Join us today at https://www.SmallBizThoughts.org   :-)  

The Heidrick & Struggles Leadership Podcast
Former Google VP of worldwide data center operations and Wayfair CTO discusses leadership and innovation trends in the data center and public cloud industry

The Heidrick & Struggles Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 23:22


In this podcast, Heidrick & Struggles' Nick DeMagistris speaks to Jim Miller, board member and advisor at TheRealReal, Brambles, and Deep North, and former CTO and board member of Wayfair and VP of worldwide data center operations at Google, about the innovation and leadership trends in the data center and public cloud industry. Miller discusses what the next five years could look like for the industry and whether or not we could be approaching a saturation point, particularly for AWS. Miller also shares some advice for the next generation of leaders of cloud computing or digital infrastructure companies and offers his thoughts on how his experience, perspective, and relationships as a board member of Wayfair helped prepare him for his role as CTO. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Inside SAP S/4HANA
Inside SAP S/4HANA Episode 73: Moving SAP S/4HANA to the Public Cloud with Red Hat and Microsoft Azure

Inside SAP S/4HANA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 27:43


In this new Inside SAP S/4HANA podcast episode, our host, Yannick Peterschmitt, is joined by Prakash Pattaiyan, Principal Program Manager for SAP on Azure Engineering at Microsoft, and Ricardo Garcia Cavero, Principal Portfolio Architect at Red Hat. Together, they talk about moving SAP S/4HANA to the Public Cloud with Red Hat and Microsoft and list some of the reasons why SAP S/4HANA Cloud customers choose Azure to run their cloud ERP. Tune into this week's episode and listen to them explain how an automation strategy at scale will improve employee satisfaction, accelerate innovation, and reduce costs. What topic would you like us to discuss next? Send an email to insides4@sap.com.

The Marvell Essential Technology Podcast
S1 EP18 - Securing Private Keys in the Public Cloud

The Marvell Essential Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 8:45 Transcription Available


Amer Haider, VP Product Management Security Solution Business Unit and podcast host Chris Banuelos discuss industry trends related to hardware security modules (HSM) as well as how Marvell is shaping the industry.  Hear Amer's perspective and insights on how security solutions have evolved since the start of the pandemic and how trends in data privacy and trust are at the forefront of thinking across the industry. 

IT Availability Now
What to consider when developing a multi-cloud strategy

IT Availability Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 15:18


Multi-cloud remains the “de facto standard” among enterprises, according to Flexera's 2022 State of the Cloud Report, with 89% of businesses taking this approach. Yet, while many companies would love to follow suit, they don't know where to start.On this episode of IT Availability Now, host Servaas Verbiest and guest James Mora, Vice President of Engineering and Operations at Sungard AS, discuss what organizations should consider when developing a multi-cloud strategy. Listen to this full episode to learn:How to determine the right cloud strategy for your business and what this looks like in practiceWhy you must plan for how you will support and maintain these new environmentsWhat steps your organization should take to ensure it properly maintains and supports a multi-cloud environmentAs Director of Product Field Strategy at Sungard AS, Servaas Verbiest assists businesses and organizations in realizing the full potential of cloud computing by thinking strategically, deploying rapidly, and acting as an ambassador for the cloud ecosystem. While at Sungard AS, Servaas has worked with more than 1,000 unique clients across multiple industries on complex application deployments, re-platforming, public cloud integrations, private cloud deployments, application lifecycle, and hybrid cloud model development.James Mora is Vice President of Engineering and Operations for Sungard Availability Services. James has more than 20 years' experience in Product Engineering. In this role, he is focused on providing pre-sales solutioning, product engineering, platform engineering, DevOps, security operations and customer implementation support for Cloud and Managed Services. James joined Sungard in 2016, and has since transformed engineering into an Agile and DevOps organization delivering flagship Private and Public Cloud services.Listen and subscribe to IT Availability Now on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Podchaser, deezer, Podcast Addict, Listen Notes, and more.

SDxCentral Weekly Wrap
SDxCentral 2-Minute Weekly Wrap: Microsoft Bests Amazon as top Public Cloud

SDxCentral Weekly Wrap

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 2:16


SDxCentral 2-Minute Weekly Wrap Podcast for July 8, 2022 Plus, Parallel Wireless slashes jobs; and Samsung unveils 2G vRAN plans Microsoft Bests Amazon as top Public Cloud, IDC Reports Parallel Wireless Job Cuts Parallel Tough Open RAN Market Samsung Preps 2G vRAN Option Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Innovation in Government
Public cloud offers agencies an accelerated path to improving their cyber posture

Innovation in Government

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 27:57


Telecoms.com Podcast
Core, public cloud and supply chain

Telecoms.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 93:00


Following a slight delay to accommodate their hectic social lives, the lads are delighted to once more welcome a special guest - Erlend Prestgard, CEO of Working Group 2. They start by learning all about his company, which seeks to disrupt the network core sector via the ‘as a service' model. This inevitably leads the conversation towards the role of public cloud giants in the telecoms world, before they conclude with a quick look at some of the supply chain challenges faced by the industry.

SDxCentral Weekly Wrap
SDxCentral 2-Minute Weekly Wrap: Gartner Crowns Amazon No. 1 Public Cloud

SDxCentral Weekly Wrap

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 2:11


SDxCentral 2-Minute Weekly Wrap Podcast for June 10, 2022 Plus, HPE claims victory over Cisco, and Arista launched new low-latency switches Gartner Crowns Amazon No. 1 Public Cloud As Microsoft, Google Gain Ground HPE Hit by Supply Chain, Takes Dig at Cisco Arista Lashes Latency From 7130 Lineup Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sudo Show
53: Multicloud Revisted

Sudo Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 29:22


Check out the Show Notes at https://tuxdigital.com/podcasts/sudo-show/sudo-53/ (https://tuxdigital.com/podcasts/sudo-show/sudo-53/) Special Guest: Chris Psaltis.

BSD Now
458: Traceroute interpretation

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 48:41


Fundamentals of the FreeBSD Shell, Spammers in the Public Cloud, locking user accounts properly, overgrowth on NetBSD, moreutils, ctwm & spleen, interpreting a traceroute, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Fundamentals of the FreeBSD Shell (https://klarasystems.com/articles/interacting-with-freebsd-learning-the-fundamentals-of-the-freebsd-shell-2/) Spammers in the Public Cloud, Protected by SPF; Intensified Password Groping Still Ongoing; Spamware Hawked to Spamtraps (https://bsdly.blogspot.com/2022/04/spammers-in-public-cloud-protected-by.html) News Roundup A cautionary tale about locking Linux & FreeBSD user accounts (https://www.cyberciti.biz/networking/a-cautionary-tale-about-locking-linux-freebsd-user-accounts/) Overgrowth runs on NetBSD (https://www.reddit.com/r/openbsd_gaming/comments/ucgavg/i_was_able_to_build_overgrowth_on_netbsd/) moreutils (https://joeyh.name/code/moreutils/) NetBSD, CTWM, and Spleen (https://www.cambus.net/netbsd-ctwm-and-spleen/) How to properly interpret a traceroute or mtr (https://phil.lavin.me.uk/2022/03/how-to-properly-interpret-a-traceroute-or-mtr/) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Lets talk a bit about some of the events happening this year, BSDCan in virtual this weekend, emfcamp is this weekend too and in person, MCH is this summer and eurobsdcon is in september. How were the postgres conferences benedict? Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

Security Conversations
Subbu Rama, co-founder and CEO, BalkanID

Security Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 34:17


Serial entrepreneur Subbu Rama joins the show to talk about building a cybersecurity business, addressing the problem of entitlement sprawl and raising seed funding for intelligent access governance technology.

Cloud Talk
Episode 119: Pros and Cons of Running Oracle in the Cloud

Cloud Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 33:39


Join Jeff DeVerter alongside Macon Medlin and Ed Shnekendorf from Oracle to chat through how Oracle really works in tandem with the cloud.

Inside the Datacenter - Connected Social Media
Validating Software for Moving Between Private Data Centers and Public Cloud

Inside the Datacenter - Connected Social Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


In this podcast segment, The Forecast's editor Ken Kaplan talks to Tony Palmer, principal validation analyst at research firm ESG, who tested Nutanix Cloud Clusters on AWS, designed to reduce the operational complexity of migrating, extending or bursting business applications and data between on-premises and clouds. Perhaps at the top of IT's wish list is […]

Tech Barometer – From The Forecast by Nutanix
Validating Software for Moving Between Private Data Centers and Public Cloud

Tech Barometer – From The Forecast by Nutanix

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


In this podcast segment, The Forecast's editor Ken Kaplan talks to Tony Palmer, principal validation analyst at research firm ESG, who tested Nutanix Cloud Clusters on AWS, designed to reduce the operational complexity of migrating, extending or bursting business applications and data between on-premises and clouds. Perhaps at the top of IT's wish list is […]

Connected Social Media
Validating Software for Moving Between Private Data Centers and Public Cloud

Connected Social Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


In this podcast segment, The Forecast's editor Ken Kaplan talks to Tony Palmer, principal validation analyst at research firm ESG, who tested Nutanix Cloud Clusters on AWS, designed to reduce the operational complexity of migrating, extending or bursting business applications and data between on-premises and clouds. Perhaps at the top of IT's wish list is […]

Data Protection Gumbo
144: How to Remove Legacy Baggage - MinIO

Data Protection Gumbo

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 42:13


Anand Babu Periasamy, Co-Founder, CEO of MinIO, Inc. discusses object storage and the rise of SaaS or Software as a Service, the importance of using microservices in the data protection space, and the role APIs play in data management.

Day 2 Cloud
Day Two Cloud 144: The State Of IPv6 In Public Cloud

Day 2 Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 50:47


Today's Day Two Cloud explores the vastness of IPv6 and public cloud. IPv6 provides so much address space that you can use an address once for one connection and never use it again, and it isn't wasteful. The abundance of IPv6 may influence how you approach cloud applications and networks. The post Day Two Cloud 144: The State Of IPv6 In Public Cloud appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Day Two Cloud 144: The State Of IPv6 In Public Cloud

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 50:47


Today's Day Two Cloud explores the vastness of IPv6 and public cloud. IPv6 provides so much address space that you can use an address once for one connection and never use it again, and it isn't wasteful. The abundance of IPv6 may influence how you approach cloud applications and networks. The post Day Two Cloud 144: The State Of IPv6 In Public Cloud appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Day Two Cloud 144: The State Of IPv6 In Public Cloud

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 50:47


Today's Day Two Cloud explores the vastness of IPv6 and public cloud. IPv6 provides so much address space that you can use an address once for one connection and never use it again, and it isn't wasteful. The abundance of IPv6 may influence how you approach cloud applications and networks. The post Day Two Cloud 144: The State Of IPv6 In Public Cloud appeared first on Packet Pushers.

openSAP Invites
Episode 23: Learn How SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Can Help Move SAP Workloads to the Public Cloud

openSAP Invites

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 44:05 Transcription Available


Learn about SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, the leading Linux platform for hosting SAP workloads, including SAP HANA, SAP NetWeaver and SAP S/4HANA.

Telco in 20
Ep 36 – The Public Cloud is NOW

Telco in 20

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 13:56


Listen to the most exciting talk from MWC 2022 to learn how to turn the public cloud into a competitive advantage.

Red Hat X Podcast Series
Security Facepalms- Five Security Issues you Should Consider

Red Hat X Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2022 33:05


Running a Cloud Native Database in Public Cloud and Hybrid Cloud environments, one gets to see a number of security issues. These are nearly always obvious in hindsight. This is a list of five that Matt Ingenthron, Sr. Director of Engineering and in charge of Cloud Native Development, has seen with Couchbase Database Deployments.Resources: Matt's Scale 17x talk: https://www.socallinuxexpo.org/scale/17x/presentations/tyrannical-9s-solved-opentracing-your-apps-and-couchbaseJeff Dean and Luiz BarrosoThe Tail at Scale - CACM February 2013Rick L. HudsonInternational Symposium on Memory Management July 2018

The Future of Money
Commentary - My views on the Bitfinex Hack Money Laundering Arrests

The Future of Money

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 8:34


In this very special edition of Crypto Capsule Commentary, Henri Arslanian breaks down the fallout stemming from the recent arrests of a New York couple linked to the 2016 Bitfinex hack whilst offering a glimpse into how investigators currently operate in the cryptocurrency ecosystem, touching upon everything from the tools that law enforcement authorities typically deploy to the growing risks of money laundering in the DeFi space. Henri also explores the evolution of law enforcement's relationship with the crypto ecosystem and how the traceability tools deployed by authorities have advanced to the point that laundering crypto is easier to detect than laundering funds through fiat currency. This Crypto Capsule Commentary is ideal for anyone looking to learn more about some of the details behind these sensational arrests in a concise, digestible format. --- This episode is brought to you by Crypto.com where you can buy bitcoin and over 150 other cryptocurrencies with over 20 different fiat currencies.  Download the Crypto.com App now and stake CRO to get USD 25 with the code “henri2022": https://bit.ly/3xol87c  

Dell Technologies PowerofStorage Podcast
Meet the newest member of the APEX family: APEX Multi-Cloud Data Services

Dell Technologies PowerofStorage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 14:15


Mick is joined by Jay Krone to cover a key component of Dell's Multi-Cloud launch from January 19th. They discuss how to truly unlock the power of the multi public cloud. Hear about why this market is important to Dell, the offer itself and some tangible examples of how this unique solution can be applied in the real world.

Commitment Matters
Mary & Kevin Nincehelser: On-prem and hybrid and cloud, oh my!

Commitment Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 66:25


In this episode of Commitment Matters, Mary speaks with Kevin Nincehelser, COO at Premier One. Kevin can be reached via email at: KevinN@premier-one.com During their conversation, Kevin or Mary mentioned:The dilemma: hosting provider vs facilitator…on premises vs cloud…or hybrid? Here's a quick article to highlight the options.Then, there's the Private Cloud vs Public Cloud debate.Premier One is a facilitator that allows its customers to take advantage of industry giants, like Microsoft and Amazon Data Centers.Were you surprised to hear Kevin mention “The Cloud” is not more secure?Is migrating to the cloud a cost-savings option? The answer is “sometimes.”You need a Disaster Recovery Plan. Here's an overview to help you get started. Kevin mentioned knowing the difference between a switch and a fire wall. In case you wanted to know, here's the answer!Fraudsters are becoming more and more sophisticated in their approach. To learn more about protecting your business, listen to this podcast episode from season one featuring Tyler Adams of CertifID.Want a 101 on SOC Compliance?Kevin mentions that businesses are experiencing far more frequent cyber-attack than most of us realize. These statistics support his statement.Nobody likes Mutli-Factor Authentication (MFA). Here's why you need to use it.Are VPN solutions good, bad, situational?Kevin admits, everyone wants email, and it can be a good component for your business's communication but there's a security concern with it being your only option. Plus, here's more on how AI bolsters secure communication.Cyber Security Insurance Policies aren't all the same! What should you look for in one? Tech Terms Defined: Backup systems, Active Directory, Air Gapping, DR Testing. Ready to learn more about Premier One's services and take advantage of their knowledge? Check out their Tech Exec podcast!If you'd like to contact the Commitment Matters podcast, email podcasts@ramquest.com. Don't forget to subscribe, rate, and review this podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, or visit RamQuest.com/podcast to download the latest episode. Lastly, we love to see when and how you're listening. Share our posts, or create your own and tag them: #CommitmentMattersPodcast