Podcasts about Excel

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Best podcasts about Excel

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Latest podcast episodes about Excel

Diverse Thinking Different Learning
Ep. 87: Why Dyslexic Students Can Excel in Tech with Jeannette Roberes

Diverse Thinking Different Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 31:47


We often talk about ways to help students with dyslexia while in the classroom. But what happens when they are ready to enter the workplace and they still feel like their learning challenges will hinder them? There is a place for everyone and, in reality, those with dyslexia are a true asset to many companies, specifically those in the tech industry. Today's guest is Jeannette Roberes and she wears a lot of different hats. She is an author, speech pathologist, educator, and software engineer. While it sounds like a disconnected career path, Jeanette has used her multitude of experiences and passions to guide her to her role today: an advocate for individuals with dyslexia to pursue careers in tech. She works tirelessly to help organizations be better equipped and accessible to those with dyslexia, and she helps companies understand that individuals with dyslexia come with their own set of superpowers that can be a true asset.   Show Notes: [2:21] - Jeannette is on the board for Smiles for Speech and she explains her role there alongside previous podcast guest, Sandy. [4:06] - As a speech pathologist, Jeanette found the work extraordinary and she explains how she became an advocate for those with dyslexia. [5:34] - Jeannette is also a software engineer and she shares why she sought a career change by utilizing her interests. [7:01] - This experience allowed Jeannette to see how she could be multi-passionate.  [8:03] - In the past, we've seen our parents and grandparents work one job for their whole career, but things are different these days. [9:12] - She now focuses on helping technology companies hire neurodiverse individuals. [10:27] - Dyslexia is a language-based disorder that results in a high level of difficulty in reading. Dr. Wilson shares a bit about dyslexia. [11:12] - Jeannette's book outlines ways for employers to create accessible work spaces for those with dyslexia and what they bring to the job. [12:33] - Many educators are not familiar with dyslexia and are inadvertently providing their students with a negative experience. [13:49] - There is a mindset shift that needs to take place for not only employers but for those with dyslexia to know that they are valuable. [15:54] - We want to tap into our interests and work in a space that allows us to do that. [17:17] - Jeannette and Dr. Wilson discuss tools that can be used to better prepare someone with dyslexia to become proficient in technology. [19:16] - There are several products available and assistive technologies that have a huge impact; however, many parents and students think it is “cheating.” [21:22] - It is not the case that working harder results in success. It is so much more than who works the hardest. [24:02] - No matter the learning difference, we need to embrace every dynamic, including employers. [26:43] - Not only do employers and educators need to embrace their differences, individuals need to know that they are assets.   About Our Guest: Jeannette Roberes is an author who has worked as a speech pathologist, software engineer, and educator. She has spoken in over 40 countries and has earned recognition in The Washington Post and U.S. News & World Report, among other media acknowledgements. Jeannette's commitment to life-long learning is noted through her LETRS ® early childhood facilitator certification, TEACCH ® , Fast ForWord ® and PROJECT READ ® curriculum certifications. Her debut book, Technical Difficulties: Why Dyslexic Narratives Matter in Tech, has received 5 star reviews across Goodreads and Amazon. Jeannette is the chief academic officer of Bearly Articulating and a board member of Smiles for Speech.   Connect with Jeannette Roberes: Barely Articulating Website Smiles for Speech Technical Difficulties: Why Dyslexic Narratives Matter in Tech by Jeannette Roberes   Links and Related Resources: 6 Quick Questions for Parents Concerned About Dyslexia Dyslexia Episode 21: What You Know and Don't Know About Dyslexia with Dr. Lauren McClenny Rosenstein Episode 22: How Students with Dyslexia Can Develop the Skills Needed For Reading with Forough Azimi Episode 27: Why We Need to Support Parents Whose Kids Struggle With Learning with Maria Fagan Hassani Join our email list so that you can receive information about upcoming webinars - ChildNEXUS.com The Diverse Thinking Different Learning podcast is intended for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical or legal advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Additionally, the views and opinions expressed by the host and guests are not considered treatment and do not necessarily reflect those of ChildNEXUS, Inc or the host, Dr. Karen Wilson.

Radio Giga
2 Excel-Tabellen vergleichen & Unterschiede hervorheben

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022


Wie ihr in Excel zwei Tabellen vergleicht und die Unterschiede hervorhebt, zeigen wir euch hier anhand eines Beispiels mit Video.

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S37E14 - The Unlimited Potential of the Human Mind, with Masha Malka

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 39:08


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Masha Malka about the unlimited potential of the human mind. See the video here: https://youtu.be/SPgiFZB7XMg. Masha Malka (https://www.linkedin.com/in/theoneminutecoach/) has a master's degree in Higher Education, a diploma in Clinical Hypnotherapy, training certificates in Accelerated Learning Techniques, NLP, Transformational Thinking, the Science of Wellbeing, Law of Attraction Advanced Practitioner, and a graduate certificate in Teaching and Training Online. She is the founder of The One Minute Coach system, member of the Forbes Coaching Council, entrepreneur, best-selling author of 2 books, contributing author to the Chicken Soup for the Soul: Power Moms, international speaker, and a mother of three. She is a frequent guest on podcasts, radio shows, and television. Masha has been coaching clients internationally for 18 years, using her original programs - Year at a Glance executive program; Emotion Hacks to Clarity and Getting What You Want in Life, Excel in Learning, and Manifest with Masha. Masha currently lives between Miami, Florida and Marbella, Spain and travels frequently to London, UK where two of her children currently study. She speaks English, Russian, and Spanish, and competes professionally in ballroom Latin dance. Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Check out the Ready for Takeoff podcast at Wix.com/readyfortakeoff. Check out Zapier.com/HCI to explore their business automations! Go to Swag.com/HCI and use promo code HCI10. Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

2 Girls 1 Podcast
Making Spreadsheets Fun With @BachelorData [ENCORE]

2 Girls 1 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 79:40


We're off this week, but sharing another one of our favorite episodes about turning fandom into something amazing on the Internet. -Original Show Notes // December 6, 2021 - The only thing bigger than "Bachelor Nation" is "Bachelor Instagram." That's usually where the contestants, stars, villains, and conversations around the Bachelor and Bachelorette franchises go during each season. But educator Suzana Somers had a fresh idea. When she had to start learning Excel for her job, she got bored crunching pivot tables, so she inserted data from The Bachelor instead: How much screen time did each contestant get? Age ranges? Race and ethnic backgrounds? Roses awarded? Instagram followers? The results, which she visualized on Instagram, have been intriguing thousands of fans ever since. @BachelorData has become a big voice in the reality show conversation, and Suzana has turned it into an educational resource for those who want to improve their spreadsheets skills in a non-boring way. Alli and Lindsey chat with Suzana about the origin of the account, the online Bachelor community, and the fascinating conclusions she's drawn from analyzing the franchise over many seasons. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

La Radio de la República
DE MAL EN PEOR

La Radio de la República

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 39:16


Señora bonita. Amigo amo de casa. Por fin… ¡Es viernes! Quítese el SOSTEN. Cierre el Excel. DESCONÉCTESE DE TODO… Menos de Fórmula porque hoy también se desinforma. Por eso, pare la oreja, súbale a su radito porque estas son las noticias:-¡ARMAS SI , ABORTO NO!... Suprema Corte de Estados Unidos saca de la constitución el derecho al aborto. Justo lo que necesitamos, más gringos ARMADOS.-¡NO ES USTED, ES LA INFLACIÓN! Inflación crece primera quincena de junio… Pero como decía Raúl… Velasco, no Salinas: Aún hay más. -ANDAMOS VOLANDO BAJO… Aeronáutica mexicana no pasa el examen y seguimos sin lograr categoría 1 en aeropuertos. Dicen que pa diciembre, si bien nos va.-Y EN LA MAÑANERA: AMLO pone las manos en la lumbre por Gertz: “Le tengo confianza al fiscal” dice en el morning show. Si eso no es amor… entonces nada lo es.Completamente en vivo y en directo. Transmitiendo desde la capital mexicana especialmente a su escuela, casa u oficina. Ah, qué buena es la vecina. Abriendo la conversación. Cerrando con llave desde adentro. Ya llegaron, ya están listos, no se apure, comen y se van: La Radio de La República.

LinkedIn Ads Show
Is it Time to Fire Your LinkedIn Ads Agency? - Ep 66

LinkedIn Ads Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 17:41


Show Resources Here were the resources we covered in the episode: Episode on average benchmarks to shoot for Episode on boosting posts Episode on segmentation NEW LinkedIn Learning course about LinkedIn Ads by AJ Wilcox Contact us at Podcast@B2Linked.com with ideas for what you'd like AJ to cover.   Show Transcript Is it time to fire your agency that's managing your LinkedIn Ads? I'm going to walk you through what your agency should be doing on this week's episode of the LinkedIn Ads show. Welcome to the LinkedIn Ads show. Here's your host, AJ Wilcox. Hey there LinkedIn Ads fanatics. Because we run a LinkedIn Ads agency, we really get a front row seat into the tactics and management that other agencies are doing for their clients. We get to audit their accounts and take over accounts that they used to manage. We also realize that not everyone is able to work with us. So in this episode, we're going to be covering a lot of what expert management of a LinkedIn Ads account looks like. And of course, if you're an agency, and you're not doing some of these things, take the advice to heart and see if you can improve. A lot of these things are hard lessons that we ourselves have learned over time, and we've even lost clients over. So we're holding ourselves just as accountable to the standards, as well as you and we're trying to always improve. We've certainly learned from some bar mistakes. And that's what this episode is all about. And we hope that this will help you better evaluate the service that you're getting, so that you can get it elevated. And of course, if you're not an agency, if you're managing your LinkedIn Ads strategy in house, I do hope that you'll get some value from this about how you can improve your own strategy as well. And if you think we missed anything here, let us know in the comments, or shoot us an email so that we can include it in future episodes. First in the news, I got an interesting email from LinkedIn this week that was titled Inaccurate Engagement Reporting for your LinkedIn Video Ads. It says between December 2021, and January 2022, we discovered and fixed an issue that may have affected some metrics for sponsored video ads. Due to a technical error, you may have also viewed inaccurate campaign data for the timeframe of September 23 2021 to November first 2021, we recommend that you consider generating a new report for more accurate metrics. So this is really interesting, what it looks like LinkedIn did is they noticed that there were some over reporting going on in their campaigns. We've seen the same thing from Facebook, so this isn't a huge surprise. But they've now corrected it. And if you've already generated that data, you can go back to those time periods and regenerate your reporting. This happened to probably eight different accounts that we were managing during that time period. So you may want to go take a look at your ad account and see if you had some missed reporting happening during that time as well. We also noticed this week that LinkedIn's new navigation features are back, it doesn't look like anything changed. They took it off the market for a little bit and now it's back on. If you notice any changes, feel free to let us know, but it looks pretty similar to us. Okay, that's it for the news. Let's hit it. From my experience, there aren't very many add professionals out there with a lot of experience in LinkedIn specifically. And LinkedIn is very much a different beast, it appears quite similar to Facebook in a lot of regards, but the strategies are totally different. So in this first section, I'm going to be sharing a lot of the qualitative nature of maybe how you can feel out how experienced your ad manager is, there are a lot of questions that you can ask and just gauge from their response, how adept they are at it. And I should mention that everyone has to start somewhere. And I'm not saying that you shouldn't work with someone who doesn't have a ton of experience. But I would just hope that you would ensure that you're not paying premium rates for less than premium service. If someone is just dipping their toe in the waters and learning LinkedIn ads, you shouldn't be getting charged rates that are maybe for experienced agencies. First off, you can ask them about their experience on the platform, and just get a very direct answer from them, how many accounts they've managed, how much spend, how long they've been on it. Listen for how they talk about general strategy, how do they talk about how they utilize LinkedIn as different ad objectives? Or how they think about the different ad types? How do they use them strategically? Or how do they use them in tandem with your goals? A really big one is how do they talk about bidding and budgeting? Because those things are really crucial in getting low costs from LinkedIn. Because the network is already so expensive, it's really important to make sure that you're getting the best costs possible. How do they talk about different offers? Do they take a one size fits all kind of approach? Or do they work with you to strategically select offers, and they have a scientific approach to that level of testing? Find out what resources they use to stay educated. Obviously, if they're listening to this podcast, that's a great indicator they care enough to stay up on a topic and dive in really deep, but find out what other types of resources they're including and they're using. It's also good if they're doing their own testing on other ad accounts to try to learn, but obviously, you may not want to be an agency's guinea pig as they're testing new strategies that aren't proven. You might want to ask them about how often they refresh ad creative, and how often they do new ad launches, how they determine when something is old and saturated, and now needs to be replaced? Do you catch them just parroting back what they've heard from LinkedIn? Or did they talk more from experience? And not that it's a bad thing to do what LinkedIn recommends, but if they take all of LinkedIn's advice, they may not have very much experience or done much testing themselves. And then you have to ask yourself, why not just let your LinkedIn account rep do all of the management, if your agency is just taking all of their advice anyway? Here's some things that are more about the marketer themselves. Every time you talk to them, do you learn something new? That could be an indication of how excited they are about their craft? And truly how deep their knowledge base goes? Do you feel like you can trust them? Have they lost any of your trust by maybe flaking out on something they promised to do, but didn't end up doing? Or have they been wrong on something and you've caught them in being wrong? And if you do catch them being incorrect on something, do they freely admit their mistake and take ownership? Are they honest? Are they transparent? I know it's a big deal to me, when I'm working with someone, I don't expect everyone to be perfect. But I do expect that they will own up to a mistake. If every time you talk to someone about something that has happened wrong, and it's always someone else's fault. It's always someone else's problem. They always have a great excuse for why they didn't play a part in that, that's a good sign that you've got someone who isn't willing to admit their own mistakes. And I lose respect very quickly for those kinds of people who can't admit when they're wrong. Are they constantly giving recommendations for ways to improve the account? And how about the attention they provide to you? Do they take a long time to reply? Do you get short answers or answers that feel like they didn't really read your email? These could be a signal that you're not really a valuable client to them. And maybe it's because your account is maybe on the smaller end of what they usually manage. Or maybe they specialize in another platform and LinkedIn Ads is just kind of a bolt on for them. So they can't really give it all that much attention. And of course, we know that an agency can't act like an internal employee. You can't expect an agency to reply immediately and go and do tons of tasks for you like an internal marketer would. The way that the agency model is set up is that account manager usually has multiple accounts, and multiple other clients that they're managing. So we definitely accept the fact that they're not going to act like an internal employee, but we do expect that they're going to give you good responses, good service, and obviously try to respond quickly. Are they constantly coming to you with new thoughts and strategies about the platform? Do they stay up to date on LinkedIn Ads trends and new products that LinkedIn is coming out with? Are they willing to test new things? Or even be the ones suggesting new tests? How ofte are they in communication with you? Do you sometimes go days or weeks without hearing from them? Or do you feel like if you weren't bugging them, would you never hear from them? This one really bothers me. Did someone sell you, but then when it came to actually get started, they pawned you off onto some marketer who has much less experience and maybe they're overburdened and responsible for way too many things or other channels? That feels like a little bit of a bait and switch to me. And during that sales process, I would share hope they are being really upfront about who's actually doing the management. And of course, like we've said, everyone needs to start somewhere. So definitely no knocks on having an entry level person managing an account, but if they're brand new to LinkedIn, and responsible for running Google and Facebook, too, there's no way that they're going to be hyper trained and knowledgeable enough for years. We get around this a little bit because we focus only on LinkedIn Ads. And so it's one channel that we have to train our employees on. So we can get them up to speed much, much faster than if we were trying to train them across multiple channels. How about are they honest about their performance? Do you catch them maybe taking credit for something that occurred on a different channel? Or that someone else did? Did they try to sugarcoat their metrics? And if something isn't working, are they flexible? Can they pivot strategies and think outside the box? Do they seem overly optimistic about performance? Are they trying to sugarcoat like we've talked about, if they're telling you that everything's looking really good, but when you look at it, it doesn't feel like it's doing that great. Maybe they're just trying to keep you as a customer longer by giving you a good report and lulling you into thinking that things are going well, when they may not be. How about how do they handle your concerns? Do they just brush them off? Or do they address them head on? Some marketers like to act arrogant, like you're stupid and that they know what's better? And usually, to me, this feels like a defense mechanism for someone who doesn't feel comfortable managing what they are, and I would hope that you're not being subjected to something like that. Okay. Here's a quick sponsor break, and then we'll dive into the quantitative measures on how you can evaluate your agency. The LinkedIn Ads Show is proudly brought to you by B2Linked.com, the LinkedIn Ads experts. 10:15 We as marketers want to be where our customers are. If you're a B2B company, chances are LinkedIn is the channel that you'll want to be on. But this is a platform that's both expensive and cumbersome by nature. It takes an expert to tame the beast that is LinkedIn Ads. If you want to get the right message to your ideal customer at the lowest possible costs, B2Linked is the agency for you. We've learned the ins and outs of LinkedIn Ads. For the past eight years, we've spent over $150 million on the platform. And we're official LinkedIn partners. So you'll be working with LinkedIn Ads experts from day one. You can apply to work with us on the contact page of B2Linked.com. We'd absolutely love the opportunity to work with you. Alright, let's go ahead and jump into it. What about performance? Are they hitting your goals and getting good performance? One great way of telling this is comparing them with benchmarks to see if they're outperforming or underperforming, what the averages are on the network. To understand the benchmarks, go back and listen to episode 15, where we go really deep into that. If they're below benchmark, which happens because marketing is all about constantly testing. And we never know what's going to work and what won't. But if it's below average, are they making optimizations and trying to get them above. LinkedIn doesn't have a change history like Google does. So you can't go in and see how many changes or how often changes are happening in the account. But at least if you see real effort, that could be a clue that you've got someone good working on your account. Is your click traffic or your leads, actually, within your ideal customer persona? There's a lot of tools that LinkedIn gives us to be able to narrow down your lead quality, and make sure it's the very, very best leads that you're bringing in. So if you're seeing a lot of low quality leads, or people outside of your ideal persona coming through in your leads, and they're not doing anything about it, that may be a clue that they don't totally know what they're doing. You'd certainly want to see them going in and actively adding exclusions and trimming audience targeting down to adjust and make sure you're getting the very best. What about this? Are they invested in performance further down the funnel? Or are they focused just on the front end data that they can get from campaign manager? This is a little bit challenging, because a lot of marketers aren't technical enough. They're maybe not super skilled at CRMs, or Excel, but if they're not technical enough to blend the front end data from LinkedIn campaign manager, and the back end data from your CRM, maybe they've got an internal resource that they could bring who is able to do that. You just want to make sure they're not leaving you high and dry, or saying something like, well, that's not possible when it actually is. What about what features they're using? You could ask if they're using audience expansion, that is immediately a red flag that they probably don't know what they're doing, because I've never seen a case where audience expansion performed well. Are they using lead gen forms? Lead gen forms generally have a much higher conversion rate, but sales will talk about them, resulting in a lower quality lead. So it's very worth comparing between lead gen forms and landing pages. If they've just defaulted to one and they haven't asked you about the other, then that could be a red flag. Or they asking about getting access to your CRM, or being able to report from the data in your CRM. That is super important on LinkedIn. If they only boost posts, that could be a clue that they are really experienced in Facebook, but don't really know LinkedIn all that well. Go back and listen to episode 51 all about boosting posts. What about the bidding method that they're using? If they're only using the defaults for anything, that could be a clue that they don't really know what they're doing. We found that if click through rate is really good max delivery is the best way to bid. Most of the time click through rates are in that position where it's actually better to pay by cost per click. And if they're only using one bid type, that could be a clue that they don't know what they're doing. What about the targeting? Are they targeting too broadly? Do they have multiple job functions or multiple types of personas, all lumped in one, same campaign? Go back and listen to the last episode, Episode 65, all about segmentation. Also look at your audience sizes. If every audience is over about 150,000 people, generally that tells me they don't have a solid targeting strategy. So that's worth looking at for sure. Do they do all of their analysis inside of campaign manager? Or do they pull data out into Excel or some other dashboard where they can get a deeper look? There are a lot of insights that you can only get by bringing the data into a different platform. So I hope they are. Here's a really big one for me. There are a lot of agencies that won't actually give the client access to the LinkedIn Ads account. That lack of transparency really bothers me as a marketer, because they could be doing things like misreporting, lying to you about what your data is doing, or telling you certain costs, but then adding a markup on there, which you may not want to be paying. If you do have access to the account, and I really hope you do, you can do a little bit of analysis yourself and see do your numbers that you see match up with what the agency is showing you. That could be a great way to compare and see if they're being totally transparent and honest. So I hope these were helpful and understanding what your agency should be doing, or at least could be doing. And certainly, I hope it's helpful for you internal marketers to help you manage your own account better. Is there anything that you look for that we might have missed? Shoot us an email or leave us a comment? We'd absolutely love to include it in a future episode. All right, I've got the episode resources for you coming right up. So stick around. Thank you for listening to the LinkedIn Ads Show. Hungry for more? AJ Wilcox, take it away. 16:12 All right down in the show notes, you'll see links to Episode 15 that's all about benchmarks. So you can compare your performance and see how you're actually doing. Episode 51 we do a call out to and it's all about boosting posts so make sure you listen to that one. If that's something that you're curious about. I also just barely mentioned the episode on segmentation. It was the most recent episode, you've probably listened to it if you're listening to this one. But if not go back and listen to it. It's definitely one of the ones that you'll need to listen to. If you're trying to learn more about LinkedIn Ads. Or if you have a colleague who is, go check out the course that I did on LinkedIn Learning. The link is right down in the show notes and it is by far the highest quality course and the course with the lowest cost out there for LinkedIn Ads right now. So check that one out and look down at your podcast player right now. If you're not already subscribed to this podcast, hit that subscribe button. We'd love to have you around next episode. And please do go leave us a review. We absolutely love to hear from you. We get emails all the time from you about what you're learning from the podcast and what you're getting out of it. Please go leave those in the reviews so other people get the news about what they should be learning as well. With any questions, future topics or feedback to the show, email us at Podcast@B2Linked.com. And with that being said, we'll see you back here next week. Cheering you on in your LinkedIn Ads initiatives.

Introvert Biz Growth Podcast
Understanding How to Price Your Offers

Introvert Biz Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 52:05


In this week's episode, I talk to Janene Liston about the P of Pricing. We talked about understanding how to price your offers. Janene is a highly trusted Pricing Consultant & Business Coach working with small businesses, startups and entrepreneurs across industries and the globe. She's also a Certified Pricing Professional who has been helping businesses improve pricing and profits for over 25 years. Her mission is to empower small businesses to be more sustainably profitable. Helping them know the value of their offer and more effectively implement their pricing. Ensuring they can confidently create, communicate and charge for the value they deliver. She's the host of Live with the Pricing Lady, the Podcast, a European public speaking Champion and a sought-after podcast and radio show guest. Watch out, her passion for pricing is contagious In this episode, you'll learn about understanding how to price your offers as well as... why pricing is so darn difficult Value Pricing and what the heck that means anyways Pricing psychology and when pricing gets icky How to apply fair and humane Pricing if we want a Triple Win: win for ourselves, win for our clients and win for the planet What confidence has to do with Pricing Discounting our prices And much more… Janene's Resources   Janene's Website Live with the Pricing Lady Check out Janene's free resources Connect with Janene on: Twitter Facebook YouTube LinkedIn Sarah's Resources Watch this episode on Youtube (FREE) Sarah's One Page Marketing Plan (FREE) Sarah Suggests Newsletter (FREE) The Humane Business Manifesto (FREE) Gentle Confidence Mini-Course Marketing Like We're Human - Sarah's book The Humane Marketing Circle Authentic & Fair Pricing Mini-Course Podcast Show Notes We use Descript to edit our episodes and it's fantastic! Email Sarah at sarah@sarahsantacroce.com Thanks for listening!   After you listen, check out Humane Business Manifesto, an invitation to belong to a movement of people who do business the humane and gentle way and disrupt the current marketing paradigm. You can download it for free at this page. There's no opt-in. Just an instant download. Are you enjoying the podcast?  The Humane Marketing show is listener-supported—I'd love for you to become an active supporter of the show and join the Humane Marketing Circle. You will be invited to a private monthly Q&A call with me and fellow Humane Marketers -  a safe zone to hang out with like-minded conscious entrepreneurs and help each other build our business and grow our impact.  — I'd love for you to join us! Learn more at humane.marketing/circle Don't forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes or on Android to get notified for all my future shows and why not sign up for my weekly(ish) "Sarah Suggests Saturdays", a round-up of best practices, tools I use, books I read, podcasts, and other resources. Raise your hand and join the Humane Business Revolution. Warmly, Sarah Imperfect Transcript of the show We use and love Descript to edit our podcast and provide this free transcript of the episode. And yes, that's an affiliate link. Sarah: [00:00:00] [00:01:00] [00:02:00] [00:03:00] [00:04:00] [00:05:00] [00:06:00] [00:07:00] Hi, Janine. So happy to have this conversation with you. Yay. I'm so glad Malita introduced  Janene: the two of us. Yeah, me too. Great to  Janene: be  Sarah: here. So Janine, we're gonna be talking about pricing. It's kind of one of the, I'd say it's definitely a hard topic. You know how I have the humane marketing mandala and one of the pieces. Pricing. And so I always have in each kind of season, I [00:08:00] have one of the episodes about pricing and it's definitely one that a lot of people listen to cuz let's face it. It's not easy for us business owners. So I wanna ask you that question, why it's not easy, but maybe for before that tell us a little bit about you and how you got into pricing. They call you the pricing lady. So , so tell us how that all came about. Yeah. And yeah. Share a little bit of your  Janene: story with us. Okay. Yeah. So thank you. First of all, for having me here and welcome to all those of you who are watching and listening. I started my career. I'm a us born. I grew up in California. I started my career as a structural engineer and after a few years of practicing, I decided it wasn't what I wanted and ended up. Long story short ended up in product management. And the first thing that they handed me was a price list and it was 20 years old and without any commercial background or any real marketing knowhow, I knew [00:09:00] something was wrong with that and took it upon myself to not just redo my price list, but all the price lists and really. Gave everything a refresh. And that was really my first foray or my first experience in pricing. I can honestly say I had no real background in it. But I just knew that was wrong and that we needed to at least fix that. After it was with that company, I came to Switzerland in 2001. And when I decided to stay here, then I was hired as a global pricing manager for Siemens building technologies. And that was in 2004. And it's been all pricing all the time. Since then. So it's been nearly 20 years of just pricing. I worked in also in another industry in the agricultural industry agrichemicals and seeds industry for a while. And then in 2015 started my own business. And at the time I didn't know what to call myself. A coach, a consultant. And I, you know, I didn't really care for either of the terms. [00:10:00] And one day I was explaining to someone that when I would do projects in the corporate world, I was traveling all over the place and I'd walk into a new location with a new group of people to kick off a pricing project and, you know, walk up to them and start introducing myself. Hey, I'm Janine, I'm here for the pricing project and they go, yeah, I know you, you're the pricing lady. . And she goes, well, why didn't you call yourself that? I was like, I dunno, , let's do it. And so now I use it, I leaned into it fully and, and use it. And I, I find it very easy. It's a nice way to, first of all, introduce myself because it always puts a smile. Either people are confused at first if they're not native English speakers, they're like, what, what is that? But usually people smile. It's easy to remember. Right. And it sort of breaks the ice. So it, it, for me, it fits the bill of not saying I'm a coach or I'm a consultant. Which makes me a little bit more general, but it puts me in [00:11:00] a very different position. It's very clear what what I work with and what I do. Yeah. And it kind of has this  Sarah: familiar tone to it. It's not like, oh, I'm the pricing expert. You know, it's like, I'm the pricing lady. I, I know a thing or two  Janene: about pricing. it's approachable. That was one of the things that when I worked on my brand. I kept using the word fun. And of course the people who are with the branding experts were like, no, don't use the F word . Yeah. You know, cause a lot of people try to do that and it's very general. And I, I understood that. And then one day I realized it's it was about being approachable. Most small businesses may feel that, you know, consultants are out of reach for them. You know that it's not something that's really available to them. And I really wanted to work with small businesses and I am approachable. And you know, I work a little bit differently than you might with a typical consultant. Although I can work in that way. I, I prefer to work with people in, [00:12:00] in a more approachable way. End fun pricing can be fun. And I've actually had people tell me specifically that, you know, they really dreaded going to that workshop, that pricing workshop or course, or whatever it was, but it was actually really a lot of fun for them. And to me that was, you know, high praise .  Sarah: Yeah. Yeah, totally. It's funny because for me as well, I think about pricing and, and it's like, you know, math. And numbers and that kind of stuff comes up and, and, and that's only a very small part of it. I'm sure. But we'll dig into that a little bit today. So, so yeah. Why don't we go back to my initial question that I thought, you know, why is it so hard for us to price? As small business owners to put a price on our services, what have you found out over the last 20 years? Janene: Great question, Sarah. So in my experience, there's really two reasons. [00:13:00] One is that nobody ever taught you how Hmm. Yeah, right. It's like, you know, if nobody ever taught you how to ride a bike, you'd figure it out possibly by yourself. But you'd have quite a bit of scrapes and bruises and bumps and maybe some mild trauma depending on, on, you know, how quickly you were able to do it. And it's the same with anything else. As well as with pricing, if nobody's ever showed you, how then, why would you expect for it to be just something that you would know how to do? And it would be easy and without any struggle, it's a little bit illogical to think that it would be nobody's ever pulled us aside in school and said, okay, Sarah, 30 years from now, when you start your own business, this is how you're gonna set the price of your, your packages. Right. They don't do that. And funnily enough, most people don't realize. While they do teach about pricing in MBAs. They don't actually teach you how to go about setting your prices. [00:14:00] Mm, they talk about, well, there's, you know, penetration strategies and skimming strategies and there's price elasticity. They use all these big fancy words, but they don't actually tell you how to go about setting those prices. So yeah, most people don't know how that's the first reason. Right.  Sarah: The second reason. Can I just go in there as sure. Because also what came to mind is for the MBAs probably cause I've worked at an international management school here in Loza and they have a big MBA program. And so I think when they teach about pricing, they look at big companies. They don't necessarily look at the small business owner and the small entrepreneur as an example. Right. And that, I think also probably leads to the, I don't know what you're gonna say for the second reason, but I have a feeling it has to do more with the, the personal aspect as well.  Janene: Yes, it does. Mm-hmm it does you're right. I would say those programs are geared towards more corporates. Yeah. Uh, [00:15:00] Yet again I would say. A lot of corporates are not very good at setting and managing their prices either. Mm. Yeah. I mean, even the corporates are not good at it. How are we gonna figure it? They do. They do struggle with it. They struggle with different aspects of it. Mm-hmm but if you think about in the larger company, who's usually responsible for setting the prices. A lot of times it's the product manager, right. And the product manager's background is not a marketing one. Right. They're an engineer or they're an agronomist or they're a scientist, you know, or a chemist. Right? They have no commercial background. No. Yeah, it's true. Yeah. So it it's, it's. It's a very important aspect and a larger company. A lot of people are responsible for it. Of course, in a smaller company, you gotta wear all the hats, the finance hat and the marking hat and the sales hat, so on and so forth. And that comes to, like you said, the second aspect of it, which is very personal and it has to do with [00:16:00] your core beliefs around money, success and worthiness mm-hmm . Yeah. And that is, you know, that is really something. Comes in full force for most small business owners because it becomes it shouldn't. But for many people it feels like that price that they're setting is somehow a reflection of them personally. Right. And being able to make. You know that disconnect, you know, you're not, I, I used to have a program called speak, believe in charge your worth. And I always had a real problem with charge your worth being in that phrase. I couldn't find a better way to say it. So I stuck with it for a while, but because it's really, it's not your worth. It's the value of what your products are, services or. Bring the customer and yeah, being specific with your language in that way can be very important. Most of us have hangups with money, success, and worthiness that play a sabotage role in the [00:17:00] background of our decision. So I was just got off the call with a client who is Dutch. And I've had several clients who are Dutch and they always think that the price has to be the lowest price in the market. Mm. But that is, you know, something that comes from in large part, the Dutch culture from their families, from their upbringing that, you know, it always has to be the lowest price. Now, many of those clients are operating in Switzerland where people are. Generally willing to pay a bit more. They're not always looking for the cheapest solution and yet they're operating with this completely other mindset in a market that doesn't match that mindset. And it really makes it hard for them. To feel like they can charge more. So that's just one example. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, we  Sarah: could do an hour just on  Janene: this topic alone. Right.  Sarah: And, and, and that's yeah, you work with clients on that. It's part of my marketing, like we're human program, because it, it is like, if you don't get. [00:18:00]  Janene: Like, if you don't do the deep work right there, mm-hmm , I, I honestly  Sarah: think you can never figure out the pricing and, and, and it's so interesting. You're bringing up different cultures so that matters, but then also, you know, how you grew up and, and, and all of these. Influences that obviously by the time we are ready to launch our business while we've been influenced by all of this. So we come with this baggage that is just like, yeah. And it's, it's so different from. You know, being an employee in a corporate where it has nothing to do with you, even if you are the one setting the price, it has nothing  Janene: to do with you where here it has everything to do with you, or you think it has everything to feel it. Yeah. Yeah. It's. Even, I mean, in the corporate world. So to me, there's two sides to pricing. There's, you know, the, the more concrete side, which is the numbers and the figures, which generally are [00:19:00] feel more concrete. And then there's the psychological side. I always tell people. Somewhat jokingly, but I actually mean in all seriousness is that pricing is all about the psychology baby. And you have to wiggle your eyebrows. When you say that , I don't think I'm asking. You're not doing it very well today. I'm out of practice because whether it's a small company or a big company, the psychology. Your personal psychology, the psychology of your organization. And this I've seen in large companies, the sales team thinks that price is the most important factor. From the customer's perspective. I will tell you nine times outta 10, when we did the research, we found it was maybe in the top five, usually within the top 10 mm-hmm . But if your sales team thinks it's number one, That is going to impact how they behave when they're having sales discussions with your customers. Yeah, so it, it's not just a small business [00:20:00] thing. It, it happens in both sides. And when it comes to psychology, you have the psychology internal to your business for a small business, your psychology usually and not of your employees, but then you also have the external psychology towards the market, towards the customer. So it has many different facets to.  Sarah: Yeah, I wanna talk about, so we addressed the, you know, the internal psychology a little bit, because it has to do with, you know, who you are, what you believe, whether you believe that you are worthy net, whether you ever sell anything anymore or not. Right. You have  Janene: to really, truly believe that you're worthy without ever  Sarah: getting a client again. right. And then there's the external psychology. And, and I talk about that also in my marketing, like we're human book, that's kind of. Cheeky psychology that we're taught in, in marketing and kind of this online sales world. Mm-hmm so I'm really curious to, to hear more about that and your points of view, and what's true. [00:21:00] What's not, and mm-hmm and how to deal with it when we want to. You know, apply this humane approach to running a business with ethics and not cheat people into buying your stuff just by using some kind of psychology hack mm-hmm . So talk to us about that.  Janene: Okay. Before I get into that, let me just make one more comment. So one of the things that I've learned in having my own business is I thought this was a career development journey. Mm. When in fact it's been a perfect per a personal development journey from day minus two until the day I stop, it will continue to be a personal development journey. And that's also one of the reasons that this personal psychology. Placed it such a big role. So you're constantly being pushed outside of your comfort zone. Pricing is certainly one of those areas. The value of what you offer is certainly one of those areas and, and being able to have the [00:22:00] strength and the courage. To step outside your comfort zone to tackle these things is what's going to enable you to keep pushing forward in your business and be there to deliver the great things that you wanna deliver to your clients. I truly believe that. And I'm sure that people told me that before I started. I'm sure I did not understand it. I know, but it is 100%. My reality. Yeah, yeah, yeah,  Sarah: yeah. That's a good preface for, for what's coming up next.  Janene: okay. So now you wanted to talk about the psychology. So the external psychology, there are a lot of things. A lot of studies out there. A lot of tricks of the trade, if you will. I'm not sure I like that terminology. But when it comes to, you know, having a humane business and I, I I'm, I'm not going to say that using them is inhumane or humane. I'm not making any judgment. What I really [00:23:00] feel is that as a business owner, you should understand the psychology side of it because. Even if you're not using it actively, you wanna make sure that accidentally you're not doing things that are hurting your business. . Yeah. And, and that's very possible to do. For example, I had a client a few weeks ago, we had CR gone through and created her price list. And she was getting her website ready and she had two offers, one for a very high priced. Group high net worth individuals. And the second offer, there were two completely different offers, but one was targeted towards young adults who were just starting out in their careers. Mm-hmm . And so she had one offer on one webpage and the other offer on another, and then she had a pricing page and she had the prices for both offers side by side mm-hmm which from a psychology perspective [00:24:00] meant that all the good work we had done was actually now working against her because it felt like cuz the prices were on the same page. Like they were competing with each other mm-hmm whereas if she just removed the pricing page and put the price for the young adult offer here and the price for the high net worth individuals here, that comparison would not be made in the same way. That's what I mean by you have to understand, you know, These things are communicating so that you can make sure you're not doing things in a way that is actually hurting your business or your customer's experience. Mm. Yeah. Now one of the things you and I had spoken about was the endings of prices. Right? Right. You might have that conversation. yeah. Should it be 95 or 97 or 99 or zero? So I can't answer that question. For everybody that is going to be a very individual decision in each business. Here's what I can tell you. And then you can decide for [00:25:00] yourselves what is going to be best suited for your company prices that end in zero, tend to be associated with more luxury goods. Prices. It ends in nines and sevens and fives tend to be associated, especially when they put, you know, 95 cents. Yeah. Or 99 cents at the end, those tend to be associated with more. Companies that are playing towards the low price leader side of things. How, how do I know this? If you go into Louis Viton you will never see 1,999 and 99 cents, right? You just won't see it. No, yeah. You'll see. 2000, you'll see, 2,500, 8,000, right. It's just, and, and the prices will be tiny on a little teeny, tiny price tech. Yeah, you go to Miro or you go to Kmart or somewhere like that. They have big price tags with great big [00:26:00] prices on them. And there's 90 nines and 90 fives at the bottom. Right. So you have to, you know, what sort of, you know, how does this align with the value or with your purpose or brand? What's gonna make more sense for you. Yeah. And, and, and,  Sarah: and how is it gonna resonate with your clients? You know, who are you trying to attract? If you have a big ticket and, you know, service and you price it with the 99 cents at the end, they probably  Janene: won't like it well, it depends. And it also depends. So here's another example. If you're say you're a consultant, you're offering projects. If you offer a price of 25,000 versus 24,495, right then from the customer's perspective, 25,000 looks like a number that you kind of just pulled outta your back pocket. Whereas [00:27:00] 24,495 looks like a number that you've actually spent some time considering. does that make one better than the other? You have to be the judge about yeah. What per what you want or how you want to be perceived by your customers. What's going to make more sense right now, if you're in an, in an industry or in a part of the world where you're gonna be doing a lot of negotiation, then 25,000, maybe. Just the easiest place to start. Right. But if you're looking not to do a whole lot of negotiation, you may start with a number that's more precise because then it reflects that that number is precise. Right.  Sarah: And if you're in Morocco, because I just came back from two weeks in Morocco I learned that you, you know, negotiate the price down to 30% of. They tell you, and then you go back up. So yeah, that's something that we're completely not used to doing the whole bargaining. Right. So I don't recommend that. no, no. And  Janene: I think you are, you're [00:28:00] absolutely right. Think about who you're targeting, what they expect, what works exposed for you now, the 90 nines and the 90 sevens. You know, those work with target groups that are more price sensitive. Yeah. They do, I mean, studies have shown time and again, that 1499 people see the 14, they don't think 15. Yeah. So if they were to see 15 and 1499 next to each other, they would perceive the 1 14 99 as being 14. Now that doesn't mean you have to use that in your business. You need to do what's right for you and for your clients. So understand why those things are things, if you will and then decide, okay. What feels right for my business and for my audience and lead with that, because that's most important to me is that you believe in the number that you use. Yeah.  Sarah: I think that permission piece is so important [00:29:00] because yeah. I've had people ask me, so do I need to do the 2 97? Can I not just, you know, say 300 just because everybody else is doing it. And I'm like, no, you just like, you it's like, whatever you feel is right. And because when you priced the way you feel is right. then if you've done your, you know, intense client work and know who your client is, well, then they will also resonate with that more than the 2 97. Janene: So, and if you're really, really not sure, create two landing pages, change one to have a price of 2 97, 1 to have a price of 300 and AB test. Yeah. Yeah. See what works better. Exactly. Yeah. I mean, okay. You'll make $3 or three Franks, less on each sale for the 2 97, depending on how on your margins. That could be that could make a difference or not, hopefully not. You know, but that's test it out. Yeah. Who says you can't. No  Sarah: one, I have a [00:30:00] follow up question on the comparison because that's another example that I share in the book and we see a lot where we have one same offer mm-hmm , but we have three different prices, you know, like one is the V I P offer the other one the sec, the one in the middle, and then the, the, the, the third one. And you know, where you use that anchor system. So talk to  Janene: us about that. Yeah. So anchoring is actually really important. I always tell PE, ask people what's the best way to sell a 500 Frank product, put it next to a 1500 Frank product. Right. And it's, it's, it's actually true. Yeah, you may never sell the 1500 Frank product, but if it's there, cause what, what you're doing. So the anchoring, the concept here is that people are going to want to compare it to something, right. And if you give them something else on the page to compare it to, they don't necessarily have to go elsewhere to look for a comparison. Right. Right. So that can be [00:31:00] really helpful. Now. Also not just the price, but what's included in each package. So you said the same offer, but there should be three different offers. Sorry. Yeah. Say same sales page, but same sales page, but three different offers. Yeah. What's included in those offers can steer behavior as well as the price. So let's say that, you know, the middle offer is the one that you think is the best for most of your clients. Right? Then you can set it up to kind of steer most of them towards that. Right. Or if you don't wanna use that, you need to make sure that you're not accidentally steering them in the wrong direction. Right. So based on what's included and the price levels, you can, you can. Help them navigate through the decision  Sarah: gently influence them or, or, yeah,  Janene: well navigate. Well, let's, let's face it. I mean, if I worked with a tool called [00:32:00] apathy and it is a tool that allows you to take an Excel. Like I, my pricing tools that I have on my website, they're Excel based. Mm-hmm it take, it takes the Excel tool and makes it into a web-based tool. Okay. So just converse it mm-hmm magic. I love it. and when I wanted to use it, they had three offers. Right. And the first offer was you have access for one, one month or three months. I forget which and then the next level up, it meant that you got a WordPress integration. And it was almost double the price. And I thought, well, okay, mm-hmm but where did press integration is really helpful? It can really solve a lot of problems. So I thought, okay, fine. And then the premium one came with phone support and I thought, well, I don't know anything about web based tools. I have no idea what I'm getting into and it was only 10 bucks more. So I think it went from like 30 to 60 to 70. Dollars. Okay. And the middle one was six months [00:33:00] and the last one was a one year access. Okay. So. My logic was okay. I want the WordPress integration. So I'm willing to pay double right and have six months access. Right. And then in the next step, my logic was, I want the phone support or the, the priority support. I didn't really care about the 12 months. I just, and it's only 10 bucks more. Okay. That's interesting. So they,  Sarah: they actually wanted you to get the, the third  Janene: offer. Right? Did, but that's where they put their focus. They absolutely did. Mm-hmm they absolutely did. And you know, if you start looking at, as you're buying things online, look, look at how they structure the offers and you'll see very clearly. Usually you can tell which one are the most profitable or at least which one they're steering you towards. Yeah. Wine lists at a gross at a grocery store at a restaurant mm-hmm . The most profitable will wine for most restaurants will be the second, most expensive. On like [00:34:00] buy the glass Uhhuh glass. Why? Well, they know that most people don't know a lot about wine mm-hmm so they're trying to, you know, make a good choice, but they don't wanna buy the, they don't wanna embarrass themselves by no, they're not gonna buy the cheapest and they're not gonna buy the most expensive mm-hmm so they buy the second most expensive,  Sarah: right. yeah. Yeah. And that's kind of the traditional thing. So I was surprised that with this tool, They actually wanted you to get the, you know, the highest one, even though it wasn't that much higher, because usually you see the third offer to be some kind of V I P you know, 10 times the middle of it depends. So it was interesting to, yeah, I've never  Janene: seen it really depends. So sometimes. You're right. Sometimes they use the, the premium offer as the main anchor. Yeah. Which means they make it so high price to make everything look cheaper. Yeah. But other times it's actually the it's better for ACY. It was better to have someone in there [00:35:00] for full year mm-hmm Because they had just started and they were working out some of the kinks right. In this web-based con web-based tool converter, if you will, for lack of a better phrase. And so, and to have me on the phone with them, so actually, Benefit more to have people all the way over there. Yeah. Yeah. That feels like  Sarah: an honest offer. You know, it feels like, okay, I see what you're doing, but it's a win-win situation and, and yeah. You know, that's what we want. So I'm gonna share with you an example of one of my programs. So the, the marketing, like we're human program, I ran it in January and I had those three offers. The first one was. Online only mm-hmm I think they went for 500 bucks and then the group program 950 mm-hmm cause I run it live only twice per year  Janene: mm-hmm  Sarah: and then the V I P program for 4,800 mm-hmm where they also got coaching besides the [00:36:00] group program. And so I thought like, you know, the, the cur the common advices, just put that V I P offer on there. You might sell one, but you might not. And to my surprise, I actually sold three and only four group programs. So I was like, what's going on here? Like how, yeah. Can you share some insights of what might have been happening there? Did I not put enough value maybe or perceived value in the group offer? What do you think  Janene: was happening? Yeah, there's a lot of things that could be going on there. The price difference between 509 50 is not very big. Did you get anybody at the 500 or was it no, not for this one. Exactly. So you made, you made the barrier very low for them to go to the middle package. Okay. Yeah,  Sarah: so which I wanted, I wanted to, which was good,  Track 3: right?  Janene: Yeah. Yeah. Which is, which is good. I wanted,  Sarah: You know, [00:37:00] probably, I mean, it was great that I had the three V I P I would've wanted more for the  Janene: middle one for the middle, right? Yeah. Yeah. Hmm. I think, I think here it's, it's just a matter of people wanting that one to one support. Yeah. So the big difference between the two packages, the middle and the top was getting your one to one time. Right. Is that correct? Am I correct in that?  Sarah: Yeah. Yeah. That's the difference. Yeah. Between the two. So,  Janene: And I think for, you know, for some things, you know, I, I I've had group programs as well and I, I will continue to do but I've found most of my clients prefer to work one on one. Because , this is gonna sound funny when I say it, you know, but most people will assume that. Their pricing is special. Right. And that it has to be done in a special way. It's unique and, yeah. Right. And, and yes, every business is unique. Don't get me wrong. I use the same [00:38:00] process with everyone, but as we go through that process, different. Different businesses will require we focus on different areas with different levels of intensity. Right? Right. So it's, it's same but different. And I would guess that, you know, the, the people who went for your, your V IP package, it was really because they wanted that one to one. FaceTime with you. Yeah. And they didn't think that the group would give them what they needed.  Sarah: Yeah. It's interesting. You get so much insights from, you know, just this example and, and, and then you're like, oh, what does that mean for me? Do I want to lower the V I P do I want to increase it? Because I actually want more people in the, in the group or, yeah. How do I play with that? And it's yeah. Yeah. It's just  Janene: so, I mean, I think, I think in your case you could play. Increasing the one to one package mm-hmm , but may, maybe also bringing your, your group program over a thousand. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It'll, [00:39:00] it'll be interesting how  Sarah: it plays out for the next. Yeah. I thought I'd bring it up and, you know, because these, yeah. These examples are, are real and we're like, how do we do this? And it's basically just like, well, you, you try and, and then you figure out, okay, this work, that didn't work. How do I improve it now? Right. But obviously  Janene: it could also be that. I mean, cuz they are. They are, I would guess the same, but different , which is so, so specific Janine in that, you know, one is a group, two of them are group program, and one is individual. So having it in this tiered structure, you know, it's. If you had say a VIP option, that was part of the group, it was really a VIP experience of the group, as opposed to a straight up one to one package, then you might see different results. Right, right. Yeah.  Sarah: Yeah. Again, what, what this tells me that is that pricing.[00:40:00]  It's not just about a number that you put on the thing it's also  Janene: about your offering, right? Offering pricing,  Sarah: same, same thing. Really. It's like, well, how much value are you going to put into that price? And, and I think that's kind of what went wrong the last few years. And that's why I, I kind of attack some of these pricing strategies where they use these psychology hacks to, you know, sell a program for a hundred thousand and that, and the actual value. It's just very questionable often. And, and so that's why, what we need to understand is like, well, what is the value that people actually get out  Janene: from that offer? Right. Well, I guess, you know, if, if the business is, you know, half a million dollar business and they're looking to grow to be a million dollar business than investing a hundred thousand dollars to grow your business to a million is, is a reasonable. Investment to expect to make, right? Yeah, of course. But if you're a [00:41:00] $80,000 business and you are investing a hundred thousand to try and get to  Sarah: 200,000, then you  Janene: know, it's, you can, the pace be made probably would most people buy into it? Probably not. Right? Yeah. So it's, it's all contextual and this is why. I cannot emphasize enough when it comes to pricing. You always, always, always have to go back to who are you targeting? Mm. Yeah, because if you're targeting businesses that are $80,000 businesses looking to get to 200, then a hundred thousand dollars offer or Frank offer is probably. Suitable for that target group. Yeah. That's true. And you can really make life difficult for you if you try to create, if you create an offer and then try to force that offer on the wrong target group, right? Yeah. And let's face it. Most businesses start with, this is what I offer. Now. Let me figure out who I [00:42:00] can sell it to . Yeah. As opposed to starting with, I wanna do something for this group of people, with what I have, let me figure out how I can best serve. Sarah: So it feels like there's like two big problems. Either you price too low because you have all this baggage or you grew up in a culture where the lowest price is the best idea or you price too high to the wrong target audience. And I'm sure there's a ton, tons of other problems, but these are kind of the two that stand out from our conversation. Janene: Would you agree with that? Well, yeah. I mean, it's much, if you. Regardless of whether or not, you know what you're no, let me, let me think about how I wanna say this. So. Probability that you will over under price is relatively high. The more you understand about pricing, the more you can reduce that likelihood, right? Yeah. Of being under overpriced doesn't mean it doesn't happen, but even, even if, and here's another interesting part of the [00:43:00] psychology. So even if your price is a little bit high, Yeah. If you're really good at communicating the value, you'll sell it anyhow. Yeah. No. Now you don't want it to be icky sales, but let's say I, you always use this example. So let me just use it again. There are two lemonade stands. You're walking down the street, you run across two lemonade stands. One says lemonade, 25 cents. The other says lemonade, 50 cents. Which one do you buy? okay. In most parts of the world, you might buy one from each kid. If they're two cute little kids selling lemonade, and just give the other one, a 25 cent tip, call it a day. But what if the one that is 50 cents also says clean water included? Hmm. Yeah. And that's the marketing  Sarah: piece. ,  Janene: that's the pricing psychology piece from the communication standpoint. Yeah. That child is communicating the value of what they deliver better. Now it may be that they are brother and sister [00:44:00] and mom is in the kitchen making the lemonade, but because one of them communicated the value differently. People are more willing to pay the 50 cents. Right. And let's say you're in a country where clean water isn't assumed. Then they have an even bigger advantage. So the better that you can communicate the value of your offer. To some degree, not big, not on a big scale, but to some degree, the more wiggle room you have in terms of, you know, O overpricing let's say yeah. Over underpricing. And that's exactly  Sarah: why. And what we said at the beginning, it's not just about the, the number. In fact, the number you can change it, however you want almost with, with boundaries, but it's about communicating that value. That's absolutely so key.  Janene: And I was saying most people struggle. To really understand. I see this in my clients all the time. This is where they struggle the most. When we get to the value [00:45:00] piece, consistently, I mean, there are struggles in different areas, but there's something about that. That attaching a number. Cuz when we do the value work, we don't just talk about benefits. Benefits are not value. It's what people get from those benefits that creates value. And you need to be able to understand the benefits so that you can understand how those create value and then quantify that value mm-hmm . And when it comes to quantifying value and know, it makes people feel really uncomfortable. but it's hard because  Sarah: again, your worth, your worst kind of gets  Janene: in there. It's like, really? Yeah. And they're like, well, what if you know, what if. I can't guarantee it. I'm like, I'm not asking you to guarantee it. I'm asking you to tell a story about the value that people can get. Mm-hmm you can choose to share that with clients or not. It's up to you, but if you don't understand what it is, [00:46:00] then how can you believe in any price that you put out there? Yeah. Yeah. You can't. Mm. And if you don't this ,  Sarah: I, I look at the hour and I'm like, oh no, we have to wrap up. But I'm so glad we brought up the, the value pricing. Cause that was kind of in the questions I, I had prepared and we just kind of jumped over it. But the, yeah, this idea of pricing for value and not like your Dutch  Janene: client just for time  Sarah: exchanged or, you know, let me get the cheapest offer out there so that I get the most clients. It is so important and I think it cannot be repeated enough and, and you're right. It's, it's difficult. I mean, it's,  Janene: you have to believe in the value that you bring. Yeah. Yeah. And if you don't look at it and, and put number to it, Then you'll really struggle to believe in it. And like I said, if you don't, they won't there's always a few gem clients out there who believe in spite that you [00:47:00] don't , but those, you know, those are, are often few and far between and the best thing for you and for your clients is that you understand and believe in the value that you bring. Sarah: Ah, this has been so good. Thanks so much, Janine. This you're welcome has been really valuable. I wish we could. Maybe we will do a second round round. hard to, yeah. But do you share with our listeners where they can find out more about you and how you work with clients and, and all of that? Yeah.  Janene: I encourage people to head on over to the pricing lady.com. Very easy to remember. I have a podcast you'll find some great Information on there as well and regular guests and also solo cast episodes, which are a little bit more instructional. And of course, if you'd like to book a call, you can find that there as well.  Sarah: Wonderful. And I have one last question and that is what are you grateful for today or this  Janene: week? This one? Yep. I'm grateful for opportunities like this. I [00:48:00] really enjoy sharing this topic with people and, and helping people to think differently about it so that they can gain momentum towards having a more sustainably profitable business. So thank you very much, Sarah. Thanks for everyone for listening. Thank  Sarah: you, Janine. Take  Janene: care.[00:49:00] [00:50:00] [00:51:00] [00:52:00] 

Catfish Weekly/Panfish Weekly Podcast Station
Panfish Nation 74 With Lyle And Mark

Catfish Weekly/Panfish Weekly Podcast Station

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 68:37


They spawn is over so how do you catch panfish in your area now. We will discuss that and a lot more tonight at 8 Central time on our YouTube Channel. Be sure to check it out, https://www.youtube.com/c/PanFishWeekly/videos for our thoughts. Be sure to like, share, and subscribe! Donations appreciated paypal.me/catfishweekly Lyle's equipment 2001 Tracker Tundra with a 125 Mercury Humminbird elecronics Crappie Zilla Baits, plastics Lil Miss Bacon Baits 6500 LLC Abu reels, and others Krampus Kanes Blackhorse ultra lite rods Sufix 832 braid 10# Bass Pro Shop 6# Excel line Slime line 6# Panfish Nation hand ties --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lyle-stokes/support

The Financial Modelling Podcast

Is Microsoft Excel Dead? Lance Rubin from Financial Modelling Podcast sponsor Model Citizn, and Christopher Argent from Generation CFO resume their debate of whether this 35-year-old tool is the pocket knife for all tasks or past its prime.

This Project Life
CoP Live: The Path to Business Cases & Knowledge Capture

This Project Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 44:28


Co-hosts Jeff Plumblee and Matt Stoltz are live today for the second Community of Practice live event! The group discusses preparing a business case for executive approval, starting a project, and gathering subject matter experts and an executive sponsor. Jeff asks for the amount of detail that is wanted to start a project. The conversation moves to involving cross-functional team members and conducting retrospectives after every phase and concludes with an overview of solutions for storing and sharing the lessons learned for best practices.Listen in for new perspectives on making the most of your projects.   Key Takeaways: We've doubled our community since the first event! The group discusses how to turn an idea into a project: Present the business case to executives. Gather cross-functional folks. Empower subject matter expert champions. Get an executive sponsor. Support the SMEs. Jeff asks John what level of detail he looks for in a project idea. John wants to know the date, description, benefits, and the company pillar it touches. Lauren talks about drilling down to the use case, the benefit, and keeping up with the competition. Jeff suggests using a template. Matt asks how to share project learnings. John holds a retrospective listing what they Loved, Learned, Loathed, and Longed for on sticky notes on the wall to discuss. Aaron says to hold an Agile retrospective after each project phase so nothing will be missed. Then institutionalize the learning. Lauren discusses surveys and retrospectives. She uses Start/Stop/Continue for actionable takeaways. John's Lessons Learned is an Excel spreadsheet. Matt also uses an Excel file. Aaron suggests using a database system. Lauren says to have one knowledge management repository that links to every document.   Brought to you by Moovila — Autonomous Project Management Website: Moovila.com/thisprojectlife Email: thisprojectlife@moovila.comResources Mentioned:Moovila.com Teams Agile FunRetro EasyRetro Start/Stop/Continue (SKS process) Confluence Notion  

Cloud Accounting Podcast
Why Accountants Don't Trust Tech

Cloud Accounting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:27


SponsorsCanopy: https://www.cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/canopyA2X: https://www.cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/a2x Synder: https://www.cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/synderNeed CPE? Subscribe to the Earmark Accounting Podcast: https://podcast.earmarkcpe.comGet CPE for listening to podcasts with Earmark CPE: https://earmarkcpeShow NotesComing soon! Get in TouchThanks for listening and for the great reviews! We appreciate you! Follow and tweet @BlakeTOliver and @DavidLeary. Find us on Facebook and, if you like what you hear, please do us a favor and write a review on iTunes, or Podchaser. Interested in sponsoring the Cloud Accounting Podcast? For details, read the prospectus, and NOW, you can see our smiling faces on Instagram! You can now call us and leave a voicemail, maybe we'll play it on the show. DIAL (202) 695-1040Need Accounting Conference Info? Check out our new website - accountingconferences.comLimited edition shirts, stickers, and other necessitiesTeePublic Store: http://cloudacctpod.link/merchSubscribe Apple Podcasts: http://cloudacctpod.link/ApplePodcasts Podchaser: http://cloudacctpod.link/podchaser Spotify: http://cloudacctpod.link/Spotify Stitcher: http://cloudacctpod.link/Stitcher Overcast: http://cloudacctpod.link/Overcast ClassifiedsFuture Firm: futurefirmaccelerate.comGetW9: getw9.taxRoyalwise Solutions: learn.royalwise.comResolve Works: https://www.resolve-works.com/careersWant to get the word out about your newsletter, webinar, party, Facebook group, podcast, e-book, job posting, or that fancy Excel macro you just created? Why not let the listeners of The Cloud Accounting Podcast know by running a classified ad? Hit the link below to get more info.Go here to create your classified ad: https://cloudacctpod.link/RunClassifiedAd Full Transcript Available Upon Request - info@cloudaccountingpodcast.com

Business Breakdowns
Gogo: Internet for Private Jets - [Business Breakdowns, EP. 62]

Business Breakdowns

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 67:59


I am @Compound248 and this is the next installment in our Business Breakdowns mini-series focused on Digital Infrastructure, where we are breaking down a handful of companies that are key players in the digital infrastructure asset class.    In this episode, we will talk about a company that delivers that airbourne experience, Gogo. Known for its eponymous inflight WiFi service, Gogo is frequently misunderstood, having undergone a transformation to focus purely on the business, or private, aviation industry. It sells equipment that gets installed on a private aviation airplane, and then, in infrastructure like fashion, monetizes that equipment with high margin service revenue for decades. We're fortunate to be joined by Oak Thorne, who has led Gogo for 20 years into the success it is today.   For the full show notes, transcript, and links to the best content to learn more, check out the episode page here.   -----   This episode is presented by Visible Alpha. The team at Visible Alpha built a platform to analyze consensus data and financial metrics on over 6,000 publicly traded companies. Rather than having to dig through models one by one, Visible Alpha extracts data from every line item across sell-side models so you can better understand expectations on metrics beyond just revenue and earnings. Listeners are invited to try Visible Alpha for free by visiting visiblealpha.com/breakdowns   -----   This episode is brought to you by Daloopa. Daloopa streamlines a major pain point for investors. By capturing all of a company's KPIs and adjusted financials into their database - Daloopa makes it easy to quickly update your models for what matters. Daloopa uses AI to find every KPI disclosed - from charts, to text, and even from footnotes of investor presentations. Daloopa updates these KPIs and data points in your existing Excel models in one click, regardless of your source or format. Test Daloopa for free at daloopa.com/Patrick.   —--   This episode is brought to you in partnership with Roundhill Investments, the advisor to the Roundhill IO Digital Infrastructure ETF – BYTE - which trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol BYTE. The fund tracks the BYTE Index, which measures the performance of 40 leading global digital infrastructure businesses, such as towers and mobile communications, fiber and fixed line connectivity, and data centers. For a prospectus and more information, please visit roundhillinvestments.com/etf/byte.   -----   Business Breakdowns is a property of Colossus, LLC. For more episodes of Business Breakdowns, visit joincolossus.com/episodes.   Stay up to date on all our podcasts by signing up to Colossus Weekly, our quick dive every Sunday highlighting the top business and investing concepts from our podcasts and the best of what we read that week. Sign up here.   Follow us on Twitter: @JoinColossus | @patrick_oshag | @jspujji | @zbfuss   Show Notes [00:04:02] - [First question] - Gogo's history and how his history intersects with it [00:08:03] - His background and what lead him to joining Gogo  [00:10:01] - A primary focus on US airlines and high-end air travel specifically [00:11:37] - 30% market penetration of potential WiFi signal outfitted aircraft [00:12:33] - What the competitive landscape looks like today and how many planes they have [00:14:15] - Whether the formerly unaddressable planes will make their way into their fleet  [00:16:04] - Their product offerings today and the differences between them  [00:19:26] - Overview of their business economics and their digital infrastructure  [00:21:31] - Unit economics and labor and install costs [00:23:44] - How much more traffic their existing network could handle   [00:24:17] - CapEx, service revenue, and a projected 20% system growth  [00:25:55] - Cost structure margin on their recurring service revenue  [00:26:36] - Where they are in building out their 5G network [00:27:25] - Momentum of business growth year-over-year [00:28:29] - How the ATG network actually works and how the 5G connection improves it  [00:30:44] - What portion of their business comes from aftermarket installations [00:32:18] - Competitive nature of this sector and if someone could come after Gogo [00:35:23] - Speed differentials between their varying network offerings   [00:36:48] - Price differences with competitors and the strength of their dealer network  [00:38:19] - Expensive alternatives and the customer experience of GeoSatellite services  [00:40:42] - Describing the differences between GeoSatellite and Elon's Starlink [00:46:19] - Reasons why Starlink might become a competitor [00:48:56] - How Gogo's 5G and global broadband product are offensive and defensive  [00:51:24] - Portion of new US delivery aviation planes built with in-flight WiFi solutions [00:53:39] - Plans to become a free cash flow generating machine  [00:55:01] - How long he anticipates this growth runway to continue  [00:56:27] - Potential risks to Gogo from a legal and regulatory perspective  [00:57:33] - Legal allegations from SmartSky and using the unlicensed spectrum [00:59:50] - Cyclicality of their clients and suspended business periods   [01:02:18] - Their channels and customer concentration  [01:03:17] - Minority shareholders and their long term vision  [01:04:57] - Two key lessons for others attempting to build and lead a company 

Mastering Your Small Business Finances ~ Money Management, Bookkeeping, Entrepreneurship, Payroll, Accounting, Cash Flow, Sol
89: Save Time Utilizing Automated Bookkeeping Whether You're Starting A Business, Self-Employed, A Solopreneur, Entrepreneur, Mompreneur, Owner, Side Hustler, Freelancer, Bookkeeper Virtual Assistant

Mastering Your Small Business Finances ~ Money Management, Bookkeeping, Entrepreneurship, Payroll, Accounting, Cash Flow, Sol

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 15:14


Whether you are a business owner or a bookkeeper, you've probably heard about automated bookkeeping.  Automated bookkeeping uses artificial intelligence, or AI, as well as machine learning to help speed up your bookkeeping tasks.  In today's podcast episode, I dig deeper into what automated bookkeeping is and how you can start utilizing these practices in your business to be more efficient.  If you are already utilizing automatic bookkeeping, you know how much time it can save you, but make sure you are doing everything you can to ensure that your data is accurate.  I'll cover how you can refine your processes and prepare yourself for the future so that you are taking advantage of all the benefits that come along with automated bookkeeping.  Whether you are a self-employed individual, a solopreneur, entrepreneur, mompreneur, freelancer, small business owner, a remote, virtual, online, or in-house bookkeeper, or a virtual assistant or VA, you know how time-consuming your bookkeeping can be.  Listen in so that you can learn how to let automated bookkeeping work for you so that your bookkeeping entries get made even when you are not working on it. These tips are essential whether you are using a computerized software system like QuickBooks, Xero, Wave, or FreshBooks for your business finances; or doing your bookkeeping manually with an Excel spreadsheet or even a Google Document… The Strategic Bookkeeping Academy, including Bookkeeping Basics, is open for registration!  You can learn more and sign up here: https://www.financialadventure.com/sba Schedule a free consultation, and we'll work together to dive into where you'd like to see yourself and your business in the future.  We'll create a laser-focused plan including which steps you need to take and when you should be taking them: https://www.financialadventure.com/contact-us Grab Your FREE guide:  5 Essential Strategies For Stress-Free Bookkeeping: https://www.financialadventure.com/5essentials Your FREE Online Virtual Bookkeeping Business Starter Guide & Success Path is waiting for you: https://www.financialadventure.com/starterguide Apply to join the Mastering Your Small Business Finances CEO Mastermind or the Elevate Your Bookkeeping Business GROW Mastermind group: https://www.financialadventure.com/mastermind Looking for a payroll solution for your business?  You can get an exclusive 15% discount on your payroll services when you sign up here: https://www.financialadventure.com/adp Looking for an extremely beneficial online bookkeeping resource?  Join us in our Mastering Your Small Business Finances Membership, where you can ask questions and get answers regarding your specific business.  We dive deeper into the topics on this podcast and provide additional resources and accountability: https://www.financialadventure.com/mysbf Sign up for a virtual coffee chat to see if starting a Bookkeeping Business is right for you: https://www.financialadventure.com/discovery Join Our Facebook Community:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/womenbusinessownersultimatediybookkeepingboutique Are you a bookkeeper looking to start, grow or scale your bookkeeping business?  Join our FREE bookkeeper community here: https://www.financialadventure.com/bookkeepercommunity QuickBooks Online - Save 30% Your First 6 Months: https://www.financialadventure.com/quickbooks Show Notes:  https://www.financialadventure.com This podcast is sponsored by Financial Adventure, LLC ~ visit https://www.financialadventure.com for additional information and free resources.

NCPR's Story of the Day
6/22/22: A class for kids who excel in building stuff

NCPR's Story of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 9:54


(Jun 22, 2022) The college track isn't for everyone. A building trades program in Malone is giving high school students a feeling of success in school, and the skills they need to get a good job right away. Also: New York Democrats' will vote on their choice for lieutenant governor in primaries next week.

The Texan Podcast
Special Edition - Ted Cruz at the Texas GOP Convention

The Texan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 17:28


Welcome to a special edition of The Texan's Voices of Texas podcast. Our team spent most of last week covering the Texas GOP Convention, and chatted with dozens of elected officials, candidates, and insiders. We'll be releasing a series of podcasts with those conversations, so stay tuned. This first installment is a conversation with Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX). We chat about gun control proposals in D.C., his decision to speak at the NRA convention despite many other Texas Republicans bowing out, chances for GOP congressional candidates in South Texas, and why school choice is the litmus test for his endorsement in state-level Republican primaries.  MT: This is McKenzie Taylor here with Senator Ted Cruz. Senator, thank you so much for joining us. We so appreciate your time. TC: McKenzie, it's great to be with you. Thanks for having me. MT: Absolutely. I would love to talk about the various gun control proposals that are floating around DC right now. We just saw Senator Cornyn, you know, a few hours ago. He's on stage here at convention, the delegates had a lot to say, they booed him there. Walk us through what is on the table in DC, and kind of what you could see happening with these proposals. TC: Well, it's not clear what's on the table. And I've said I'm going to wait and actually see the text of something that is submitted, that I'm not going to judge a bill till I see the details. At this point we have a one page list of bullet points, and on something as fundamental as our constitutional rights, the devil's in the details. I think there's a lot Congress can and should do when it comes to violent crime. I was in Uvalde the day after that horrific shooting. MT: Oh, wow. TC: And I've been in too many of these. I was there in Santa Fe, I was in Sutherland Springs, I was in El Paso, I was in Midland, Odessa, I was in Dallas. It is horrific that we have monsters, that we have homicidal maniacs who commit these kind of terrible crimes. I think there's a lot we can and should do. The problem is whenever there's a mass murder, inevitably there are a bunch of voices of Democrats and the corporate media who all say do something, do something, do something. Well, it might surprise them to know I agree we should do something, but the something we should do really matters. And what works, what's effective, is targeting bad guys, targeting criminals, targeting felons and fugitives, and those with serious mental illness who try to illegally buy firearms, prosecuting them, putting them in jail, getting them off the street before they commit those crimes. That's that's how you stop these kind of horrific murders. And then on top of that, it is also making our vulnerable targets safer and more secure, in particular schools, enhancing the security at schools. And the most effective tool to do that is putting armed law enforcement in our schools so that if a lunatic comes and tries to hurt our kids, the first thing that lunatic encounters is an armed police officer who stops them before they hurt a child. Those are the steps that if we really wanted to stop these crimes, we would focus on doing. And I've repeatedly introduced legislation to do exactly that, to target the bad guys, to prosecute the felons and fugitives, to make our schools safer. And sadly, over and over again, the Democrats have filibustered that legislation, they block that legislation. Their approach is consistently to try to go after the right to keep and bear arms for law abiding citizens, and that doesn't work. Just as a matter of effectiveness it is incredibly ineffective in stopping violent crime. You look at the jurisdictions with the toughest gun control laws, almost without exception they have the highest crime rates and the highest murder rates. And gun control doesn't work 'cause when you disarm law abiding citizens, the criminals still have their guns but nobody can defend themselves. And so I don't know what Congress is going to do, if anything. If we are focusing on criminals and stopping bad guys and making schools safer, I am enthusiastically in favor of it. But if instead we have Republicans teaming up with Democrats to undermine the Second Amendment and take away the constitutional right to keep and bear arms of law abiding citizens, then I'll fight tooth and nail to stop it. MT: So speaking of law abiding citizens, the NRA convention. You were one of the only Texas Republicans who still opted to go to convention when so many others bowed out. What was behind your decision? TC: Look, I thought that was actually a very easy choice. I've spoken at a lot of NRA conventions, and I have to admit I'm tired of the cynicism. Whenever there's a mass murder, Democrats and the corporate media immediately begin demonizing the NRA, begin treating it as if the men and women of the NRA are responsible for the psychopathic mass murderer. And that's a lie, it's an absolute lie. And it's not just a lie in that nobody there is a violent criminal committing acts like that, but it's even worse than that because it is the men and women at the NRA, it is law abiding citizens, it is good guys with a gun who inevitably stop these lunatics. You know, I was in Sutherland Springs the day after that church shooting. I stood in that sanctuary while the pews were still thrown to the sides, while there was shattered glass everywhere covered with blood. I saw a cell phone shattered and covered with blood. I saw where an 18-month-old child was murdered by that evil bastard. And I'm sorry, anyone that murders an 18-year-old child, there is no other word for it but evil. That monster was stopped because an individual citizen, a guy named Stephen Willeford, a plumber, lived right down the street, he heard the shooting that Sunday morning. He didn't go to the church, he was just at home. He heard the shooting. He went to his gun safe, he brought out his AR-15, and he ran down to the church barefoot, didn't take time to put on his shoes. And he got behind a truck and he engaged the shooter. He called out and engaged the shooter. The shooter was wearing body armor and he was systematically executing the people in that church. The shooter came out to engage Stephen Willeford. And Stephen is an NRA rifle instructor, he knows how to handle a firearm and he put two rounds in the shooter. If Stephen Willeford hadn't been there, that monster would have killed many more people that morning. Now, the Democrats and the corporate press are liars when they blame law abiding citizens exercising their Second Amendment rights for the conduct of homicidal maniacs. And so I wish everyone had made the decision to come to the convention. Donald Trump came and I came, and I saw President Trump, and I pulled him aside and said, thank you, thank you for being here. It mattered that you came, it mattered that you didn't back out. You didn't give in to the heat, to the criticism, because I think giving in to that gives credence to the lies of the Democrats and the corporate media. MT: Absolutely. So earlier on stage you shouted out three South Texas Republican candidates, Cassy Garcia, Mayra Flores and Monica De La Cruz. What do you expect to see in November for these candidates? TC: I hope to see all three win. Mayra Flores obviously just won this week, and it's a big, big deal. The district she won in South Texas, it has not gone Republican in over 100 years. I mean, it has been a Democrat bastion. And I gotta say, national Democrats are freaking out. They're terrified. I think Cassy Garcia is a fantastic candidate. I think Monica De La Cruz is a fantastic candidate. I think the most likely outcome in November is we win all three. And if that happens, all three of those districts all along the Rio Grande, they had been Democrat for more than a century. And if we come out of November with three Republican members of Congress representing them, not just Republicans, but Hispanic women, conservatives. Look, Cassy I know incredibly well. Cassy was part of my staff for about 7 years. She was my South Texas director, she was my deputy state director. I've already done multiple rallies with Cassy. I'm going to be down in the valley helping all three, helping Mayra, helping Monica, helping Cassy, 'cause I think we win all three races. And it is a sea change. We're seeing Hispanic voters in South Texas, across Texas and across the country, galloping towards Republicans because the policies of Democrats are failing them. Look, it is Hispanic working families who are seeing inflation skyrocketing or paying 100 or 150 bucks to fill up their truck or their minivan, who are seeing the cost of food, the cost of electricity, the cost of rent, the cost of homes, the cost of lumber, every cost going up. It's Hispanic families and every family across Texas that's dealing with crime and the rising crime rates because of the Democrats' soft on crime policies. And the single biggest driver of South Texas turning is the chaos at the southern border. You know it's easy for Chuck Schumer to sit in Manhattan and say an open border is great. Doesn't impact him. You cannot be down in the Rio Grande Valley, you cannot be down in South Texas and see firsthand the human misery that Joe Biden and Kamala Harris' open border policies have cost. You can't see the prisons that are overflowing, the hospitals that are full, the schools that are overflowing, that the infectious disease rates that are going up. You can't see the little boys and little girls who've been horribly assaulted by human traffickers, physically assaulted, sexually assaulted, young girls brutalized. You can't see that human tragedy and defend the policies of this administration. I've done multiple roundtables down in South Texas. I remember one prominent Democrat elected official said at the roundtable, listen, if my party is the party of open borders, I can't support that. Nobody who is seeing this disaster can defend it. So Chuck Schumer can from Manhattan, Nancy Pelosi can from San Francisco. But one of the things I'm really excited about, I'm looking forward to in January, seeing Cassy and Monica and Mayra standing up and arguing with Pelosi and AOC and all the rest of them about the disaster their policies are producing. MT: You said school choice is probably the largest, you know, the biggest issue you look at when endorsing candidates, specifically here in Texas. Why among all the conservative issues that are important to Republican voters is that the litmus test for you? TC: I think school choice is the civil rights issue of this next century. You know, if you think about all the problems we've got in society, whether it's poverty, whether it's crime, whether it's healthcare issues, if kids get an education, many of those crimes largely take care of themselves. Many of those problems are much more likely to be solved. On the other hand, if kids don't get an education, if they drop out of school, if they don't learn, we know the poverty rate is going to be much, much higher. We know the crime rate is going to be much, much higher. We know that healthcare issues are going to be much more severe. You know, in my family, like most people's families, education was the gateway to the American Dream. My mom was the first one in her family ever to go to college. She went to Rice in 1956, studied math, became a pioneering computer programmer in the 1950s. My dad, as you know, he came from Cuba in 1957, went to the University of Texas. Came here with nothing, was washing dishes making $0.50 an hour, but he was able to get an education and was able to climb the economic ladder, to work towards and achieve the American dream. And the Democrats… Look, there's a political failure. Today's Democrat Party is bought and paid for by the teachers' unions. They are irrevocably opposed to choice because the teachers' union bosses demand it of them. Now this is at the same time that just about every poll that is done of African American communities and Hispanic communities show anywhere from 60, 70 to even 80% support for choice. The Democrats who claim they give a damn about those communities are willing to leave those kids trapped in failing schools. I point it out a lot of times. I've said, listen, school choice, the rich and middle class have always had it. If you're wealthy, you're going to be able to get a good education for your kids. If you're wealthy, the school down the street that you send your kids to, if it had a 50% dropout rate, if of those kids that graduated 70% couldn't read at grade level, if you had drug dealers walking the halls and little girls getting sexually assaulted in the bathrooms, if you have resources, your kid would be gone the next day. You wouldn't leave your kid in a school like that. You would either pay the money for tuition for a private school, or you'd pick up and move to another neighborhood that had a better public school. But you would use the resources you have to give your kid hope and a chance. School choice is about saying you know what, low income kids deserve that same right. If you've got the right to save your kid, don't tell the single mom in the inner city that her children, her babies have no hope, her babies have no escape, her babies have no chance at the American Dream. I think this issue matters fundamentally and profoundly. And I gotta say, you know, my approach, virtually every US senator stays out of state elections and stays out of state primaries. Frankly, if you're an elected statewide official on the federal level, it is stupid to get into primaries. So every time I do this, I am hurting myself.  MT: Yeah. TC: If you make an endorsement in a primary, here's the typical pattern you have. You get half their friends and all their enemies, so whoever you endorse against, they hate you forever. There's a reason that you don't see any other senators doing this, because you make a lot of people mad when you stick your nose into a contested primary in your state. I usually stay out of issues in Austin. I figure I got enough battles fighting Biden and Harris and Pelosi and Schumer that I don't need to be in the middle of every battle in Austin too. The one big exception I make is for school choice, and I engage in a lot of primaries in Texas state races. And my team literally makes an Excel spreadsheet of every vote on school choice. And it's real simple. If you have voted against choice, the chances that I will support you are essentially zero. If you voted for it and you otherwise have a reasonable and conservative record, the chances that I'll support you are pretty good. And there are a whole bunch of contested primaries where I've engaged on that basis. And this last cycle we saw a bunch of champions who had the courage to defend choice win. Now, I'm glad that we're going to have more champions in the legislature in January. But I also hope that this becomes an encouragement even to those folks in whose race I didn't get involved. I hope it is a carrot and a stick. I hope that we'll see some Republicans saying, you know what, maybe I wasn't going to vote for choice before but I'm not sure I want to pick that fight. I'm okay with that. I'm okay with folks deciding, let's do the right thing, let's actually make a lasting difference for kids. I can tell you before I ran for Senate, I told several people, I said if I am dead and gone, if my tombstone says that I made a meaningful difference in bringing about school choice for the kids of Texas and the kids of this country, I'll die a happy man. That is a legacy to be proud of. It matters for the future of our state and the future of our country.  MT: Senator, thank you so much for taking the time. It's a busy week, we so appreciate it.  TC: It's great to be with you.

Cloud Accounting Podcast
AccountingWEB Live #5: Marketing that Works w/ Lee Frederiksen

Cloud Accounting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 24:46


Meet Our Guest, Lee Frederiksen:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/leefrederiksen/Accounting Today contributions: https://www.accountingtoday.com/author/lee-frederiksenLearn more about Hingehttps://hingemarketing.com/Need CPE? Subscribe to the Earmark Accounting Podcast: https://podcast.earmarkcpe.comGet CPE for listening to podcasts with Earmark CPE: https://earmarkcpeGet in TouchThanks for listening and for the great reviews! We appreciate you! Follow and tweet @BlakeTOliver and @DavidLeary. Find us on Facebook and, if you like what you hear, please do us a favor and write a review on iTunes, or Podchaser. Interested in sponsoring the Cloud Accounting Podcast? For details, read the prospectus, and NOW, you can see our smiling faces on Instagram! You can now call us and leave a voicemail, maybe we'll play it on the show. DIAL (202) 695-1040Need Accounting Conference Info? Check out our new website - accountingconferences.comLimited edition shirts, stickers, and other necessitiesTeePublic Store: http://cloudacctpod.link/merchSubscribe Apple Podcasts: http://cloudacctpod.link/ApplePodcasts Podchaser: http://cloudacctpod.link/podchaser Spotify: http://cloudacctpod.link/Spotify Stitcher: http://cloudacctpod.link/Stitcher Overcast: http://cloudacctpod.link/Overcast Want to get the word out about your newsletter, webinar, party, Facebook group, podcast, e-book, job posting, or that fancy Excel macro you just created? Why not let the listeners of The Cloud Accounting Podcast know by running a classified ad? Hit the link below to get more info.Go here to create your classified ad: https://cloudacctpod.link/RunClassifiedAd Full Transcript Available Upon Request - info@cloudaccountingpodcast.com

Cloud Accounting Podcast
AccountingWEB Live #4: How Uncle Sam Collects His Due with IRS Deputies

Cloud Accounting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 35:14


Meet Our Guests:James Robnett, Deputy Chief, Criminal InvestigationLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-robnett-b5697445/Darren Guillot, Deputy Commissioner, IRS Small Business DivisionLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/darren-john-guillot-b7262351/Learn more about IRS Criminal Investigationhttps://www.irs.gov/compliance/criminal-investigationLearn more about IRS Small Business Divisionhttps://www.irs.gov/about-irs/small-business-self-employed-division-at-a-glanceNeed CPE? Subscribe to the Earmark Accounting Podcast: https://podcast.earmarkcpe.comGet CPE for listening to podcasts with Earmark CPE: https://earmarkcpeGet in TouchThanks for listening and for the great reviews! We appreciate you! Follow and tweet @BlakeTOliver and @DavidLeary. Find us on Facebook and, if you like what you hear, please do us a favor and write a review on iTunes, or Podchaser. Interested in sponsoring the Cloud Accounting Podcast? For details, read the prospectus, and NOW, you can see our smiling faces on Instagram! You can now call us and leave a voicemail, maybe we'll play it on the show. DIAL (202) 695-1040Need Accounting Conference Info? Check out our new website - accountingconferences.comLimited edition shirts, stickers, and other necessitiesTeePublic Store: http://cloudacctpod.link/merchSubscribe Apple Podcasts: http://cloudacctpod.link/ApplePodcasts Podchaser: http://cloudacctpod.link/podchaser Spotify: http://cloudacctpod.link/Spotify Stitcher: http://cloudacctpod.link/Stitcher Overcast: http://cloudacctpod.link/Overcast Want to get the word out about your newsletter, webinar, party, Facebook group, podcast, e-book, job posting, or that fancy Excel macro you just created? Why not let the listeners of The Cloud Accounting Podcast know by running a classified ad? Hit the link below to get more info.Go here to create your classified ad: https://cloudacctpod.link/RunClassifiedAd Full Transcript Available Upon Request - info@cloudaccountingpodcast.com

Always Irish: A Notre Dame Football Podcast
Notre Dame Football: 2022 Wide Receivers Can Excel

Always Irish: A Notre Dame Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 22:12


twitter: @alwaysirishINC email: alwaysirishnd@gmail.com

FP&A Today
Kenneth Fick: FP&A as Influence without Power

FP&A Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 48:55


Kenneth Fick, had it in his background to be in FP&A: His father spent 40 years in FP&A at Fisher Price. Ken is now Vice President of Financial Planning Analysis at Citrin Cooperman which is a $350 million accounting tax and advisory firm based in New York. In this interview Kenneth discusses: Being a 20-year-old watching the chaos unfold at Circuit City which is now taught as an example of corporate failure in America While technical skills get you first roles, you get promoted through skills in influence and storytelling Becoming a leading name in FP&A through his writing – including a viral article about how to exactly define to a stranger what FP&A is, at a cocktail party His budget process and love of budgeting as a means of listening to the company Why it angers him that FP&A is being judged on predictions How fuzzy data is at the core of FP&A Linear regression and statistical modeling in Excel   Follow Kenneth on LinkedIn FP&A Today is brought to you by Datarails. Datarails is the financial planning and analysis platform that automates data consolidation, reporting and planning, while enabling finance teams to continue using their own Excel spreadsheets and financial models. With Datarails on your side for FP&A you get improved data integrity and visibility helping your relationships with your internal business partners and external stakeholders; real-time latest version of all your company's data in one place, with version control, audit trail and records, ensuring errors and multiple versions are avoided; the ability to let your data tell your story through proprietary, built-in visualization of critical KPIs in real-down; and drill-downs to answer questions on underlying data on the spot. Get in touch at www.datarails.com Follow DataRails on LinkedIn to find out about upcoming episodes and the latest FP&A news Read the Full Program Transcript Watch the Full Episode on YouTube To suggest a great guest for the show, or if you would like to be the FP&A Pro being interviewed contact jonathan.m@datarails.com

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
From Management Consulting to Commercial Real Estate Investing

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 19:05


Ernest has more than 12 years of experience as a management consultant providing technology and business consulting to Fortune 500 companies. His project/program management, business development executive background, an entrepreneurial mindset, provided him with opportunities to merge his enthusiasm to work in the technology sector and real estate as a broker and investor in residential and commercial RE since 2010. In this episode, Ernest Peralta discusses his journey from corporate consultant to successful real estate investor. He advises listeners to seek out mentors and learn as much as possible about the industry before jumping in, and to focus on specific asset classes during turbulent times.   Highlights:   [00:00 - 05:35] How to Scale Your Business in 6 Months or Less   Ernest Peralta started 12 years ago and has experience in management consulting and real estate. Took the route of consulting after he graduated with his undergraduate degree He networked with people in the industry and took courses to learn more about the business Right before the pandemic hits, Ernest educated himself about real estate and did some research. He considers Covid as a time of education and Post-Covid as implementation.   [05:35 - 10:50] How to Scale Your Business and Attract Investors with Strategy   Ernest uses programs such as Microsoft Office to create a project plan outlining steps to scale within six months to a year and where they could be to where they are today. He also recommends reaching out to potential investors through mailers, conference calls, and mastermind groups. Ernest shares that bad advice often includes telling people to find their passion.   [10:51 - 16:00] Follow Your Passion But Work on Your Daily Plan   One of the main things Ernest recommends is to not only follow your passion, but also to work on your daily plan and action plan. Ernest has found that the current market is challenging, but he is still optimistic about the future. One of the biggest challenges Ernest faces is finding investors who are willing to pay a high price for his properties." Tweetable Quotes “I would say it would be better advice to not only follow your passion, but work on your daily plan, work on those things that you don't want to do on a daily basis, because those are things that you actually need to do in order for you to accomplish your goals.” - Ernest Peralta   ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with Eric Peralta on LinkedIn or visit their website at mvpequitygroup.com You email him through  ernest@mvpequitygroup.com Connect with me:   Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below: [00:00:00] Ernest Peralta: How can I scale within six months to a year? And where could I be to where I am today. So, you know, the first thing that I wanted to do was really understand the business. [00:00:08] Ernest Peralta: So I always go back to COVID because to me that was my learning year. And then the following year after that was my implementation year. So the first year was all educational for me, just really trying to understand, put together a plan of how can I learn as much as I can about the industry. [00:00:24] Ernest Peralta: But aside from learning, a lot of it is trying to, to implement can learn as much as you can, but if you don't implement, you're never really gonna pursue or grow.  [00:00:45] Sam Wilson:  [00:00:45] Sam Wilson: Ernest Peralta has combined his passion for multifamily investment management, consulting and personal development with his personal philosophy of goal setting, envisioning and manifesting success to help people who wanna live their best life. Ernest, welcome to the show.  [00:00:58] Ernest Peralta: Thanks a lot, Sam, thank you for having me. [00:01:00] Sam Wilson: Hey man. The pleasure's mine. There's three questions. I ask every guest who comes to the show. Can you tell us in 90 seconds or less, where did you start? Where are you now? And how did you get there? Yeah,  [00:01:08] Ernest Peralta: absolutely. So I started about 12 years ago. My background entails management consulting, but my family had a small portfolio of residential real estate. [00:01:18] Ernest Peralta: And so that's kind of how I got my start was kind of through my family. And over the years I basically had always had real estate in the back of my mind, but I took the route of consulting cause I had finished my undergraduate degree. My master's degree kind of did the whole educational thing worked in corporate arena for, several years long and long story short is that I ended up stumbling into commercial real estate right before COVID and tried to find out what asset classes or what areas could actually help me sustain if anything was to come again like this to impact me and my family in the future. [00:01:51] Ernest Peralta: And I came across commercial real estate. Man that's and that's  [00:01:54] Ernest Peralta: where I am today. Tell me real quick. I mean, the term corporate consultant for somebody that has no experience in the corporate world doesn't mean much to me.  [00:02:01] Sam Wilson: Can you break that down for us.  [00:02:02] Ernest Peralta: Absolutely. Yeah. It's always a confusing thing. [00:02:04] Ernest Peralta: When you say corporate consulting or management consulting, it's like, what is that? Right? So what it is basically is I provide advisory services, whether it's project program management for fortune 500 companies. So you name the big retailers I've consulted for, companies like, and I'll say this here, like Microsoft AT&T , Costco. [00:02:24] Ernest Peralta: Bill Melinda gates foundation, all of their companies, basically I come in and I provide strategic type of guidance, whether it is pushing an initiative, a business initiative that they have a new application or a software. Sometimes it could be data privacy or security type of issues. These are things that I help them. [00:02:40] Ernest Peralta: Either document work with a team. It's usually a global team that I work with and we have timelines and processes that I typically kind of project manage until delivery of, these products and service. Is  [00:02:51] Sam Wilson: that something you're still involved in today or have you switched completely to commercial real estate? [00:02:55] Ernest Peralta: I did. Yeah. I actually had switched over about a year now. Okay. And so I ended up making that switch over. I spent about a good 16 plus years in that arena and I decided like, I mentioned earlier before jumping on COVID actually had impacted me. So this is where that pivotal moment for me actually happened is when I decided to look back into commercial real estate since I had done, residential real estate many years ago. And so that was my pivotal moment. And this is where my focus is right now.  [00:03:26] Sam Wilson: What was your strategy? jumping into commercial real estate just before, COVID probably had to be a little bit unnerving, but what was your strategy? [00:03:34] Sam Wilson: Once you said, okay, I'm stepping out of corporate consulting role. what did you do to get involved in commercial real estate?  [00:03:40] Ernest Peralta: Absolutely. Yeah. Great question, Sam. I think for me, one of the, one of the things that I always like to do is I like to strategize like, okay, I don't know too much about commercial real estate. [00:03:50] Ernest Peralta: Where do I start? So the first thing I ended up doing was trying to find individuals out there that actually could help me as a mentor or maybe I could take courses. So I did a lot of, research online and I came across a couple of individuals, like the Michael Blank of the world, the Peter Harris' and Dylan Borland, those individuals were folks that I had actually looked at research prior to me jumping on board and, really dedicating myself into commercial real estate. So that was number one, was trying to find experts in the industry. Secondly, I networked with people at that time, a lot of zoom calls. [00:04:23] Ernest Peralta: So a lot of interactivity, in, in, in the social media realm, if you will. So I did a lot of. Connections through LinkedIn social media with individuals that already had experience in commercial real estate. Now at the time I was really trying to focus on, okay, what aspect of commercial real estate do I wanna focus in? [00:04:40] Ernest Peralta: Cuz there are various different asset classes I realized at the time that, multifamily mobile homes, as well as, different types of retail could potentially be lucrative. In times of turbulent recessions, if you will, that happen in our economy. So I ended up just focusing on multi-family for the fact that it was kind of a segue for my family and I, when we had owned a couple of duplexes in the past. [00:05:03] Ernest Peralta: So for me, that was kind of a no brainer to kind of step into that arena that had became my focus, going forward. So kind of to where we are today, I ended up just really networking very well with individuals that are in the industry, tried to learn what it was to be like as a limited partner. [00:05:20] Ernest Peralta: What is a cog, what is a GP? And also, how do you equity raise? All those things kind of came into play for me to really understand, okay, what aspect of this business do I want to focus in? And how do I get involved? So that was basically my start.  [00:05:36] Sam Wilson: I love it. I bet. From the corporate consulting side, you did a lot of strategy in planning. [00:05:42] Sam Wilson: So what did you do? Find the experts network on social media. Did you lay out like a 10 step plan and said, okay, I'm gonna do this first and I'm gonna do this. And here's how I'm gonna raise equity. What did that blueprint look like if you had one and I'm sure you probably did.  [00:05:56] Sam Wilson: I did. [00:05:56] Ernest Peralta: Yeah. I created an Excel file. Basically. I used a Microsoft Excel document or basically it was Microsoft. And I pulled up my document, created a project plan, if you will. Basically, it was my steps to, how can I scale within six months to a year? And where could I be to where I am today. So, you know, the first thing that I wanted to do was really understand the business. [00:06:17] Ernest Peralta: So I like to use, I always go back to COVID because to me that was my learning year. And then the following year after that was my implementation year. So the first year was all educational for me, just really trying to understand, put together a plan of how can I learn as much as I can about the industry. [00:06:35] Ernest Peralta: But aside from learning, a lot of it is trying to, to implement you can learn as much as you can, but if you don't implement, you're never really gonna pursue or grow. So, about four months into it, after I put my plan together, my whole intent was to have a 90 day plan. And so, that's kind of what I got. [00:06:52] Ernest Peralta: It was kind of the theme after, a networking with various folks that within 90 days, I should definitely try to, know, go out there and start making some deals. So that's what I ended up doing. So one of my plans of action was learn as much as I could. And then also start reaching out to potential investors, whether it was, through mailers just cold calling and really trying to get exposure in that sense. [00:07:12] Ernest Peralta: So that was basically my first 90 days to, I would say, four to five months of just doing that and then also trying to make offers. So I would get on these conference calls. Or mastermind group calls with my group and basically talk about these different scenarios and go through different ways of how we're approaching it. [00:07:32] Ernest Peralta: If we did get a deal, how would we evaluate and analyze it? So it, there was a lot of brainstorming and just working with individuals that  I team with to really understand the business, as much as I could. One thing that I'd like to say is that there is a really good underwriting course that, that I actually, well, it's more of a conference call, but it's a, an underwriting conference call that I attended on a weekly basis for almost a couple of months. [00:07:58] Ernest Peralta: And this gentleman, I can name him here in a little bit, but he is. Exceptional. And I would say that he was the foundation of me actually, really trying to understand the underwriting process and everything, for multifamily.  [00:08:12] Sam Wilson: That is really I love the multi step, approach. [00:08:15] Sam Wilson: Hey, we're gonna line this out and then we're gonna go do it, I guess. You've brought up a few questions I have along the way. I mean, you talked about mastermind group calls. I mean, that's something that a lot of people like the idea of, but even just selecting a mastermind can take an enormous amount of time and going, gosh, especially if you're new to the industry, it's like, there's How many, a thousand masterminds you could possibly pick from there is, a thousand ways you can reach out to investors, I guess. [00:08:37] Sam Wilson: How did, I mean, it sounds like you, you broke this down on a very granular level. Like how did you even go about selecting? Let's just start there with your mastermind.  [00:08:44] Ernest Peralta: Yeah. Well, a lot of it was. Mainly geographic. I looked at folks that were geographically located to where, or an area that I wanted to invest in. [00:08:53] Ernest Peralta: For me, one of the lucrative areas outside of the state of Washington is kind of the Southwest, if you will, and the Midwest. So I tried to find mastermind groups that kind of focused in those areas and, just through social interaction, just meaning them online. That's how I developed, a lot of the relationships. [00:09:08] Ernest Peralta: So a lot of it also was based on building relationships folks that I just connected with right away. I think that's very key. And just developing that trust factor, when you invest in real estate, you just wanna make sure that you align yourself with the right people. The people that probably have done at least a few deals under their belt. [00:09:24] Ernest Peralta: So they've got a track record that is good at the same time. You wanna be able to, be able to. Talk to these individuals and to just be open with them. So I think having that connection and that connectivity, as well as a history of success would be ideal. Right,  [00:09:38] Ernest Peralta: right. [00:09:38] Sam Wilson: No, that's really cool. Tell us the the conference call you were on for underwriting. I think that's a valuable tool and resource that our listeners may really appreciate it.  [00:09:45] Sam Wilson: Oh yeah. So, gentleman's name is Charles seamen and he is incredible. As of this call, I believe he's still doing it every Saturdays. [00:09:53] Sam Wilson: That's right. If that's something that, your audience members or folks that are listening here on the conference, call one. 10, I would say, reach out to Sam or myself, and be happy to connect you to him. Yeah. But I would say he is ideal and  [00:10:04] Sam Wilson: certainly Charles has come on the show. [00:10:05] Sam Wilson: Gosh, it's been maybe a year and a half ago. So you can go to our website at brickandinvestmentgroup.com slash podcast and just type in Charles Seamen, S E A M E N yeah, look up Charles Seaman and you can find their information there right on our website. [00:10:18] Sam Wilson: And you can probably attend that, that conference call. So there's a great tool and resource. Thank you for sharing that earnest that actually absolutely forgotten that. Tell me, is there been any bad advice that you were given along the way that you either implemented or immediately knew it was bad? [00:10:33] Ernest Peralta: Bad advice. I would say, you hear this a lot. It's like, find your passion. And I believe that to some extent, passion, I think is something that is relatively gets you moving gets you motivated. But I think it's short term. to me, by following my passion, I've done many numerous things prior to getting into into commercial real estate. [00:10:51] Ernest Peralta: But I think one of the main things and things that I would say would be better advice is to not only, follow your passion, but work on your daily plan, work on those things that you don't want to do on a daily basis, because those are things that you actually need to do in order for you to accomplish your goals. [00:11:06] Ernest Peralta: I think, , that to me is an advice to where if I were to flip that, I would say work on things that you don't want to do that you need to accomplish, , what you want in life. If it's, commercial real estate, you have to put in the work, you have to put in the grind, making your daily calls, working your action plan. [00:11:23] Ernest Peralta: Passion comes out of doing that for a number of days until it becomes a habit, then it becomes a passion because you're gonna end up liking some of the things that you do, whether it's the grind or it's gonna be talking to people or putting a deal together. I think that to me is probably one of the most misconceptions that I hear. [00:11:41] Ernest Peralta: And I think that if you flip that around a little bit, I think it would , be better advice that's from my perspective, the least, no, I think  [00:11:47] Sam Wilson: that's great. I mean, there's the it's always, I think it's always a a blend there, right? There's like the, Hey, you gotta get your reps in. Right. Yeah. If you wanna stay fit you, it doesn't matter. [00:11:55] Sam Wilson: If like I read that in the, on the workout plan for yesterday, it was something like, Hey, you know what, maybe you don't love the day's workout, but it's just, it's a matter of showing up and doing the work and then you'll get the results you want. Yeah. Do you love it every day? Maybe. Maybe not. But I think there's a blend there of like finding what your skill set is and what really, you can bring value to the table. [00:12:13] Sam Wilson: How can you bring value to the table, but also going, Hey, what is it at times? Do you just have to say, I just gotta get through this. So. It's it's a nice, but I like the idea of, maybe not necessarily following your passion, but following your plan at first and then, your passion will certainly come out of that. [00:12:26] Sam Wilson: What does your portfolio look like today?  [00:12:29] Ernest Peralta: Yeah, so portfolio today, we own over 600 units. It spends across the Southwest. I'm basically an LP, a GP co GP and a capital razor for for these assets. They're mainly multi-family their class B and CS. We typically look at, little bit of capital improvement. [00:12:48] Ernest Peralta: We don't come in and do huge renovations, but something to where we can come in and do some potential upside, whether it's mainly raising rents or just, adding different things to the To the property itself. And for us, that's been our stronghold and kind of our focus for now. [00:13:02] Sam Wilson: Gotcha. That's really awesome. Tell me you mentioned this earlier in the show where you said that you were reaching out to investors before you'd ever had a deal. Like yeah. What did, how talk, walk us through that conversation? Because for me, I would think that would be a hard conversation of like, Hey, I'm planning on getting into this, but I don't have a track record. [00:13:19] Sam Wilson: How'd you overcome that?  [00:13:20] Ernest Peralta: Yeah, well, for me, I always try to reach out to folks that have the experience  whether you're a VP SVP or an investor, in any situation, I'll definitely go to you because you have the knowledge. So for an me going out to an investor, my whole plan of action, there was basically to reach out to them to say, Hey, I understand that you own a few properties. [00:13:42] Ernest Peralta: I'm kind of getting into the industry. Do you have any best practices or any, anything that you could provide me in terms of how did you get your education and how'd you get your start? That was basically my segue and most people are very cordial. Those that have as you probably know, Sam, those that have success or have tremendous success, they're willing to help for the most part, and provide you advice. [00:14:03] Ernest Peralta: So to me, that was my segue because. You never know what opportunities come out that way. And that was the way I started. Yeah.  [00:14:10] Sam Wilson: No, I think that's absolutely great Ernest, tell me, what's one of the biggest challenges, now that you've kind of gotten your, I'm gonna call it your feet wet. Obviously you're firmly in the business now you've kind of developed your plan. [00:14:20] Sam Wilson: You've implemented part of it. What are some challenges that you face scaling from this point going forward?  [00:14:26] Ernest Peralta: Yeah, that's a very good question. I think one of the challenges that we have right now is that it's definitely a seller's market for the most part. So I think there's a lot of individuals now I think over just even a couple of years now, there's a lot of individuals such as myself that have done. [00:14:42] Ernest Peralta: Corporate work and are now starting to look into investing. So I think there's an influx of this group, this kind of group. Now that's getting into the industry. So it's challenging. It's more challenging at the same time. You have a lot of savvy investors. Now, a lot of these individuals are smart. [00:14:57] Ernest Peralta: They know how to come in underwrite. And so they're making it fierce in that sense. , think in combination with, a lot of folks coming now into this arena, because they understand that it's a great niche to be in for longevity, but at the same time, I think the investors also have the certain mindset of what they think their price is for their, their assets. [00:15:18] Ernest Peralta: You know, they're thinking six months ago that the price is still, relevant today. So they're asking for, a pretty hefty price on, on, their assets. So it's a challenge there it's a double-edged sword. You wanna make it work, but at the same time you wanted to be able to. [00:15:32] Ernest Peralta: Get the property and also make it lucrative for your investors as well. So I think that's probably one of the biggest challenges that I  [00:15:39] Sam Wilson: see. Yeah. And it, and I think as we see, who knows where interest rates, for those of you who are listening to this this is being recorded on May 12th, 2022. [00:15:47] Sam Wilson: So, we don't know right now where interest rates are going, what effect that's gonna have on a, as a, on a cooling, are we gonna see a continued rise in especially in multifamily, in, rent, rent increases, things like that. And so when you say six months ago, I wonder, just because it is fierce and it is competitive though. [00:16:06] Sam Wilson: Are we seeing a tapering in the prices in multifamily or at least a leveling off, or is it that people are still looking, for that, kind of almost vertical trajectory in sales  [00:16:14] Ernest Peralta: price? Yeah. Well, one thing is that I notice is that. A lot of the investors are holding firm on, what they believe their property is worth at this point. [00:16:24] Ernest Peralta: . And so I think for right now, I know inflation kind of, I think it slowed down a little bit last month from what I read. But you know, it's very minimal. It's probably not too impactful at this point, but For the most part. I think a lot of investors are still holding on. They're still holding firm. [00:16:38] Ernest Peralta: I don't think they're gonna budge anytime soon, but at the same time, I think investors are willing to pay, what they're asking. Right. So I think you really have to underwrite, look at the market and when you're doing your deals, just really make sure that you're coming. [00:16:51] Ernest Peralta: You're coming to the table with something that's worthwhile and you're not just paying just to pay, and I think that's kind of the challenge right now for us. I think we're taking the standpoint of, we're gonna hold onto our portfolio for now, but we're definitely looking at properties on the daily basis, we're just underwriting and if there's a good deal, then we'll definitely pursue it. [00:17:09] Ernest Peralta: But for right now, I think a lot of it is just kind of looking at the way that things are going right now in the market. And just evaluating things as we move along. We'll see what happens here in the next six months though,  [00:17:20] Sam Wilson: right? Right. Like to say time will tell last question for you. Is this 10 year plan? [00:17:26] Sam Wilson: Where do you wanna be in 10  [00:17:27] Ernest Peralta: years? Well, yeah, in 10 years, we'd like to have at least close to 50 million in assets. If not more what we'd like to do eventually is look at other asset classes right now. As I mentioned, we're looking at, we have a multi-family portfolio, but it would be nice to diversify that. [00:17:43] Ernest Peralta: Potentially get into mobile home parks or maybe into storage facilities too as well. Those are other, asset classes that we want to get into, but I think over time, that will definitely happen. But for right now, our focus is on multifamily. It's a great area for us to focus our efforts in, but that's our tenure plan. [00:18:01] Sam Wilson: I love it. I love it, Ernest. Thanks for taking the time to come on the show today and really break down your business and tell us your awesome story. I love the the precision with which you have enacted your plan and even putting the plan together. So many bullet just lack that out of the gate. [00:18:14] Sam Wilson: So some great tips, some great tools. Appreciate it. If our listeners wanna get in touch with you or learn more about you, what is the best way to do that?  [00:18:21] Ernest Peralta: Yeah, the best way is you can look me up on LinkedIn. You could also reach out to me@mvpequitygroup.com. That's basically our private equity company. [00:18:30] Ernest Peralta: And yeah, you could just reach out to me also ernest@mvpequitygroup.com.  [00:18:36] Sam Wilson: Awesome. Thank you for your time, Ernest.  [00:18:37] Ernest Peralta: Appreciate it. Thank you, Sam. Appreciate it. 

Land Academy Show
Stories of Great Land Brokers (LA 1788)

Land Academy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 13:53


Stories of Great Land Brokers (LA 1788) Transcript: Steven Jack Butala: Steve and Jill here. Jill K DeWit: Hello. Steven Jack Butala: Welcome to the Land Academy Show, entertaining land investment talk. I'm Steven Jack Butala. Jill K DeWit: And I'm Jill DeWit broadcasting from the Valley of the Sun. Steven Jack Butala: Today Jill and I talk about stories of great land brokers. Jill and I were talking a couple of days ago about the deals that we're doing, like we always do. And she was telling me these stories about all these- Jill K DeWit: What a difference. Steven Jack Butala: ... these great brokers that she's finding. Jill K DeWit: Well, wait a minute. Because of not great brokers, the great ones stand out. Let's be clear here. Steven Jack Butala: So we bash real estate agents all the time on this show with the... It's kind of a hobby of mine. Jill K DeWit: Yes. Steven Jack Butala: But this show is not about that. This show is about good ones, because there are a lot of good ones out there. Jill K DeWit: Okay. Steven Jack Butala: Before we get into it, let's take a question posted by one of our members on the Landinvestors.com online community. It's free, and I hope by now you know Jill and I personally instruct a handful of new and existing Land Academy members in a live class, live on Zoom, called Career Path. It's 10 weeks, and if this is your career, or you want it to be, check it out. Call us, or email us I should say, at support@landacademy.com, and see if it's for you. Jill K DeWit: Aston wrote, "Hi, I have an interested seller for my first mailer, which is an infill lot. The guy inherited it from his mom, who also left her home and another property to him, his sister and his brother, who is in prison. Does anyone have an experience trying to get signatures from someone in prison?" I've not had that one. "If the numbers make sense, is this something that I should pursue, or a lost cause? Thoughts?" Well I wouldn't drop it yet. Steven Jack Butala: No, it's not a lost cause at all. Jill K DeWit: I'm sure there's a way. Steven Jack Butala: In fact, I'm sure this is a benefit to you. Jill K DeWit: Yeah. Steven Jack Butala: People in prison sign stuff all the time. Jill K DeWit: I'm sure there's a way that you can request the documents. They probably have a notary on staff. Steven Jack Butala: Absolutely. Plus, people in prisons have lawyers, so- Jill K DeWit: True. Steven Jack Butala: I don't have any personal experience with this. This is quite the topic in Discord. Everybody kind of just said the same thing I just said. People sign documents all the time. Jill K DeWit: Most people, I bet if you're in prison, let's just say it, and you know you might have some legal things that need to get taken care of while you're in prison, you probably have an attorney or somebody already lined up, and you already have a power of attorney to that person, and then they can do all the stuff for you. So it's probably in place. But I have not had to do that yet. Nor do I plan to learn about it from the other side. Steven Jack Butala: Today's topic, stories of great land brokers. This is the meat of the show. Jill K DeWit: Okay. So this started because, you walked in my office the other day and I said, "Check out this conversation with Jan and I that's happening inside of Airtable." Steven Jack Butala: Who's Jan? Jill K DeWit: Jan is my transaction [crosstalk 00:02:53]. Steven Jack Butala: Oh. Jill K DeWit: So this is really how we communicate. We don't even communicate as much like via Skype or Teams or chatting like that, or texting. Pretty much all of our communication, and not even email, it's in Airtable. Airtable is... it's like Excel on steroids. It's a great place to keep track of all your transactions. How we move our properties through the system. Everything that we do. Properties come in, it goes into our Airtable base, and it gets assigned to a person. And then there's a task. It might be,

Cloud Accounting Podcast
AccountingWEB Live #3: Building a Female-Owned and Operated BPO in India with Penny Breslin

Cloud Accounting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 28:13


Meet Our Guest, Penny BreslinLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/penny-breslin-0228b81Learn more about MoneyPenny, LLChttps://moneypennyllc.com/about-us/Need CPE? Subscribe to the Earmark Accounting Podcast: https://podcast.earmarkcpe.comGet CPE for listening to podcasts with Earmark CPE: https://earmarkcpeGet in TouchThanks for listening and for the great reviews! We appreciate you! Follow and tweet @BlakeTOliver and @DavidLeary. Find us on Facebook and, if you like what you hear, please do us a favor and write a review on iTunes, or Podchaser. Interested in sponsoring the Cloud Accounting Podcast? For details, read the prospectus, and NOW, you can see our smiling faces on Instagram! You can now call us and leave a voicemail, maybe we'll play it on the show. DIAL (202) 695-1040Need Accounting Conference Info? Check out our new website - accountingconferences.comLimited edition shirts, stickers, and other necessitiesTeePublic Store: http://cloudacctpod.link/merchSubscribe Apple Podcasts: http://cloudacctpod.link/ApplePodcasts Podchaser: http://cloudacctpod.link/podchaser Spotify: http://cloudacctpod.link/Spotify Stitcher: http://cloudacctpod.link/Stitcher Overcast: http://cloudacctpod.link/Overcast Want to get the word out about your newsletter, webinar, party, Facebook group, podcast, e-book, job posting, or that fancy Excel macro you just created? Why not let the listeners of The Cloud Accounting Podcast know by running a classified ad? Hit the link below to get more info.Go here to create your classified ad: https://cloudacctpod.link/RunClassifiedAd Full Transcript Available Upon Request - info@cloudaccountingpodcast.com

Craft Your Own Coffee Podcast
[S4E7] Roast Coffee, Save Money, Be Awesome

Craft Your Own Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 14:52


Not ready to start a coffee business, but want to save some money in these tight economic times while at the same time "leveling up" your home coffee game? Enter: Home Coffee Roasting. I went deep into roasting coffee at home in Season 2 so feel free to go back and listen to those episodes on the "how" of home roasting. But for today, I want to focus on the "Why" question, specifically the "Financial Why" of home roasting. I went a little Excel-nerdy and put together a simple financial model showing the various Payback Periods/Breakeven Points where it would make financial sense to roast coffee at home. Click here , download, and fill in the YELLOW cells with your own assumptions to calculate an estimated payback period based on your coffee drinking habits. Hit me up and let me know if this helped you pull the trigger, and let me know if I can help! Home Roasters: FreshRoast Behmor Gene Cafe Hottop Before July 1 2022, take advantage of 15% off an order of green coffee from Sweet Maria's! Use code CYOCOFFEE at checkout through 7/1/22. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/craftyourowncoffee/message

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Private is Crypto? What About WhatsApp and Signal?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 82:20


How Private is Crypto? What About WhatsApp and Signal? Cryptocurrencies were thought to be like the gold standard of security, of having your information stay private. Maybe you don't want to use regular currency and transactions. It's all changed. [Automated transcript follows.] [00:00:14] We have had such volatility over the years when it comes to what are called cryptocurrencies. [00:00:21] Now I get a lot of questions about cryptocurrencies. First of all, let me say, I have never owned any cryptocurrencies and I do not own any crypto assets at all. Most people look at crypto currencies and think of a couple of things. First of all, an investment. An investment is something that you can use or sell, right? [00:00:42] Typically investments you don't really use. It's like a house. Is it an investment? Not so much. It's more of a liability, but people look at it and say listen, it went from what was a 10,000. Bitcoins to buy a pizza to, it went up to $50,000 per Bitcoin. There's a pretty big jump there. [00:01:03] And yeah, it was pretty big. And of course, it's gone way down and it's gone back up and it's gone down. It's gone back up. But the idea of any kind of currency is can you do anything with the currency? You can take a dollar bill and go and try and buy a cup of coffee. Okay. A $10 bill and buy a cup of coffee in most places anyways. [00:01:26] That sounds like a good idea. I could probably use a cup of coffee right now and get a tickle on my throat. I hate that. But if you have something like Bitcoin, where can you spend it? You might remember Elon Musk was saying, yeah, you can use Bitcoin to buy a Tesla. Also Wikipedia would accept donations. [00:01:45] Via Bitcoin, there were a number of places online that you could use. Bitcoin. In fact, there's a country right now in south central America that has Bitcoin as its currency. That's cool too. When you think about it, what is, so what are you gonna do? Latin American country? I'm trying to remember what it is. [00:02:05] Oh yeah. It's all Salvador. The first country in the world to adopt Bitcoin is an official legal tender. Now there's a number of reasons they're doing that and he can do it basically. If you got a dictator, you can do almost anything you want to. So in El Salvador, they've got apps that you can use and you can go and buy a tree taco using Bitcoin using their app. [00:02:31] So there you go. If you have Bitcoin, you can go to El Salvador and you can buy all of the tacos and other basic stuff you might wanna buy. But in general, No you can't just go and take any of these cryptocurrencies and use them anywhere. So what good are they as a currency? we already established that they haven't been good as an investment unless you're paying a lot of attention and you're every day buying and selling based on what the movement is. [00:02:59] I know a guy that does exactly that it's, he's a day trader basically in some of these cryptocurrencies, good for. But in reality, is that something that makes sense in a long term? Is that going to help him long term? I don't know. I really don't because again, there's no intrinsic value. [00:03:18] So some of the cryptocurrencies have decided let's have some sort of intrinsic value. And what they've done is they've created what are generally known as stable coins. And a stable coin is a type of cryptocurrency that behind it has the ability to be tied to something that's stable. So for instance, one that really hit the news recently is a stable coin that is tied to the us dollar. [00:03:46] And yet, even though it is tied to the us dollar and the coin is a dollar and the dollar is a coin. They managed to get down into the few pennies worth of value, kinda like penny. so what good was that, it has since come back up, some are tied to other types of assets. Some of them say we have gold behind us. [00:04:09] Kinda like what the United States used to do back when we were on the gold standard. And we became the petrol dollar where countries were using our currency are us dollars, no matter which country it was to buy and sell oil. Things have changed obviously. And we're not gonna talk about. The whole Petro dollar thing right now. [00:04:30] So forget about that. Second benefit. Third benefit is while it's crypto, which means it's encrypted, which means we're safe from anybody's spine on us, anybody stealing it. And of course that's been proven to be false too. We've seen the cryptocurrencies stolen by the billions of dollars. We've seen these cryptocurrencies lost by the billions of dollars as well. [00:04:58] That's pretty substantial. We get right down to it, lost by the billions because people had them in their crypto wallets, lost the password for the crypto wallet. And all of a sudden, now they are completely out of luck. Does that make sense to you? So the basic. Idea behind currency is to make it easier to use the currency than to say, I'll trade you a chicken for five pounds of nail. [00:05:25] Does that make sense to you? So you use a currency. So you say the chicken is worth five bucks. Actually chicken is nowadays is about $30. If it's a LA hen and those five pounds of nails are probably worth about $30. So we just exchanged dollars back and forth. I think that makes a lot of sense. One of the things that has driven up the value of cryptocurrencies, particularly Bitcoin has been criminal marketplaces. [00:05:53] As you look at some of the stats of ransoms that are occurring, where people's computers are taken over via ransomware, and then that person then pays a ransom. And what happens when they pay that ransom while they have to go find an exchange. Pay us dollars to buy cryptocurrency Bitcoin usually. And then they have the Bitcoin and they have to transfer to another wallet, whether or not the bad guys can use the money. [00:06:25] Is a, again, a separate discussion. They certainly can than they do because some of these countries like Russia are going ahead and just exchanging the critical currencies for rubs, which again, makes sense if you're Russia. Now we have a lot of criminals that have been using the Bitcoin for ransoms businesses. [00:06:49] Publicly traded businesses have been buying Bitcoin by the tens of millions of dollars so that they have it as an asset. In case they get ransom. Things have changed. There's a great article in NBC news, by Kevin Collier. And Kevin's talking about this California man who was scammed out of hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of cryptocurrency. [00:07:15] Now this was a fake romance scam, which is a fairly common one. It. It tends to target older people who are lonely and a romance starts online and they go ahead and talk and kind of fall in love. And it turns out she or he has this really almost terminal disease. If only they had an extra, a hundred thousand dollars to pay for the surgery. [00:07:45] You, you know the story, so he was conned out of the money. What's interesting to me is how the investigation and investigative ability has changed over the years. Probably about five years ago, I sat through a briefing by the secret service and. In that briefing, they explained how they had gone and very, quite cleverly tracked the money that was being sent to and used by this dark web operator who ran a site known as a silk road. [00:08:22] And that site was selling illegal things online. Oh, and the currency that they were tracking was Bitcoin. Yes, indeed. So much for cryptocurrency being secure it, five years ago, the secret service was able to do it. The FBI was able to do it and they couldn't do a whole lot about it. But part of the problem is all of your transactions are a matter of public record. [00:08:52] So if someone sends you a fraction of a Bitcoin. That is now in a ledger and that ledger now can be used because when you then spend. Fraction of a Bitcoin somewhere else, it can be tracked. It is tracked is a hundred percent guaranteed to be tracked. And once it's tracked government can get in. [00:09:15] Now, in this case, a deputy district attorney in Santa Clara county, California, was able to track the movement of the cryptocurrency. Yeah. So this district attorney, okay. Deputy district attorney, not the FBI, not the secret service, not the national security agency, a local district attorney in Santa Clara county, California, not a particularly huge county, but. [00:09:44] She was able to track it. And she said that she thinks that the scammer lives in a country where they can't easily extradite them. And so they're unlikely to be arrested at any time soon. So that includes countries like Russia that do not extradite criminals to the United States. Now getting into the details. [00:10:03] There's a great quote from her in this NBC news article, our bread and butter these days really is tracing cryptocurrency and trying to seize it and trying to get there faster than the bad guys are moving it elsewhere, where we can't. Grab it. So she said the team tracked the victim's money as it bounced from one digital wallet to another, till it ended up at a major cryptocurrency exchange where it appeared the scammer was planning to launder the money or cash out, they sent a warrant to the exchange. [00:10:35] Froze the money and she plans to return it to the victim. That is a dramatic reversal from just a few years back when cryptocurrencies were seen as a boon for criminals. Amazing. Isn't it? Stick around. We get a lot more to talk about here and of course, sign up online Craig peterson.com and get my free newsletter. [00:11:01] There have been a lot of efforts by many companies, Microsoft, apple, Google, to try and get rid of passwords. How can you do that? What is a password and what are these new technologies? Apple thinks they have the answer. [00:11:17] Passwords have been the bane of existence for a long while. And if you'd like, I have a special report on passwords, where I talk about password managers, things you can do, things you should do in order to help keep your information safe, online things like. [00:11:34] Bank accounts, et cetera. Just email me, Craig peterson.com and ask for the password special report and I'll get it to you. Believe me it's self-contained it's not trying to get you to buy something. Nothing. It is entirely about passwords and what you can do again, just email me, me@craigpeterson.com and we'll get right back with you. [00:11:56] Give us a couple of days, passwords are a problem. And over the years, the standards for passwords have changed. I remember way back when some of the passwords might be 2, 3, 4 characters long. and back then, those were hard to crack. Then Unix came along. I started using Unix and when was that? [00:12:16] Probably about 81. And as I was messing around with Unix, I. They used to had a couple of changes in how they did passwords. They added assault to it. They used basically the same cipher that the Germans used in world war II, that enigma cipher, which again was okay for the times today, we have much more powerful ciphers and the biggest concern right now, amongst real cybersecurity people. [00:12:43] Government agencies is okay. So what are we going to do when these new quantum computers come along with their artificial intelligence and other things, that's going to be a bit of a problem because quantum computers are able to solve problems in fractions of a second. Even that traditional computers cannot solve it. [00:13:10] It's a whole different thing. I want you to think. Something here. I, if you have a handful of spaghetti now we're talking about hard spaghetti, not cooked spaghetti and they all dried out and they are a varying links. How could you sort those into the smallest to largest, if you will, how could you find which ones were the longest, perhaps? [00:13:37] Which ones were the shortest? There's an analog way of doing that and there's a digital way of doing that. So the digital way for the computer would be. To measure them all and compare the measurements and then identify how long the longest one was. And then maybe you'd have to go back and try and find that. [00:13:55] So you can imagine that would take some time, the analog way of doing that. Cuz there still are analog computers out there and they do an amazing job in certain tasks, but the analog way of doing that is okay. So you take that bundle of various length spaghetti and you slam it on the table. What's gonna happen while those pieces of dried spaghetti are going to self align, right? [00:14:22] The shortest ones are going to be down at the bottom and the tallest one's gonna be sticking out from the top. So there you go. There's your tallest, your longest pieces of spaghetti, and it's done. Instantly. So that's just an idea here, quantum, computing's not the same thing, but that's a comparison really of digital and analog computers, but it's the same type of thing. [00:14:45] Some of these problems that would take thousands of years for digital computer. To work out, can just take a fraction of a second. It's absolutely amazing. So when we're looking at today's algorithms, today's programs for encrypting things like military information, secret telegrams, if you will going back and forth in inside the secretary of state embasies worldwide. [00:15:10] Today they're considered to be quite secure, but with quantum computing what's gonna happen. So there are a lot of people out there right now who are working on trying to figure out how can we come up with an algorithm that works today with our digital computers and can be easily solved by quantum computer. [00:15:34] We have a pretty good idea of how quantum computers are going to work in the future, how they work right now, but this really gets us to the next level, which is cool. Franklin. That's a little bit here about cybersecurity. How about you and your password? How does this all tie in? [00:15:51] There are a few standards out there that people have been trying to pass is it's no longer the four character password you might remember. Oh, it needs to be eight to 10 characters, random mix of upper lowercase, special digits, character numbers. You remember those? And you should change it every 30 days. [00:16:09] And those recommendations changed about three or four years ago when the national Institute of standards and technology said, Hey guys pass phrase is much better than the, what we've been doing because people are gonna remember it and it can be longer. So if you are using I have some past phrases I use that are 30 characters or more. [00:16:33] And I mix up the case and I mix up mix ins on special characters and some numbers, but it's a phrase that I can remember and I have different phrases for different websites. Cause I use a password manager right now. I have about 3,100 entries in my password manager. That's a lot. And I bet you have a lot more passwords or at least a lot more websites and accounts than you realize. [00:17:03] And so that gets to be a real problem. How do you make all of this work and make it easy for people? One of the ways that that. They're looking at using is something called the Fido alliances technique. And the idea behind Fido is actually similar to what I do right now. Cause I use one password.com. [00:17:24] I have an app on my phone and the phone goes ahead and gives me the password. In fact, it'll. Put it in. I have plugins in my browsers. It'll put it right into the password form on the website. And then it'll ask me on my phone. Hey, is that really you? And I'll say yes, using duo and TA I'm logged in it's really quite cool. [00:17:48] Fido is a little different than that, but the same, the whole idea behind Fido is you registered a website and the website will send a request to the Fido app. That's on your phone. So now on your phone, you'll use biometrics or maybe one time pass key, those six digit keys that change every 30 seconds. [00:18:13] And so now you on your phone, you say yeah. That's me. That's good. That's me. Yeah. Okay. And then the app will exchange with the website using public key cryptography. A public key and it's gonna be unique public key for that website. So it'll generate a private key and a public key for that website. [00:18:35] And now TA a, the website does not have your password and cannot get your password. And anytime you log in, it's going to ask you on your smartphone. Is this. And there's ways beyond smartphones. And if you wanna find out more about passwords, I've got, again, that free, special report, just Craig peterson.com. [00:18:59] Email me, just email me@craigpeterson.com and I'll make sure we send that off to you and explains a lot about passwords and current technology. So Fido is one way of doing this and a few different companies have gone ahead and have invested some. Into final registration, because it requires changes on the websites as well in order to. [00:19:25] With Fido. Now you might use a pin, you might use the biometrics, et cetera, but apple has decided they've come up with something even better. Now there's still a lot of questions about what apple is doing, but they are rolling it into the next release of iOS and also of Mac operating system. And you'll be able to use that to secure. [00:19:48] Log into websites. I think Apple's gonna get a lot of traction on this and I think it's gonna be better for all of us involved here. We'll see. There's still a lot of UN unanswered questions, but I'll keep you up to date on this whole password technology stick around. [00:20:08] There are ways for us to communicate nowadays easy ways, but are the easy ways, the best ways, the question here, frankly. And part of this answer has to do with WhatsApp and we'll talk right now. [00:20:23] Many people have asked me about secure messaging. You probably know by now that sending text messages is not secure. [00:20:34] In fact, it could be illegal if you have any personal information about. Patients or maybe employees, you just can't send those over open channels. So what apple has done for instance is they've got their messaging app and if the message is green, it's just reminding you that this is a text message. Now they stuck with green because that was the industry's standard. [00:21:01] Green does not mean safe in the apple world when it comes to iMessage. Blue does. So they've got end to end encryption. So if the message is blue, that means the encryptions in place from side to side, there are on the other end of the spectrum. There are apps like telegram, which are not. Particularly safe. [00:21:22] Now, telegram has pulled up it socks a little bit here, but in order to have end to end encryption and telegram, you have to manually turn it on. It is not on by default. I also personally don't trust telegram because of their background, things that they've done in the past. Avoid that. [00:21:43] WhatsApp is something I've been asked about. I had a family member of a service member who was overseas, ask if WhatsApp was safe for them to communicate on cuz they didn't want third parties picking. Private messages, things you say and do online with friends and family are not necessarily things there are for public consumption. [00:22:06] So the answer that I gave was yeah, you might remember Facebook getting WhatsApp. They bought it and deciding they were going to make some changes to the privacy settings in. now that was really a big mistake. They said we're gonna add advertisements. How are you going to effectively advertise? [00:22:27] If you don't know what we're talking about, have you noticed advertising platforms? If you look up something or someone else in your house looks up something, if your neighbors are looking up, they assume that you might be interested in it as well. So what do they do? They go ahead and show you ads for that brand new pair of socks that you never really cared about, but because the algorithms in the background figured yeah, that's what you've been talking about. [00:22:55] Let's pass out your pair of socks. So if Facebook is going to. Add into WhatsApp, what's going to happen. Are they going to be monitoring what you're saying? And then sending you some of these messages, right? These ads, because of that, a lot of people started looking for a more secure. Platform and that's frankly, where Moxi Marlin spike comes in a fun name, the bloom in this case, but he started a company called signal. [00:23:30] He didn't just start it. He wrote the code for it, the server code, everything. And the whole idea behind signal was to have a guaranteed safe end to end way to communicate. A third party with a friend, a relative, et cetera. So signal is something that I've used in the past. And I used from time to time now, as well, depending on who I'm talking to. [00:23:56] And it does allow you to send messages. It does allow you to talk. You can do all kinds of stuff with it. So now there's an issue with signal. It's disappointing. Moxi has stepped down from running signal. There's a company behind it in January, 2022. And he said, the company's begin off. They can run themselves. [00:24:19] He's still on the board of direct. And the guy who's currently the head of signal is also a very privacy focused guy, which is really good too signal by the way is free. And you can get it for pretty much any platform you would care to have it for a very nice piece of software. I like what they've done. [00:24:38] Now the problem is that some of those people at signal have decided that they should have a way of making payments inside signal. So a few months ago, they went ahead and added into signal, a piece of software that allows you to send. Payments online. Now this is a little concerning and the let's talk about some of the reasons for the concern. [00:25:09] Basically what we're seeing is a cryptocurrency that Moxi himself helped to put in place now, I guess that's good cuz he understands it. It's supposedly a cryptocurrency that is privacy. Focused. And that's a good thing. What type of crypto is it? That's privacy focused. And how good is it going to be? [00:25:34] Those are all good questions, but here's the biggest problem. I think that comes from this. We've got our friends at Facebook, again, trying to add crypto payments to their various messenger and other products. We're seeing that from a lot of these communication systems, cuz they can skim a little off the top legally, charge you a fee and then make their money that way. But. What happens when you put it into an encrypted messaging app? Bottom line, a lot of bad things can happen here because now all of a sudden you come under financial regulations, right? Because you are performing a financial. Function. So now potentially here, there could be criminal misuse of the app because you could have ransomware and they say, reach us on signal. [00:26:33] Here's our signal account. And go ahead and send us crypto. it's called mobile coin by the way, this particular cryptocurrency. So now all of a sudden you are opening up the possibility of all kinds of bad things happening and your app signal, which was originally great for messaging now being used nefariously. [00:26:57] I think that's a real problem. Now, when it comes to money transfer functions with cryptocurrencies to say that they're anonymous, I think is a hundred percent a misnomer because it's really pseudo anonymous. It's never completely anonymous. So now you've increased the legal attack surface here. So now the various regulators and countries around the world can say, Hey. [00:27:26] This is no longer just a messaging app. You are using it to send money. We wanna track all money transactions. And so what does that mean? That means now we need to be able to break the encryption or need to shut down your app, or you need to stop the ability to send money. So the concern right now with signal is we really could have some legal problems with signal. [00:27:53] And we could potentially cause some real life harm. On the other side of, this is what Moi Marlin spike has been really driving with signal over the years, which is we don't want anyone to be able to break into signal. So there's a particularly one Israeli based company that sells tools that you can buy that allow you to break into smartphone. [00:28:20] And they're used by everybody from criminals. You can even buy some of these things on eBay. And they're used also by law enforcement agencies. So he found that there was a bug in one of the libraries that's used by this Israeli soft. To where that causes it to crash. And so he puts some code into signal, at least he threatened to that would cause any of the scanning software that tries to break into your smartphone to fail to crash. [00:28:53] Yeah. Yeah. Cool. Greg Peterson here, online Craig peterson.com and really you are not alone. [00:29:09] I got some good news about ransomware and some bad news about B E C business email compromise. In fact, I got a call just this just this week from someone who had in fact again, had their operating account emptied. [00:29:27] Ransomware is a real problem, but it's interesting to watch it as it's evolved over the years. [00:29:36] We're now seeing crackdowns driving down ransomware profits. Yes, indeed. Ransomware's ROI is dropping the return on investment. And so what we're starting to see is a drive towards more. Business email compromise attack. So we'll talk about those, what those are. And I have a couple of clients now that became clients because of the business email compromises that happened to them. [00:30:10] A great article that was in this week's newsletter. You should have received it Tuesday morning from me. If you are signed up for the free newsletter. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You'll get these usually Tuesday morning. It's my insider show notes. So you can get up to speed on some of the articles I'm talking about during the week that I talk about on the radio. [00:30:38] And of course talk about here on the radio show and podcast and everything else as well. So what we're seeing here, according to dark readings, editor, Becky Bracken is some major changes, a pivot by the bad guys, because at the RSA conference, they're saying that law enforcement crackdowns try cryptocurrency regulations. [00:31:05] We've been talking about that today and ransomware as a service operator. Downs are driving the return on investment for ransomware operations across the world all the way across the globe. So what is ransomware as a service? I think that's a good place to start because that has really been an Albert Cross around our next for a long time. [00:31:30] The idea with ransomware is they get you to download some software, run some software that you really should not be running. That makes sense to you. So you get this software on your computer, it exfil trades files. So in other words, it takes files that you have sends them. Off to the bad guys. And then once it's done that, so it'll send like any word files, it finds Excel, other files. [00:32:00] It might find interesting once it's done that, then it goes ahead and encrypts those files. So you no longer have access to them and it doesn't just do them on your computer. If you share a drive, let's say you've got a Gdrive or something else on your computer that is being mounted from either another computer or maybe a server. [00:32:24] It will go ahead and do the same thing. With those files. And remember it, isn't just encrypting because if you have a good backup and by the way, most businesses that I've come into do not have a good backup, which is a real problem because their backups fail. They haven't run. I had one case where we helped the business out and it had been a year and a half since they had a successful backup and they had no. [00:32:52] They were dutifully carrying home. These USB drives every day, plug in a new one in, and the backups were not running. Absolutely amazing. So anyhow, ransomware is a service then. So they've encrypted your files. They've exfiltrated. In other words, they've taken your files and then they demand a ran. [00:33:14] So usually it's like this red screen that comes up and says, Hey all your files are belong to us and you need to contact us. So they have people who help you buy Bitcoin or whatever they're looking for. Usually it's Bitcoin and send the Bitcoin to them. And then they'll give you what's hopefully a decryption. [00:33:38] Now what's particularly interesting about these decryption keys is they work about half of the time. So in other words, about half of the time, you'll get all your data back about half the time. You will not, it's just not good. So if you are a small operator, if you are just a small, bad guy and it's you and maybe somebody else helping you, you got your nephew there helping you out. [00:34:03] How are you going to. Help these people that you're ransoming by the cryptocurrency. How are you going to threaten them with release of their documents online? Unless you have a staff of people to really help you out here? That's where ransomware's a service comes in. The whole idea behind RA is. [00:34:25] You can just be a one man shop. And all you have to do is get someone to open this file. So you go ahead and register with the ransomware service provider and they give you the software and you embed your little key in there, so they know it's you. And then you send it off in an email. You might try and mess with those people to get them to do something they shouldn't do. [00:34:49] And. That's all you have to do because once somebody opens up that file that you sent them, it's in the hand of these service guys and ransomwares the service guys. So the, these ransomwares of service people will do all of the tech support. They'll help people buy the Bitcoin. They'll help them pay the ransom. [00:35:11] They'll help them recover files, to a certain extent. Does this make sense to you? Yeah, it's kinda crazy. Now I wanna offer you, I've got this document about the new rules for backup and again, it's free. You can get it. No problem. Just go ahead and email me, me@craigpeterson.com m@craigpeterson.com because the backups are so important and. [00:35:38] Just like password rules have changed. The rules have changed for backups as well. So just drop me an email me@craigpeterson.com and ask for it and we'll make sure we send it off to you and is not trying to sell you more stuff. Okay. It's really is explaining the whole thing for you. I'm not holding anything back. [00:35:54] These ransoms, the service operators, then get the payment from you and then pay a percentage anywhere from 80% to 50%, sometimes even lower to the person who ransom due. Isn't that just wonderful. So our law enforcement people, as well as in other countries have been going after the ransomware as a service providers, because if they can shut down. [00:36:21] These RAs guys just shutting. One of them down can shut down thousands of small ransomware people. Isn't that cool works really well. So they have been shut down. Many of them there's one that just popped its head back up again. After about six months, we'll see how far they get, but it is a very big. [00:36:46] Blow to the whole industry, ransomware really because of these O as a service operators has become a centralized business. So there's a small number of operators responsible for the majority of these thousands of hundreds of thousands of attacks. Really. It's probably worse than. So couple of dis big groups are left the KTI group and lock bit, and they've got more than 50% of the share of ransomware attacks in the first half of 2022. [00:37:18] But now they're going after them. The feds. And I think that makes a whole lot of sense, because who do you go for while you go for the people who are causing the most harm and that's certainly them. So I expect they'll be shut down sometimes soon, too. Ransomware had its moment over the last couple of years, still a lot of ransomware out there, still a lot of problems, but now we're seeing B C business, email compromise tactics, and I did a. [00:37:50] At television appearance, where I was working with the the newsmaker or whatever they call them, talking heads on that TV show and explaining what was happening. And the most standard tactic right now is the gift card swindle. I should put together a little video on this one, but it was all, it's all about tricking employees into buying bogus gift cards. [00:38:18] So this good old fashioned Grif is still working. And what happened in our case is it was actually one of the newscasters who got an email, supposedly from someone else saying, Hey we wanna celebrate everybody. And in order to do that, I wanna give 'em all gift cards. So can you go out and buy gift cards? [00:38:42] And so we messed around with them. It was really fun and said, okay what denomination, how many do you think we need? Who do you think we should give them to? And of course we knew what we were doing. Their English grammar was not very good. And it was really obvious that this was not. [00:38:59] The person they were pretending to be. So that happens and it happens a lot. They got into a business email account, the email account of that newscaster. So they were able to go through their email, figure out who else was in the business, who was a trusted source inside of the business. So they could pretend that that they were that newscaster and send emails to this trusted source. [00:39:31] And today these business email compromise attacks are aimed at the financial supply chain. And once these threat actors are inside, they look for opportunities to spoof vendor emails, to send payments to controlled accounts. And the worst case I know of this is a company that sent $45 million. To a scammer. [00:39:57] And what happened here is the, this woman pretended to be the CEO who was out of the country at the time and got the CFO to wire the money to her. An interesting story. We'll have to tell it to you sometime, but it's a real problem. And we just had another one. We've had them in school districts, look, 'em up online, do a duck dot, go search for them and you'll find them right. [00:40:24] Left and center because social engineering works. And frankly, business email compromise is a clear threat to businesses everywhere. I, as I mentioned, we had one listens to the show, contact us just last week. Again, $40,000 taken out of the operating account. We had another one that had a, I think it was $120,000 taken out of the operating account. [00:40:53] And another one that had about $80,000 taken outta the operating account. Make sure you're on my newsletter. even the free one. I do weekly free trainings. Craig peterson.com. Make sure you subscribe now. [00:41:10] Facebook's about 18 years old coming on 20 Facebook has a lot of data. How much stuff have you given Facebook? Did you fall victim for that? Hey, upload your contacts. We'll find your friends. They don't know where your data is. [00:41:26] It's going to be a great time today because man. This whole thing with Facebook has exploded here lately. [00:41:35] There is an article that had appeared on a line from our friends over at, I think it was, yeah. Let me see here. Yeah. Yeah. Motherboard. I was right. And motherboards reporting that Facebook doesn't know what it does with your data or. It goes now, there's always a lot of rumors about different companies and particularly when they're big company and the news headlines are grabbing your attention. [00:42:08] And certainly Facebook can be one of those companies. So where did motherboard get this opinion about Facebook? Just being completely clueless about your personal data? It came from a leaked document. Yeah, exactly. So I, we find out a lot of stuff like that. I used to follow a website about companies that were going to go under and they posted internal memos. [00:42:38] It basically got sued out of existence, but there's no way that Facebook is gonna be able to Sue this one out of existence because they are describing this as. Internally as a tsunami of privacy regulations all over the world. So of course, if you're older, we used to call those TIAL waves, but think of what the implication there is of a tsunami coming in and just overwhelming everything. [00:43:08] So Facebook internally, they, their engineers are trying to figure out, okay, so how do we deal? People's personal data. It's not categorized in ways that regulators want to control it. Now there's a huge problem right there. You've got third party data. You've got first party data. You've got sensitive categories, data. [00:43:31] They might know what religion you are, what your persuasions are in various different ways. There's a lot of things they might know about you. How are they all CATA categorized? Now we've got the European union. With their gen general data protection regulation. The GDPR we talked about when it came into effect back in 2018, and I've helped a few companies to comply with that. [00:43:56] That's not my specialty. My specialty is the cybersecurity side. But in article five, this European law mandates that personal data must be collected for specified explicit and legitimate purposes and not further processed in a manner that is incompatible with those purposes. So what that means is that every piece of data, like where you are using Facebook or your religious orientation, Can only be collected and used for a specific purpose and not reused for another purpose. [00:44:34] So there's an example here that vice is giving in past Facebook, took the phone number that users provided to protect their accounts with two factor authentication and fed it to its people, feature as well as. Advertisers. Yeah. Interesting. Eh, so Gizmoto with the help of academic researchers caught Facebook doing this, and eventually the company had to stop the practice. [00:45:01] Cuz this goes back to the earlier days where Facebook would say, Hey, find out if your friends are on Facebook, upload your contacts right now. And most people. What did you know back then about trying to keep your data private, to try and stop the proliferation of information about you online and nothing. [00:45:21] I think I probably even uploaded it back then thinking that'd be nice to see if I got friends here. We can start chatting, et cetera. According to legal experts that were interviewed by motherboard who wrote this article and has a copy of the internal me memo, this European regulation specifically prohibits that kind of repurposing of your phone number of trying to put together the social graph and the leak document shows that Facebook may not even have the ability to limit. [00:45:53] how it handles users data. Now I was on a number of radio stations this week, talking about this and the example I gave, I is just look at an average business from the time it start, Facebook started how right. You scrape in pictures of young women off of Harvard universities. Main catalog, contact page, and then asking people what do you think of this rate? This person rate that person and off they go, trying to rate them. Yeah. All that matters to a woman, at least according to mark Zuckerberg or all that matters about a woman is how she looks. Do I think she's pretty or not ridiculous what he was doing? [00:46:35] I, it just, oh, that's Zuckerberg, right? That's. Who he is not a great guy anyways. So you go from stealing pictures of young ladies asking people to rate them, putting together some class information and stuff there at Harvard, and then moving on to other universities and then opening up even wider and wider. [00:47:00] And of course, that also created demand cuz you can't get on. If you're not at one of the universities that we have set it up for. And then you continue to grow. You're adding these universities, certain you're starting to collect data and you're making more money than God. So what do you do? You don't have to worry about inefficiencies. [00:47:20] I'll tell you that. One thing you don't have to do is worry about, oh, GE we've got a lot of redundant work going on here. We've got a lot of teams working on basically the same thing. No, you've got more money than you can possibly shake a stick at. So now you go ahead and send that money to this group or that group. [00:47:41] And they put together all of the basic information, that, that they want. They are. Pulling it out of this database and that database, and they're doing some correlation writing some really cool sequel queries with some incredible joins and everything else. And now that becomes part of the main code for Facebook. [00:48:02] And then Facebook goes on to the next little project and they do the same thing. Then the next project, then the next project. And then someone comes along and says Hey, we. This feature, that feature for advertisers and then in that goes, and then along comes candidate Obama. And they, one of the groups inside Facebook says yeah here we go. [00:48:25] Here's all of the information we have about everybody and it's free. Don't worry about it. And then when Trump actually bought it and hired a company to try and process some of that information he got in trouble. No but the Obama. The whole campaign could get access to anything they wanted to, again, because the data wasn't controlled, they had no idea who was doing what with the data. [00:48:50] And according to this internal memo, they still don't know. They don't even know if they can possibly comply with these regulations, not just in Europe, but we have regulations in pretty much all of the 50 states in the us Canada of course, has their own Australia, New Zealand think about all the places. [00:49:12] Facebook makes a lot of money. So here's a quote from that we build systems with open borders. The result of these open systems and open culture is well described with an analogy. Imagine you hold a bottle of ink in your hand, the bottle of ink is a mixture of all kinds of user data. You pour that ink into a lake of water. [00:49:34] Okay. And it flows every. The document red. So how do you put that ink back in the bottle, in the right bottle? How do you organize it again? So that it only flows to the allowed places in the lake? They're totally right about that. Where did they collect it from it? Apparently they don't even know where they got some of this information. [00:49:58] This data from reminds me of the no fly list. You don't know you're on it and you can't get yourself off of it. It is crazy. So this document that we're talking about was written last year by. Privacy engineers on the ad and business product team, whose mission is to make meaningful connections between people and businesses and which quote sits at the center of a monetization strategy. [00:50:22] And is the engine that powers Facebook's growth. Interesting problems. And I see this being a problem well into the future for more and more of these companies, look at Twitter as an example that we've all heard about a lot lately. And I've talked about as well along comes Elon Musk and he says wait a minute now. [00:50:41] Now I can make Twitter way more profitable. We're gonna get rid of however many people it's well over a thousand, and then we are going to hire more people. We're gonna start charging. We're gonna be more efficient. You can bet all of these redundancies that are in Facebook are also there on Twitter. and Twitter also has to comply with all of these regulations that Facebook is freaking out about. [00:51:09] It, for really a very good reason. So this document is available to anybody who wants to look at it. I'm looking at it right now, talking about regulatory landscape and the fundamental problems Facebook's data lake. And this is a problem that most companies have not. As bad as Facebook does, but most companies, you grow. I have yet to walk into a business that needs help with cybersecurity and find everything in place as it should be, because it grew organically. You started out with a little consumer firewall, router and wifi, and then you added to it and you put a switch here and you added another switch behind that and move things around. [00:51:54] This is normal. This is not total incompetence on the part of the management, but my gosh, I don't know. Maybe they need an Elon Musk. Just straighten them out as well. Hey, stick around. I'll be right back and sign up online@craigpeterson.com. [00:52:13] Apparently looting is one of the benefits of being a Russian soldier. And according to the reports coming out of Ukraine, they've been doing it a lot, but there's a tech angle on here that is really turning the tables on these Russian looters. [00:52:30] This is really something, we know in wars, there are people that loot and typically the various militaries try and make sure, at least recently that looting is kept to an absolute minimum. [00:52:45] Certainly the Americans, the British, even the Nazis during world war II the the socialists they're in. Germany they tried to stop some of the looting that was going on. I think that's probably a very good thing, because what you end up with is just all of these locals that are just totally upset with you. [00:53:10] I found a great article on the guardian and there's a village. Had been occupied for about a month by Russian troops and the people came back, they are just shocked to see what happened. They're giving a few examples of different towns. They found that alcohol was stolen and they left empty bottles behind food rappers, cigarette butts, thrown all over the place in apartments and homes. [00:53:39] Piles of feces blocking the toilets, family photographs torn, thrown around the house. They took away all of the clothes. This is a code from one of the people, literally everything, male and female coats, boots, shirts, jackets, even my dresses and lingerie. This is really something. It, the Soviets didn't do this, but now Russian. [00:54:02] Military apparently does. So over the past couple of weeks, there've been reporting from numerous places where Russian troops had occupied Ukrainian territory and the guardian, which is this UK newspaper collected evidences suggests looting by Russian forces was not merely a case of a few way, word soldiers, but a systematic part of Russian military behavior across multiple towns. [00:54:29] And villages. That's absolutely amazing. Another quote here, people saw the Russian soldiers loading everything onto Euro trucks, everything they could get their hands on a dozen houses on the villages. Main street had been looted as well as the shops. Other villagers reported losing washing machines, food laptops, even as sofa, air conditioners. [00:54:53] Being shipped back, just you might use ups here, they have their equivalent over there. A lady here who was the head teacher in the school. She came back in, of course, found her home Lood and in the head teacher's office. she found an open pair of scissors that had been jammed into a plasma screen that was left behind because if they can't steal it, they're gonna destroy it. [00:55:19] They don't only leave anything behind. They found the Russians had taken most of the computers, the projectors and other electronic equipment. It's incredible. So let's talk about the turnaround here. A little. You might have heard stories about some of these bad guys that have smashed and grabbed their way into apple stores. [00:55:38] So they get into the apple store. They grab laptops on iPads, no longer iPods, cuz they don't make those anymore. And I phones. And they take them and they run with them. Nowadays there's not a whole lot of use for those. Now what they have been doing, some of these bad guys is they take some parts and use them in stolen equipment. [00:56:03] They sell them on the used market, et cetera. But when you're talking about something specific, like an iPhone that needs specific activation. Completely different problem arises for these guys because that iPhone needs to have a SIM card in order to get onto the cell network. And it also has built in serial numbers. [00:56:26] So what happens in those cases while apple goes ahead and disables them. So as soon as they connect to the internet, let's say they put 'em on wifi. They don't get a SIM card. They don't. service from T-Mobile or Verizon or whoever it might be. So now they disconnect to the wifi and it calls home, cuz it's gonna get updates. [00:56:45] So on download stuff from the app store and they find that it's been bricked. Now you can do that with a lot of mobile device managers that are available for. All kinds of equipment nowadays, but certainly apple equipment where if a phone is lost or stolen or a laptop or other pieces of equipment, you can get on the MDM and disable it, have it remotely erased, et cetera. [00:57:11] Now, police have had some interesting problems with that. Because a bad guy might go ahead and erase a smartphone. That's in the evidence locker at the police station. So they're doing things like putting them into Fairday cages or static bags or other things to try and stop that. So I think we've established here that the higher tech equipment is pretty well protected. [00:57:36] You steal it. It's not gonna do you much. Good. So one of the things the Russian stole when they were in it's called I think you pronounce it. Mela me pole which is again, a Erian city is they stole all of the equipment from a farm equipment dealership and shipped it to Chenia. Now that's according to a source in a businessman in the area that CNN is reporting on. [00:58:06] So they shipped this equipment. We're talking about combines harvesters worth 300 grand a piece. They shipped it 700 miles. and the thieves were ultimately unable to use the equipment, cuz it had been locked remotely. So think about agriculture equipment that John Deere, in this case, these pieces of equipment, they, they drive themselves. [00:58:33] It's autonomous. It goes up and down the fields. Goes any pattern that you want to it'll bring itself within a foot or an inch of your boundaries, of your property being very efficient the whole time, whether it's planting or harvesting, et cetera. And that's just a phenomenal thing because it saves so much time for the farmer makes it easier to do the companies like John Deere. [00:58:58] Want to sell as many pieces of this equipment as they possibly can. And farming is known to be a, what not terribly profitable business. It certainly isn't like Facebook. So how can they get this expensive equipment into the hands of a lot of farmers? What they do is they lease it. So you can lease the equipment through leasing company or maybe directly from the manufacturer and now you're off and running. [00:59:26] But what happens if the lease isn't paid now? It's one thing. If you don't pay your lease on a $2,000 laptop, right? They're probably not gonna come hunting for you, but when you're talking about a $300,000 harvester, they're more interested. So the leasing company. Has titled to the equipment and the leasing company can shut it off remotely. [00:59:51] You see where I'm going with this so that they can get their equipment in the hands of more farmers cuz the farmers can lease it. It costs them less. They don't have to have a big cash payment. You see how this all works. So when the Russian forces stole this equipment, that's valued. Total value here is about $5 million. [01:00:11] They were able to shut it all. And obviously, if you can't start the engine, because it's all shut off and it's all run by computers nowadays, and there's pros and cons to that. I think there's a lot of cons, but what are you gonna do? How's that gonna work for you? It. Isn't going to work for you. [01:00:32] And they were able to track it. It had GPS trackers find out exactly where it was. That's how they know it was taken to Chenia and could be controlled remotely. And in this case, how'd they control it. They completely. Shut it off. Even if they sell the harvesters for spare parts, they'll learn some money, but they sure can be able to sell 'em for the 300 grand that they were actually worth. [01:00:57] Hey, stick around. We'll be right back and visit me online@craigpeterson.com. If you sign up there, you'll be able to get my insider show note. And every week I have a quick five. Training right there in your emails, Craig Peter san.com. That's S O N in case you're wondering. [01:01:22] If you've been worried about ransomware, you are right to worry. It's up. It's costly. And we're gonna talk about that right now. What are the stats? What can you do? What happens if you do get hacked? Interesting world. [01:01:38] Ransomware has been a very long running problem. I remember a client of ours, a car dealership who we had gone in. [01:01:49] We had improved all of their systems and their security and one of their. People who was actually a senior manager, ended up downloading a piece of ransomware, one of these encrypted ones and opened it up and his machine, all of a sudden TA, guess what it had ransomware on it. One of those big reds. [01:02:12] Greens that say pay up is send us this much Bitcoin. And here's our address. All of that sort of stuff. And he called us up and said, what's going on here? What happened? First of all, don't bring your own machine into the office. Secondly, don't open up particularly encrypted files using the password that they gave. [01:02:33] and thirdly, we stopped it automatically. It did not spread. We were able to completely restore his computer. Now let's consider here at the consequences of what happened. So he obviously was scared. And within a matter of a couple of hours, we actually had him back to where he was and it didn't spread. [01:02:59] So the consequences there they weren't that bad. But how about if it had gotten worse? How about if they ransomware. Also before it started holding his computer ransom, went out and found all of the data about their customers. Would, do you think an auto dealership would love to hear that all of their customer data was stolen and released all of the personal data of all of their customers? [01:03:25] Obviously not. So there's a potential cost there. And then how long do you think it would take a normal company? That thinks they have backups to get back online. I can tell you it'll take quite a while because the biggest problem is most backups don't work. We have yet to go into a business that was actually doing backups that would work to help restore them. [01:03:52] And if you're interested, I can send you, I've got something. I wrote up. Be glad to email it back to you. Obviously as usual, no charge. and you'll be able to go into that and figure out what you should do. Cause I, I break it down into the different types of backups and why you might want to use them or why you might not want to use them, but ransomware. [01:04:15] Is a kind of a pernicious nasty little thing, particularly nowadays, because it's two, two factor, first is they've encrypted your data. You can't get to it. And then the second side of that is okay I can't get to my data and now they're threatening to hold my data ransom or they'll release. So they'll put it out there. [01:04:38] And of course, if you're in a regulated industry, which actually car dealers are because they deal with financial transactions, leases, loans, that sort of thing you can lose your license for your business. You can U lose your ability to go ahead and frankly make loans and work with financial companies and financial instruments. [01:05:00] It could be a very big deal. so there are a lot of potential things that can happen all the way from losing your reputation as a business or an individual losing all of the money in your operating account. And we, again, we've got a client that we picked up afterwards. That yes, indeed. They lost all of the money in their operating account. [01:05:24] And then how do you make payroll? How do you do things? There's a new study that came out from checkpoint. Checkpoint is one of the original firewall companies and they had a look at ransomware. What are the costs of ransomware? Now bottom line, I'm looking at some stats here on a couple of different sites. [01:05:44] One is by the way, KTI, which is a big ransomware gang that also got hacked after they said we are going to attack anyone that. That doesn't defend Vlad's invasion of Ukraine, and then they got hacked and their information was released, but here's ransomware statistics. This is from cloud words. First of all, the largest ransom demand is $50 million. [01:06:11] And that was in 2021 to Acer big computer company. Now 37% of businesses were hit by ransomware. In 2021. This is amazing. They're expecting by 2031. So in about a decade, ransomware is gonna be costing about $265 billion a year. Now on average Ransomware costs businesses. 1.8, 5 million to recover from an attack. [01:06:41] Now that's obviously not a one or two person place, but think of the car dealer again, how much money are they going to make over the year or over the life of the business? If you're a car dealer, you have a to print money, right? You're selling car model or cars from manufacturer X. And now you have the right to do that and they can remove that. [01:07:03] How many tens, hundreds of millions of dollars might that end up costing you? Yeah. Big deal. Total cost of ransomware last year, 20 billion. Now these are the interesting statistics here right now. So pay closer attention to this 32% of ransomware victims paid a ransom demand. So about her third paid ransom demand. [01:07:27] Last. It's actually down. Cuz my recollection is it used to be about 50% would pay a ransom. Now on average that one third of victims that paid a ransom only recovered 65% of their data. Now that differs from a number I've been using from the FBI. That's a little bit older that was saying it's little better than 50%, but 65% of pain victims recovered their data. [01:07:55] Now isn't that absolutely amazing. Now 57% of companies are able to recover the data using a cloud backup. Now think about the different types of backup cloud backup is something that can work pretty well if you're a home user, but how long did it take for your system to get backed? Probably took weeks, right? [01:08:19] For a regular computer over a regular internet line. Now restoring from backup's gonna be faster because your down link is usually faster than your uplink. That's not true for businesses that have real internet service ours. It's the same bandwidth up as it is down. But it can take again, days or weeks to try and recover your machine. [01:08:39] So it's very expensive. And I wish I had more time to go into this, but looking at the costs here and the fact that insurance companies are no longer paying out for a lot of these ransomware attacks, it could be incredibly expensive for you incredibly. So here you. The number one business types by industry for ransomware tax retail. [01:09:13] That makes sense. Doesn't it. Real estate. Electrical contractors, law firms and wholesale building materials. Isn't that interesting? And that's probably because none of these people are really aware, conscious of doing what, of keeping their data secure of having a good it team, a good it department. So there's your bottom line. [01:09:40] Those are the guys that are getting hit. The most, the numbers are increasing dramatically and your costs are not just in the money. You might pay as a ransom. And as it turns out in pretty much every case prevention. Is less expensive and much better than the cure of trying to pay ransom or trying to restore from backups. [01:10:06] Hey, you're listening to Craig Peterson. You can get my weekly show notes by just going to Craig peterson.com. And I'll also send you my special report on how to do passwords stick around will be right back. [01:10:24] You and I have talked about passwords before the way to generate them and how important they are. And we'll go over that again a little bit in just a second, but there is a new standard out there that will eliminate the need for passwords. [01:10:40] I remember, I think the only system I've ever really used that did not require passwords was the IBM 360. [01:10:49] Yeah, 360, you punch up the cards, all of the JCL you feed the card deck in and off it goes. And does this little thing that was a different day, a different era. When I started in college in university, we. We had remote systems, timeshare systems that we could log into. And there weren't much in the line of password requirements in, but you had a username. [01:11:18] You had a simple password. And I remember one of our instructors, his name was Robert, Andrew Lang. And his password was always some sort of a combination of RA Lang. So it was always easy to guess what his password was. Today, it has gotten a lot worse today. We have devices with us all of the time. [01:11:40] You might be wearing a smart watch. That requires a password. You of course probably have a smart phone. That's also maybe requiring a password, certainly after boots nowadays they use fingerprints or facial recognition, which is handy, but has its own drawbacks. But how about the websites? You're going to the systems you're using when you're at work and logging in, they all require passwords. [01:12:10] And usernames of some sort or another well, apple, Google, and Microsoft have all committed to expanding their support for a standard. That's actually been out there for a few years. It's called the Fido standard. And the idea behind this is that you don't have to have a password in order to log. Now that's really an interesting thing, right? [01:12:37] Just looking at it because we're so used to having this password only authentic. And of course the thing to do there is make sure you have for your password, multiple words in the password, it should really be a pass phrase. And between the words put in special characters or numbers, maybe mix. [01:12:59] Upper lowercase a little bit. In those words, those are the best passwords, 20 characters, 30 characters long. And then if you have to have a pin, I typically use a 12 digit pin. And how do I remember all of these? Cuz I use a completely different password for every website and right now, Let me pull it up. [01:13:21] I'm using one password dot com's password manager. And my main password for that is about 25 characters long. And I have thirty one hundred and thirty five. Entries here in my password manager, 3,100. That is a whole lot of passwords, right? As well as software licenses and a few other things in there. [01:13:48] That's how we remember them is using a password manager. One password.com is my favorite. Now, obviously I don't make any money by referring you there. I really do like that. Some others that I've liked in the past include last pass, but they really messed. With some of their cybersecurity last year and I lost my faith in it. [01:14:08] So now what they're trying to do is make these websites that we go to as well as some apps to have a consistent, secure, and passwordless sign in. and they're gonna make it available to consumers across all kinds of devices and platforms. That's why you've got apple, Google, and Microsoft all committing to it. [01:14:32] And you can bet everybody else is going to follow along because there's hundreds of other companies that have decided they're gonna work with the Fido Alliance and they're gonna create this passwordless future. Which I like this idea. So how does this work? Basically you need to have a smartphone. [01:14:50] This is, I'm just gonna go with the most standard way that this is going to work here in the future. And you can then have a, a. Pass key. This is like a multifactor authentication or two factor authentication. So for instance, right now, when I sign into a website online, I'm giving a username, I'm giving a password and then it comes up and it asks me for a code. [01:15:14] So I enter an a six digit code and that code changes every 30 seconds. And again, I use my password manager from one password dot. In order to generate that code. So that's how I log into Microsoft sites and Google sites and all kinds of sites out there. So it's a similar thing here now for the sites for my company, because we do cyber security for businesses, including regulated businesses. [01:15:41] We have biometrics tied in as. so to log into our systems, I have to have a username. I have to have a password. I then am sent to a single sign on page where I have to have a message sent to my smart device. That then has a special app that uses biometrics either a face ID or a fingerprint to verify who I am. [01:16:06] Yeah, there's a lot there, but I have to protect my customer's data. Something that very few it's crazy. Actual managed security services providers do, but it's important, right? By the way, if you want my password. Special report, just go to Craig peterson.com. Sign up for my email list. [01:16:29] I'll send that to you. That's what we're sending out right now for anyone who signs up new@craigpeterson.com. And if you'd like a copy of it and you're already on the list, just go ahead and email me M E. At Craig peterson.com and ask for the password special report where I go through a

Razorcake
Razorcake Podcast #781 with When Horns Are Okay 13, Stations of the Brass with Ethan and Todd

Razorcake

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 79:35


We've now collected, cataloged, and Excel-nerded over 320 horn songs by over 300 different artists… and counting. Be warned

Scrum Dynamics
Power Platform governance at a global scale with Rene Modery

Scrum Dynamics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 36:45


121. What's it like trying to manage 10 Microsoft 365 tenants with hundreds of environments, apps and citizen developers. Rene Modery, Power Platform Technical Lead shares his journey at global advertising company, WPP. Managing ten Microsoft 365 tenants for a global company with hundreds of subsidiaries.Power Platform environment policies and other guard rails to help makers.How do you know what apps have already been built and what problems have already been solved within a large organisation so that makers don't reinvent the wheel?Which data sources and connectors are proving to be the most popular in your Power Platform environments? SharePoint, Microsoft Lists, Excel, Azure SQL, Dataverse?Why Rene is not ready to ask makers to standardise on Dataverse quite yet.How the new Fluent UI controls will help app makers build apps that are better looking and more useful.If Rene could direct the Microsoft product teams to improve one thing, it would be...licensing!And he'd love to see some of the Center of Excellence features brought into the Power Platform Admin Center too.  And in person events are returning to the Power Platform user groups in Singapore.ResourcesRene Modery on TwitterRene Modery on LinkedInRene's book, Hands-On Microsoft ListsSingapore Power Platform User GroupSupport the show

Cloud Accounting Podcast
AICPA Disengage

Cloud Accounting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 66:54


SponsorsOnPay: https://www.cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/onpaySynder: https://www.cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/synderFreshbooks: https://www.cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/freshbooksNeed CPE? Subscribe to the Earmark Accounting Podcast: https://podcast.earmarkcpe.comGet CPE for listening to podcasts with Earmark CPE: https://earmarkcpeShow NotesComing soon! Get in TouchThanks for listening and for the great reviews! We appreciate you! Follow and tweet @BlakeTOliver and @DavidLeary. Find us on Facebook and, if you like what you hear, please do us a favor and write a review on iTunes, or Podchaser. Interested in sponsoring the Cloud Accounting Podcast? For details, read the prospectus, and NOW, you can see our smiling faces on Instagram! You can now call us and leave a voicemail, maybe we'll play it on the show. DIAL (202) 695-1040Need Accounting Conference Info? Check out our new website - accountingconferences.comLimited edition shirts, stickers, and other necessitiesTeePublic Store: http://cloudacctpod.link/merchSubscribe Apple Podcasts: http://cloudacctpod.link/ApplePodcasts Podchaser: http://cloudacctpod.link/podchaser Spotify: http://cloudacctpod.link/Spotify Stitcher: http://cloudacctpod.link/Stitcher Overcast: http://cloudacctpod.link/Overcast ClassifiedsFuture Firm: futurefirmaccelerate.comGetW9: getw9.taxAmbitious Bookkeeper: https://www.ambitiousbookkeeper.com/podcastRoyalwise Solutions: learn.royalwise.comResolve Works: https://www.resolve-works.com/careersAdvisors For Change: advisorsforchange.com/join-our-teamWant to get the word out about your newsletter, webinar, party, Facebook group, podcast, e-book, job posting, or that fancy Excel macro you just created? Why not let the listeners of The Cloud Accounting Podcast know by running a classified ad? Hit the link below to get more info.Go here to create your classified ad: https://cloudacctpod.link/RunClassifiedAd Full Transcript Available Upon Request - info@cloudaccountingpodcast.com

Catfish Weekly/Panfish Weekly Podcast Station
Panfish nation 73 With Guest Jeremy Albrition

Catfish Weekly/Panfish Weekly Podcast Station

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 64:19


Donations appreciated paypal.me/catfishweekly Lyle's equipment 2001 Tracker Tundra with a 125 Mercury Humminbird elecronics Crappie Zilla Baits, plastics Lil Miss Bacon Baits 6500 LLC Abu reels, and others Krampus Kanes Blackhorse ultra lite rods Sufix 832 braid 10# Bass Pro Shop 6# Excel line Slime line 6# Panfish Nation hand ties Check out Mark's Channel "Catfish and Crappie" https://www.youtube.com/CatfishandCra... --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lyle-stokes/support

All Gallup Webcasts
Poder das Parcerias - Talentos em Ação! Itana Torres, Rebeca Maia e Yuri Trafane

All Gallup Webcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 55:38


Nosso Called to Coach de Maio é muito especial!! Recebemos as queridas Itana Torres e Rebeca Maia - Co Founders na Inspirar Consultoria, falando para nós sobre: O Poder das Parcerias - Talentos em Ação. Rebeca Maia e Itana Torres, são Co-founder da Inspirar Consultoria, Mentoria e Educação Corporativa. Especialistas em Psicologia Positiva. Mentoras de Pontos Fortes certificada pela Gallup. Chiefs Happiness Officer e certificadas em Cultura de Segurança Psicológica. Experiência em liderança de equipes. A Inspirar é uma empresa de Consultoria, Mentoria e Educação Corporativa. Atuam inspirando pessoas para os resultados do negócio, através do desenvolvimento humano, planejamento, execução e acompanhamento da estratégia, mapeamento e estruturação dos processos, além de apoio à performance desejada. Top 05 Itana Torres: 1.Restauração 2.Crença 3.Realização 4.Ideativo 5.Responsabilidade Top 05 Rebeca Maia: 1.Relacionamento 2.Estratégico 3.Excelência 4.Realização 5.Autoafirmação Yuri Trafane formou-se em Gestão de Marketing pela ESPM após ter cursado Química na UNICAMP. Possui dois MBAs, um pela USP e outro pela FGV, seguido de um pós-MBA pela FIA, uma certificação em coaching pela ATD USA e uma especialização em Strength Based Coaching pela Gallup USA. Com sólida formação acadêmica, construiu sua experiência profissional como executivo em empresas renomadas, como Johnson & Johnson, Unilever, Parmalat, Bauducco e Grupo Abril.Atualmente dirige a Ynner Treinamentos, empresa de treinamento e consultoria especializada em Gestão, Estratégia, Vendas e Marketing, onde teve o privilégio de formar executivos de empresas de destaque como Bayer, Nestlé, Bosch, Nívea, Walmart, 3M, Eaton , Emerson, Mercedes-Benz, FMC, Mary Kay, Sanofi, Saint Gobain e várias outras. Ynner é a representante oficial da Gallup no Brasil. Yuri's Top 5 CliftonStrengths: Input (Input), Estudioso (Learner), Ativação (Activator), Significância (Significance), Relacionamento (Relator)

ACB Conference and Convention
Appetizer Auction Day 1: 2022 ACB Summer Auction

ACB Conference and Convention

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 20:12


2022 Appetizer Auction Day One Opens Thursday, June 16 at 12:00 noon ET Closes Friday, June 17 at 12:00 noon ET Opening Bids Included Appetizer Auction Rules and Information: Contact Leslie Spoone at 407 678-4163 or email at lesliespoone@cfl.rr.com with your bid. Please provide your name, phone number, email, item number and bid amount. Bids must be in $5.00 increments. Leslie will send out Appetizer Auction information communicating the high bid on each item at 5:00pm ET, 8:00pm ET and 9:00am ET each day. Billing for both the Appetizer Auction and The ACB Summer Auction will begin on Monday, June 20 for the total amount of all winning purchases. Appetizer Auction Items Day One 201 $50 Rada Cutlery gift certificate donated by ACB Board Director Donna Brown Opening Bid $25 For the cook of the house or the wannabee cook, cutlery from Rada is made in the USA and is guaranteed for life. Choose from a variety of knives, utensils, pans, food mixes, and more. Items will be shipped from the factory directly to your home. 202 The Stars and Stripes Crafters Gift Basket donated by Anonymous Opening Bid$25 This basket includes 5 rolls of red, white, and blue decorative mesh ribbon, a star-shaped wreath frame, 3 sheets pearl stick-on gems 216 of each color red, white and blue. Jeweled boarder stickers made of rhinestones and pearls 10 inches long .5 inch wide 15 white and 15 blue, 6 scalloped rhinestones boarder stickers 10 inches long in blue, 2 pages of rub-on foil transfers various patriot images, 2 blue stencils with border designs, 2 pages of jeweled star stick-ons, 24 blank 5x7 cards 8 white, 8 red, 8 blue with 24 matching white envelopes, 24 blank 4.25 x 5.5 8 white, 8 blue, 8 red with matching white envelopes also comes with 6 pages of rubber stamps for paper stamping approximately 36 stamps. 203 Handmade Crochet Afghan donated by Nancy Moreno Opening Bid $40 This beautiful handmade afghan is 45 inches wide and 58 inches long. The colors are yellow, orange and beige. You will love cuddling up on a cold night with a special friend! 204 One-Year License for Office 365 donated by Anonymous Opening Bid $50 Make the most of your Microsoft 365 Premium Office apps and more. Make life more creative, organized, and secure. Install Office apps on your favorite devices including Windows, macOS, iOS, and Android. Now it's easier than ever to write, design, and share seamlessly across your devices. You get smart assistance features as soon as they are released in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint so you're always working with the latest. Now, you can manage multiple calendars in one view to stay on top of work meetings, remote schooling, and family time. Back up your files with 1 TB of OneDrive cloud storage. 205 Mary Kay Satin Hands Set donated by Nancy Folsom Opening Bid $25 This 3-step process will leave your hands and feet feeling soft, smooth, and luxurious! The Satin Hands set softens, exfoliates, and moisturizes each time you use it. Now that we are washing our hands more than ever, this set is great for guys and gals to help keep your hands healthy! You will love how great your hands feel! You can use it on your feet as well. 206 American Patriot with Statue of Liberty Picture Frame donated by Sharon Dutmer Opening Bid $20 This is an 8 by 10-inch brown frame with a picture of the American Patriot with the Statue of liberty and the American Eagle with a flag in the background. It will look lovely hanging on your wall. 207 Three Dozen of Your Choice Homemade Cookies donated by Patty Slaby Opening Bid $30 Wow, Patty's delicious homemade cookies are back by demand! Enjoy three dozen cookies of your choice. There are many kinds, but a few might include: snickerdoodles, ginger, oatmeal varieties, peanut butter varieties and many more. Yum, Yum! 208 $100 Amazon Gift Card donated by Jim and Vickie Kennedy Opening Bid $60 It's time to treat yourself to something special and here's a gift card to help you do it. $100 in spending at Amazon! 209 Three Scented Sprays from Dau De Parfum donated by Connie Jacomini Opening Bid $25 Enjoy these Dolly Parton perfumes Above Deu De Parfum Spray which is 3.4fluid ounces. Also, enjoy Love Notes by Michael Buble, Dau De Parfum 3.4 fluid ounces and an Invitation by Michael Buble, which is 1.7 fluid ounces. Wow, what an extravaganza! This would make a fantastic gift for that someone special in your life or if you just want to spoil yourself. 210 Amazon Echo Dot 3rd Generation donated by The Literacy Project Opening Bid $25 Our most popular smart speaker with a fabric design. It is our most compact smart speaker that fits perfectly into small spaces. Improved speaker quality. Better speaker quality than Echo Dot Gen 2 for richer and louder sound. Pair with a second Echo Dot for stereo sound. Designed to protect your privacy - Built with multiple layers of privacy protections and controls, including a microphone off button that electronically disconnects the microphones. 211 Plot Stitch Editorial Review donated by Ann Harrison Opening Bid $20 For the winner, I will provide a critique of the first three chapters of a manuscript, or a short work up to 10,000 words. This is such a wonderful item to either give to yourself or a friend. Please contact Ann at theplotstitch@gmail.com 212 A Basket of Goodies from Blind Girl Designs donated by Tricia Waechter Opening Bid $25 The basket will be filled with 3 assorted Blind Girl Designs printed t shirts in your favorite size (S to 5XL) in black, ash grey, and deep blue. A black cotton sun hat to keep the summer sun off your peepers, and a bundle of soft, stretchy knit beanie hats each in their own little organza drawstring pouches. 213 Braille Plus Mobile Manager donated by Roberta McCall Opening Bid $35 Braille+ unit: rectangular gray plastic case with brushed aluminum faceplate; top features diamond-shaped navigation pad in middle with five application buttons immediately above and three below; gray 12 key numeric keyboard at bottom; six rectangular blue braille keys on left and three braille keys on right (shift, space, and alt); speaker grill at top middle of face, along with screened APH logo and Braille+ logo in blue; on bottom of case is keyboard lock toggle and interface cable port; on left side of case is volume toggle, speaker on/off button, and record button; on top of case are line in jack, mini SD card reader slot, headphone jack, and headset jack. 214 $25 Amazon Gift Card and a $25 Oriental Trading Gift Card donated by Monica Svopa and ACB of Nebraska Opening Bid $30 It's time to treat yourself to something special and here's a gift card to help you do it. $25 in spending at Amazon! Also, enjoy this $25 gift card to Oriental Trading to buy some unique gifts for yourself or friends. 215 $100 Gift Card to Urbane Salon in Omaha, Nebraska donated by Ann Brash Opening Bid $50 Enjoy pampering yourself while in Omaha over a busy week during convention. You can look spectacular for the banquet. Urbane Salon and Day Spa is a full service, Aveda salon offering excellent hair care services for men, women, and children and exceptional spa services. Our skilled stylists will provide you with the quality service you deserve and the style you will love. This salon is three blocks from the hotel in Omaha. 216 Storage Galore donated by Marsha farrow Opening bid $30 Silicone reusable bags: reduce plastic waste with reusable bags to take meals and snacks with you on the go! Each silicone bag has a clear window and a leakproof zipper so you can see and seal whatever's inside plus, these bags are perfect for sous-vide cooking. They can go in your freezer, refrigerator, microwave, or oven (400 degrees max). This set includes the following items: • Small Reusable Storage Bag - Take snacks with you on the go. Holds 1.5 cups (375 mL). • Medium Reusable Storage Bag - Perfect for meal prep, storing snacks, and sous-vide cooking. Holds 3 cups (750 mL). • Medium Reusable Sandwich Bag - Store sandwiches, snacks, and more. Holds 3 cups (750 mL). • Large Reusable Storage Bag - Use for transporting snacks, storing leftovers, and sous-vide cooking. Holds 8 cups (1.9 L). Step up your meal prep: • Our Cut & Store Containers are the ultimate 2-in-1 kitchen storage containers. Outfitted with lids that double as cutting boards, you can use these durable containers to cut and store your food. Plus, they stack to save you counter and fridge space. Refrigerator, freezer, and dishwasher safe. 217 Tan Denim Purse donated by Anonymous Opening Bid $25 A lovely purse made from jeans. This one is from a repurposed pair of tan cargo pants, or kakis. The purse is 16 inches deep and 18 inches wide. The purse part is made from the upper part of the pants, so pockets are still used as part of the waistband functions as the top band of purse legs of the pants were cut up and sewn to make the two purse handles, one on either side of the opening. Hammer on coat snaps were used so purse can be snapped closed at the top. The purse is lined with a navy blue, burgundy and tan print and decorative belt is made from the same fabric as the lining to accent the purse. The accent belt is feed through the existing belt loops. 218 $50 Gift Certificate to Sergeant Peffer's Café Italian donated by Dana Peffer, owner of Sgt. Peffer's Café Italian Opening Bid $30 Remember the Welcome to Omaha party with its Beetles cover band as you dine-in or carry-out at Sgt. Peffer's Café Italian with a $50 gift certificate. Sgt. Peffer's is a charming, Italian eatery decorated in a Beetles theme. The restaurant is located 4 miles west of downtown Omaha. Expires April 2023. 219 Bakers Candies donated by Kristal Platt Opening Bid $50 Sample in advance Two 1-pound bags of mouth-watering Bakers Candies variety chocolates where the ACB Convention tour will visit. 220 $150 Spencer's Steaks and Chops Gift Certificate donated by The Literacy Project Opening Bid $70 Enjoy dining at this fantastic steak house in Omaha. This steak house offers crafted cocktails with prime beef and prime pork. This certificate expires July 21, 2022. 221 Josh Allen Quarterback NFL Official Jersey donated by Angelo Lanier Opening Bid $50 Josh Allen, Buffalo Bills Quarterback, is a rising superstar. You will enjoy having this extra-large blue jersey in your sports collection! This is truly a must to have for yourself or to give someone for a special gift. 222 Four $25 Starbucks Gift Cards donated by Tennessee Council of the Blind Opening Bid $50 Everyone loves a good cup of coffee. It's even better with a friend. 223 Restore Your Brailler donated by John Harden Opening Bid $45 Is your good old Perkins braille writer not working as good as it once did? John Harden's quality Brallier repair service will take care of that for you. Ship John your machine and he will return it to you in like new condition with a brand-new dust cover complements of John's quality service. Contact John to make shipping arrangements. 224 $75 Gift Certificate to Cranberry Sweets donated by ACB of Oregon Cranberry Sweets on the Beautiful Southern Coast of Oregon Opening Bid $40 Do you have a sweet tooth? Does the sound of homemade, hand crafted, goodies strike your fancy? Then head on over to the website for Cranberry Sweets. Browse everything from chocolate dipped cranberries, a massive variety of flavored popcorn, cheeses, cookies, etc. I mean you name it they probably have it. With your gift card you aren't able to order online but give the fabulous ladies at Cranberry Sweets a call and they will be more than happy to help you out. They can ship directly to you and even tell you what some of their seasonal treats are at the time of your call. Contact Information: Cranberry Sweets 1005 Newmark Ave. Coos Bay, OR. 97420 (541)888-9824 225 The Pocket Bible Donated by Rev. Ray Raysor, President DC Council of the Blind Opening Bid $40 The Pocket Bible is a self-contained digital device that contains the entire Bible. It is about the size of the old cassette tapes and has navigation buttons that allow forward and backward movement by both book and chapter. It has no moving parts and is rugged and water resistant. The Pocket Bible Player has both an internal speaker and an earphone jack. • English Standard Version • King James Version • New King James Version • New American Standard Bible • New International Version (NIV) • New Living Translation ® • Audio Bibles in Spanish also available. 226 Amazon Fire TV Stick donated by Margie Donovan Opening Bid $30 The Amazon Fire TV Stick is a device joining the ranks of home entertainment streaming technologies. The Fire Stick plugs into your TV's HDMI port giving you access to your favorite TV shows, movies, music, games, photos and more. It has both screen reading and magnification capability and is accessible to the blind and visually impaired community. You can watch Prime Video, Netflix, Disney, and much more all with audio description.

The Godmother with Lisa Bevere
It's Time to Excel with Jennifer Allwood

The Godmother with Lisa Bevere

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 33:50


Have you ever felt ashamed of your desire to make money? Or afraid of what other people will think of you when you finally step out and do what God has put in your heart to do? It's easy to let fear hold us back from our God-given destinies, but I believe it is your time to be released to step forward in confidence!I'm so excited to host the marvelously talented Jennifer Allwood! She is known for her books like Get Unstuck and Stay Unstuck and Covering Your Business in Prayer. She is recognized by Forbes as one of the world's best business coaches, and I'm honored to have her pour into you today! Prepare to be permitted to excel in your calling and so much more!

Cruise Radio News
Cruise News Today — June 16, 2022

Cruise Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 2:39


Cruise News Today — June 16, 2022. Cruise lines are urging the CDC to drop its pre-cruise testing guidelines after dropping reentry requirements for air travelers returning from international flights. The coin ceremony for Carnival Celebration was held on Wednesday, the second Excel class ship for Carnival Cruise Line that is due out in November 2022. Princess Cruises has canceled voyages on two of its Royal-class ships in the Baltic and Asia for 2023. Cruise stocks were up for CCL, RCL, and NCLH. 

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
Once upon a time . My Favourite Story Opening

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 4:24


Today I wish to change how you think about public speaking. It's not a chore to be feared; it's an opportunity to be grasped. I dislike anything to do with Excel and Accounts. I keep putting this type of work off until the last minute and then do it under pressure, increasing my distaste for the task at hand. Lots of people have a similar dislike for speaking to groups, be they 5, 50 or 500. It leads to dissatisfaction afterwards as they know they could have done better. If you lack confidence in yourself or your skill set, people may overlook and undervalue your contribution to the team or organization. In my experience, it's always the best presenters that get promoted! How not to Prepare: Preparation is not opening the previous slide deck, changing the title slide, and presenting the same deck that will bore you and your audience. How to Prepare: When answered well and truthfully, the following three questions will simplify and shorten your preparation time, while forming the basis of an engaging, exciting, and entertaining talk that will lead to a successful outcome. 1. Who is your audience? To be very specific, there may be quite a few people in the room, but usually, there is one decision-maker; this is the person you need to persuade to act. What do you know about this person? You must inform yourself about this person by reading the company website, LinkedIn profile, and press articles which will provide valuable insights. Ideally, you are looking to discover some connection with people you both know. For example, previous companies they worked for, maybe your clients, Colleges they attended etc. Do not leave the research to chance. This preparation will help you stand out from the crowd while creating the building blocks to forming a lasting relationship. 2. What is the problem you solve for your audience? In asking the question “What is the audience's problem?”, I assume you provide a product or service that solves a problem for people. Far too often, the first reaction of the speaker is to assume that their audience is aware of the problem that you believe you can solve for them. Often, skipping over this critical step and move immediately to bore their audience by talking to them about themselves and their business. A BIG MISTAKE! Start every presentation by engaging your audience in a conversation about their problems before trying to sell them your solution. In answering the question, “What is the Problem?”, there are two possible answers. a. They do not realise that they have this problem, which is highly unlikely. b. The second is that they have lived with the Problem for years while trying to find a solution without success. In a short story/case study, tell the audience the problem you can solve for them. 3. Remind your audience how they will be better once your solution is implemented. Here are some examples of closing comments my clients have used: “You can leave the plant on a Friday afternoon safe, knowing there would be very little likelihood of being called out over the weekend to deal with a production issue.” “You can pay anyone, anywhere, anytime, immediately- it's money reimagined.” The one I use: I help you capture your story and give you the confidence to tell it or sell it First Meeting: Here is the conversation template I recommend for a first meeting. Connect: Create a headline in twenty words or seven seconds if you wish to capture your audience's attention. Win the interest of the audience by speaking about their Problem? Do this by telling them a story that reminds them of their problem. Who are you? Introduce your business and tell your audience what you can do to solve their problem. Close: How is the audience better? Remind your audience how they will be BETTER as a result of your intervention. Agree on Next Action: The number one failing of all meetings is not agreeing on the next steps. By Executive Coach Andrew Keogh of Aristo.ie

Startupeable
073. Tomas Bercovich, Global66 | Cómo Validar tu Idea con Excel y Escalar a 500 mil Clientes

Startupeable

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 44:08


Para validar una idea de negocio, no necesitas levantar cientos de miles de dólares de capital, ni mucho menos pagar por desarrollar un producto. Nuestro invitado de hoy, Tomás Bercovich, CEO y cofundador de Global66, tardó 10 días en construir su Producto Mínimo Viable con una página web conectada a un Google Sheets. Global66 es una plataforma de remesas internacionales cuya visión es convertirse en el banco digital sin fronteras para individuos y empresas en Latinoamérica, y a la fecha, atiende a más de 500 mil clientes en toda la región.La manera más sencilla de ayudarnos es dejando una reseña en Apple Podcasts: https://ratethispodcast.com/startupeableEste episodio es auspiciado por:• Jeeves, la plataforma de crédito corporativo sin costo y con hasta 3% de cashback. Aplica y accede en https://bit.ly/3EsYcZf• Platanus Ventures, una aceleradora que invierte 100 mil dólares en startups en etapa temprana. Postula en https://ventures.platan.us/Notas del episodio: https://startupeable.com/global66/Síguenos en:• Página Web: https://startupeable.com/ • LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/startupeable/ • Twitter: https://twitter.com/startupeable • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/startupeable/ • YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Startupeable

Business Breakdowns
Diploma: Specialized Distribution - [Business Breakdowns, EP. 61]

Business Breakdowns

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 52:29


This is Matt Reustle and today we're breaking down Diploma. Diploma is a specialist distributor of medical equipment and industrial components listed in the UK. It's a business you're unlikely to be familiar with and, at first glance, may appear mundane. But dig a little deeper and you'll find a high-quality operator generating significant free cash flow through a mix of organic and inorganic growth channels.  To break down Diploma, I'm joined by Charlie Huggins, an investor in the business and Head of Equities at WealthClub.   For the full show notes, transcript, and links to the best content to learn more, check out the episode page here.   -----   This episode is presented by Visible Alpha. The team at Visible Alpha built a platform to analyze consensus data and financial metrics on over 6,000 publicly traded companies. Rather than having to dig through models one by one, Visible Alpha extracts data from every line item across sell-side models so you can better understand expectations on metrics beyond just revenue and earnings. Listeners are invited to try Visible Alpha for free by visiting visiblealpha.com/breakdowns   -----   This episode is brought to you by Daloopa. Daloopa streamlines a major pain point for investors. By capturing all of a company's KPIs and adjusted financials into their database - Daloopa makes it easy to quickly update your models for what matters. Daloopa uses AI to find every KPI disclosed - from charts, to text, and even from footnotes of investor presentations. Daloopa updates these KPIs and data points in your existing Excel models in o