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Presentation application, part of Microsoft Office

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  • May 19, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about powerpoint

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com
Victory Over Self

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 28:04


Today on PowerPoint, Pastor Jack Graham continues his series, Heart of a Champion, by comparing the corrupt King Saul, and David, the shepherd boy, who would become king and serve as God's man in leading Israel. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/395/29

The Presentation Podcast
Presentation on the Mac

The Presentation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 71:06


Episode #150 - What's it like to design presentations on the Mac? Longtime Mac users Jole Simmons and Mike Parkinson join Nolan for a conversation about the good, the bad, and the ugly on using PowerPoint and Keynote and Google Slides on a Mac. What are the disadvantages and what are the advantages to Windows? Is the animation timeline really that important? Is it more expensive or less? And how does Keynote stack up next to PowerPoint?   Full Episode Show Notes https://thepresentationpodcast.com/2022/e150/   Show Suggestions? Questions for your Hosts? Email us at: info@thepresentationpodcast.com   Listen and review on iTunes. Thanks! http://apple.co/1ROGCUq   New Episodes 1st and 3rd Tuesday Every Month

CorConsult Rx: Evidence-Based Medicine and Pharmacy
Atopic Dermatitis *ACPE-Accredited*

CorConsult Rx: Evidence-Based Medicine and Pharmacy

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 60:30


On this episode, we are joined by P4 MUSC students Kaleigh Steelman and Emilie Parkman.  We disucss the management and treatment options for atopic dermatitis.  Cole and I are happy to share that our listeners can claim ACPE-accredited continuing education for listening to this podcast episode! We continue to partner with freeCE to provide listeners with the opportunity to claim 1-hour of continuing education credit for select episodes. To earn credit for this episode, visit the following link and select this episode from the list of accredited episodes: FreeCE Podcast Episode List For existing freeCE members, this CE option is included in your membership benefits at no additional cost! Members can simply follow the link above to take the post-test and evaluation for this activity. Use the password ITCHING (all caps) to unlock the post-test for this episode. But if you're not currently a freeCE member, we definitely suggest you explore all the benefits of their Unlimited Membership on their website and earn CE for listening to this podcast. CorConsult Rx listeners can save 15% off the purchase of an unlimited membership by entering the discount code “PODCAST2022” at checkout, or by clicking the following link in the description https://hubs.ly/Q012N0H60 Thanks for listening! We want to give a big thanks to our main sponsor Pyrls. Try out their drug information app today. Visit the website below for a free trial: www.pyrls.com/corconsultrx If you want to support the podcast, check out our Patreon account. Subscribers will have access to all previous and new pharmacotherapy lectures as well as downloadable PowerPoint slides for each lecture. You can find our account at the website below:  www.patreon.com/corconsultrx If you have any questions for Cole or me, reach out to us on any of the following: Text - 415-943-6116 Mike - mcorvino@corconsultrx.com Cole - cswanson@corconsultrx.com Instagram and other social media platforms - @corconsultrx This podcast reviews current evidence-based medicine and pharmacy treatment options. This podcast is intended to be used for educational purposes only and is intended for healthcare professionals and students. This podcast is not for patients and not intended as advice or treatment.

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com
A Heart for God

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 28:04


This week on PowerPoint, Pastor Jack Graham kicks off the six-message series, Heart of a Champion looking at the life of David. In today's message, Pastor Graham teaches about this shepherd boy's heart for God. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/395/29

Andrew & Andrew on Texas Criminal Defense
The Andrews' Jury Selection Tips

Andrew & Andrew on Texas Criminal Defense

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 44:07


This is a listener-submitted topic! The Andrews' discuss some of their tips on selecting juries. Are you a lecturer or a questioner? Do you loop? Powerpoint or no? There's no right or wrong way to pick a jury, so long as you are finding the right jurors to return your two word verdict. Listen in for some of the ways we select a jury.

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:35


Want to know how you can deploy a smart warehouse for your business? Today's guest is Dan Gilmore of Softeon, a company that provides a full suite of flexible and robust end-to-end supply chain software solutions to deliver success. He joins Joe Lynch to talk about the idea and technology behind their system. They discuss some of the big trends impacting warehouses, e-commerce, and retail. From labor shortages to automation, Dan enlightens on the benefits of WMS and WES for any business. Tune in to better understand the perks of this new smart technology for optimizing your business! The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore Our topic is the smart warehouse with my friend Dan Gilmore. How's it going, Dan? It's great. I'm happy to be here. I'm glad I'm finally getting to interview you. Please introduce yourself, your company, and where you are calling from. I'm a Chief Marketing Officer of a supply chain software company called Softeon. Our company is headquartered in Reston, Virginia, outside of Dallas Airport. I happen to be in the Dayton/Cincinnati, Ohio area. What does Softeon do? It's a supply chain software company, primarily a supply chain execution. The company was founded in 1999. Our first customer all the way back then was the L'Oreal, and we proceeded to build out a suite of solutions that were brought in deep capability. That includes warehouse management systems, and all the stuff that goes around warehouse management systems including labor and resource management, slotting optimization, and yard management. A newer thing which we will get into because it's critical to what's happening in terms of the smart warehouse is something called warehouse execution systems, which have been around for a while but gained prominence in the last couple of years as a way to optimize and orchestrate order fulfillment level at a capability that's beyond even very good tier ones. This category of stuff is called distributed order management, which has to do with the optimal sourcing of products based on customer commitments as well as network capacities constraints in how do I get the lowest cost alternative that meets the customer needs? It's a very prominent in omnichannel commerce. It is almost essential in retail but we are having a lot of B2B type of successes in distributed order management as well. There are some other things that could give a flavor to what we do. You started well before eCommerce was a thing. Do you still support stores and that kind of warehousing? Traditional WMS type of capabilities for retailers, would largely be store replenishment. Now, we are moving into eCommerce fulfillment. Many retailers are also looking to have a lot of activity at the store level, whether that's buying online, pick up in-store, curbside pickup or store fulfillment. We've got some solutions there, both in terms of the distributed order management that I referenced. It is the tool going that says, “The best place to fulfill this order from based on the time commitments as well as inventory availability, labor availability, etc. is store 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,” and then have the ability to first identify where it's the right location. That could be obviously a DC, a third-party facility or something like that. The first word is the best place to source it from, and if it's a store, we have a store module that facilitates the inventory transactions, picking transactions, and shipping at a store level. That became a thing. Target is one of those companies that if you buy something online from them, they are more likely to ship from their stores these days. I have seen and the figure keeps rising. The whole market has changed. The more high-tech feel and touch, the less back-breaking work and less bending over and lifting heavy cases. It's like 80% or 90%. Let's say 90%. That's the number I had in my mind too. They are doing them from the store, which is incredible. Before we get into all that, tell us a little bit about you. Where did you grow up and go to school? Give us some career highlights and bullet points before you join Softeon. I'm an Ohio guy. My whole life, I grew up in Akron, Cleveland area, and then got a job with NCR after grad school. I got an MBA from the University of Akron. I got a job at NCR that was here in Dayton. I was a Product Manager in charge of barcode and data collection. The way serendipity works, I moved from barcode data collection systems to wireless systems and then got into WMS. I was into consulting for a while. I have done a lot of marketing in the space. I was also Chief Marketing Officer at the Red Prairie before it got acquired by JDA and became ultimately Blue Yonder. Earlier in my life, I spent a couple of years implementing WMS, a couple of major projects down here in the Cincinnati area that helped me learn a lot about how the technology works and what's good and less good. Notably, in 2003, I started a publication called Supply Chain Digest, which changed the face of online supply chain and logistics, news, and coverage. I still keep a light hand on it. I still write a column once a week still for Supply Chain Digest. I have read that. I wrote a lot of blog posts in the past. When you are a writer, I have joked that “My research is a little different than a professor's research, I Google.” You start to realize which publications have good content when you are a blogger. The bar is a little lower for a blogger than it is for somebody who is writing in a publication. I would say, “Supply Chain Digest always had good stuff.” When and why did you join Softeon? It has been a few years now. I had done a little bit of side consulting with Softeon before joining, and I was impressed with the breadth and depth of the software and the number of innovative capabilities, but as important as that is, lots of companies have good software. We think we've got leading-edge software but the approach to customers and success - I have never seen a company that consistently puts its own interests behind its customers on a regular basis. We are not going to let anything get in the way of a successful implementation. That's a direct record that's unequal in the marketplace. It's the care and concern for success at the customer level and not looking at everything through a lens of only professional services hours if I can sell or something like that. It was a different attitude. It intrigued me, and plus, the company needed some help in the marketing area to get that message out. The combination of those factors led me to join Softeon. Our topic is the smart warehouse. Obviously, things have changed quite a bit in this business. Talk about some of the big trends that are out there that are impacting warehousing, eCommerce, and retail. It impacts everybody. Most of the audience is going to say they are living this or these are big surprises but it's nice to still put it all in context, the growing distribution labor shortage and there's a shortage of manufacturing. It's very acute. Everywhere you go, that's what you hear about the turnover levels, retention, and even with the greatest rising substantially. That's everyone's concern. After about a decade of very flat wage growth in warehousing and distribution until a few years ago, now, all of a sudden, the costs are taken off. Amazon has over $20 an hour with attractive signing bonuses in many parts of the country. They now offer parental leave for twenty weeks. I saw it on TV. That would be a very attractive benefit. That's the advantage. Target announced that they were raising their wage in both stores and distribution centers, not all markets but in some markets, by $24 an hour. That's $48,000 a year, and assume there's probably some overtime in there, whatever husband and wife are making up, for example. They are working at a Target DC in those markets, you could be pulling in $100,000 a year for a family, which is not bad money. [caption id="attachment_7940" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: With the e-commerce-driven cycle time pressure, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days.[/caption]   This has come up on my show a few times. I'm getting too old for that kind of work, and I can't walk 10 miles a day but if I had a choice, we need to make that job easier. We are going to get to that because this is what technology does. It also makes the job more attractive when they can say, “I go to that job, and I'm learning all this cool technology.” If you can bring somebody in, there's a different feeling when I get to wear all that high-tech gear and use high-tech systems and say, “I'm part of the supply chain,” as opposed to, “I'm a strong back, walk 5 miles a day and nobody gives a crap about me.” There are no questions about that. It's going to be both in terms of the shortage of labor and, second, building to attract people into this career. Now the whole market has changed, that more high-tech feel and touch, less back-breaking work, less bending over and lifting heavy cases, and all the kinds of things to go on and work for a long time. You are spot-on on that dynamic. If we have a shortage, that means the people we do have to be more efficient. The way they can be more efficient is with tech. That's one big trend going on. What's another big trend? There's a bunch in there that interrelated as well. Obviously, the eCommerce-driven cycle time pressure. If you look ay Amazon over your tablet, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days, even somewhat obscure products not that long ago, I need a new power cord for my HP computer. Somehow Amazon was able to deliver that the next day. I'm like, “Probably, they have this cable in someplace that they can get it to me one day.” Think of all the thousands of cables that are out there, and they've got mine. The cycle time pressure in that both are in terms of getting the order process from when it drops into the DC and out the door. Obviously, companies are also moving distribution facilities closer to the customer, so the transportation part of the journey is cut down as well. They will remember the specific numbers. It's Home Depot that is building 170 or 180 different local fulfillment centers that are being the largely cross-dock type of facilities that bring bulky items in and get them right to the customer in addition to the big giant warehouses that they already have. It's a fact of life. Eventually, we will teleport or whatever the product from the warehouse because it seems like we are reaching the Laws of Physics there that it can't be here any faster but maybe we will find a way. I remember, many years ago, I was working on a digital marketing project. I was helping this distribution center, nice, concise in Chicago land Peoria. They said we are one-day shipping to 65% of the population of the US. That was always what Indiana, Illinois, and there are so many DCs down in Ohio can always make that claim, and that was good enough. If you said, “I have a DC in the Midwest that can get me to the Eastern Coast, and I have one out West, that was good enough.” We are not seeing that anymore. We are going to get increasingly where same-day delivery becomes a fact of life rather incredible. Amazon and others talk about getting it down to 2 hours or 30 minutes. That's what Target is doing, not with those DCs. We think we will get to Walmart doing some of the same. What's another trend? Obviously, because we are calling the session, we are going to talk about the smart and also the future but it's largely here nowadays. We've got smart everything. We've got smart houses, cars, refrigerators, and toothbrushes even. I saw that a couple of years ago. I'm not sure if it's exactly taken off the map but to monitor how often you brush your teeth. What does it mean? Primarily, it's talked about internet connectivity and some analytics around that. The least examples are John Deere, Caterpillar or companies of that kind, putting sensors and other IoT types of devices on their equipment out in the field so they can get a sense of how people are actually using it. They can do predictive maintenance on it. They could say, “Your guys aren't using the equipment as effectively as they could if they changed their techniques.” It's certainly timely. If we are going to almost start things where it's time for the smart warehouse too but we will get into for the rest of the broadcast era left different than more internet connectivity, sensors, and things like that. That can be part of it but it is a small part of it. The bottom line of it is we are entering a new era of where all soccer technologies that are, in fact, much smarter than we have ever had before. I have argued publicly for a couple of years now that we had about twenty years of relatively incremental progress in WMS technology. I used this in speeches before but a few years ago, I was cleaning up my office and running the holidays as I often do when I found an RFP from a major food company for a WMS circuit in 2003. I looked through that and I thought, “This doesn't look all that different than the RFPs we are seeing in 2019, 2020 or whatever year we are looking at that.” I looked at it and said, “The big difference is not in the functionality being asked for. It's that now, a lot of that functionality is, in fact, core product, configurable product than maybe a lot of it had to be achieved through customizations.” That's probably true. Same-day delivery has just become a fact of life. The fundamental way of where WMS operates didn't change all that much give or take from 2000 to 2020 or somewhere in that range. Now, with the smart technologies that we are talking about, they are brought by the world's execution systems in working with WMS, I talked about before. This is a new ball game, and it was going to be fun for the rest of the people here to talk about this. You throw in a new term there. You said warehouse execution system. Those have been around for a while but they are now becoming the norm. It's becoming very prominent, and then the value is starting to be recognized. What is it? A couple of three companies had the belief and correctly, for most of the WMS systems did not care enough about equipment throughput and utilization. We wound up with big peaks and valleys, and anybody have been in a district distribution center, even a busy one. You have seen it where there are all kinds of activity at the beginning and the middle of the wave, then as the wave starts to dissipate even on a big, expensive, huge sortation system, you've got a relatively small number of boxes moving around, waiting for that wave and everything to close out. You said wave. Does that mean the orders come in waves? Yeah. The work is released in what is called pick waves. That's based on any number of different attributes. It could be the carrier schedule, value-added processing that needs to be done or workload balancing across the different pick areas of the company. You organize the work against various attributes that constitute a block of work that's typically referred to as a wave. I know I've got all these trucks that are going to show up and they are taking different orders, so maybe I'm working to that order that's going to fill up that truck. The problem, to your point, is we've got already may be a shortage of headcount in there. Now when we have waves, I'm not being efficient because I've got too much work at one moment and then not enough at another. The whole goal of WMS of what we're talking about with the smart warehouse is overcoming, I mean, obviously, you've got to plan and execute based on the workforce that you have here, and we will talk about that. Having a warehouse management system that gives me stuff was great in the past but you are saying, “I will help you with a WES or Warehouse Execution System. I'm going to help you manage the flow.” Manage the flow work and the resource utilization, and then new ways. Part of that still ties into that interest in level loading or making the flow of goods across an automation system more smooth and consistent because if you can do that, there are a couple of things. First off, the total throughput of the system is likely to be better. Second, if it's a new facility, you could probably get by with a smaller sorter because you are going to be able to utilize it more consistently over a block of time, a shift or over what you want to look at it there. The other breakthrough that Softeon said is that the WES tends its roots and level loading of the automation and better utilization there. The WES works extremely well, even in non-automated facilities or lightly automated facilities. [caption id="attachment_7941" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: The fundamental way a warehouse operates didn't change all that much from 2000 to 2020. But now, with smart technologies, this is a new ball game.[/caption]   As a matter of fact, one of our leading customers did a press release a couple of years back that talked about 50% productivity gain from implementing WES or Warehouse Execution Systems on top of existing Softeon WMS, and doing that in a totally manual environment. Everything is part of a system. You can have a sortation system, goods to person system or put wall system or whatever. It's got a certain capacity, throughputs, inputs, and outputs. Twenty workers walked around on a three-level case pick module. There are systems too. They have inputs, outputs, throughput, and expectations. The one big difference is that with a more manual system, you can throw more bodies at it up to the point of diminishing returns and gain through the port from that area, whereas a heavily automated system is rate as its rating. You are not going to do a whole lot to affect that. Throughput is everything, whether you are a plant, a freight broker or a warehouse. The stuff that goes out the door and that we can charge for is what we want to do. Having a warehouse management system is great. I know there are certain warehouses. Probably the old ones still don't even have that. You are saying to be as efficient and effective as you need to be in the market, you need a warehouse execution system that gets me the flow and that throughput. It may not be for everybody, and there are certain things you can do. We could take your core WMS and add some select capabilities from a full-blown WES if a modest level of that kind of automation is necessary. It's not necessarily for one, and I don't want to position it that way but it's certainly something that you want to take a look at as you get to where you've got a significant number of workers. Even smaller operations, things like the automated release of work to the floor without the human being need needing to be involved, that's going to be attractive even for a mid-size operation. The first thing we need is we need to get into this. WMS is given. You said that there was an incremental improvement for many years. Now, you are starting to see big improvements that may be driven by the market that needed big improvements in recent years. Part of that is this WES. What else is there that's part of that smart warehouse? There's a whole bunch of stuff. First, as a reminder, the automation because automation is tied to the labor shortage. Even a couple of years ago, it was very common to talk to DC managers or logistics executives, and automation wasn't necessarily very high on the radar. Nowadays, almost close to 100% of the companies we talked to, even smaller companies, are looking at automation of some kind. That could be big automation where you've got traditional sortation systems but can be very large, goods to person systems, those kinds of things. There's also a lot of interest in lighter, more flexible, and less expensive technology things like what are called put walls. What's a put wall? In great simplicity, it is a technique or a structure, which is a module with a series of cubby holes or slots. In one of these modules, we have 1 customer that has 80 of these modules. What you do is you pick the orders, then when you come to the put wall, you distribute the order to the different orders that need that product. I batch pick the product. I bring it either mechanically or manually to the put wall. Typically, a series of lights says, “This company wall number 3 here and needs 1 of the skews. Put wall in. This one needs 2 that skew you put two in. This one needs 1 put 1 in.” That process repeats itself until all of the items for a given order are complete within that cubbyhole. That's called putting. That's why it's called a put wall because you are taking the order in back, and then you are putting it into the put wall. Around the backside, lights will turn on that indicate, “This cubbyhole is now complete.” The operator comes up and touches a button typically. That starts the printing of the label in any shipping documentation that's required in the orders packed, shipped, and off you go. It provides a tremendous amount of productivity. It's very flexible. You can start small. We had one customer that started with a 1-foot wall module, then added 8 or 9 more because they liked it, then they added 20 more because they really liked it, and did this all over a couple of three-year types of the period there. For any kind of piece picking, especially of soft goods but other types of products as well but often driven not only by eCommerce with any kind of heavy piece picking operation can be a great solution but you've got to have the right software to do it. You've got that big like almost a shelf you said like cubbies on that I'm putting a product through it. Maybe I walked over, and I got 10 different sweaters, 10 sweaters that are all the same, and this cubby gets one. As I do that, I'm scanning it or it recognizes that it's in there. It's informing the other side of the cubby when the order is complete. It needs two sweaters and a pair of shoes. That's just one more way. What do you call this? Technology is only part of it. The other piece of the cubby that walking up to that, I could be putting those in bins in the old days but this is putting that on steroids. The bottom line is we are entering a new era where all technologies are, in fact, much smarter than we've ever had before. It was just a new way of doing it. There are a lot of people who talk about this in terms of optimizing materials and handling systems because getting this right is not a trivial task. I don't want to steal all my thunder from later on but the ability to rapidly turn these put walls and cubbyholes are the whole key to the success. If it's taking you a long time to do that, you are not getting the throughput that you required and probably wasting your time and money but if you can rapidly turn those by making sure the inventory gets there on time and efficient execution on both sides of the wall, then you've got something that can drive a lot of productivity. I don't know what the number is. There are quite a few customers now that are using put walls. When we would go out to some new customers, we've got some videos to show them an operation, and they are interested in seeing how this works. It's the technology along with mobile robots that you are going to see, any eCommerce but any kind of piece picking as well, you are going to see a lot of adoption. I'm an automotive guy originally. When you used to go through a plant, you would see people doing lifting heavy things when I first started, crouching down and doing functions that were hard on the body. Maybe it's not hard on 1 day, 1 week or 1 month but over 1 year, you are going to have a bad back, shoulders or knees. The same thing happens in these DCS or the warehousing. This automation you are talking about is making it easier on the workers, which means, “Hopefully, I will be able to keep my workers healthy and make that job again more attractive.” One time, I talked to a VP of logistics at Sherwin-Williams, the paint company. He noted that on the manufacturing side of the operation, they were always having people retire, and during retirement, little parties were almost taken. He said, “There was no one that ever retired from the distribution side.” That's because the heavy worker is picking cases of paint as a young man's job. As people got older, they couldn't do that work anymore. People are obviously rethinking that for the aging factor, and then there's another factor, “How do I make the work easier so I can have somebody in their 50s and 60s continuing to do this at distribution center job?” If you gave me a choice to go work in an old school warehouse, go deliver food or deliver groceries, I'm going to do the grocery delivery. I can make decent money, sit in my car, and I don't have to hurt my back, or knees or walk 5 miles a day. We have to make these jobs more attractive or we are not going to be able to keep and get good people. This automation is of such interest to the jobs now that we become more technicians and less of an order pickers. Besides a put wall, what's some other automation you are seeing out there? The automated mobile robots, economists mobile robots or AMRs. There's a huge interest in that. One of the interesting things is that in both put walls and mobile robots, you are seeing a lot of adoption and interest by a third-party logistics companies. This makes the point. In the past, 3PLs were very reluctant to do any kind of heavy automation because they couldn't sync the return on investment with the contracts that they had from the shipper. If the shipper can pay off that equipment, it's going to take 5, 7 or whatever years, and the shippers only keep you where 2 or 3-year contract, the risk of automation is too great in these other kinds of systems. It includes things like voice, picks the lights, and smart cards. They are all connected in some ways. Those kinds of systems can be put in for much less expense, much lower risk, and be incrementally adapted. You can start with three mobile robots and see how you like it, then we have seven more later on or whatever until you get to the optimal point for your operation. The fact that 3PLs are making this kind of investment as a whole new phenomenon and it speaks to the way you can incrementally get into the technology and the high level of payback that they are seeing because we were very strong in the third-party logistics arena, as an aside, so we are seeing it very closely. The number of 3PLs that are interested in this mid-range of lighter picking systems, not heavy automation but it's often somewhat newer technologies. It speaks to the changes we are seeing out there in the marketplace. Those are robots. Depending on the facility, they are not necessarily always replacing people. I talked to the CEO or president of DHL. He says, “We thought we would be replacing people with robots. The more robots we add to a facility, the more work we end up getting for that facility. We ended up hiring more people.” Everyone has a shortage. Job is going unfilled. If the robots are taking some of that slack but very few case studies of people that are adopting these technologies, they are still looking for people who have been able to be on. [caption id="attachment_7942" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: WES (Warehouse Execution System) will help manage the flow of work and resource utilization.[/caption]   What's another thing we need for that smart warehouse? Let's get into it in some more detail. We talked about some of the core software components, things like warehouse management systems and warehouse execution systems. A platform for integrating this automation with both heavy and/or traditional and newer age capabilities. There are some enabling technologies, things like rules engines, simulation and some other things. The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. How do I get that right? That typically involves traditional WMS-type capabilities. What does that mean? What defines a warehouse management system versus an inventory system is the pervasive use of mobile terminals, barcode scanning, wireless RF devices or whatever term you want to use there, and then a lot of system directed activity, this whole notion of task management and task monitoring, where the system is orchestrating the different traditional paths of put away, receiving put away, picking replenishment, etc., and support for multiple strategies around that. We have lots of different picking method options, different replenishment strategies that I can use, and things that have been around for a while like slotting optimization, detailed labor management, labor reporting, and things like that. The foundation is core operations excellence. That's what everyone should strive to get to but nowadays, there's no ability to take that even further in terms of different types of capabilities that we think are defining what we are calling the smart warehouse. You used a term there that was an integration platform. What am I integrating? You were integrating primarily different materials handling technologies. That can be things we have had for a wall that conveyor transport and sortation. It can be some of these newer technologies like robots and put walls. The key is, “How do I optimize the flow so I don't have these islands of automation that are all doing their own thing.” I talked to somebody in the apparel industry. They have a very large and highly automated facility somewhere down in the Atlanta area. It's 1 million or 2 million square feet. They are seeing their throughput from that building after huge investments over the years and over time. They are seeing the throughput decline. What's happening, he believed, is that the business keeps changing. They keep having all these new requirements in terms of how an order needs to be processed. What they do is they keep building new wave types. We talked about wave planning before. Now they are up to like 70 or 80 different wave types. Every time there's another problem, wave fight number 82 if that solves our problem, it's not solving the problem. Part of the reason is that the system is not looking holistically across the facility and seeing how I can optimize the flow of work as a whole, not as an individual subsystem. That's part of what we are talking about here with the smart warehouse. That's the thing that traditional WMS has not done. That integration platform means I can connect all the tools and all the different systems I'm using all connect easily through that integration as opposed to the old way, which is a standalone $100,000 integration with expensive people who have to code. That's certainly part of it. It's managing the flow of work across that. I'm getting hit myself again but for example, you can have some scenarios where I have different paths for an order to be fulfilled. One of the paths and the most efficient for certain orders is maybe a group of put wall models. Let's say put wall area, for whatever reason, starts to be congested. All of a sudden, there's a big backup on the conveyor feeding into the put wall area. The system is going to automatically recognize that. For some time, route orders away from the put wall into manual cart picking, which takes them to the packing station, the same packing area where the put wall automotive leads. When the congestion is clear, then the system automatically reroutes that work back to the put walls again. Now you are looking at only the plain integration but in monitoring the flow of work that's happening and making real-time decisions accordingly. I'm an automotive guy, and we had all of those years. We used the term smart factories, and it was the same thing. How do we increase throughput? What can happen is you can end up with a local optimum where some guys are building a big stack of inventory and does nobody any good? What does all that excess inventory doing for me? What makes more sense is to say, “We are going to get this, so there's a flow to it. We are not building up too much inventory. There are no bottlenecks.” This is the same thing. What you are talking about here is, “How do I arrange my people so I don't have these guys sitting around because they already finished while these guys are in a congested area?” The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. The term flow manufacturing came out of exactly what you are talking about there and was largely developed initially in the automotive industry. We are talking about the same thing. Now we are talking about flow distribution instead of flow manufacturing but the fundamental concepts, more of a pull-based system were being worked on capacities and constraints, more concerned with the total flow of goods and not what's happening in one individual area. All those are very consistent, whether you're looking at the principles that were established earlier in manufacturing or what's being applied here in distribution. I'm going to assume that at one time, the WMS, a big selling point would be, “We will tell you where your inventory is at,” That was probably a big step up. You go, “It does that. Now I'm going to tell you how that inventory moves off of your shelves and out the door and how you bring new inventory.” It's amazing. We still see quite a few every week, we see somebody that's a calling or emailing in, and then we talked to him. It turns out they don't have that real-time visibility of the inventory because they are using some kind of paper-based system or something, and sometimes these are even good size companies. In general, anybody that's implemented a tier-1 or tier-2 level, even WMS shouldn't have that real-time inventory visibility in doing that. It gets into that operations excellence and problem but that's the foundation, “I got to know what I got and where it is by lot, batch, serial number or whatever attribute is important for your operation or combination of attributes.” That's the foundation, but now, we are saying, “How do we optimize on top of that and get more product out the door and lower cost?” It requires investment. Having a WMS tell me, “Here is the information but it's not enough anymore.” To your point, we need all of this to get there. You asked me about some of the components of the smart warehouse, and I talked about it from a product category perspective, but now, I'm talking about it more from a philosophical or a functional view. One of the key foundations is constraining condition awareness, “What's happening in my building? What's happening with the flow of goods?” One of the things that first got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always-on listening and monitoring the environment. If you think about a traditional WMS, it's more sequential-oriented, “I receive the product. I put it away. I replenished pick sites. I do the picking. I take it to pack or evaluated services. I put it in this receiving staging. I get it shipping staging. I get it out the door all very good then the delivered.” A lot of companies don't have that. Organizing and automating all of that are big steps forward but we need to take it to the next level. If you think about this notion, the system is always on monitoring throughput and flow. There are certain rates and throughput that I'm expecting. I need to be able to have a flexible set of dashboards supported by event alerts and notifications. If there's a problem that says, “Here's what's happening across.” However, I wanted to find it in the area, I can define an area as a case picking module or as a whole three-level case pick module. I see that as one unit, and I want to know what the throughput is there. Maybe I want to see it at each level of that pick module. I can see it more gradually. What's nifty about this is that new level of visibility, the activity, throughput, bottlenecks, alerts, and corrective action automated, increasingly automated, if there are bottlenecks. That provides a nice set of real-time dashboards of looking stuff where people can see what's happening, “I have these many orders pending here that's already been completed. Here's how many are in picking,” or all of that level of detail. To understand what's going on here with the smart warehouse is, the system is using that same data that's being exposed to managers and supervisors that's what it's using to make decisions as well. I decided that example of being aware of the backup that's happening in the put wall and automatically, for some time, routing work around that until the congestion is cleared. That's what's different now about this visibility and activity monitoring. Being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area could be evaluated services. It could be peace picking and all these things. Obviously, now the design is at these different flows throughout the facility are in sync. I'm not getting old backed up and packing, which is causing problems way back, picking and replenishment because I haven't automated the visibility and the flow, release in a way that's going to be cognizant and aware that I've got a problem here and, “Here's what I need to do about it for some time until we are adjusting. We are just taking action to solve the problem.” You sent me a PowerPoint and I have this here. It's got that real-time configurable dashboard. It's been a while since I have seen somebody had me a piece of paper but somebody handed me a piece of paper that had 40 columns. It was like an Excel spreadsheet or something, maybe a spin out of a system. It had so much, I looked at it and I was like, “What am I supposed to do with this?” I liked the idea of being able to configure it for those KPIs that I care about. [caption id="attachment_7943" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: One of the things that got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always on, listening and monitoring the environment.[/caption]   I don't want to measure everything. That's just me. Tell me the 4, 5 or 7 things that matter that tells me my warehouse is moving in the right direction, and that things are working well. It says, “Orders with issues.” I also love the idea that I don't find out about the issues in next week's report. I find out about them in real-time. The point that you made is a nice transition to this notion of another component. We talked about the real-time visibility of capacities, constraints, the conditions up there, and the always-on nature of the WES. Now, we have talked about looking at a table of 40 rows of information or whatever. It's all in the past. It brings up a point there, which is even with higher-end WMS, this is one of the learnings and insights that we have. There's still a tremendous amount of decision-making that is being done by human beings. As the manager, whoever you were talking about there in your example, staring at a 40-row spreadsheet or whatever, you see the same thing nowadays of managers and supervisors staring at computer screens, trying to figure out what the right thing to do next. Here's the reality. Every time you do that, first off, you introduce some latency into the system because it takes time to look at those different screens, think about it, make decisions, and scribble some things down on a piece of paper to remind you this needs to be taken care of or whatever. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you are a smart guy or girl, there's just too much data and too much to try to process at one time. Part of the capabilities of the smart WMS is the much more advanced software-based decision-making. Things like order batch optimization, given block of orders, “What's the best way to most effectively execute that on the software floor?” What we think is absolutely huge is this notion of the autonomous warehouse, as a term of Gartner is used, and others have used it as well but it talks about being able to automatically release work without the need for a wave planner, inventory expediters or all the kind of people that you see often involved in these decisions about what work to do when. Work relation on a variety of attributes, things like the order of priority, the inventory and resource availability, what kind of optimization opportunities are there? The bigger the order pool and more optimization opportunities you have because they are more data or conditions to be optimized but you can't hold on so long. You are not getting the throughput out through your cutoff time. This is a huge one. It's sophisticated. Whereas now, at 4:00 or 5:00, when the UPS, FedEx or whatever truck is leaving, you often see, and we have made commitments to the eCommerce is going to ship, you see a certain amount of chaos going around, trying to figure out all the orders that need to go on that truck, have been on the trucking and what to do about it. What we are talking about here is we are saying, “This is the work. We know how long it's going to take to pick and transport those orders to the shipping dock.” The work is going to automatically release itself. At the beginning of the day, we are more concerned about optimization. We still got a lot of decent amount of time, so we can focus on doing it the most efficient we can but as you go throughout the day, that needle starts to change from the focus on efficiency and cost to efficiency on customer service and making sure that those items are on there. The system does that automatically. It's configured to take those into consideration. Now those orders are getting on the trucks automatically without the chaos and the difficulty that's going on out there. This is a step-change capability here. We are talking about a system that is self-learning and in optimal how releases work. This is another concept we have had in distribution software before, and this is what defines what works on the smart warehouse. I had a boss in the past when I was young, I remember I sent an Excel spreadsheet to him, and it told a story. He's pulled me into his office and said, “This is a great Excel spreadsheet. I have to go through here and come to the same conclusion you did.” I go, “It's easy.” He goes, “No. When you send me this Excel spreadsheet, send me a recommendation. I don't want to have to come to a conclusion. That's your job. Show me that you attach the data back up but give me a recommendation.” I feel the same take way about running a warehouse, “Don't make me figure it out myself. Give me an alert that says, ‘This is a problem. This is how many orders are at risk. This is how many orders need to get on that truck that isn't done yet.'” To show you a simple example. Still, a lot of people, especially for eCommerce, are doing manual cart picking. I may have a cart that's got a certain configuration 3x3 or 4x4. What I mean by a 3x3 would be 3 shelves that each have room for 3 cartons each. I have nine total orders that I'm working on there. Most companies that we see do that are doing it with paper picking or pick by label or something. There's some attempt to do that more efficiently but something as simple as cart picking. The smart warehouse can take it to a whole new level. First off, you've got to get this order pool that's out there and at any one period. I'm probably going to have done some cartonization logic there to determine what should go in what box, especially with a multi carton order. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you're really smart, there's just too much data to process at one time. If you are shipping, for example, you don't want to put perfume in the same carton as payroll because of the obvious contamination that can happen there. When a picker comes up and scans a barcode on that cart, the system is going to automatically know it's this configuration, 3x3, 4x4 or whatever. It will have done some optimization typically in terms of what's called cluster picking were, “I'm going to take that cart to one location. I will put as many orders as I can on the cart that is signed to that cart that has the same set of skews so I can minimize my travel distance. Hopefully, I'm being clear on what that means.” Now I get to that location that can be done with lights or it can be done with barcode scanning. It says, “Take one of these from this location, put it in the carton slot 3'1, which is the 3rd shelf and the first location. The next one is 3'2. 2'3, 2'1 or whatever that sequence. I'm doing that in a way that makes it very efficient but we can take it even still beyond that. What if a high-priority order comes on? The pickers walk along as long as there's a location on that cart, whether it's a carton or a tote they are picking into. If it hasn't been started, we can remove automatically a lower priority order and insert a higher priority order that has come down onto that card as long as we would typically do it. The picker doesn't have to turn around and go backward as long as it picks for the new order or ahead of that picker. We do that without the picker, even being aware that it happened. You can expedite automatically like, “I got a truck that's going to be here one hour. We haven't even started yet. Let's get this going.” We say, “If you get an order in by 2:00, we will ship it that day. If it's 1: 58, all of a sudden, an order drops. I got two minutes.” This isn't going to automatically insert a higher priority order possible. I like something you said in there that we talked about the labor problem with these guys walking around maybe 5 or 10 miles in a day. One of the reasons we are going to quit, especially if you are me, is I don't want that many steps. When I walk over there, all my orders are in the same area, then I walk over here, and all my orders are there, as opposed to one side of the warehouse, and another order on the other side or I'm walking and go, “What has my life become where I walk back and like this?” Order pool optimization as well because the bigger the batch that I'm working with, the more opportunities I have to gain those picks together. On a given card, I'm maybe walking a very few feet. To your point, and this is where you get into the whole notion of mobile robots because now, perhaps that, “I go to the pick location, I pick the order but I'm putting it on a pick card. I'm putting it on a mobile robot, and the mobile robots can move on to the next location or on the packing of the orders completed. I'm walking very little at that point or comparatively little, which is one of the attractiveness of mobile robot technology.” Hopefully, it's becoming clearer. The nature of the warehouse is changing, and a part of that's going to have to be to not only be more cost-efficient and get more out the door with the staff that I've got but it's making sure that people have a less miserable work experience and hence hopefully going to stay with this a lot longer. This is not your grandpa's warehouse anymore. To be competitive, it used to be like, “These guys are high tech because they have a WMS.” Now we are starting to spin out the automation, the warehouse execution, and the integration platform. This is all getting really high-tech. Do you think this is probably the lowest-tech business there was many years ago? House is all going to play out. It's going to be interesting to see but the lighter automation techniques, including the robots and the put walls, are so attractive in terms of their flexibility and expandability. There are machine learning, artificial intelligence, and all kinds of things going to be involved here. The warehouses are becoming technology centers. If you see the private equity money that's flowing into robotics firms, AI firms, and others, in a lot of the smart money, it's the work that they do. Companies, retailers, and other eCommerce companies are starting to realize the importance of a well-run warehouse. Was this guy's quiet logistics? They've got bought by American Eagle. That was American Eagle recognizing the traditional retailer, the same thing we're going to buy ourselves a warehousing company because that's how important this business is. The force behind what has become locus robots. We will move our vendors that happened because Amazon had bought key assist systems right before that and left a quiet without a partner for automation they were building the business on. They invented their own robot. [caption id="attachment_7944" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: What's really different now about this kind of visibility and activity monitoring is being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area.[/caption]   Bruce Welty was at my show. He's the Founder of Quiet. He said he got a phone call saying, “Are you guys using those Locus robots?” He says, “Yeah, how do you like them?” “We like them a lot. Can we come to visit?” “Sure.” It was Amazon. Amazon looked around and said, “We love this.” They bought Locus. A couple of other things I would like to bring up. First, broader use of some automation ideas or IoT type devices. RFID is starting to make something of a comeback years after Walmart tried back in 2003 or 2004. Generally, you are going to see many manual scanning activities that are going to disappear or if I need to move this way back now from being implemented at the store level by customers concerned with the eCommerce fulfillment for inventory equity purposes, you are going to see a move back up into the distribution operations. That will certainly be a big part of it. We were already doing things like, for example, we are a broker with a pick cart. Picker with a pick cart can walk up to a fixed zone. The IoT automatically recognizes that this person is on. It automatically turns on the pick lights that are on those four pick locations. It's a minor thing there but that's an advancement we are going to see. We have even done some stuff with congestion management and COVID, where we can tell exactly where somebody is in the I or using IoT and being able to assign work based on real-time visibility to who's closest to that work, but also when the COVID area being able to space people apart so that they don't get to say within 8 feet of each other, whatever that happens to be, whatever your metric you want to use, therefore that group constraint. There are some various things that can happen there. This is still slow going. It hasn't taken off as fast as many people think but you are going to see RFID and IoT start to make some mural inroads over the next years. We have this follow the notion of Gartner and what's considered to be called a conversational voice. The transactional voice is doing the picking, pallet build or something using voice technologies. Typically, reading in a location check digit and doing a hands-free pick, replenishment or whatever the task might be but we're starting to get now into more of a dialogue. We are all ready to the point now where we can have a supervisor take a smartphone and say, “Show me how I'm doing on wave number 235,” over a smartphone. That's going to bring back exactly what's happening now or, “Where's the replenishment for location on 3652?” We are still early in this game here but certainly, we will move to more of a dialogue going on with the WMS and WES than just playing transactional voice-type of technology. We ended with a very exciting where the future interface of the software is going to had. This is where that integration platform you talked about comes in handy. I can connect to all this stuff. The new killer app that comes out, I can get it. We have been left there. Automation and optimization of materials handling systems is certainly a key part of this. We refer to it, not just as a smart warehouse's the future but as the smart automated across to the future due to the interest in the technologies we have talked about several times already. We can directly connect with these picking assistance, like walls, pick the light or voice without the need for third-party software. Everyone else uses some kind of software from the put wall vendor, pixelate vendor or voice vendor, which adds another layer of integration and costs. It often results in people operating silos. We can directly control a lot of these materials handling technologies. It allows you to operate and optimize those in the context of everything that's happening in the world and all the information that's available, which provides you a lot of benefits over time because you are not just trying to operate in silos. I talked to somebody that was using a pick-to-light system. They talked about how at the end of every week, they've got to go in and clean up all these pics that some of them never were executed in the pick-to-light system. I'm not quite sure why that is but it wouldn't happen with the way we are approaching things because we would be aware of that. It probably has to wait on a real punishment. The problem is the pixelate vendor doesn't do replenishment the documents. You've got these silos going on here and there are a lot of opportunities. In terms of that integration platform, we think this is especially true for mobile robots, people are using the mobile software of the mobile robots. What that does is it limits the total optimization that can be achieved but more importantly, you are now totally dependent on that robot software. What if you want to add different robots or change horses three years from now? There's a better mousetrap that works faster or whatever that happens to be. Now you have become locked in. We refer to it not just as smart but the smart automated across to the future. We think the market needs a mobile robot and a broader automation integration platform. It's almost like an operating system for automation in the warehouse that's going to allow you to have visibility to optimization of robots of different kinds from the same manufacturer of different types for different manufacturers. You are not locked in. It's like a plug-and-play type of environment here three years from now. You can keep the robots or keep dependent you bought, but now, you want to add five more from a different vendor, plug them into this operating system, and have instant connectivity and the ability to optimize the performance. We think that's a much more low-risk approach going forward than locking yourself into a vendor that's coming to the software that's coming from the robot vendor. Get back to the idea of a smart warehouse. It's all about throughput. If I have different systems that are connecting, that are doing local optimums, that's a problem because it's not supporting throughput. I always need that one source of truth. That's the main system that says, “This is all about getting stuff out the door here.” I wanted to bring up one. Earlier, I talked about wanting to give an example of what the put wall. I referenced that as the cubbyholes in put walls. Here's the scenario we are seeing. Let's say there are three line items eCommerce order. Two of those line items in the order come from a carton flow rec area, that's very close to packing. I mean those orders are efficient to pick, in short distance to transport. The third line item is actually coming from a slow-moving mezzanine pick area that's farther away and is less efficient to pick. If you don't do anything, otherwise what's going to happen in those first two items from that order are going to show up rather quickly, then they are going to sit and wait for 10, 15, 20, 45 minutes or whatever it happens to be for that third item on the pick, the order to finally show up. The cubbyhole has been tied up that entire time. What's the smarter warehouse way of doing it? What's the WES way of doing it? Let's say it's 25% slower to go through the mezzanine or whatever the number you want to use it. We would release that third line item in effect 25% or 30% earlier. After the time it takes to pick and transport that as it's on its way to the pack station, now we release the other two orders line items in the carton flow rack. They show up at the put wall for processing at relatively the same time, and now I'm able to turn that wall without the latency that would occur if you didn't have smart software to do that. Hopefully, that's an example that makes it somewhat clearer as to how the optimization can affect operational performance. You would never be able to get that done manually. It doesn't happen. This is like drinking from a fire hose. There is so much going on in this. Put a bow on this. Give us your final thoughts on this. What do I need to get to have that smart warehouse? First of all, the benefit is it is going to reduce labor costs, have higher and more consistent DC throughput, you are going to reduce your need for automation in terms of things like the number of diverse or get more throughput out of the automation you have there. We didn't talk much about labor planning but that's a big part of it. We can dynamically assign workers throughout the course of a shift from 1 to 8 to 9, 9 to 10, or 10 to 11 hours where are they needed motion and in what quantities, improved automated decision-making. It's an assessment. Certainly, if you are heavily automated, there are a lot of opportunities for you. As I tried to make the point earlier, even if you're only modestly automated or not automated at all, these capabilities can have some real benefit for your operations there. The important thing to note with Softeon is these can be implemented very incrementally. I could implement a traditional WMS. Let's say I want the labor planning and allocation part of it. We can take that capability from WES and attach it to the WMS. To give you a solution, conversely, if you want to implement WES and leave your existing WMS in place, we didn't talk too much about that but that's a key dynamic. You need cartonization, which is a warehouse management function and even attach cartonization to that WES implementation. Flexibility is key. That's what we try to design. We call it a shirt component library, where the applications can borrow components, functionality, and services from each other. We are pretty confident that it gives us a chance to understand what you are trying to accomplish, what your operations are like or whatever that some combination of these technologies is going to have a pretty good fit and take your world to a whole new level than we have seen over the last many years. What's new over at Softeon?. What conferences do you go into? We have done with the motor show, and it was a big success for us. We not only showed the smart warehouse, we presented the smart warehouse capabilities. We had a lot of equipment pick the light, other packing stations, etc., right on our routes. At the bottom of every hour, we did a presentation. We had consistently good traffic the whole time. We did a bit of an educational track and a session on the smart warehouse of the future available on Softeon. It was very well attended. That was good. We will be at the Gartner Supply Chain Symposium down in Orlando and then break after that. [caption id="attachment_7945" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: Even if you're just modestly automated, these capabilities can have some real benefits on your operations. These can be implemented very incrementally.[/caption]   We finished up a series of educational broadcasts called the WMS Bootcamp, six different sessions on everything from building the business case to how to implement it successfully. It was a huge success, but all of that's now available on-demand. If they go up to Softeon.com. You will be able to find some links to that. If you have any interest in WMS, they're not commercial, educational sessions. You will find they have a lot of value. The feedback we got on it was outstanding. I would like to watch myself because we went over this and it is gone from simple to more complex over time. I know you are simplifying it but to understand what's required requires a Bootcamp. We learned a lot of lessons. I brought in some consultants and people that I knew and knew what they were talking about in terms of building the business case. We had some folks from Invista that came on and did that. I had some experience or exposure. I knew they knew what they were talking about. Some of that applies to some other consultants as well. It's a real nice series. It's non-commercial. If you want to learn some tips about how to get WMS selection and implementation, you'll find the Bootcamp serves you well. How do we reach out and talk to you over at Softeon? The way to get me is via email. My email address is DGilmore@TheSofteon.com. You can also use Contact@Softeon.com for the general inquiry box. I love to hear from you. Hopefully, we came across, so at least you know a little bit about what I'm talking about and discuss your problems as well. Anyone who wants to reach out can reach out and talk to you about the smart warehouse. Thanks, Joe. I enjoyed it. It was a great conversation. Thank you so much, Dan. Thank all of you for reading. Your supports are very much appreciated, until next time and more network.   Important Links Softeon Supply Chain Digest WMS Bootcamp DGilmore@TheSofteon.com Contact@Softeon.com https://www.linkedin.com/company/softeon The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Faith of a Mustard Seed: Messages of faith Through challenges with M.S.
Ponder & Wonder Title Jesus's PowerPoint Message Author Laverna Spain

Faith of a Mustard Seed: Messages of faith Through challenges with M.S.

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 13:50


Midweek, short Christian message of faith and inspiration. All scriptures were taken from the KJV Bible. All music pieces are licensed for use to author Laverna Spain. And voice announcers Arne Loe. Thank you for listening, I pray that you will share this message with a family member or friend. Please join me again this Sunday! May God Bless!

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
422: Verge HealthTech Fund with Joseph Mocanu

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:52


Joseph Mocanu is Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Chad talks with Joseph about the healthcare landscape in different places of the world, funding criteria for companies, and how the pandemic has changed prospects for the fund and the market in general. Verge HealthTech Fund (https://www.vergehc.com/) Follow Verge HealthTech Fund on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/verge-healthtech-fund-i/). Follow Joseph on Twitter (https://twitter.com/jmocanu) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jmocanu/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel, and with me today is Joseph Mocanu, Co-founder and Managing Director of Verge HealthTech Fund, which invests globally in seed-stage healthcare technology startups relevant to emerging Asia that focus on disease prevention and management, digital therapies, and health system efficiency. Joseph, thank you for joining me. JOSEPH: Thanks so much, Chad, for having me. CHAD: So you have been focused on emerging Asia healthtech for a little while both at Verge HealthTech Fund, and prior to that, how did you get involved in this space? JOSEPH: I wish I had a really cool, deliberate story that made it sound like it was a smooth transition from point A to point B. But I simply have to owe it to an opportunity to transfer to the region through my old employer which is Oliver Wyman, a global management consultancy. So I joined this consultancy in 2011 after doing my Ph.D. and MBA really to understand how to be a better investor, which, again, sounds a little bit backwards. But I had worked at a hedge fund in China just after my MBA, and I learned that they use management consulting techniques to add value to their portfolio companies. And I thought that's a great skill to learn. And it'd be great to even learn it in English and doing it in healthcare 100% of the time. So I had joined Oliver Wyman in 2011 in Toronto office back home, where I spent a lot of my life. And they asked me one day if I wanted to transfer to the Singapore office to help start healthcare over there. And when I went to Singapore, of course, it's this futuristic city, really well planned. It's got a lot of fine names and a reputation globally of being a modern cosmopolitan place to do business. Some people refer to it as Asia-lite. But the surrounding areas have a lot of issues when it comes to their health systems. I knew this from an academic perspective, having studied about the region before moving to Singapore but seeing it firsthand was a completely different experience. At the time, I was working for primarily pharmaceutical clients, helping them with market access and other commercially relevant activities. And they were faced with a fundamental challenge of trying to sell their product, which was usually placed in the premium category to markets that had difficulty affording this. And not only did it have difficulty affording this, it had difficulty in delivering it as well as in using the product appropriately, making sure it gets to the patients when it's needed at the right time, at the right dose. And so they were looking for partners. They were looking for partners on the ground that could assist with this delivery education, the technology, and the financing around it as well. Now, there was a real shortage of said partners on the ground. At the same time, there were also insurance companies that wanted to expand their business. They also realized that the policies tended to be a bit simple, and they tended to resemble one another across competitors. And also, to manage increasing claims, they had a tendency to increase the premium that they charged. This was not possible to do indefinitely. And at some point, they needed to actually manage the medical conditions, which you're probably seeing more and more of in the U.S. and in Western markets, less so of in this part of the world. And then lastly, you had conglomerates and investors who said, "Hey, we hear healthcare is going to be a pretty hot field. How do we get started? How do we invest?" And all of this basically set me on a mission of target hunting. And during the course of this, well, I met a lot of interesting companies, a lot of them really, really early in their journey and really too small for any of my clients to find a meaningful way to engage with them. And unfortunately, they couldn't get to the point where they are relevant and large enough to engage with without a lot of capital. This is where, you know, you'd have a nice investment ecosystem coming in to fill in the gaps. This, unfortunately, did not really exist at the time. And I had the hubris of thinking that I could do something about it by being an angel investor and starting to support these founders directly, which, thankfully, seemed to work to a certain degree. It worked to the point where one day, I woke up, and I realized I had 13 angel investments, 9 of which were in healthcare technology, and not a lot of money left in my bank account to do other things with. CHAD: Uh-oh. [laughs] JOSEPH: Yeah. And at the same time, I also realized that the work that those founders are doing is a whole lot more impactful than me sitting up until 3:00 o'clock in the morning every night writing PowerPoint slides or begging analysts to write the PowerPoint slides that would more or less sit and collect dust on my clients' shelves for various reasons. So I came to the realization that I need to do this full time. I didn't have, you know, $10 million in my pocket as reference to spending all my money on angel investments. So I realized that I have to use other people's money, and the way to do that is to join a fund. Now, the problem with that idea is that there weren't any funds that were doing this, like really, really early investing in healthtech companies in the region that was really geared to helping solve some of these really big access challenges. So then I realized I had to start a VC fund that did this and only this. So that's really kind of a long-winded introduction as to how I got started with this. CHAD: Yeah, I want to come back to the process of actually starting a VC fund in a bit. But I'm curious, were the companies that you were doing angel investment in and now doing seed-stage investment in do they tend to be local companies, or do they tend to be international companies that are planning to solve a problem locally? JOSEPH: It's funny you ask that. At the beginning, they were local. Well, actually, if I really were to take a step back, the very first angel investment I made was for a mentee, and she was based in Toronto. But I'd say that the first true angel investment I made, you know, it was in Singapore, first and foremost, because I was there. And then I started branching out. I started making investments in the Philippines. I started looking at companies in Taiwan and other parts. And actually, that opened my eyes to the fact that there may be other companies around the world that are trying to solve a problem that may not necessarily be in my own backyard. So I started to, you know, cheekily, I sent my wife to tech conferences around the world. And she herself is an entrepreneur from the tech industry; hardware was her specialty. And we started identifying companies from all over the world. And the second angel investment where I was the very first investor was actually from a company in South Africa with similar challenges. So the things that we saw as major health system deficiencies or maybe shortages in infrastructure and human capital were very much true not just in Southeast Asia but in a lot of parts of the world. And we noticed that while there were different reasons for why they ended up in that position, the outcome was similar. CHAD: I'm not sure that everyone listening has a good sense of what the healthcare landscape actually looks like in these different places of the world. So let's take insurance, for example; what is the insurance landscape, generally speaking, in Southeast Asian countries? JOSEPH: So, in Southeast Asia, we do have insurers. I mean, private insurance is certainly there. But it's just not -- CHAD: Do most companies have public insurance, too, like universal healthcare? JOSEPH: That depends on which country you're in. Now, the one interesting thing about our entire region is that they've all committed to universal healthcare coverage. I would say that the implementation thereof has been heterogeneous; let's put it that way. Out of Southeast Asian countries that are not Singapore, I'd say that Thailand probably has the strongest public healthcare system. And in fact, they even do health technology assessments, which is really looking at the true cost-effectiveness of a new intervention versus what's currently done in practice to make decisions as to whether they're going to pay for it. And they cover a pretty high percentage of their population with this. And then there are other places where the financing mechanisms are in place, but you don't necessarily have the doctors or the hospitals where they need to be to address the needs of the population. Still, we are dealing with places that are not fully urbanized. And in fact, a good deal of the population is still working on the pharm, basically. One of the other complexities of our region is that just between the Philippines and Indonesia, which together has a combined population of 380 million at least, maybe it's 390 now, you've got 25,000 islands, and not all of those islands tend to hold major tier-one cities, even though they can hold a lot of people. And if there is one thing about healthcare that seems to be a universal truth is that highly skilled workers like to live in the rich cities. CHAD: And so what I'm hearing is that on an individual island, if there's not a major city there, the access to the actual healthcare might be really limited. JOSEPH: That is exactly it. CHAD: In these economies in these countries, it's typical to have private insurance layered on top. But the pharmas probably aren't doing that, right? JOSEPH: Oh, no, no, unfortunately not. There are some pilots of trying to do co-ops or collective insurance or micro-insurance policies. But again, when you look at the amount of premium that they could pay in, the kind of coverage they get is pretty basic. CHAD: So, how does that landscape influence the solutions that startups are creating? JOSEPH: Well, first and foremost, you've got to try to get some sort of mechanism by which you can seek care without having to travel too much. And I think that concept is extremely familiar to all of us thanks to the global pandemic that I hope we're coming out of right now, although there's always a new strain surprising us. The idea of basic telemedicine is one that can have a great deal of impact in these populations. But even before that, just understanding the importance of healthcare, like, what the concept of healthcare is, what the concept of the modern medical system is, is something that a fair number of people never really had awareness of. And I'll call out an example country, and I try not to call out too many examples. But Indonesia did a really good job of educating people about the concept of healthcare when they promoted their universal healthcare coverage. Even if they didn't have the ability to deliver it as well as they wanted to or as widespread as they wanted to, at least they got people paying attention to this concept called health. So awareness is really the first step. The second challenge is all right, so you know health exists. When do you know when you need it? Where are you going to find a doctor? How do you know if a doctor is even good? And how do you know that the products that you're going to get are appropriate? So there are so many challenges that you have to face when you are in a lack of access situation. CHAD: I assume you're getting pitched on a lot of ideas coming to your fund, a lot of startups. Correct me if that's wrong. [laughs] JOSEPH: No, no, that's absolutely true. So one of the blessings and curses of being one of the very few super early-stage healthtech venture funds out there is that there aren't many of us out there. And when we started...let's just put it this way, if I could find a fund that was doing what I wanted to do, I would have sent my CV in, and I couldn't. And starting a fund was basically the last thing I wanted to do, having never worked at a VC before or ever raised money in my life before. So I still think that we are the only truly global impact-oriented seed - I hate the term pre-seed, but I'll use it because of the audience's familiarity with it- investment fund out there right now for healthtech. So by virtue of that, we do see a lot of companies. CHAD: So what are some of the criteria? JOSEPH: So I'd say some of the criteria that we look for is number one, are you solving a real problem? And we define a real problem by the breadth of the problem, like, how many people are suffering from it or how systemic is this problem if it's an infrastructural one? And depth being how severe is this problem: is it life or death, or is it a minor inconvenience? So first and foremost, it's got to be solving a real problem. Second, it's really around the team. You need a lot of clinical, technical, and commercial experience in order to pull off a healthtech startup successfully. And even before that, we want to understand why are you doing this? Because this is not easy. I'd say on a scale of 1 to 10, doing a startup is like an eight, and then doing a healthtech startup is like an 11. It's slow; it's technical, it's regulated, it's super risky. And health systems are very pathway-dependent in the intent to not have many things in common with one another. So it is really, really hard. So we want to know the motivation. Are you going to stick through the thick and thin, or are you doing this healthtech startup because you think healthtech is cool or hot this particular period in the market cycle? So that's another criterion. Another criterion is, well, what's your edge? I mean, okay, you can have a great team, and I think that is definitely a prerequisite. You can solve a problem. But do you have something that could make sure that you are going to be competitive and remain competitive? CHAD: Given the barriers to market entry that you just outlined, do most of the companies that you're investing in have any sort of traction already in the market, or where are they in the product development or business development cycle? JOSEPH: I'm going to give the ultimate cop-out answer of it depends. CHAD: [laughs] Yeah. JOSEPH: But I will qualify that by saying it depends on whether it's hardware or software, and it depends whether it's regulated or non-regulated. So if you are a software company that's unregulated so, what does this mean? It could be like a marketplace. It could be health education. It could be some telemedicine in a loosely regulated market. We'd really like to see user traction. We'd really like to see revenue even. However, if you're a device company and you need to get FDA before you can earn a single dollar, we're okay with it being a science experiment or a prototype on the table as long as the science part of it has been de-risked. So if we know that the fundamental scientific principles are sound, then we're willing to take the productization and regulatory risk because we've been through this journey ourselves. CHAD: And also, you said a team is really important, so if it's a team that has never gone through that before, that's less attractive than a team that has done it before, I assume. JOSEPH: Yeah, absolutely. However, one of the challenges is that outside of the U.S., certain European markets in Israel, it's really difficult to find a team that's gone through the entire medical device development process before. So you are going to rely heavily on your professional service providers, consultants, advisors, other investors who've done this before. And as long as you have at least a path to getting to a point where you can unlock and utilize that expertise, that's okay. But if you don't, then that's a really, really big risk. Mid-Roll Ad I wanted to tell you all about something I've been working on quietly for the past year or so, and that's AgencyU. AgencyU is a membership-based program where I work one-on-one with a small group of agency founders and leaders toward their business goals. We do one-on-one coaching sessions and also monthly group meetings. We start with goal setting, advice, and problem-solving based on my experiences over the last 18 years of running thoughtbot. As we progress as a group, we all get to know each other more. And many of the AgencyU members are now working on client projects together and even referring work to each other. Whether you're struggling to grow an agency, taking it to the next level and having growing pains, or a solo founder who just needs someone to talk to, in my 18 years of leading and growing thoughtbot, I've seen and learned from a lot of different situations, and I'd be happy to work with you. Learn more and sign up today at thoughtbot.com/agencyu. That's A-G-E-N-C-Y, the letter U. CHAD: Earlier, you said FDA. FDA is a United States thing. Do most countries in Southeast Asia have a local regulatory agency like the FDA that things need to be approved through? JOSEPH: Yep, every single one. The question is, what's the process to go through that? Generally speaking, the FDA, as well as the European equivalent, which is the CE Mark, are used as predicates in order to kind of shortcut the process, make it go a little bit faster. Because then you don't have to create a bunch of new work or get the local regulator to really try to do things that they're unfamiliar with. CHAD: You said it's fairly rare for teams to have concrete experience doing that in the local market. Does that mean that most of these markets have been served by, I don't know, large companies previously? JOSEPH: Yeah, and still are. A fair number of emerging markets don't even have the manufacturing capability to even do local production, so they require a lot of importation. I'd say that this is a different case when it comes to generic pharmaceuticals and maybe vaccines and some consumables. But complex devices and biologics are generally manufactured in more developed markets or larger economies. CHAD: Yeah. Well, you mentioned the pandemic, and I'm curious how the pandemic has changed either your prospects for the fund but also the market in general. JOSEPH: I would say, again, it's both a blessing and a curse. So during the start of the pandemic, there was a great deal of societal and economic uncertainty around where are we going to be as a species in six months? And I remember early 2020; it was kind of these Hollywood movies that would paint this kind of semi-apocalyptic picture of where we're going to end up. And as a consequence, people really puckered up and stopped investing in things. I would say that the other side of it is now much of the world understands what it's like to not have access to quality healthcare or even access to healthcare. You see people not going to the hospital for things that they ought to and then suffering the consequences at home, like, let's say, not going for that heart checkup, and then you having a heart attack at home and passing when you otherwise wouldn't have. Or even cancer patients having to delay their therapy because the hospital is just too full. So this concept of telemedicine which has always been resisted by both the payers and providers for being infeasible, or inaccurate, or impossible to fund properly, suddenly had to be done. And the concept of telemedicine is fairly old. I mean, how else would you treat your astronauts in space in the '60s if they got sick? So this is something that NASA thought of and invented and implemented, you know, decades and decades ago. And finally, this came forward. And I was pleasantly surprised to see...and again, I'll quote the U.S. here where The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services or CMS actually reimbursed a bunch of remote procedure codes, which is pretty amazing. And I think that was opening Pandora's Box. There's no going back from that. So I think telemedicine is absolutely here to stay. And the real challenge now is really how to make it more user-friendly, how to improve it, how to improve the decisions that come from it. I really don't think it's going back. And as a consequence of this, it's really benefited a lot of our startups that were trying to build this remote-connected future anyway. CHAD: Has there also been an influx of those kinds of startups? JOSEPH: Absolutely. I would say that there has been a veritable Cambrian explosion of startups where everyone and their uncle is starting a healthtech startup as well as a healthtech fund. I see a lot of new funds coming up promising to invest in this space. So I think it's good in that there's going to be a lot of really new ideas, and hopefully, it's going to improve the standard of care for everyone around the world. But at the same time, it is creating a lot of noise, and it's becoming increasingly difficult to filter through that. CHAD: Do the solutions tend to be local? I guess the nature of my question was, you know, like messaging apps. [laughs] Different countries have different popular messaging apps. What do you see as the penetration of different telemedicine solutions in the different countries? Do you think it's going to be, oh, you know, this is popular in this country? Or do you think it's possible for one company to come in and really have a significant impact in the market across multiple markets? JOSEPH: Yeah, I think it's eventually going to be the latter. So at the start, you do see that you have your national champions. And like instant messaging apps, it's kind of like a 90-10 rule where the number 1 player takes 90% of the market, number 2 takes most of what's left, and then number 3 player caters to some niche or another. And I see two competing forces here; one is, yes, there may be a big player like Babylon or Crew who comes in and rolls up everything backed by heaps of capital. But the other thing could also be that all the health systems start saying, "You know what? Why are we working with an external company? Why don't we just develop all these capabilities ourselves and then keep the patient captive?" And you are starting to see middleware providers who are basically providing that telemedicine layer, white-labeling it, or giving API access to the providers themselves, the legacy providers themselves, and then allowing them to do that. And I actually saw this statistic...I don't know how accurate it was, but I saw a chart in the U.S. that white-labeled or internal telemedicine consults exceeded the number of Teladoc consultations, which is the largest platform in the U.S., at some point last year. CHAD: I'm wondering, do you know if Teladoc uses Twilio? JOSEPH: I really should know the answer to that question, but unfortunately, I do not. CHAD: Because my sense is the real winner in this game might be companies like Twilio because I think everyone is using them. [laughs] JOSEPH: That makes a ton of sense. So when we do look at some investments, we actually want to invest in middleware because why duke it out to be the platform when you're the utility provider? CHAD: So let's turn our attention to the actual creation of the fund. And I know you just opened your second fund last month, right? JOSEPH: Actually, this month. I mean, last month was the paperwork, but it takes time for stuff to get approved. CHAD: Yeah, fair enough. So you already said actually starting a fund was, I think you said, the last thing on earth that you wanted to do. Why was that the last thing you wanted to do? JOSEPH: Frankly, it was a whole lot more uncertainty than I was prepared to handle at the time. And I was either blessed or cursed with this momentary clarity of purpose where I knew with all my being that this is what I wanted to do with myself for, if not the rest of my life, a very long time. And the only alternative, or rather the only choice to pursue this at the time, was really starting a fund. So that's what I had to do, right? CHAD: And how large was the first fund? JOSEPH: It was pretty small; it was $7.6 million, which in local currency equates to a nice number of just above 10 million sings. CHAD: And where did you...I'm going to ask where that ended up coming from. But in terms of the mechanics of actually starting a fund, what did that look like? JOSEPH: Well, it depends on each market. But typically, what happens is you need to first have permission from the regulator in order to actually start and run a fund. So in Singapore, you need to apply for a venture capital fund management license from the Monetary Authority of Singapore. That's what had to be done first, and we got that approved in a pretty good time, actually. I think we might have captured a lull period because now, with all the funds coming out, I've heard the queue is months long in some cases. And then came the business of incorporating the fund itself and then starting to draft all the legal paperwork, the conditions, the private memorandum or prospectus, depending on which geography and how regulated you are, that you show around to investors once they've expressed interest in learning substantially more details about your fund beyond what a simple PowerPoint deck or a casual coffee conversation can yield. And then you start collecting commitments, and then you start collecting the money. And at some point, you have enough money to say, all right, we'll do a close or first close, and that then gives you permission to start deploying that money into investments. And some funds they'll only do one close, some funds will do a first close, and then a final close when they get the rest of the money in or some money committed and then calling the rest of it to come in. Or some will do multiple closes just so that they have the ability to keep deploying continuously while they're doing this fundraising process. And in our case, we were doing rolling closes. So we would close every few months, and we'd continue to deploy. And by the time we finished fundraising, we actually already had nine companies out of the 15 that we have in our portfolio done. So it really depends on all sorts of different factors, which we probably don't have that much time to get into. And I risk perhaps putting my foot in my mouth and misspeaking if I give too many examples. CHAD: [laughs] When it comes to starting a fund, how cookie-cutter is it? Or do you find yourself having to create everything from scratch, all the legal documents, whatever platform you might be...or access you might be giving to the people who are contributing to the fund? JOSEPH: I'd say, again, it depends where you are. I think in the U.S. and especially with the advent of great service providers platforms like AngelList and Assure, it is super cookie-cutter. In our part of the world, I still think it's somewhat cookie-cutter, but we got a little too cute. CHAD: [chuckles] JOSEPH: We thought, okay, it's our first time doing a fund. I've been an LP in other funds. What did I wish I had as an LP? And as a consequence, we introduced some hurdle rates of tiered carry, and even zero carry if we don't hit a certain return. And all that really did was just create more questions from the investors. So we should have probably done it as cookie-cutter as possible in hindsight. CHAD: So I often hear from founders who talk about how it's important to have a VC fund behind you that you agree with, and want to work with, and are excited about, and that can be value additive. Do you need, as someone raising a fund, do you need to consider things like that or other things when it comes to the people you're taking money from the fund? JOSEPH: Absolutely. Maybe knock on wood here, but our relative inexperience when starting a fund probably selected out all the folks who might not have gotten along with us anyway. And the fact that we're pretty straightforward and direct with what we want to do in our objectives probably helped with that selection process as well on the positive side. But I absolutely, absolutely can recommend having that alignment of values and mission with those who are on the journey with you for a good decade. It's like getting married, right? CHAD: Yeah. Well, so when you're planning a fund and thinking about time horizons, is a decade what you're thinking about? JOSEPH: Yeah, all things considered. So our fund lifetime was eight years from final close. But still, it takes time to raise the fund and plan the fund, and you have people that are on board even before the fund begins. So it is a decade-long relationship, at least. And then some of the larger funds because they want to have a longer investment period, will push that out even further where they're going to be a 10-year fund from final close. And if you have enough of your portfolio that hasn't exited yet but still has some value to be uncovered, you may ask your investors to extend the fund life even further. So this is a supremely long relationship that you have. And aside from evergreen funds that don't have a fund lifetime, I think this is about as long as it gets, although I have seen some people float the idea of a 20-year fund or a 50-year fund, but that's really not widely practiced. I think five years is the fastest I've seen, and ten seems to be the average. CHAD: Where did that first fund come from? How did you drum up the interest and decide who would be a part of it? JOSEPH: It's really the folks who have known me the longest or worked with me. So you know how they say when you're raising money for a startup, you get it from the three F's, Friends, Family, and Fools? For funds and for first-time fund managers, I think it's a pretty analogous group of people, although I don't think we have any fools. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And, unfortunately, don't have family either. So it's really all friends, old co-workers, old clients, and then the people that they introduced us to. There were some serendipitous moments where people liked what I said at a conference, or we asked a tough question. And people asked, "Well, how can you ask such a tough question?" Then they got to know us and then decide to invest from there. But majority of it was just introductions, warm introductions. We never did any cold emails. CHAD: Have there been any exits in the first fund? JOSEPH: Not just yet. We do come in as either the first or second investor in these companies. So there is quite a long journey that we expect before we, you know, see some exits. There may be some this year. But if I look back at my angel investments, there was only real serious talk of an exit at the six-year mark for one of the companies that's doing really well. And even that exit turned out to be just another, you know, the investor changed their mind, and instead of buying the company, they decided to just invest more money into it. So this is a long journey. CHAD: Yeah, definitely. Did that make putting together the second fund any harder, or is that what everyone expects? JOSEPH: I am cautiously optimistic because we're still so early in our journey that the only folks we've really spoken with are the ones who invested in our first fund or passed on our first fund because they don't back first-time fund managers. They come to expect that your second fund is built on the momentum of the first fund. And it's really your third fund that's built on the exit and actual realized track record of your first fund. CHAD: That makes sense. What do you think is next for Verge HealthTech? JOSEPH: Well, first things first, we got to get started with the second fund and see if we can build something to scale. I mean, the first fund was an experiment. It was a small fund, you know. Could we build the world's seed-stage global impact healthtech fund on basically a shoestring? And the second fund is now let's take everything that we wish we had for the first fund and scale it up so bigger initial ticket sizes because we want to own more, the ability to follow on properly, the ability to do more deals, which requires a much bigger team which we now have. As well as to go back and support the winners of our first fund as well as some of the companies that maybe we made a mistake on and passed but still have a strong enough relationship to revisit and get them on the next round or the round after that, or just new companies that the market has moved. You know, the area that we might have been really interested in at the seed stage is now a pre-A stage or an A stage. So that's really what we want to do with the second one. And it would be amazing to see where this goes. I'm thrilled that we actually have, well, I think, one of the best healthtech investment teams in the world; maybe I'm slightly biased with this. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: And I'm excited to see what we can do together. CHAD: That's great. Well, I wish you the best. And I really appreciate you for stopping by and sharing with us. If folks want to follow along with you or get in touch with you, where are the best places for them to do that? JOSEPH: Probably LinkedIn is the best way to do it. Also, I have a blog on Medium, which I'm sure can be linked in the show notes. I've been really bad...I've been traveling intensely in the past half-year. But I promise my next blog post will be interesting. CHAD: [laughs] JOSEPH: Because I just got back from Rwanda and Saudi Arabia, which are two very, very different countries, however, with a great emphasis on improving healthcare, especially on the digital side. CHAD: Well, that's exciting. So folks definitely can find the links for that in the notes, which you can find the notes; you can subscribe to the show and a full transcript of the episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening, and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Joseph Mocanu.

Ready to Be Petty
Episode 91: Petty about 365: This Day, Tiktokers, and Met Gala Looks

Ready to Be Petty

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 107:02


In episode 91, Torry (she/her) is joined by Kelly (she/her) from the Boobies & Noobies podcast. They discuss Bridgerton season 2 (10:27), 365: This Day (17:23), Kim Kardashian and Pete Davidson attending the White House Correspondents' Dinner (36:51) and his new tattoo for Kim's kids (46:50). Next they discuss everything from the Met Gala 2022 (52:47) and then Kelly nominates three Pettyweight Champions of the Week: the Kardashians missing the verdict of their trial with Blac Chyna, everyone participating in the Amber Heard versus Johnny Depp trial, and Ulta Beauty for advertising Kate Spade's perfume in the grossest way (1:18:40). Then Torry discusses Tiktokers who set up their cameras to film themselves sleeping in This Week in Petty (1:32:39). At 1:39:32, Torry provides an update on the Blac Chyna versus the Kardashians court case, Ray J leaking texts between him and Kim, and the most embarrassing stories from her obsession with Emma Chamberlain. Content Warning: Discussion about extreme dieting between 53:35-56:23 and suicide between 1:22:59-1:26:00. Check out the PowerPoint about Emma Chamberlain, the @CelebJets Twitter account, and ways to donate to Planned Parenthood mentioned in the episode. Kelly's Previous RTBP Appearances Episode 54: Petty about the Misconceptions of Romance Novels Leave an audio message of a question or comment for Torry to include in a future podcast on Speakpipe. Join our Facebook group and follow RTBP on Instagram and Twitter. Subscribing and leaving a rating helps us find new listeners! Thank you. Ready to Be Petty is a Playlyst Studios Original.

So techt Deutschland
Pitch will das bessere Powerpoint sein

So techt Deutschland

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 43:17


Wer eine Präsentation im Job, in der Schule oder im Studium vorbereitet, nutzt dafür sehr wahrscheinlich Powerpoint von Microsoft. Mehr als 30 Millionen Präsentationen werden Schätzungen zufolge jeden Tag mit der Software des Marktführers erstellt. Christian Reber will das ändern. Das neue Startup des Seriengründers heißt Pitch und bietet eine gleichnamige Präsentationssoftware an.Reber hat seine Erfahrungen mit Microsoft. Sein Startup Wunderlist verkaufte er einst für 150 Millionen Euro an das von Bill Gates gegründete Unternehmen. Mit Pitch will er den Platzhirschen aber nicht ärgern. Das beteuert er zumindest im ntv-Podcast "So techt Deutschland": Weltweit nutzen 500 Millionen Menschen eine Präsentationssoftware. Wenn er auch nur einen kleinen Teil davon gewinnen könne, wäre das schon ein Erfolg.Im Schnitt werden zwei Stunden aufgewendet, um eine Präsentation in Powerpoint vorzubereiten. Reber will es schneller und schicker schaffen. Die erfolgreichsten Unternehmen der Welt wie Apple und Tesla haben "die Kunst des Präsentierens perfektioniert", behauptet der Gründer. Deshalb hätten Veranstaltungen der beiden Firmen regelmäßig Millionen von Zuschauern.Sie haben Fragen für Frauke Holzmeier und Andreas Laukat? Dann schreiben Sie eine E-Mail an sotechtdeutschland@ntv.de.]]

Turned On Podcast
Ep 149: Thinking Outside the Box; A Fascinating Look on News Ways to Approach Corporate America, Personal Finance and The School System with Kyle Depiesse

Turned On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 56:17


Not another Power Point, taking the office outdoors to free the mindWhen life has you on a train headed in the wrong direction, how transformation happens in the most unusual placesDiscernment and instinct, how we can be strategic and intuitive at the same timeGetting out of 400K debt, it can be done without giving up the things you enjoyReaching the new generation, how the education industry is ripe for education and reform.Who is responsible to prepare kids for the real world? Parenting vs Schooling.Why are we teaching students to do well on standardized tests rather than the real world?The bureaucracy has stymied education. Getting through the red tapeThis current generation of children is begging to be challenged, they are ready to step up

THE NEURO SIDE OF INFLUENCE AND LEADERSHIP
The Power of Hand Gestures

THE NEURO SIDE OF INFLUENCE AND LEADERSHIP

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 25:38


“You're a PowerPoint slide. And anything you do is either contributing to your message or distracting from it.” When most of us think of hand gestures, we might have a few rude ones in mind, but studies tell us that hand gestures are crucial for both the presenter's recall AND the audience's accurate perception of the message being delivered. René gives us concrete examples of how to use our body and especially our hands to take our influence to the next level. But what about the over-expressers? René has you covered too as he outlines the concept of the Influence Zone and how staying inside of it can take you from overbearing to outstanding. Whether you're born to hand jive or always keeping one hand in your pocket, this episode will help you break out of your shell and into the influence zone. Don't miss it! Show Resources: https://theneuroside.com/ (TheNeuroSide.com) https://meetrene.com/ (MeetRene.com) https://amplifiimylife.com/ (Amplifiimylife.com) https://amplifybook.com/ (AmplifyBook.com) https://www.amanet.org/articles/when-leaders-talk-with-their-hands/ (www.amanet.org/articles/when-leaders-talk-with-their-hands/) https://www.scienceofpeople.com/hand-gestures/ (www.scienceofpeople.com/hand-gestures/) 02:00 - What is AMPLIFII™? 02:40 - We begin with “the Influence Zone” 03:40 - Holler and Beatie study 05:15 - Anchoring messages in your fingers 06:20 - Matching hand gestures can drive a message home 07:45 - Hand gestures can alter perception of character 10:25 - Personality Types 12:30 - Information Packaging Hypothesis 14:00 - If you're the PowerPoint slide, are there any distractions? 15:34 - The Influence Zone or The Box 17:00 - Avoid international hand gesture confusion! 17:35 - How do you START? 18:20 - the Steeple 19:15 - your fingers are a gun, you don't want to point them at anyone 20:00 - Take an acting class 20:35 - look at their feet! 22:08 - take it EVEN bigger!! 22:44 - Takeaways 24:20 - Wall Street Journal #2 Best Seller!!! Amplify Your Influence the Book

The Goddamn Fools
185. NFT's & Herpes

The Goddamn Fools

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022


This week we discuss how we're all “proficient” in PowerPoint, Evan's billion dollar dating app idea, Supreme Court potentially overturning Roe v Wade allowing states to ban abortions, Kevin Samuels death, Dave Chappelle attacked on stage, Kendrick Lamar's “The Heart Part 5”, Young Thug and Gunna arrested on RICO charges, more. Subscribe, Rate Us, and Share! Follow us on social media: @TheGoddamnFools @EvSwain @TheBlkofWallSt @hi_biancaaaa (Twitter) / @hi.biancaaaa (Instagram)

Sixteen:Nine
Geoff Bessin, Intuiface

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 38:26


NOTE - Podcasts normally come out on Wednesdays, but as a favor to Intuiface - which is at this week's ISE trade show in Spain - I moved it up a day to coincide with the show's opening day ... The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT One of the big trends in the software world is the whole idea of no code development - the premise that both programmers and mere mortals can create applications without getting their typing fingers dirty and brains fried doing traditional computer programming. The proposition is that no code development platforms can cut out a lot of time and cost associated with pulling applications together, and also deal with the reality that good programmers are in high demand and therefore scarce. The French software firm Intuiface is in the interesting position of having offered a no code platform long before no code was a discussion point, so the folks there are a great resource for discussing the implications for the digital signage and interactive display market. I spoke with Geoff Bessin, the CMO and main voice for Intuiface, about the distinctions between no code and low code development platforms, and how they differ from the simple drag and drop, what you see is what you get user interfaces that are common in digital signage content management systems. We also dig into the benefits, the limitations, and more than anything, why you should know and care about no code. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Geoff, thank you for joining me. Can you give me the rundown first on what Intuiface is all about?  Geoff Bessin: Will do, Dave, thank you for having me. So Intuiface is a no-code platform dedicated to the creation of interactive digital content. That includes digital signage, but really it can anything in the venue. It could be a museum exhibition, could be a sales pitch for a movie sales team, could be anything at a trade show, something in a real estate office, et cetera. So you create it, you deploy it, you can do analytics with it. It's all good. And the company is based in France, correct?  Geoff Bessin: We are headquartered in a town called Labège, which is right outside Toulouse in France. Although I'm not, but it's funny, my name is Geoffrey Besson, so both my first and last name look French. So people always assume it's French, but that's not the case. I'm in Boston. Can you speak a lick of French? Geoff Bessin: Oui. Yes.  Good for you! I wanted to talk about no-code software, cause you guys have been no-code before people were even using that term and no-code is one of these trends, just like headless CMS, that seems to be bubbling up and maybe people don't understand a lot about it yet. Geoff Bessin: Yeah, you could go back to the 80s and find things like HyperCard where you were enabling non-developers to create an application of some sorts. So it goes back a long way, but in terms of a movement, generating notice, gaining investment and having companies spend money on it, it's only been the past few years.  I can tell you that statistics are now saying that the market size, the amount of money being spent on no-code software used to create apps is almost $14 billion. It's a lot of money being pumped into these apps. And in fact, more than 65% of apps are now created using no-code tools. So more than 50%, more than half of apps are being built with no-code software. It is the predominant means of delivering applications these days.  What's the distinction between no-code and low-code, because I've heard both terms. Geoff Bessin: There's no formal distinction. You can't point at it and go, “Oh, this one's no-code” like you just went over the line. But the idea is that with low-code, there are back doors. There are means to enhance, to extend, to facilitate integration that might involve a little bit of coding. Even that coding could be simplified based on maybe either a scripting language that is native to the tool or a public scripting language like Ruby.  Whereas no-code is just 100%, you're not going to see code anywhere, and so you are in a way limited to the sandbox provided by the no-code platform, what it is you're able to deliver is limited by what you can piece together with the Lego blocks of that platform. no-code gives you those little back doors to branch yourself out.  So what does it mean for development? Does it distance or mediate the need for application developers completely, and just any old end-user can produce an application without having to engage developers or is it more something that accelerates the development process and just gets some cost and time out of the way? Geoff Bessin: I think that question brings us to who's doing it, and why are they doing it? As I mentioned, no-code has exploded recently, and it is due to a set of developments that have driven application development to what is now called the “citizen developer.”  Trends such as a shortage of developers, it's not that we're trying to get rid of them. It's that there's not enough. I saw one statistic that back in 2020, there were 1.2 million unfilled developer jobs in the United States, just the US but 1.2 million developer jobs unfilled in the US and colleges and universities were only cranking out about 400,000 developers. There's a shortage. So it's not that we don't want them, we don't have them. What do you do about that? There was also COVID, which has greatly accelerated investment in these no-code platforms, because everything moved online, and when everything moved online, everything needed to be digitized and companies realized we have to move now but we don't have enough resources, so how the heck are we going to digitize these things?  And then there's also tangential, but influential, the fact that even in our own home, we're not coders, but we are programmers. If I'm working with my Nest thermostat, that's programming. I just got a puppy and they have these apps that you can then program to see how many steps they've taken and how much water they drink, that's programming, and the digital native is used to controlling their environment digitally. There are tools out there that enable them to realize their ideas as an application, and somebody has to build it because there's not enough developers to go around. That's what really kicked the no-code market in the butt. What we're seeing subsequently is that the developer shortage is being filled by these citizen developers producing applications, maybe for personal use, maybe for internal employee use, maybe for customer us, it depends. Those developers are now being transitioned to work on larger projects, more intricate projects. They have more time arguably to focus on the big tickets stuff that still needs the hardcore development, offloading their responsibility from the simpler things that can now be handled by that citizen developer. Are there trade offs that you have to accept, to use no-code instead of just doing your own thing? Geoff Bessin: Certainly. There are obvious advantages, there's speed and there's costs benefits. There's a big productivity boost, but of course there's trade offs. I like this notion of Legos. You have these prebuilt blocks and this is a finite number of block options that you can combine in an infinite number of ways. At the end of the day, you're still limited to those blocks, right? And so if I'm using a no-code platform and I need a block that doesn't exist, I'm stuck.  Now, I suppose if it's a low-code platform, depending on what I need to achieve,okay, maybe I can put something together if I have the skill, maybe I don't, but if I don't have the skill or if the opportunity with the platform doesn't exist, I am limited, and I think that might be the fundamental challenge is what can I do? What can I realize? Cause recognize that a lot of these platforms are built to be generic, to address sort of breadth, not always depth, and so that can be a challenge. You are also, of course, relying on them to be responsible for performance and reliability. You are handing over that duty, that responsibility to the provider, the no-code platform. I hope they're doing a good job. Because it's out of my hands, I can't control that, and so those are the big risks: can I achieve exactly what I want or am I making compromises? Am I achieving the level of performance? My ability to deploy? My ability to collect data analytics? My ability to manage that deployment?  There's 150-200 platforms across the spectrum offering no-code and low-code options. You might be making some compromises on the way, certainly are, but as I shared with you, 65% of apps are now built with no-code platforms. So companies have decided it's worth the risk.  What's the distinction between no-code and what you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) user interfaces? Geoff Bessin: No-code, I think it's more of a connotation, not a denotation. I think you could argue that a lot of no-code platforms are WYSIWYG. Intuiface is a no-code platform, it's a drag and drop tool. It's a WYSIWYG. The connotation of WYSIWYG, it could be for a developer. It could be for anybody of any skill set. So it's more of a generic catchall for applications enabled to create other applications by dragging components and you can see what they look like at design time and development time.  No-code connotes the non-developer, the citizen developer that you don't have coding skills and you're not expected to have those skills. So I think that's it.  You sent me a white paper that kind of goes into this and you're making the argument that while no-code is out there, it's exploding and growing and everything else, there's really no application, I think you called it a ‘no-code blind spot' in terms of in-venue applications. What do you mean by that?  Geoff Bessin: So let's define in-venue because that is exactly our contention. In-venue is an encapsulation of any digital deployment out of the home. It could be digital signage, could be all those things I mentioned with Intuiface as well, the museum exhibition, the sales presentation, real estate office, et cetera. It is out of the home. It is not my phone though. It is not my PC. I'm not browsing the web at home. I'm out of my home, I'm in a venue and there is some digital content trying to communicate to educate, to promote, to sell to me.  That domain has been, I think with the exception of Intuiface, untouched by the no-code movement. For sure, if you look at the landscape of companies delivering solutions to address the needs of the citizen developer, there is nothing out there addressing these in-venue deployments. It's all about web and mobile apps and some websites, that's it. So if you want to create digital signage, if you want to create that museum exhibition, the sales pitch, there is no option out there now, and which brings us David, I know you're going to want to ask this, which is, will, aren't all digital signage platforms, no-code? Which is great question, Dave, by the way... You are a psychic! Geoff Bessin: That's a yes, but, it is absolutely true that you don't write code, but there are certain expectations of a no-code platform that the traditional digital signage CMS cannot fulfill, and it's interesting if I take a step back, really by definition, it has always been the non-developer on the digital signage side, hasn't it? You buy a platform, there's a CMS, the user of the content management system is the content person. They're not coding anything. They're working with the CMS, they're assigning content to zones and they're day partying. By definition from day one, digital signage was always a non-developer domain, whereas web and mobile apps and these sorts of things were always the developer domain.  The no-code movement was, “Hey, this complicated stuff, we gotta make it simpler. We need the citizen developer involved.” So they brought no-code to the domain that started with developers, which I think is one of the explanations for why it didn't really come over to the in-venue side yet, because it was always non-coder users, but there are certain expectations of the no-code platform, that is not really in scope of the platform delivering in-venue content. A simple example, just to give you one would be the notion of context. To react to the user, react to the environment, in real time in that context, and do something as a result that is inherently this notion of logic. If this, then that. That's coding, right? It's got the whiff of coding and how do you do that? And there's a list of things we can discuss about what makes in-venue unique. But it requires the accommodation of additional concerns that are beyond the scope of what a traditional CMS does and that no other no-code platform does across the no-code spectrum.  I guess what you're saying in certain respects is you can develop a playlist, do all the basic functionality of a digital sign, you can target content and everything else, but the moment you get into a request to do something different, that's interactive, that as you say, maybe responds to triggers and so on, that gets a lot more complicated, and at that point you're putting in, if you're an end user, you're putting in a request to your reseller or to the software company directly saying, can you do this? And they'll say, yes, we can, but it's going to take this amount of time, this amount of money and, we can't get this to you for six months cause it's off of our roadmap or whatever… Is that one of the arguments you'd make?  Geoff Bessin: I would say that for sure. You see, a lot of companies have libraries. Here's our template library, here's our plugin library, here's our integration library. Oh, you want something we don't have? We can build that for you. Here's the cost. Here's how long it's going to take. That's one example. I can tell you that from a Intuiface perspective, we don't have any libraries. We haven't really prebuilt anything. Our paradigm is to enable integration with any web service, to create any UI, to integrate with any content management system, to have that ubiquity, which means that we don't have to build anything for our clients. The customer can do that. But it also means that, well, you better have a good idea and you better need to know what you. Because you're starting with a tabula rasa, but yes, that is certainly one good example of how you fulfill these sort of unique needs you might have thought about. I'll give you another example, which is retail point of sale. How would you build that thing? To me, that qualifies as an in-venue application. That's in the venue, right? I can order through a website, but do I want to put a website on a kiosk? It's a different domain. It's a different paradigm. It has different design requirements, different expectations, different issues about security, about being able to run potentially offline. But having to work with peripherals, having hyper-local context dependence, there are all of these concerns that will impact that user experience in the venue that may not be relevant or at all to a web experience. If I want to build that thing, how much flexibility am I going to have? Now there are companies like Grubber, which are pretty much pre-built everything, right? All you do is you push your menu into their back office system, and you're good to go. You just have to hope it does exactly what it is you want because you're constrained within the confines of what they offer for design, with the offer for business process, what they offer in terms of context, awareness, and reaction and if you need to make any kind of changes, you're dependent on them to make those changes, and that has a cost and a time penalty to it.  What kind of skillsets do you realistically need to use a no-code particularly in the context of Intuiface? I'm assuming the proposition is anybody can sit down, but you still have to plan out, you have to have some methodical thinking about what you want to do with what the decision tree is on all that stuff, right? Geoff Bessin: You do, and that gives me an opportunity to give you just a brief history of Intuiface because we were never a no-code company, that wasn't how we were oriented. The company was actually founded back in 2002. It was founded by a couple of PhDs with expertise in touch technology. And from day one, it was about bringing user experiences to a lot of it was, believe it or not, the defense industry, but also retail, touch-driven user experiences for something, to accomplish something. The company was always about the user experience.  At the end of the day, as great as your touch technology might be, nobody cares if it's not usable. If it doesn't make it easy to achieve some goal, and so Intuiface, when it was born it was all about the user experience, and in fact, most of its early hires were focused on that, on how to make something intuitive and that where the company name comes from, an intuitive interface. To make intuitive user experiences that we're driven by interaction like touch. What happened was we were servicing all of these organizations, again, a lot of defense, Intuiface is headquartered just outside the Toulouse, as i mentioned. So you have the big aerospace and defense industry located in Toulouse like Airbus. So a lot of those clients, but also retail, commerce. Focused on user experience, and it was hard to scale the business because you had this deep technical dependency underneath because it's driven by touch and we're going back 15 years, so expensive hardware, challenging technology, and at the same time, trying to come up with these really intuitive user interfaces, it was a challenge, and we decided internally, I say we, but I wasn't here yet. Intuiface decided internally that we need to come up with something that can accelerate our ability to deliver good user experiences on top of this touch technology. The company builds something called Intuikit, it was used internally by user experience experts, designers, and people good at aesthetics, people good at thinking about the customer. They were not developers. Ultimately, we decided this thing called Intuikit is pretty awesome, maybe that's our business, and so we're. It's a short story about how the software platform Intuiface was born. We were always about the user experience. It is our expectation that our users are experts in the users, creating intuitive interfaces, not In having any necessary knowledge about development. So that is our expectation, and that's what we think is appropriate. You need to be creative. You need to understand the user. You need to understand the domain. You don't have to worry about the platform you're building it on. That should not be your problem. You should be all about solving the customer's problem. I realize you work with a bunch of industries, but a lot of your activity is in digital signage. If I am an end-user and I'm using ACME digital signage software, can I use the Intuiface with it? Does it plug into it or are there restrictions? Do you have to go through door number one or door number two, you can't use both doors? Geoff Bessin: Probably, you can't do. Typically the content management system used by the DS platform is proprietary. It's a closed system. It doesn't have a published API. So we couldn't read from it. Intuiface conversely has its own runtime as well. We can run side by side. In fact, on Windows, we have the ability to run side by side with other applications, we have had customers who are not ready to transition off their existing DS investment. So they were sort of a cohabitating interactive Intuiface based content at one part of the screen and traditional DS content and others were cohabitating that screen. But normally no, that wouldn't be how one would do it.  Certainly Intuiface is positioned around interactivity. We believe that by definition, once you introduce interactivity and the need to be responsive and context, and to accommodate not just touch, but sensors and voice and computer vision, when you need to account for all of these things, you need to be very good at that if-when, right? And that notion of conditional responses to events which are completely typically outside the realm of the traditional DS platform. That's where we start, and then clients can decide, do I want these Intuiface to co-exist with this DS platform? Or do we need to make some sort of transition. If I'm an end-user and I start with Intuiface and have a series of interactive screens that are doing some sort of functionality, whatever it may be and then I decide, I want to also have an expanding network of “dumb screens” that are just running traditional digital signage content in some sort of a sequence. Can you do that too?  Geoff Bessin: Sure, the content doesn't know it's in a dumb playlist, right? The content is fine. Certainly you can do that. The Intuiface was born, solving the interactive problem. And it's interesting, Dave, because in the early days of selling our platform, digital signage was something else. You didn't touch signage. So our communication to the marketplace was not interactive signage. There wasn't such a thing. There was interactive content for kiosks. That was the world when we first walked in, you were touching something such as a table or a kiosk. There were touch screens, very expensive touch screens. You could be bound on a wall, never a perceptive pixel from a million years ago. Like those CNN screens and that sort of thing. You spend $2,500, you can have a touchscreen, but bylarge, it was kiosks and that sort of thing.  What happened was that they had this largely commoditized, digital signage space, hundreds of companies offering traditional digital signage and customers had iPhones in their pocket and they had iPads at home, and they started thinking about interactivity. They see the voting coverage on CNN and people tapping screens. So can you do that? That's why we started getting questions about traditional digital signage. Can you fulfill that as well? We were like yeah, we can, and over the years we developed additional capability to accommodate it.  The paradigm is still different. We don't have a traditional notion of a playlist for example, but you can create a playlist within Intuiface. We're using our Lego blocks, not just to build interactive content, but non-interactive content as well. You can do both.  So it was something you could do, but it's not your focus?  Geoff Bessin: I would say, we'res interactive first, but the traditional broadcast signage, and I don't mean this in a judgy way, it's not typically that complicated. So if it is a playlist of stuff, images, videos, documents, it's very easily done, but people very rarely come to us, Dave, with traditional first. They're coming to us because they need to solve an interactive need, and oh, by the way, long-term you can transition to traditional content as well. I agree that, the conventional side of digital signage, the meat potatoes, run this stuff at this time and these locations and all that is commoditized and pretty simple, and I always say that the complicated stuff is behind the scenes, the device management, the API integrations and all that sort of stuff. Are you at a level now where you can provide the building blocks, the Lego blocks to do the interactive piece, but also enable the end user to monitor and remotely manage all that?  Geoff Bessin: We do offer that, and in fact we offer both of what you mentioned, cause you also mentioned the API integration, we can accommodate that as well. On the device management side, certainly we have an awareness of the devices in the field and you can set up notifications if things are going wrong, that sort of thing, you can see what's running on those devices. On certain platforms, you can remotely update on runtime, that sort of thing. We're not averse to working with a device and platform management options, to collaborate with them in a deployment, but we do offer some of that. And with API integration, we've actually offered for six years. It's been a long time and it's one of those things, Dave, where, as I said, we weren't born with no-code. We were born worried about user experience and we realized we looked in the mirror and wen, oh, we're actually no-code.  We've been offering a software called API Explorer.  You can automatically create an integration, an integration with a web API without writing code And it is a real time integration reading from writing to that web API. It could be a back office system, ERP application, CRM application could be a database wrapped in an API, could be a device on the internet of things, all of these options can be integrated with a running Intuiface experienced by a non-developer, using API Explorer. So we've offered that for some time.  We now have our own CMS but you don't have to use it. Our original value prop is to use whatever you want. We have API Explorer, you can plug into whatever you want. We have now introduced our own because depending on the scenario and the requirements of the project, it just makes better sense to use ours. But we still have customers that would rather use that other thing, or Dave, they're integrated with the ERP application. They're building a retail point of sale application with Intuiface, and they have integrated with the ERP system, they need to work with the API and you can do that. Who would you describe as your kind of core end-users, core customers?  Geoff Bessin: I would say 50 to 60% of our customers are agencies and integrators. So we can discuss with the actual user might be, but I would say more than half of our installed base are agencies and integrators with their own clients. And there is a spectrum of reasons why they're using Intuiface. Some of them, they don't have the development skill, but they want to offer interactivity. Others have men and women on the bench with the skill, but they don't have the scale. That's the problem with people is that they can work on one thing at a time. And what we find is that a lot of the integrators in particular will be taking Intuiface so they can scale. They can take on a larger volume of maybe small and mid-sized projects that they can do with Intuiface, and then put the men and women on the bench onto the bigger high value projects. We find that customers are saving 80% of time and 60% of costs versus customer that don't use Intuiface. So it's very easy for them, and it's an easy pitch. Conceptually, if you can build an interactive application, doing exactly what you want with a no-code platform is probably cheaper and faster than if I wrote code, so it's an easy idea to wallow and it is what our customers experience. So that's what you'll find. I would say the majority 60%-55% agencies and integrators, the rest are the small and midsize museums, schools, retailers, sales offices, marketing, and sales teams, they want to do it themselves. And do they want to do it themselves because of cost or control? Geoff Bessin: Often it's because of cost. They have ambition or they've been bitten, Dave, where they have outsourced it. You don't see this going in, but you meet an agency. You tell them what you want, they agree and deliver something in two months that doesn't resemble what you wanted, so you ask for revisions, and this cycle continues while you pay for the time. It's not an agile process, and again, I'm not casting aspersions at the agency, they are our customers. But their sales pitch is we use Intuiface so we can deliver what you want faster than the other guys that do exactly what you want, and by the way, if you don't like the work we did, you can take it with you. If I pay an agency to write custom code and I'll be dissatisfied, I'm starting from zero with another agency. So you have that kind of portability benefit as well. So yes, a lot of the small and midsize, it's budget driven or based on their experience, they have limited budgets. They outsourced it, and they were just satisfied. We do have the occasional large enterprise. They want to have maybe an interactive sales pitch. So the marketing and sales team is driving the creation of the collateral, hiring a developer to make. I could use PowerPoint. Why am I hiring? It's hard to justify this pay developers to code a sales pitch, I can just use PowerPoint. Hold on a second, here's this thing called Intuiface. I can build an interactive sales pitch for my Salesforce. I'm still using the tool. I'm the creative team on the marketing sales team. But I'm creating something that is far more novel and engaging than a PowerPoint. When the pandemic hit, I speculated and I'm sure many people speculated that this was going to be a difficult time for people who were in the touch and interactive business. What happened instead is that touch actually went up in demand and self service applications became very much a big development initiative. Have you seen that happening in the last couple of years?  Geoff Bessin: We have, and then ultimately it turns out people are more afraid of other people than touch screens. And our business has rebounded quite well. What we were hoping for, and it seems to be the case is that demand didn't drop. It got stuck behind a wall. There was a dam and the demand was building behind the dam, and you couldn't open the dam cause nobody was out of the house and the waters were rising, people are finally out of the house, and you opened up the floodgates. So we're seeing a really nice rebound that is complimented, not just by the building interest anyway, but the kind of renewed interest in facilitating a non-human interaction, which sounds horrible culturally, in their place of business or what have you. And again, it's not just touch. Yes, I think probably most people would rather take a little Purell. They're fine with that, but still some people are not, and maybe they can use their mobile phone or scan a QR code.  But it's also a labor issue. It's harder to hire people and if you can use self service, then you don't have to worry so much about staffing. Geoff Bessin: There's that whole other thing too which is the cost of staffing and training and enabling and equipping and there's that as well. So for sure, there is certainly a perceived increase in interest, and interactivity of any kind and Intuiface has always been focused on any kind of interactivity, not just touch, and certainly this ability to use my mobile phone to interact with content is an increasingly interesting example, using gestures to interact, using voice to interact. So I'm not touching but I'm still working with technology directly rather than mediating through somebody else. So all of that is going on.  Last question: you guys have certainly in the last few years had a presence at ISE and at other trade shows, what are you doing in the next few weeks and months? Is Intuiface going to be something that people can walk up and get demos for?  Geoff Bessin: We will be at ISE, so that'll be our first trade show in however many years we'll be there. So you and I are speaking on April 26th and that's why I say in just a couple of weeks, we will be there with a booth, and we certainly hope we'll see others there.  We used to actually have our user conference in parallel with ISE, in-person and the pandemic put the kibosh on that. We've done virtual user conferences every year since then, and we like that because you don't have to travel, and so our user conference will be forever more be virtual. We actually have our user conference in three weeks that people are welcome to join. It's free, it'll be online, but we plan to be at ISE. We plan to be a DSE in the US and I think it's now November, and we'll be participating when your colleagues at Avitas are running DSE in parallel and ISE will be participating in that as well. So we're starting. We're treating this as back to normal. It's interesting, Dave working on my travel plans, flying into Spain. But you can't just get on a plane, you need to jump through certain things because of COVID. But it looks as of today, they're not even requiring masks onsite. That doesn't seem to be a requirement. Just the honor system that you are vaccinated or recovered and we'll see how that goes, but we're excited to be there. We'll have a big booth and about eight of us, we'll have a lot of people there.  And where can people find Intuiface online?  Geoff Bessin: Dave, thank you for asking, Intuiface.com. They can also just contact us. You are listening to Jeff Besson. You can just email me bessin@intuiface.com. The product can be tried for free, Dave. No credit card required. People can poke at it and see if what we're saying is true.  All right, thank you. Geoff Bessin: Dave. It's a pleasure. Thanks for having me.

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com
The Man of God

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 28:04


Today on PowerPoint, Pastor Jack Graham begins a weeklong series of messages called Father Knows Best. In his message, The Man of God, he looks to Psalm 1 and teaches that a true man of God is separated from the world and satisfied with the Word. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/395/29

Net Cast
Confidence In The Lord - Psalm 4 (S6 - E5)

Net Cast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 25:35


Once we trust God in our lives and see His mighty hand work on our behalf, that initial trust turns into bold confidence. David is going to show us several areas where we can have confidence in the Lord. Have you visited the podcast store? This is going to provide you with a place to get Net Cast merch. At the same time, you will be supporting Net Cast with a portion of your purchase and securing an opportunity to talk about the faith that we share together on this podcast. Click the shop link to learn more at www.netcasthost.com/shop In season 6, titled Psalms of Life, I have a special offer that is connected with this series in the book of Psalms. If you partner with Net Cast during our 6th season, I want to send you the complete outline for the study, but I will also be including the supplemental PowerPoint slideshows to guide you in your study. If you want to become a partner or make a donation, you can send PayPal donations using netcasthost@gmail.com or visit Patreon.com/netcast to learn more about how you can get on board with this podcast. I have also added this podcast to www.buymeacoffee.com/netcasthost where you can send a small gift of any amount to help support the show. Thank you in advance! If you are not able to support this ministry effort financially at this time, would you please consider doing one of the following? First, please subscribe and continue to be a dedicated listener. Next, please share NetCast with your friends and family and encourage them to subscribe. Finally, consider leaving a review for the podcast so that your positive feedback could encourage others to listen. Take a few moments after we sign off to visit our website at netcasthost.com. Here you will find transcripts of the podcast on the blog, you can sign up for the free newsletter, become a member and join Net Cast for free, which will give you access to hidden portions of the podcast host site, like our member forum and so much more. Don't forget to check out our social media sites on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Be sure to like and follow the podcast as we use these sites to keep you current on what is happening at Net Cast. Every new episode is announced on these media outlets. Until next time, God bless you richly in Jesus Christ our Lord. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/netcast/message

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com

What will it take to effectively move the Church into the future? On today's PowerPoint, Pastor Jack Graham shares the need for believers to not only take the Word to the world, but also to drive deep the stakes of biblical conviction and personal godliness. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/395/29

The Greatest Discovery: New Star Trek Reviewed
Hair Technologies (SNW S1E1)

The Greatest Discovery: New Star Trek Reviewed

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 86:47


When Captain Pike gets called back from Montana to rescue Number One, the mission goes from undercover prison break to very persuasive Powerpoint presentation after Spock's loaf wears off. But as the Entrepreneur's new crew settles in for a season of space exploration, Pike sees visions of his future in every reflective panel on the ship. Is the Vulcan bra unnecessarily complex? Are shipwide comms the best part about being a Starfleet captain? Was Archer insulted by having a single-nacelle ship named after him? It's the episode with million-dollar grays!It's the MaxFunDrive, and we'd really appreciate if you'd click this link andSupport the production of The Greatest Discovery. Music by Adam RaguseaFollow The Greatest Discovery on Twitter, and discuss the show using the hashtag #GreatestDiscovery!The Greatest Generation is now regularly streaming on Twitch.Facebook group | Subreddit | Discord | WikiSign up for our mailing list!

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - MARK MACY - International Network for Instrumental Transcommunication

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 45:18


Mark Macy founded the International Network for Instrumental Transcommunication (INIT) in England in 1995, along with a dozen other researchers from eight countries. Their intent was to open a contact bridge between Heaven and Earth, or more precisely, between our world and the finer worlds of spirit, using technology as the medium. In the course of five years the group received dozens of phone calls and TV images from the other side. They enjoyed long dialogs with spirits and angels through radio devices and had files planted quietly on the hard disks of their computers. Some of those files contained images, others contained text - - actual pictures and letters depicting life in the spirit worlds in extraordinary detail. Macy himself received one particular phone call from a departed colleague named Konstantin Raudive that lasted nearly fifteen minutes. It's all part of a young field of research called ITC, or instrumental transcommunication. For the past five years Macy has focused most of his attention on a small subset of ITC in which he receives clear spirit faces on Polaroid film with the help of a subtle energy device called a "luminator." He has also kept busy spreading the word about ITC through books, interviews, Powerpoint presentations, TV specials, documentaries, and a massive ITC website, www.worlditc.org, mastered by his good friend and ITC colleague Rolf Ehrhardt of Ratingen, Germany. Macy was an agnostic or atheist as far back as he can remember - - a writer with a background in journalism and electronics. Thoughts of God and afterlife always seemed like wishful thinking to him. That changed in 1988 when he was diagnosed with colon cancer. With death staring him in the face, suddenly he had to know - - - what really happens to us after we die? He couldn't take it on faith alone. Not that there's anything wrong with faith, but Macy had always needed proof or solid evidence to convince him of something that was beyond his understanding. And afterlife was certainly beyond his understanding. At a conference in 1991 he was introduced to ITC research, and at first he could scarcely believe researchers in Europe who claimed to be in touch with spirits through technical devices. So after the conference ended he hopped on a transatlantic flight to visit with those researchers, and what he found changed his life forever. He's been fully immersed in ITC research ever since. Today he lives in Colorado with his wife Regina. The empty-nesters (their son entered college in 2005) fill their time with spiritual pursuits, including Mark's ITC research and Regina's energy healing. - http://www.spiritfaces.com/ To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com

The Presentation Podcast
Deposits, Terms, and $ (Take II)

The Presentation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 49:07


Episode #49 - This episode has a backstory. As projects continue to spin up with wonderful client requests, internally at TLC Creative Services, we have been revisiting our rate sheet, project timelines and project terms. The Presentation Podcast's focus on the business of presentation design is a great resource, that I found myself (Troy Chollar) using. This episode we revisit a conversation Sandy, Nolan and myself had back in 2017 were we discuss presentation project Deposits, Terms and Rates. Virtually every part of the conversation is relevant today, so much so that it is worth bringing back to the surface episode 28 and hopefully encouraging you to evaluate your project options and assuring things are advantageous for both sides of the project; the designer and recipient. Enjoy.   Full Episode Show Notes https://thepresentationpodcast.com/2022/e149   Show Suggestions? Questions for your Hosts? Email us at: info@thepresentationpodcast.com   Listen and review on iTunes. Thanks! http://apple.co/1ROGCUq   New Episodes 1st and 3rd Tuesday Every Month

Fearless Presentation
101 Public Speaking Tips - Part 3 of 4

Fearless Presentation

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 19:02


This is part 3 of a four-part series covering the 101 best public speaking tips. We are going to zoom through another 25 or so tips today.In this episode, I'm going to continue our series on 101 public speaking tips that you can use as a roadmap to improve your presentation skills. I have to go through them at lightning speed. though.So, if you want more information about any of these tips or you want to see all of them visually, just click the link in the show notes.Last week, I finished with tip #50 which was to add in at least one impact idea to add more content to the presentation outline we talked about earlier. The tips this week begin with three more ways to better organize your speech along with my best PowerPoint tips.To see all the show notes and for additional information and reading about any of the tips, visit 101 of the Best Public Speaking Tipshttps://www.fearlesspresentations.com/101-public-speaking-tips/

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com
Where Does God Live?

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 28:04


Today on PowerPoint, we kick off a new four-part series, Giving God Your Best. Pastor Jack Graham answers the question: Where Does God Live? Although we all know that God exists everywhere; His presence is everywhere. But we also must understand that God manifests His presence and communicates His presence in the praises of His people. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/395/29

CorConsult Rx: Evidence-Based Medicine and Pharmacy
Managing Allergic Rhinitis *ACPE-Accredited*

CorConsult Rx: Evidence-Based Medicine and Pharmacy

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 53:55


On this episode, we discuss the various treatment options available for managing allergic rhinitis.  Cole and I are happy to share that our listeners can claim ACPE-accredited continuing education for listening to this podcast episode! We continue to partner with freeCE to provide listeners with the opportunity to claim 1-hour of continuing education credit for select episodes. To earn credit for this episode, visit the following link and select this episode from the list of accredited episodes: FreeCE Podcast Episode List For existing freeCE members, this CE option is included in your membership benefits at no additional cost! Members can simply follow the link above to take the post-test and evaluation for this activity. Use the password POLLEN (all caps) to unlock the post-test for this episode. But if you're not currently a freeCE member, we definitely suggest you explore all the benefits of their Unlimited Membership on their website and earn CE for listening to this podcast. CorConsult Rx listeners can save 15% off the purchase of an unlimited membership by entering the discount code “PODCAST2022” at checkout, or by clicking the following link in the description https://hubs.ly/Q012N0H60 Thanks for listening! We want to give a big thanks to our main sponsor Pyrls. Try out their drug information app today. Visit the website below for a free trial: www.pyrls.com/corconsultrx If you want to support the podcast, check out our Patreon account. Subscribers will have access to all previous and new pharmacotherapy lectures as well as downloadable PowerPoint slides for each lecture. You can find our account at the website below:  www.patreon.com/corconsultrx If you have any questions for Cole or me, reach out to us on any of the following: Text - 415-943-6116 Mike - mcorvino@corconsultrx.com Cole - cswanson@corconsultrx.com Instagram and other social media platforms - @corconsultrx This podcast reviews current evidence-based medicine and pharmacy treatment options. This podcast is intended to be used for educational purposes only and is intended for healthcare professionals and students. This podcast is not for patients and not intended as advice or treatment.

CorConsult Rx: Evidence-Based Medicine and Pharmacy
Patient Case: Asthma and Cocaine use Disorder

CorConsult Rx: Evidence-Based Medicine and Pharmacy

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 43:42


On this episode, we are joined by 4th year pharmacy students Olivia Schad and Austin Dew. We discuss a patient case involving asthma and substance use disorder.  Thanks for listening! We want to give a big thanks to our main sponsor Pyrls. Try out their drug information app today. Visit the website below for a free trial: www.pyrls.com/corconsultrx If you want to support the podcast, check out our Patreon account. Subscribers will have access to all previous and new pharmacotherapy lectures as well as downloadable PowerPoint slides for each lecture. You can find our account at the website below:  www.patreon.com/corconsultrx If you have any questions for Cole or me, reach out to us on any of the following: Text - 415-943-6116 Mike - mcorvino@corconsultrx.com Cole - cswanson@corconsultrx.com Instagram and other social media platforms - @corconsultrx This podcast reviews current evidence-based medicine and pharmacy treatment options. This podcast is intended to be used for educational purposes only and is intended for healthcare professionals and students. This podcast is not for patients and not intended as advice or treatment.

The Tech Guy (MP3)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1889

The Tech Guy (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 146:45


Discussing content moderation on Twitter. A Blockbuster documentary recommendation. Troubleshooting legacy email connections. Changing the default search engine for Windows. Troubleshooting and disabling WiFi Protected Setup. Upgrading to wired ethernet in every room. Finding a way to video chat with pets while you're away from home. Understanding ad tech. Syncing a local Outlook account with Outlook online. Plus, conversations with Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick Debartolo. You Can Now Ask Google to Remove Your Phone Number, Email or Address from Search Results – Krebs on Security Remove your personal information from Google - Google Search Help Spokeo - People Search | White Pages | Reverse Phone Lookup Why Netflix Is the Worst Performing Stock in the S&P 500 - The New York Times FY22 Q3 - Press Releases - Investor Relations - Microsoft https://abc.xyz/investor/static/pdf/2022Q1_alphabet_earnings_release.pdf Meta Earnings: Facebook Parent's Profit Drops 21% - The New York Times Spotify — Spotify Technology S.A. Announces Financial Results for First Quarter 2022 The Shadow Crew Who Encouraged Elon Musk's Twitter Takeover - WSJ Framework | The Framework Laptop is now in stock! Thanks for Joining Us at the 2022 NAB Show - 2022 NAB Show ATSC 3.0 - Wikipedia CNET: Free 4K from an antenna - These 2021 TVs from Samsung, Sony and LG can get it - ATSC : NextGen TV $200 NextGen TV Tuner Now Available on Amazon | TV Tech Features - ZapperBox The Last Blockbuster (2020) - IMDb Prodigy.net - Is Prodigy Down Right Now? Configure Gmail to Pull Mail from prodigy.net | Red Stamp Mail Windows 11: How to set Google as your default search engine instead of Bing - CNET The Internet's Most Unique Clock Uses Google Earth - JohnnyJet.com Earth Clock This man is trolling his airline with PowerPoint presentations to find his missing bag. | CNN Travel SCOTTeVEST: It's not Rocket Science. It's Pocket Science! theoriginalmusclebeach.com Furbo Dog Camera | Treat Tossing Pet Camera with Barking Alerts Alexa's most underrated feature: Why you should 'drop in' on Amazon Echo more often - CNET Interactive Pet Camera • Best Dog Camera 2020 • PetChatz® High-Speed, Secure & Anonymous VPN Service | ExpressVPN NextDNS - The new firewall for the modern Internet uBlock Origin - Free, open-source ad content blocker. Insects Like Your Skin? Here's A Way To Take The "Bite Away" | Giz Wiz Biz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1889 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy Sponsor: wealthfront.com/techguy

The Tech Guy (Video HI)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1889

The Tech Guy (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 147:27


Discussing content moderation on Twitter. A Blockbuster documentary recommendation. Troubleshooting legacy email connections. Changing the default search engine for Windows. Troubleshooting and disabling WiFi Protected Setup. Upgrading to wired ethernet in every room. Finding a way to video chat with pets while you're away from home. Understanding ad tech. Syncing a local Outlook account with Outlook online. Plus, conversations with Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick Debartolo. You Can Now Ask Google to Remove Your Phone Number, Email or Address from Search Results – Krebs on Security Remove your personal information from Google - Google Search Help Spokeo - People Search | White Pages | Reverse Phone Lookup Why Netflix Is the Worst Performing Stock in the S&P 500 - The New York Times FY22 Q3 - Press Releases - Investor Relations - Microsoft https://abc.xyz/investor/static/pdf/2022Q1_alphabet_earnings_release.pdf Meta Earnings: Facebook Parent's Profit Drops 21% - The New York Times Spotify — Spotify Technology S.A. Announces Financial Results for First Quarter 2022 The Shadow Crew Who Encouraged Elon Musk's Twitter Takeover - WSJ Framework | The Framework Laptop is now in stock! Thanks for Joining Us at the 2022 NAB Show - 2022 NAB Show ATSC 3.0 - Wikipedia CNET: Free 4K from an antenna - These 2021 TVs from Samsung, Sony and LG can get it - ATSC : NextGen TV $200 NextGen TV Tuner Now Available on Amazon | TV Tech Features - ZapperBox The Last Blockbuster (2020) - IMDb Prodigy.net - Is Prodigy Down Right Now? Configure Gmail to Pull Mail from prodigy.net | Red Stamp Mail Windows 11: How to set Google as your default search engine instead of Bing - CNET The Internet's Most Unique Clock Uses Google Earth - JohnnyJet.com Earth Clock This man is trolling his airline with PowerPoint presentations to find his missing bag. | CNN Travel SCOTTeVEST: It's not Rocket Science. It's Pocket Science! theoriginalmusclebeach.com Furbo Dog Camera | Treat Tossing Pet Camera with Barking Alerts Alexa's most underrated feature: Why you should 'drop in' on Amazon Echo more often - CNET Interactive Pet Camera • Best Dog Camera 2020 • PetChatz® High-Speed, Secure & Anonymous VPN Service | ExpressVPN NextDNS - The new firewall for the modern Internet uBlock Origin - Free, open-source ad content blocker. Insects Like Your Skin? Here's A Way To Take The "Bite Away" | Giz Wiz Biz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1889 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy Sponsor: wealthfront.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
The Tech Guy 1889

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 147:27


Discussing content moderation on Twitter. A Blockbuster documentary recommendation. Troubleshooting legacy email connections. Changing the default search engine for Windows. Troubleshooting and disabling WiFi Protected Setup. Upgrading to wired ethernet in every room. Finding a way to video chat with pets while you're away from home. Understanding ad tech. Syncing a local Outlook account with Outlook online. Plus, conversations with Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick Debartolo. You Can Now Ask Google to Remove Your Phone Number, Email or Address from Search Results – Krebs on Security Remove your personal information from Google - Google Search Help Spokeo - People Search | White Pages | Reverse Phone Lookup Why Netflix Is the Worst Performing Stock in the S&P 500 - The New York Times FY22 Q3 - Press Releases - Investor Relations - Microsoft https://abc.xyz/investor/static/pdf/2022Q1_alphabet_earnings_release.pdf Meta Earnings: Facebook Parent's Profit Drops 21% - The New York Times Spotify — Spotify Technology S.A. Announces Financial Results for First Quarter 2022 The Shadow Crew Who Encouraged Elon Musk's Twitter Takeover - WSJ Framework | The Framework Laptop is now in stock! Thanks for Joining Us at the 2022 NAB Show - 2022 NAB Show ATSC 3.0 - Wikipedia CNET: Free 4K from an antenna - These 2021 TVs from Samsung, Sony and LG can get it - ATSC : NextGen TV $200 NextGen TV Tuner Now Available on Amazon | TV Tech Features - ZapperBox The Last Blockbuster (2020) - IMDb Prodigy.net - Is Prodigy Down Right Now? Configure Gmail to Pull Mail from prodigy.net | Red Stamp Mail Windows 11: How to set Google as your default search engine instead of Bing - CNET The Internet's Most Unique Clock Uses Google Earth - JohnnyJet.com Earth Clock This man is trolling his airline with PowerPoint presentations to find his missing bag. | CNN Travel SCOTTeVEST: It's not Rocket Science. It's Pocket Science! theoriginalmusclebeach.com Furbo Dog Camera | Treat Tossing Pet Camera with Barking Alerts Alexa's most underrated feature: Why you should 'drop in' on Amazon Echo more often - CNET Interactive Pet Camera • Best Dog Camera 2020 • PetChatz® High-Speed, Secure & Anonymous VPN Service | ExpressVPN NextDNS - The new firewall for the modern Internet uBlock Origin - Free, open-source ad content blocker. Insects Like Your Skin? Here's A Way To Take The "Bite Away" | Giz Wiz Biz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1889 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/all-twittv-shows Sponsor: wealthfront.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
The Tech Guy 1889

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 146:45


Discussing content moderation on Twitter. A Blockbuster documentary recommendation. Troubleshooting legacy email connections. Changing the default search engine for Windows. Troubleshooting and disabling WiFi Protected Setup. Upgrading to wired ethernet in every room. Finding a way to video chat with pets while you're away from home. Understanding ad tech. Syncing a local Outlook account with Outlook online. Plus, conversations with Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick Debartolo. You Can Now Ask Google to Remove Your Phone Number, Email or Address from Search Results – Krebs on Security Remove your personal information from Google - Google Search Help Spokeo - People Search | White Pages | Reverse Phone Lookup Why Netflix Is the Worst Performing Stock in the S&P 500 - The New York Times FY22 Q3 - Press Releases - Investor Relations - Microsoft https://abc.xyz/investor/static/pdf/2022Q1_alphabet_earnings_release.pdf Meta Earnings: Facebook Parent's Profit Drops 21% - The New York Times Spotify — Spotify Technology S.A. Announces Financial Results for First Quarter 2022 The Shadow Crew Who Encouraged Elon Musk's Twitter Takeover - WSJ Framework | The Framework Laptop is now in stock! Thanks for Joining Us at the 2022 NAB Show - 2022 NAB Show ATSC 3.0 - Wikipedia CNET: Free 4K from an antenna - These 2021 TVs from Samsung, Sony and LG can get it - ATSC : NextGen TV $200 NextGen TV Tuner Now Available on Amazon | TV Tech Features - ZapperBox The Last Blockbuster (2020) - IMDb Prodigy.net - Is Prodigy Down Right Now? Configure Gmail to Pull Mail from prodigy.net | Red Stamp Mail Windows 11: How to set Google as your default search engine instead of Bing - CNET The Internet's Most Unique Clock Uses Google Earth - JohnnyJet.com Earth Clock This man is trolling his airline with PowerPoint presentations to find his missing bag. | CNN Travel SCOTTeVEST: It's not Rocket Science. It's Pocket Science! theoriginalmusclebeach.com Furbo Dog Camera | Treat Tossing Pet Camera with Barking Alerts Alexa's most underrated feature: Why you should 'drop in' on Amazon Echo more often - CNET Interactive Pet Camera • Best Dog Camera 2020 • PetChatz® High-Speed, Secure & Anonymous VPN Service | ExpressVPN NextDNS - The new firewall for the modern Internet uBlock Origin - Free, open-source ad content blocker. Insects Like Your Skin? Here's A Way To Take The "Bite Away" | Giz Wiz Biz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1889 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/all-twittv-shows Sponsor: wealthfront.com/techguy

Radio Leo (Audio)
The Tech Guy 1889

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 146:45


Discussing content moderation on Twitter. A Blockbuster documentary recommendation. Troubleshooting legacy email connections. Changing the default search engine for Windows. Troubleshooting and disabling WiFi Protected Setup. Upgrading to wired ethernet in every room. Finding a way to video chat with pets while you're away from home. Understanding ad tech. Syncing a local Outlook account with Outlook online. Plus, conversations with Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick Debartolo. You Can Now Ask Google to Remove Your Phone Number, Email or Address from Search Results – Krebs on Security Remove your personal information from Google - Google Search Help Spokeo - People Search | White Pages | Reverse Phone Lookup Why Netflix Is the Worst Performing Stock in the S&P 500 - The New York Times FY22 Q3 - Press Releases - Investor Relations - Microsoft https://abc.xyz/investor/static/pdf/2022Q1_alphabet_earnings_release.pdf Meta Earnings: Facebook Parent's Profit Drops 21% - The New York Times Spotify — Spotify Technology S.A. Announces Financial Results for First Quarter 2022 The Shadow Crew Who Encouraged Elon Musk's Twitter Takeover - WSJ Framework | The Framework Laptop is now in stock! Thanks for Joining Us at the 2022 NAB Show - 2022 NAB Show ATSC 3.0 - Wikipedia CNET: Free 4K from an antenna - These 2021 TVs from Samsung, Sony and LG can get it - ATSC : NextGen TV $200 NextGen TV Tuner Now Available on Amazon | TV Tech Features - ZapperBox The Last Blockbuster (2020) - IMDb Prodigy.net - Is Prodigy Down Right Now? Configure Gmail to Pull Mail from prodigy.net | Red Stamp Mail Windows 11: How to set Google as your default search engine instead of Bing - CNET The Internet's Most Unique Clock Uses Google Earth - JohnnyJet.com Earth Clock This man is trolling his airline with PowerPoint presentations to find his missing bag. | CNN Travel SCOTTeVEST: It's not Rocket Science. It's Pocket Science! theoriginalmusclebeach.com Furbo Dog Camera | Treat Tossing Pet Camera with Barking Alerts Alexa's most underrated feature: Why you should 'drop in' on Amazon Echo more often - CNET Interactive Pet Camera • Best Dog Camera 2020 • PetChatz® High-Speed, Secure & Anonymous VPN Service | ExpressVPN NextDNS - The new firewall for the modern Internet uBlock Origin - Free, open-source ad content blocker. Insects Like Your Skin? Here's A Way To Take The "Bite Away" | Giz Wiz Biz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1889 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/radio-leo Sponsor: wealthfront.com/techguy

Radio Leo (Video HD)
The Tech Guy 1889

Radio Leo (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 147:27


Discussing content moderation on Twitter. A Blockbuster documentary recommendation. Troubleshooting legacy email connections. Changing the default search engine for Windows. Troubleshooting and disabling WiFi Protected Setup. Upgrading to wired ethernet in every room. Finding a way to video chat with pets while you're away from home. Understanding ad tech. Syncing a local Outlook account with Outlook online. Plus, conversations with Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick Debartolo. You Can Now Ask Google to Remove Your Phone Number, Email or Address from Search Results – Krebs on Security Remove your personal information from Google - Google Search Help Spokeo - People Search | White Pages | Reverse Phone Lookup Why Netflix Is the Worst Performing Stock in the S&P 500 - The New York Times FY22 Q3 - Press Releases - Investor Relations - Microsoft https://abc.xyz/investor/static/pdf/2022Q1_alphabet_earnings_release.pdf Meta Earnings: Facebook Parent's Profit Drops 21% - The New York Times Spotify — Spotify Technology S.A. Announces Financial Results for First Quarter 2022 The Shadow Crew Who Encouraged Elon Musk's Twitter Takeover - WSJ Framework | The Framework Laptop is now in stock! Thanks for Joining Us at the 2022 NAB Show - 2022 NAB Show ATSC 3.0 - Wikipedia CNET: Free 4K from an antenna - These 2021 TVs from Samsung, Sony and LG can get it - ATSC : NextGen TV $200 NextGen TV Tuner Now Available on Amazon | TV Tech Features - ZapperBox The Last Blockbuster (2020) - IMDb Prodigy.net - Is Prodigy Down Right Now? Configure Gmail to Pull Mail from prodigy.net | Red Stamp Mail Windows 11: How to set Google as your default search engine instead of Bing - CNET The Internet's Most Unique Clock Uses Google Earth - JohnnyJet.com Earth Clock This man is trolling his airline with PowerPoint presentations to find his missing bag. | CNN Travel SCOTTeVEST: It's not Rocket Science. It's Pocket Science! theoriginalmusclebeach.com Furbo Dog Camera | Treat Tossing Pet Camera with Barking Alerts Alexa's most underrated feature: Why you should 'drop in' on Amazon Echo more often - CNET Interactive Pet Camera • Best Dog Camera 2020 • PetChatz® High-Speed, Secure & Anonymous VPN Service | ExpressVPN NextDNS - The new firewall for the modern Internet uBlock Origin - Free, open-source ad content blocker. Insects Like Your Skin? Here's A Way To Take The "Bite Away" | Giz Wiz Biz Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson, Johnny Jet, and Dick DeBartolo Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1889 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/radio-leo Sponsor: wealthfront.com/techguy

The Book Review
Jennifer Egan Talks About 'The Candy House'

The Book Review

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 40:44


Jennifer Egan's new novel, “The Candy House,” is a follow-up to her Pulitzer Prize-winning “A Visit From the Goon Squad.” A few characters appear in both books, but the novels are also united by Egan's structural approach — an inventive one that, in “Goon Squad,” included a chapter written as a PowerPoint presentation, and in “The Candy House,” a chapter written as a long series of terse directives to a spy.On this week's podcast, Egan talks about the new book, and about why she enjoys experimenting with form.“To my mind, the novel was invented to be a hungry, greedy form that could pull into itself all other kinds of discourse,” Egan says. “So in the earliest novels: graphic images, letters, legal documents. As a fiction writer, one of the fun things about working with the novel is that anything is up for grabs. If I can bend it to fiction, I will, and I'm looking around me for those opportunities all the time. It's not easy to do it, because the danger is that you just look like you're using gimmickry. And what I find is that the only time any kind of radical structural form works is if I can find a story that can only be told that way. It involves a lot of waiting, and a lot of trial and error.”Also on this week's episode, Alexandra Alter discusses the work of the Russian novelist Vladimir Sorokin; and Alexandra Jacobs and Molly Young talk about books they've recently reviewed. John Williams is the host.Here are the books discussed by The Times's critics this week:“The Palace Papers” by Tina Brown“Liarmouth” by John WatersWe would love to hear your thoughts about this episode, and about the Book Review's podcast in general. You can send them to books@nytimes.com.

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com
Ultimate Success

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 28:04


Today on PowerPoint, Pastor Jack Graham brings a message relevant to us all titled Ultimate Success. Pastor Graham challenges us to live at the judgment seat of Christ. It's not the duration of our life that matters, he teaches, it's the donation of our life that matters. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/395/29

SEO Podcast | SEO.co Search Engine Optimization Podcast
#709: How to Build a Kickass Content Strategy for SEO Episode 5

SEO Podcast | SEO.co Search Engine Optimization Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 14:08


Google and Facebook each have their own advantages and disadvantages, so it's up to you and the nature of your content to decide which is best. With that said, brands can pay to boost their content's reach to their fans, and it's relatively inexpensive as far as paid ads go. You can create a series that keeps some concept, idea, or format consistent across multiple posts. Each new post adds value to the ones that came before it and all the posts that will come after it. Revisiting an older piece with a new analysis is a great way to hearken back to your older material. Creating your content (perhaps with a content writing service for SEO) in a new medium allows you to target new audiences. Transforming volumes of data into a single, digestible image demands significant imagination and work. If you have a video interview, for example, consider offering it as an MP3 file on your website. While you're using PowerPoint, create a webinar. After you've created a slide deck, post it to Slideshare for further reach. You can also convert Word documents to PDF files natively. Anthologizing is the process of bringing together multiple posts to form a single unit. There are two main options for doing this: eBook creation, or "Greatest Hits" style anthologies. For example, let's say you've written a series of blog posts about the sales cycle. There are so many options for content promotion and support that it's virtually impossible to use all of them to support your strategy. Instead, try to specialize in a handful that seems to have the greatest impact on your brand. S.E.O resellers also provide white-label reseller support for online marketing campaigns and outreach. More info about how to build a kickass content strategy for SEO:    https://seo.co/content-marketing/content-strategy/   Connect with us:  SEO // PPC // DEV // WEBSITE DESIGN

Embark
Coach (Barbara) Roche: Step Out of Your Comfort Zone

Embark

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 29:06


Barbara Roche, or 'Coach Roche' develops leaders, inspires confidence and gets people talking. She also adds a booty-shaking dance routine or fun movement break into almost every program she develops.Join us for this smart and savvy conversation about how to see yourself better so you can raise yourself up and forward.About Barbara RocheHer mission is to help more women advance to the C-Suite. And to eradicate death by PowerPoint!She's  a player-coach. When Barbara is not speaking, she's  coaching presenters, leaders and aspiring keynoters. She's coached CEOs, pitch teams, job candidates, and TEDx speakers.A native Bostonian, Barbara is a proud member of Red Sox Nation. She  lives a secret life as a fitness instructor."Time to stop playing small. Step up, speak up, stand out."

InDesign Secrets
InDesignSecrets Podcast 297

InDesign Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 33:35


In this episode… News Adobe InDesign 17.2.1 update patch released CreativePro Week May 9-13, live in DC and online CreativePro Events: https://creativepro.com/events CreativePro Magazine: https://creativepro.com/issues/ CI-HUB Prize Raffle: https://ci-hub.com/creativepro/   Deadline is May 2 2022! Details on that page Field Guide to Non-Printing Highlights (there are more than you think!) Obscure InDesign Feature: Float in Window  Sponsors for this episode: >> Microsoft and Adobe! Both of these fine companies are CreativePro partners and will be represented at CreativePro Week 2022. Adobe is flying in a group of Adobe CC engineers from India, and MS Office product manager Stephanie Horn is doing a session on using video in Powerpoint.  Links mentioned in this podcast: You can use CC Libraries in Word and PowerPoint: https://creativepro.com/using-cc-libraries-in-word-and-powerpoint/ Cool tip: "How to Make an Object Style That Resizes Objects from the Center (or Any Other Reference Point) in InDesign" https://creativepro.com/how-to-make-an-object-style-that-resizes-objects-from-the-center-or-any-other-reference-point-in-indesign/ What's new in 17.2.1: https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/kb/fixed-issues.html Andreas Michalski from CI-HUB, our guest from the last podcast episode Company site https://ci-hub.com Enter their raffle here: https://ci-hub.com/creativepro/) for free tickets to CreativePro Week and free subscriptions to CI-HUB! Deadline for entries is May 2, and they'll contact the winners on May 3, 2022 Composition Highlights: https://creativepro.com/field-guide-to-composition-highlighting/ https://creativepro.com/why-is-my-indesign-text-highlighted-in-blue/ What Anne-Marie taught David in this episode (how to quickly jump to the active InDesign document's location on your hard drive):https://creativepro.com/indesign-how-to-video-find-file-size-location/ 3 Minutes Max tips: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=580PSVBohDI&list=PLFof_0NMmT7Uwyy6bc1Uo5OlfBUEtU2Li

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com
Heavenly Bodies

PowerPoint on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 28:04


On today's PowerPoint, Pastor Jack Graham takes a special look at heaven and the resurrected body. Heaven is a real, tangible place, Pastor Graham teaches. As Christ followers, we will live in a perfect place with a perfect Savior and a perfected state of life. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/395/29

MacBreak Weekly (Video HI)
MBW 815: Now With Less Potato - Studio Display Fix, Apple Union Fight, macOS Server

MacBreak Weekly (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 129:36


Studio Display Fix, Apple Union Fight, macOS Server  Apple releases fix for Studio Display.  Twitter accepts buyout, giving Elon Musk total control of the company.  Twitter's legal team has been an aggressive defender of free speech; Will that continue under Musk?  Apple warns developers it will pull apps without recent updates from the App Store.  Apple protests Japan's report seeking fair competition in OS market.  Apple hires anti-union lawyers in escalating union fight.  M1 Thunderbolt ports don't fully support USB 3.1 Gen 2.  Apple announces service program for Apple Watch Series 6 'blank screen issue'.  Google Pixel Watch: Exclusive leaked images seem to show Google's first smartwatch.  Apple's Thunderbolt 4 Pro Cable teardown shows why the accessory is expensive.  Apple pulls the plug on dated $20 macOS Server app.  Gurman: Apple Watch could feature satellite connectivity in a future model.  Gurman: iMac with M3 chip already in the works, could be released later next year.  Man uses AirTags and PowerPoint presentation to ask airline for his lost bags.  Apple's latest Shot on iPhone 13 Pro short film spotlights food culture in Singapore. Picks of the Week:  Andy's Pick: Postman  Alex's Pick: Maxon Cinema 4D  Rene's Pick: MotionVFX: mKBHD Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Guest: Mikah Sargent Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: eightsleep.com/macbreak wealthfront.com/macbreak itpro.tv/macbreak promo code MACBREAK30

MacBreak Weekly (MP3)
MBW 815: Now With Less Potato - Studio Display Fix, Apple Union Fight, macOS Server

MacBreak Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 129:00


Studio Display Fix, Apple Union Fight, macOS Server  Apple releases fix for Studio Display.  Twitter accepts buyout, giving Elon Musk total control of the company.  Twitter's legal team has been an aggressive defender of free speech; Will that continue under Musk?  Apple warns developers it will pull apps without recent updates from the App Store.  Apple protests Japan's report seeking fair competition in OS market.  Apple hires anti-union lawyers in escalating union fight.  M1 Thunderbolt ports don't fully support USB 3.1 Gen 2.  Apple announces service program for Apple Watch Series 6 'blank screen issue'.  Google Pixel Watch: Exclusive leaked images seem to show Google's first smartwatch.  Apple's Thunderbolt 4 Pro Cable teardown shows why the accessory is expensive.  Apple pulls the plug on dated $20 macOS Server app.  Gurman: Apple Watch could feature satellite connectivity in a future model.  Gurman: iMac with M3 chip already in the works, could be released later next year.  Man uses AirTags and PowerPoint presentation to ask airline for his lost bags.  Apple's latest Shot on iPhone 13 Pro short film spotlights food culture in Singapore. Picks of the Week:  Andy's Pick: Postman  Alex's Pick: Maxon Cinema 4D  Rene's Pick: MotionVFX: mKBHD Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Guest: Mikah Sargent Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: eightsleep.com/macbreak wealthfront.com/macbreak itpro.tv/macbreak promo code MACBREAK30

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
MacBreak Weekly 815: Now With Less Potato

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 129:36


Studio Display Fix, Apple Union Fight, macOS Server  Apple releases fix for Studio Display.  Twitter accepts buyout, giving Elon Musk total control of the company.  Twitter's legal team has been an aggressive defender of free speech; Will that continue under Musk?  Apple warns developers it will pull apps without recent updates from the App Store.  Apple protests Japan's report seeking fair competition in OS market.  Apple hires anti-union lawyers in escalating union fight.  M1 Thunderbolt ports don't fully support USB 3.1 Gen 2.  Apple announces service program for Apple Watch Series 6 'blank screen issue'.  Google Pixel Watch: Exclusive leaked images seem to show Google's first smartwatch.  Apple's Thunderbolt 4 Pro Cable teardown shows why the accessory is expensive.  Apple pulls the plug on dated $20 macOS Server app.  Gurman: Apple Watch could feature satellite connectivity in a future model.  Gurman: iMac with M3 chip already in the works, could be released later next year.  Man uses AirTags and PowerPoint presentation to ask airline for his lost bags.  Apple's latest Shot on iPhone 13 Pro short film spotlights food culture in Singapore. Picks of the Week:  Andy's Pick: Postman  Alex's Pick: Maxon Cinema 4D  Rene's Pick: MotionVFX: mKBHD Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Guest: Mikah Sargent Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: eightsleep.com/macbreak wealthfront.com/macbreak itpro.tv/macbreak promo code MACBREAK30