Podcasts about Gatorade

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Manufacturer of sports-themed beverage and food products

  • 1,473PODCASTS
  • 2,079EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 11, 2022LATEST
Gatorade

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Best podcasts about Gatorade

Latest podcast episodes about Gatorade

The Produce Moms Podcast
EP218: Make Healthy Boundaries And Wellbeing A Non-Negotiable With Dr. Christopher Mohr, PhD M.D., Nutrition Spokesperson, Sports Nutritionist And Owner Of Mohr Results

The Produce Moms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 34:56


“Sometimes we think, ‘I'm not sleeping, I'm not exercising, I need to eat healthier, I'm stressed', and then we're just even more overwhelmed. Overwhelm does nothing for us.”   Dr. Christopher Mohr (24:07-24:17) Dr. Christopher Mohr, PhD R.D., is one of the world's leading nutrition and mindset experts and he's got a lot to say when it comes to “Minding your Melon”. He's consulted for clients like Under Armour, Reebok, Clif Bar, Gatorade, and was the consulting Sports Nutritionist for the Cincinnati Bengals. He's even spoken at the White House and to the CIA thanks to his incredible expertise!   Dr. Mohr is no stranger to mental health. Sure, you can practice all the “wellbeing” steps in the world, but if you aren't handling stress properly, you won't reap the benefits of all your “wellbeing” hard work. One thing Dr. Mohr is concerned about in regards to stress is our children. Not only have they grown up in an era of constantly being connected digitally, they've experienced a large amount of radical changes in a short period of time with the pandemic and virtual schooling, causing a heightened sensitivity.    Even as adults, we're always connected to a device and lack the quiet time we need to refresh, relax and reenergize. If you're mentally stressed out, it's going to impact all other areas of your life and can turn into a vicious cycle of burnout. As we know, stress can turn into not being able to sleep well and get the rest you need, eating foods that aren't healthy for you, which turns into weight gain, which can cause self-esteem issues, and then the cycle just continues.    “If we're not making sleep a priority (in quality and quantity), that can play a big role in overall stress and mental health struggles.” Dr. Christopher Mohr (11:15-11:26)   Whether we like it or not, stress is unavoidable. There's constantly different shoes we have to fill, hats we have to wear, and uncontrollable variables being thrown at us (like a pandemic) that we have to deal with. Now, we're living in an era where it's common to work from home or have a hybrid work situation, on top of always being connected through a device, there's never enough time to shut down, disconnect and decompress from the day.    Did you know 60% of people say their stress level is at an all-time high, and many of those people were claiming to be at the level of burnout?   This is why boundaries are important, which can be difficult if you're in a field like farming, for example, where your job truly is 24/7. Farmers' boundary issues with work go beyond receiving an email at 11 p.m. and choosing to answer or ignore it. Farmers have to deal with their profit growing in the ground almost all year round, while fighting unforeseen variables Mother Nature throws at them. Plus, there's labor issues, diseases, and so many other things out of a farmer's control. Dr. Mohr likens farmers to first responders – they're both always working and if they don't work, we don't eat!    For farmers and anyone else dealing with stress, Dr. Mohr suggests making a list of controllable stressors and uncontrollable stressors. There are always going to be things we deal with that are out of our control, but what is in our control is how we respond to those stressors. When it comes to your health, you do have control over what you put in your body, how and when you move it, and taking baby steps in the right direction.    “Worrying about things that we have no control over does nothing more than increase our stress and worry when we can't do anything about it anyway.” Dr. Christopher Mohr (20:33-20:42)   It's important to identify the pieces in your life you can control and the things you can't, so you can then decide how to respond to them. Knowing the harmony that's created between taking care of your sleep, diet and exercise habits in conjunction to mental stress, take just one baby step in the right direction with any area you're struggling with. That might mean you commit to eating one piece of fruit a day, or making it a non-negotiable that you're in bed by 9 p.m. (with your phone off!) every night.    Also, don't hesitate to talk to someone like a licensed therapist or counselor about your stress. There are plenty of professionals who will understand your unique situation and can help you discover improvements you can make to better your mental health. Boundaries, non-negotiables and understanding what you can and can't control are all great takeaways to “Mind your Melon” and take care of your mental health! For more great tips, advice, coaching and beyond, find Dr. Mohr's website at www.mohrresults.com.    How to get involved Join The Produce Moms Group on Facebook and continue the discussion every week!  Reach out to us - we'd love to hear more about where you are in life and business! Find out more here.    If you liked this episode, be sure to subscribe and leave a quick review on iTunes. It would mean the world to hear your feedback and we'd love for you to help us spread the word!  

Ken Webster Jr
WJ_ 7 AM_MERCURY IS IN GATORADE OR WHATEVER THAT MEANS

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 38:14


New Money Gang
Cheech & Chong, Gatorade and Italian Soccer hits the METAVERSE (Mainstream News 5.9.22)

New Money Gang

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 3:38


Good Morning Metaverse is all about mainstream news happening within Web 3.0. This week Justin and Morgan sit down and go over the following news stories… - Cheech and Chong light up the Metaverse - Gatorade wants to keep your NFT hydrated - The first LIVE soccer match broadcast in the Metaverse

Coaching Call
S3 Ep # 11 Eric D'Agati: coach, trainer and instructor

Coaching Call

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 62:04


My guest today is Eric D'Agati, Eric has spent the past 20+ years in the fitness industry as a coach, trainer, and instructor, pioneering his unique approach to training, client assessment, performance enhancement and injury prevention. I loved my conversation with Eric, his knowledge of fitness and health is top-notch. Each year, Eric travels around the world teaching and speaking to trainers, coaches and therapists as a lead instructor for Functional Movement Systems and guest speaker for such prestigious organizations as Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York University Medical, the Navy SEALS, US Army, NJAHPERD, NJSIAA, Nike and SPARQ Camps, Frank Glazier Clinics, The Mayo Clinic and multiple major universities. Eric also appeared in the NY Times bestseller “The 4-Hour Body” by Tim Ferriss. His list of training clients includes individuals who have been an Olympic Gold Medalist, Gatorade and NJ Players of the Year, All-Americans, National Champions, World Series Champions and Pro-Bowl athletes. He also works with many high-level County, State, National and World Champion sports teams, including being the Strength and Conditioning Coordinator for the 2004 NPF National Champion NY/NJ Juggernaut Women's Professional Softball, and a training consultant to the NY Islanders, Detroit Lions, Washington Redskins, Miami Dolphins, and NY Football Giants. Eric also serves on the Advisory Board for On Base University, The Baseball Health Network and the Raritan Valley College Exercise Science Department. His latest projects include “Diamond Revolution Training” an online training platform for baseball and softball athletes, as well as the “Principles of Program Design”, an educational workshop series and coaching service for trainers and clinicians on the art and science of designing training programs. Contact Eric: https://ericdagati.com/ If you enjoy the podcast, please subscribe and leave a short review on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen? It takes less than 60 seconds and it really helps. If you enjoyed this episode buy me a cup of coffee, make it a large: I'm trying to keep this episode free of advertisements and could use your help with the cost of bringing your this fun and entertaining podcast. Anything you can donate to the cause is greatly appreciated. To donate go to: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/sifuRafael Subscribe: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coaching-call/id1546026323 Please leave a star rating and a review here Follow Coaching Call: Facebook: facebook.com/coachingcall Instagram: instagram.com/coachingcall Email: maxfitness@optonline.net LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/maxfitness Youtube: https://bit.ly/coachingcallYoutube to watch the full interview. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coachingcall/message

The Security Token Show
Exchange Tokens Could Be Stocks - Security Token Show: Episode 139

The Security Token Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 27:54


#SecurityTokens #ExchangeTokens #SecurityTokenSummit   Tune in to this episode of the Security Token Show where Kyle and Herwig get into how exchange tokens could be stocks!   Herwig's Company Of The Week: The Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp: https://jingculturecommerce.com/royal-museum-of-fine-arts-antwerp-kmska-art-security-tokens-ast/   Kyle's Company Of The Week: Elan Béarnais: https://www.crowdfundinsider.com/2022/05/190568-french-basketball-team-elan-bearnais-pursues-security-token-offering-using-avalanche-securitize/    = Stay in touch via our Social Media = Kyle: https://twitter.com/kylesonlin  Herwig: https://www.linkedin.com/in/herwigkonings/ Opinion articles, interviews, and more: https://medium.com/security-token-group Find the video edition of this episode on our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTKdeN3ElyPeqtROWUp0CmQ   All articles that were discussed were sourced from https://STOmarket.com/news    Check out our medium blog for more news!   #STSTOP5 Articles of the Week Oddity: https://www.thestreet.com/crypto/ethereum/https-roundtablecrypto-io-news-oddity-unveils-ipo-linked-digital-security-token-on-ethereum Elan Béarnais: https://www.crowdfundinsider.com/2022/05/190568-french-basketball-team-elan-bearnais-pursues-security-token-offering-using-avalanche-securitize/ Art STO: https://thetokenizer.io/2022/04/28/hogan-lovells-advises-on-the-first-art-security-token-offering-by-a-european-museum/ SEC: https://www.hklaw.com/en/insights/publications/2022/05/sec-adds-resources-to-division-of-enforcements-crypto-assets Yoshi Markets: https://xtz.news/digital-securities-news/yoshi-markets-and-tezos-gulf-partner-to-develop-a-solution-for-tokenized-assets-using-tezos/   Industry Updates   Idaho Digital Asset Act: https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/idaho-s-digital-asset-act-excludes-9689976/   California Governor Crypto Exec Order: https://www.cnbc.com/2022/05/04/california-governor-signs-executive-order-on-cryptocurrencies.html   US Securities Regulator Pauses more Digital Currency Firms: https://coingeek.com/us-securities-regulator-adds-more-digital-currency-firms-to-pause-list/   BNY Mellon CEO: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/bny-mellon-names-roman-regelman-ceo-of-securities-services-and-digital-301532008.html   Goldman Sachs: https://www.coindesk.com/business/2022/04/28/goldman-sachs-makes-its-first-bitcoin-backed-loan-report/   STO Updates & New STOs   HCS Pharma: https://www.crowdfundinsider.com/2022/04/190413-hcs-pharma-pursues-security-token-offering-on-edsx-a-digital-securities-exchange/   Oddity: https://www.thestreet.com/crypto/ethereum/https-roundtablecrypto-io-news-oddity-unveils-ipo-linked-digital-security-token-on-ethereum   French Basketball Team: https://www.crowdfundinsider.com/2022/05/190568-french-basketball-team-elan-bearnais-pursues-security-token-offering-using-avalanche-securitize/   Inside The Metaverse:   Gatorade: https://cointelegraph.com/news/gatorade-trademark-applications-hint-at-joining-the-metaverse   BAYC: https://bitcoinist.com/bored-ape-yacht-club-land-sells-out-in-within-hours/   Spotify: https://bitcoinist.com/spotify-builds-own-island/   Dubai Regulator: https://cointelegraph.com/news/from-within-dubai-s-virtual-asset-regulator-plans-to-open-hq-in-metaverse   = Check out our Companies = Security Token Group: http://securitytokengroup.com/  Security Token Advisors: http://www.securitytokenadvisors.com/  Security Token Market: https://stomarket.com  InvestReady: https://www.investready.com   ⏰ TABLE OF CONTENTS ⏰ 0:00 Introduction: Exchange Tokens Could Be Stocks 1:50 Oddity, Elan Béarnais, Hogan Lovells, SEC Crypto Unit, Yoshi Markets | STSTOP5 5:48 Idaho Digital Asset Act, California Exec Order, BNY Mellon CEO, Goldman Sachs | STS Industry Updates 8:40 HCS Pharma, Oddity, French Basketball Team STO | STO Updates & New STOs 12:37 $18.4 Billion Dollar Security Token Market Cap | STS Market Updates 14:12 Gatorade, BAYC Land Sales Sell Out, Spotify Island, Dubai Regulator | STS Inside The Metaverse 15:36 Companies of The Week: Elan Béarnais, Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp 18:30 Main Topic: Exchange Tokens Could Be Stocks

Chakras and Shotguns
E45: Slow Down (Mercury Retrograde)

Chakras and Shotguns

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 48:20


Mercury is in Gatorade! Feeling like your technology is janky, your emails aren't going through, and things just aren't moving as smoothly as normal? Mercury is entering a retrograde period, and Mik and Jenn get into what that means and how to get through the next few weeks. Some things we talked about in this episode: Mik's taking a metaphysical Bible study with Jullien Gordon. Mik's talked about his book, RICH & RIGHTEOUS, on our manifestation episode (episode #29). You can join the waitlist for the bible study here.Want to get into some of the alien smut that Jenn's reading? Start with ICE PLANET BARBARIANS*, by Ruby Dixon. It's on Kindle Unlimited!Join our Patreon community for more exclusive content.*Note: As Amazon Associates, we earn from qualifying Amazon purchases.Support the show

STOPTIME: Live in the Moment.
Philip Anthony Rodriguez: Cherishing Each & Every Day

STOPTIME: Live in the Moment.

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 55:03


Lisa chats with veteran actor Phil Rodriguez about his origins in NYC, his journey to Hollywood, and the life lessons learned along the way.  A true family man with a heart of gold and faith that humanity will prevail, Phil talks about his most important role as a father to his young son and pays homage  to his own dad and the positive influence he had in his life.Philip Anthony Rodriguez was voted as one of LATINA Magazine's 25 Most Beautiful Latino Men. He is an accomplished and versatile performer, host and coach from Brooklyn, NY.He has joined the casts of many Hit TV series. Including: “The Morning Show” on AppleTV- executive produced by Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston, NBC's popular Grimm as sinister royal henchman, Marcus Rispoli, CBS's Tommy,  hit CBS All Access show, “Why Women Kill”, starring Lucy Liu, Freeform's hit “The Secret Life Of an American Teenager” as Ruben Enriquez and CBS' Seal Team as CIA Operative Greg Smith. Other credits include Modern Family, S.W.A.T. Magnum P.I., Shameless, 9-1-1, Good Trouble, The Mentalist, Madame Secretary, Queen of the South, ”24”, NCIS: New Orleans. He's also the voice of Sith Inquisitor Fifth Brother in Disney's popular animated series, Star Wars: Rebels, for which he's ALSO proud to be an action figure!Philip made his Broadway debut as Ritchie Valens in “BUDDY – THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY” for which he was honored by the New York Drama League. He returned to Broadway in Tennessee Williams “NOT ABOUT NIGHTINGALES” directed by Tony Award winner Trevor Nunn. He has numerous voice over campaigns--including: UFC, Lincoln Motor Co, Gatorade & Ralph Lauren as well as many popular video games. He is the Spanish speaking & singing voices of ELMO and TELLY MONSTER on Sesame Street Beginnings.@philAnthonyRodSupport the show

Zimmer 101
#81 | Zootiere schamponieren & Aszendent Rollschinkli

Zimmer 101

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 66:52


Merkur schwimmt in Gatorade, diese Folge steht also unter einem denkbar ungünstigen Stern. Amina findet zum Beispiel heraus, dass sie wegen ihrem Mondzeichen leider immer ein emotionales Wrack sein wird. Und Lara hat von ihrem Arzt erfahren, dass ihre schlechten Blutwerte ihr leider den Zugang zur geistige Welt erschweren. Wegen dem roten Knochenmark und den Schildkröten. Ihr kennt es. Und auch sonst läuft gerade wenig so wie es sollte: im Zoo versteckt sich der Schneeleopard, die Summer Rolls sind mit einem Fluch belegt, in den Vitamin-B12-Kapseln ist mutmasslich stinkendes Meth drin und alle guten Serien haben ein Ende. Da hilft nur eins: in bester Steiner-Rüedu-Manier Pentagramm drauf malen und schlechte Vibes verbannen! | Instagram: @zimmer.101 | Playlist: 101 Banger Ice King Hut: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Adventure-Time-Crown-Costume-Beanie/dp/B00B03J4U8  Susannas TikTöggu: https://www.tiktok.com/@discomitsusi/video/7091308896777800965  Lisa Masé zum Muttertag: https://www.instagram.com/p/CdF7sxsKRv-/  nu3 (Enn-u-Drei) Vitamin-B12-Kapseln des Todes: https://www.nu3.ch/products/nu3-premium-vegan-essential 

The Divorce Devil Podcast
Divorce Devil Podcast 073: How do you mix Divorce Recovery with the do's and don'ts rules and/or etiquette on social media?

The Divorce Devil Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 33:18


We could have done this podcast in a few episodes.  There are so many facets to social media and divorce recovery.  We both agree that you shouldn't just jump in with both feet and do a brain and/or heart dump.  Social media is not the place for airing that laundry.  With limited positive attributes in doing that, you should keep it simple and easy when posting.  As you know, once you post it, it is out there for all the world to see.  Discussions of Mercury is in Gatorade, trolling Facebook groups, screw-on penises, he forgot his password, passive-aggressiveness, and the War and Peace book of dating are all touched on.  Please folks, be easy with social media while going through the beginning, middle, and end of your divorce.  You can always say more, but once it is in the universe, it's too late.  Enjoy…

Woody & Wilcox
Craig's List Price is Right 05-05-2022

Woody & Wilcox

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 6:28


A lightly used stove, a Kim Jong-Un sweatshirt, and a bottle of Gatorade!

UFO Paranormal Radio & United Public Radio
UFO Undercover W Joe Montaldo Illustrators Of The Future Judge Tom Wood

UFO Paranormal Radio & United Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 117:57


Tom Wood is a fantasy art illustrator who is among the best-selling poster artists in the US and Canada. The “Tom Wood Fantasy Art” brand has sold millions of products since 2005. Tom's creations of dragons and medieval, death-defying warriors have become iconic images of fantasy culture across America, Europe, and Asia. In addition as a commercial artist, Tom's clients have included well-known companies: Warner Brothers, Disney, NBA, NFL, NASCAR, MLS, Reebok, Gatorade, and the NCAA. His formal education began at the University of Arkansas (Fayetteville), where he was accepted on a full academic scholarship. His first professional work was in the screen-printing industry, art directing many sports designs. His early career launched and grew during the desktop revolution of the 1990s, where he quickly mastered his digital skills to become an art director and illustrator. This propelled his extensive freelance career that he maintains today, with his company Meridian Design Works Corp and Tom Wood Fantasy Art. Tom's painstaking attention to detail is the hallmark of his life-like images—images that do not simply tell a story, they transport one to entirely new fantastical realms. His compassion and enthusiasm for the visual arts make him sought after as a speaker. He spends much of his time outside the studio mentoring students, as well as appearing at comic cons across the country. Tom has been an Illustrators of the Future judge since 2021. “The road to becoming a professional artist is not for the meek. It is the responsibility of artists, who have been fortunate enough to see that dream realized, to help guide and foster the next generation of talented youth. “The Writers and Illustrators of the Future selflessly embodies that goal like no other program on the planet. It's an honor to be associated with such an amazing organization and the esteemed panel of judges that assembles for just that purpose.” —Tom Wood Find out more at: www.tomwoodfantasyart.com and www.meridiandesignworks.com.

United Public Radio
UFO Undercover W Joe Montaldo Illustrators Of The Future Judge Tom Wood

United Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 117:57


Tom Wood is a fantasy art illustrator who is among the best-selling poster artists in the US and Canada. The “Tom Wood Fantasy Art” brand has sold millions of products since 2005. Tom's creations of dragons and medieval, death-defying warriors have become iconic images of fantasy culture across America, Europe, and Asia. In addition as a commercial artist, Tom's clients have included well-known companies: Warner Brothers, Disney, NBA, NFL, NASCAR, MLS, Reebok, Gatorade, and the NCAA. His formal education began at the University of Arkansas (Fayetteville), where he was accepted on a full academic scholarship. His first professional work was in the screen-printing industry, art directing many sports designs. His early career launched and grew during the desktop revolution of the 1990s, where he quickly mastered his digital skills to become an art director and illustrator. This propelled his extensive freelance career that he maintains today, with his company Meridian Design Works Corp and Tom Wood Fantasy Art. Tom's painstaking attention to detail is the hallmark of his life-like images—images that do not simply tell a story, they transport one to entirely new fantastical realms. His compassion and enthusiasm for the visual arts make him sought after as a speaker. He spends much of his time outside the studio mentoring students, as well as appearing at comic cons across the country. Tom has been an Illustrators of the Future judge since 2021. “The road to becoming a professional artist is not for the meek. It is the responsibility of artists, who have been fortunate enough to see that dream realized, to help guide and foster the next generation of talented youth. “The Writers and Illustrators of the Future selflessly embodies that goal like no other program on the planet. It's an honor to be associated with such an amazing organization and the esteemed panel of judges that assembles for just that purpose.” —Tom Wood Find out more at: www.tomwoodfantasyart.com and www.meridiandesignworks.com.

Being Becky
Doing Whatever It Takes: He's Used Gatorade, Pizza and Even Cigarettes to Reach America's Youth in Public Schools! (Reggie Dabbs)

Being Becky

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 31:36


Host Becky Hennesy welcomes America's favorite public school assembly speaker Reggie Dabbs to the podcast. Since the late 1980s, Reggie has been a familiar name for many teenagers who have heard him speak in hundreds of school systems, churches, youth camps and other events around the nation. His impact for the Kingdom is so broad and wide it's nearly impossible to measure. He and Becky share about his latest move to the Dallas/Ft. Worth Texas region, where he's joined the Trinity Church pastoral staff. They also dive into how his role in the Kingdom has reformation roots that run deep into the hearts of America's youth.Links to Reggie's website: reggiedabbsonline.comBorn to an unwed teenager, Reggie was raised by foster parents until he was in the fourth grade, and then they officially adopted him and gave him the Dabbs name.As the Dabbs' reared Reggie, they instilled in him strong moral values, for which he is genuinely grateful. They also ingrained in him the fact that in every situation he faced, he had a choice. What he did with those choices was entirely up to him.In the sixth grade, Reggie began playing the saxophone and hated it. At the insistence of his parents he continued to practice and to play. Not until his freshman year in college did he actually enjoy the instrument, and today, he plays with fervor and expertise.After graduating from college, Reggie began his public speaking. During one speaking engagement, his host asked if he would be interested in addressing a high school assembly. From that small beginning in 1987, Reggie has become a popular public school speaker.When addressing a school assembly, Reggie talks to the kids in a humorous style about choices each of them has when faced with drugs, alcohol, suicide, etc. Reggie gets in kids faces and tells them that he never smoked a cigarette, never did drugs, never drank alcohol, because he chose not to. He assures them that they can make the same kinds of choices.Reggie talks to kids about family and how thankful they should be that they have families.  Most of all, Reggie drives home the fact that “You can never change your past, but you can change your future!”The Reformers Collective podcast is part of the expanding Charisma Podcast Network (CPN).  Click here to visit the CPN main page. While at CPN, look for additional Reformers Collective resources such as Becky's blog articles on the topic of reformation.Let's keep bringing godly solutions to earthly problems!

Diktatur der Freundlichkeit
49. Mein Vater war ein Promogirl

Diktatur der Freundlichkeit

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 89:05


Ärgerlich! Einfach ärgerlich, wenn man zu den 80 Liter Sonnenblumenöl kein Mehl mehr in den Einkaufswagen bekommt oder es nach einem lange Fußmarsch durch Ferdis Büro Wasser nur noch für die Pitbulls gibt. Aber so ist es halt als Diktator der Freundlichkeit, es wird einem auch wirklich nicht leicht gemacht. Noch dazu war in den letzten zwei Wochen einiges los. Boris muss ins Gefängnis, Xavier kommt aus dem (Gedanken-)Gefängnis raus, Alice Schwarzer ist Alice Schwarzer und Zweibrücken gar nicht im Saarland. Dafür haben wir aber endlich verstanden wie das mit dem Scheck geht, auf welchem Tier man sicher einen Überweisungsträger ausstellen kann, warum sich Joe Biden über jeden Scheck freut, der in einem Film zerrissen wird und wie das eigentlich mit dem Faxgerät ist. Zudem arbeiten wir aktiv an einer Musicalversion von Asterix mit Peter Altmaier als Sidekick. Leider sind wir uns noch nicht ganz einig, wer die Hauptrolle bekommt und wissen nicht, ob Marie-Agnes Strack-Zimmermann einen vernünftigen Zaubertrank brauen kann. Auch das musikalische Berlin hat uns also wieder keine Ruhe gelassen – das alles und noch viel mehr bringt ruck zuck 90 weitere Minuten auf Eure Podcast-Uhr beim Apple. Los geht's – eine Folge noch, dann feiern wir unseren 50. Podcastgeburtstag. Wer die Farbe der Gatoradedusche errät kann schon jetzt was gewinnen! Ach eins noch – Herzlichen Glückwunsch an die Metzgerei Merte!! Unser Instagram Profil: https://www.instagram.com/diktatur_der_freundlichkeit/             Unsere Webpage: https://www.diktaturderfreundlichkeit.de Hier könnt Ihr Euch super für den Newsletter registrieren! Ärgerlich: Ärgerlich • Wilhelm Busch (wilhelm-busch.de) Da hat sie recht: Baerbock pocht auf Abzug russischer Truppen aus der Ukraine - ZDFheute Superbowl Wetten: Verrückte Super Bowl Wetten zu Halftime Show, Hymne & Gatorade (wettbasis.com) Herzlichen Glückwunsch: Die Gewinner der Pokale in den Wettbewerben Meisterstücke (meisterstuecke-fleischerhandwerk.de) Deso: „Deso – Der Rapper, der zum IS ging“ auf Apple Podcasts Man muss nicht jede Kleinigkeit ausdiskutieren – Harmonie siegt!

St. Louis on the Air
How St. Louis-based Metaphase came to design popular household products

St. Louis on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 21:20


The red Solo Cup, Gatorade sport bottle, Harry's Razor and many more common household products were designed in St. Louis. Metaphase Design Group founder and CEO Bryce Rutter's 30-year-old company has quietly been working with some of the most recognizable companies in the world, and he joined the show to share the stories behind his company's success.

F1 And Done
Guest: Dave Kerley, Living Right, Shake Shack, Blue Gatorade, Adrenaline, Shaken Baby, Sidepods, HRC, Skateboard, Rare Earth, Friendshoring, Spin Launch, Tokyo Vice, Heaven's Gate, Fake Marina, Ricky Steamboat

F1 And Done

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 67:21


Every Damn Thing
90. Spice Girls, Shell Suits, British Food (w/ Eirinie Carson)

Every Damn Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 66:53


Phil & Jake are joined by returning friend (and author) Eirinie Carson to rank the British Pop group Spice Girls, the outfits that the British call shell suits, and British food on the List of Every Damn Thing.Follow Eirinie on Instagram (@eirinieeee) and Twitter (@Eirineee), and read her columns on Mother Mag. Her upcoming book The Dead Are Gods will be published by Melville House. If you have something to add to the list, email it to list@everydamnthing.net (or get at us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook).SHOW NOTES: The Spice Girls are, of course: Victoria Adams aka Victoria Beckham aka Posh Spice, Geri Halliwell aka Ginger Spice, Melanie C aka Sporty Spice, Mel B aka Scary Spice and Emma Bunton aka Baby Spice. Was there a sixth Spice Girl? Kind of. Michelle Stephenson was briefly part of the group that would go on to become the Spice Girls. At the time of this writing, we can't provide a link to Lady Camden from Ru Paul's Drag Race because it would risk spoiling the season finale for ourselves. Lucy Pinder is, as Wikipedia tells us, a British actress, TV personality and former glamour model. Shes also joins Eirinie for going on "holiday" (aka vacation). Phil at some point got it into his head that she was a right-wing ideologue and it broke the spell she had over him. It's probably for the best, even if it wasn't true! We talk about the Spice Girls songs “Wannabe” and “2 Become 1”. The video featuring them in leather outfits is for the song "Say You'll Be There". 2 Live Crew are filthy Miami rappers who legally laid the foundation for all filthy rappers that followed. Mogul did an excellent series about them. We get into a little Chubby Checker discussion, including his songs “The Twist” and “Let's Twist Again”. Phil tells us about Don't Knock the Twist , is a movie that features Checker with a lot of associated acts including Dee Dee Sharp, who sings Mashed Potato time, one of Phil's favorites. Phil likes anything where the song tells you "It's the latest" or "it's the greatest" and Mashed Potato time does both. Robbie Williams is the cheeky chappie from Stoke. Harry Styles is Hazza? Dolly Parton is the Backwoods Barbie. Hank Williams is the Hillbilly Shakespeare. Phil mentions the 2013 Morgan Spurlock 3-D documentary about One Direction, This Is Us but then gets confused as to whether it exists or not. It does. Phil mentions the youtube video "A Scouser Tries The Wigan Kebab and Smack Barm Pea Wet" in which a guy from Liverpool travels 17 miles to Wigan to enjoy Smack Barm Pea Wet which is a roll with a potato that's been batter dipped and deep fried, served with the liquid that peas sit in.  Turkey Twizzlers were a UK meat product that used to be served to children at schools until celebrity chef Jamie Olive raised a fuss about them. Bovril is a beef broth concentrate, formerly known as Johnston's Fluid Beef. Phil remembers a guy saying it's served hot in a disposable cup. Kit-Kat is a candy that originates in England but really hit its stride in Japan where they make many variant flavors and generally appreciate the brand. Lucozade is a sports drink, roughly akin to Gatorade that was originally sold at pharmacies. Kebab stands are places where you can buy kebabs. Phil said we don't really have them in America but it's not really true. In his old neighborhood in Queens they were all over. Phil mentions a shocking ad for breakfast in a can he saw in a lad mag. He was unable to find images because when people are preserving and scanning lad mags, their priority is the photos of Lucy Pinder or Lucy Collett and then when that's done they'll eventually get around to the horrifying pictures of canned sausage and eggs. The product was probably ​​Hunger Breaks' All Day Breakfast. ALSO DISCUSSED IN THIS EPISODE:fishing * Spice World * Destiny's Child  * TLC * Jessica Rabbit * K-Pop * girl power * British politics * Margaret Thatcher * Britney Spears * Flat-Earthers * British Imperialism * spices * Simon Cowell * volcanoes * pickles * backpacking * “I'm Scum” by Idles * tracksuits * Tommy Bahama shirts * zipper jeans worn with no underwear * no-show socks * commandos * fast fashion * plastic straws * chip shop chips *  English breakfast * bangers & mash * toad in the hole * bubble & squeak * haggis * Irn-Bru * burritos * pieBelow are the Top Ten and Bottom Top items on List of Every Damn Thing as of this episode (for the complete up-to-date list, go here).TOP TEN: Dolly Parton - person interspecies animal friends - idea sex - idea bicycles - tool coffee - beverage Clement Street in San Francisco - location Prince - person It's-It - food Doctor Doom - fictional character Cher - person BOTTOM TEN:277. Hank Williams, Jr - person278. British Royal Family - institution279. Steven Seagal - person280. McRib - food281. Hoarders - TV show282. death - idea283. war - idea284. cigarettes - drug285. QAnon - idea286. transphobia - ideaTheme song by Jade Puget. Graphic design by Jason Mann. This episode was produced & edited by Jake MacLachlan. Show notes by Jake MacLachlan & Phil Green.Our website is everydamnthing.net and we're also on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.Email us at list@everydamnthing.net. 

The Dave Chang Show
A Master Brewer Takes on Nonalcoholic Beer | Demystified

The Dave Chang Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 69:39


John Walker was earning accolades for his work as a brewer in Santa Fe when he heard about a different kind of challenge—starting up a first-class nonalcoholic brewery. He tells Dave and Chris about what drew him to Athletic Brewing, amid a conversation covering temperance pairings, shift drinks, the Am-I-Stupid test, mowing the lawn in a shirt and tie, the great taste of cheap beer, Mosaic hops, capturing aromatic compounds, Joe Biden's favorite Gatorade, standing in line for Pliny the Younger, the sparkling water glut, beer regionality, and Dave's ongoing crusade against IPA. Hosts: Dave Chang and Chris Ying Guest: John Walker Producers: Sasha Ashall and Mike Wargon Additional Production: Jordan Bass and Lala Rasor Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Writers Bloc
How Matthews Became A 60-Goal Scorer

Writers Bloc

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 48:46


Justin Bourne joins Ben Ennis (1:40) to discuss the potential Leafs-Lightning first round series, Auston Matthews hitting #60, and how his pace is already there with Ovie. Then we catch up with Joe Bowen (17:27) who has called all of Matthews' goals - especially #60 - and he looks at his growth and where he is now compared to when he entered the league. We wrap with Arash Madani (30:12) from Rogers Centre after watching the 9th inning George Springer HR and how he somehow avoided the Gatorade shower in the post-game plus a discussion on the offence at the bottom of the order, an update on Teoscar Hernandesz's return to the lineup and another setback for Ryan Borucki.  The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates.

OutKick 360
NFL Draft Fact Or Fiction + OutKick's Trey Wallace

OutKick 360

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 46:37


OutKick 360 April 27, 2022 Hour 2 On the eve of the NFL Draft, outKick 360 host another round of Fact Or Fiction with the latest headlines and rumors prior to the 1st round. OutKick's Trey Wallace joins OK360 to discuss SEC players in the NFL Draft, Mark Emmert's planned exit as the president of the NCAA & tainted Gatorade. ------------------------------------------------------ $1,000 For New Users At FanDuel  ------------------------------------------------------ Follow OutKick 360 on Twitter  Like OutKick 360 on Facebook Follow OutKick 360 on Instagram SUBSCRIBE to OutKick 360 & OutKick on YouTube ------------------------------------------------------ Use code "VIP15" for 15% off OutKick VIP!  Shop OutKick Gear Watch the latest from Clay Travis OutKick the Show Read more from OutKick Follow Outkick on Twitter Like OutKick on Facebook Follow OutKick on Instagram Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Yahoo Sports College Podcast
Emergency pod: Mark Emmert resigns, what's next for the NCAA?

Yahoo Sports College Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 40:50


Embattled NCAA President Mark Emmert announced on Tuesday he will step down no later than June 30th, 2023. Dan Wetzel and SI's Pat Forde react to the decision and parse through what's the next move for the NCAA? What were Mark Emmert's all-time baffling decisions and who will take over? As the Twitter account @247CWS often states, some people do cocaine... others do college baseball. In a season that has featured major upsets, players hitting for the cycle, and coaches chest-bumping umpires, the wildest story of the year involves the Gatorade coolers of small-town Kansas. The ghost of The Little Brown Jug's past has come to the Kansas Wesleyan University vs Bethany College rivalry. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Spaghetti Junction Boys
Jerry West, Paint Thinner and the Eradication of Florida Man

Spaghetti Junction Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 26:22


Doc and William discuss Jerry West hilariously threatening to take his defamation case to the Supreme Court, Kansas Wesleyan baseball players allegedly getting paint thinner in their Gatorade and Florida politician Nikki Fried attempting to make Florida Man as we know it extinct.

The KiddChris Show
Gatorade and Gummies

The KiddChris Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 54:16


The KiddChris Show - 04/25/2022

Therapy Gecko
"MY PARTNER WANTS ME TO SELL DRUGS"

Therapy Gecko

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 52:56


A retired drug dealer calls in and we weigh the pros and cons of returning to the game after their partner suggests doing so.  Then talk to a caller who is trying to turn their Gatorade addiction into an art piece, a man who disassociated for multiple months in a row, and a caller who is struggling telling the other participants of her threesome that she may have given them chlamydia. It is a good episode. I am a gecko. More gecko stuff here: https://linktr.ee/lyleforever

Top Dad
Sick Days with Dad

Top Dad

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 54:48


Episode 84: Top Dad Tips for Kids home sick from school What does a Top Dad due when you have a child home sick from school? You bust out the old-school remedies: cinnamon toast, soup, ginger ale, Gatorade, and plenty of rest. Plus a trip to the pediatrician. Find out how Top Dad Matt did when his oldest was home sick with the flu. Top Dad Bonus: The Top Dads discuss the real-world scenarios of Sharknados and Velocipastors... yes those are real things. Enjoy! Thank you for listening and taking this journey with us. Please be sure to follow us on social media on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tik Tok @topdadpod for great Top Dad tips, tricks, jokes, and hacks.If you like our show please be sure to share the Top Dad Podcast with your friends and family. Please consider leaving us a five-star review on Apple Podcasts and follow us on Spotify.Listen to Top Dad for free wherever you listen to podcasts or go to TopDadpod.com for more info. Remember to subscribe, rate, review, and share us with your friends.  

Kottke Ride Home
Thu. 04/14 - Redefining Units of Time for the Techno-Era

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 16:00


Should we be measuring time differently now that we spend more time with digital technology than nature? Paul Ford has some suggestions. Plus, how the heck is AriZona Iced Tea still just 99 cents and not playing any nefarious shrinkflation games like the other guys? And a new study analyzing the personality profile of absolute a-holes.Sponsor:The Jordan Harbinger Show, jordanharbinger.com/start Links:Time Got So Much Weirder. The World Needs a New Lexicon (Wired)How is AriZona Iced Tea still 99 cents as inflation soars? (LA Times)From 5 fewer Doritos to shrunken Gatorade bottles, here are the insidious ways companies are charging the same amount for less stuff (Insider)Scientists Ran an Experiment to Identify the Personality Profile of an A-Hole (ScienceAlert)What makes an a--hole an a—hole? (EukekAlert)How an early 2000s bop shaped the 'Everything Everywhere All At Once' multiverse (Mashable)How Son Lux Crafted a Maximalist Soundtrack for 'Everything Everywhere All at Once' (Rolling Stone)Jackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Your Morning Show On-Demand
Ron Rivera Is Our First In-Studio Interview

Your Morning Show On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 10:21


Turns out that Washington Commanders Head Coach Ron Rivera will always stick with tails on a coin toss!Join John, Riley, and Rose as we talk to Rivera about the most unique things he's seen a player buy with their salary and what really goes on in a coach's headset when they're on the field! What flavor of Gatorade does Rivera want the Commanders dumped on him? Plus is there an open spot for John on the team? All that and more in our interview with Ron Rivera!

Rally Caps: A College Baseball Podcast
BASEBALL IS WEIRD: The infection is spreading, Gatorade & coffee, 16-hour bus rides, and severely Atheist umpires

Rally Caps: A College Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 50:16


This episode, much like USF's right fielder Jackson Mayo, has a ton of range. Marc and Ben dive into another entertaining week of college baseball, beginning with the hottest team in the world right now... The Tennessee Volunteers. The two razz Chase Burns for having a really bad outing that was actually a really good outing, and talk about the other dominant performances from the Vols' starters. They also talk about Vanderbilt and the crazy new lights at their stadium which came back to bite them this weekend, though they did look cool after home runs. After a contractually obligated mention of Enrique Bradfield Jr., the duo stays on the topic of stolen bases and discusses a few instances of stealing home and how it can be a recipe for success. Then, unfortunately, you'll hear a phrase you hoped never to hear (hint: you may have an STD if you played against Oregon State this weekend), and why that is the case. After that Ben and Marc answer the question going through the minds of Longhorns fans everywhere: when is it okay to start worrying about Texas? Maybe Kevin Durant will come on the podcast to discuss. Following a brief eulogy for the undefeated Banana Hammocks of ETSU it's onto every team's worst nightmare... double digit hour bus rides. The two pay their respects to College of Charleston and Old Dominion who suffered the ill fate of having to drive 11 and 16 hours, respectively, back home after road series' this weekend. There's also talk of Notre Dame sweeping Florida State, and while on the topic of Christianity we have to mention an interesting thing that happened with Liberty's star player Derek Orndorff. Finally its onto talk of gatorade and coffee cocktails and imagining your family getting shot in the face, courtesy of the great Gary Vee. This was a fun one.

Heat Death of the Universe
141 - Biden's Poppers Habit Equals Imminent Nuclear Winter

Heat Death of the Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 73:23


Teachers must side-hustle to survive. More budgetary sadism from the Grand American Experiment. SARS-CoV-2 manages to create millions of orphans despite no longer and/or never existing. Joseph Robinette Biden may set off nuclear annihilation through typical senile outbursts stutters gaffes etc. South Korean labor unions invoke Squid Game while organizing a general strike. The Wizard of Oz is an allegory for something you've likely never heard about. Big dumb corporations get pathetic.Support: patreon.com/heatdeathpodGeneral RecommendationsJD's Recommendation: Pulp FictionJNM's Recommendation: Death Becomes HerFurther Reading, Viewing, ListeningNew Teachers are Earning 11% Less Than They Were 30 Years AgoOur Nation's Teachers Are Hustling to SurviveCongress Found An Easy Way To Fix Child Poverty. Then It Walked Away.There's no return to normal for millions of children orphaned during CovidJoe Biden's Careless Babbling Could Get Us All KilledFirst look: Biden to ask Congress to fund the policeKorean unions use Squid Game to mobilize for general strikeThe Wizard of Oz as an Allegory for the 1896 Presidential ElectionFrom 5 fewer Doritos to shrunken Gatorade bottles, here are the insidious ways companies are charging the same amount for less stuffLocationless Locationsheatdeathpod.comEvery show-related link is corralled and available here.Twitter: @heatdeathpodPlease send all Letters of Derision, Indifference, Inquiry, Mild Elation, et cetera to: heatdeathoftheuniversepodcast@gmail.comAlso, check out our newly updated YouTube channel for the hell of it

Superfeed! from The Incomparable
Somehow I Manage 161: Boiled Gatorade (S8E18)

Superfeed! from The Incomparable

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 33:51


Stephen and Tiff order dozens of Girl Scout cookies to ensure that they have plenty of snacks when they discuss “Last Day in Florida”. This episode of “The Office” originally aired on March 8, 2012. Host Tiff Arment and Stephen Hackett.

Somehow I Manage
161: Boiled Gatorade (S8E18)

Somehow I Manage

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 33:51


Stephen and Tiff order dozens of Girl Scout cookies to ensure that they have plenty of snacks when they discuss “Last Day in Florida”. This episode of “The Office” originally aired on March 8, 2012. Tiff Arment and Stephen Hackett.

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Crime Alert 03.30.22

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 1:30


Hubby blames podiatrist for wife's death, hires hitman. Robber leaved DNA on Gatorade bottle. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Crime Alert with Nancy Grace
Crime Alert 03.30.22

Crime Alert with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 1:00


Hubby blames podiatrist for wife's death, hires hitman. Robber leaved DNA on Gatorade bottle. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Taste Radio
You Must Check This Box To Have A Fighting Chance. These Founders Explain Why.

Taste Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 72:36


This week, we explored the ideation, business plans and growth strategies of three innovative and on-trend brands in conversations with Susan Buckwalter, the co-founder and CEO of ginger-powered wellness brand Recoup; Dr. Juan Salinas, the founder and CEO of P-nuff Crunch, a brand of nutritious baked peanut puffs; and Michelle Razavi and Nikki Elliott, the co-founders of functional, decadent snack brand ELAVI. Show notes: 1:02: Interview: Susan Buckwalter, Co-Founder/CEO, Recoup – Taste Radio editor Ray Latif sat down with  Buckwalter at Natural Products Expo West 2022 where they spoke about how Recoup has made strides in the two-plus years since its launch and found a receptive audience among consumers seeking alternatives to traditional sports and hydration beverages. As part of the conversation, Buckwalter discussed how her co-founder's personal health battles inspired the brand, how their respective backgrounds supported their alignment as a team and how Recoup set out to create a foundation for success. She also explained why leaning into both flavor and function has supported trial and sales and why she encourages entrepreneurs to build and engage with a network of like minded founders. 26:01: Interview: Dr. Juan Salinas, Founder/CEO, P-nuff Crunch – Also at Expo West 2022, Latif sat down with Salinas, who spoke about how he drew upon his education in food science and sport nutrition and as a project manager with global food companies including Kraft Foods and Nestlé to develop P-nuff Crunch. Salinas also discussed how the brand gained national attention in 2020 following his memorable appearance on “Shark Tank,” where P-nuff landed investment from Mark Cuban. Further topics include communicating the benefits of its key ingredients to consumers, why he's bullish about brick-and-mortar retail despite the brand's strong ecommerce sales and why he wants the company to be known for nutrition, first and foremost.   50:36: Interview: Michelle Razavi and Nikki Elliott, Co-Founders, ELAVI – Razavi and Elliott spoke with Latif at Expo West 2022 about the underpinnings of ELAVI, which is presented as a brand of “functional, decadent snacks to boost energy, recovery, and focus.” ELAVI markets a line of collagen protein bars and a new line of superfood cashew butters that are similarly positioned and described as “protein frosting.” Razavi and Elliott discussed how their work as Equinox fitness instructors supported their vision for a modern protein company, why they sought to position ELAVI as a “luxe brand,” why video has been a key medium for communicating with consumers and why patience and taste were critical factors prior to launching the nut butters.  Brands in this episode: Recoup Beverage, P-nuff Crunch, ELAVI, Gatorade, Powerade, Taika, Hella Cocktail Co., Hoplark, Asarasi

RAW with Marty Gallagher
Willie Bell - World Champion Powerlifter

RAW with Marty Gallagher

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 108:54


Make sure to visit Ironcompany.com for your next purchase of free weight equipment including kettlebells, bumper plates, rubber hex dumbbells and Olympic bars. What's 5' 10" and 245 lbs., squats 865, benches 523, deadlifts 832, consumes 12,000 calories a day including 16-hamburgers and chews Gatorade gum to make weight before a meet? The one and only, Willie Bell. Lots of great musings today and a glimpse into the training and diet at the career peak of the first man in the US Armed Forces to total over 2,000 lbs. Don't miss this one!Check back weekly for best powerlifting articles by Marty Gallagher where Marty discusses everything from the squat, deadlift, bench press, overhead press and even historical bodybuilding musings. His latest article "Putting A Finer Point On Resistance Training"  is up now. And don't forget the Jim Steel strength training articles combining his head strength coach experience from the University of Pennsylvania for twenty years with decades of successful powerlifting meets and bodybuilding competitions for us all to learn from and enjoy. His latest article "Weightlifting - The Little Things Are A Big Deal" is up now. And if you're looking for a personal trainer in Charlotte, NC check out KB Fitness for custom programming and verifiable results.Thanks for listening and if you like what you hear please give us a review on your favorite podcast player.

The Free Cheese
The Free Cheese Episode 446: Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty

The Free Cheese

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 113:54


This week on The Free Cheese, and I'm all outta Gatorade.  We play and rank Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty, discussing its legacy and breaking down some of our favorite details. We reach the end of the bracket and declare Video Games' Greatest Sidekick and share our favorite Game Over screens. Episode Timestamps 10:47 - Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty 49:41 - Lightning Round 01:02:55 - Who Would Win in a Fight? 01:21:33 - What's the Best Game Over Screen? 01:31:15 - Patched 01:45:42 - The Ranking

Chatting with Sherri
We welcome fantasy illustrator & best-selling poster artist; Tom Wood!

Chatting with Sherri

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 48:00


Chatting With Sherri welcomes fantasy art illustrator and best-selling poster artist; Tom Wood! Tom Wood is a fantasy art illustrator who is among the best-selling poster artists in the US and Canada. The “Tom Wood Fantasy Art” brand has sold millions of products since 2005. Tom's creations of dragons and medieval, death-defying warriors have become iconic images of fantasy culture across America, Europe, and Asia. In addition as a commercial artist, Tom's clients have included well-known companies: Warner Brothers, Disney, NBA, NFL, NASCAR, MLS, Reebok, Gatorade, and the NCAA. His formal education began at the University of Arkansas (Fayetteville), where he was accepted on a full academic scholarship. His first professional work was in the screen-printing industry, art directing many sports designs. His early career launched and grew during the desktop revolution of the 1990s, where he quickly mastered his digital skills to become an art director and illustrator. This propelled his extensive freelance career that he maintains today, with his company Meridian Design Works Corp and Tom Wood Fantasy Art. Tom's painstaking attention to detail is the hallmark of his life-like images—images that do not simply tell a story, they transport one to entirely new fantastical realms. His compassion and enthusiasm for the visual arts make him sought after as a speaker. He spends much of his time outside the studio mentoring students, as well as appearing at comic cons across the country.   Tom has been an Illustrators of the Future judge since 2021.   “The road to becoming a professional artist is not for the meek. It is the responsibility of artists, who have been fortunate enough to see that dream realized, to help guide and foster the next generation of talented youth.    

The DeJuan Marrero Podcast
Eps. 144 - Indiana Gatorade Boys POY, Fletcher Loyer

The DeJuan Marrero Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 9:03


Happy Wednesday! Joining me this week is 2022 Indiana's Gatorade Boys Basketball Player of the Year, Fletcher Loyer. Fletcher joins the podcast to discuss all things that went into his 2021-2022 basketball season, his preparation to head to Purdue this summer and what it means for him to win the Gatorade POY. For all of JEDtv Content: Subscribe here https://www.jedtv.com/ DeJuan Marrero Social Media YouTube Channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UC5uNsn8rQXbVM2wOAoVC1hw?view_as=subscriber Spotify Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2lcn... Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dejuanmarrero/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedmpodcast_/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/dejuanmarrero?lan... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dejuan.marrero

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Fabian Serrralta - Gravel Locos

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 50:39


This week we sit down with Gravel Locos founder Fabian Serralta to unpack the road to developing a stand out event.  New for this year, Gravel Locos will be adding an event in Peublo, CO in addition to the original event in Hico, TX. Episode Sponsor: Hammerhead.  Use coupon code 'TheGravelRide' for a free custom color kit and premium water bottle. Gravel Locos Website Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Gravel Locos [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist.   [00:00:26] Craig Dalton: Have you ever thought about organizing a gravel event? I certainly have this week's guest Fabion. Serralta took that passion and idea to create an event. And created gravel Locos. The original event in Heico Texas is joined this year by a new event in Pueblo, Colorado. I sat down with Fabi and to learn about his inspiration for gravel Locos, the charitable component of what he does and the general theme of all gravel Locos events. Before we jump into the conversation. I need to thank this week. Sponsor hammerhead. The hammerhead kuru to you as raised the bar for cycling computers. You can get advanced GPS, navigation, and intuitive software right on your handlebars. In a way you never thought possible. I spent this past weekend down in Tucson, Arizona. After speaking with John from the mountain lemon, gravel grinder, a few years back, I've been itching to get out on the course. So I simply downloaded the GPS file from their website, uploaded it to my kuru to and felt super confident going out there in the back country. I've got a ton of stories about some of the snafoos. I had mechanically speaking while I was out there, but from a navigational perspective, it was spot on what I really appreciate about the crew too. And I've talked about the responsive touchscreen display before. Is that in the navigation? Once you've loaded a route in there, you get a little icon, no matter what screen you're on. saying when the next turn is coming up. It's those little touches and details that I think really setting the hammerhead crew to a part beyond that, I really got to dive into the climber feature, which is something unique and special about hammerhead. The climber feature allows you to visualize and prepare for upcoming gradient changes in real time. So, what does that mean? Basically it translates to a nice graph. On the climber screen on your crew to computer that shows you in color-coded fashion. The length to the top of the climb, both in miles, as well as elevation, and then gradient by gradient profile looks that map exactly to what you're experiencing when you're out on an adventure loop that you've never been on before. It was super useful to see, okay, this is going to be a punchy. Mile mile and a half climb. Versus at the end i discovered as it turned a corner that i was in front of a six mile climb but fortunately the gradient was pretty chill. This all translates to knowledge is power. And with the hammerhead crew too, you can get all the information available out of your GPX files. You can customize it to the nth degree. I still have a ways to go and customizing mine, but you can see the power of organizing your data right there on your computer screen. For a limited time, our listeners can get a free custom color kit and exclusive premium water bottle with the purchase of a hammerhead crew to visit hammerhead.io right now and use the promo code, the gravel ride. At checkout to get yours today, that's a free custom color kit. And a premium water bottle with the purchase of a career to. Go to hammerhead.io at all three items to your cart and use the promo code. The gravel ride. With that said let's jump right into my interview with Fabienne from gravel Locos. [00:03:40] CraigDalton.: Fabian , welcome to the show. [00:03:41] FabianSerralta: Hey, Craig. Thank you. [00:03:43] CraigDalton.: It's good to talk to you again. [00:03:44] FabianSerralta: Same here. Thank you. [00:03:46] CraigDalton.: I'm excited to learn all the things about gravel locus and, but would love to learn a little bit about your background first, just kinda what drew you into the sport originally, and then what led you to take on the huge challenge of creating an event? [00:04:01] FabianSerralta: Well, I, I would definitely say I was probably what led me to the sport was purely accidental. I I purchased a, a ranch in Oklahoma in 2012, and I remember the first time driving out there to see this ranch with the R I was following a realtor and wearing this perfectly smooth country road. And I was just thinking, this is great. I'm gonna have my road bike out here. And and as soon as we get to the one road leads to the ranch, it was this. Awful road with rocks and gravel and dirt. And I was like, oh my gosh, this is terrible. I'm not gonna be able to ride my road, bike out here. And then we're on this road. And this lady is just like flying on this road and just dusting, dirt everywhere. And then we're just flying on their road and, and it was like a 15 mile drive from on this. Awful gravel dirt road to the driveway of this ranch that I had just purchased and or I was about to purchase. And then the driveway from this road to the ranch was another mile and a half. And when we get to the ranch property in the house, I said to her. This is terrible. I'm not gonna be able to ride my bike when I'm out here. She's like, well, what do you mean? I said, I'll get a flat tire by the time I get to, to the to the main road. And she's like, well, you can just drive your bike in your car and, and go out there and just park out there. I'm like, where am I gonna park? That's like somebody else's property out there. So this is 2012. And I, so I buy this property and probably from 20 12, 20 13 until about 2015. I didn't get to ride my road bike every time that I went out there. [00:05:41] CraigDalton.: yeah. I was gonna say there wasn't a lot of options [00:05:43] FabianSerralta: Yeah. [00:05:44] CraigDalton.: of gravel bikes at that point in time. [00:05:45] FabianSerralta: Yeah. But then in 2015, I'm visiting my son in Denver. He was gonna school at the university of Denver and I just happened to go to a, a bike store. It was a, I believe it was a specialized bike store and I walk in there and there's. White and red bike Witham, and it looked like a road bike and it had these Nobby tires on it and zip wheels. And I'm like, what in the world is this thing? And the sales guy comes up to me and I'm like, what is this thing? You know? And he's looking at me like, he's like, where are you from? I'm like, well, I'm from Cuba. And he's probably thinking this guy just fell off of open a Palm or something. Cause likes a, and I'm like, what's a, you, I had idea what a. He's like, you don't know what a cross bike is. I was like, I don't know, but I want that bike. He's like, well, you gonna Doy lacrosse. I'm like, no, I bought this ranch and it has these horrible roads that are rocks. And he's like, oh, so you want a gravel bike? I'm like a gravel bike. I said, no, I want that bike. And I need you to ship it to Texas. And the guy is just like, looking me, like I'm nuts. But it was like, It looked like a road bike and it had, you know, what looked like to be mountain bike tires. And I'm like, this is it. So I purchased a bike and it happened to be on my size, a 54 centimeter. They ship it to to Texas to my local bike shop and gets over there. They had 700 by 33 C tires. I start writing it in Oklahoma and I thought was the greatest thing ever. And I was running 90 PSI on the tires, which I thought at the time was perfect. As you know, on my tubular road tires, I was running 120 PSI. And so I thought this thing was just as smooth as can be on these gravel roads. And I signed up for my first gravel event, October 1st, 2016. And I thought, Hey, you know, it was 15 miles, no big deal. I showed up at the time, I think I had 95 P assigned a rear and 90 in the front. And I thought it was gonna be very much like a road rally where you have, you know, rest stops every so many miles. And so I think I had two water bottles and, or maybe a one snack or whatever, and man, it was a nightmare. [00:07:55] CraigDalton.: Was was that in Oklahoma, the event that you signed [00:07:58] FabianSerralta: it was Texas. It was a really hilly area monster, Texas. And you know, I paid my registration fee, which I think it was, I don't know, 85, $90. And I was expecting it to be just like many of the road rallies I had done. And. You know, grass stops with bananas and oranges and cookies and pickle, juices, and Gatorade. And there was nothing. all they had was a water table. with warm water, no food. And by the end of the 50 miles, I thought I was gonna die. And with that tire pressure on those 33 sea tires. I was so beat up. I swear, I'll never do this again. I remember getting to the finish and calling some buddies. I'm like, I am never doing this again. This is horrible. Why would anybody ever do this? You know, [00:08:43] CraigDalton.: Yeah. It's, it's funny. What a difference the evolution of the equipment has made in the enjoyment of the sport. I'm with you. I, I got my first gravel bike a little bit later than the, I think back in 2016, but it was a. 2014 model year bike, 32 C tires. Fortunately it, it did have tubeless on it, but it still, like, I just felt like it wasn't that much better than Ayro bike. I had five or six years earlier, which I had pretty much quit riding because I would either flat or get the crap beat outta me every time I rode it. [00:09:15] FabianSerralta: Yeah, this, this, I mean, it was, it was ay, it was a cycle cross bike. It was specialized crux. I mean, it had great, I mean, it had zip three or threes. I was running tubes. Which was, you know, a big difference from running tubers on my other bikes road bikes. And they had ceramic red, I couldn't complain it was a great bike, but I was just running to run tire pressure, the wrong tire size. And I really didn't have any, any knowledge of, of gravel, but, you know, I did see other people running big, your tires and all that. And it, it was just this learning curve. But that first experience was horrible. And I really, I swear I never did this again. And it took a while and then I, I started learning from others like, Hey, yeah, you can't be out there running tire pressure like that. And you can't, you, you gotta run bigger tires than that. And you gotta run, you know, tube, you know, tubeless. And and you know, I, it probably took me a few, a couple of months before I even wrote again. But as I, I started getting more and more advice from others that were doing it. But it was so early on. But it was that experience that really led me to wanna have eventually at one day have a gravel event. That was a lot like a road rally, but that it was also, you know, it, it had the, it was at the time it was, you know, the dirty cancer event, the DK 200. So I wanted to have a, a DK 200 event with the pro component, but yet. Beginner friendly. So have all the support that you would need for beginners like myself or, or people just really interested in gravel. So having all the bunch of rest stops and having portable bathrooms at rest stops for the women and having sag vehicles all over the place, but yet having a ton of pros. So having, you know, an event that was a DK 200 packed with pros, but yet packed with. All the support and all the things that you are accustomed to experiencing and having at a, you know, family road, rally type event. [00:11:15] CraigDalton.: Interesting. So it sounds like, I mean, if we fast forward a few years from that original event, it sounds like you competed in a handful of events every year to try to, you know, obviously continue your enjoyment of the sport. The, the equipment had continued to evolve and, and you'd had a number of experiences at other events where you're like, I like part of what this event has done, but part of what that event has done. And you thought, well, like what if I did this on my own? [00:11:41] FabianSerralta: Yeah, look so it, the events continue. I con I would go to every gravel event that I could go to, but it just, it was, you know, you pay your 75, 85, a hundred something dollars, but. You're lucky you got a water table and it was, everything was always self support, self support, self supported, and you're paying all this money, but you're not really getting a whole lot in return. And to me, it really excluded a lot of beginners. It excluded people that didn't have a lot of bike skills or, or bike mechanic knowledge because, you know, I always say what, what makes riding gravel so great is that you're out in the middle of nowhere. , but what that's also, what makes it kind of dangerous and also kind of keeps a lot of people out of it because you know, you're out in the middle of nowhere. You don't have cell reception, you don't have convenience stores. Oftentimes you don't have many houses or you don't see a vehicle or cars don't even go come by half the time. So yeah, you're out there in the middle of nowhere, but then you don't help of neighbors and you don't have convenience stores and you don't have others to reach out to in case of an emergency or a mechanical. And I feel that that deters a lot of people from venturing and, and experiencing gravel. And as a result, you know, a lot of people miss out on experiencing gravel. So how do you bring in all those people? And for me, Is the way to do that is by bringing in all the support, the sag vehicles, aid stations, every so many miles. So for example, in gravel Locos, you have, you know, six aid stations you have 20 something sag vehicles for the women. We have portable bathrooms at all the aid stations where there is in HaCo or in Pueblo, Colorado . And that's how we take out that, that fear of, you know, Being out there in the middle of nowhere. So, but yet we still have, you know, 20 something, 30 pros out there participating just like you, we did, you know, at events like dirty cans, 200 or, you know, what was land run, you know? And I referred to them by those names because that's what I was modeling. Then. [00:13:42] CraigDalton.: I'm glad we unearthed that because I think it's important to kind of think about people's orientations as event organizers in terms of how they're gonna set up the overall experience. You know, it's one thing when you've got a, a top level pro who's decided they want to get into the event business. And oftentimes they do design events that are driven from the front. They're really a professional experience that does trickle down to the rest of us. But it's you know, it's pretty refreshing to hear you talk about. Wanting the last person in the event to have the best time possible as well as, as the first. So stepping back for a second, you, you live in Arlington, Texas, you've got property in Oklahoma. You'd experience the gravel community for a number of years. You decided, Hey, there's something missing. I'd love to highlight my perspective of a gravel event. How did you decide on, on, on Texas for the original event and what was that process like? [00:14:36] FabianSerralta: Well, I, you said it in, cause that's where I predominantly ride, you know, so I've a lot gravel. I've done gravel in California. I've done gravel in Vermont, in, in Montana. I've done gravel in Scotland. I, you know, I've, I've done gravel in other parts and, but Texas, where, where I mostly write gravel and I've done gravel all over Texas and HaCo. I remember writing and close to close to HaCo. And one of the folks that I was riding with says, man, if you like this area, You've gotta check out. Heico so I said Heico where's that? So I found it went out there and, [00:15:13] CraigDalton.: And where, where is it relative to, to the Dallas area [00:15:17] FabianSerralta: for me, it's about an hour and 20 minute drive [00:15:20] CraigDalton.: and is that to, to the east or which direction [00:15:23] FabianSerralta: I'm the guy that gets lost with Garmen. So so I'm gonna take a chance here. Say I think it's so out. [00:15:30] CraigDalton.: Okay. [00:15:31] FabianSerralta: So, yeah, I'm horrible. I'm like directionally challenged. So I get asked this all the time. Like the other day I was in Pueblo for meetings and I was meeting with the the the PBR, the folks for the professional bull riding association, which one of our sponsors in there were asking me. So which direction I, I have no idea. Here's the route, you figure it out. And really, I do get lost even with Garman. I'm that guy that I'm following route. And I always end up with more mileage. So I, up going out to HaCo. And I follow this route and it had so much more climbing, even though I am not built like a climber. I love as these challenging routes. I really love taking on routes to have as much climbing as possible. And it, even though it takes me all stinking day and HaCo has that, you know, for Texas as one of these guess that you get so much climbing and I absolutely fell in love with it. And Heico has it's heart packed. And it has a lot of beautiful canopy areas, you know, tree canopy, tree areas. It has lots of water crossings. It has. I mean, it's just a really diverse terrain. And even if it were to rain, it's so hard packed. It's it's got a lot of smooth areas. There's really nothing rough or nasty about it. It, and. Even, even if it rains it's, it's not an area that, that you get much mu much more than a couple inches of mud. So it's not like, like Mid-South where you have, you know, six inches, 12 inches of mud in your foot, you know, is, you know, foot into the mud. For example, last year in may it did run, it did rain. And so yeah, people got my, but you're talking, you know, an inch of mud, two inches of mud. Maybe two and a half. So it's not a situation that you're just bogged down and you, you have to walk, you, you can ride through it. So it it's really a, an area that you can ride it all year long rain or shine. And it was just perfect. And. I said, this is it. We're gonna do it here. So, you know, we had last year, we had three routes this year. We have four routes. Last year we had a 30 mile or a 60 and 150 something. And after our survey of the event, it was a very positive survey folks, which is absolutely thrilled with the event. But what kept coming up was have a 100 mile. I said, all right. So for 2022, we have a hundred mile as well. And it just filled up immediately. So folks really wanted a hundred. Not everybody wants to do 150 something miles, but they want it more than a 60 mile. So the hundred mile, you know, I never even thought of it, you know? So you learn, I've learned a lot, you know, I thought, [00:18:03] CraigDalton.: feel, I feel like I'm in that category where 150 mile, maybe I can muster that up once a year, if I'm lucky, but a hundred keeps me honest. I need to train for that pretty well. But I, I believe in my heart, like I can always uncork a hundred miles if I'm like relatively fit. [00:18:20] FabianSerralta: Yeah. And you know, and the hundred mile it is, it's a legit route. I mean, it's, it's over 5,000 feet of climbing and it's really a beautiful route and it, and it really incorporates all the hard climbs that are in the 150 something mile. And [00:18:33] CraigDalton.: what I, one of the things I always wanna unpack with event organizers, because I think it is a challenge depending on where you are, is okay. So you you've decided on HaCo as a, as a great riding location. But there are also logistics and permits and all kinds of things. You need to go through granted in a rural community. Maybe those are less than a more populous community, but you still need to do that. So what was that process? What was that process like for you? [00:18:59] FabianSerralta: Really easy, you know, what, what I have learned with I, you know, this is for me as a hobby and HaCo has, you know, it's really been incredibly easy. They they've really take care of all that for me. And I went in there with, you know, the understanding that, look, I'm doing this to help the volunteer fire departments. If you're willing to help me, I'm willing to do it. [00:19:17] CraigDalton.: And was that perspective, something that was already in your head. Hey, I wanna have a charitable component to the event I put on. [00:19:24] FabianSerralta: Yes. Yes. And, and if you're willing to work with me and, and take care of these things, I'm willing to do it. If you're not willing to work with me, I'm outta here. I just, you know, it's, it's one of those things that I, I don't have the time to mess with all that stuff. So if the town is willing, then I'm willing, I, if they want to put me through all these hoops and things and, and, and, and barricades and all these. All this red tape, I'm just, I'm outta here because I just don't have time for it. You know, I've got four kids and two other businesses to run. And so I was really upfront and they were really honest about it. And they just, they facilitated everything that I needed. They, they provide all the things that I needed. They provide law enforcement, they provide crowd control and barricades and they provide everything. The same thing with Pueblo, you know, they're. [00:20:09] CraigDalton.: you know, hike in the original gravel locus event. Sorry to interrupt you there for it. It took off through the gravel cycling community as a event option incredibly quickly. And there was a couple things that. Kind of at least caught my eye right off the bat, which were one was correct me if I'm wrong here. But it seemed like the registration was entirely a donation based model, which was unheard of. And two for a first year event, you had all these top pros saying I'm gonna be there. [00:20:40] FabianSerralta: Yes. [00:20:40] CraigDalton.: How did both of those things happen? [00:20:43] FabianSerralta: well, you know, it was, it was out of really, so the event was initially gonna take place in 2020 in November and I canceled it cuz of COVID, you know, so I had the Greenlight from, from HaCo, but I canceled it because of COVID. My basically, you know, I have absolutely zero connections in the bike industry. And what I tried to do was try and get the bike industry board. And the only way that I could do that was reaching out to them via Instagram and Facebook. And that really didn't really work. I couldn't get anybody to, you know, return any messages or anything, despite the amount of money that I spent on bikes. You know, I have the the record of my local bike shop for spending the most money on bicycles every year. just absurd. despite all that I couldn't get a response from anybody. So I said, you know what? I'm not gonna let that discourage me. I'm gonna have this event with, or without the bike industry. And so I said, I'll, I'll fund it. I'll do it myself, cuz I I'm gonna have this event. And this event is gonna have the component of the pros and the component of the beginners. And there is not there. Isn't gonna be a cutoff. So if folks are gonna train for the geo one fifty, a hundred fifty something miles with over 8,000 feet of elevation gain. I'm not gonna yank 'em off the course. They're gonna be out there as long as they want to be. And if they want to give up, they're gonna give up, but it's not gonna be, I'm not gonna take it away from anybody. I'm not gonna be that person. That's gonna say, Hey, you know what? You didn't make the cut off by 10 minutes or an hour or two hours. And you're off the course. Because I'm always that person, who's the last one. And you know, when I was at Ted's event in Vermont last year, I didn't make the cutoff. And when they came up to me and they, Hey, look, you, you didn't make the cutoff. I said, , we're gonna have a fricking fight. . And they said call Ted. And they did. They called Ted and it's like, leave him alone. He's fine. I I'll take care of, I'll wait for him. And Ted did. And he understands, he, he waited out there for me and I didn't make the cutoff by over an hour. And he was out there in the rain, in the cold waiting for me, everybody was gone. The whole thing was shut down. And he followed me for like the last 15 miles, cuz it was pouring rain. It was cold, but you know, he, he let me finish the, the event and to me, that's what being inclusive and, and finishing and, and you know what it's about. So to, Hey said, I'm gonna have this event regardless. So in 20 for 2021, how I was able to. Do what I did is with, like you mentioned earlier, this, this donation thing I said, you know what? Let's just, I've gotta get the attention of, of folks. Cause I don't have the support of the bike industry and I don't have name recognition and I certainly don't have, you know, experience. I've never done this before. So how do we capture attention? We're gonna do this for free. It's gonna be a free event. And, and first thing I said, all right, this event is gonna have 1200 free registrations. And what you're gonna do is it's up to you to make a donation, a direct donation to the volunteer fire department. Most folks are used to paying a hundred, something to hundred dollars or more for an event like of this caliber. Remember you have all these age stations you have. So you're getting 20 something pros. Top level pros from around the world. You're getting over five age stations, fully S stocked, 20 something, sag vehicles, portable bathrooms at all. Age stations. You're getting a draw string swag bag. Really nice. You're getting with zipper. You're getting T really nice. T-shirts you're getting purest water bottles from specialized. You're get all this swag, all this stuff for free. So, whether you give the fire station a dollar or $0, you're gonna get everything for free. So it was an honor system. And really, I think that showed people that it, Hey, this is an event that has Lawrence 10, Dan Ted king, Peter TNA, Allison Terick Jess, Sarah. You know, Colin, Strickland, you know, all these names that I, that are all of 'em are gonna be at at Unbound, all of 'em are, are all these huge events and there's no cutoff. There's all of this support that you don't get at these big events, you know, as far as aid stations and it is entirely up to me to decide how much I'm willing to pay with what I think it's worth well out of those 1200 free registrations. Less than 400 people donated anything. So that was a bit of a shock, but we still had the event [00:25:11] CraigDalton.: Yeah. And, and just to unpack that a little bit, you know, quite disappointing, obviously, that just like sort of the percentage of people that actually donated and to, to put a finer point on it, like, as you describe all the things that one would get for participating, you're talking about a hundred dollars worth of. Effort per rider to give them nutrition, to provide them porta potties, to give them swag, all those things. So it's a, it's a big proposition that I think often gets lost and and you put it in the proper context in that without someone supporting you without a, you know, a nutrition sponsor coming in and dumping. Tens of thousands of dollars worth of product on your tables. Like that's coming outta your pocket as the race organizer. And there's no way around that. So pretty incredible effort to get it off the ground. And sorry to hear that the donations were not as great as you wanted them to be, but with those donations, something great. Did material realize for the fire department. [00:26:12] FabianSerralta: Yeah. And. That that side didn't happen the way that it had. I had hope, but it, we don't really even think about it because we, at the end of the day, there were so many articles written about the event that I never expected in a million years. I honestly, I never thought that GCN would write about it. That basically magazine would write about it. That cycling news, the Velo news, all these publications wrote about it. You know, it was listed as a, as a basically magazine listed as a. Top 20 bucket list event. You, it was mentioned like 17 times in VLO news. GCN mentioned it cycling news had articles about it. These are all things that I never even consider would happen. [00:26:55] CraigDalton.: Yeah. it was absolutely incredible to reach the brand and the event got in that first year. [00:27:00] FabianSerralta: We smoking great deal on the, the fire. We were still able to buy it with the money that we raised. We, you know, we still had great registration numbers we had. And then for 2022, you know, we have over 1500 people registered and we raised enough to build a bigger fire station. So [00:27:20] CraigDalton.: That's [00:27:20] FabianSerralta: while maybe, you know, less than 400 people register out of 1200, it doesn't matter to me because cuz we still accomplished everything that we set out to do. We still got more numbers than I ever thought were gonna happen. And as a result, we, we have interest from other cities that are contacting me that wanna have events. So, you know, I, I was several cities reached out to me. Hey, can, can you do the same at our city? And it is, you know, I've had to turn down cities cuz it's just too much. You know, I've had two, two other Texas cities that I asked me to host events at their cities. And I unfortunately I've had to say no because I just don't have the time [00:27:59] CraigDalton.: Yeah. Yeah. [00:28:00] FabianSerralta: Pueblo. Against my better judgment. I was like, sure. It's you know, the, the Pueblo story. I really, really I, I couldn't say no, it's just, they they've, they've been wanting to do an event there and they even they were bidding to try and get an event and they, they lost the bidding most cities that want to do something like this. They're paying promoters to do the events there. That's one of my rules. I will not charge a city to host any event, cuz it goes completely against what I'm trying to do. So what I'm trying to do is bring money to the city and build and bring equipment and funding to the volunteer fire departments. So why would I be charging them money to host events [00:28:39] CraigDalton.: Yeah, it's super, it's super interesting. When you look at the economics of events, just events in general, how much they cost, but the economic impact to these rural communities, which in your case is very specific to raising money for these volunteer fire departments. But even beyond that, the, you know, the amount of meals purchased the amount of hotel nights, cetera. Like it's it, it has a significant impact. and, I'm super interested to get into your second event in Pueblo and learn how that happened. But one more question, just outta my own curiosity, how did you end up getting those 20 to 30 pros to come to a first year event? [00:29:15] FabianSerralta: I will see the credit to that goes to Ted king because I reached out to several pros. First was him. Via Instagram. Again, I don't have any connections or I don't really know anybody. And he was the only person that responded. And I wrote him this long thing through Instagram, direct messaging through Instagram. And I explained to him, look, this is what I'm trying to do. I'm I'm gonna have this event and it's gonna be free to everybody and gonna be up to them to donate. And this is all that they're gonna get, and this is all I'm gonna give them. And this is what I'm trying to buy a fire truck for the fire department. And I'm trying to get this many pros and he, he rides back. He's like, are you nuts? and he finally calls me. He's like, are you nuts? He's like, I'm so intrigued by this. And. [00:30:04] CraigDalton.: The idea, the idea was so crazy. He had to call and talk to the guy behind [00:30:08] FabianSerralta: That's exactly what he said. He's like, this is absolutely insane in this, but I'm so like intrigued by this and he's like, are you really gonna do this? And I said, oh yeah, I'm really gonna do this. And he's like, you know, this is how stuff gets done. You know, when, when people just take a chain and, and, and do something completely outside of the box. And, and he said, can I have two weeks to think about this? And I said, absolutely just take your time. And and he's, and he did two weeks later, he calls me back and I'm like huge fan of Ted. And, and I remember watching him in the tour de France and all that, and sure enough, two weeks later he calls me back. He's like, all right, I'm in. And. Do you have a website? No. He's like, you need a website and then he's like, what are you gonna do for registration? I don't know. I mean, he just went down this list. He's like, you gotta have registration, you gotta have this. And, and then and then he says to me and your social media post suck [00:31:11] CraigDalton.: suck [00:31:12] FabianSerralta: and he is, starts helping me, you know, he starts Giving me so much guidance and stuff like that. And he is like, and how are you gonna get ahold of all these other riders? Cause I give 'em a list. Like I want to get ahold of, of all these other riders. And he is like, I don't know. He says that, you know, let me help you. So he started really vouching for me and, and contacting them. And. And then he gave me a lot of advice. He says, you know, don't, don't do a don't, don't give money, don't do a purse, don't do this and don't do that. And, and you're gonna find that the folks that believe in what you're trying to do are gonna jump on board. And, and that's how it happened. He just, the folks that came forward are, are folks that care about what I was trying to do. And really wanted to be a part of something totally different. That was more about giving back. To communities and, and, and not so much about, you know, a big corporate event, it was more of a Grasso type thing. They, they were just interested and a lot of 'em have their own events that are grassroots focused, you know, Ted and Jess, Sarah, Sam Boardman, Laura King, and Ted, you know, all of them Lawrence Tanem has his own events in the Netherlands. Peter has his own event. So all of there's a connection amongst all of us. That have to do with our own little small events that are, they're not corporate they're just small community type events. [00:32:32] CraigDalton.: Yeah. Yeah. Amazing, amazing [00:32:34] FabianSerralta: then what would I do in return? You know, I help with the hotels and things like that and meals and stuff like, you know, that's how, what we do, you know, they, they ride for a living that's, that's, that's how they make a living. So you certainly, you have to help out in some way, you know, and you know, when with HCO helps me out with the hotel cost, so I provide them with a room and, and stuff like that. [00:32:54] CraigDalton.: Gotcha. Interesting. So now let's shift gears to Pueblo. I know you had mentioned you had a number of rural communities. See what you had done and reach out to you, but what was it about going to Pueblo in a state that you don't and you don't have property at this point? What was it about the Pueblo opportunity that said, Hey, this is the right next step for the gravel locus event team. [00:33:16] FabianSerralta: Well, I, I found out that they helped, they they've been wanting to have a gravel rent and I found out that. They had been bidding on, on, on having an event hosted there and, and they lost somebody else got the bid and that kind of bugged me. It bugged me, it bugs me that these small towns that are hurting and economically, and they're trying to bring business and they're trying to bring funds to their towns that they're, that there. Trying to get events by paying promoters and paying corporations money or offering to pay money. So that events are being hosted there. And to me, that it just doesn't make sense because if you're doing it for, for, as a business, you're making money. If, if you're hosting an event somewhere, you're gonna make money from registration, you're gonna make money from cells of, of, of, you know, shirts and, and you're making money from. Vendors and, and the bike industry's paying you per and, and, and all this stuff that I, I have, I don't have access to cause I don't have any, you know, I don't have the bike industry behind me and you know, or any of that, but you know, the, the lifetime events and the big corporate events have all of that, you know, you know, all those, you know, shaman and spa and all those companies that are, there are not there for free, you know, let's just be honest, you know, I was born at night, but not last night. So, And then to have these small towns that are struggling financially and have high unemployment paying significant amount of money for, for them to host the event there, to me that that just seemed wrong. And as a result, they, they were outted by another town and they didn't get the event. And I learned about this and I said, all right, we'll do the event there. So I met with the city I met with the mayor. And one of the questions were, well, how much are you gonna charge us to do the event here? I said zero. And I said, if I ever ask you for money to do an event here, kick me in your ass, please. I said, that's not. That goes completely against what I'm trying to do. I said, the reason I'm I'm doing these events is to bring funds to cities that are struggling financially, but also to bring funds to the volunteer fire department, because. Guess who we call when we fall and wipe out and bust our asses out, riding gravel, volunteer, fire departments, guess who's out there. That's, who's out there. You know, when we're out there riding gravel that, and all of us know this it's volunteer fire departments. We're out in the middle of nowhere and it's a volunteer fire department. It out there charge and really taking care of hundreds of, of miles. That they're covering and that's who we rely on. So if we're gonna support a, a department as a gravel community, I mean, I would think that I, you know, logically we're gonna support the volunteer fire departments in those areas that we ride. So it's not that I'm Mr. Nice or anything like that. It's just logical that we're gonna support the very same people that come to help us. And it's the volunteer fire departments in those areas that we ride. So. And I think they, they appreciate that, you know, so to charge them, it doesn't make sense. I don't think it's fair, but they do help. You know, they provide, like we said earlier, they help me with the permitting and they help me with law enforcement and they help me with barricades and things like that. So they, they do help. It's not like they're doing nothing. So it's, it becomes a, a community, a true community involved event. And we, we get that. We throw that word around all the time, community, this community, that, but when you really dig into it, poor community is paying a few hundred thousand dollars. And it's really no longer a community. Now we're talking about a service and a fees and stuff like that. But in, in our case, you know, HaCo provides all this help and volume and stuff like that. The same with Pueblo. That's. [00:37:03] CraigDalton.: think that's, you know, it's, it's in, I think it's refreshing to take that expansive view of community cuz oftentimes the gravel community, those words are thrown around a lot. Generally implying your fellow athletes, the fellow people out there riding with you. But it, it really is in these rural communities. It's the people of the community that are coming out, coming out, whether they're, you know, Manning the registration booth or Manning an aid station, or, you know, opening their doors and giving you a glass of water. If you're stuck out there somewhere like that, that really is the breadth of the community that gravel does touch in these town. [00:37:38] FabianSerralta: Oh, I mean, you better believe it. If they don't help me, I'm not doing it. mean, there's no way I, I would do it. It it's just, you know, I wouldn't do it. And they understand that and, and, and I'm really open about that. It's like, I'm not charging anything, but you gotta help me. You know, when I met with the fire department, it's like, you all gotta help me. There's, you know, I don't have, this is, you know, and I, and I say this, you know, like, My social media, it's one Cuban and an iPhone. You know, I don't have a, a, a, a crew or anything like that. It's, you know what you see on social media? It's Fabian, you know, one Cuban and an iPhone. I don't have employees. I don't have anything. It's just myself. So I, I will take all the help that I can get. And you don't need an entire staff to, to do anything like this, but you do need, you know, help and, and volunteers and, and Pueblo understands that. And HaCo understands that, you know, I'm looking at another state right now and we're looking at a third event and they understand the same thing that, Hey, we need, we want to have event grab a locus type event. We don't have, you know, a few hundred thousand dollars to. Give a promoter to bring the event here, but we do have willing bodies and people that are willing to, you know, help and, and volunteer. And, and that's the model. And, but we also like having 20 something pros and we like having the, that racing component. But yet we also want to have an environment that the Fabians that are gonna come in last know that they can train for this. And it's not gonna be taken away. They're not gonna be turned around and yanked off the course because to me, that's, I can't imagine training for something for a year. And, you know, not being a Ted king or, or, or a Allison Terick or Jess, Sarah, I'm not those folks. You know, I can't imagine training and having my family behind me and all of that support and, and the struggles of having to work other jobs and then being yanked off the course until, Hey, you know, you can't finish you because you didn't make it by 30 minutes or an hour or two hours. I cannot imagine what that feels like. And to me that just, that that's not inclusive, that that's just telling somebody you're not good enough and turn around. I, I, to me, there's no explanation that you can give me that tells me that's rational, reasonable, not even safety. What do you mean safety? There's, there's nothing. If it's a issue then guess what? You know, the amount of money that these events make, then you plant a fricking sag vehicle behind those folks to follow them till the end. What does that cost? I mean, lemme know I'll pay for it. What's the big deal. You know, and that's what we do at gravel locus. Last year, we had a vehicle sag vehicle to follow five folks, cuz it was dark. They didn't have lights. I said, well you freaking follow them. Follow 'em all the way to the end. You're gonna be their light because. Again, why would we yank somebody off the course? Now, if they want to quit, it's on them. If they want to throw in the towel, it's on them. But, and, and then the other thing that we have with our pros and, and, and they're more, and you, we don't even have to ask em and it's like, Hey, you know, make yourself available to the, to the folks, to the regular folks. And I do, there are so many selfies out there with Ted and, and kids and, and Pete. Lawrence. It's just super cool and funny as hell. Allie Terick and Jess, you know, all these young girls and, and folks that got to meet them personally. And they were out there available to all these folks, which, you know, it's, those are memories and things that you just, you know, all their fans get to meet them. [00:41:16] CraigDalton.: A hundred percent. So I guess we, you know, I feel like we've unpacked pretty completely what the gravel Locos, eco ethos is and what the experience is gonna be like on the Pueblo side. What is that terrain like? I've driven through Pueblo, but I've never, I've never put rubber on the its and trails there. What, what do you expect the courses to be like in Pueblo? [00:41:36] FabianSerralta: Oh, my gosh, it's silky smooth, but you know, it's, it's, it's so beautiful. I got to ride 23, 24 miles the other day. So we, we, we rode from the fire station. We did a loop and it was about 24 miles and about 1400 feet of elevation gain. The the main route we call it the, the GL one 50, that's just our, our, our, the, the big route is always gonna be called the gravel locals one 50, but it's really 169 miles. So you get, you get a little extra, but it's, you know, right with GPS says it's over 13,000 miles, but as we know, it's always under, it's always more than. [00:42:14] CraigDalton.: feet of climbing. [00:42:15] FabianSerralta: So I would expect just about 14,000 feet of elevation gain and, you know, it's it's for me coming from Texas, it was a little, a little harder cuz there there's that whole, you know, the altitude, but it is just so smooth and so nice. It's you know, it's hard packed also. It's it's smoother. The gravel there is it. It's just hard to explain. It's just, it's beautiful. [00:42:40] CraigDalton.: So do you imagine this being the type of event that larger groups can stay together and benefit from drafting off one another and things like that? Just given the type of terrain you're on. [00:42:48] FabianSerralta: Yeah. Yeah. It's just, I mean, it, it's hard to explain. I mean, there it's, I was, I was telling them over there, it's like, it's hard and it's definitely challenging, but you're looking at mountains and you're looking at, at all this beautiful terrain, it's really, you know, I was, I was exhausted. Again, I'm not, I'm not anybody who's in the kind of shape and certainly I've, I've gained. I, I was telling them the other day, I was like, you know, there was the COVID 19 pounds. I, I managed to, you know, I went from riding a ton of mileage every year. And when I started gravel Locos, I've gained 50 pounds in, in two years of not riding and running two businesses and gravel Loco. So. I've gotta find a way to get these 50 pounds off. So yeah, going downhill was great over there, but going up was tough, but just a scenery is just so, so interesting. [00:43:37] CraigDalton.: and are the courses punctuated by like a significant climbs? Like in terms of like, oh, you're gonna be climbing for an hour at a time. Like [00:43:44] FabianSerralta: know, gradual they're gradual climbs. There was nothing that like in HCO, you get these punchy climbs over. There's more gradual. So. You know, you can get away with with less big gears in HighCo. I tend to run bigger gears over there. You know, I didn't get in any of my big gears, you know, I, I run a 10 52 in a rear Ram and I, I wasn't using it over there because they're, they're more of the gradual climb. You kind of get into a rhythm and they're kind of, I prefer that to be honest, that you just kind of get into this groove and you get into this rhythm. Whereas high code has these. You know, we have some, some climbs that are 22% 23, and they're pretty punchy. And we have these three climbs that are back to back that we call the three bees. You can decide whatever you want to call those bees, but bitches they're rough. And then and man, those kick up into the 22, you 23, 20 4%. and it's, you know, they're kind of loose rocks and you just kind of gotta lean forward and you gotta get that big granny gear and just work your way up. Whereas in Pueblo, you don't have, I didn't experience anything like that. And, and most of what's out there is these long gradual climbs that you kind of get into a rhythm. So I prefer the, the type of climbing that they have out there in Pueblo, but they're both very, very different, very different type of riding. [00:45:05] CraigDalton.: And would you change your, your tire width from HaCo to Pueblo? Would you do [00:45:10] FabianSerralta: I think that you can. I think that at, at both, you can get away with smaller diameter tires. So I've done HaCo with 35 centimeter tires. I've done HaCo with 47. I think that in Pueblo again, we rode Pueblo last week where it had been snowing. and it was muddy, but even then, you know, I wrote it with 45 centimeters and there was folks out there running it, riding it with 30 eights and they still did just fine, but the, the Pueblo gravel is much smoother than the HaCo. And I, I can see some folks getting away with when it's dry, especially over getting away with, you know, 30 fives, [00:45:50] CraigDalton.: Yeah. [00:45:50] FabianSerralta: somes. I. [00:45:52] CraigDalton.: It's funny. It's so it's so counterintuitive to me to, and S B T gravels the same way I remember getting like my arm twisted to run 30 eights, and I was like, there's, there's no way, like I'm going to Colorado. And at home, I'm all about the 40 sevens here in Marin county, cuz it's so Rocky and but sure enough, like I definit could have ridden that as they call it champagne, gravel in Colorado on 38 with absolutely no issue. So it, it, it's quite fascinating to me and. One of the things I. [00:46:20] FabianSerralta: racers recently that are 40 threes. I haven't put 'em on yet, but they're kind of, you know, they're not slicks, but they're not Nobbies and I can't wait to try something like that. They're 40 threes. And normally in HighCo I run 40 fives or 40 sevens, but I'm looking forward to running those 43 as a whole new tire I've never used for, but I can certainly see a. And in Pueblo getting away with 38, even, even a slick or a semi slick. [00:46:45] CraigDalton.: Yeah. so, so interesting. It's obviously, it's like, it's a never ending debate and discussion about which tires to use. And I remember reading, you know, where the, when we're recording, it's the weekend of Mid-South and you know, there's a lot of people. Twisting their arms and, and twist getting all twisted inside about what tires are gonna run tomorrow or today. Excuse me. On race day at Mid-South. So always fun and appreciate the insight there. So for people looking to find out more information about the events, where can they find information about gravel locus? Why don't you tell us the, the website and the dates of the events this year? [00:47:19] FabianSerralta: So HaCo is May 14th. And Pueblo is October the first you can sign up on our website, which is www dot gravel, locos.bike. Just make sure you click the link for one or the other, or if you wanna do both I've left. He still opened. But we've got a or 1500. I haven't decided where I want to shut it down because HaCo is open to having more Pueblo is still open as well. but just all the information is on there. There's four routes for each. So there's the gravel locals, 30, the 60, the hundred. And the one 50 information about the routes is on both of them. The cause for each of the events is always gonna be a volunteer fire department. Pretty much everything you need to know about it is on the website. You'll find all the different pros that are gonna be there. We've got more pros to add to the website every day you get, you know, we get new pros that wanna come on board. As far as our sponsors there, aren't not many of them, but the, the ones that are on there, you'll find out that these are folks that are very, have been very loyal since the beginning. And if somebody wants to be a sponsor, they're more welcome. Welcome to send us a message or email us, but. We're pretty much self supported and really it's just a community thing. And, and it's really, this whole entire thing has been made possible by, by the towns and, and little businesses within the towns. Very small involvement from the bike industry. It's been a, a community thing to be on. Oh, just kind of how it worked out. [00:48:42] CraigDalton.: Amazing. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for putting so much of your heart out. there and, and making a making events that you wanted to see happen in the world. And I think it's such a sort of beneficial place for the gravel cycling community to have event organizers with that orientation and From this conversation in our earlier conversations. I know how much of yourself, both personally and financially you put on the line to create this event series. So again, for, from, for me, thank you for doing that and exciting to hear that Pueblo is going off this year and exciting to hear that yet another community has come to you and talking about like, how do we have grow Ava three. [00:49:19] FabianSerralta: Yes, we we'll release that soon. I'll let you know. . [00:49:23] CraigDalton.: Awesome. Thanks for your time, Fabian. [00:49:25] FabianSerralta: you. Thank you. So. [00:49:27] Craig Dalton: That's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. Huge. Thanks to Fabion, not only for joining us on the show, but for everything he's doing around the gravel Locos series, I think he's got his heart in the right place and I've no doubt. These are some of the best gravel events out there to attend. Big. Thanks. Also to our friends at hammerhead for sponsoring the show member, you can get a free custom color kit and premium water bottle with the purchase of the new hammerhead kuru two computer, simply go to hammerhead.io and use the promo code. The gravel ride. If you are interested in supporting the show, ratings and reviews are hugely helpful as is sharing the show with other gravel cyclists. If you're able to support the show financially, simply visit buy me a coffee.com/the gravel ride. Until next time. Here's to finding some dirt onto your wheels  

I Survived Theatre School
Mickey O'Sullivan

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 82:28


Intro: when you don't feel your best, do the thing anyway, Fake Famous, H&M is 40 shades of putty, Stitch Fix,  Let Me Run This By You: Selfie vacations, Paul Stuart, rent a fake jet, Tevas, we are old enough to accidentally wear cool clothes. Interview: We talk to Mickey O'Sullivan about body image, sibling relationships, getting bullied, Illinois State University, The Wake, Henry Moore is Melting at The Athenaeum, addiction, Sophia Bush, Chicago PD, Casey Affleck.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina .3 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.2 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.3 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?2 (35s):Isolation is a funny thing because it's both the thing that you feel drawn towards when you don't feel well. But it's also the thing that, you know, that makes it worse. And I saw another thing that said, the more comfortable you get with you and who you are, the less likely you're going to want to isolate because it does, you know, it it's effort to be who you are when you're, you know, not kind of sinked up. Yeah. That's all just to say that when my kids have their aches and pains and two of my kids are real vocal about every single sensation they ever have in their body at any given time. Like, I can't think of a time where these two leave the house where I haven't heard my foot hurts.2 (1m 20s):My shoulder hurts. I have a headache. My stomach hurts. It hurts when I do this. And I, I believe it all. And yet I'm like, yeah, but if you stay home, I'm not going to let you be on a screen. So you're just going to literally be staring at the wall, feeling that I wouldn't, you rather go to school. Right.1 (1m 38s):Interesting. But Gina, it has taken me to 46 to actually realize that. So they're like, literally like a year ago, I probably would've been like, you know what, I'm just gonna stay home. And like, I have a headache, but like now I realize like, oh no, I think it's also like, time is slipping by like, I'm getting older, we're marching towards death. Like I got to get outside2 (2m 3s):Dude. And1 (2m 4s):You know, so like, I, I think it takes some what it takes, but yeah, man, I know that this pandemic has created the sense that the outside world is dangerous because literally it was, so it is like a war in that we, I felt like we were in a war when, when this all started, it was two years ago this month. Right. So right. I came to visit and then all to you and then all hell broke loose. And it, yeah, it created this thing of like the danger is outside the home. And so now it's like so easy to, but I actually realize that I feel worse at home because not only then do I have a headache, I have to deal with my fucking dog.1 (2m 52s):Who's a pain in the ass and get triggered by my husband who I think should be doing his job differently. And I hear him because we're in a teeny house. So that's torture. That's worse.2 (3m 3s):That's terrible. That's no good. My corollary for that is just, I do spend all of my, I mean, I do my, everything I do is, is at my house. I take care of my house. I take care of my kids and then I write and, and work, work on, you know, artistic stuff when you're home and your office, maybe miles experiences this too. Like you don't, you're never not at work in a way. So you're, I gotta do some, I gotta do something to have more of a separation. Maybe I should just like, bro, did you, did you see what about Bob? When he, he worked from home, but he clocked in. I should know that.1 (3m 42s):Well, the other thing that I was thinking, so I, okay. I thought about this cause I was asked. Okay. So I, a friend of mine said, I have this free thing for stitch fix. Right. One of these bottles. Okay. Right. I've done those before I did DIA and co and whatever it lost, its luster, it's a waste of money. Eventually. It feels like, and it's ridiculous. Okay. But good, good news about stitch fix is that, or one of these services is that one. I love the jeans they sent me, but two, you have to leave the house to return the things you don't want or you pay for the things. Right. Okay. So that's a side benefit. And so that got me out of the house and three I'm wondering, I was like, oh, maybe I should send my code to Gina.1 (4m 26s):But then I'm like, Gina, doesn't like to shut up. Right. And Gina doesn't like, so they do the shopping, but you also don't strike me as someone who would want to dress up for our meetings.2 (4m 36s):Exactly. And I did stitch fix and did it for a while. And then I was like, well, what am I dress for? This is a big conundrum. I have just life in general. And we should tell our listeners that, you know, we're, we're contemplating recording, doing a video recorder recording of these podcasts, which will be great, but then it'll make me feel like I need to, but maybe, but maybe it's okay to feel that way. Maybe it would be actually really good for my mental health to be like, I have to get dressed for my day.1 (5m 8s):I think it helps me. I mean, look, I'm literally wearing a tank top and a bra, but like2 (5m 14s):No, that's huge. Yeah,1 (5m 15s):Yeah, yeah. Right. No, and pants without an elastic ways. So like, I think it helps me in that. And some days it's just a pain in the ass, but it also helps me to think that, yeah, at least I'm trying in some area of my life, which we're all trying in all areas, but I'm just saying it's a visual representation of the fact that like, oh, I'm trying, the other thing about coworking that I like is I get to see other people's outfits. And sometimes they're really cute. Sometimes they're fucking horrible. Like it there's a lot of like 20 year olds that are here at co-working because are 20, 25. I'm a little old. So I like age everyone down, but like a 25 year olds that cause you can rent big offices here too.1 (5m 59s):Like for companies like marketing companies. So I see the fashions of the 20 five-year-olds and I'm like, whoa, you are opening my eyes to a whole hell scape of fashion that I did not know existed.2 (6m 14s):It's all so bad. It's all so bad. By the way, before I forget the, the getting dressed is, is this the reason to do it as the same reason to make your bed every morning? Like you don't have to sure. But doing it creates a nice demarcation that you're not always just, you know, in this miasma of like doing the same, same thing. But yeah. Getting back to the fashions of it's all terrible. And I just watched this documentary called fake famous. You might really like it it's is actually so fascinating. It's a, some guy who, I'm not sure if he's a journalist or whatever, but he speaks all of the time on news programs about social media.2 (7m 2s):Like that's just his area of expertise. So he says the social experiment where he, they have a casting call where the casting call says, I'm asking for people who want to be famous. So they get 4,000 submissions1 (7m 18s):And it's is it called the theater school?2 (7m 20s):Yeah, no, it's not going to theater school. And of course, you know, they paid these people to do it inverse of what we did and they pick these three people who wants to be famous. And he was, he set out to use his knowledge of social media to make them famous, artificially famous. And it was so interesting. It's a, it's something, it's a culture that I knew about. Like, but I'm not, I don't participate in influencer culture. Right. And I don't know if you saw this thing, I posted that 40 million people in the world have a million or more followers, like really puts things in perspective.2 (8m 5s):You know? And, and, and it was also talking about how the algorithm shapes itself. So like I'm also reading this book about Alex Jones and conspiracy theories. And you know, he will say on his show, he'll say a lie. And then he'll say Google it, because he's got millions of listeners and millions of listeners Googling something. Right. Makes it, shapes it into something. Right.1 (8m 35s):It makes it true. Makes it true. You can literally an impact the truth. It's gross. But it's also, it's like literally how for me, yeah. It's like how Hitler got to power, right? There was no Google, but it is the same. Like if you believe it, it will be so on some level. And if 40 million people believe it, it will really be so on some level. Yes.2 (8m 58s):And if they tell us that earth tones and no patterns and no structure to garments looks good, eventually will believe it. And they probably are doing it because there's a glut of earth, tone fabric, and people are trying to write, but I haven't seen something that I would consider a cute outfit on a person under, or maybe even anybody, but in years, like going to the mall, I don't say, Ooh, this is great street1 (9m 29s):Snapper.2 (9m 30s):It's all just looks gross.1 (9m 33s):I went to, so I walked down my street to get to coworking and there's an H and M there. And I, and also when my niece was here, we went to H and M because they love that shit. And I, I was like, literally, this is all 40 shades of putty. Like honey, 40 shades of putty. I said, and she goes, what's potty. And I go, it's this color? 40 shades of putty is my new memoir. And it's all about this color scheme they've got going on. Right? Like it is literally Putney. The putty that came in, the eggs that we used to play with silly putty or whatever, the fuck,2 (10m 9s):Petty wood glue,1 (10m 12s):Like coffee2 (10m 13s):Grounds call,1 (10m 19s):Let me run this by you.2 (10m 27s):So one of the places, I guess that Instagram is a very popular Instagram spot, by the way, people do whole vacations that are just centered around where to have their picture made. And like, not even thinking about the vacation itself, like people come to LA. Yes. Ma'am people come to LA, let's say they had this one story on their two girls from there might have been from Russia. Now that I'm thinking of it came, you know, spent $2,000 or whatever on their ticket to come to LA. And it was literally just touring these selfie spots. One of them is the Paul Stewart building. There's a big pink, it's a Paul Stewart it's fashion design.2 (11m 9s):And it was just like, his store is the, it's a huge, huge, huge pink wall. Oh. And this is where people at any time of day, you could drive by it. And you're going to see people taking selfies there because it's an Instagram spot. Oh. So people come to LA by the droves with a list of selfie spots.1 (11m 33s):This is like fucking Pokemon people situation.2 (11m 37s):Okay. Like by dying because you're being pokey while you're driving. Yeah, exactly.1 (11m 42s):Wait, wait, wait, wait. Yeah.2 (11m 43s):So I guess you don't see too much of this.1 (11m 45s):No, not, especially not in Pasadena. I can't2 (11m 48s):Imagine1 (11m 50s):Fucking suburb dude. And, and, and I would also, oh, but I did see, okay. So miles surfs. Right? And we, while he's a new surfer, I shouldn't, it's not like Kelly Slater or whatever the fuck. Anyway, the point is we went to a surf lesson once and I fucking kid, you not, there was a guy who I believe was speaking Russian on the phone at the Santa Monica parking lot at 7:00 AM beach parking lot with his Mercedes that was rented clearly with a camera on a fucking tripod, taking selfies at 7:00 AM with a rented Mercedes in a crazy outfit there when he was doing and, and, and me and miles and I, and, and, and the surf teacher, who's fucking hilarious.1 (12m 41s):Who's this stoner comedian named Jared, who is hilarious, was like, yeah, yeah, dude, this is, this is, this is it, man. This is how they do it. They like stop traffic. And, and I didn't know what he was talking about, but now that you're saying it, this is what this guy was doing. And I, he was on the bash Dudley doing it. So like, there was no embarrassment. I was like, what the fuck? And music was playing. It was videos too. Like Instagram videos, reels or something. He's fucking, he was playing rap music, which was the best thing about the whole thing was the music. But he, it was raw. And he was crouching down, like by the car, in an outfit at 7:00 AM.1 (13m 21s):And Doris was, I was with the dog of the dog was like, even the dog was like, what the fuck is this guy doing? Like what?2 (13m 28s):I never bring my personal. I was like, just taking a selfie. I have to do it usually with one of my kids. And even then it feels it's something about it feels wrong. And did you know that you can rent the space that looks like the interior of a private jet for $50 an hour so that you could take pictures and make it look like you are traveling,1 (13m 58s):Which is like my nightmare, because I'm afraid to fly. I'd go to, I'd be in hell, but okay.2 (14m 2s):Oh, you can rent a mansion for $600 in a day and have, you know, these Instagrammers, they get together like four or five looks and they rent out a mansion and they pose themselves in these ridiculous things. And then they, because they post, they have to post four times a day in order to stay relevant and to get brands that want to get a sponsor them or whatever. So they are just constantly going around looking for content. And then the pandemic happened. And I think that really gave rise to like renting these spaces because they couldn't actually go on these vacations and so forth.2 (14m 43s):Isn't that wild. It's just1 (14m 45s):Craziest shit I've ever, I'm going to watch this documentary. I M it is again, I know why you find it interesting too, is because it really reminds me of Adam McKay's work. Like what is happening? It's so meta. It's like, what? Wait a minute, wait, what is happening?2 (15m 7s):Well, ironically, I think one of the things that's happening is whereas, you know, initially the feeling about the internet, it was just made everything opened up, right. And that's still true to, to a large degree, but on another way, everybody's life is just about their phone. You know, your life takes place on this tiny little screen and, and to be in a group of people under, I mean, maybe not even that maybe just to be in a group of people is to see like 80% of them at any given moment staring at their phone, wherever they are out in the world. Right. They, one of the scenes in the movie is they, some company hires a bunch of influencers.2 (15m 51s):It's a junket, essentially. Like they take them to these selfie spots, including a abandoned water park. That's like a, that's like a great place to take salaries. They get this crew of girls and they just take them to these various spots to model this ugly, putty, colored clothing, and then get paid for brand, you know, for hashtagging the brand. And there, I was just like so depressed. I felt sick after watching that Pressing right. There was one guy who did not, he decided that actually of the three people, they picked, two of them quit during the experiment, because one of them was getting comments from his real cause the guy was buying them followers.2 (16m 38s):That's what he was doing. He bought them followers, which are all of these bots. And did you know that like people like Kim Kardashians who have whatever millions and millions it's estimated this 60% of their followers are bots. Yeppers. Yep. Yep. Yep. So I guess1 (17m 1s):I can't, I can't even process what's going on here today. Like, I, I, you, you can't people can't see what they will. Once we start recording these bad boys, the video, I like looked down at my fucking TIVA sandal. Okay. My Tivas okay. By the way, by the way I was wearing, I bought Tivas because my feet are fucked up. Right. And I had to wear, I got, I have two shoes now I can really wear, which are Hocus. And then Tivas alright, terrible. Sarah will situations. But anyway, I'm wearing black Tivas sandals that I wore literally wore in eighth grade. And then I have a fucking LL bean like throw back at, or is it an Adirondack2 (17m 45s):And1 (17m 47s):Adirondacks a chair. Right. But okay. And it has like kind of nineties, throwback colors, not on purpose. I just liked it. And I bought it has a hood. I fucking wearing that. Some jeans and my Tivas and I look like I'm going to summer camp. Right. And I'm in the coworking and these young, these young ladies go, oh my God, we'd love your throwback nineties outfit. Literally. They said that. And I was like, Oh my God, I, oh my God, I didn't ha I didn't know what was going on. And I was like, oh my God, the one there. Right. I literally looked like I was going to camp echo, which was the camp I went to the Y camp.1 (18m 30s):And I also was like, it's also kind of hideous. And yet these youngsters are thinking I'm doing it. Ironically.2 (18m 38s):Let's, let's give up.1 (18m 44s):Let's just give up. Let's kill ourselves.2 (18m 47s):Let's wave the white flag. I tried Lord. Oh Lord.1 (18m 53s):I mean, I, I couldn't understand what's going on. And I looked down and I was like, oh my God, they're so right. And I just smiled. And I was like, are they2 (19m 1s):Literally Chivas from eighth grade? Like, you literally still have your same. No,1 (19m 4s):I bought Because my feet hurt. I need sandals that are literally, it's so sad. It's so sad. And I was sitting at coworking and they walked by and they said that I looked down and I was like, I, I did, I did feel Gina. Like I just, I gave up2 (19m 23s):Trying to give up. Now we're all set.0 (19m 28s):Well2 (19m 39s):Today on the podcast, we are talking to Mickey O'Sullivan. Mickey O'Sullivan is a Chicago actor. You know him, you know him from the shy and from Chicago PD and athletes. So many television shows. I couldn't possibly mention them all here as well as theater and commercials. And he is a related and relatable, insightful, funny, warm, talented person. So please enjoy our conversation with Mickey O'Sullivan1 (20m 15s):I'm talking about right now, filling her age. I don't know. It's great. It's great. It's in a good way. You will see that my internet was in and out. It's just,2 (20m 24s):Yeah. Are you close to your router or1 (20m 27s):Even know where the router is? So there we5 (20m 29s):Go. What's the router.2 (20m 33s):Good point. Make you good. Bye. Nice flex there with your Peloton in the background.5 (20m 39s):Oh yeah. Check that out. Just like slid it over. I've got it on one of those lazy Susan's right now. This is my current look. And it just,1 (20m 48s):Do you have another lip?5 (20m 52s):Who's a lazy Susan on the table and you know how you got to kind of prop up your, your laptop. So,1 (20m 57s):Oh, I thought you had the Peloton on a fucking lazy Susan. I was like Next level.2 (21m 4s):I was adding a whole new dimension to that workout, which is already very difficult.1 (21m 8s):I was just feeling Gina and about the things, which is interesting that you popped on. So I can tell, I can say it in front of you and make you really embarrassed. So in a good way. So I was just saying, and we'll, we'll, we'll start with the official Gina opening, even though you left theater school still the same opening applies. So say it,2 (21m 27s):Congratulations. Mikio Sullivan, you survived theater school. Hey, Mickey, serve a cookie.1 (21m 35s):You deserve a cookie and all sorts of things and free therapy. And Yeah, so we all need that. But I was just saying that one of the things that I wanted to talk to you about, and we'll just dive right in and see Gina and I talked before our guests. So we're like warmed up about like psychological issues. Other people are like, what are you talking about? Like, why are you starting here? But here's how I have to start, because this is what I've realized lately. You're the only male identifying person that I've ever talked to. That talks about body image.2 (22m 8s):Oh,1 (22m 10s):I had never had a conversation where casually come up in conversation, your history of your relationship with your body as, as you from a kid to an adult, no one ever taught male, identifying person has ever talked about that with me and eight, I, it opened my eyes to like, oh shit, oh shit, men have body image issues. I did. It didn't even occur to me. So that's where I want to start. Good morning to you.5 (22m 40s):No, I'm also kind of jealous, right? So I listened to your podcast and you do you get like a real ramp up. And so this morning I was like, you know what? I need this a little bit. So I, you know, I drove the wife to work. I have a wife, I would say the word wife, which is really exciting. Thank you. And I'm also a chauffeur, which I love being. I like to be of service. I'm driving her there and I'm trying to have conversation to like warm up, you know? And she is so focused on work.2 (23m 12s):She's like, yeah. Anyway.1 (23m 17s):Yeah. She's like, that's all good. I didn't listen to the last 10 minutes. You said? Yeah. I mean, so I I'm glad that you, that was nice of you to do a ramp up, but no need, but, but, but also, can you talk a little bit about, and then we'll leave that that'll probably lead into acting stuff too, obviously in schooling, but like, what was your experience? Because you've talked about that. Like, I guess my first question would be like, what are the thoughts when I bring that up about a dude talking about body image,5 (23m 49s):To me, it makes total sense. And I'm also kind of shocked that more people don't talk about this. I mean, growing up, right. Like, yeah, kids are cruel for sure. But like, it's kind of very insidious the way that guys can be cruel to other guys. And also this idea that like, in order to be attractive to whoever I'm, whoever I'm like crushing on, like starting from a real young age is I better look like these people. And when we were growing up, those people were athletes. Right. It was never like Neil deGrasse Tyson. Right? Like it was never like these like really super intense or if it was, it was like bill gates or something.5 (24m 31s):And I don't know, like there was, there's this disconnect between masculinity and like being okay with your, your body and your body image and the way that you give off your image to other person, people so much. So to this day, I still struggle with it on a daily basis for a little while there, I was like, you know what? I think I understand the key to Hollywood success and that's the six pack and the really fucked up part was that the more, the closer I got to that goal, the better my career got. And I don't think that the two are linked. I don't think so. But I think that like, being, having to think that as somebody who's, who understands the industry pretty well and who has kind of had highs and lows in their career, if I'm thinking that then what is, you know, the version of 15 year old Makey, who's like, oh, I wonder what being an actor is like thinking.5 (25m 27s):And so that starts super young, but I was also stop me if you have questions, but I'm going to go on like a tangent here. Sure. So very young right. Actor on a baby soap opera before image is even a thing, right? Like before you have any concept of that, you give off your image to other people. I don't remember any of it, obviously. Right. And then parents separated. I come to Chicago, dad stays in New York, me and my brother growing up. My brother is always super thin, super smart. And I am always not super thin and not super smart. And so there's this kind of competitiveness that's going on right there.5 (26m 11s):But in order to fit in my brother developed a real good sense of humor at new school, very young. And I didn't, I was, I, I struggled to acclimate to like a new environment. And I guess, I don't know necessarily that I, I think that I wanted to tell myself that I had an eating problem growing up, but I don't know that that's true. I don't think I understood food or my body or energy really well because later on I started getting into athletics probably out of this complex.5 (26m 50s):Right. But I started using food for fuel and that kind of started my journey towards like understanding my body and understanding of what goes in there. But as a kid, it was like, if it's in the cupboard, I'm going to eat it. And I am a very energetic person. And so I attached myself to like food, energy, just keep going. But then when you're getting made fun of on a daily basis, energy emotions take like a lot of energy to process. And so I would come home and I would be in tears from, you know, being, they call me Shabaka my brother's name is Danica.5 (27m 30s):And they like, you know, the, the terrible people that our children. So I was always known as like, what is the one thing that is different between you and your brother? Well, you're fat and you're not. And, and yeah, like going into the career, it's awful.1 (27m 51s):But wait, I have a question. Was your family, I always wonder this because my family was not supportive. So, so I was bullied at school and I was also bullied at home. Were you bullied by your brother and your mom or no,5 (28m 8s):For sure. My brother, like, we were awful to one another, the fact that we have a relationship now and like a really good one is, is mind blowing. But yeah, we were awful each other. My mom, not so much, my mom always struggled with her body image and her weight and her reflection of herself. And I think still does to this day, like I remember like some of the conversations before our wedding was like, for both her and I like, you know, gotta start to trim up for the way, you know? So, so yeah. I don't know if I was bullied at home as much. I was, it was definitely a safe space for me coming home in that regard.5 (28m 50s):But my brother around his friends, it would increase a bit. And then of course that's like a role model to all of my friends or whatever. And then I just started hanging out with people who like, probably weren't the best for me because they weren't making fun of me. They weren't the best for me because of,1 (29m 10s):I mean, I think that it's like, we go, I'll speak for myself. I went, you go where the teasing stops. Right. Whoever's not, the love is great. And the love5 (29m 22s):Has an absence of love.1 (29m 24s):Right. I see. I always say like, I didn't necessarily want to be not if once I realized I was just going to keep being bullied, I then just wanted to be left alone. So whoever would leave me alone, if not mention it became my friend, even those people were fricking had troubles of their own. I mean, like were troubled, at least they weren't picking on me. Right. So it's like you start settling for more and more, less and less love. And like, you just want to disappear. I mean, that's what happened.5 (29m 56s):Do you think that that led to you being an artist in the sense that you started focusing more on self through isolation? Do you know what I mean?1 (30m 5s):Great question. I started. Yeah. I think that what happened was it led to my brain and heart madly trying to figure out why this was happening to me. Why was reading, being treated this way by school and at home and what I could do that was safe. And the only thing to do that was safe was make believe and create in a world where, yeah, where it wasn't about the way I looked because you know, but then you mix2 (30m 37s):Except until it totally was1 (30m 41s):When you then go to a theater school. So there you go.5 (30m 44s):Yeah. Yeah. Super weird to how that kind of comes into the mix. Right.2 (30m 50s):So I, I'm being quiet as you're talking Mickey because you're describing a dynamic that is happening in my house right now with my two sons and, and you're, so you're the, you're the grown up version. I'm really happy to hear you have a good relationship with your brother, because this is like one of my biggest fears. I had such a terrible relationship with my sister and my sons are on their way to, you know, how it seems to me is they're on their way to having that type of relationship. And maybe it's the thing about, you know, because kids are like, prof, I forget sometimes how much they have to take on at any given day.2 (31m 30s):Maybe even 90% of it at school is social. And only 10% of it is academic, but that's, that is so much that just, just like information processing and it has to happen in your body. So if you're having a hard time with it and then you're having, you know, body image issues on top of it, it's, it's all, it just seems like impossible to survive high school, you know? Like how does anybody survive high school, let alone theater school,5 (31m 60s):But oh,2 (32m 2s):No. The 15 and 13.5 (32m 4s):So part of the pandemic was they were being judged on this while they're going through like fuck and hormones and brutal. I could not imagine2 (32m 16s):Completely, completely brutal. And that's a whole other thing about education and the pandemic and how like we'll never get it back. Like, you know, it's just, there's just last years basically. But anyway. So when did you start getting into acting? When did you decide that that was something you wanted to pursue?5 (32m 34s):All right. So like alone, personally, like walking home from school, right. That, that mind was already there. Like my entire life. I was like, I'll be an actor. Not that I wanted to, but like, oh, that seems like, like I was the liar growing up. I was the storyteller I told the fucking biggest bibs in the world. And so I think like in my mind, but then it was like, oh, I'm very distractable. And I, this is how I knew I wanted to be an actor. Was that like one day that, wow, I could be a doctor. I could be a firefighter. Oh my gosh, garbage man. Why not? Right. And then the idea, like, I'd maybe like work on that for like a day.5 (33m 17s):And then the next day I'd be like, oh, I'm so interested in this. And I think later on, I was like, oh, you can go. It's a really cool way to learn about all sorts of these little things. It was just kind of like spin the wheel of roulette, acting, you know, go out for tons of commercials. You get to play a handyman for a day. And for me, like, I personally loved the pretend of like, oh, I wonder what a handyman stays like.1 (33m 41s):Yeah. That's what I remember about you is like a super curious kid, like super curious and maybe like that's part of the artist's brain too, is like, you were always curious, curious, curious, curious a hundred times curious. So what, okay, so you were like, that was your thought as you're walking home and then how did that translate into like being in a play or auditioning for shit? Or like how does that work or going to school? Yeah,5 (34m 7s):Definitely thought, right. Like funny person was my option in terms of getting out of like the social anxiety. And so my mom got me involved in a play, I think in like sixth grade, but it was outside of my social circle. It was like, we were on like the Southwest suburbs and this was way in the south suburbs. And so I didn't know anybody there only relationship to me was this thing. I played a skunk in a Winnie, the Pooh play. And then I proceeded to like rip my pants and fart in my own peace scene. So That helped the whole shitty body image to thing. Cause right.5 (34m 47s):Cause who splits their pants.2 (34m 50s):Right. Miley Cyrus actually. I mean, anybody can start therapy6 (34m 56s):It's me and my2 (34m 58s):Okay. But when it was time to pick college and you were looking around, did you look at a variety of theater programs or conservatories?5 (35m 8s):No. I don't think that I admitted to myself at that point that those was like a valid career option. So my senior year of high school, I had this like real stint in hockey where like I thought that that could be a career path for me. And then that was ended through like a variety of like injuries and you know, like personal stuff. And so then it was like I had a theater professor pulled me aside and was like, Hey, not professor, but high school teacher, special ed teacher who then ran the drama program was like, Hey, maybe you should consider doing this with your free time. Instead of just like smoking pot and smoking hookah and like driving around with your newfound free time.5 (35m 51s):And I was like, oh, maybe that's a good idea. So I did like beauty and the beast high school as like, you know, this like a side character kind of like not in the limelight. And then later on did a Shakespeare comedians, LR where we just totally ripped off of the American conservatory theater's production from, we like copied it, move by move and called it acting. And then we won state for that, which is kind of backwards, you know, like we won state for copying and production. So I definitely thought it was good, but I didn't think that I was any good at like creating my own versions of characters or anything. So I knew I had to apply to a school.5 (36m 32s):I had no idea what I was going to apply to. That seemed to be what I was good at. So I did a double major and special education and, and theater because I didn't think that a, my parents would approve of me being fully theater student. And then B I felt like maybe it was either a selfish career path or yeah, not like, I think I wanted something more noble maybe. And I had experience working summer camps for special Olympics and stuff like that growing up. So I was like, oh, that's a, that's an interesting thing. So then when I got to Illinois state university, they were one of the schools that accepted me.5 (37m 15s):I had no concept of what a theater school should be, none whatsoever. And a lot of the other people were like, oh, I did four years of drama and four years of forensics. And in the summers, I go away to theater camp and I was like, I played hockey. And so I didn't fit in again. Right. Which was fine because I learned how to be by myself. And so I started making all of my social circles outside of the theater department for the most part. And I think in a way that kind of helped me, like I practice my monologues in front of my buddy, Greg, who I think Greg does like computer science and you would just go, I think that was good. You know, it really became self self reflection.5 (37m 59s):And the weird part is like, I would go in and I, I really did become the, the, one of the golden children of my department. I was an asshole. Yeah. So a hundred percent I was cast in a li almost immediately. And2 (38m 18s):It does not surprise me because this is what always happens. Like the, the men who go into drama don't tend towards the masculine. Right. So then when they get somebody who's like, I played hockey that, I mean, you know, that happened in my high school. That1 (38m 35s):Happened our theater school too.5 (38m 37s):I think it's backwards too though. Cause you the more in touch with my feminine, oh, I hate that word. But like, you know, like this idea that like there's a masculine, the more I got in touch with myself and with art, I felt the better I did. Right. I still think that to this day, like the more I'm receptive to my own emotions and the emotions of those around me, the better I'm able to handle my career.1 (39m 4s):Yeah. It just sounds like the, the, the bind that we're all in, which is people want you to be a certain way. But when you actually invest in being another way, it's going to make you a better person than artists, but nobody really wants that, but they say they want it. So men are in a bind. I guess what I'm saying is like, you're the first male guest that we've had on that I've known. And I know the struggles that you've been through and it, it opened my eyes to theater school for men straight men specifically are men that identify as straight, whatever. It's a, it's a bind for you too. It's a bind for you. So I guess, what did you love about theater school and what were you like? I'm outta here.1 (39m 46s):That's my question.5 (39m 48s):Yeah. And those are all awesome points. Like it continues. The body image thing continues all throughout college. And I do grow closer to myself through that. But I think the thing that I loved about it is that I had that opportunity for the first time in my life. Like hockey was definitely an obsession for me. I tend to gravitate towards obsessing. And so to get into theater school, I didn't take any gen EDS. I like, I, I forgot my degree. I failed out of school. And finally, because I just, I wasn't interested in anything except for learning all of the theater that I think at some point I looked at somebody I MDB and I was like, oh, they were, you know, working for 15 years before they had their big, big, big break right there before they were discovered.5 (40m 36s):And so I was like, oh, I have a lot of catching up to do. Right. I didn't do this until my, until I was 18. Now it's time to catch up. So I just started like taking only theater classes. And then the idea that you can sit or lay on the ground in a dark room, surrounded by your peers and think about what shape your body is making and what noises are coming out to me. That was super interesting to me. I got lost in that world. And I still think to this day, like my brother is a finance guy and he he'll never know what it's like to just weep behind a mask because you saw something a certain way one day. And so for me, that was a celebrated thing.5 (41m 18s):It was like, congratulations, you, you cried behind the mask. I don't know. It's still is kind of a bizarre thing to like to reflect on. But my, my presentation skills got better at, than my social emotional skills got better. I was spending every night in a rehearsal space getting to know how to best work with people and how to make mistakes, like going back. I love college. I don't like the results of college. I don't like the way that it was kind of organized. People were cut after certain years. It was very dramatic. But theater school for me was, I mean, what a dream, right? Like I got to wake up, put on a leotard and go stretch for two hours and then go into a voice class.5 (42m 1s):Talk about my feelings towards words, study history.1 (42m 8s):I wish I could, I want to go. What if I apply where they, that's a horrible idea. I do this all the time, by the way. But like, it sounds so great when you guys, when you say it, I'm like, wait, I was wasted. I wasted my time there. I wasted my time.5 (42m 26s):I don't know though. Right. Like I think I've spent the rest of my career being like, okay, so what can I take from that? Because that's not the real world. The real world is not that you get to wake up and do that. But like, certainly I've recently gotten back into like stretching and mourning, like yoga in the mornings and stuff. And I'm like, oh, that was something that really works for you back then. Where did that go? And so, right. Like creating my own schedule. I think also I got, I was supposed to get a, B S and not a BFA. So I think I definitely missed some of the, I had more rigidity in my schedule that I think some of my peers and that made me resist the regular general education stuff and spend more time.5 (43m 16s):Like I committed to every directing project that somebody was doing. Right. Like they're in a class. And I was like, I'll do it. When they were like, bring one monologue to class. I was like, well, I'll take up the whole class and bring 10. I was super selfish about theater classes as well. Like if nobody else wanted to go, it was like, well, what are we doing here? I'll go.1 (43m 37s):Wow.5 (43m 38s):So I S I experienced a ton. Right. I was looking through, I, I was like reflecting the other day and I don't understand how I did all of that in four years or four and a half years or whatever, because I probably did at least 10 projects a year. And then I stayed during the summers and did community theater, like a playwrights festival there as well. And so I was just constantly going, but a weird body image thing. Right. So freshmen, what are the freshmen 15? I put on like the freshmen 45 drinking a lot. Right. Partying, a lot, eating food from the food Corp,1 (44m 18s):Chicken fingers, chicken fingers, fingers.5 (44m 22s):So much cheese.1 (44m 25s):Yeah.5 (44m 25s):And then I played my first like bigger role was Toby belching 12th night. So, so, oh, you have extra, you are bigger than other people. Now you're going to play the funny role, right. The drunkard, the, this or that. And I don't know what came too, but I think somebody made a body image comment in my final assessment that year. And regardless of whether that was a positive or negative thing, I committed that summer to not being what they thought I was. Right. I was like, I'm not just this1 (45m 6s):Comment. Do you remember the comment?5 (45m 7s):I don't remember. I just know that there was a catalyst, right. Something happened in that last little meeting where either what was said, or what was not said was not what I wanted to write. And so I was like, I have, I have a fucking chip on my shoulder. I love to prove people wrong. It's like a weird obsession thing as well, prove myself wrong. And so I, I went and I went running and I went back to this like, athlete, like, oh, this is how I preserve myself. And maybe if my feelings were hurt, right. Like I can focus all of that into this.5 (45m 47s):And I lost, like, I lost a lot of weight very quickly. And then that next, you know, I was the romantic leading man, the next fall In Philadelphia for the story. And to the point where like, this is how little I understood. They're like, you're doing the Philadelphia story. Will you come in and read for like the dad role? And I was like, okay. And I was like, oh, this is the dad role. It's a musical, obviously in my brain. And it's not, yeah. It's not, it's, it's Carrie gray Audrey. But I was like, I didn't read the play. I had no idea.5 (46m 27s):And then they cast me as like the leading romantically, not Carrie Grant's character. And I was like, oh no, this is a terrible idea. They don't know that. I can't say6 (46m 43s):I showed up to them like ready to like, 2 (46m 50s):Mickey. Would it be fair to say that, like, you've had to figure, I mean, a lot of people come to acting as a way to figure themselves out. Right? Like a lot of people like the idea of trying on roles. Cause that's what they're also doing with their own identity. And I do see like a little bit of a trend where a lot of people who do it for that reason, maybe didn't get enough reflected back to them when they were a kid or they got reflected only these negative things like you're describing about getting bullied. So, I mean, would it be fair to say that it's taken you oh, a long time to get to know who you really are?2 (47m 31s):Are you still in a process of figuring that out? Like, did you, how much, or how little did you know yourself when you were at theater school?5 (47m 41s):Yeah, totally fair to say. I didn't, I didn't really know myself. I definitely was enjoying the process of getting to know myself, but I didn't really have an understanding of like why I was the way I was. I, and I am definitely still in the process of trying to figure that out. I think I did a play right when I left school called, called awake. And it was about a young man. Who's a poet who's who thought his father was a poet and turns out there was, it was his brother. Like my, my father's brother was my actual father.5 (48m 22s):And it was just like, I don't know myself. I need to go figure out who I am. And that really resonated with me. It was like this idea that like sometimes what we feel is just the, the anxiety or the poles that we feel is just us going while I thought I would have known myself more by now. And so, yeah, definitely still trying to figure it out. My process, creative process. I mean, like that's constantly in flux, never the same. And that's like hockey stuff too. The reason I liked hockey was you could run a set play, and it's always going to be different every single time.5 (49m 4s):And the idea of theater, right? Like you, you get up every night and you do it. And like something about the way that your day went will be reflected in your performance. And, and so that's interesting to me. Yeah.1 (49m 23s):Interesting. I never got that. I never, I never knew that that acting was about me. Do you know what I mean? Like I never got that note. Like that message. I missed that whole thing that like, I could bring my whole self to a role. It doesn't mean that it's me. Like, but that I was allowed to bring my whole self to the role. And in fact, if I did, my acting would be better. Like I miss so much, I'm just so bombed, but I'm learning it. I'm learning it from, from listening to people like you on the podcast and talking with them like, oh, I'm helping to, to, when I teach now, I'm like, bring you, you're helping me.1 (50m 7s):The other thing I want to say is that when I saw you Mickey in my first time seeing you in a lead role or any role was at the greenhouse, I dunno, Athen am in Henry Morris, melting this, play it. And I'd never seen Mickey act. And someone was like, I have my own problems. Like, why am I going? I went to this5 (50m 36s):That's great advice. Yeah.1 (50m 40s):Oh yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. And I give you terrible advice. I was like, go to LA, you're going to be famous. But like, yeah. Well, anyway, so I saw this play. I saw you in the play and I was like, this is one of the best actors I've ever seen in my life. I, I, I was blown away. I thought, oh, this kid knows what the fuck he's doing. And commits 125% on stage, which is, it just was miles ahead of what everyone else was doing onstage, but not in a real snarky way, in a real working man sort of a way so that you don't hate Mickey because you're like, oh, this is a good person.1 (51m 26s):They just really are committed to what the fuck they're doing. I had never seen that from an actor your age, because we're2 (51m 34s):Obsessed.1 (51m 37s):And I was like,5 (51m 38s):Oh,1 (51m 39s):This kid is the real deal. Like I,5 (51m 43s):That maybe I was avoiding My work. I was avoiding all of the other things that were sitting outside of that. Right. That like were valuable pieces of insight that I could have learned about myself. But like, I, at that point, Jen, like I was moving to LA because I did not have a home. Right. Like it was a warmer climate. Like I had no money to my name whatsoever. I struggled with addiction. I right. Like I had all of these personal life crises going on, but theater is a place where you can go for two hours, whether you're seeing it or whether you're in it and totally just purposefully forget everything else.5 (52m 26s):And so I put off a lot of like personal growth until probably like 30 years old, at least like real is true. Like this might work for you, but it is destructive. I put off that work because I was like, oh, it serves me. Right? Like it's, it gives me energy to put into my career. It is going to better knees somehow to hurt.2 (52m 49s):How do you, how, how does the casting world see you? Like who are you as an actor?5 (52m 56s):That's a good question. I wish I knew. I think I'm, I think I play intense characters that I played, blue collar characters, definitely people with an emotional depth, like an intense, emotional depth. I have, I'm starting to play the good guy. All of a sudden, which is interesting. I like playing the best friend role. And I think I kind of look at every role as the best role, you know, I am there to do something.8 (53m 32s):Yeah. Right.1 (53m 37s):Which is why they want you for the leading man role. Look, this is, it makes perfect sense to me from an outside. I'm like, they want you, so you are finally what I'm hearing too is like, you're finally what you said is like starting to do the work on yourself, right? Like as a person, as a human, as a father, as a, as a, as a husband, as all the things. Right? So it makes perfect sense that you are now playing the good guy. And also that you now are wanted by people to play the lead. Even though you want to play the best friend and you play leads to, I'm not saying you don't want to play the lead, but it, it just all makes sense.1 (54m 18s):It all makes sense that when you work on yourself, if, and if you're lucky and all the things that You5 (54m 24s):End up your1 (54m 24s):Career advancing when you do the work on5 (54m 27s):Yourself1 (54m 28s):Internally, but5 (54m 30s):Then you can decide whether or not things are working. And that's like the, the small business perspective, right? Like you open a small business on the corner, your first year, you're, you're looking at like high expenses, right? Like expense your entire store. You're going to be in the red for a while. Second year, you maybe are developing a customer client relationship. Third year, maybe you have a personal crisis and things take a step back fourth year, whatever fifth year, by the time the fifth year goes, you go, I have some solid data to work with. Right? Maybe this network isn't working for me and I need to go to a different network. And I S I subverted a lot of bad advice. I didn't listen to any of it.5 (55m 10s):I went from New York back to Bloomington, normal Illinois to try to get my degree and failing out again, because I did too much theater up to Minnesota, Chicago, California, Colorado, back to Chicago, and about three years, four years. Yeah. And so then I got back to Chicago and I was like, oh, this is what it's like, when you stay in a place for a little while, maybe people have a chance to respond to the postcards that you're sending up.2 (55m 40s):Yeah. And what's that whole thing, like now, since I've been out of it for so long triangle, when you're first starting out and trying to get people to know you, you said you still send them postcards with your, with your headshot on one side or something.5 (55m 54s):Snail mail, baby headshots. Right. I would print go to Kinko's or FedEx or whatever. I've had tons of headshots, tons of resumes, tons of cover letters. And I'd send them to everybody which maybe is what I'm learning. Now. Thankfully, I have representation. I've had representation for a really long time. Is that like, maybe be targeted with the people that you want to work with and focus on that rather than like, will anybody like me please will anybody, But maybe I had a better, I I've never thought about this. I submitted to two agencies or one agency that called me, and it was a really big name in Chicago.5 (56m 39s):And they called me in and they kept calling me Maki, like, Hey, Maki, come here. And then they were like, yeah, my name is Mickey. Sorry. That was the thing that they call me,1 (56m 59s):Excuse me.5 (57m 1s):And I was like, well,1 (57m 2s):That's the greatest fucking name I've ever heard of. I mean, it's not your name, but it's a great name. Yeah.5 (57m 8s):They brought me into the room and they're like, okay, give us your monologue. But look at the wall. They're so spot on the wall, look at it. So I did the whole thing and they were like, how are you expecting to have a good relationship with casting? If you just stare while you talk the entire time. And I was like, oh, I thought you said, like stare at the wall and talk. And they were like, you know what I think, like with your look and your experience, we could do a trial contract. And I was like, maybe finally at that point, did I have the guts in my life to be like, I don't need just anyone to be my friend or to work with me.2 (57m 48s):Maki need somebody who can really connect with5 (57m 51s):It knows my name, you know, that read the email. And then sure enough, I, I reached out to somebody who I knew was an agent and I had a meeting with them and I was like, Hey, is that how all of them should go? Because if it is, I'll just take the contract and I'll work in the industry and whatever. But if it's not, I'm not going to sign with somebody who's a Dick. Who's like too overwhelmed to actually build new relationships. Let me go and focus on somebody who like, wants to have a conversation about what I think of the industry and my place in that.2 (58m 23s):Oh, it makes me sick to think about how many people who are in those positions of power. It's, that's all they're interested in is the sort of the power play of it all. Like this thing that we start doing when we're kids and for some people we don't ever outgrow it, which is like, I don't need you. You need me, you know, the way that I show my, you know, whatever that ability in the world is to reject you instead of, you know, to be inclusive or, or even just, I mean, just a kind thing, because by the way, nobody has, is named Maki. So they should have had a sense of like, wait, why are we saying this? Right. I mean, right.2 (59m 3s):Shouldn't they have had some idea that5 (59m 6s):I do. Like, maybe I'm a sucker and lately I've been trying to think of like, what are all of the reasons that people could act like that? Because I don't get it right. Like, I don't get like, the I'm going to go brag to people about how I treated this person, like shit. And I, I think maybe it like it, it is just a really deep, deep, personal thing that's going on. That's totally clouding. Then being aware of how they're treating other people at all. Because I don't, I it's gotta be because I don't, I I've never heard anybody brag to me about how they treated somebody like shit in my entire life. I know that that's a thing that generally, as humans, we feel deep shame about and how maybe that deep shame manifests is just constantly being so focused on, on you and the things that you have to do and, you know, maintaining your own personal level of success and survival.5 (59m 59s):It's this fucked up survival tactic of like nobody else matters only what I'm doing matters. Maybe. I dunno. Maybe I'm just a sucker.1 (1h 0m 8s):No, I think it's, I think you're right. Like I think people get so caught up in their own process. They don't even know some people do, but I think that's like the exceptional sociopath psychopath, but like most people are just like low level nurses. We're all such low level narcissists mixed with our childhood trauma. We don't even realize what we're doing. I swear because I have confronted people, you know, that I've, I've confronted big wigs and said, do you realize that you're talking like this person is a piece of shit and they're like, what are you talking about? And I'm like, oh my God, most people don't understand.2 (1h 0m 50s):And most people are so far from understanding that the, that the farthest they'll ever get with that is just a defensive will know you're the asshole for pointing out. Right. I mean, that's, that's, that's usually the limit. It never ceases to amaze me. And yet it always amazes me. No, that's the same thing. how with, you know, my, the thing I'm always interested is getting from surface to depth with people. But I think like maybe 98% of the population is just really interested in staying or maybe it's just because of where I'm living. I don't know. But I, I find that not only do people not want to go from surface to depth, they're frightened and weirded out by you wanting to do that.2 (1h 1m 35s):You know what I mean? Because my thing is always like, we all know that the weather is how it is. Like, can we just like, let's skip that part. Let's go to the next thing. And people don't like that. They really don't like that.1 (1h 1m 47s):No people are not interested in that because what they have to, I am convinced that at the, at the core of that is, oh, one day I'm going to die and everyone I know is going to die.2 (1h 1m 59s):And1 (1h 1m 59s):If we talk about real, if we talk about real stuff, it'll inevitably lead me to, oh my God, everyone I love is going to die and I'm going to die. And I can't handle that. So I'm going to do drugs or do anything else instead, or not, or talk about the,5 (1h 2m 13s):Not the talking about the weather, but that's where I'm at right now is that I'm like, oh, the most important thing that we could do now is acknowledged the back that we're going to die2 (1h 2m 23s):Because it's so much freedom by the way, because it's not like, sorry to spoiler alert, but everybody is going to die. So like let's instead of being, spending your entire life afraid of that thing, embrace it because you're not going to die right now necessarily, you know, like you could make right now more interesting, right.5 (1h 2m 43s):Enjoy right now. Right. In a way1 (1h 2m 46s):Even noticed right now, just notice that we're actually alive. And I, and that we are here now doing things, talking, eating, all the things that we do it's happening. I think that that's what I've come to in this podcast. And in my life is like if the most I ever get to is, oh, this is actually happening. I'm here. This is going on. How I feel about it as how I feel about it, but this is what's going on. Acknowledging them. That's going to have to be enough because to go deep with people is such a treat and so rare. But like, I have to still stay true to the acknowledging part.1 (1h 3m 28s):Like, oh, you, you might be uncomfortable, but I'm going to acknowledge in my own way that, that, that we're all going to die in. And that's part of the impermanence. I'm going to acknowledge it to myself because if I don't, it just really leads to2 (1h 3m 40s):You just feel so isolated and desperate and yeah. Yeah. Well, anyway, speaking of isolated and desperate and alone, you mentioned going through some issues with addiction. How, how do you, could you say anything about that and how you, how you got ahead of it?5 (1h 4m 0s):Yeah. Never out of it, right? Like I am an addict through and through, right? Like it's anything that make me feel better and then like learning what those good things are and what leads to right. This path of destruction. I think really early on, I was constantly the kid that was if he only put his mind towards things, but I think if you only focused on those thing, and so that got me on this idea of like, whatever it is, and this is where obsession came in, right. Like if I could just focus on stuff and then I would dive 110%. And so what were the things that allowed me to do that?5 (1h 4m 41s):Right? Like first it was, you know, cigarettes, right? Like I could just sit there and read a play and read another play and smoke cigarettes, I guess. Right. Like definitely alcohol is in there. It's not like my primary. I, I do not go into functioning or nonfunctioning relationships where this, where I'm like, oh, I need this to function. Or I need this not to be totally dysfunctional. But early in my life, it was definitely a medicine of some sort. Right. Like I was definitely looking at it for relief. I drank a lot and drank, it was binge. Like, that was the way that we drank in high school and college.5 (1h 5m 23s):You had three hours to drink. You better drink a lot of it. Right.9 (1h 5m 27s):So true.5 (1h 5m 30s):So that was a thing. And then Adderall became a thing for me where it was like, this is something that allowed me to sit and work for hours on end. And certainly I think that, like, if I'm going to go to a psychiatrist, they would be like, I think you definitely have some traits that are right there with add or ADHD, but I did it. And so I would just abuse on my own. Right. Like, and I, I looked at it as the investment opportunity of a lifetime. Right. It was like, you're going to constantly have this on you. You're going to constantly be taking it. You're going to constantly be working. And that led to cigarettes. Right. That led to me avoiding all of my own personal shit.5 (1h 6m 13s):And then, right. Like the way I quote unquote got out of the throws of it was total collapse2 (1h 6m 24s):All the way to the bottom5 (1h 6m 26s):All the way. Right. Many times where I thought that I was going to die. Right. That I thought I was like, I would not sleep at night and a very functioning. Right. Nobody, nobody knew at least that I know of. Right. Like, I'm sure, like now looking back like, oh, something's going on there? Like, but it was a whole production for me. Right. Like I had the hand sanitizer to stop my hands from smelling like smoke. Right. So nobody needed to know that, like that was my preparation to get myself right. For, you know, the audition. And then it was, you know, I've got gum, I've got Gatorade to keep my body, like all of the, the electrolytes in my body up because I haven't slept in two days, I've got like coffee.5 (1h 7m 17s):And so like financially fell apart. Right. And no good reason. Right. Like best point in my career probably was like, you know, commercial money coming in, episodic money coming in. And for me, this was just like, great. Double-down on my investment. Great. Like be better, be better. And in my version of better was more, more altered, I guess. So never out of it and re emotionally my relationships fell apart. Right. I stopped paying attention to what other people, how other people were reacting around me.5 (1h 7m 58s):And that kind of led into acting, I guess, a little bit that like, it wasn't maybe until like five years ago. And Jen, this is where I'm a little bit jealous of you. Is that like, I did think that what you said earlier was like, I never considered myself, like the main part of gen actor being so valuable to whatever character I'm playing. I never considered that, the shit that I was trying in rehearsal, like just like a kid in a box, like had real time attacks on the other actors that I'm working with.1 (1h 8m 31s):I never considered that either. Like, but you're right. Like, it goes both ways, right.5 (1h 8m 37s):If you're in a, if you're in a meeting with a coworker at an office and they never focused on one idea long enough for everyone to kind of like gel with the idea, you don't work with that person for very long, even if what they're doing is an abusive or hurtful or anything like that, it's just not conducive to like, right. Especially for theater, where in Chicago, right? Like you get $300 for an eight week stipend. And so you better really get everybody read it better, really be getting something out of that rehearsal time. And I was selfish, you know, like this is about me and my journey and my character and, and everybody else better fight for that.5 (1h 9m 17s):And there's, and that's what conflict is. And that's what drama is.2 (1h 9m 22s):Well, what are your feelings about that? The stories that we hear about famous actors who do that, who still do that, that's still their process. Does it make you mad?5 (1h 9m 31s):Yeah, I think it's so misguided. Right. And I'm thankful that I've had enough experiences where I'm like, oh, you're, you were kind of the Dick there that could be bad. That could develop. Right. Or somebody who pulled me aside and was like, you know, that just wasn't necessary or whatever, really, really early on, I moved to New York and I was in a play festival. And it was like about what is that? The witch who they shove into the oven, what was that called? The Hansel Hansel and Gretel. I was Honsel I guess. And we were pushing the witch into the fire and they were like, yeah, you used a broom and we didn't have a broom.5 (1h 10m 17s):And so like fresh out of college, Mickey was like here, hand on the butt. And afterwards this woman came up to me and she was like, don't do that ever again. And I was like, oh my God, what did I do? I have no idea. I'm so sorry. And at first I was really kind of like, come on, like, what are we going to do? Like you needed to get it. So it was my first time being like, oh wow. And she was older than I was. And so to me that told me that she's been hurt in this process and that through whatever trauma that she's been through, like this is not the, the road to working with other people.5 (1h 11m 2s):Right. And so there's just like little moments like that, that I think if you're so blind you're so like, I need to get to the top. I needed to get to the top. I needed to get to the top. It's really easy to just that everybody is being1 (1h 11m 16s):Right. Right. It's like, that's5 (1h 11m 19s):Like1 (1h 11m 20s):This whole reckoning, this whole reckoning that the arts and humanity and the U S and everyone is doing, which is like, that may be true. You said something really important to me, which is, it may be true that people are overly sensitive. You didn't say this part, but I, I think people can be, oh, I can be overly sensitive. That's for fucking shirt. And it's also true that that is not the way to working with others. So like, both are true. Like I have sensitive issues. And you notice that like, doing that kind of behavior is actually not conducive to doing good art and creating and not, and getting jobs, the whole thing.1 (1h 12m 2s):So like, it's interesting. It's like you took the note and actually took it. Whether you took it all in or whatever, you took the note, but a lot of these dudes aren't taking the note. They're not getting the note. They're seeing it as the people are over sensitive, which they might be, but they're also not taking the note, like take the note, you know,5 (1h 12m 21s):I take the note. Absolutely. That's something like in college that we were constantly reminded. It's like, you don't have to respond. Just take it, write it down and think about it for a, for an eye and then com

Plant Based Briefing
234: Sports Drinks are Neither Safe Nor Effective by Dr. Michael Greger at NutritionFacts.org

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 9:17


Sports Drinks are Neither Safe Nor Effective. Commercial influences may have corrupted the American College of Sports Medicine's hydration guidelines. Dr. Michael Greger at NutritionFacts.org explains. Original post: https://nutritionfacts.org/2022/03/15/sports-drinks-are-neither-safe-nor-effective/  Dr. Michael Greger is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized speaker on nutrition, food safety, and public health issues. A founding member and Fellow of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, Dr. Greger is licensed as a general practitioner specializing in clinical nutrition. He is a graduate of the Cornell University School of Agriculture and Tufts University School of Medicine. In 2017, Dr. Greger was honored with the ACLM Lifestyle Medicine Trailblazer Award and became a diplomat of the American Board of Lifestyle Medicine.   He founded NUTRITIONFACTS.ORG is a non-profit, non-commercial, science-based public service provided by Dr. Michael Greger, providing free updates on the latest in nutrition research via bite-sized videos. There are more than a thousand videos on nearly every aspect of healthy eating, with new videos and articles uploaded every day.   His latest books —How Not to Die, the How Not to Die Cookbook, and How Not to Diet — became instant New York Times Best Sellers. His two latest books, How to Survive a Pandemic and the How Not to Diet Cookbook were released in 2020.  100% of all proceeds he has ever received from his books, DVDs, and speaking engagements have always and will always be donated to charity. How to support the podcast: Share with others. Buy some merch: https://www.plantbasedbriefing.com/shop Leave 5-star rating and review on  Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/plant-based-briefing/id1562925866  Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2GONW0q2EDJMzqhuwuxdCF Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Plant-Based-Briefing/dp/B08K59CRM4/ref=sr_1_3?crid=18XNAH6UMO9L5&keywords=plant+based+briefing&qid=1643393899&sprefix=plant+based+briefi%2Caps%2C168&sr=8-3  Follow Plant Based Briefing on social media: Twitter: @PlantBasedBrief YouTube: YouTube.com/PlantBasedBriefing  Facebook: Facebook.com/PlantBasedBriefing  LinkedIn: Plant Based Briefing Podcast Instagram: @PlantBasedBriefing   #vegan #plantbased #Plantbasednutrition #veganpodcast #plantbasedpodcast #plantbasedbriefing #drgreger #nutritionfacts #wfpb #wholefoodplantbased #electrolytes #childdeaths #diarrhea #gatorade #dehydration #exerciseassociatedhyponatremia #encephalopathy #americancollegeofsportsmedicine #cocacola