Podcasts about Gatorade

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Manufacturer of sports-themed beverage and food products

  • 1,270PODCASTS
  • 1,543EPISODES
  • 49mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 26, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Gatorade

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Latest podcast episodes about Gatorade

The SociEATy Podcast
How to Intuitively Fuel a Workout [feat. Katie Spada, RD]

The SociEATy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 45:02


Fellow Registered Dietitian Katie Spada joins me in this episode to discuss marrying food with joyful movement! Having been a synchronized swimmer, she talks about how many of us tie our identities to exercise and lose ourselves along the way, wondering who we are without it. She also reflects on why she decided to become a dietitian and how she then found intuitive eating! Katie walks us through what we should do to fuel before a workout, during a workout, and after a workout! She discusses the primary differences and also walks us through how the intensity of your workout is important and affects how you will need to fuel, how to be sure that you're properly fueling without counting calories, how identity does (or doesn't) play a role in what we do, and so much more! She, as is tradition on the show, closes with a couple of actionable tips, including starting with something small if we aren't accustomed to eating before working out and also reflecting on our hydration. I love talking with other dietitians because we all have our different specialities and perspectives, so I always learn something new, and Katie, who is such a wealth of knowledge and information, is certainly no exception! I thank Katie for coming on and helping me dispel the myth that you can't eat intuitively and exercise at the same time, and I hope that you enjoy our chat. Feel free to reach out to Katie on her website or her Instagram page, and screenshot this episode to let us know that you have listened and what especially resonated with you! I would also so appreciate it if you would leave a review via whatever platform that you use to listen as I read each and every one of your reviews and it helps us continue to do this. If you aren't already, be sure to subscribe to The SociEATy Podcast so that you never miss an episode, and be sure to also check out this episode's sponsor – Equilibria!   Time Stamps [1:23] – Colleen announces today's topic and today's guest – Katie Spada, RD! [3:27] – Katie shares some of her background with us. [6:57] – Katie gives us some key tips on how to fuel before a workout. [10:48] – Katie reveals whether or not it's ever too close to a workout to fuel. [15:45] – Katie recommends sipping on Gatorade or Powerade before and/or during an early morning workout. [18:53] – We learn what we should do during a workout. [20:47] – Katie discusses post-workout fueling. [25:41] – Katie warns us what could happen if we don't refuel after a workout. [29:42] – Katie explains how to be sure that we're fueling properly without counting calories. [35:44] – Colleen shifts the conversation toward identity. [41:01] – We are given a couple of actionable tips, such as starting with something small if we don't usually eat before a workout. [42:50] – We learn where we can go online to reach Katie.   Links and Resources Colleen Christensen Nutrition – Website The SociEATy - Become a Member The SociEATy's Instagram Page Colleen's Instagram Page Colleen's YouTube Page Katie's Website Katie's Instagram Page Email Katle: spada.strong.nutrition@gmail.com Equilibria - Website

Adam Carolla Show
Part 1: Ian Bagg's Body Bagg, plus Nate Adams talks Alec Baldwin (ACS Oct 26)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 69:17


At the top of the show, Adam talks to Mike Dawson about chugging a stranger's Gatorade while in the security line at the Las Vegas airport. Gina then talks about her gambling experiences after their show this past Saturday, and Nate Adams joins the show to lend some perspective to the recent Alec Baldwin story. Adam also makes fun of DJ Khaled, and talks about getting his teeth whitened. Up next, Ian Bagg is in studio to discuss being roommates with frequent podcast guest Kyle Dunnigan, which leads to a larger conversation about roommates and landlords. Before the break, Ian presents a bizarre True Crime story for this week's ‘Body Bagg'. Please support today's sponsors: MarshallHeadphones.com enter CAROLLA15 MDHearingAid.com enter ADAM PendulumLife.com enter ADAM SimpliSafe.com/ADAM TRICOCatsAndDogs.com Geico.com Check out the Jordan Harbinger Show Podcast

I’m Not As Think As You Drunk I Am
Are you ok? I know my Mercury needs a Gatorade

I’m Not As Think As You Drunk I Am

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 107:36


This week the “The Sandwich Crew” is back together again! This episode we are asking the question that most men never get asked!!!! ARE YOU OK? Don't forget to click the link in the show notes to become a monthly supporter of the show. Also if you want to know where Cat gets his rings from go check out undauntedjewelry.com and use promo code CAT20 at your checkout to save 20% off of your purchase. Catch us on SocialMedia: - [ ] Twitter: @Imnotasthinkasyoudrunkiampod - [ ] FaceBook: @Imnotasthinkasyoudrunkiampod - [ ] IG: @Imnotasthinkasyoudrunkiampod - [ ] Cat @Papo_Gato - [ ] Kobe @Nat_King_Kobe - [ ] BIG Mo @Bigmo_BITW - [ ] VooDoo @VooDoo_0962 - [ ] ClubHouse: - [ ] @LatinCat - [ ] @Kob3_delaghetto --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/imnotasthinkasyoudrunkiam/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/imnotasthinkasyoudrunkiam/support

Raw Room
Wonkaz

Raw Room

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 65:16


This Raw Room Thursday is a special one as Daren and Alex talk DB's move to the Atlanta Falcons and wants to find out who Atlanta's SUPERFAN is, talk the NBA season starting up and the latest Ben Simmons drama in Philly, Daren breaks down which NFL teams have the best food in the facility, Alex winning big money over the weekend, the best NBA commercials of all time, Daren teaches Alex what the "Gator" in "Gatorade" means , Alex tries to figure out how his nail tech fired him, and much more! 

The Emo Social Club Podcast
Lemon Lime or Blue? Chatting with Dan Lambton of rationale.

The Emo Social Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 67:54


Talking on the stream with Dan Lambton of rationale. (ex-Real Friends) about new tunes, which Gatorade flavor is superior (minus all cucumbers ever), mental health & illness awareness, his Twitch stream and more.Follow & Support rationale. & Dan:Twitter, Insta, Listen; Dan's Twitch, Twitter, Linktree______SOOTHSAYER HOT SAUCE X SPICY TAKESCan the guys in Action/Adventure stand the heat? Tune in to our latest episode of Spicy Takes on our YouTube channel to find out!In this episode, we feature their hot sauce "Poser Poison" sauce, which includes hints of Mexican chocolate and scorpion pepper. It's sold out online BUT you can snag a ticket to their upcoming tour this fall, & snag a bottle at their merch table. you can scoop over on their website.Make sure to give Soothsayer a follow on Insta to stay up to date with them + upcoming sauce drops. Also! Subscribe to us on YouTube so you can be the first to see our spiciest takes. EMO KID SUMMER MERCHSun's Out, Stay Inside! Or maybe you're feeling a nu-metal vibe? Whichever it is, we've got you covered! Grab our summer 2.0 drop now in our store!Thanks to our designer Joey Resko for our designs.___________________________CHECK OUT: BAD PLANNING X HIGHWIRE HOUSE SHOW (CHICAGO)Looking for a good ol' fashioned house show? Are you in Chicagoland and looking to monster mosh it out while supporting a good cause? Well Our friends in Bad Planning & Highwire are playing a haunted house gig on Fri. Oct. 22 in Hanover Park! Honey Creek, Radar & our friends in Wolf Rd. will also be there to get your bones rattlin'. It's $5 at the door & it goes to St. Judes Children's Research Hospital.Check out the FB event for more info!Join the club!Twitch: https://emosocialclub.tvDiscord: https://emosocial.club/discordTikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@xemosocialclubxTwitter: https://emosocial.club/twitterInstagram: https://emosocial.club/instagramYoutube: https://emosocial.club/youtubeFacebook: https://emosocial.club/facebook  Follow us!Brian: @spookypants1Lizzie: @bordenbathory

So Much JENergy
Ep 105: New Comedy Material, Lotza Acorns and laughing!

So Much JENergy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 30:33


This week we laugh about things that happened this week, putt putt on the phone, new comedy materail and lotzzzzza acrorns!!     Cheers to a great week!  oh - mercury is out of Gatorade! Resume normal activities! hahah

Mr. Fitxit
Episode 30 - Sex Offenders Who Win Spelling Bees

Mr. Fitxit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 67:27


Wow didn't even realize we'd done 30. HOO freakin RAY.Doesn't it feel like Gatorade Frost just came out not that long ago? Weird.Who the hell does Mississippi think they are? Ole Miss???????? I guess if your state is that horrible maybe you have to make yourselves stand out somehow. Maybe some would say that's what we do with this show. But does it even stand out? Maybe it sits down to stand up. Have you ever heard that song where he screams that? I have. It rocks so hard.Hey… can you believe we never got a picture when Brian and I had an entire wall of our apartment dedicated to local sex offenders? Brian if you're reading this and I haven't texted you yet… lemme know if you have a picture… or kept the map. HE SERIOUSLY DREW THE MAP!!! Of Chicago!!!! TO SCALE (I think.)If you have ideas on how to spell that “word” at the end, let us know. My brain is convinced it knows the answer but I've been wrong about many things a lot of times. That's the thing about people who think they are never wrong… they're wrong A LOT and you CAN'T TRUST THEM.  But y'all can trust me. Even tho I just told you I'm wrong a lot.

Chicken Noodle Scoop
We are in a funk + how the heck we get out of it

Chicken Noodle Scoop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 53:52


Another Monday, another episode bby! This week we catch up on what has been happening, and our recent funk/slump. Then, we share our tips for how to get out of it, and all things Mercury in Retrograde (don't worry it's ending) Mercury in Gatorade for each sign: https://indianexpress.com/article/lifestyle/life-style/sunday-zodiac-mercury-retrograde-sign-7543378/ Follow Along! Instagram: Outgoing Pod Gabi Lexi Youtube: Gabi Lexi Tiktok: Gabi Lexi xoxo love you all! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/outgoingpodcast/support

You Just Have To Laugh
Lauren Fritts - From a big wheel to the big time.

You Just Have To Laugh

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 44:20


As Vice President of Marketing for the Chicago Cubs, Lauren and her team oversee all fan engagement touch points for the Cubs, Wrigley Field & the Wrigley Rooftops inclusive of CRM, brand identity, activations/events, multi-platform advertising, promotions, game-day entertainment, social media, broadcast relations, and Cubs Productions. Previously, Lauren was Global Director of Consumer Engagement for Gatorade. In this role she drove creative and media go-to-market strategies as a model for markets globally. Her team also had accountability for brand-owned experiential activations, influencer marketing and sports culture driving platforms. Under her leadership, Gatorade creative assets, events and media partnerships were consistently awarded top industry honors. In other roles with Gatorade, Lauren was accountable for international sports marketing partnerships in the sport of global football, and she also served as the brand's first head of branded content. Prior to joining Gatorade, Lauren spent time in public affairs working with sports team owners, worked within the Kansas City Chiefs media relations department, and spent time in the Sprint corporate partnership group working on NASCAR.

The Sports Junkies
Bit Season, Episode 6: Stolen Valor

The Sports Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 73:47


Lurch is bribed into listening to this episode.  Has EB joined Jason in being a helicopter parent?  Drab realizes how expensive bowling can be.  There's a theft at the radio station.  The gang contemplates if their dongs would fit in a Gatorade bottle or be too big, like EB claims. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Women Who Sarcast
Breakin' It Down with Sheilani Alix - FB Outage & Destination Addiction

Women Who Sarcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:01


Did you happen to be one of those people that screamed into your pillow during the Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp outage? Were you beside yourself when you couldn't post that inspirational quote or that gorgeous photo of your oatmeal, flax, and blueberry breakfast? Kathy and Sheilani break down the FB/IG/WA outage and maybe even come up with a few solutions. They also talk about Destination Addiction (aka Happiness Destination Syndrome); what it entails and the daily practices we can do to live in the present, rather than the past or the future. Sheilani shares her positive affirmation and what she would write in her gratitude journal. Tune in and find out what musicians Sheilani was excited to see in concert, what show Kathy has been watching "After Hours," and who said "Mercury is in Gatorade." We love our listeners and want to hear from you! Send us your feedback at womenwhosarcast@yahoo.com. SUBSCRIBE wherever you listen to podcasts! Join us on Patreon! Buy the latest issue of Women Who Podcast magazine at womenwhopodcastmag.com!

All Call Radio
Episode Four!

All Call Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 64:41


Recording this while Mercury is in Gatorade was bold of me but I survived. Happy listening :)

Secrets From The Saddle: All things Cycling PODCAST
135. CORY MORTENSON: Biked ACROSS the USA with NO Experience Cycling and Wrote about It. You'll Laugh your Ass off.

Secrets From The Saddle: All things Cycling PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 61:59


In this episode, you will learn: Meet Cory Mortenson. 20 yrs ago he decided to bike across the USA, he had no bike packing experience, drank Gatorade, eat Chinese, drank more beer, survived encounters, you will laugh your ass off reading his story. Book " The BUDDHA and the BEE

Gem Nation Radio
Mercury drinking that Gatorade

Gem Nation Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 111:21


Ep 45 is here! Being we took a week off we are catching up on just about everything.  It's still HHM so show a hispanic some love!  We discuss the R.Kelly trial verdict, The social media shut down, Verzuz and Iconz, The NJ serial killer, Something in the water comes to a strong halt in VA, and last but not least gems in TV and Music ENJOY!

Food For Your Soul
(303) You'll Suffer & Die, but Don't Worry- Mt.6:28-33

Food For Your Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 18:00


How can you take comfort in God's promises when you know sometimes it's his will for his children to suffer and die- It might be his plan for all the things you're afraid of to happen to you. So how do his promises help you with worry--The answer has to do with Gatorade.

Spit Sessions
Seventy-ninth Episode - Pet Scamming, Serial Egging, R. Kelly Sentencing, and Gatorade Guzzling

Spit Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 68:49


Delancey was a late bagel bloomer and Reggie is forced to drink like an athlete.

Unsolicited Views
Episode 158: Mercury in Gatorade

Unsolicited Views

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 88:08


This week the guys are joined by Gabby to discuss the taboos in astrology, what it means for mercury to be in retrograde, Mel's birth chart, taboos in the black church, dealing with conflict, Mal's birth chart, and more! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/baltimore-podcast-studio/message

Candid Athletic Training
#142- The Time You Were Right...Little Wins

Candid Athletic Training

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 75:04


The Candid Guys are talking with their followers about those times you got to say "HA! I was right!!!!" in your head...haha Top5: Companies who should have an ATC ad? FMK: ATC Blisters? FoF: Taking an athlete to an appt FAT: Dr. Doom vs. Venom? https://www.healthyroster.com/ https://network.structuralelements.com/a/2147488435/M4Tzcxyf https://www.medbridgeeducation.com/?a_aid=8179&a_cid= https://www.masterdryneedling.com/

Today In History
Today In History - Gatorade invented at University of Florida

Today In History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021


https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/gatorade-sports-drinks-inventionsSupport the show on Patreon

Breaking Anonymity
Brandon Novak

Breaking Anonymity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 43:06


On the premiere episode of Breaking Anonymity, we sit down with Brandon to discuss his battle with addiction, 15 stints in rehab, going from being the youngest athlete sponsored by Gatorade and doing commercials with Michael Jordan to working the streets of Philly for drugs. After coming to terms with his addiction, he's come out the other side and is currently helping other addicts with his Novak Sober Living Houses, proving there is hope in even the darkest places. Catch new episodes of Breaking Anonymity dropping every Wednesday. Available wherever you listen to podcasts. To learn more about Novak's House, or to find a location closest to you, visit brandonnovak.com or reach out by phone at 302-433-6256. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fantasy Beer League
Defeated Gatorade Shower - Week 3 Preview!

Fantasy Beer League

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 53:18


Defeated Gatorade Shower - Week 3 Preview!Shawn gets 5 gallons of Gatorade dumped on his head, Senni questions the value of athleticism, and the guys discuss players with increased and diminished value ahead of week 3

Outdoors with Hiking Bob – Studio 809 Radio
269 Bob and Kevin call out the sociopaths vandalizing parks

Outdoors with Hiking Bob – Studio 809 Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 40:14


On this week's podcast Bob and co-host Kevin discuss extensive vandalism at a Colorado Springs city park, and deliver some harsh words to those responsible. You've never heard them be this forthright about a topic before. They also discuss the start of the fall foliage season; an award given to Bob; and why is there a shortage of Gatorade? Article about why leaves change colors: https://scijinks.gov/leaves-color/ Bob's photography workshop at the Garden of the Gods: https://bit.ly/2XJLPaj Please consider becoming a patron of this podcast! Visit: https://www.patreon.com/hikingbob for more information. Hiking Bob on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and website  Wild Westendorf on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and website Listen on Google Podcasts, Spotify and Apple Podcasts Subscribe on Android

The Weekly Walk
Redefining How We Think About Food with Michele Fumagalli

The Weekly Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021


Join Joyce & Michele Fumagalli, Dietitian, Mother, Athlete, Foodie and owner of Fit Plate Nutrition, for a casual conversation you can walk to. Dig into what it means to eat intuitively, the power of breakfast, and how determining what influences your food thoughts can reprogram how you think about food.About MicheleI help women and athletes relearn how to fuel and nourish their body & mind without diets. Diet culture tells us we need to look, eat and move a certain way to have greater worth and value. It causes confusion with food choices, food guilt, restriction, poor body image, and moving as a form of punishment rather than enjoyment.I bring awareness to diet culture and its negative effects in order to help others break free and live healthier, happier lives. Using an intuitive eating approach, I work with clients to improve confidence in their food choices and relationship with food, body and movement.I have always loved sport and fitness, however my passion for empowering others through nutrition didn't begin until my mid-twenties. Dietetics is my second degree and career. I received my first degree from University of Notre Dame in Business-Marketing. After a year of playing professional soccer in Germany and the US, I worked at Gatorade in business development. Part of my role at Gatorade was to educate athletes, teams, coaches and athletic trainers on sports nutrition. I loved learning the science behind sports nutrition, educating the athletes and began wanting more involvement and a greater impact on the Athlete's nutrition. This brought me back to school in pursuit of becoming a nutrition expert, a Registered Dietitian. Coupling my expertise in food, nutrition and vast experiences in sports, I am a credible voice of reason, encouragement, and guidance in this crazy chaotic world of food. I provide comprehensive client-centered nutritional therapy, partnering with each client in order to find what works best for them. I provide one-on-one and small group coaching, as well as wellness workshops, and am a nutrition expert speaker and writer. I am blessed to have helped 1000's and hopeful to help hundreds of thousands more.Connect with MicheleWebsite: https://www.fitplatenutrition.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FitPlateNutritionInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/fumagalli_fitplate/

Upon Further Review
Chris Long on Jalen Hurts, Chase Young, Taylor Heinicke, Gatorade Flavors, and the return of Jameis Winston

Upon Further Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 26:41


Chris Long joins the show to recap the first week of NFL Football, to give his thoughts on the WFT's defensive line, Fitzpatricks injury, the Eagles shocking win, the Raiders insane win over Baltimore, Maxx Crosby, his preferred Gatorade flavors, his podcast, his foundation, Adam Sandler, Jameis Winston, and looking ahead at Week 2. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Open Seat
Sand Deer and Gatorade Deserts | FLT 068

The Open Seat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 34:35


Keith and Tommy discuss a woman calling in a bomb threat to make her flight, the C-17 Globemaster featuring a mystery Qatar Airways plane, and one podcast host's near death experience in Dubai, surviving desert heat, dehydration and frigid slope temperatures.Contact Us: theopenseatpodcast@gmail.comInstagram: @theopenseat_Have you tried ID90 Travel, the exclusive booking app? Sign up with our link and get $10 off your first hotel booking. https://linktr.ee/theopenseat

Thrive LOUD with Lou Diamond
665: Ryan Richards - Growing People AND Companies

Thrive LOUD with Lou Diamond

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 26:10


Ryan Richards has paved an incredible track record of success leading brand strategy teams and departments for many of the world's Leading Creative Agencies, Fortune 500 Corporations, and Startups. At BBDO NY, Ryan led a team and budget of 10 strategists that repositioned AT&T from a phone company to a connected everything company. In this role, he activated a $3.6b marketing budget to drive all verticals from network to enterprise to smart homes as well as their merger with DirectTV. Driven by a desire to direct creative capabilities toward real human and social problems, Ryan co-founded innovation labs at both DDB Sydney and BBDO NY, where they would crowd-source community problems then develop customized product and platform solutions. Ryan co-founded his record label On Point Productions which made him an easy choice to lead the team that launched Powerbeats Pro with Apple, while managing an impressive roster of 30 athletes from LeBron James to Simone Biles around the Beats Product with the creative agency Zambezi LA. It was here he also developed Venmo's first brand strategy as it began to monetize its massive cultural platform and launched James Harden's first signature shoe with Adidas. In Sydney, Ryan led brand strategy for the world's most awarded Volkswagen team, developed an industry first augmented reality platform for McDonald's, ran strategy for the Mars Wrigley portfolio and embedded Gatorade into Cricket at DDB Sydney. At George Patterson Y&R Sydney (the first agency in Australia), Ryan led the launch of a new team for the AFL (Australia's NFL) and created a master brand strategy and music festival for V8 Supercars (Australia's Nascar). Most recently, he started his own brand development agency to help post-raise startups define compellingly distinct brand narratives and develop their companies from logo through new product innovations. This has included launching a virtual mental health clinic in Canada, to helping Keurig Dr Pepper launch new products and brands that meet market needs. At AIMCAST, Ryan is responsible for formulating a compelling brand identity and messaging that resonates with all AIMCAST stakeholders and brings AIMCAST brand engagement to the next level. He shares with Lou - who has been working intricately with Ryan - about the changing-work environment and how AIMCAST is helping grow the people within companies and make the work environment a better place to be for everyone. CONNECT WITH LOU DIAMOND & THRIVE LOUD  

Da Beer Bros
Gatorade Show

Da Beer Bros

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 51:05


Da Bros get into football season with a sampling of Gatorade flavors old and new! Listen and Enjoy!

Andy In The Morning - Majic 95.1
Most Awkward Living Situations, Kids Carpool Comedy, & 9/11 Reflection

Andy In The Morning - Majic 95.1

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 17:56


1/3rd of American's Alive Today, were not alive 20 years or are too young to remember 9/11. Andy discusses NOT yet educating his kids about those events. Have you talked to your kids? We do a quick round of Kid's Carpool Comedy. Also, what was the most awkward living situation you were ever apart of? What Andy once did for a roommate that involved Gatorade bottles is shocking. Plus, maybe our best game of Blank Slate yet!

Kill By Kill
Dish By Dish S2 Ep12 "Tome-Wan"

Kill By Kill

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 34:40


It's the last double serving of the season as we discuss the penultimate episode of HANNIBAL's Season 2: Tome-Wan. Along the way we go cuckoo for cattle prods, review the accomplishments we believe are Gatorade-bath worthy, debate child tear mixology, and the lengths that Jack is willing to go to in order to catch the Chesapeake Ripper. Also, save room for seconds, cause episode 13 is also in your podcast feed, Fannibals!Our TeePublic shop for killer merch is right here: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/kill-by-kill-podcast?utm_campaign=18042&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_source=Kill%2BBy%2BKill%2Bpodcast%2BHave something to say? Find us on Twitter @KillByKillPod Join the conversation about any episode on the Facebook Group! Follow us on IG @killbykillpodcast Check out the films we've covered & what might come soon on Letterboxd! Get even more episodes exclusively on Patreon!  Follow our station on vurbl: https://vurbl.com/station/2bdTISeI3X/ Artwork by Josh Hollis: joshhollis.com Kill By Kill theme by Revenge Body. For the full-length version and more great music, head to revengebodymemphis.bandcamp.com today!

Coach's Corner
Mishawaka Penn | Jake Brodbeck

Coach's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 43:27


Defensive Coordinator Jake Brodbeck '11 joins Will Reilly '09 and Steve Specht '86 to talk about the defensive dominance during the Bombers 3-0 start.  Coach Specht's microphone stops working halfway through, giving Will and Jake a golden opportunity.  CTI clinical trials include changing out the Gatorade for Iced Coffee and allowing players to coach themselves.

CMO Moves
David Tinson, CMO of EA, and Kalen Thornton, CMO of Gatorade - Marketing Is The Name of the Game

CMO Moves

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 38:30


For the sports-fuel brand Gatorade and video game software company Electronic Arts, entertainment has been blurring the line between the business and their audiences. From partnerships with Snoop Dogg and Keyshawn Johnson to bringing sports to digital via Twitch like having Marshawn Lynch and more athletes recreate the Pro Bowl during the pandemic, both brands have seen an incredible digital transformation in the past years. Discover the moves David and Kalen are taking to fuel sport, how playing the video game Madden came full circle for the marketers' strategy, and how embracing the community as a shared experience allowed them to tap into unique insights.

EXCUSE ME, MAY I HAVE SOME MORE?!: The FoodCast with an Insatiable Appetite
There's Nothing Cheesy About Chef Donatella Arpaia's Success

EXCUSE ME, MAY I HAVE SOME MORE?!: The FoodCast with an Insatiable Appetite

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 59:35


Award-winning chef & restaurateur Donatella Arpaia joins the foodcast and shares her culinary journey with Brad, while soccer legend Abby Wambach tells Cristine about partnering with Gatorade to empower women athletes.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

EMBody Radio
115. The Basics of Birthcharts, Reframing Mercury Retrograde, and the Spiral of Fortune and Growth | with Brittany McMurray, Astrologer and Tarot Reader

EMBody Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 110:51


In 2021, there's a fair chance you've seen (and maybe shared) at least one astrology meme circulating around social. Perhaps you've lamented over the trials and tribulations of the big, scary Mercury Retrograde (or in meme terms, Mercury in Gatorade). Maybe now you know your "Big Three." But... what does it all mean? Today we're talking with my good friend Brittany McMurray: astrologer, tarot card reader, and seer who, in her words, "Doesn't tell you what to see, but rather, where to look."  We're breaking down the basics of birth charts, like your Big 3 and what they mean, what your different houses represent, and the overall "Blueprint of your Soul" in Brittany's terms; reframing Mercury retrograde and  why it's actually an opportunity vs some cyclical cosmic curse; and talking all things growth, rebirth, relationships, Saturn returns, and navigating the wheels/spirals of fortune that show up in our own lives. Interested in having your birth chart read and interpreted for better self understanding? Book a reading with Brittany here. Interested in tarot readings? Book a reading with Brittany here. Brittany's Instagram  ---- Interested in working with EDF Coaching to reach your fitness and lifestyle goals? Click here to inquire!  WHERE TO FIND ME: Instagram YouTube Website (sign up for the email list here!) EmandDarbyPresets Instagram Legion Athletics - Code Embody Cured Nutrition - Code Emily ----------- The #JackedNNerdyTrainer At Home Program The #JackedNNerdyTrainer V I Program The #JackedNNerdyTrainer V II Program

Bold Base Performance
Red vs. Blue Gatorade

Bold Base Performance

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 8:01


Today I talk about my new favorite analogy: Red vs. Blue Gatorade. (Hint: Blue is better) In this episode, I relate this analogy to our risk:reward analysis and decision making model in training and rehab. Want to learn more? Connect with me on social media: Host - Tom Broback IG: @tombroback Twitter: @tombroback CoachTube Courses and Presentations

Opening Weekend
Episode 59: The Wicker Man - Crank - Idiocracy: September 1, 2006

Opening Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 112:31


Nic Cage walks into a forest dressed like a bear and punches a woman. No, you're not having a bad fever dream; you're just watching one of the movies that opened on September 1, 2006: a week filled with mystery, mayhem, and most of all, misogyny. THE WICKER MAN, CRANK, and IDIOCRACY are being pumped full of adrenaline and then burned alive on Episode 59 of Opening Weekend! (Brought to you by Carl's Jr).“I wish I could quit you.” “You complete me.” “I'll have what she's having.” No, the boys aren't discussing any movies this week REMOTELY related to romance. These are just a few of the things Jason screamed to the rafters in the fall of 2006 as he desperately tried to keep Dan from moving out of their Astoria apartment.  To which Dan replied, ““AH, MY LEGS! NOT THE BEES!!! YOU BITCHES!!!!” Or was that Nic Cage? It's hard to tell, since they were both wearing bear costumes at the time. Also in September 2006: While Jason Statham was desperately trying to keep his heart beating performing scenes of chaos throughout Los Angeles, Jason and Dan were desperately trying to keep audiences' hearts beating performing scenes of Chekhov in the basement of a bar in the East Village. And while Fred was spending the last days of summer soaking up the Tuscan sun, the cast of “Idiocracy” was showing us how we're all going to be soaking up Gatorade and fast-food during the last days of humanity.  And speaking of Gatorade: Fred shows his commitment to non-stop podcasting magic this week….while completely stopping pod-cast magic cold with his own brand of idiocracy. Now leave me alone, I'm ‘batin'….to Episode 59 of Opening Weekend!

The Solarpreneur
The 2 Step Framework to Go from 1-2 Closes to 4+ Monthly

The Solarpreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 19:51


Tune in now and don't forget to sign up for www.solciety.co!Speaker 1 (00:03):Welcome to the Solarpreneur podcast, where we teach you to take your solar business to the next level. My name is Taylor Armstrong and I went from $50 in my bank account and struggling for groceries to closing 150 deals in a year and cracking the code on why sales reps fail. I teach you to avoid the mistakes I made and bringing the top solar dogs, the industry to let you in on the secrets of generating more leads, falling up like a pro and closing more deals. What is a Solarpreneur you might ask a Solarpreneur is a new breed of solar pro that is willing to do whatever it takes to achieve mastery and you are about to become one. What's up Solapreneurs Taylor Armstrong back withSpeaker 2 (00:44):Another episode here to help you close more deals, generate more referrals and dominate in the solar industry. Today, we're going to be talking about the two step framework that you can use today to go from one to two closes to four plus monthly. Okay. And the reason I'm seeing one to two to four, plus this is primarily for people that haven't broken through that barrier yet. Hey, that being said, if you are already closing, you know, four or 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 deals, you can implement these things and they are going to help. But the reason I'm saying from one to two to four plus is because this process, I think is the number one thing missing from people that are trying, they start hitting those consistent four plus a month. Okay. And we'll get into that. But before we jump into the topic of today, I wanted to give my boy Surge creator, a shout out.Speaker 2 (01:40):If you don't follow a Surge, he is, uh, helping a lot of guys in the solar industry, crush it on social media on Instagram, Facebook, if you don't, if you haven't heard of this guy, go shoot him a follow, look them up. And he's been actually helping us with some of our content, depending on when you're listening to this, you were probably going to see more video content that we're posting along with episodes. We're going to be posting some of these interviews now on YouTube. Okay. So we'll, um, we'll post a link. Once those things come out, but, uh, go search Solarpreneur. They might on YouTube. They might already be out as we're are recording this episode, but Serge has been helping us get some killer video content with some of our recent interviews. So we'd love to hear what you guys think of that.Speaker 2 (02:28):Do you want more video? Do you guys like the video or are you just audio people personally? I love the podcasts. I listen to podcasts when I'm at the gym, when I'm driving to deals, when I'm driving out to my turf, to my area. So I'm a huge proponent of podcasts, but I know there's a lot of people that prefer the video. So anyways, let me know what you think. I think it's good to have both options, video and audio, but we're going to be posting more and more video. And we're going to try to get some of these, uh, interviews on a YouTube. So let us know if you vibe with that, let's jump into the episode. So the two-step framework to go from one to two to four plus deals in a month. The reason we're talking about this today is because I'm actually coaching.Speaker 2 (03:19):Um, we are doing, we are accepting a coaching clients in our Solciety, inner circle. If you want to find out more about that, go to Solciety.co. There should be an inner circle tab. You can hit that and book a call. If you're interested in some, um, personal coaching and masterminding to take your cells, um, your closes up by 40%, 40 to 50% in a month. Okay. But, um, anyways, the reason I'm talking about this, one of our coaching clients in the inner circle, he is right now, he's not, he's primarily setting appointments and he has closers, but he's working up to, um, close his own deals. And he tells me, Taylor, my goal is in the next two months that we're working together. I want to get closing my own deals and I want to have five deals closed in a month. So I'm like, all right, that's an awesome goal, dude, let's, let's hit it.Speaker 2 (04:20):Let's go for it. So we've been working together three weeks or so now we're talking, we're talking, he's making some small improvements, but our last call is the reason for this episode, as we get on the call. And, um, he didn't have, he didn't have much no improvement from the previous week. We talked and I started realizing that a few of our recent calls that we had is we were talking about almost all of the sales techniques. He's like, Taylor, what do you do on the doors? What do you, how do you overcome this? Objection, how do you get more referral? All these cells, specific things, very technical what's, which is awesome to know all the technical sales knowledge and that's going to create improvements. But as I was trying to think, why, why is he making slower improvements? And this was the reasons cause we're focused so much on these little technical things that we weren't, we weren't talking as much about what needed to be talked about.Speaker 2 (05:25):And that is the behind the scenes, things that consistency, the routines that showing up every day, working the exact hours that you need, and then making sure you have your routines dialed in. So I started realizing this I'm like, dude, before we get in all the technical sales stuff, again, let's talk about what are you doing every day to show up? What are you doing everyday to be consistent in your morning routine and your evening routine in your hours knocked in your appointments booked. And that's the purpose of these KPIs, right? The key performance indicators is they help you see where the improvements need to be made. So for those that are training new teams, think about that. I think this is the number one thing for newer reps to take them from the couple deals a month to start closing four plus a month, because that's the thing that people don't talk about as much as they need to that.Speaker 2 (06:27):I see everyone wants to talk about the sexy sales techniques, the sexy closing lanes, the things that you can say on the door, what's the magic words that people are going to sign up instantly. But guess what if you're not putting in consistent hours, if you are not, if you don't have your Headspace dialed in, if you're not there mentally, if you're not following your routines, your morning routine, it's going to make it super tough to have success. Even if you are the world's greatest, closer, even if you know all the cool lanes, even if you know all the good stuff. If you read all of the sells books in the world, none of that matters if you can't be consistent. And if you can't do the small little things, day after day decree success, okay. And I brought these books up quite a few times in the podcast, but go read.Speaker 2 (07:15):I'm looking at it right now on my bookshelf. It's the slight edge and the compound effect. They talk about it. And there's a reason why those are two of the best. I would say personal development books that have been written because they're not talking about secret lines. They're just talking about being consistent, doing something small every day. And that's, what's going to create a massive results in your life. So think about that. What is the things, what are the things that you can do every day to create the mental space you want to get in? When I was at this knock star event, um, a couple of weeks back, we've been talking about it kind of all lately. Um, Taylor McCarthy, Danny Pessy two awesome, awesome guys in the door to door training industry. Um, they're changing the game of, for solar training. They got some great content, but I was at their mastermind event and they're in key west Florida.Speaker 2 (08:15):And this is something that Taylor McCarthy was talking about. He was telling us how he closed five deals in a day, all self-generated just him going out and knock. And he closed five in a day. And then he closed like 14 in the week. Um, yeah, all knocking himself, no leads, no setters, none of that. And someone was asking him like to, what did you do to create that? And the question he threw at us, he asked us to write down what our perfect day of knocking looks like. What's our knocking process in what he meant by that is, and this is a good exercise for, to go through. Um, if you have a notepad or something, it's be a great time to pause and write the answer to this down. Think back to the time when you had a massive day on the doors, massive day, closing to some of your most successful days, what were the things you did during that day?Speaker 2 (09:17):Okay. Maybe you haven't had a ton of success yet, but write them down. Think what were the routines you went through? How did you feel? What were the hours you worked make a checklist of those things. Okay. And this is something that Taylor had us do and kind of rate ourselves on. Okay. I'm sure you can notice a difference in the things you did on your days of massive success versus days where you didn't have much, much success. So notice those things. Did you take a, I dunno, ice bath that day? Did you do some meditation? Did you exercise? What type of food were you eating? How many hours did you work? Hey, some key things you can notice if you went through this exercise. Okay. And now start to think about, are you doing those things? Day after day, are you implementing falls? Little things that gave you the success that day, are those things that you implement in your day-to-day routine?Speaker 2 (10:21):Maybe so, maybe not. So what McCarthy told us is his perfect day and knocking looks like this, and this is how he, he got the five deals in a day, in 14 in a week. He said, guys, my perfect day of knocking is this nine 30 to 10. I knocked my first door. That's when I get out there before I get out, though I go in, I, yeah, my cooler full of ice. That's this trigger habit. Any of you have read, um, the power of habit. That's a great book as well, Charles Duhigg um, they talk about what are the triggers that you can put in a place for your habits. That's something to think about. So for those that are out knocking, what type of triggers do you have that can trigger you into knocking mindsets for Taylor McCarthy? He goes, and he fills up his cooler with ice.Speaker 2 (11:15):He goes to the gas station and then he gets all his drinks, his Gatorades. Cause he's not, he's not taking breaks to go, come back and go to gas stations. Right. He's gearing up for a full day and knocking. So from nine 30 to 10, before he's going to a gas station getting his ice. That's his trigger for his habit, which is getting out and knocking. So once he gets his ice, he knows, right? It's game time. That's his equivalent of like, I dunno, LeBron James chalking up his hands before the game, throwing it in the air. This is what Taylor McCarthy does. He gets his eyes. So I think what are, what's the key, what's the trigger you can put into place for when you're knocking for, when you're closing that can get you into that, right? Mindset can let your brain know. All right.Speaker 2 (12:04):It's time to go. Once I do this, that means it's time to go knock stem, to go close timing, to go work it because this job, as you know, you don't have people babysitting you. Lot of the times. There's a lot of people, a lot of solar guys out there that are getting out by themselves, much easier with the team, got respect for guys that are lone Wolf in it. But think of some trigger you can put into place. And then after that to McCarthy, he's hitting his first door from nine 30 to 10. And then from 10 to 12, he calls that just as like extra bonus time as bonus sales, anything he gets from 10 to 12 that's, um, just kind of icing on the cake. He's not necessarily expecting any deals, any, he closes from men, but he's going out there and he's just trying to talk to people.Speaker 2 (12:58):And then from what he does after that, he breaks it into, uh, quarters. And I guess it's not really for, I think he called them quarters, even though it's kind of three times thoughts. But instead of thinking, I'm knocking all day long, 10 to 12 is a bonus extra curricular time. 12 to three is his first quarter three to six is a second quarter and six to nine is his third quarter. And that's another pro tip right there. If you are knocking, um, you know, really any amount of time, make sure you break up your hours and it's something like that. The brain can manage quarters and little chunks of time, a lot better than it can. All right. We're going to be out here eight hours. That sounds pretty daunting. Right? So break it up into chunks. And that's what he does. That's his perfect day knocking every time there's a end of a quarter, 12 to three, he's going back to his car.Speaker 2 (13:58):He's getting a Gatorade, he's getting a snack, taking a little break. Okay. But he's not sitting in the car. He's not hanging out there. That's what he does. Okay. So the point of all this, make sure you have your perfect knocking day in place in the two-step framework is this number one, get a list of all the habits that are, um, contributing you, having success, write down exactly what your routines need to be. Write down the things that are helping you that have helped you have big days. And once you identify all of these habits, for example, you know, you craft your morning, your team, you exercise, you get out of bed at a specific hour, you do your meditation. This is what I talked about with my client. And then you make your green smoothie. It doesn't necessarily have to be these things, but these are just examples of things you can throw into your dailies habits.Speaker 2 (14:55):You can track. And then the other thing we put into place for my coaching student there is he wanted to be on the doors at one o'clock okay. Maybe it's different. Maybe your, maybe your goal is to just knock four hours for the day or go to X amount of appointments. But whatever your goal is, whatever you know is going to help you to have success. That's what you need to be tracking, measuring, and adjusting. So for my student, it was, he wanted to be on the doors by one, and then he wanted to be knocking until eight 30. Okay. So what we did is we assigned points to all these habits and all these things that he's trying to put into place because at the end of the day, he knew, he knew a lot of they close. It is a lot of the lines they say on the doors, but what he is missing and the reason he's not getting four plus deals in the month right now is because first he needs to get consistent with these things.Speaker 2 (15:53):First, he needs to get consistent with being out on the doors at a specific time with doing his perfect morning routine. Okay. And so if you're not closing four plus deals, or even if you are, this is a great exercise to go through, start tracking these habits, figure out what you're missing, write them all down and then assign a point value to them. That's what we've put into place. Okay. So maybe you're getting a point for waking up on time. Maybe you're getting a point if you're a green smoothie and then give yourself a couple of points for getting on the door as it can at a consistent time. And for him, it was, he wanted to talk to 15 homeowners in a day as he was out there. Cause that's what he can control. Right? He can't necessarily control how many appointments he books, but he can control how many people he talks to out there.Speaker 2 (16:48):Okay. So if you are for a rep or if you were training reps or even, yeah, if you are having success out there, go through this framework, all right. Write down the habits to things you want to be improving and then track them. Okay? This is something that every rep should do every week. Check these old things, give yourself points for them, make it a game, gain a guarantee. It's going to be something that increases the amount of cells, especially if you haven't tasted a ton of success yet, it's going to be the thing that if you are only closing one or two deals a month, just doing this, making this little change, tracking, measuring, adjusting, and seeing what's missing, that's going to be the number one thing. They can take you to four paws deals in a month. So try it, train your reps on it.Speaker 2 (17:40):Hey, let me know what you think. Share it with someone that's having trouble in their routines or being consistent and keep crushing out their hope. The end your summer is going awesome. Make sure they push super hard these months. Cause this one people are getting their high electric bills. Hope you enjoyed the episode. And next time don't miss out because we're going to have someone that is doing awesome things. His name's Dan Dunn. He is the CEO of harness power. It's a company that's, I think they're in four or five different states and his reps are doing awesome. He's doing awesome things in his company. So you're not gonna miss out on what he has to say next time on the Solarpreneur podcast. So keep crushing and we'll see you soon.Speaker 3 (18:28):Hey, Solarpreneurs quick question. What if you could surround yourself with the industry's top performing sales pros, marketers, and CEOs, and learn from their experience and wisdom in less than 20 minutes a day. For the last three years, I've been placed in the fortunate position to interview dozens of elite level solar professionals and learn exactly what they do behind closed doors to build their solar careers to an all-star level. That's why I want to make a truly special announcement about the new learning community, exclusively for solar professionals to learn, compete, and win with top performers in the industry. And it's called the Solciety, this learning community with designed from the ground up to level the playing field to give solar pros access to proven members who want to give back to this community and help you or your team to be held accountable by the industry. Brightest minds four, are you ready for it? Less than $3 and 45 cents a day currently Solciety is open, launched, and ready to be enrolled. So go to Solciety.co To learn more and join the learning experience. Now this is exclusively for Solarpreneur listeners. So be sure to go to solciety.co And join. We'll see you on the inside. 

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

Le Batard and the crew discuss drinking Gatorade out of a can, the most common results when searching #Washed, all the latest Mike Richards/Jeopardy drama, and the recent changes the WWE has made. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

HNL Movement Podcast
Utilize Sports Foods To Maximize Performance While Avoiding Negative Health Impacts

HNL Movement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 14:59


This week, Andrew provides some key nutrition information involving sports foods. Sports foods include anything that is packaged and manufactured with the intent of health benefits that provide energy to the body. Think of energy bars, Gatorade, gels, chews, and so on. Sports foods are meant to give us energy and are great to use before and during activity. However, they are not meant to replace whole-food nutrition or be used as a quick fix for poor eating habits. In this episode, Andrew provides some key information about how to utilize these foods healthily and not over-consume them.Andrew talks about building a strong foundation when it comes to nutrition and building those nutritional habits that shape the lifestyle we want to live. Sports foods are great supplementary sources of nutrition, but there is a time and a place to utilize them. Listen in on this episode so that you can gain a better understanding of the balance between these packaged nutrition products and whole food nutrition. Enjoy the episode! Did you enjoy this episode?Please subscribe and leave a review on:AppleSpotifyGooglePandoraiHeartRadio

Things That Go Boom
S5 E5 - You Say Gatorade, I Say Bacon

Things That Go Boom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 28:10


On this episode of Things That Go Boom, we look at some of the ways civilian and military cultures are merging — and diverging — after two decades of war in Iraq and Afghanistan. If Americans are distanced from the messy work of national security, how can the Biden administration have an honest conversation with them about priorities? GUESTS: Lacey Hopper, rucking aficionado; Timur Nersesov, US Army Reserve Officer; Loren DeJonge Schulman, Center for a New American Security. ADDITIONAL READING: Who signs up to fight? Dave Philipps and Tim Arango, The New York Times. Biden's Foreign Policy Starts at Home, Peter Nicholas, The Atlantic. // This episode comes at a chaotic and frightening time in Afghanistan, as Taliban fighters pour into the capital and US troops rush to evacuate allies. The following organizations are just a few providing aid to those in Afghanistan who need help: Doctors Without Borders International Rescue Committee No One Left Behind

Green Light with Chris Long
Terrell Owens! On NFL Return, QB Feuds, Wine & Candles, The HOF & Today's Best Receivers. Color Expert Dr. Bevil Conway Settles The Green Light Gatorade Controversy.

Green Light with Chris Long

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 157:21


(01:40) - Gatorade Debate Rages On. (15:00) - Dr. Bevil Conway on the Color of Lemon-Lime Gatorade and an Individuals' Color Perception. (27:53) - Football is Back, Preseason NFL Week 1. (31:30) - 2021 Hard Knocks Episode 1 Review. (47:57) - Terrell Owens on Returning to the NFL, TD Celebrations, Racing Teammates, The Hall of Fame, Best WR's in Today's NFL, Wine and Candles and the Driveway Workout/Interview. (1:51:23) - Good, Bad, Ugly. (2:05:37) - Chris' Wholesome List. (2:10:26) - Gatorade Flavor Draft. (2:24:25) - Gatorade Taste Test. Green Light Spotify Music: https://open.spotify.com/user/951jyryv2nu6l4iqz9p81him9?si=17c560d10ff04a9b Spotify Layup Line: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1olmCMKGMEyWwOKaT1Aah3?si=675d445ddb824c42 Green Light with Chris Long: Subscribe and enjoy weekly content including podcasts, documentaries, live chats, celebrity interviews and more including hot news items, trending discussions from the NFL, MLB, NHL, NBA, NCAA are just a small part of what we will be sharing with you. http://bit.ly/chalknetwork Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Volume
Jenkins and Jonez - Did Dennis Schroder Have An All-Time Bag Fumble?

The Volume

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 43:51


John, Tyler, and Mike are joined by Twitter's @TylerIAm to discuss Dennis Schroder's epic bag fumbling in which he ended up on the Celtics for $6 million (7:00) and Jason Whitlock's wild tweet about Brittany Renner, PJ Washington's ex-wife (15:00). Then John reveals the key to baths (20:00) and the guys debate the color of lemon lime Gatorade (27:30). Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Green Light with Chris Long
Osi Umenyiora! Best NFL Edge Rushers, Training Camp Fights, NFL In Africa, Eli In The HOF? Gatorade Color Debate. Lululemon Dressing Rooms.

Green Light with Chris Long

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 115:52


(02:00) - Hello, Layup Line and Gatorade Debate. (19:10) - Good, Bad, Ugly: Preseason NBA, Lululemon Sports and OJ Simpson. (39:41) - Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony Review. (58:58) - Osi Umenyiora on NFL Training Camps, Africa to Alabama, Troy University Scholarship Story and Edge Rush Moves. (1:45:16) - River Floats, Turtles and Private School Buses. Green Light Spotify Music: https://open.spotify.com/user/951jyryv2nu6l4iqz9p81him9?si=17c560d10ff04a9b Spotify Layup Line: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1olmCMKGMEyWwOKaT1Aah3?si=675d445ddb824c42 Green Light with Chris Long: Subscribe and enjoy weekly content including podcasts, documentaries, live chats, celebrity interviews and more including hot news items, trending discussions from the NFL, MLB, NHL, NBA, NCAA are just a small part of what we will be sharing with you. http://bit.ly/chalknetwork Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Vacation Mavens
195 Kim's Trip to Disneyland & Irvine, California

Vacation Mavens

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 54:54


Wondering what it is like to visit Disneyland now that California is reopened? Want to hear about a fun place to stay near Disneyland that makes a great family vacation? Tune in this week while Kim shares her family's experience in Disneyland and Irvine, California. About Our Sponsor: Room Steals Today's episode is sponsored by Room Steals.  Listeners may remember Room Steals from our discussion on finding hotel deals in Episode 185, but Room Steals is a Chrome browser extension that works alongside existing booking sites to show you what the wholesale price is for that room. Just install the browser extension and search for a hotel as you usually would on Hotels.com, Booking.com, Expedia, or Google. Once you've done your initial search, Room Steals will show you in a pop-up if that same room is available for less. If it is, you can click on that pop-up and book it directly through Room Steals. Downloading and using Room Steals is free; however, if you want to book a discounted room you have to pay an annual membership fee. Listeners can save 20% off the annual membership fee with promo code vacationmavens.  If you travel multiple times in a year, the subscription will quickly pay for itself. One listener already saved $400 using Room Steals on her first booking!  To learn more, visit roomsteals.com. That's roomsteals.com and use promo code vacationmavens to save 20% off your membership to Room Steals, and we thank them for their support. Tips for Visiting Disneyland (Summer 2021) Disneyland reopened this spring and is now allowing out-of-state visitors, and has been steadily increasing capacity. The parks are crowded and they have not yet restarted Max Pass so you have no choice but to wait in long lines. The rides have also been breaking down frequently this summer, making it harder to ride all the rides that you want to get to. At the time, they were no longer offering annual passes, although there was a special for California residents. A new annual pass plan has recently been announced. When you purchase tickets, you need to make a reservation for a specific day to visit and which park you want to visit. Park reservations can be booked 120 days in advance of your visit. If you are visiting in less than 120 days, make sure you look at the availability calendar before booking your trip. If you purchase a Park Hopper ticket, you can hop to the other park after 1 pm. Two rides require boarding group reservations on top of your ticket reservation. You can try to claim a boarding group beginning at 7 am, and they are usually gone within seconds. Another opportunity will begin at noon, but only if you have already used your first boarding group or if you didn't have success in the morning. Those two rides are Rise of the Resistance in California Adventure Park and the new Avenger's Web Slingers. You need a Park Hopper ticket to be able to get two boarding groups/virtual queues within the same day. To get prepared for how to snag a spot in the virtual queue for Web Slingers, check out this post on Trips with Tykes. Mobile ordering for food is getting better but still a little spotty. It is best to plan on eating off hours and bringing snacks to tide you over. Kim stayed at the Hotel Lulu, which is nearby Disneyland and newly renovated. There are pharmacies on the corner, which are great for stocking up on snacks and drinks. There is also a Starbucks nearby. Hotel Lulu, which was recently taken over by Red Lion, is a good budget option. They are often allowing guests to go through security and the turnstiles before the opening time so for a 8 am opening, it pays to arrive around 7 or 7:10. It pays to stay in the Grand Californian hotel for easy access to the parks but the hotel pricing is $800+ right now so finding a nearby alternative helps the budget. If you stay at one of the Harbor hotels you can still take a break in the middle of the day. Just keep in mind that the hotels around Disneyland are suffering from major staff shortages this summer. Also keep in mind that car rental shortages and pricing continues to be an issue as well, especially with the smaller, non-airport locations. Auto Slash is a good option for finding deals on rental cars. Tips for a Family Vacation to Irvine, California Irvine is where the John Wayne / Orange County airport is located, which is the closest Disneyland Kim stayed at the Marriott Irvine Spectrum hotel, which was a nice way to decompress after a few days in Disneyland. The hotel has a nice pool and a rooftop bar on the 16th floor that is popular with locals and guests. There is also a Club floor that provides access to a lounge with snacks and drinks. Boomers is a cool family fun park with go karts, putt putt golf, laser tag, an arcade, and all kinds of games. Irvine has one of the lowest hotel occupancy taxes in California. Tanaka Farms in Irvine is family-owned and is a non-profit that donates food to people in the area. You can do a U-pick tour on a wagon tour and you can pick the produce that are in season. Irvine is also known for its outdoor hiking paths. Irvine Spectrum Center is a large outdoor mall with a ton of restaurants and the Great Wheel ferris wheel. There is a lawn with a stage and they have live music. Irvine is also home to the Orange County Soccer Club, which is fun to watch and is near the Great Park Balloon. Diamond Jamboree is a great spot to find authentic Asian cuisine. Full Episode Transcript [00:00:00.060] - Kim Tate It's summertime at Disneyland, listen to find out what it's like right now.   [00:00:15.900] - Announcer Welcome to Vacation Mavens. A family travel podcast with ideas for your next vacation and tips to get you out the door. Here are your hosts, Kim from Stuffed Suitcase and Tamara from We3Travel.   [00:00:30.690] - Kim Tate Today's episode is sponsored by Room Steals. Listeners may remember Room Steals from our discussion on finding hotel deals in Episode 185, but Room Steals is a Chrome browser extension that works alongside your existing booking sites. To show you what the wholesale price is for that room, just install the browser extension and search for a hotel, as you normally would on Hotels.com. Booking.com, Expedia or Google. Once you've done your initial search, Roo Steals will show you in a pop up if that same room is available for cheaper.   [00:00:57.210] - Kim Tate If it is, you can click on that pop up and book directly through Room Steals instead. Downloading and using Room Steals is free. However, if you want to book a discounted room, you will have to pay an annual membership fee. Listeners can save 20 percent of the annual membership fee with promo code vacationmavens. If you travel multiple times a year, the subscription will quickly pay for itself. One listener has already saved four hundred dollars using Room Steals on her first booking to learn more visit RoomSteals.com, that's roomsteals.com and use promo code vacationmavens to save 20 percent off your membership to Room Steals, and we thank them for their support.   [00:01:30.790] - Tamara Gruber So, Kim, last week we talked all about my trip to Greece and this week, we get to talk all about your return trip to California. You're really doing a lot of California these days, huh?   [00:01:41.620] - Kim Tate Yeah, it's so funny because we had family and friends say, you're going to Disneyland again. And it's tough because I know that in some ways we'd like to do other vacations. But the girls had missed getting to Disneyland. And I feel like they really liked it and that's what they wanted to do. And it's a pretty easy trip in a lot of ways. So we headed back to Disneyland for family vacation.   [00:02:05.650] - Tamara Gruber And it's a really nice, I'm sure, a change of scenery to go to from pine trees to palm trees, right?   [00:02:11.680] - Kim Tate Yes, exactly. It's so different. It's kind of funny how the atmosphere is so different there. And we experience that, especially because we did Disneyland for a few days and then we spent three days in Irvine, California, which is actually a city. It's kind of the neighboring city to Disneyland. A lot of people will know if you fly in and out of Disneyland. The closest airport is called in a also known as John Wayne or Orange County Airport.   [00:02:36.040] - Kim Tate And that airport is located in Irvine. So it's kind of a neighboring city. And we thought it would be a good time to kind of get that Disneyland trip for the girls, but then also be in a hotel and kind of have a more relaxed end to our vacation so that Paul could be happy and have, you know, time to sleep in and kick up his feet a little.   [00:02:54.360] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, that's good. I mean, plus like you've been to Disneyland, but it's probably been a couple of years or more since the girls have been. Right.   [00:03:02.110] - Kim Tate Right. Yeah. So in February 2020 we actually went to a conference in Disney World and then I was in Disneyland for a conference in March of 2020. Well it was end of February when I flew home March 1st before everything shut down. But yeah, the girls have not been to Disneyland in a little while and so that's what they were really excited about. And it was our home park that we kind of know the best. And I think for the girls, they feel really confident in how to manage it and touring it.   [00:03:30.440] - Kim Tate And so that was kind of a for them. It's a trip that they they feel, I think, empowered and excited about.   [00:03:37.970] - Tamara Gruber And it all worked out because they just reopened for out-of-state visitors in June.   [00:03:42.640] - Kim Tate That was one of the big reasons. When they got that news, they're like, that's what I want to do. I want to go back to Disneyland. And I figure, you know this, too. With the girls getting older and especially with Lizzy going into her senior year, it's getting tougher and tougher. Once they get into high school and even late middle school, it gets tough to pull them out of school. And so you kind of need to do those summer trips.   [00:04:04.070] - Kim Tate And that's where they wanted to go. I thought, well, you know, I guess that's what we'll do. And I was hearing these reports that everyone was saying, oh, it's the perfect time to be in Disneyland. You know, there's no crowds and it's really easy and it's really nice. And then they had the new Avengers campus that was going to open. So we thought it was going to be a great trip and we had a lot of fun.   [00:04:21.850] - Kim Tate But it's definitely not the it's not the low, low crowds that people were expecting, I think, for summer in Disneyland. You if you if you've been to summer to Disneyland in the summer and you know what those ride wait times were like, then, yes, it's going to be a real delight for you. But if you go normally in off-seasons or other times and you kind of are used to being able to really own the park and kind of fly through lines, especially with the fact that there's no Fastpass or Max pass, which we are very confident using, you are faced with just plain waiting in lines and that's something my girls were not very excited about.   [00:05:02.020] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I was going to say. And just the fact that it's been so long since people have been around a lot of people and had to do these kind of things were waiting in line. It must have like probably gets to maybe even a little bit more.   [00:05:15.490] - Kim Tate Yeah, it is interesting, especially also because we some of the rides I felt like the rides were going down more often. Also it seemed like or they had limited capacity, not on, not for social distancing, but just you know, for example, Lizzy's favorite ride is the Guardians of the Galaxy, which used to be Tower of Terror. And on we were there for three days. And the first day she rode it twice, thinking she would write it the other days as well.   [00:05:40.390] - Kim Tate And they had two of their elevators break down. So they were only using one one elevator of. So basically they had to have six loading zones and, you know, park opening would happen and you would see it go from like a zero 15 minute wait all sudden in one hundred and twenty five minute wait, 90 minute wait throughout the day. And so that was real disappointing. They finally got it fixed, but she wasn't able to go on it again the whole trip.   [00:06:07.210] - Kim Tate So she was kind of bummed about that. So there are those little things where when you're used to doing that and then I don't know if it's just staffing or if the maintenance I mean, I don't know if Disneyland has been able to get all their workers back. But you can see that, you know, when something went awry that you love does go down, it can be tough. And then, you know, it's weird because Space Mountain is normally one of the top rides with long wait times.   [00:06:30.510] - Kim Tate And, you know, you're used to seeing it with those kind of wait times, normally 70 to 90 minutes is what I see a lot of times, and it was regularly 40 to 60 minutes throughout the day. So that was a real win. But like the railroad was 30 to 40 minutes. It's just unacceptable to me. So it was really weird how the the numbers kind of flowed. So I don't know what to think. And they had opened up a Disneyland California resident ticket offer shortly before our trip.   [00:06:59.340] - Kim Tate And I'm wondering how much of that special affected people, because, you know, they don't have annual passes anymore. And I think a lot of locals are craving their Disney fix, but buying tickets each time has gotten expensive. And I think this ticket coming out probably made a lot of locals who really understand the park flocked to the park. So I think it affected certain certain rides and things more maybe.   [00:07:24.810] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I mean, that all makes sense. It seems like it's just in that transition kind of phase. Now, what you said that there's no max pass. So that obviously is a big change. What are some of the other things like do you need a reservation for that day in advance and that kind of thing?   [00:07:40.290] - Kim Tate Yeah. So you still need reservations so you can buy your tickets and then you have to reserve the day you want to visit and it's automatically linked to your ticket when you reserve the day through your, you know, like Disneyland, my Disney account. And so that's one nice thing, is that it's all linked. So as long as you have a reservation for that day, you have no issue booking, not Max, but the boarding groups for two other rides, which I'll explain in a minute.   [00:08:07.770] - Kim Tate And so there is that it's it's very fluid, like going through the turnstiles. It's all linked. You just show your ticket. It's it's good to go, but you do have to do a little bit of advance planning and definitely make sure before you plan a trip that there's the availability. So they are opening up the park reservations for you to book one hundred and twenty days out. So if you're, you know, planning a trip that's more than that, it's no problem.   [00:08:33.090] - Kim Tate Just decide what they want to do it and then you book it as those days open up on the calendar. And then if you are within the 120 days, you definitely want to make sure you check the availability calendar and make sure however, it's the calendar is pretty open. It seems like the capacity has definitely been increased. I know our week that we were there, they had it looked like the Disneyland park, because that's the other thing that I'll explain in a minute, because you book a specific park.   [00:08:58.290] - Kim Tate It looked like Disneyland had locked up and was closed and there weren't any more reservations. But then all of a sudden, I know they opened up more reservations. So it's kind of an interesting I don't know if people are releasing reservations and that's why it looks open or if they're strictly just adjusting capacity limits as they want, I'm not sure. So something to know about the reservation system is it is so Disneyland has the two parks, they have Disneyland Park and then they have Disney, California Adventure.   [00:09:24.990] - Kim Tate And the reservation works for one of the parks. And that's the park you start in. Now, if you buy a park hopper ticket, you can hop to the other park after 1:00 p.m., but you have to start in that starting park. And if you don't buy a park hopper ticket, then you're only in that park for the day, if that makes sense. So that's kind of an extra little level that you have to think about. And then it gets even further planning because there's two major rides have to have boarding group passes, which is a huge ordeal in itself.   [00:10:01.080] - Kim Tate And you try and get into a boarding group, which is basically the chance to ride. You still go stand in the line, although the line is very short, but you have to win one of those boarding groups and these things are gone in seconds, like not even minutes. These are gone in seconds. And your chances at seven a.m. and then at noon. And so whichever park you're starting in is the one you can get the seven a.m. for and then at noon you can get it for the other part.   [00:10:27.360] - Kim Tate So in Disneyland, it's rise of the resistance. That's that Star Wars in California adventure, the other is the new Avengers Web slingers ride. So that's another level that we had all four of us logging in trying to get these boarding passes. And it was it was stressful, but we were successful every time. So but that's part of it because I knew I, I knew this was a thing.   [00:10:54.420] - Kim Tate And I've been reading articles like our friend Leslie from Trips with Tikes has an article about it. And then I actually watched like a video on YouTube to show Paul and the girls, like, here's what you need to do. And it's sad, though, because I think people who are wanting to experience those, the fact that you have to know all of that and be, you know, like 6:58 we're there on our phones, like, OK, stop everything we're doing and get ready to get these tickets and then setting alarms for eleven fifty eight so we can get the noon one and it's it can be stressful.   [00:11:25.470] - Kim Tate So it's kind of an interesting and and if you don't have hoppers you only have the one. You do have it at 7:00 a.m. and noon, so so if you're booked at Disneyland and you miss out at the seven a.m. one, you can try again for the noon one. Either park, you can try again, but you can't go on the same ride twice. So if we were in Disney, California adventure, we couldn't go to Web slingers if we got a boarding group at seven a.m. and then try and get another boarding group for Web slingers at noon.   [00:11:52.100] - Kim Tate But we can. And then this is another level of it. Sorry, you guys. This is getting a lot of information, but you have to have already used your first boarding pass before you can get the noon one. So if you have a late boarding group that hasn't been able to ride yet and you haven't used your boarding pass yet, by noon, you won't get to try for the noon pass for the ride. Right.   [00:12:14.240] - Tamara Gruber But if you had like a one o'clock boarding, I'm sure by one o'clock they're all gone for the rest.   [00:12:18.740] - Kim Tate Oh, definitely. Yeah, in seconds. I mean, literally it's seven to one. There's nothing available like for people who sit there and they don't know the system and they think, oh, it's seven, I'm going to open my app and try and get a boarding group. Nope. They're already gone like you. There's some tricks. You have to have the like, we were rebooting our phone. Everything was closed. We had the app already open and then there's like refresh, refresh, refresh, and then you have to know exactly where to hit.   [00:12:42.230] - Kim Tate Like you hit here and then you hit start hitting here and you just get lucky you're not. And it's crazy.   [00:12:47.930] - Tamara Gruber I heard Leslie talking about that on her Disney deciphered podcast. It was yes. It was very intense. I know. And when Hannah and I were in Los Angeles, we had a free day and Glenn was like, oh, you should go to Disneyland so you can finally ride. You know, the the you know, Rise of the resistance. And I was like, no, it's like, first of all, like, I'm just not it would have been like the day after they opened to out-of-state people.   [00:13:10.370] - Tamara Gruber And I was like, I just can't deal with that stress. Like, I, I want to go when I know that I can ride that ride because that's why I would go, you know. Yeah.   [00:13:20.330] - Kim Tate We were talking about that as a family. We're just saying how, you know, hard and it's nice that we knew what to do and that we were able to do it. But then the other thing is it's kind of bad, like, OK, well, we got to ride the rides multiple times. What about like, we felt kind of bad. What if there's people out there like this little kid who really wanted to go on Spider-Man loves Spider-Man and we wish there was a way we could be like, here, just use our pass, you know, for this kid to be able to go, you know, because it's it feels bad because you.   [00:13:47.960] - Kim Tate Yeah, and I saw people on Twitter, you know, they're like, oh, I didn't get it, you know, and I just want to ride this ride. I'd wait three hours for it because and I think that's what they're trying to do, is prevent, you know, when Disney World opened Avatar, Pandora flight of passage. Right. And people were like parking out in the parking lot at three a.m. so that they could get out of their car and go wait at the gates and be the first people to the rope line and then be the first people in that line because the line would grow to like three hundred and twenty minutes.   [00:14:16.070] - Kim Tate It was just insane. Like, I don't even know how you spend your entire day there. It's just crazy.   [00:14:20.360] - Tamara Gruber So I could just say, like, I'm sure there's nothing in the world that I want to do that much.   [00:14:25.070] - Kim Tate I do. It's kind of crazy. I mean, you want to wait six hours for a ride. It's just insane. But yeah. So I think they're trying to avoid that because that's it's not a positive park experience. But unfortunately, right now and then the other issue you have is just these rides have a lot of working mechanisms and go down a lot. I mean, we got we were on ride of the resistance, and it went down and we got had to leave the line and then come back later.   [00:14:51.740] - Kim Tate And thankfully, they do have a fastpass working for that now. They didn't originally, I think, but they have that working again. So they were able to program that for our ticket. So we were able to come back when it was open and go back through. So it's interesting. It's it's definitely another level. So I would say if you're planning a visit and you're not wanting or willing to be obsessive about getting those passes, definitely maybe take those two rides off your agenda and just pretend you never heard of those rides and be happy with all the other things that are.   [00:15:24.440] - Kim Tate Yeah, right.   [00:15:25.820] - Tamara Gruber So this helps to be like Disney ignorant in a way. That just going to be like happy with what you get, I don't know.   [00:15:32.810] - Kim Tate Well, and there is certainly some great I mean the wait times can certainly be great. So in a lot of ways certain rides, if you're not trying to go for these certain rides, the wait times can be great, like Toy Story mania. We almost ride that only once because normally the family is not used to it and it normally has a long wait and nobody's willing to wait with me because it's one of my favorite rides. And this time, I mean, we went on it twice because the wait time was kind of low.   [00:15:56.390] - Kim Tate And but then you looked at Mickey's fun wheel, which you would normally. It's not too crazy, but it was easily fifty to sixty minutes. It seemed like there in the middle of the day every time we were there. So it's just weird. It was a really weird. That's why I think there was a lot of California people maybe who just kind of wanted to go for, I don't know how to read the visitors because it was just an odd, odd feel.   [00:16:19.580] - Kim Tate Yeah, the numbers didn't line up everywhere we wanted and dining was a little tough. Still, they've definitely they've got the mobile ordering down a little bit better, I think, at Disneyland. Where. You can place your mail order. We didn't really have an issue getting our order, we found we have one place that we love called bingo barbecue, and we had no real issue with finding an open time slot that fit with what we wanted. And it was almost always available right away.   [00:16:45.020] - Kim Tate And then it's like a half an hour time slot. So then you go and you're like, I'm here. And then once you say I'm here to pick up your food, it's normally a it can be, you know, a minute to ten minutes before they have your food ready. But it was pretty quick. Well, that's good. A little, yes.   [00:17:00.110] - Tamara Gruber But with that, it sounds like you guys had a good time, though. I mean, luckily, it all worked out for you with the with those particular rides, because I'm sure the girls, you know, really wanted to. Yes.   [00:17:10.970] - Kim Tate Yeah. Web slingers, we all kind of thought it was ho hum. In all honesty, we did it again. And once you do it a second time, you kind of understand it a little better. And so maybe it becomes a little more fun. But I think for people who are waiting and then we also we waited 60 minutes. Well, it was we got in line at like ten, I think it was ten or two or something.   [00:17:30.410] - Kim Tate And we left at eleven o four after the ride. And that was the ride had gone down while we were in line and it was probably down for 15 minutes. So I mean, even when you get there, it's you might still have a long wait to get on the rise of the resistance. We didn't have quite that at any other times. We rode that. So but just, you know, Web slingers is a you kind of put on these 3D goggles and you it's a bit like Toy Story in a way, but you use your hands to shoot webs and you're trying to attack these, you know, little bots on the screen.   [00:18:02.570] - Kim Tate And so your webs are shooting them and you earn points. And so at the end of the ride, you have accumulated a certain amount of points.   [00:18:09.260] - Tamara Gruber So instead of like shooting a little laser gun thing.   [00:18:13.280] - Kim Tate Yeah, exactly.   [00:18:14.630] - Tamara Gruber The next generation more interactive, I guess.   [00:18:17.060] - Kim Tate Yeah. Yeah. But you're just moving like it's I thought it would be more like I don't know how to explain it like spinning or like, you know, universal Orlando. That's the Harry Potter, the forbidden journey. I know how you go in front of the screens and you watch stuff happen, but going between the screens you're like, oh it's roller coaster.   [00:18:37.760] - Kim Tate OK, yeah, but I kind of wanted that kind of experience. And this you're just on a car like Toy Story mania and you just kind of get like moved over to this next screen and then you move to this next screen and it opens. And so there's no real there's it's it's literally like, yeah, Lightyear, not Buzz Lightyear, but like Toy Story with the screen. And instead of using a little gun thing that's in front of you, you're using your hands and then, yeah, you earn points and people want to do it because they want to get better at their points.   [00:19:07.700] - Kim Tate And that's it.   [00:19:09.380] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:19:10.070] - Kim Tate Rise, on the other hand, is amazing. We really liked it, although it it's funny because we were so excited for Paul to finally get to ride it because he was a he's a Star Wars guy like Star Wars. He's not a Star Wars freak, but he I don't mean to say freak if he runs into Star Wars fans. I know. No, I didn't mean like that. But he's he likes Star Wars, you know, like.   [00:19:27.890] - Kim Tate Yes. Age. He grew up with it and like, I know Star Wars, but yeah. So we are really excited for him to do rise. And then we took him to Millennium Falcon. He's like, oh, that was way better than it was so funny because we live opposite. We were like a Millennium Falcon is not that great. And then he just loved it and he thought it was so fun and he liked it. He liked Millennium Falcon and rides better than Web slingers so.   [00:19:49.580] - Tamara Gruber Well, it's just something about like when you're so invested in a franchise, like to have like the that more immersive kind of experience is so exciting. I mean, that's why I know, like, the first time we went to Universal and all the Harry Potter stuff, it was just like a dream come true, I think like to be like walking through Hogwarts and all this kind of stuff. So I think that type of response, you know, it doesn't surprise me too much because it's not just about the ride, it's about everything else.   [00:20:16.790] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:20:17.000] - Kim Tate The characters and all that. Yeah. The big thing we dining just eating off hours is a big thing because seating seems to be a little limited again. And so just I recommend I always say like take a granola bar so that they can tide you over and just try and plan to eat off hours. We actually saw the first day the girls did the full day in the park and we got there. We did rope drop every morning, which they're back to rope drop.   [00:20:42.410] - Kim Tate So I was kind of bummed because they had done with rope drop because they didn't want to have everybody congregating together. And so people were getting there early and they were opening the turnstiles early and people were able to go just on rides like an hour before the park officially opened. Wow.   [00:20:56.570] - Tamara Gruber Because it used to be like even if you could get through the turnstiles, like the rides weren't operating, but you could least get in line.   [00:21:02.210] - Kim Tate Yeah. And so that's what they're back to. So you can get through the turns, you can get through security, you can get through the turnstiles and then you go wait at this rope. Were these, you know, cast members are holding and a big group mob of people just line up there and it's kind of depending on where you're at, but the ropes are leading into the main main areas. So you kind of held back and you can get there early.   [00:21:25.160] - Kim Tate So that's what we did. So we aimed. So we kind of aim to be on our way. Walking, we got we stayed at a new renovated hotel, it's newly branded through a best western is called Hotel Lulu and it's nearby. It's kind of in walking distance a little longer. But the cool thing about it is it is near a Walgreens and a CVS. So we stopped in there and we're able to get like Gatorade's and water for much cheaper.   [00:21:49.440] - Kim Tate Kind of, you know, that was nice for stocking up on little snacks and drinks. And definitely, even though it's a pharmacy, you know, pricing it still way cheaper than in the park. And it was nice to have that. It was so convenient that it was next door and the walking distances, I would still call it walking distance. It was maybe a ten minute walk. And there was also a Starbucks next to it. They had mobile ordering most days, but they seem to close that down on our last day.   [00:22:14.100] - Kim Tate We're not sure why. So I don't know if they're just over staffed with mobile ordering, but that's something to check. And it made it easier for us to get coffee in the morning on our way. And so we try and get coffees and then be on our way. And then we'd be slightly outside of the park and at the six fifty nine, when we'd try and get those boarding groups, we'd walk or, you know, pull over to the side of the sidewalk and get it and then go get in line.   [00:22:34.080] - Kim Tate So we were showing up. It was an eight a.m. opening time. So we were getting to the security line up right around seven to seven tennish, you know, and it worked pretty well for us. We we got in there, so we went through the security line. Then we got through security fast and then we waited in the line for the turnstiles. They open the turnstiles a half an hour before the park opened. And then once you got through the turnstiles, you walked and waited again at the rope drop where you wait, you know, where you waited for the eight a.m. opening and then you quickly walked, don't run.   [00:23:05.070] - Kim Tate Even though people ran down to the whatever ride you wanted to go for. So that was it. It was fun. It was it's a lot to manage. I think Disneyland is one of those things where if you just want to show up in the middle of the day and go on some rides, you should probably allow for more time, because there are people who I mean, we know the ins and outs. And if you're not willing to learn all those ins and outs of tricks, then you're going to just have to wait in lines, be OK with that.   [00:23:31.080] - Tamara Gruber So I'm ready to go back after the fast passes are back and after the special like after hours events and all the kind of stuff.   [00:23:42.570] - Tamara Gruber I was just going to say I just really I don't love rides except some of the special ones like Flight of Passage and I'm sure I will love the Star Wars ones. And so just being able to do it without the lines, you know, that would be the way I prefer to go.   [00:23:58.260] - Kim Tate Yeah. Yeah. I think that's where our girls are at because they really liked the rides. And so it's funny because Paul he wants to just like oh I want to watch that show or I just want to sit on this bench and people watch and I and there was like, no, we're going to go get this right and we're going to get this right. And this was the trip, though. It's nice when you're a little older and the kids can be left alone.   [00:24:17.280] - Kim Tate Like like I said, the first day, the girls stayed the full time the park. And then Paul and I left towards the afternoon evening. We took a little break in the room and then we went and got dinner again. This hotel where we stayed down the road, it's near, you know, like tourist restaurants. So it's like Cheesecake Factory and Bubba Gump Shrimp and I don't know what else there was, but opening. So we went out there and it was nice to have that little break.   [00:24:42.270] - Kim Tate And then the next two days we left after we did the rope drop, the numbers were just going insane. And the girls, like I said, they're all about the ride. So when those rides, the wait times were more than they wanted to wait. We just left and went back and took a midday break in the hotel and then went back later in the day to do more stuff. And so I think those it's that's one of the benefits.   [00:25:02.010] - Kim Tate Where does that is if you stay on property, it's great because you're in kind of the bubble of Disney. And if you stay at the Grand Californian, it's got the private access into Disney California Adventure Park. But those rooms are going for like eight hundred bucks a night right now. And you don't get the early entry with it, which normally one of the benefits of staying on site is that you get into the parks an hour early. So it's definitely a tradeoff.   [00:25:26.580] - Kim Tate So if you stay off site on one of the harbor hotels, you can, you know, kind of take those midday breaks still and walk to and from the park. But you're faced with that extra, you know, a little bit extra going through more people and a few extra waits. But it is nice to have the midday breaks.   [00:25:43.820] - Tamara Gruber I'm telling you, if I ever come to Disneyland, I'm going to go with you. Yeah. You and Leslie. Oh, yeah. I follow you guys because, I mean, I feel like, you know, I had gone to Disney World a long time ago and then recently I've gone a few times in recent years. And so now I feel like comfortable with Disney World, you know, but I've never been to Disneyland. So whole new thing.   [00:26:03.870] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, well, I'm excited to take you and show you all the ins and outs, but I will say for anybody who's thinking of taking a trip, there's a couple of things I want to mention. First is hotels. So our hotel that we stayed at, Hotel Lulu, they, you know, mentioned that they're in a real staff shortage right now. And of course, there was no housekeeping. You can request your towels when you want them and if you need garbage taken out.   [00:26:26.550] - Tamara Gruber So we definitely did that and they took care of it right away and. But it's something to keep in mind, and the Hotel Lulu, like I said, it's the best Western property recently got taken over by a Red Lion. And so it's definitely a budget friendly park property. So if people are looking to save money, that would be a good option, especially since, like I said, it's near the Walgreens and there's a CVS right across the street.   [00:26:45.840] - Tamara Gruber They both have like Disney souvenir stuff at less price than what you're going to pay in the park. So if you want to surprise your kids with something, you could always go in there and grab it. They also have, you know, of course, sunscreens and anything. You might forget that it's just a little bit different than buying them in the park. So that's convenient from a budget standpoint. The rooms themselves, I, I think there they go for around, you know, depending on the season, around 150 a night.   [00:27:10.440] - Tamara Gruber So comparing that to some of the other hotels that are a little closer, it's definitely a budget savings. And then again, even with going down the street, you have those you know, there was a California pizza kitchen, P.F. Chang's, and Cheesecake Factory. So you've got some major restaurants there. If you're trying to save a little money and take a midday break and get lunch there, get an early dinner before you go back in the parks or something, that might be an option, but definitely something with all of the hotels around Disneyland right now is that they are all dealing with a severe staff shortage.   [00:27:42.240] - Tamara Gruber They went, you know, the hotels where I talked to the people at the hotel where we stayed and they went from having like 17 rooms booked to all of a sudden having over one hundred. And they just don't they haven't been able to hire the staff. They've increased their pay rate and they still can't get staff in. And so managers are going up to clean rooms. And it's just I mean, we've heard this everywhere. But in Disneyland, it's really obvious this summer is that hotels are hurting with staff.   [00:28:08.460] - Tamara Gruber I know one of the hotels that's a popular kind of mom and pop called candy cane inn. They are not even open again yet because of staff.   [00:28:16.720] - Tamara Gruber Wow. So, yeah, it's it continues to be a problem. I hope that by far maybe things will, you know, sort themselves out. I'm seeing even like restaurants around here like closing because they're not able to have the staff and service that they want. And it's yeah, I'm sure they'll be back, but it'll just take us some time.   [00:28:35.730] - Kim Tate Yeah. And so I think you just have to be, you know, little things to just be aware of and be a little more. I mean, we've talked about this be patient, but just understanding that like maybe the cleanliness level in hotels and what you're expecting or what you're used to is not perhaps going to be what you are thinking you're going to get. So just be aware of that. And then the other thing would be the car rentals. We had our own little issue with car rentals, which everyone knows the car rental shortage issue.   [00:29:01.860] - Kim Tate We rented a car from the airport to drive and go to Disneyland and do it. We visited USC and Cal Tech for Lizzy and we had no problem. The car was there. We rented it. I was like, phew, I think it is no issue. We are fine. We dropped it off after ours, dropped our keys and we dropped it off at this Alamo that was right near where we were staying at Disneyland. And we were supposed to pick up another car on Thursday, so we dropped it off on Sunday.   [00:29:28.650] - Kim Tate We're supposed to pick up a different car on Thursday because we didn't need a car for those three days when we were at the parks because we were just going to go to the parks. And we got called Wednesday night like five minutes before they closed, telling us they wouldn't have a car for us. That was it. And then they never returned my phone call. So I reached out to them on Twitter, gotten a reply, and finally just used auto slash, which we've I think we've mentioned that before, and a rental car episode.   [00:29:54.840] - Kim Tate But I've never used it before. But I used auto slash to just find a rate and they found me a great Hertz rate that was actually cheaper than what I walked through. Alamo maybe last minute, you know, they had some availability and I was able to go down there the next day and we got the car rental and had no issue. So thank goodness it all worked out. But just beware some of the smaller like I think this was part of it because it was a smaller location.   [00:30:17.160] - Kim Tate They're not managing their inventory well. And so beware.   [00:30:20.940] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. I mean, if there's problems at airports, I can certainly imagine that there's even more problems at these, like off, you know, airport kind of locations. Yes, it's it's sad. I mean, I definitely see as places are increasing, you know, we've talked about Hawaii before. I saw someone that just got back from Iceland posting that things were like five hundred to a thousand dollars a day. And then I saw someone in my Iceland planning group just saying, like, I can't find a rental, like, what am I going to do?   [00:30:48.450] - Tamara Gruber And so I was just advising my aunt to try to book something like in advance, you know, as far as you can. But it's just hard because like you did that and then they canceled that. What do you do? You know exactly.   [00:31:00.690] - Kim Tate And I know I have another blogging friend who had the exact same thing happen to her with the exact same Alamo's site there in Disneyland about a week or two before I did. I have that problem.   [00:31:11.010] - Kim Tate So definitely something to be aware of. You can do the booking and know that you have your your reservation made. But whether they actually have a car for you when you show up for that reservation and they what I experienced, they did nothing to help us. So you just I think when you you have to be ready to backpedal and hope for the best and. So we were ready to just, you know, use Uber, find another one available, and thankfully it all worked out and we were able to get another kind of wonder if that's a case where, you know, maybe it helps if you, like, pay more like Hertz is always usually the most expensive.   [00:31:45.940] - Tamara Gruber Right. But it's like if you pay more or if if you're part of a like a loyalty club versus. Yeah, you're going to save more if you use, like auto slash or Costco or something like that. But I wonder if booking direct helps at all, like if the first people they cancel are the third parties, like who knows. But it does. I have no idea. I even booked a premium car hoping that they like it would give us more as opposed to an economy.   [00:32:09.500] - Kim Tate I booked the premium because it was only two dollars more. And so I thought that would help. But no. So it was nothing help. So I don't know now.   [00:32:18.010] - Tamara Gruber I'm glad it worked out for you. Yeah. And then you guys had some time to chill out and. Yeah.   [00:32:21.960] - Kim Tate So that was the other part of it. Yeah. So we you know, Paul's not a huge Disneyland person. Even I like Disneyland, but I'm not crazy crazy. And I can you know, I enjoy taking the breaks. And so we booked our final three nights in Irvine, which was nearby and near the John Wayne Airport that we were flying home from. And they we stayed at a brand new hotel called the Marriott Irvine Spectrum. And we loved it.   [00:32:47.540] - Kim Tate We had such a good time is the perfect way to end our vacation, because we I worked with Irvine. They gave us a couple of ideas and helped us set up a couple of things. And then we got to our hotel, kind of had a lazy day that day and just had it. It was nice. We just had I don't know what the term and what I'm trying to think of, but we just didn't have a lot on our calendar, so it kind of worked out well.   [00:33:09.030] - Kim Tate So the first day that we were checking in, we got in there and then we went to this kind of family park fun center called Boomers, and it was where they had a huge arcade with the arcade. But we did putt putt golf and then we did laser tag game, which surprisingly enough, we were all super competitive. I was completely out of breath after that. It was brutal. The girls beat both the parents. Paul actually was very sad to find out he was last, which is kind of sad.   [00:33:36.890] - Kim Tate Doesn't surprise me at all that you would be competitive.   [00:33:41.150] - Kim Tate Yeah. Evidently I rubbed it off on my kids too. So but yeah. So it was kind of fun and we we had a great time there and then playing it was a lot of fun and it was a great, you know, like, that's like a vacation. Right. I mean that was so nice. Like we did the Disneyland thing, but then we had this break in Irvine so close we didn't need to do that much traveling on the crazy interstate's of, you know, Sokal and.   [00:34:05.420] - Kim Tate Yeah, so Boomers was fun. It was just kind of one of those family park fun centers. We didn't do any of the arcade. We just did the laser tag. And oh, they did have go karts, which Paul got. You talk about competitive. He got super competitive. I got taken out by like a twelve year old boy. It made me really mad because you're like you're not allowed to bump.   [00:34:22.670] - Kim Tate But they evidently care about the rules. And so and he was just going and going and going and he'd figured out that I think he was with a friend and they figured out which cars are the fastest. So they just kept going and going. And they would always like he would specifically skip cars and go to a specific car where the rest of us just got in the car where that was next in line and it was brutal. So that was one one negative.   [00:34:43.520] - Kim Tate Is the teenage boy or not? I guess tween boy, but we still had fun and it was nice. So that was, you know, kind of a relaxed day. And then, like, we just hung out at the pool and the hotel was really nice. They, you know, it was a new Marriott. It had trying to think of how many flaws there were. Now I think it was sixteen floors. And on the sixteenth floor, they have like a rooftop bar that's supposed to be really, really popular.   [00:35:09.170] - Kim Tate They actually were able to get in on our last night and kind of go up there and look. And it's absolutely gorgeous. And I talked to the manager of the bar and he was saying that it's like seventy percent locals and visitors and only thirty percent for the hotel. So it's got its own, like, vibe and social standing. Not that's not even linked to the hotel, if that makes sense.   [00:35:29.120] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, it's a place to go.   [00:35:31.130] - Kim Tate So, yes, the hotel itself is a gorgeous Marriott property. Knew the rooms were nice and everything was good. It had a view our room had like a view of the freeway, but it had mountains in the background. So it was really kind of cool. And Irvine, I think, is unknown. I'm trying to think of I thought it was something I'm trying to think of what I know them for. But they had a whole bunch of office buildings, so they must have.   [00:35:50.000] - Kim Tate I know they have really they're one of the lowest hotel occupancy taxes in California. So you know how you always get those, you know, 15 to 18 percent charges. There's just like ten percent. So if you're staying in a nice hotel for a while, that little bit of savings can be nice. So but they have a lot of businesses around there and we were staying right across from the Taco Bell headquarters. So we laughed. And I wonder if they have a drive through.   [00:36:15.920] - Kim Tate So the hotel is nice. They had a club lounge which we were able to get into. And you know that with Glenn's, you know, status, it's always nice because lots of water. I mean, we went there for so much water, it was nice. And the girls would go there to get all the. Free chips and stuff, and then, of course, we had breakfast in the morning there, which was a nice little perk.   [00:36:33.600] - Tamara Gruber Oh, that's surprising. Like the actual hotel perks, really, when we were seated that that nice Athens hotel, that's a Marriott and we were on the what did they call it like the the butler or concierge. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And we walk by like the little you know, usually the the lounge room and it was locked and I was like, oh well good thing we're only here one day and it included breakfast early. So it was actually a wonderful breakfast that included.   [00:37:02.730] - Tamara Gruber That's nice. Yeah. But we were like oh can we get a little extra perk.   [00:37:06.660] - Kim Tate Yeah. Yeah. This is nice because they had, you know, like the coffee machine there and then they had like three hot dishes so and a meat and potatoes and then they had like porridge and cinnamon rolls. But it was great. I mean it was really nice. And they have this little patio. I mean, the hotel itself, it's a really nice property is one of those. It's a it's like weird. It's kind of resource. We feel it's not huge, though, but it's a resource we feel in this, you know, city of California.   [00:37:33.180] - Kim Tate So it was nice. But the pool lounge and then the restaurant and bar area is just beautiful. It's absolutely gorgeous. Like downstairs restaurant of our not even the rooftop bar is just really, really nice. And we we enjoyed dinner there and it was great.   [00:37:47.760] - Tamara Gruber Nice properties. Sounds like you wanted to have that pool time and stuff.   [00:37:53.190] - Kim Tate Exactly. And we actually were able to get so we went down two times to middle of the day, like to lounge and everything, get drinks at the pool and we were able to get loungers each time and there's not tons loungers. So I think we definitely noticed in the weekend because we we were there Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and we flew home Sunday. And we definitely noticed Saturday was much busier. Whereas when we were there Thursday and Friday, the pool was not as busy.   [00:38:18.910] - Kim Tate So definitely kind of well. And a sports team came in for a competition. And so there was a lot of kids there in sports uniforms and stuff, which was kind of funny because it doesn't strike me as a I mean, it's definitely a business Marriott property. So it kind of struck me as funny that. But I don't know. There must I mean, there's a big sports complex that we went and saw a soccer game at. So it's possible that that's why they pick there, because it's close to that kind of one of the most popular hotels near that sports complex.   [00:38:48.200] - Tamara Gruber Makes sense. Yeah.   [00:38:49.680] - Kim Tate So one of the I'll just mention a couple of the other things we did was in Irvine, we went to a place called Tanaka Farms, which was really cool. It's like this family owned, you know, farm it actually they told us the story that I don't and I didn't I haven't checked this. But it's a Japanese family who they said that in when the war was going on and they were doing the internment camps in the U.S., that if you opened a farmer, were running a farm, you were able to not go to an internment camp.   [00:39:19.800] - Kim Tate And so this family opened this farm. And that's sort of how it's how it stayed and it's family owned. And then it's also a nonprofit. They have volunteers who worked there and they donate part of their produce and everything to local people in need in the area. So it was pretty cool. And so we did this. It's called a you pick tour. So it's like a wagon tour and they give you these little, you know, cardboard basket things and you go around to different parts in the field.   [00:39:47.940] - Kim Tate They're like, today we're going to be picking tomatoes and Sushmita peppers and melon. And so they drove us. I mean, OK, we're going to go here and you're going to pick from these plans on the tomatoes and you got your little cardboard basket and you could just fill it up with whatever you want to. And they drove you on the wagon to the next spot and they're like, OK, now we're picking Chido Peppers. And we picked those and then moved on.   [00:40:06.450] - Kim Tate OK, here's our melon. So we've already picked some but pick which ones you want. So it's kind of cool is a really neat experience and then they hand you it or. Yeah, we kept it so we ate it on our trip. We actually brought the peppers home with us in our suitcase and they were fine because we TSA says fruit and vegetables are allowed. Paul actually carried on some of the melons, but they were getting super ripe.   [00:40:25.350] - Kim Tate It was funny because we were on the plane and I was like, OK, those melons are starting to smell too, right? Like I can. I'm starting to smell them. So, like, they weren't soft. Yeah, but, you know, they just start putting off the strong scent. People are like smelling it. I'm like, don't put it at your feet. Definitely put it up. I was so embarrassed. I was like, no, I have such a sensitive nose.   [00:40:44.390] - Tamara Gruber I would have been like, you have melon like like hand cream or whatever was that   [00:40:50.220] - Kim Tate It was so embarrassing. I was like, oh my gosh. So anyways, but yeah. So we you got to keep the food and everything and it's just neat. And they had animals there. So we got to see some, you know, sheep and chickens and all that. But it was just a cool, you know, neat little thing to see this big farm and agriculture and then to get a pick food that you couldn't eat.   [00:41:08.430] - Kim Tate So we thought that was a neat thing. And then we like I said, we did. We went to UC Irvine, which they told you that. But Lizzy's college shop in and UC Irvine was kind of on her list of interested campuses. And so we drove there and got out and she actually really liked it. It was kind of funny because she it seems like she's drawn to more of the city college campuses, but this one's more suburb, and she really liked it, she thought it was really nice.   [00:41:34.710] - Kim Tate So who knows if she becomes an anteater that's still there, the anteaters. It's an interesting, interesting mascot.   [00:41:41.430] - Tamara Gruber But I've been watching, like, never have I ever. Is that what it is? Yeah. Netflix, have you watched that.   [00:41:48.030] - Kim Tate I haven't. But the girls I know, the girls were like, oh, there's a new season or there's new something.   [00:41:51.680] - Tamara Gruber It's so cute. It's like, I don't know. It's a teen comedy. Yeah. Yeah, I, I know. I love it. I thought it was so cute. But their mascot is a cricket like so terrible. Exactly.   [00:42:03.900] - Kim Tate I think anteater is slightly better than cricket. Yeah. How funny. So we did that and we, we drove by. So Irvine is known for their outdoor like they have so many bike paths, hiking trails and stuff. So it's really interesting. So if you're an outdoorsy person and looking to do something like that remains a great destination. So we they had a wild, wild wilderness access to this place called Bomber Canyon, and it's near the campus.   [00:42:29.670] - Kim Tate So we drove over there and it was basically they give you this access to this deeper part of the woods, the deeper part of the park that normally isn't open. And we didn't pack for hiking. So we just kind of looked at it and got a feel for it. It's definitely of course, not Pacific Northwest hiking. It's definitely like Southern California, more arid hiking. So we but it was just it was neat. So it's kind of a thing.   [00:42:52.200] - Kim Tate So if you're into outdoor stuff, Irvine is a destination for that. I don't remember all the facts, but I know they have a huge number of miles of bike and hiking trails. It's crazy.   [00:43:02.470] - Tamara Gruber So definitely interesting because my perception as an east coaster, Irvine has just been. Yeah, like the John Wayne Airport. I used to work with a guy that lived in Irvine and he would talk about like some kind of giant shopping mall that's out there. Like, I have very different view of Irvine. I think of it as very like Orange County upscale. Like, I do not think about outdoor activities.   [00:43:28.260] - Tamara Gruber So that's cool to know that it has that side, too.   [00:43:30.870] - Kim Tate It's really cool. It actually is a neat little city. I think. I think people would be surprised if they gave it a chance. It feels very spread out. So it's not total. OASDI like Huntington Beach, Newport. It's not one of those tiny it's not one of those. It's more spread out open a little more open area. But there's got some really cute little houses, lots of businesses. And then, yeah, the shopping mall, which I'll talk about in a minute, is a big part of Irvine, which is a huge aspect, but it was actually a lot of fun.   [00:43:57.960] - Kim Tate So but yeah. So that was kind of that aspect of it. But the big thing that you're talking about is the Irvine Spectrum Center, which is basically a large outdoor mall that has tons of restaurants. And then they have this thing called the Great Wheel, which is kind of a Ferris wheel. And so it's not really like it's not an enclosed wheel like some of the, you know, other cities have like. Yeah, like it a lot.   [00:44:22.920] - Kim Tate And I and I not as big as that and not even like the Seattle one. That's kind of like gondola Sized seating. This is more like Ferris wheel chair lift or not chair lift. It's that's the weird thing. So it's almost like a ride where it's got kind of bench seating around. So our family of four, we sat like in a circle and there's a center thing that you hang on. But it was really cute and they had live music there when we went and we just sat on this.   [00:44:47.670] - Kim Tate They have kind of Astroturf lawn in front of the stage that's right in front of the wheel. And I showed on my Instagram stories people might have seen it, but it was just so pretty and it was fun. And the girls, whenever they had a Hello Kitty cafe and then of course, they had Brandy Melville. And I don't know what other stores the girls went to, but they did a little shopping. I went early to a place called the Yard House, which we actually have in Seattle, but it's a big sports bar with lots of beers on tap.   [00:45:11.610] - Kim Tate And so I said, oh, Paul's never been to Yard house and he would love that. So we went there and kind of watch TV while the girls finish shopping. And then we got some, you know, ordered dinner and they joined us and then we headed home. But it was fun. So it is a it is a big shopping mall, but it's it's got a neat vibe and a good feel. And it was busy on the weekend, that's for sure.   [00:45:31.350] - Kim Tate Definitely the the Irvine teen hangout spot.   [00:45:34.830] - Tamara Gruber Well, then teens should fit right in.   [00:45:36.810] - Kim Tate Yeah, exactly. So I mean they, I mean they were happy, they loved it so and it's got a lot of name brand stores in Barnes and Noble. So Lizzie was excited about that. Yeah. It was good, good place. And one other cool little thing that we did was we went to a soccer match. So they have a it's called the Orange County Soccer Club. And so it's a, I think, level for soccer. So it's not MLS like level one.   [00:46:01.260] - Kim Tate So it's level four. And so some young kids, but some people who just love playing the sport, some are paid, I think in some aren't. I think some are just walk on. But it was a really cool kind of outdoor venue. And it's in this area, I think it's called Great Park, but they have this famous, like balloon thing called the Great Park Balloon. It's this giant orange because destination Irvine, their logo's and orange.   [00:46:25.110] - Kim Tate I never found out if they have a bunch of orange fields or Richard. Nearby or something, but it's this kind of I know that you've seen it from it's very similar to Walt Disney World, what they have that downtown Disney, the Disney Springs balloon that kind of goes up and people get in the basket. Yeah. So that's basically what it is. And it's supposedly free, but there can be long waits and of course, it's dependent on wind and all that.   [00:46:47.390] - Kim Tate And so we didn't we didn't have time and go up it, but we saw it when we went to the soccer match and we were able to see that it, you know, looks like a fun little thing, gives you an overview of the whole area. But in that that complex was where it was staying so that we watched the soccer match and then there's that balloon. And then there's also like baseball fields and soccer fields and softball fields. So I think it's a big little sports center for probably local teams to play it cool.   [00:47:13.760] - Tamara Gruber So does that wrap up your trip?   [00:47:16.040] - Kim Tate Yeah, I think I want it. I'll mention one of the things we did, and that's just about food, because we didn't you know, we did eat at the hotel and then we ate at the Irvine Spectrum Center, like I mentioned. But one thing that's interesting about Irvine that I learned is that they have a over 40 percent demographic Asian demographic for their in their citizenship. And so international, like Asian cuisines, have been a big part of their make up of their dining industry.   [00:47:41.210] - Kim Tate And they have this area called Diamond Jamboree, which is basically a strip mall, but it's filled full of, you know, like different Asian cuisine restaurants. And it was is they recommended that we go there. And so we went and it looked like a really popular place. And so it's funny because you think, oh, it's just a standard strip mall, but it's just neat. They have all these different places you can eat. And they'd given us a recommendation, like one of the places they had it was called Tim Huan, which is a Michelin star, like he's a Hong Kong based chef.   [00:48:10.640] - Kim Tate And I guess there was something about like, oh, it's a best paper place at Michelin Star meal. You can get her the cheapest Michelin star meal you can get. So I don't know what he is, but it's supposed to be pretty cool. So we were thinking about going there, but we ended up going to another one. They said it was called Pepper Lunch, which is like a DIY tepid restaurant. But it's more like kind of we did teriyaki, but basically you're served your food on a really hot, hot cast iron dish.   [00:48:37.220] - Kim Tate So you don't touch it. And they'll put like if you get a certain meat dish, they'll actually have the meat is raw and you kind of move it around and mix it with the rice to cook it because it's that boiling hot on that cast iron still. And it was it was a neat experience. And it was again, it was so fast. I mean, it's just order and it's there. So it's a popular lunch place for, I think, a lot of those businesses and working people in Irvine.   [00:48:59.570] - Kim Tate But it was a really neat place. It's called the Diamond Jamboree. And if you you know, it's a great little stop and a very affordable too. So that was nice. Double bonus. That kind of wraps it up.   [00:49:11.810] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, that sounds good. It's like I love being able to try different cuisines when you're traveling. I mean, here in Rhode Island, we don't have like I mean, I don't know, it's getting better, but there's not like as many different kind of ethnicities when it comes to cuisine. And so when I go other places, I'm like, oh yeah, I try that so well.   [00:49:32.610] - Kim Tate And I think, yeah, I think the cool thing about this is that you get so I mean, being Americans like us, sometimes we get so pigeonholed like, oh it's Asian cuisine, OK, like that must be Chinese or Japanese or and it's neat to think no, there's all Cambodian. Ah. There's, you know, there's a lot of types like, you know, different, you know, Hong Kong and different cuisine styles. And so that was kind of an interesting concept to consider.   [00:49:56.930] - Kim Tate And keep in mind,   [00:49:57.830] - Tamara Gruber when we were in Berkeley the first night, we're exhausted. Hannah could barely stay awake. And I walked out to get something to eat. And, you know, it's like a lot of just like more casual pickup places right near the school. Yeah. So I found, you know, like a good Korean place. And that was I think it

Vitality Radio Podcast with Jared St. Clair
#152 Hair and Skin and Joints, Oh MY! How to Support Your Connective Tissue

Vitality Radio Podcast with Jared St. Clair

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 55:42


In this episode of Vitality Radio Podcast, Jared rants about how a doctor terribly recommended a young hockey player to eat top ramen and drink Gatorade to assist in rehydration and electrolytes. Wow...so many things are wrong with this recommendation. Jared details why.Jared then shares all about how to support your connective tissue. He discusses hair loss, skin elasticity, joint health and bone density.You can follow us at @vitalityradio on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Check us out online at vitalitynutrition.com. Let us know your thoughts about this episode by using the hashtag #vitalityradio and please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Just a reminder that this podcast is for educational purposes only. The podcast has not been evaluated by the FDA. The information within is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Advice given is not intended to replace the advice of your medical professional.

Sports Spectrum Podcast
Iowa State QB Brock Purdy on playing for Christ and living set apart from the world

Sports Spectrum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 32:48


Brock Purdy is a quarterback for the Iowa State Cyclones in the Big 12. He played his high school football at Perry High in Gilbert, Arizona and was voted Gatorade's Football Player of the Year for Arizona in 2017. As a true freshman at Iowa State, he started eight games and cemented himself as the Cyclones QB. Last season, Purdy led Iowa State to a 9-3 record and their first ever Big 12 Championship game appearance. In the 2021 Playstation Fiesta Bowl, Purdy was named Offensive MVP in helping the Cyclones to a 34-17 win over Oregon. Today on the podcast, we talk to Brock about the excitement surrounding the 2021 season, playing before a packed house in Ames, the importance of Christ in his life, the impact his father Shawn has made, and why he wants to live set apart from the world. -- If you enjoyed this podcast with Brock Purdy, we know you'll love these conversations as well: – Shawn Purdy - Former Pro Baseball Player – Patrick and Bo Nix (Alabama High School Football) Receive our 10-day Sports Spectrum Devotional written by professional athletes for FREE when you sign up for our Sports Spectrum Weekly Email Newsletter. Sign up  here.

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
Holistic Alignment and When Do We Stop Lying?

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 30:25


Scott Couvillon is CEO and Executive Strategy Director at Trumpet Advertising, an agency that strives to create purpose-aligned, believable ads. Scott says that companies succeed with their advertising, not only because their creative product promotion is compelling, but more so when the ads “compel an honest connection between a person and a brand.” Scott says there is a lot of talk in the advertising industry about purpose. What is more important is “What do you do with it once you've got it.”  Scott holds that advertising needs to be aligned with a company's core beliefs. Organizations need to think holistically and ask, “If you put purpose in the center, how do you: Get the company culture aligned with that purpose?” Get the advertising and communications pieces aligned with that purpose?” and  Get the customer experience aligned with that purpose?” Advertising agencies typically work on communications – but may neglect a company's culture and customer experience components. Focus on product characteristics does not build relationships with customers, instill customer loyalty, or keep a company's product from becoming a commodity. Trumpet clients have a common understanding – “They will sell more product by selling that product within the context of what they stand for.” Scott explains, “Brand connection is an invitation to participate in a culture that is very intentional.”  Holistic alignment is what sells premium brands like Apple phones and BMW SUVs. If you don't have holistic alignment, Scott says, the best you can hope for is that people will not dread the absence of holistic alignment. The product is okay . . . and the customer only hopes the experience won't be bad. Because transformational organizational alignment involves a deeper client-agency relationship beyond mere “communications management,” Trumpet typically engages with organizations in one of two ways:  High-level management will bring Trumpet in to force “purpose alignment” on its marcom operations.  Trumpet will start out working with marcom. Once Trumpet has proven itself, it uses its analytical performance to talk with the leadership team about a more holistic brand and organizational alignment. Scott presents the example of one client, a “very profitable credit union” that Trumpet turned into “a very meaningful credit union.” “Meaning” made the credit union “even more profitable.” Although increased profit wasn't the first goal, it was the result of the client's focus on purpose. He refers to Raj's Conscious Capitalism, and these “firms of endearment,” as “the companies that we don't dread.”  Communications should be locked in with company culture and customer experience, all three driven by clairvoyance and purpose. Scott asks key questions. “What is the core belief?” “What would the world lose if this company went out of business?” and then delivers an indicting punchline to the last query: “If the answer is a product, then you're a commodity and somebody else can do what you do. He warns that commoditization often happens when companies internalize the advertising function, communicate on self-serve platforms, and focus more on selling product than on “what they stand for.” Scott can be found on his agency's website at: https://trumpetadvertising.com/. Transcript Follows: ROB: Welcome to the Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast. I'm your host, Rob Kischuk, and I'm joined today by Scott Couvillon, CEO and Executive Strategy Director at Trumpet Advertising based in New Orleans, Louisiana. Welcome to the podcast, Scott. SCOTT: Nice to meet you, finally. ROB: Yeah, awesome to have you on here. Sometimes these things can take a little bit to schedule, but this is the moment. Why don't you start off by giving us the rundown on Trumpet Advertising and what your superpower is? SCOTT: I guess the thing about a superpower is normally the world can either see you running really fast or a human flying, and ours is maybe a little more backstage than that. But it's nonetheless clear to us and to the clients we're working with. It's pretty simple. It's the focus on believability and being purposeful as an organization as an underpinning for the things that we actually do every day, which for us is being an advertising agency. For them, it's running operations and trying to grow their organization. We just try to do that a little bit more meaningfully than I would say agencies that we've all worked for, and even in some cases the agency that we were 10 or 12 years ago. The idea that agencies are responsible for compelling creative is a prerequisite, and let's just assume that all good agencies can buy media and do the analysis and reporting and optimize and come up with great ideas for that engaged attention. But there's a difference between compelling creative and trying to compel an honest connection between a person and a brand. The most successful companies right now are doing a better job of that. Advertising works. We know that. Analytics tell us. America being overweight and in debt, advertising is alive and well. But not every business is able to truly create the connection that allows month over month growth to be sustained in the long term. That requires a more fundamental relationship than just window to window promotion success. ROB: That sort of strategy, to really execute it, it seems like that would require necessarily partnership from the client as well. How do you think about that and that initial client-agency dance of figuring out if they're really interested in that level of connection and genuineness in what they're doing? SCOTT: There's a lot in that. How do we proactively go after business? What is our posture or the conversation when we're, for example, answering an RFP or an open call for agencies? The reality is that if we are dealing exclusively with marketing communications, it would be very difficult to think so holistically about the spirituality of an organization in order to bring some level of alignment between what we're saying externally through communications and what the experience with the company is ultimately going to be if our only connection to the organization is marcom. So yeah, frankly, it requires involvement and buy-in from the leadership team. The relationship's got to go a couple of ways. Either we have a very legacy-oriented, thoughtful, and extremely intentional CEO that brings us in and forces us upon marcom, or we'll work within the marketing communications sphere for a while, really prove our practical worth, that we have good ideas and good tactical execution that shows that we know what we're doing, and then we almost use analytical performance with the leadership team to start having conversations about more of a holistic brand alignment at the organizational level, not just within communications on its own. And again, it clicks for some organizations and definitely not others. ROB: If we can, let's get a little bit more concrete with an example. Is there a particular client you can talk about that typifies what the engagement looks like, what the structure is, as well as the go-to-market message? What's that look like? SCOTT: We are not category specialists. This is a methodology and a perspective that is applicable to a very specific mindset of an organization. What our clients have in common is that they believe they will sell more product by selling that product within the context of what they stand for. They're not constantly just putting something to buy out there; they're being clairvoyant on what people are buying into via that purchase. Structurally, from a relationship standpoint, we have a big financial institution in Texas and expanding out into more and more markets every year, it seems like; we work in healthcare, we work in tourism and destination management, hospitality, but what they all have in common and the structure that's the same is by identifying the purpose of the organization – what is truly the core belief? Our industry has beaten the tar out of “figure out your why and your core motivation” and all that stuff, but what our industry has done a very poor job with is getting beyond the cosmetic application of that “why.” It's easy to turn why we exist into beautiful brand creative, but if the brand, if the company, isn't living that in any real way, it's disingenuous at best and a lie at worst. Our scopes are focused on articulating what that belief is, getting that right and bought into by every level of the organization. When we were working with that financial institution, it was very much led by really, truly an unbelievable CEO who pulled his executive team along with him and really got them all bought in. There were years of internal transformation about “Look, this is the organization that we were, and this is the organization that we are going to be. We're going to move from a very profitable credit union into a very meaningful credit union, and that meaning is going to make us even more profitable.” The profit didn't come first. It got relegated to a result. That became really, really clear, because there became a spirituality at that organization that employees, stakeholders, customers, everybody was truly able to validate and then buy into. They were more than just checking account for a free toaster. The way that process went was getting very clear on that narrative, figuring out what the utilitarian expressions of that narrative were going to be – what products were they going to stop offering? What were the kinds of products they were going to develop? Because their product offering was going to be truly a manifestation of what they stood for, not just different ways for them to make money for shareholders and stakeholders. That kind of internal, truly product holistic thinking first prior to a total renaming and a new identity, new uniforms for employees – how are we going to retrain those employees in the new spirituality of the company while we're handing them a new shirt, as opposed to just handing them a new shirt? That's really how these things, in a perfect sense, go when people are buying into it wholly. There's been plenty of clients that we've talked about this upfront, we've gone through the purpose identification in each standpoint, and it inflects in some of the product expressions and some of the customer experience in a retail sense – certainly we're talking to it from a content standpoint in advertising, marketing, and social media stuff – but never really get invited into the inner sanctum of operations and HR practices, orientation and internal transmission to every employee at the organization. As an egomaniac, those aren't my favorite scopes because we're not able to do the true holistic alignment with every element of the business with a core belief. But it's better than just offering free shipping and extra cheese and hoping for month over month improvements. ROB: Right. It's necessary for you to have the conversation at a higher level in the organization, which is usually where you want to engage. Maybe not sometimes; sometimes the CMO has tons of power and big org. But when you're talking about essentially a credit union, a bank, it's a commodity to people, just like an airline can mostly be a commodity to people unless you are let's say Southwest and you do the work over time to sustain a differentiator. Even when everyone else is charging you for a checked bag. SCOTT: I think you look at the companies that get put into a very specific cohort that we pay a lot of attention to. It's really these believable, more purposeful companies. Raj Sisodia, great TED Talk, talks about conscious capitalism, talks about these firms of endearment. It's the ones that always get talked about at ANA and every conference in our industry. It's the Caterpillars and the Starbucks and the Disneys and of course the Apples and Intuit. It's that category. It doesn't have to be consumer. But these are organizations that are truly aligned, inside and outside, with an idea, not aligned more practically with an IP or a product or a manufacturing process. You bring up Southwest; identical equipment, flying from the exact same building as other companies. It's as commoditized as rice. But there is an affinity and a preference for airlines that we all have and that we use for specific purposes. Yes, there are times that we pinch the nose and it's the cheapest or it's the only one going where I need to be, but we're dreading that experience. And when we go in as a consumer with dread, the best you can have is the absence of dread. I defy you to find a leadership team whose mission statement is “Let's provide an absence of dread to the world.” That's not going to make our stock price soar. But that's where they're landing, whereas Southwest, as you bring up – JetBlue I'd say is another one. They've got a commodity product, and they've really focused on the only thing that there is to focus on, which is the morality and the spirituality of the organization and allowing people to really buy into it. Their turnover is lower. Vendor relationships are better. It is an easier company to run because there is alignment beyond the practical. Don't be late and don't lose bags. ROB: How disruptive – you talk about that feeling of dread. Names pop to my mind. Airline names pop into my mind when you say “dread.” What a heck of a brand. You're the airline of last resort and of dread, but hey, it's cheap. But let me digress a little bit from there. Walk me through the origin story of Trumpet. How did Trumpet start and get to be where it is now? What's that journey look like? SCOTT: Trumpet was founded in '97. It fell out of another agency. Just three guys took the phones and ran and opened up a new agency. That's kind of the late '90s agency founding story. It was a designer and a writer and an account guy, and they started with some real clients, and despite being in a Tier 3 city like New Orleans, over the years they've done some great work for clients like Gatorade. Not nobodies. Launched FreshDirect in New York. It wasn't just car dealerships and plaintiffs attorneys. In fact, those are the two categories we won't work in. They really grew into a creative powerhouse when I was exposed to them in the late '90s and met the founders. At the time, I was in San Francisco. I'm from New Orleans, but I was working out there for years and was loving that, and every day being the dumbest guy in the room and just trying to stay on my toes and not get discovered. But then when I came back to New Orleans, I got reintroduced to Trumpet. The idea at the time was they had amazing creative, but really not a strong, or as strong as it could've been, strategic underpinning. So I joined, maybe narcissistically, thinking that there was an opportunity to bring some strategic scaffolding together with the creative superiority they were wielding. It took a while to be heard and understand it and figure out how our personalities were going to coalesce, but getting into about the last four or five years here, we were on a clip, winning advertising agency accounts like an advertising agency does, talking about case studies and making result promises and case studies that are completely non-verifiable. But we didn't really have a perspective that made us different. We were frankly commoditizing ourselves with all of the other agencies that are able to execute, come up with ideas and get them into the market. But the development of this perspective – and not only adding the brand consulting mindset, if not the brand consulting scope to our scopes of work with clients, but that shift of perspective to, how do we stop lying? How do we stop running ads that test well and analytically prove in the near term that they work better than the old stuff? How do we let advertising be not a short-term tool, but really have a long-term impact? And how do we stop talking about things like brand ads as unmeasurable? How do we start talking about brand ads as being really the only promise we're making? Advertising, when it's seen as a trigger or stimulus for sales, if that's how you see it, that's what it's going to be. That has become the most ignorable stuff in a consumer's day to day, when they're seeing on average 3,600 ads a day in different format. And we're calling three from the day prior. There's a ton of waste. Advertising agencies say, “Yeah, but the waste is so cheap, you can afford it.” But when you look at advertising as truly an invitation to participate in a culture of a company – even when you're promoting, even when you're doing something of a more retail nature, but definitely when you're doing it in a brand sense – you have to be making plain and clear what experience you're going to have if you were to engage with this company via a product or social media visit or whatever those things may be, so that that experience can actually validate the promise we made in advertising, because that's when you get the connection that Raj is talking about in Conscious Capitalism. Those are the companies that we don't dread. In fact, those are the companies that we re-purchase from. The Apple phone that costs twice as much as a Samsung is not twice as good. It just costs twice as much, but we don't think twice about it because we have an affinity. We have a preference for that company, and if they tell us we need a watch – I didn't, but many people did go and get one. People don't want an SUV from BMW. They want the ultimate driving machine. They want the connection with BMW, and they just had too many kids. That brand connection being meaningful isn't throwaway, unmeasurable stuff. It's frankly the most important stuff, especially when the organization sees it as an invitation to participate in a culture that is very intentional, because the leadership that's approving the ads is also using the same idea that's easy to capture in ad creative and doing the harder work of trying to figure out how to keep that alive or to program that into the organization itself and into the customer experience itself. ROB: That's definitely a very compelling challenge. I think one part of the journey that's worth underscoring for you is – we're always talking to the challenger, the independent agencies, not the holding companies. But you've got even a different perspective. Those are quite often typically operated by somebody who was there on Day 1. Talk about your own transformation from joining the agency to being the CEO now. SCOTT: There's been a lot of leadership and structural capitulations over the years. Let me start by saying, too, that while we were a small agency in New Orleans – at our biggest, we were under 50. We really enjoy remaining at about that 20-to-25-person range, because we focus primarily on creative and strategy and project management. We do not have PR and social media and media planning and buying under roof. Now, we have media planners, but they're working with external groups in our network to plan and buy media and reconcile and optimize and all that stuff. The reason for that is because every place that we've ever worked, when you have a media department, that media department's mentality is kind of what every client that we win gets. And while it might be appropriate for consumer packaged goods, it might not be right for pharma or a healthcare system. But tough; that's our media director and that's your plan. Not all flowcharts look the same, but they could. That's the risk. We don't think downstream execution is unimportant; we just don't want to subject a client we haven't met yet to a downstream execution philosophy. That's how you wind up becoming a categorical agency, and we're trying to avoid that in order to fully administer the perspective regardless of category. That said, when you see the agency that way, it's not like you have a CEO sitting atop all these profit silos, because the only silos that are at Trumpet are really creative and strategy, and then the execution that comes from our client services division, which is split between project management and relationship management. But regardless, it's not a very complicated business to run. That said, the leaders of these disciplines are really empowered. The distance between CEO and the leaders of the silos is not very distant. But in order for the vision to not be lost in day to day execution, that's really where my focus remains. Right now we're in the process of trying to extract ourselves to the degree that we can from the day to day so that we can focus on the collective vision of the day to day. I say, how do we think a little less about the busyness of the agency and think more about the business of the agency? Not to be cavalier, but clients come and go, but the agency is either going to be defined by our relationships and whether we're right about to get fired or our clients love us, or we're going to have an idea as an agency that clients are going to find valuable or they won't. That's really what we're shifting to: trying to make it very, very clear, inside and out – just like we profess to our clients – let's make Trumpet a place very clearly inside and out that our employees and our clients are all clairvoyant on our value. Because if they want it, we'll be around for a while, and our retention increases and our connection with our employees increases the more transparent and clear we are about what's different about working here and working someplace else. There's no greater commodity than an advertising agency. ROB: It doesn't take a lot of capital to stand up something. SCOTT: Yeah. It takes three people and a client, and sometimes not a client. And sometimes not three people. [laughs] But there's a lot of talk in our industry right now about purpose. This should not be the 75000th purpose podcast because there's plenty of that. What this should be is one of the few that says, what do you do with it once you've got it? If you take it and run it into brand ads that are beautiful but aren't what the company is really rallying around, I think you're frankly doing a disservice. You're probably better off sticking in promotion land. That's been around since the '50s. ROB: Oh yeah, that's a well-trod lane as well. I think what's interesting maybe also is stepping into that CEO role, what are some things you might wish you had done sooner stepping into that seat? SCOTT: Actually, I've thought a lot about this. I mentioned this to you, but there's a difference between showing up to work every day as an account person or a team member or director of a discipline and trying to do the whole. But I think what has happened successfully here, in my personal path and matriculation, is we didn't miss the opportunity to shift from being in the mailroom to being an account guy to being a strategist to now being CEO. It's not like strategy is king now, like the ops guy takes over the CEO role and now ops is king, or the marketing guy takes over the CEO role and marketing is king. We are being disciplined enough to have Trumpet become associated operationally with an idea. There is very intentional alignment between Trumpet as an organization and the products and services that we provide. So those products and services being rendered on behalf of this portfolio of clients does not wholly define Trumpet. There's an idea of Trumpet: how do we make companies more believable? Advertising has a role in that, but advertising is a very narrow solution to that. Brand consulting or internal operational consulting has a role in that, but operational consulting is a narrow solution to the complex problem of how you get the customer experience, separate and apart from the company culture, separate and apart from the communications from that company, aligned with not a product, but a belief. Product innovation: awesome, you need it. But it's a very narrow solution to the satisfaction of that complex problem. There's three legs to that stool. If you put purpose in the center, how do you get the company culture aligned with that purpose? How do you get the advertising and communications pieces aligned with that purpose, and how do you get the customer experience aligned with that purpose? That requires very intentional, top-down commitment from the organization, and in our case it requires us challenging those organizations to think that holistically. Advertising agencies typically just exist in that communications third. I think we have a responsibility not to take over the whole, but to understand or to be able to provide a perspective that not only should communications be tied, locked in with the company culture and the customer experience, but all three should really be driven by clairvoyance and purpose. What is the core belief? What would the world lose if this company went out of business? If the answer is a product, then you're a commodity and somebody else can do what you do. But how you bring that product to market and what you stand for more spiritually than practically – you get that right and you will be more successful. Ironically, you will sell more product by talking about what that product is a means to what end. Becoming the CEO of the organization of Trumpet has been a challenge to not just let this be, “Oh my gosh, what clients are we about to lose or which ones do we really want to get?” and more, how do we keep this idea clear and alive internally and externally so that everybody, from our employees to our partners, in whatever executional hallway we partner with networks, and our clients – that idea of Trumpet is alive in all of those conversations? So that you don't get lost in the execution and confuse successful execution and analytical awesomeness with the idea of the company. Because that's not the idea of a company. That's the commodity part of advertising agencies. None of us should be bad at creative, buying and measuring and optimizing media and reporting on results. We should all be good at that. But that's all short term. What's the long term? Long term comes from brand, and not the unmeasurable ads. ROB: Right, and it's at a fractal level. Most individuals don't want to just buy and sell ads and measure them, and most organizations would be better not to. There's an alignment from client to organization to person that is going to put off some people who want to go in a different vision, but at least you're not adrift without direction and just commodity all the way down. SCOTT: And look at what the industry has done relative to that mentality. It's why agencies have been complaining for years that they're being marginalized. I don't lament marginalization. I think frankly, our industry deserved it. We allowed ourselves to be commoditized. The media commission structure lived on way too long and was disproportionately beneficial to agencies a long time ago, and has just been eroding and eroding and eroding over time. Now bring in the democratization of media buying and content development and clients can internalize a lot of this stuff. That democratization of the ability to execute elements of communications through self-serve platforms, and you don't need IPG anymore to run national broadcasts. Ironically, the democratization of the ability to participate in advertising, from a local one-off car dealership to a global superpower, is moving businesses farther away from a focus on purpose. They're like, “Man, this advertising thing is something we can just do. Let's internalize it. Let's run this with greater control.” What winds up happening is that the distance, the separation, the space between consumers and companies is widening because there's just less and less focus on companies being clear about what they stand for. They're providing consumers fewer and fewer opportunities to have a referendum on whether or not they like them, so products get commoditized. You'd better lower your expenses if you hope for net profit. ROB: Thank you for all that, Scott. When people want to find you and connect with you and with Trumpet, where should they go to find you? SCOTT: The internet is an awesome place, so you can google Trumpet. If you just scroll past the instruments for sale, you'll find us. But we're not hard to find. We're in downtown New Orleans now. We love our hometown, but we just as much love airports. We do not restrict our client base to here or really even the region. Have perspective, will travel. We're really just looking for those types of companies that are interested in holistic alignment, if not holistic transformation from where they were to a much more intentional place of where they want to be headed, and then right size our relationship to what makes sense for the individual company. ROB: That is excellent. Scott Couvillon from Trumpet Advertising, thank you so much for coming on the podcast and sharing the transformation of your firm and thoughts on how we can all be transformational individually, organizationally, and brand-wise. Thank you so much. SCOTT: Thanks for the time. Love what you're doing. ROB: Be well. Thank you. Bye. Thank you for listening. The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast is presented by Converge. Converge helps digital marketing agencies and brands automate their reporting so they can be more profitable, accurate, and responsive. To learn more about how Converge can automate your marketing reporting, email info@convergehq.com, or visit us on the web at convergehq.com.

The Ready State Podcast
Anastacia Maggioncalda: Creating at the Speed of Culture, Authenticity, and the Importance of Connecting with Everyone

The Ready State Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 55:35


Anastacia Maggioncalda is the Head of Production for the Creative Studio at LinkedIn. Anastacia was a photography and cultural anthropology student at Sarah Lawrence College in New York and after graduating, worked as a producer and studio manager alongside fashion photographers in New York. After transitioning to commercial work, she led production at both Shelter Films and Crossroads Films. Anastacia made the move to the west coast and the agency side of things working with such brands as BMW, Gatorade, Target, Lexus, Coke, Virgin America, Oakley, Apple, Visa, and Aria. She has also run visual effects production on numerous music videos for artists like N'SYNC, Ricky Martin, Linkin Park, Sheryl Crow, Missy Elliot, Kanye West, and on feature films like Spiderman, Hell Boy, Castaway, Sin City and Iron Man. Anastacia has won a Webby and a Bronze Lion for her work with Virgin America. •   This episode of The Ready State Podcast is sponsored by Paleovalley Beef Sticks. Made from 100% organic grass-fed beef and organic spices, these are hands down our favorite on-the-go protein snack. They are naturally fermented making them shelf stable without chemicals or questionable ingredients, for when you find one in a backpack you haven't used since last summer. For more info and 15% off, go to thereadystate.com/beefsticks   •   This episode of The Ready State Podcast is sponsored by Kion Aminos. Available as powder or tablets, these aminos are 100 percent plant based with no artificial ingredients. Essential amino acids are the building blocks for all muscle and tissue but your body can only absorb about 50% from food which is why Kelly takes them everyday. For more info and 20% off your first purchase, go to thereadystate.com/aminos

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich
Beating Daily Pain & More - Episode 1897

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 45:46


: Episode 1897 - On this Saturday show, Carlos Duran joins Vinnie to talk his weight loss journey, cramping, beating daily pain, learning how to feed yourself, helping others, and more. Https://www.vinnietortorich.com/2021/07/beating-daily-pain-more-episode-1897 PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS GETTING HEALTHY AND STAYING IN SHAPE Carlos began this way of eating a little over 5 years ago. He is 55 now, and very muscular. He's been lifting weights since he was 15 years old, and hasn't quit. Around 40 years old, he gained about five pounds every years, and got up to 265 at 6'5". At the time, he thought he was eating right, but eventually realized he was just lied to. He wasn't trying to lose weight, and figured he was healthy. By accident, Carlos found Vinnie's podcast. In just over a week, he lost 10 lbs. After around 3 or 4 months, he got to 225 or 230. When he started losing this weight, he also cut down on the exercise a bit, and is still in better shape and health. BEATING DAILY PAIN He ended up starting this way of eating to fight the cramping he felt when he played beach volleyball. Nothing worked for him. But, when he started NSNG®, the cramping largely stopped. And then, he figured out how insulin worked at the like. In a tournament, he used to drink 15 bottles of Gatorade and would still cramp. In two days, when he cut out sugar, he got out of bed, and wasn't in pain. For Carlos (and everyone else!), the sugar caused inflammation, and when he stopped eating it, he felt like a new person. FAT DOC 2 IS AVAILABLE ON iTUNES and AMAZON Please also share it with family and friends! Buy it and watch it now on iTunes to get it to the top of the charts. We need it to get big for people to see it. Here's the (BLUERAY, DVD, PRIME) (MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE YET ACROSS THE POND). And the And the https://amzn.to/3rxHuB9 [the_ad id="17480"] PLEASE DON'T FORGET TO REVIEW the film AFTER YOU WATCH!   FAT DOC 1 IS ALSO OUT Go watch it now! We need people to buy and review for it to stay at the top of iTunes pages. Available for both rental and purchase. You can also buy hardcopy or watch online at Amazon. YOU CAN NOW STREAM FOR FREE ON AMAZON PRIME IF YOU HAVE IT! RESOURCES Https://www.vinnietortorich.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.com Https://www.purevitaminclub.co.uk Https://www.purecoffeeclub.com Https://www.nsngfoods.com Https://www.bit.ly/fatdocumentary

The Sporkful
How Did Staying Hydrated Become A Thing?

The Sporkful

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 35:37


To say that hydration is an invention is only a slight exaggeration. Water bottles have become a crucial accessory — a status symbol. How did that happen? This week we bring you an episode from our friends at the Slate podcast Decoder Ring. They investigate how bottled water transformed itself from a small, European luxury item to the single largest beverage category in America. It took savvy marketing from brands like Gatorade and Perrier, who pushed the idea that dehydration was a pervasive problem to be solved. Today hydration is a wellness cure-all, but the science doesn't exactly match the marketing. // Get 500+ more great Sporkful episodes from our catalog and lots of other Stitcher goodness when you sign up for Stitcher Premium: www.StitcherPremium.com/Sporkful (promo code: SPORKFUL). Transcript available at www.sporkful.com.

The Ben Shapiro Show
Daily Wire Backstage: The Mask Is Off

The Ben Shapiro Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 98:22


Can Biden’s daily regimen of Gatorade, PB&J’s, and Flintstone Vitamins really keep him in the tip top cognitive shape we’ve come to expect? Is there a certain number of rockets fired by Hamas at Israeli civilians that would convince the Left they’re on the “wrong side of history?” Because clearly, 3500 isn’t it. And when the UFOs playing peek-a-boo with our military do finally land, will John Cena apologize to our alien overlords for Hollywood’s shame that is The Last Jedi, Battlefield Earth, and Howard The Duck? Let’s hope he does the right thing.  Join this roundtable discussion featuring Ben Shapiro, Andrew Klavan, Matt Walsh, Michael Knowles, and Daily Wire god-king Jeremy Boreing to find out!  LAST CHANCE to Win a VIP experience to see CANDACE at the Daily Wire headquarters in Nashville! The winner will receive two VIP tickets to meet Candace Owens, attend her live show, and more!! Become a Daily Wire member today and use code VIP to get 20% off your new membership and be automatically entered to win! | JOIN TODAY: https://utm.io/udm5x