Podcast appearances and mentions of Michael Dell

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American businessman and CEO

  • 163PODCASTS
  • 187EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 4, 2022LATEST
Michael Dell

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Best podcasts about Michael Dell

Latest podcast episodes about Michael Dell

Anything But Idle
LastPass is going to become an independent company

Anything But Idle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 53:04


LastPass is going to become an independent company and the Productivity News This Week https://youtu.be/wOB-uZw5WIo (If you're reading this in a podcast directory/app, please visit https://anythingbutidle.com for clickable links and the full show notes and transcript of this cast.) Enjoy! Give us feedback! And, thanks for listening! If you'd like to continue discussing any news from this episode, please click here to leave a comment down below (this jumps you to the bottom of the post). In this Cast | DRAFT Ray Sidney-Smith Augusto Pinaud Headlines & Show Notes | DRAFT Resources we mention, including links to them, will be provided here. Please listen to the episode for context. Want to be happier? Science says buying a little time leads to significantly greater life satisfaction || Buying things won't make you happier. But research shows that buying time can, as long as you do it the right way. Micro-Resolutions If Youre Not Skipping Some Tasks Youre Making Life Harder CEO on what works with remote work Another Seattle startup trying 4-day workweek in bid to enhance productivity, well-being and culture LastPass says no passwords were compromised following breach scare Google Drive is converting all of your messy duplicate files into shortcuts instead Google Plays Best of 2021 Apple unveils the winning apps and games in its App Store Awards 2021 Swift Playgrounds 4.0: First Look  Five of the most innovative E Ink display projects Business & Finance Segment Asana, Inc. (ASAN) Reports Q3 Loss, Tops Revenue Estimates Software start-up Airtable hits $11 billion valuation in latest funding, adds Salesforce, Michael Dell as investors Productivity Resource of the Week TasksBoard | Desktop app for Google Tasks Muse 2                                Featured Story of the Week LastPass is going to become an independent company Other News KPMG Report Gives Big Thumbs Down on Long-Term Remote Working Brain Food: Run Your Own Race Apple Introduces New MacBook Upgrade Program for Business Partners  Google takes aim at Microsoft 365 with small but important update Apple Releases Safari Technology Preview 137 With Bug Fixes and Performance Improvements Zoom executive says hybrid work will continue to drive growth after the pandemic These FDA-approved eyedrops offer an alternative to reading glasses  Apple patches Log4Shell iCloud vulnerability, described as most critical in a decade  Workplace productivity platform with Colorado office raises $425 million Building a Better Planner App Fast Company: Get More Done: 10 Secrets of Today's Most Productive People TechCrunch: The unbundling of professional learning and entrepreneurship education Copy link to highlight in Chrome may soon expand to include sharing images and video Youtube PWA with offline videos for Chrome OS a success could see wider rollout in the future How to Create an Effective Personal Development Plan New Chromebook launcher will sort your apps and results into categories while you search 12 Hidden Google Messages Features You Should Be Using How To Stay Motivated For Making Healthy Lifestyle Changes Microsoft introduces Teams Essentials for small businesses Report: Google Pixel Watch coming in 2022 | TechRadar I Tried a Calendar That Uses the Idea of Death to Boost Productivity Google is making its first in-house smartwatch that could launch in 2022 - The Verge Google delays its workers' return to office yet again Avoid calendar clashes with a new breed of scheduling apps | Computerworld Tables in Google Docs are being completely reworked with easier management more tools 7 Ways Google Home Can Help Make Your Workday More Efficient Google TV Is Getting 300 Free Live TV Channels: Here's How Google Tasks created in Calendar are more useful now that they can be set to repeat

Bloomberg Businessweek
Bloomberg Businessweek Weekend

Bloomberg Businessweek

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 72:03


This special Christmas program features interviews from the past year on "Bloomberg Businessweek" with a slate of top market movers, legendary entrepreneurs, and entertainers, including Michael Dell, former Google CEO Eric Schmidt and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Gina Schock of the The Go-Go's. Hosted by Carol Massar and Tim Stenovec Hear the show live at 2PM ET on WBBR 1130 AM New York, Bloomberg 106.1 FM Boston, Bloomberg 960 AM San Francisco, WDCH 99.1 FM in Washington D.C. Metro, Sirius/XM channel 119, on the Bloomberg Business App, Radio.com, the iHeartRadio app and at Bloomberg.com/audio. You can also watch Bloomberg Businessweek on YouTube - just search for Bloomberg Global News. Like us at Bloomberg Radio on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @carolmassar @timsteno and @BW Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Cloud Accounting Podcast
How To Stop Intuit From Hiring Your Staff

Cloud Accounting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 55:00


SponsorsRewind: https://cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/rewindTallyfor: https://cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/tallyforClient Hub: https://cloudaccountingpodcast.promo/clienthubNeed CPE? Subscribe to the Earmark Accounting Podcast: https://podcast.earmarkcpe.comGet CPE for listening to podcasts with Earmark CPE: https://earmarkcpeShow Notes01:18 – David's early Christmas present  - interns! 04:03 – Blake's early Christmas present – Earmark is almost live! 04:55 – Some Kronos Customers Face Payroll, Scheduling Disruptions From Hack – CFOhttps://www.cfo.com/cyber-security-technology/2021/12/firms-face-disruption-from-kronos-hack/ Cyberattack on Payroll Provider Sets Off Scramble Ahead of Holidayshttps://www.wsj.com/articles/cyberattack-on-payroll-provider-sets-off-scramble-ahead-of-holidays-11639778286?mod=flipboard 06:04 – Kronos Warns Cyberattack May Knock HR Software Offline for Weekshttps://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-12-14/kronos-warns-cyberattack-may-knock-hr-software-offline-for-weeks 06:23 – Communications sent to impacted Kronos Private Cloud (KPC) customers beginning December, 13 at 12:45AM EThttps://community.kronos.com/s/feed/0D54M00004wJKHiSAO?language=en_US More Kronos reading:  Payroll Service Kronos Offline After Ransomware Attackhttps://www.pymnts.com/cybersecurity/2021/payroll-service-kronos-offline-after-ransomware-attack/ Kronos Securityhttps://www.kronos.com/security?utm_source=pocket_mylist Jonathan Feldman Tweethttps://twitter.com/_jfeldman/status/1470372667236618240 12:27 – Update on Hubdoc fetchhttps://www.xero.com/blog/2021/12/hubdoc-importing-docs-changing/ 16:08 – H&R Block is suing Block, formerly Square, over its new namehttps://www.theverge.com/2021/12/17/22841182/square-block-hr-block-trademark-lawsuit-jack-dorsey H&R Block sues Square to drop the name 'Block' | PaymentsSource | Accounting Todayhttps://www.accountingtoday.com/payments/news/h-r-block-sues-square-to-drop-the-name-block 22:07 – Just 30% of SMBs Have Taken Steps to Automate AP | PYMNTS.comhttps://www.pymnts.com/news/b2b-payments/2021/30-percent-smbs-automate-ap-processes/ 22:53 – Even Same-Day ACH Too Slow for Consumers as Instant Payouts Rewrite the Ruleshttps://www.pymnts.com/news/faster-payments/2021/same-day-ach-too-slow-consumers-instant-payouts-rewrite-rules/ 23:33 – Jan Roberg Tweethttps://twitter.com/RobergTax/status/1470811448133795852 Intuit is going after your staff for TurboTax Livehttps://twitter.com/davidleary/status/1471085593794805761?s=20 27:37 – Intuit's culture of positivity and inclusion enables tax and bookkeeping experts to help consumers and small businesses in navigating stressful financial decisionshttps://www.efinancialcareers.com/news/2021/12/intuits-culture-of-positivity-and-inclusion-enables-tax-and-bookkeeping-experts-to-help-consumers-and-small-businesses-in-navigating-stressful-financial-decisions-sc 30:09 – No time off policy             https://twitter.com/brianwolfe6/status/1466030268230348807?s=12 33:08 – FloQast opens entertainment studio, teases upcoming accountant comedy series | Accounting Today       https://www.accountingtoday.com/news/floqast-opens-entertainment-studio-teases-upcoming-accountant-comedy-series 38:27 – At tech company Expensify, workers vote on each other's pay raiseshttps://www.cbsnews.com/news/expensify-employee-wages-vote-raises/ 44:50 – DiviPay Gets $20M in Series A Roundhttps://www.pymnts.com/news/investment-tracker/2021/divipay-gets-20m-in-series-a-round/ 45:48 – OakNorth deepens support for SMEs with its first acquisition – and says there will be morehttps://www.oaknorth.co.uk/oaknorth-in-the-news/oaknorth-deepens-support-for-smes-with-its-first-acquisition-and-says-there-will-be-more/ 46:21 – Affirm spinout Resolve raises $25M in Insight Partners-led round to grow B2B buy now, pay later offeringhttps://techcrunch.com/2021/12/09/affirm-spinout-resolve-raises-25m-in-insight-partners-led-round-to-grow-b2b-buy-now-pay-later-offering/ 46:51 – Built Technologies Debuts Built Pay Digital Payment Solutionhttps://www.pymnts.com/news/b2b-payments/2021/built-technologies-debuts-built-pay-digital-payment-solution/  47:22 – Software start-up Airtable hits $11 billion valuation in latest funding, adds Salesforce, Michael Dell as investorshttps://www.cnbc.com/2021/12/13/low-code-software-start-up-airtable-worth-11-billion-in-new-funding.htmlGet in TouchThanks for listening and for the great reviews! We appreciate you! Follow and tweet @BlakeTOliver and @DavidLeary. Find us on Facebook and, if you like what you hear, please do us a favor and write a review on iTunes, or Podchaser. Interested in sponsoring the Cloud Accounting Podcast? For details, read the prospectus, and NOW, you can see our smiling faces on Instagram! You can now call us and leave a voicemail, maybe we'll play it on the show. DIAL (202) 695-1040Need Accounting Conference Info? Check out our new website - accountingconferences.comLimited edition shirts, stickers, and other necessitiesTeePublic Store: http://cloudacctpod.link/merchSubscribe Apple Podcasts: http://cloudacctpod.link/ApplePodcasts Podchaser: http://cloudacctpod.link/podchaser Spotify: http://cloudacctpod.link/Spotify Stitcher: http://cloudacctpod.link/Stitcher Overcast: http://cloudacctpod.link/Overcast ClassifiedsFuture Firm: https://futurefirmaccelerate.com/Oh My Fraud: A True Crime Podcast for Accountants: ohmyfraud.comAccounting Podcast Network: https://accountingpodcastnetwork.com/Want to get the word out about your newsletter, webinar, party, Facebook group, podcast, e-book, job posting, or that fancy Excel macro you just created? Why not let the listeners of The Cloud Accounting Podcast know by running a classified ad? Hit the link below to get more info.Go here to create your classified ad: https://cloudacctpod.link/RunClassifiedAd Full Transcript Available Upon Request - info@cloudaccountingpodcast.com

Software Defined Talk
Episode 335: Eager to take a JNDI lookup

Software Defined Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 49:14


This week we discuss how the industry reacted to the Log4j vulnerability and the merits of going Multicloud. Plus, some thoughts on printer paper. Rundown Log4j and OSS Security warning: New zero-day in the Log4j Java library is already being exploited (https://www.zdnet.com/article/security-warning-new-zero-day-in-the-log4j-java-library-is-already-being-exploited/) ‘Extremely bad' vulnerability found in widely used logging system (https://www.theverge.com/2021/12/10/22828303/log4j-library-vulnerability-log4shell-zero-day-exploit) What you need to know about the Log4J vulnerability rocking the internet (https://blog.f-secure.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-log4j-vulnerability-rocking-the-internet/) Zero-Day Exploit Targeting Popular Java Library Log4j (https://www.govcert.ch/blog/zero-day-exploit-targeting-popular-java-library-log4j/) Paying people to work on OSS (https://twitter.com/grhmc/status/1470074108327215118?s=21) Don't pay people to work on OSS? (https://twitter.com/littleidea/status/1470393230256533505?s=21) AWS Outage and Multicloud Is multi-cloud getting more popular? (https://www.cnbc.com/2021/12/12/aws-outage-and-hashicorp-ipo-point-to-a-multicloud-future.html) It always has been, also, it means a lot (https://www.getrevue.co/profile/cote/issues/cote-s-commonplace-book-issue-56-889420). Summary of the AWS Service Event in the Northern Virginia (US-EAST-1) Region (https://aws.amazon.com/message/12721/) https://www.whoownsmyavailability.com Relevant to your interests Oracle swings to loss because of payment tied to dispute over former CEO Hurd's employment (https://www.cnbc.com/2021/12/09/oracle-orcl-earnings-q2-2022.html) Snowflake stock soars after software sales more than double (https://www.marketwatch.com/story/snowflake-stock-soars-after-software-sales-more-than-double-11638393921) Better.com CEO Vishal Garg steps back as employees detail how he ‘led by fear' (https://techcrunch.com/2021/12/10/better-com-ceo-vishal-garg-steps-back-as-employees-detail-how-he-led-by-fear/) Top Excel experts will battle it out in an esports-like competition this weekend (https://www.pcworld.com/article/559001/the-future-of-esports-is-microsoft-excel-and-its-on-espn.html) Is multi-cloud getting more popular? (https://www.cnbc.com/2021/12/12/aws-outage-and-hashicorp-ipo-point-to-a-multicloud-future.html) Who gets left out of ‘bootstrapping'? (https://thehustle.co/who-gets-left-out-of-bootstrapping/?utm_source=sunday%20-%2012/12) SnapLogic raises $165M to accelerate enterprise automation via data integration (https://siliconangle.com/2021/12/13/snaplogic-raises-150m-accelerate-enterprise-automation-via-data-integration/) Take one last look at Google Toolbar, which is now dead (https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/12/happy-21st-birthday-to-google-toolbar-which-inexplicably-still-exists/) The Matrix Awakens: An Unreal Engine 5 Experience (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WU0gvPcc3jQ) Apple Officially Delays macOS Monterey Universal Control Until Spring 2022 (https://www.macrumors.com/2021/12/13/apple-delays-universal-control/) Software start-up Airtable hits $11 billion valuation in latest funding, adds Salesforce, Michael Dell as investors (https://www.cnbc.com/2021/12/13/low-code-software-start-up-airtable-worth-11-billion-in-new-funding.html) Noname Security Becomes First API Security Unicorn (https://nonamesecurity.com/blog/noname-security-becomes-first-api-security-unicorn) Catching Up On Cloud Infrastructure Startups After The HashiCorp IPO (https://www.forbes.com/sites/rscottraynovich/2021/12/14/catching-up-on-cloud-infrastructure-startups-after-the-hashicorp-ipo/) GitLab acquires Opstrace - FAQ (https://forum.gitlab.com/t/gitlab-acquires-opstrace-faq/62844) Nonsense How to speak Australian : Abbreviate Everything (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDb_WsAt_Z0) Recycling Center - Sorting Aluminum and Steel (https://youtu.be/BuBIDn9kkY8?t=79) NIKE, Inc. Acquires RTFKT (https://news.nike.com/news/nike-acquires-rtfkt) A Quadruped Humanoid Robot Might Be Able To Do It All (https://spectrum.ieee.org/delivery-robot-anymal) Busy Simulator (https://busysimulator.com/) Sponsors strongDM — Manage and audit remote access to infrastructure. Start your free 14-day trial today at strongdm.com/SDT (http://strongdm.com/SDT) CBT Nuggets — Training available for IT Pros anytime, anywhere. Start your 7-day Free Trial today at cbtnuggets.com/sdt (https://cbtnuggets.com/sdt) Postlight — Postlight co-founders Paul Ford and Rich Ziade talk tech, business, ethics, and culture. Subscribe to the Postlight Podcast: https://postlight.com/podcast Conferences THAT Conference comes to Texas January 17-20, 2022 (https://that.us/events/tx/2022/) Software Defined Talk Live Recording - THAT (https://that.us/activities/onqzzIqfp9NOeyLm67SY) Discount Codes: Everything Ticket ($75 off): SDTFriends75 3 Day Camper Ticket ($50 off): SDTFriends50 Virtual Ticket ($75 off): SDTFriendsON75 DevOpsDays Chicago 2022: Call for Speakers/Papers (https://sessionize.com/devopsdays-chicago-2022/), May 10 & 11th, 2022 CFP closes on Jan 31, 2022, DevOps Days Birmingham AL, 2022 Call for Speakers (https://www.papercall.io/devopsdays-2022-birmingham-al) . April 18 & 19th, 2022 CFP closes on Jan 31, 2022, SDT news & hype Join us in Slack (http://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/slack). Get a SDT Sticker! Send your postal address to stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com (mailto:stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com) and we will send you free laptop stickers! Follow us on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/sdtpodcast), Twitter (https://twitter.com/softwaredeftalk), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/softwaredefinedtalk/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/software-defined-talk/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3OJPV6h9tp-hbsGBLGsDQ/featured). Use the code SDT to get $20 off Coté's book, (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt) Digital WTF (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt), so $5 total. Become a sponsor of Software Defined Talk (https://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/ads)! Recommendations Brandon: Apple Legacy Contact (https://appleinsider.com/articles/21/12/14/how-to-set-up-legacy-contacts-on-ios-15) Matt: (https://k8slens.dev)A.P. Bio (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6461726/) Coté: Texas Sun (https://open.spotify.com/album/4HFO9PDRxsdbcegkcNhxgz?si=1VPg7l8NRriNVxR03eJ7LQ). Also, the song Coté was trying to remember, “Didn't I,” by Darondo (https://open.spotify.com/track/6Dq2LzijkY9WNPwBGDah4L?si=wBlYORO7RV6GOTfWSZILRA) - an example of perfection. Number two on that list (https://open.spotify.com/track/3PrqRBsMdy8eZkbDqDb32p?si=88b4da23bcd94c84). Photo Credits Banner Picture (https://unsplash.com/photos/UdDCjj0rR7c) CoverArt (https://unsplash.com/photos/Wpnoqo2plFA)

Screaming in the Cloud
“Liqui”fying the Database Bottleneck with Robert Reeves

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:45


About RobertR2 advocates for Liquibase customers and provides technical architecture leadership. Prior to co-founding Datical (now Liquibase), Robert was a Director at the Austin Technology Incubator. Robert co-founded Phurnace Software in 2005. He invented and created the flagship product, Phurnace Deliver, which provides middleware infrastructure management to multiple Fortune 500 companies.Links: Liquibase: https://www.liquibase.com Liquibase Community: https://www.liquibase.org Liquibase AWS Marketplace: https://aws.amazon.com/marketplace/seller-profile?id=7e70900d-dcb2-4ef6-adab-f64590f4a967 Github: https://github.com/liquibase Twitter: https://twitter.com/liquibase TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com. Corey: You know how Git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really. Please ask someone else.Corey: That's all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best ways I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's Git-based workflows mean you don't have to play slap-and-tickle with integrating arcane nonsense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as Git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for Pets startup, to global Fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them—because you don't have to; they get why self-service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y dot com.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This is a promoted episode. What does that mean in practice? Well, it means the company who provides the guest has paid to turn this into a discussion that's much more aligned with the company than it is the individual.Sometimes it works, Sometimes it doesn't, but the key part of that story is I get paid. Why am I bringing this up? Because today's guest is someone I met in person at Monktoberfest, which is the RedMonk conference in Portland, Maine, one of the only reasons to go to Maine, speaking as someone who grew up there. And I spoke there, I met my guest today, and eventually it turned into this, proving that I am the envy of developer advocates everywhere because now I can directly tie me attending one conference to making a fixed sum of money, and right now they're all screaming and tearing off their headphones and closing this episode. But for those of you who are sticking around, thank you. My guest today is the CTO and co-founder of Liquibase. Please welcome Robert Reeves. Robert, thank you for joining me, and suffering the slings and arrows I'm about to hurled directly into your arse, as a warning shot.Robert: [laugh]. Man. Thanks for having me. Corey, I've been looking forward to this for a while. I love hanging out with you.Corey: One of the things I love about the Monktoberfest conference, and frankly, anything that RedMonk gets up to is, forget what's on stage, which is uniformly excellent; forget the people at RedMonk who are wonderful and I aspire to do more work with them in different ways; they're great, but the people that they attract are invariably interesting, they are invariably incredibly diverse in terms of not just demographics, but interests and proclivities. It's just a wonderful group of people, and every time I get the opportunity to spend time with those folks I do, and I've never once regretted it because I get to meet people like you. Snark and cynicism about sponsoring this nonsense aside—for which I do thank you—you've been a fascinating person to talk to you because you're better at a lot of the database-facing things than I am, so I shortcut to instead of forming my own opinions, I just skate off of yours in some cases. You're going to get letters now.Robert: Well, look, it's an occupational hazard, right? Releasing software, it's hard so you have to learn these platforms, and part of it includes the database. But I tell you, you're spot on about Monktoberfest. I left that conference so motivated. Really opened my eyes, certainly injecting empathy into what I do on a day-to-day basis, but it spurred me to action.And there's a lot of programs that we've started at Liquibase that the germination for that seed came from Monktoberfest. And certainly, you know, we were bummed out that it's been canceled two years in a row, but we can't wait to get back and sponsor it. No end of love and affection for that team. They're also really smart and right about a hundred percent of the time.Corey: That's the most amazing part is that they have opinions that generally tend to mirror my own—which, you know—Robert: [laugh].Corey: —confirmation bias is awesome, but they almost never get it wrong. And that is one of the impressive things is when I do it, I'm shooting from the hip and I already have an apology half-written and ready to go, whereas when dealing with them, they do research on this and they don't have the ‘I'm a loud, abrasive shitpostter on Twitter' defense to fall back on to defend opinions. And if they do, I've never seen them do it. They're right, and the fact that I am as aligned with them as I am, you'd think that one of us was cribbing from the other. I assure you that's not the case.But every time Steve O'Grady or Rachel Stephens, or Kelly—I forget her last name; my apologies is all Twitter, but she studied medieval history, I remember that—or James Governor writes something, I'm uniformly looking at this and I feel a sense of dismay, been, “Dammit. I should have written this. It's so well written and it makes such a salient point.” I really envy their ability to be so consistently on point.Robert: Well, they're the only analysts we pay money to. So, we vote with our dollars with that one. [laugh].Corey: Yeah. I'm only an analyst when people have analyst budget. Other than that, I'm whatever the hell you describe me. So, let's talk about that thing you're here to show. You know, that little side project thing you found and are the CTO of.I wasn't super familiar with what Liquibase does until I looked into it and then had this—I got to say, it really pissed me off because I'm looking at it, and it's how did I not know that this existed back when the exact problems that you solve are the things I was careening headlong into? I was actively annoyed. You're also an open-source project, which means that you're effectively making all of your money by giving things away and hoping for gratitude to come back on you in the fullness of time, right?Robert: Well, yeah. There's two things there. They're open-source component, but also, where was this when I was struggling with this problem? So, for the folks that don't know, what Liquibase does is automate database schema change. So, if you need to update a database—I don't care what it is—as part of your application deployment, we can help.Instead of writing a ticket or manually executing a SQL script, or generating a bunch of docs in a NoSQL database, you can have Liquibase help you out with that. And so I was at a conference years ago, at the booth, doing my booth thing, and a managing director of a very large bank came to me, like, “Hey, what do you do?” And saw what we did and got angry, started yelling at me. “Where were you three years ago when I was struggling with this problem?” Like, spitting mad. [laugh]. And I was like, “Dude, we just started”—this was a while ago—it was like, “We just started the company two years ago. We got here as soon as we could.”But I struggled with this problem when I was a release manager. And so I've been doing this for years and years and years—I don't even want to talk about how long—getting bits from dev to test to production, and the database was always, always, always the bottleneck, whether it was things didn't run the same in test as they did, eventually in production, environments weren't in sync. It's just really hard. And we've automated so much stuff, we've automated application deployment, lowercase a compiled bits; we're building things with containers, so everything's in that container. It's not a J2EE app anymore—yay—but we haven't done a damn thing for the database.And what this means is that we have a whole part of our industry, all of our database professionals, that are frankly struggling. I always say we don't sell software Liquibase. We sell piano recitals, date nights, happy hours, all the stuff you want to do but you can't because you're stuck dealing with the database. And that's what we do at Liquibase.Corey: Well, you're talking about database people. That's not how I even do it. I would never call myself that, for very good reason because you know, Route 53 remains the only database I use. But the problem I always had was that, “Great. I'm doing a deployment. Oh, I'm going to put out some changes to some web servers. Okay, what's my rollback?” “Well, we have this other commit we can use.” “Oh, we're going to be making a database schema change. What's your rollback strategy,” “Oh, I've updated my resume and made sure that any personal files I had on my work laptop been backed up somewhere else when I immediately leave the company when we can't roll back.” Because there's not really going to be a company anymore at that point.It's one of those everyone sort of holds their breath and winces when it comes to anything that resembles a schema change—or an ALTER TABLE as we used to call it—because that is the mistakes will show territory and you can hope and plan for things in pre-prod environments, but it's always scary. It's always terrifying because production is not like other things. That's why I always call my staging environment ‘theory' because things work in theory but not in production. So, it's how do you avoid the mess of winding up just creating disasters when you're dealing with the reality of your production environments? So, let's back up here. How do you do it? Because it sounds like something people would love to sell me but doesn't exist.Robert: [laugh]. Well, it's real simple. We have a file, we call it the change log. And this is a ledger. So, databases need to be evolved. You can't drop everything and recreate it from scratch, so you have to apply changes sequentially.And so what Liquibase will do is it connects to the database, and it says, “Hey, what version are you?” It looks at the change log, and we'll see, ehh, “There's ten change sets”—that's what components of a change log, we call them change sets—“There's ten change sets in there and the database is telling me that only five had been executed.” “Oh, great. Well, I'll execute these other five.” Or it asks the database, “Hey, how many have been executed?” And it says, “Ten.”And we've got a couple of meta tables that we have in the database, real simple, ANSI SQL compliant, that store the changes that happen to the database. So, if it's a net new database, say you're running a Docker container with the database in it on your local machine, it's empty, you would run Liquibase, and it says, “Oh, hey. It's got that, you know, new database smell. I can run everything.”And so the interesting thing happens when you start pointing it at an environment that you haven't updated in a while. So, dev and test typically are going to have a lot of releases. And so there's going to be little tiny incremental changes, but when it's time to go to production, Liquibase will catch it up. And so we speak SQL to the database, if it's a NoSQL database, we'll speak their API and make the changes requested. And that's it. It's very simple in how it works.The real complex stuff is when we go a couple of inches deeper, when we start doing things like, well, reverse engineering of your database. How can I get a change log of an existing database? Because nobody starts out using Liquibase for a project. You always do it later.Corey: No, no. It's one of those things where when you're doing a project to see if it works, it's one of those, “Great, I'll run a database in some local Docker container or something just to prove that it works.” And, “Todo: fix this later.” And yeah, that todo becomes load-bearing.Robert: [laugh]. That's scary. And so, you know, we can help, like, reverse engineering an entire database schema, no problem. We also have things called quality checks. So sure, you can test your Liquibase change against an empty database and it will tell you if it's syntactically correct—you'll get an error if you need to fix something—but it doesn't enforce things like corporate standards. “Tables start with T underscore.” “Do not create a foreign key unless those columns have an ID already applied.” And that's what our quality checks does. We used to call it rules, but nobody likes rules, so we call it quality checks now.Corey: How do you avoid the trap of enumerating all the bad things you've seen happen because at some point, it feels like that's what leads to process ossification at large companies where, “Oh, we had this bad thing happen once, like, a disk filled up, so now we have a check that makes sure that all the disks are at least 20, empty.” Et cetera. Great. But you keep stacking those you have thousands and thousands and thousands of those, and even a one-line code change then has to pass through so many different tests to validate that this isn't going to cause the failure mode that happened that one time in a unicorn circumstance. How do you avoid the bloat and the creep of stuff like that?Robert: Well, let's look at what we've learned from automated testing. We certainly want more and more tests. Look, DevOp's algorithm is, “All right, we had a problem here.” [laugh]. Or SRE algorithm, I should say. “We had a problem here. What happened? What are we going to change in the future to make sure this doesn't happen?” Typically, that involves a new standard.Now, ossification occurs when a person has to enforce that standard. And what we should do is seek to have automation, have the machine do it for us. Have the humans come up and identify the problem, find a creative way to look for the issue, and then let the machine enforce it. Ossification happens in large organizations when it's people that are responsible, not the machine. The machines are great at running these things over and over again, and they're never hung over, day after Super Bowl Sunday, their kid doesn't get sick, they don't get sick. But we want humans to look at the things that we need that creative energy, that brain power on. And then the rote drudgery, hand that off to the machine.Corey: Drudgery seems like sort of a job description for a lot of us who spend time doing operation stuff.Robert: [laugh].Corey: It's drudgery and it's boring, punctuated by moments of sheer terror. On some level, you're more or less taking some of the adrenaline high of this job away from people. And you know, when it comes to databases, I'm kind of okay with that as it turns out.Robert: Yeah. Oh, yeah, we want no surprises in database-land. And that is why over the past several decades—can I say several decades since 1979?Corey: Oh, you can s—it's many decades, I'm sorry to burst your bubble on that.Robert: [laugh]. Thank you, Corey. Thank you.Corey: Five, if we're being honest. Go ahead.Robert: So, it has evolved over these many decades where change is the enemy of stability. And so we don't want change, and we want to lock these things down. And our database professionals have become changed from sentinels of data into traffic cops and TSA. And as we all know, some things slip through those. Sometimes we speed, sometimes things get snuck through TSA.And so what we need to do is create a system where it's not the people that are in charge of that; that we can set these policies and have our database professionals do more valuable things, instead of that adrenaline rush of, “Oh, my God,” how about we get the rush of solving a problem and saving the company millions of dollars? How about that rush? How about the rush of taking our old, busted on-prem databases and figure out a way to scale these up in the cloud, and also provide quick dev and test environments for our developer and test friends? These are exciting things. These are more fun, I would argue.Corey: You have a list of reference customers on your website that are awesome. In fact, we share a reference customer in the form of Ticketmaster. And I don't think that they will get too upset if I mention that based upon my work with them, at no point was I left with the impression that they played fast and loose with databases. This was something that they take very seriously because for any company that, you know, sells tickets to things you kind of need an authoritative record of who's bought what, or suddenly you don't really have a ticket-selling business anymore. You also reference customers in the form of UPS, which is important; banks in a variety of different places.Yeah, this is stuff that matters. And you support—from the looks of it—every database people can name except for Route 53. You've got RDS, you've got Redshift, you've got Postgres-squeal, you've got Oracle, Snowflake, Google's Cloud Spanner—lest people think that it winds up being just something from a legacy perspective—Cassandra, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera, CockroachDB. I could go on because you have multiple pages of these things, SAP HANA—whatever the hell that's supposed to be—Yugabyte, and so on, and so forth. And it's like, some of these, like, ‘now you're just making up animals' territory.Robert: Well, that goes back to open-source, you know, you were talking about that earlier. There is no way in hell we could have brought out support for all these database platforms without us being open-source. That is where the community aligns their goals and works to a common end. So, I'll give you an example. So, case in point, recently, let me see Yugabyte, CockroachDB, AWS Redshift, and Google Cloud Spanner.So, these are four folks that reached out to us and said, either A) “Hey, we want Liquibase to support our database,” or B) “We want you to improve the support that's already there.” And so we have what we call—which is a super creative name—the Liquibase test harness, which is just genius because it's an automated way of running a whole suite of tests against an arbitrary database. And that helped us partner with these database vendors very quickly and to identify gaps. And so there's certain things that AWS Redshift—certain objects—that AWS Redshift doesn't support, for all the right reasons. Because it's data warehouse.Okay, great. And so we didn't have to run those tests. But there were other tests that we had to run, so we create a new test for them. They actually wrote some of those tests. Our friends at Yugabyte, CockroachDB, Cloud Spanner, they wrote these extensions and they came to us and partnered with us.The only way this works is with open-source, by being open, by being transparent, and aligning what we want out of life. And so what our friends—our database friends—wanted was they wanted more tooling for their platform. We wanted to support their platform. So, by teaming up, we help the most important person, [laugh] the most important person, and that's the customer. That's it. It was not about, “Oh, money,” and all this other stuff. It was, “This makes our customers' lives easier. So, let's do it. Oop, no brainer.”Corey: There's something to be said for making people's lives easier. I do want to talk about that open-source versus commercial divide. If I Google Liquibase—which, you know, I don't know how typing addresses in browsers works anymore because search engines are so fast—I just type in Liquibase. And the first thing it spits me out to is liquibase.org, which is the Community open-source version. And there's a link there to the Pro paid version and whatnot. And I was just scrolling idly through the comparison chart to see, “Oh, so ‘Community' is just code for shitty and you're holding back advanced features.” But it really doesn't look that way. What's the deal here?Robert: Oh, no. So, Liquibase open-source project started in 2006 and Liquibase the company, the commercial entity, started after that, 2012; 2014, first deal. And so, for—Nathan Voxland started this, and Nathan was struggling. He was working at a company, and he had to have his application—of course—you know, early 2000s, J2EE—support SQL Server and Oracle and he was struggling with it. And so he open-sourced it and added more and more databases.Certainly, as open-source databases grew, obviously he added those: MySQL, Postgres. But we're never going to undo that stuff. There's rollback for free in Liquibase, we're not going to be [laugh] we're not going to be jerks and either A) pull features out or, B) even worse, make Stephen O'Grady's life awful by changing the license [laugh] so he has to write about it. He loves writing about open-source license changes. We're Apache 2.0 and so you can do whatever you want with it.And we believe that the things that make sense for a paying customer, which is database-specific objects, that makes sense. But Liquibase Community, the open-source stuff, that is built so you can go to any database. So, if you have a change log that runs against Oracle, it should be able to run against SQL Server, or MySQL, or Postgres, as long as you don't use platform-specific data types and those sorts of things. And so that's what Community is about. Community is about being able to support any database with the same change log. Pro is about helping you get to that next level of DevOps Nirvana, of reaching those four metrics that Dr. Forsgren tells us are really important.Corey: Oh, yes. You can argue with Nicole Forsgren, but then you're wrong. So, why would you ever do that?Robert: Yeah. Yeah. [laugh]. It's just—it's a sucker's bet. Don't do it. There's a reason why she's got a PhD in CS.Corey: She has been a recurring guest on this show, and I only wish she would come back more often. You and I are fun to talk to, don't get me wrong. We want unbridled intellect that is couched in just a scintillating wit, and someone is great to talk to. Sorry, we're both outclassed.Robert: Yeah, you get entertained with us; you learn with her.Corey: Exactly. And you're still entertained while doing it is the best part.Robert: [laugh]. That's the difference between Community and Pro. Look, at the end of the day, if you're an individual developer just trying to solve a problem and get done and away from the computer and go spend time with your friends and family, yeah, go use Liquibase Community. If it's something that you think can improve the rest of the organization by teaming up and taking advantage of the collaboration features? Yes, sure, let us know. We're happy to help.Corey: Now, if people wanted to become an attorney, but law school was too expensive, out of reach, too much time, et cetera, but they did have a Twitter account, very often, they'll find that they can scratch that itch by arguing online about open-source licenses. So, I want to be very clear—because those people are odious when they email me—that you are licensed under the Apache License. That is a bonafide OSI approved open-source license. It is not everyone except big cloud companies, or service providers, which basically are people dancing around—they mean Amazon. So, let's be clear. One, are you worried about Amazon launching a competitive service with a dumb name? And/or have you really been validated as a product if AWS hasn't attempted and failed to launch a competitor?Robert: [laugh]. Well, I mean, we do have a very large corporation that has embedded Liquibase into one of their flagship products, and that is Oracle. They have embedded Liquibase in SQLcl. We're tickled pink because that means that, one, yes, it does validate Liquibase is the right way to do it, but it also means more people are getting help. Now, for Oracle users, if you're just an Oracle shop, great, have fun. We think it's a great solution. But there's not a lot of those.And so we believe that if you have Liquibase, whether it's open-source or the Pro version, then you're going to be able to support all the databases, and I think that's more important than being tied to a single cloud. Also—this is just my opinion and take it for what it's worth—but if Amazon wanted to do this, well, they're not the only game in town. So, somebody else is going to want to do it, too. And, you know, I would argue even with Amazon's backing that Liquibase is a little stronger brand than anything they would come out with.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense. Corey: So, I want to call out though, that on some level, they have already competed with you because one of database that you do not support is DynamoDB. Let's ignore the Route 53 stuff because, okay. But the reason behind that, having worked with it myself, is that, “Oh, how do you do a schema change in DynamoDB?” The answer is that you don't because it doesn't do schemas for one—it is schemaless, which is kind of the point of it—as well as oh, you want to change the primary, or the partition, or the sort key index? Great. You need a new table because those things are immutable.So, they've solved this Gordian Knot just like Alexander the Great did by cutting through it. Like, “Oh, how do you wind up doing this?” “You don't do this. The end.” And that is certainly an approach, but there are scenarios where those were first, NoSQL is not a acceptable answer for some workloads.I know Rick [Horahan 00:26:16] is going to yell at me for that as soon as he hears me, but okay. But there are some for which a relational database is kind of a thing, and you need that. So, Dynamo isn't fit for everything. But there are other workloads where, okay, I'm going to just switch over. I'm going to basically dump all the data and add it to a new table. I can't necessarily afford to do that with anything less than maybe, you know, 20 milliseconds of downtime between table one and table two. And they're obnoxious and difficult ways to do it, but for everything else, you do kind of need to make ALTER TABLE changes from time to time as you go through the build and release process.Robert: Yeah. Well, we certainly have plans for DynamoDB support. We are working our way through all the NoSQLs. Started with Mongo, and—Corey: Well, back that out a second then for me because there's something I'm clearly not grasping because it's my understanding, DynamoDB is schemaless. You can put whatever you want into various arbitrary fields. How would Liquibase work with something like that?Robert: Well, that's something I struggled with. I had the same question. Like, “Dude, really, we're a schema change tool. Why would we work with a schemaless database?” And so what happened was a soon-to-be friend of ours in Europe had reached out to me and said, “I built an extension for MongoDB in Liquibase. Can we open-source this, and can y'all take care of the care and feeding of this?” And I said, “Absolutely. What does it do?” [laugh].And so I looked at it and it turns out that it focuses on collections and generating data for test. So, you're right about schemaless because these are just documents and we're not going to go through every single document and change the structure, we're just going to have the application create a new doc and the new format. Maybe there's a conversion log logic built into the app, who knows. But it's the database professionals that have to apply these collections—you know, indices; that's what they call them in Mongo-land: collections. And so being able to apply these across all environments—dev, test, production—and have consistency, that's important.Now, what was really interesting is that this came from MasterCard. So, this engineer had a consulting business and worked for MasterCard. And they had a problem, and they said, “Hey, can you fix this with Liquibase?” And he said, “Sure, no problem.” And he built it.So, that's why if you go to the MongoDB—the liquibase-mongodb repository in our Liquibase org, you'll see that MasterCard has the copyright on all that code. Still Apache 2.0. But for me, that was the validation we needed to start expanding to other things: Dynamo, Couch. And same—Corey: Oh, yeah. For a lot of contributors, there's a contributor license process you can go through, assign copyright. For everything else, there's MasterCard.Robert: Yeah. Well, we don't do that. Look, you know, we certainly have a code of conduct with our community, but we don't have a signing copyright and that kind of stuff. Because that's baked into Apache 2.0. So, why would I want to take somebody's ability to get credit and magical internet points and increase the rep by taking that away? That's just rude.Corey: The problem I keep smacking myself into is just looking at how the entire database space across the board goes, it feels like it's built on lock-in, it's built on it is super finicky to work with, and it generally feels like, okay, great. You take something like Postgres-squeal or whatever it is you want to run your database on, yeah, you could theoretically move it a bunch of other places, but moving databases is really hard. Back when I was at my last, “Real job,” quote-unquote, years ago, we were late to the game; we migrated the entire site from EC2 Classic into a VPC, and the biggest pain in the ass with all of that was the RDS instance. Because we had to quiesce the database so it would stop taking writes; we would then do snapshot it, shut it down, and then restore a new database from that RDS snapshot.How long does it take, at least in those days? That is left as an experiment for the reader. So, we booked a four hour maintenance window under the fear that would not be enough. It completed in 45 minutes. So okay, there's that. Sparked the thing up and everything else was tested and good to go. And yay. Okay.It took a tremendous amount of planning, a tremendous amount of work, and that wasn't moving it very far. It is the only time I've done a late-night deploy, where not a single thing went wrong. Until I was on the way home and the Uber driver sideswiped a city vehicle. So, there we go—Robert: [laugh].Corey: —that's the one. But everything else was flawless on this because we planned these things out. But imagine moving to a different provider. Oh, forget it. Or imagine moving to a different database engine? That's good. Tell another one.Robert: Well, those are the problems that we want our database professionals to solve. We do not want them to be like janitors at an elementary school, cleaning up developer throw-up with sawdust. The issue that you're describing, that's a one time event. This is something that doesn't happen very often. You need hands on the keyboard, you want people there to look for problems.If you can take these database releases away from those folks and automate them safely—you can have safety and speed—then that frees up their time to do these other herculean tasks, these other feats of strength that they're far better at. There is no silver bullet panacea for database issues. All we're trying to do is take about 70% of DBAs time and free it up to do the fun stuff that you described. There are people that really enjoy that, and we want to free up their time so they can do that. Moving to another platform, going from the data center to the cloud, these sorts of things, this is what we want a human on; we don't want them updating a column three times in a row because dev couldn't get it right. Let's just give them the keys and make sure they stay in their lane.Corey: There's something glorious about being able to do that. I wish that there were more commonly appreciated ways of addressing those pains, rather than, “Oh, we're going to sell you something big and enterprise-y and it's going to add a bunch of process and not work out super well for you.” You integrate with existing CI/CD systems reasonably well, as best I can tell because the nice thing about CI/CD—and by nice I mean awful—is that there is no consensus. Every pipeline you see, in a release engineering process inherently becomes this beautiful bespoke unicorn.Robert: Mm-hm. Yeah. And we have to. We have to integrate with whatever CI/CD they have in place. And we do not want customers to just run Liquibase by itself. We want them to integrate it with whatever is driving that application deployment.We're Switzerland when it comes to databases, and CI/CD. And I certainly have my favorite of those, and it's primarily based on who bought me drinks at the last conference, but we cannot go into somebody's house and start rearranging the furniture. That's just rude. If they're deploying the app a certain way, what we tell that customer is, “Hey, we're just going to have that CI/CD tool call Liquibase to update the database. This should be an atomic unit of deployment.” And it should be hidden from the person that pushes that shiny button or the automation that does it.Corey: I wish that one day that you could automate all of the button pushing, but the thing that always annoyed me in release engineering was the, “Oh, and here's where we stop to have a human press the button.” And I get it. That stuff's scary for some folks, but at the same time, this is the nature of reality. So, you're not going to be able to technology your way around people. At least not successfully and not for very long.Robert: It's about trust. You have to earn that database professional's trust because if something goes wrong, blaming Liquibase doesn't go very far. In that company, they're going to want a person [laugh] who has a badge to—with a throat to choke. And so I've seen this pattern over and over again.And this happened at our first customer. Major, major, big, big, big bank, and this was on the consumer side. They were doing their first production push, and they wanted us ready. Not on the call, but ready if there was an issue they needed to escalate and get us to help them out. And so my VP of Engineering and me, we took it. Great. Got VP of engineering and CTO. Right on.And so Kevin and I, we stayed home, stayed sober [laugh], you know—a lot of places to party in Austin; we fought that temptation—and so we stayed and I'm texting with Kevin, back and forth. “Did you get a call?” “No, I didn't get a call.” It was Friday night. Saturday rolls around. Sunday. “Did you get a—what's going on?” [laugh].Monday, we're like, “Hey. Everything, okay? Did you push to the next weekend?” They're like, “Oh, no. We did. It went great. We forgot to tell you.” [laugh]. But here's what happened. The DBAs push the Liquibase ‘make it go' button, and then they said, “Uh-Oh.” And we're like, “What do you mean, uh-oh?” They said, “Well, something went wrong.” “Well, what went wrong?” “Well, it was too fast.” [laugh]. Something—no way. And so they went through the whole thing—Corey: That was my downtime when I supposed to be compiling.Robert: Yeah. So, they went through the whole thing to verify every single change set. Okay, so that was weekend one. And then they go to weekend two, they do it the same thing. All right, all right. Building trust.By week four, they called a meeting with the release team. And they said, “Hey, process change. We're no longer going to be on these calls. You are going to push the Liquibase button. Now, if you want to integrate it with your CI/CD, go right ahead, but that's not my problem.” Dev—or, the release team is tier one; dev is tier two; we—DBAs—are tier three support, but we'll call you because we'll know something went wrong. And to this day, it's all automated.And so you have to earn trust to get people to give that up. Once they have trust and you really—it's based on empathy. You have to understand how terrible [laugh] they are sometimes treated, and to actively take care of them, realize the problems they're struggling with, and when you earn that trust, then and only then will they allow automation. But it's hard, but it's something you got to do.Corey: You mentioned something a minute ago that I want to focus on a little bit more closely, specifically that you're in Austin. Seems like that's a popular choice lately. You've got companies that are relocating their headquarters there, presumably for tax purposes. Oracle's there, Tesla's there. Great. I mean, from my perspective, terrific because it gets a number of notably annoying CEOs out of my backyard. But what's going on? Why is Austin on this meteoric rise and how'd it get there?Robert: Well, a lot of folks—overnight success, 40 years in the making, I guess. But what a lot of people don't realize is that, one, we had a pretty vibrant tech hub prior to all this. It all started with MCC, Microcomputer Consortium, which in the '80s, we were afraid of the Japanese taking over and so we decided to get a bunch of companies together, and Admiral Bobby Inman who was director planted it in Austin. And that's where it started. You certainly have other folks that have a huge impact, obviously, Michael Dell, Austin Ventures, a whole host of folks that have really leaned in on tech in Austin, but it actually started before that.So, there was a time where Willie Nelson was in Nashville and was just fed up with RCA Records. They would not release his albums because he wanted to change his sound. And so he had some nice friends at Atlantic Records that said, “Willie, we got this. Go to New York, use our studio, cut an album, we'll fix it up.” And so he cut an album called Shotgun Willie, famous for having “Whiskey River” which is what he uses to open and close every show.But that album sucked as far as sales. It's a good album, I like it. But it didn't sell except for one place in America: in Austin, Texas. It sold more copies in Austin than anywhere else. And so Willie was like, “I need to go check this out.”And so he shows up in Austin and sees a bunch of rednecks and hippies hanging out together, really geeking out on music. It was a great vibe. And then he calls, you know, Kris, and Waylon, and Merle, and say, “Come on down.” And so what happened here was a bunch of people really wanted to geek out on this new type of country music, outlaw country. And it started a pattern where people just geek out on stuff they really like.So, same thing with Austin film. You got Robert Rodriguez, you got Richard Linklater, and Slackers, his first movie, that's why I moved to Austin. And I got a job at Les Amis—a coffee shop that's closed—because it had three scenes in that. There was a whole scene of people that just really wanted to make different types of films. And we see that with software, we see that with film, we see it with fashion.And it just seems that Austin is the place where if you're really into something, you're going to find somebody here that really wants to get into it with you, whether it's board gaming, D&D, noise punk, whatever. And that's really comforting. I think it's the community that's just welcoming. And I just hope that we can continue that creativity, that sense of community, and that we don't have large corporations that are coming in and just taking from the system. I hope they inject more.I think Oracle's done a really good job; their new headquarters is gorgeous, they've done some really good things with the city, doing a land swap, I think it was forty acres for nine acres. They coughed up forty for nine. And it was nine acres the city wasn't even using. Great. So, I think they're being good citizens. I think Tesla's been pretty cool with building that factory where it is. I hope more come. I hope they catch what is ever in the water and the breakfast tacos in Austin.Corey: [laugh]. I certainly look forward to this pandemic ending; I can come over and find out for myself. I'm looking forward to it. I always enjoyed my time there, I just wish I got to spend more of it.Robert: How many folks from Duckbill Group are in Austin now?Corey: One at the moment. Tim Banks. And the challenge, of course, is that if you look across the board, there really aren't that many places that have more than one employee. For example, our operations person, Megan, is here in San Francisco and so is Jesse DeRose, our manager of cloud economics. But my business partner is in Portland; we have people scattered all over the country.It's kind of fun having a fully-distributed company. We started this way, back when that was easy. And because all right, travel is easy; we'll just go and visit whenever we need to. But there's no central office, which I think is sort of the dangerous part of full remote because then you have this idea of second-class citizens hanging out in one part of the country and then they go out to lunch together and that's where the real decisions get made. And then you get caught up to speed. It definitely fosters a writing culture.Robert: Yeah. When we went to remote work, our lease was up. We just didn't renew. And now we have expanded hiring outside of Austin, we have folks in the Ukraine, Poland, Brazil, more and more coming. We even have folks that are moving out of Austin to places like Minnesota and Virginia, moving back home where their family is located.And that is wonderful. But we are getting together as a company in January. We're also going to, instead of having an office, we're calling it a ‘Liquibase Lounge.' So, there's a number of retail places that didn't survive, and so we're going to take one of those spots and just make a little hangout place so that people can come in. And we also want to open it up for the community as well.But it's very important—and we learned this from our friends at GitLab and their culture. We really studied how they do it, how they've been successful, and it is an awareness of those lunch meetings where the decisions are made. And it is saying, “Nope, this is great we've had this conversation. We need to have this conversation again. Let's bring other people in.” And that's how we're doing at Liquibase, and so far it seems to work.Corey: I'm looking forward to seeing what happens, once this whole pandemic ends, and how things continue to thrive. We're long past due for a startup center that isn't San Francisco. The whole thing is based on the idea of disruption. “Oh, we're disruptive.” “Yes, we're so disruptive, we've taken a job that can be done from literally anywhere with internet access and created a land crunch in eight square miles, located in an earthquake zone.” Genius, simply genius.Robert: It's a shame that we had to have such a tragedy to happen to fix that.Corey: Isn't that the truth?Robert: It really is. But the toothpaste is out of the tube. You ain't putting that back in. But my bet on the next Tech Hub: Kansas City. That town is cool, it has one hundred percent Google Fiber all throughout, great university. Kauffman Fellows, I believe, is based there, so VC folks are trained there. I believe so; I hope I'm not wrong with that. I know Kauffman Foundation is there. But look, there's something happening in that town. And so if you're a buy low, sell high kind of person, come check us out in Austin. I'm not trying to dissuade anybody from moving to Austin; I'm not one of those people. But if the housing prices [laugh] you don't like them, check out Kansas City, and get that two-gig fiber for peanuts. Well, $75 worth of peanuts.Corey: Robert, I want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me so extensively about Liquibase, about how awesome RedMonk is, about Austin and so many other topics. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Robert: Well, I think the best place to find us right now is in AWS Marketplace. So—Corey: Now, hand on a second. When you say the best place for anything being the AWS Marketplace, I'm naturally a little suspicious. Tell me more.Robert: [laugh]. Well, best is, you know, it's—[laugh].Corey: It is a place that is there and people can find you through it. All right, then.Robert: I have a list. I have a list. But the first one I'm going to mention is AWS Marketplace. And so that's a really easy way, especially if you're taking advantage of the EDP, Enterprise Discount Program. That's helpful. Burn down those dollars, get a discount, et cetera, et cetera. Now, of course, you can go to liquibase.com, download a trial. Or you can find us on Github, github.com/liquibase. Of course, talking smack to us on Twitter is always appreciated.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:46:37]. Robert Reeves, CTO and co-founder of Liquibase. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment complaining about how Liquibase doesn't support your database engine of choice, which will quickly be rendered obsolete by the open-source community.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Mac Folklore Radio
Don Melton - Memories of Steve (2013)

Mac Folklore Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 46:34


Don Melton, former WebKit and Safari team lead at Apple, recalls some close encounters with Steve Jobs. Original text from Don's website. Don did a wonderful interview about his computer journey before, during, and after heading the Safari project on episode 11 of the Debug podcast. Steve Jobs Quote Compilation Index WWDC 2004: “Our competitors buy the panels we reject” All Things D 2007, Bill Gates: “He's really pursued that with incredible taste and elegance… I'd do a lot to have Steve's taste” Game Changers, Guy Kawasaki: “It's a perfect match because he's a showman who can really introduce a product, and he has great products to introduce” WWDC 1997 Keynote: “The line of code that a developer can write the fastest, the line of code the developer can maintain the cheapest, and the line of code that never breaks for the user is the line of code the developer never had to write.” MWSF 2001 (Titanium PowerBook G4 intro): “We have the most powerful notebooks in the world … but they have the sex. We want both!” MWSF 1999: “Our relationship with Microsoft, it's kind of like a marriage … it's terrific about 99% of the time… about 1% of the time we argue over stuff, usually having to do with multimedia. Y'know, in life, that's not a bad ratio.” MWSF 2001: “We very much appreciate the applause but you shouldn't be applauding because this is how it ought to work!” MWSF 1999: “We don't think design is just how it looks; we think design is how it works. … We think we've got the most incredible access story in the business. And you know what's it's called? It's called a door.” WWDC 2004: “The back of these displays looks better than the front of most of our competitors'. … First time I saw one of these I couldn't talk for the first minute.” WWDC 1999: “We're giving away fifty of these new PowerBooks… and the winner of the first PowerBook is… oh! Steve Jobs! No…” iBook Dual USB Intro, 2001: “Michael Dell said some disparaging things about us lately, publicly. We're not going to engage in that sort of thing, but let me show you their product. … It looks like this and you can see it's about that thick, and it's got some nice fans in the back so you can keep an eye on them…” CAUSE 1998 on “digital convergence”: “I converged myself last week, actually. Can you tell? I don't know what it means. Here's what it means: it means your television's gonna make toast. Y'know? That's what it means. […] People go their TVs to turn their brain off […] I used to think like many you might have thought that there was this giant conspiracy of the networks to put mediocrity on television and dumb us down! … But I then found out the truth which is far more depressing, which is the networks give people precisely what they want!” Apple 2003 Q4 investors call: “We're gonna integrate toasters and computers. We think people want toast when they're working on their computers. We can have computer control, just get it exactly how you–we can put up pictures of toast, and you pick the one that looks like what you want, and it'll come right out the side!” CHM iPhone Event w/Fiennes, Ganatra, Hertz, Forstall: Scott Forstall's Steve Jobs cafeteria payment story Xserve Launch Event/WWDC 2002: (on Apple's extremely poor record of committing to enterprise products) “I wasn't here when Apple did a lot of those … I look at that as a dream when, you know, Apple was in a coma.” CHM iPhone Event w/Fiennes, Ganatra, Hertz, Forstall: “My interview at NeXT was funny because .. I'd been there 10 minutes… Steve barges into the room, grabs the guy …” New Pathways Into the Library of Congress: “Bicycle for our minds” bit CHM iPhone Event w/Fiennes, Ganatra, Hertz, Forstall: “You're a billionaire, you don't understand!” MWSF 1999: “Maybe it's telling you to revert back to a Macintosh” CAUSE 1998: “The goal used to be to make the best computers in the world… goal 2 we got from Hewlett-Packard, which is we have to make a profit! .. along the way somewhere, those two got reversed. … It's very subtle at first but it turns out it's everything.” CAUSE 1998: (on user interface design) “we've just stuck warts on the side of what we had 10 years ago instead of rethinking everything” Seybold 1999 Keynote: John Warnock: “The wonderful thing about having Apple back is that this industry is no longer boring. Thank you, Steve.”

Let’s Go to The Library

Michael Dell founded Dell in 1984 and in 1988 Penny Adkins and Marc Evans published A Dell Handbook. Adele has shared her life from 19-30 and we listen along and tell you how we feel during the trip.

The Cloudcast
Lessons learned from Dell-VMware

The Cloudcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 21:36


In 2015, Dell acquired EMC and VMware for a record-setting $67B. In 2021, Dell spun out VMware as an independent company. What lessons were learned? SHOW: 572CLOUD NEWS OF THE WEEK - http://bit.ly/cloudcast-cnotwCHECK OUT OUR NEW PODCAST - "CLOUDCAST BASICS"SHOW SPONSORS:Megaport - Network as a Service PlatformTry Megaport - Cloud Connectivity SimplifiedCBT Nuggets: Expert IT Training for individuals and teamsSign up for a CBT Nuggets Free Learner account SHOW NOTES:Dell offers $67B for EMC - 2015Dell finalizes acquisition of EMC (and VMware) - 20163 Years Later, Was it Worth the Debt? (TechCrunch)Dell's Public Journey from Private Equity to VMware Share Swap (2018)Dell spins out VMware - Dell (2021)A New Day for VMware - VMware (2021)EMC Revenues (2015-16)Dell Revenues (2015-2021)VMware Revenues (2015-2021) WHAT WERE THE GOALS OF THE DELL ACQUISITION OF EMC?Dell was trying to recover from having to go private in 2013. Wanted to consolidate the Enterprise infrastructure market. Wanted to have a one-stop-shop from desktop to enterprise infrastructure to security to applications to hybrid cloud. WHAT VALUE DID DELL BRING TO VMWARE?VMware - 26 acquisitions (2016-2021)VMware grew revenues 66% (2016-2021), 11% annuallyVMW shares grew from $70 to $118 (+68%)Dell grew revenues from $50B to $94B (EMC revenues $25B)VMware on AWS launched in 2016 - grown to around $3B business (26% revenues)Michael Dell gets an A+ for financial engineeringDell/EMC/VMware missed an opportunity to create an alternative to the Big3 cloud providers.  FEEDBACK?Email: show at the cloudcast dot netTwitter: @thecloudcastnet

On Purpose with Jay Shetty
Michael Dell ON: Dreaming Bigger Than Your Goals & How to Play Nice But Win

On Purpose with Jay Shetty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 34:04


Michael Dell sits down with Jay Shetty to talk about how he built a multi-billion dollar technology business. It was a risk he was willing to take for he saw these risks as opportunities he could leverage to achieve his goals. He didn't allow people's opinions to dampen his innovative pursuit to build an empire where failures are seen as stepping stones and financial challenges remain a temporary drawback. Michael is chairman and chief executive officer of Dell Technologies, an innovator and technology leader providing the essential infrastructure for organizations to build their digital future, transform IT and protect their most important information. His first book, Direct from Dell: Strategies That Revolutionized an Industry, was written in 1999 and is currently promoting his second, Play Nice But Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader.What We Discuss with Michael:00:00 Intro02:52 “I started as a dishwasher boy at a Chinese restaurant.” - Michael Dell05:45 If you got little to lose, go take a risk10:08 Some big risks are just opportunities13:51 Play nice but win14:52 You have too feel right about what you're doing17:31 It wouldn't feel right to win if you cheated19:15 Building a business is not for the faint of heart 21:37 Going against a big corporation24:26 Fighting for the company to retain its risk-taking spirit26:26 A great work-life balance doesn't work when you're starting a business28:54 Set boundaries when you have a family32:25 Collecting company mementos33:34 3 key factors your leading the company right  35:29 Michael on Final FiveLike this show? Please leave us a review here - even one sentence helps! Post a screenshot of you listening on Instagram & tag us so we can thank you personally!Episode Resources:Michael Dell | TwitterMichael Dell | LinkedInMichael Dell | Dell TechnologiesPlay Nice But Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to LeaderAchieve success in every area of your life with Jay Shetty's Genius Community. Join over 10,000 members taking their holistic well-being to the next level today, at https://shetty.cc/OnPurposeGenius

The Daily Stoic
Michael Dell on Calculating Risk and Playing Nice But Winning

The Daily Stoic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 65:44


Ryan talks to founder and CEO of one of America's largest technology companies Michael Dell about his new book Play Nice But Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader, the balance between trusting yourself and trusting the opinions of experts, focusing on what you can control, and more. Michael Dell is chairman and chief executive officer of Dell Technologies, an innovator and technology leader providing the essential infrastructure for organizations to build their digital future, transform IT and protect their most important information. He is ranked 24th richest person in the world by Bloomberg Billionaires Index. He founded Dell Technologies with $1000 in 1984 at the age of 19. In 1992, Michael became the youngest CEO ever to earn a ranking on the Fortune 500.Cometeer partners with the best locally owned roasters in the world and through their breakthrough brewing technology, provides a delicious, high-quality, balanced cup of coffee for a fraction of the price. For a limited time, you can save 20 Dollars off your first order - that's 10 free cups on your first order, and shipping is always free - but only when you visit cometeer.com/STOICTalkspace is an online and mobile therapy company. Talkspace lets you send and receive unlimited messages with your dedicated therapist in the Talkspace platform 24/7. To match with a licensed therapist today, go to Talkspace.com or download the app. Make sure to use the code STOIC to get $100 off of your first month and show your support for the show.LinkedIn Jobs is the best platform for finding the right candidate to join your business this fall. It's the largest marketplace for job seekers in the world, and it has great search features so that you can find candidates with any hard or soft skills that you need. And now, you can post a job for free. Just visit linkedin.com/STOIC to post a job for free. Sign up for the Daily Stoic email: https://DailyStoic.com/signupFollow us: Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, TikTok, FacebookFollow Michael Dell: Homepage, TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Curse Free GaryVee
Why The Side Hustle was Unheard of 30 Years Ago | Interview with Michael Dell

Curse Free GaryVee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 38:53


Today's episode is an original interview with CEO and founder of Dell Technologies Michael Dell, an absolute legend! We discuss all things Dell, his new book "Play Nice but Win", what got him to start the company, entrepreneurship back then vs now and more. Enjoy! Let me know what you thought. Tweet Me! @garyvee Text Me! 212-931-5731 My Newsletter: garyvee.com/newsletter Check out my new NFT project: veefriends.com Join the VeeFriends Discord: https://discord.gg/veefriends Checkout my new co-hosted podcast with DraftKing's founder--Matt Kalish on all things sports, business, and alternative investing: https://linktr.ee/propsanddropspod For more info on Michael Dell: Check out Play Nice But Win Here: https://www.amazon.com/Play-Nice-But-Win-Journey/dp/0593087747/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&g[…]377_11336091&keywords=play+nice+but+win&qid=1633472920&sr=8-1 Follow Michael Here: https://twitter.com/MichaelDell?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

What I Know
What I know BEST: Securing a Huge Customer with Michael Dell

What I Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 7:22


Christine Lagorio-Chafkin talks with Michael Dell about how to secure a huge customer in this segment of What I Know BEST.

AEA Research Highlights
Ep. 38: Growth by proximity

AEA Research Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 23:44


Austin was a laid-back college town in the 1980s when a student at the University of Texas named Michael Dell began selling computers from his dorm room. At the time, Texas's capital city was perhaps known more for high hats than high-tech. But the company Dell started would become the world's largest PC maker and attracted a slew of talent that turned Austin into a technology hub. Enrico Moretti has studied how these “agglomeration economies” develop and the ways they drive growth. In a paper in the American Economic Review, he says that inventors produce more patented research when surrounded by other top talent in their field.   He also says that tech clusters will continue to thrive after the pandemic, despite speculation that they will be less relevant in a world of more remote work. Moretti spoke with Chris Fleisher about agglomeration and what the case study of Kodak in Rochester, New York, can tell us about how clusters affect innovation.

5 Questions With Dan Schawbel
Episode 156: Michael Dell

5 Questions With Dan Schawbel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:55


My guest today is the chairman and CEO of Dell Technologies, Michael Dell. Michael started Dell in his dorm room at the University of Texas and today it's become of the most successful technologies companies in the world. He is one of the 25 richest people in the world with a net worth of $51.7 […]

Entrepreneur Network Podcast
Michael Dell's Path to Success: Take Risks!

Entrepreneur Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 30:42


"It's not that I was 50% smarter than everybody else," says Michael Dell, founder of Dell Technologies, who has built one of the world's largest tech infrastructure companies. "I was just willing to take more risks." On this episode, I speak with Dell about his philosophy on business and his new book, Play Nice But Win.

Problem Solvers
Michael Dell's Path to Success: Take Risks!

Problem Solvers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 30:39


What I Know
Michael Dell: A New Way To Think About Risk

What I Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 35:49


One of America's best-known entrepreneurs, Michael Dell, founded his eponymous company out of a University of Texas dorm room. More than three decades later, he's led his company through multiple transformations, including taking it private, and taking on $50 billion in debt to complete a major acquisition. Dell Technologies is in a new phase of its life--and Dell explains his leadership philosophies that have shaped it all in his new book, Play Nice But Win. Christine Lagorio-Chafkin interviews him about the early growth of his computer company, how his thinking and actions as a leader have changed over the years, and how he'd advise entrepreneurs to reconceptualize their risk-taking.

This Week in Tech (MP3)
TWiT 844: Christina Needs It - FB's Horrible Week, Surface Laptop Studio Review, TikTok Masters the Algorithm

This Week in Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 155:19


Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen details company's misleading efforts on 60 Minutes. Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp Were Down: Here's What to Know. Update about the October 4th outage. Facebook and its apps suffer another outage. Mark Zuckerberg - I wanted to share a note I wrote to... 1 Billion TikTok Users Understand What Congress Doesn't. Windows 11 review: The start of a new era. Here's the story behind the Microsoft Store for Windows 11 and how its creator thinks this time it'll work. The Steve Jobs deal with Michael Dell that could have changed Apple and tech history. Surface Laptop Studio review: Redefining what a Windows laptop can be (again) The iPad Air is everything that's wrong with Apple's tablets. Apple files appeal in Epic Games case, potentially delaying App Store changes for years. The Twitch Hack Is Worse for Streamers Than for Twitch. New ad suggests drinking Coke will destroy video games, usher in world peace. YouTube To Stop Making Year-End 'Rewind' Videos. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Dan Moren, Christina Warren, and Daniel Rubino Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Stamps.com promo code TWiT checkout.com/twit business.eset.com/twit itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

This Week in Tech (Video LO)
TWiT 844: Christina Needs It - FB's Horrible Week, Surface Laptop Studio Review, TikTok Masters the Algorithm

This Week in Tech (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 156:03


Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen details company's misleading efforts on 60 Minutes. Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp Were Down: Here's What to Know. Update about the October 4th outage. Facebook and its apps suffer another outage. Mark Zuckerberg - I wanted to share a note I wrote to... 1 Billion TikTok Users Understand What Congress Doesn't. Windows 11 review: The start of a new era. Here's the story behind the Microsoft Store for Windows 11 and how its creator thinks this time it'll work. The Steve Jobs deal with Michael Dell that could have changed Apple and tech history. Surface Laptop Studio review: Redefining what a Windows laptop can be (again) The iPad Air is everything that's wrong with Apple's tablets. Apple files appeal in Epic Games case, potentially delaying App Store changes for years. The Twitch Hack Is Worse for Streamers Than for Twitch. New ad suggests drinking Coke will destroy video games, usher in world peace. YouTube To Stop Making Year-End 'Rewind' Videos. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Dan Moren, Christina Warren, and Daniel Rubino Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Stamps.com promo code TWiT checkout.com/twit business.eset.com/twit itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

This Week in Tech (Video HD)
TWiT 844: Christina Needs It - FB's Horrible Week, Surface Laptop Studio Review, TikTok Masters the Algorithm

This Week in Tech (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 156:03


Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen details company's misleading efforts on 60 Minutes. Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp Were Down: Here's What to Know. Update about the October 4th outage. Facebook and its apps suffer another outage. Mark Zuckerberg - I wanted to share a note I wrote to... 1 Billion TikTok Users Understand What Congress Doesn't. Windows 11 review: The start of a new era. Here's the story behind the Microsoft Store for Windows 11 and how its creator thinks this time it'll work. The Steve Jobs deal with Michael Dell that could have changed Apple and tech history. Surface Laptop Studio review: Redefining what a Windows laptop can be (again) The iPad Air is everything that's wrong with Apple's tablets. Apple files appeal in Epic Games case, potentially delaying App Store changes for years. The Twitch Hack Is Worse for Streamers Than for Twitch. New ad suggests drinking Coke will destroy video games, usher in world peace. YouTube To Stop Making Year-End 'Rewind' Videos. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Dan Moren, Christina Warren, and Daniel Rubino Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Stamps.com promo code TWiT checkout.com/twit business.eset.com/twit itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

This Week in Tech (Video HI)
TWiT 844: Christina Needs It - FB's Horrible Week, Surface Laptop Studio Review, TikTok Masters the Algorithm

This Week in Tech (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 156:03


Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen details company's misleading efforts on 60 Minutes. Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp Were Down: Here's What to Know. Update about the October 4th outage. Facebook and its apps suffer another outage. Mark Zuckerberg - I wanted to share a note I wrote to... 1 Billion TikTok Users Understand What Congress Doesn't. Windows 11 review: The start of a new era. Here's the story behind the Microsoft Store for Windows 11 and how its creator thinks this time it'll work. The Steve Jobs deal with Michael Dell that could have changed Apple and tech history. Surface Laptop Studio review: Redefining what a Windows laptop can be (again) The iPad Air is everything that's wrong with Apple's tablets. Apple files appeal in Epic Games case, potentially delaying App Store changes for years. The Twitch Hack Is Worse for Streamers Than for Twitch. New ad suggests drinking Coke will destroy video games, usher in world peace. YouTube To Stop Making Year-End 'Rewind' Videos. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Dan Moren, Christina Warren, and Daniel Rubino Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Stamps.com promo code TWiT checkout.com/twit business.eset.com/twit itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Tech 844: Christina Needs It

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 155:19


Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen details company's misleading efforts on 60 Minutes. Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp Were Down: Here's What to Know. Update about the October 4th outage. Facebook and its apps suffer another outage. Mark Zuckerberg - I wanted to share a note I wrote to... 1 Billion TikTok Users Understand What Congress Doesn't. Windows 11 review: The start of a new era. Here's the story behind the Microsoft Store for Windows 11 and how its creator thinks this time it'll work. The Steve Jobs deal with Michael Dell that could have changed Apple and tech history. Surface Laptop Studio review: Redefining what a Windows laptop can be (again) The iPad Air is everything that's wrong with Apple's tablets. Apple files appeal in Epic Games case, potentially delaying App Store changes for years. The Twitch Hack Is Worse for Streamers Than for Twitch. New ad suggests drinking Coke will destroy video games, usher in world peace. YouTube To Stop Making Year-End 'Rewind' Videos. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Dan Moren, Christina Warren, and Daniel Rubino Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Stamps.com promo code TWiT checkout.com/twit business.eset.com/twit itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Tech 844: Christina Needs It

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 156:03


Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen details company's misleading efforts on 60 Minutes. Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp Were Down: Here's What to Know. Update about the October 4th outage. Facebook and its apps suffer another outage. Mark Zuckerberg - I wanted to share a note I wrote to... 1 Billion TikTok Users Understand What Congress Doesn't. Windows 11 review: The start of a new era. Here's the story behind the Microsoft Store for Windows 11 and how its creator thinks this time it'll work. The Steve Jobs deal with Michael Dell that could have changed Apple and tech history. Surface Laptop Studio review: Redefining what a Windows laptop can be (again) The iPad Air is everything that's wrong with Apple's tablets. Apple files appeal in Epic Games case, potentially delaying App Store changes for years. The Twitch Hack Is Worse for Streamers Than for Twitch. New ad suggests drinking Coke will destroy video games, usher in world peace. YouTube To Stop Making Year-End 'Rewind' Videos. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Dan Moren, Christina Warren, and Daniel Rubino Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Stamps.com promo code TWiT checkout.com/twit business.eset.com/twit itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HI)
This Week in Tech 844: Christina Needs It

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 156:03


Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen details company's misleading efforts on 60 Minutes. Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp Were Down: Here's What to Know. Update about the October 4th outage. Facebook and its apps suffer another outage. Mark Zuckerberg - I wanted to share a note I wrote to... 1 Billion TikTok Users Understand What Congress Doesn't. Windows 11 review: The start of a new era. Here's the story behind the Microsoft Store for Windows 11 and how its creator thinks this time it'll work. The Steve Jobs deal with Michael Dell that could have changed Apple and tech history. Surface Laptop Studio review: Redefining what a Windows laptop can be (again) The iPad Air is everything that's wrong with Apple's tablets. Apple files appeal in Epic Games case, potentially delaying App Store changes for years. The Twitch Hack Is Worse for Streamers Than for Twitch. New ad suggests drinking Coke will destroy video games, usher in world peace. YouTube To Stop Making Year-End 'Rewind' Videos. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Dan Moren, Christina Warren, and Daniel Rubino Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Stamps.com promo code TWiT checkout.com/twit business.eset.com/twit itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HD)
This Week in Tech 844: Christina Needs It

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 156:03


Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen details company's misleading efforts on 60 Minutes. Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp Were Down: Here's What to Know. Update about the October 4th outage. Facebook and its apps suffer another outage. Mark Zuckerberg - I wanted to share a note I wrote to... 1 Billion TikTok Users Understand What Congress Doesn't. Windows 11 review: The start of a new era. Here's the story behind the Microsoft Store for Windows 11 and how its creator thinks this time it'll work. The Steve Jobs deal with Michael Dell that could have changed Apple and tech history. Surface Laptop Studio review: Redefining what a Windows laptop can be (again) The iPad Air is everything that's wrong with Apple's tablets. Apple files appeal in Epic Games case, potentially delaying App Store changes for years. The Twitch Hack Is Worse for Streamers Than for Twitch. New ad suggests drinking Coke will destroy video games, usher in world peace. YouTube To Stop Making Year-End 'Rewind' Videos. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Dan Moren, Christina Warren, and Daniel Rubino Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Stamps.com promo code TWiT checkout.com/twit business.eset.com/twit itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

Radio Leo (Video HD)
This Week in Tech 844: Christina Needs It

Radio Leo (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 156:03


Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen details company's misleading efforts on 60 Minutes. Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp Were Down: Here's What to Know. Update about the October 4th outage. Facebook and its apps suffer another outage. Mark Zuckerberg - I wanted to share a note I wrote to... 1 Billion TikTok Users Understand What Congress Doesn't. Windows 11 review: The start of a new era. Here's the story behind the Microsoft Store for Windows 11 and how its creator thinks this time it'll work. The Steve Jobs deal with Michael Dell that could have changed Apple and tech history. Surface Laptop Studio review: Redefining what a Windows laptop can be (again) The iPad Air is everything that's wrong with Apple's tablets. Apple files appeal in Epic Games case, potentially delaying App Store changes for years. The Twitch Hack Is Worse for Streamers Than for Twitch. New ad suggests drinking Coke will destroy video games, usher in world peace. YouTube To Stop Making Year-End 'Rewind' Videos. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Dan Moren, Christina Warren, and Daniel Rubino Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Stamps.com promo code TWiT checkout.com/twit business.eset.com/twit itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

Radio Leo (Audio)
This Week in Tech 844: Christina Needs It

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 155:19


Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen details company's misleading efforts on 60 Minutes. Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp Were Down: Here's What to Know. Update about the October 4th outage. Facebook and its apps suffer another outage. Mark Zuckerberg - I wanted to share a note I wrote to... 1 Billion TikTok Users Understand What Congress Doesn't. Windows 11 review: The start of a new era. Here's the story behind the Microsoft Store for Windows 11 and how its creator thinks this time it'll work. The Steve Jobs deal with Michael Dell that could have changed Apple and tech history. Surface Laptop Studio review: Redefining what a Windows laptop can be (again) The iPad Air is everything that's wrong with Apple's tablets. Apple files appeal in Epic Games case, potentially delaying App Store changes for years. The Twitch Hack Is Worse for Streamers Than for Twitch. New ad suggests drinking Coke will destroy video games, usher in world peace. YouTube To Stop Making Year-End 'Rewind' Videos. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Dan Moren, Christina Warren, and Daniel Rubino Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Stamps.com promo code TWiT checkout.com/twit business.eset.com/twit itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
Cloud Wars and Company Wars: Play Nice But Win

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 52:57


A16z Podcast Podcast Notes Key Takeaways It is not a question of “either-or” but “both-and” (public and private cloud), and beyond that- it is about edge computing“There are estimates that say there will be more applications and more data at the edge and it is not all going to come back to the center of the universe,” – Michael DellThe massive shift to SAS (software for statistical analysis and data visualization) could be cloud wars 2.0Because of AI and ML rise, programmers will have to deal with the software on a new level of abstractionInnovation is the main reason a startup should use cloud computingDell's company went public, then private, then public againThey hired tons of engineers, salespeople, invested organically and it worked really quicklyThe demise of the PC narrative gave them an incredible opportunity to buy the company backMergers and acquisitions are the No. 1 reason to go publicLeaving college to start a business: “It is not for everybody; you need to be deviant, mischievous, and a rule-breaker,” – Michael DellGet something up and running and then decide to leave or not – this is much better adviceThere is something about the times we are in; the pull and drive of the moment (think about cryptocurrency)Read the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgThere are lots of challenges in being public while trying to innovate, and limits to being a private company as well; but it's rare to see a company go public then private then back to public again. As is the case with Dell Technologies, one of the largest tech companies -- which went private 2012-2013 and then also pulled off one of the most epic mergers of all time with Dell + EMC + VMWare 2015-2016 (and which we wrote about here at the time).Is there a method to the madness? How does one not just start, but keep, and transform, their company and business? Especially as it adapts to broader, underlying tech platform shifts. Michael Dell shares all this in his upcoming new book, Play Nice to Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader... he also, tellingly, may be one of the longest-standing founder-CEOs (37 years so far).Because this is really a story about innovation, who decides, who judges, who does it, and where: In the markets, in public, in private; in the both the big picture and the inner detailed workings of a business beyond "cells in a spreadsheet"; and even in fighting -- or harnessing! -- narratives, whether it's the demise-of-PC or cloud wars 1.0 /2.0... And where trends like the cost paradox of cloud, and "end of cloud" edge computing, among others like AI & ML, also come in. In this special book-launch episode of the a16z Podcast with Marc Andreessen, Martin Casado, and Sonal Chokshi debate the Cloud Wars to the Company Wars (along with some behind-scenes stories and even some star wars) with Michael Dell... and whether you can really play nice to win. image: Dell EMC World 2016/ © Dell Inc. The views expressed here are those of the individual AH Capital Management, L.L.C. (“a16z”) personnel quoted and are not the views of a16z or its affiliates. Certain information contained in here has been obtained from third-party sources, including from portfolio companies of funds managed by a16z. While taken from sources believed to be reliable, a16z has not independently verified such information and makes no representations about the enduring accuracy of the information or its appropriateness for a given situation.This content is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be relied upon as legal, business, investment, or tax advice. You should consult your own advisers as to those matters. References to any securities or digital assets are for illustrative purposes only, and do not constitute an investment recommendation or offer to provide investment advisory services. Furthermore, this content is not directed at nor intended for use by any investors or prospective investors, and may not under any circumstances be relied upon when making a decision to invest in any fund managed by a16z. (An offering to invest in an a16z fund will be made only by the private placement memorandum, subscription agreement, and other relevant documentation of any such fund and should be read in their entirety.) Any investments or portfolio companies mentioned, referred to, or described are not representative of all investments in vehicles managed by a16z, and there can be no assurance that the investments will be profitable or that other investments made in the future will have similar characteristics or results. A list of investments made by funds managed by Andreessen Horowitz (excluding investments for which the issuer has not provided permission for a16z to disclose publicly as well as unannounced investments in publicly traded digital assets) is available at https://a16z.com/investments/.Charts and graphs provided within are for informational purposes solely and should not be relied upon when making any investment decision. Past performance is not indicative of future results. The content speaks only as of the date indicated. Any projections, estimates, forecasts, targets, prospects, and/or opinions expressed in these materials are subject to change without notice and may differ or be contrary to opinions expressed by others. Please see https://a16z.com/disclosures for additional important information.

Kill Bigger Radio with Kyle Keegan
Michael Dell's 21 Principles for Billions - Ep 246

Kill Bigger Radio with Kyle Keegan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 38:59


I am inspired to spend a little bit of time on the greats. I want to learn from the billionaires I respect, so I found this great article discussing the 21 principles of success that Michael Dell has implemented in his life to become the billionaire founder of Dell computer.    Want to keep "Killing Bigger?"   Text KKRS to: 713-528-8219   Telegram Community: https://t.me/killbigger   Twitter: https://twitter.com/killbiggerradio   Parler: https://parler.com/#/user/KillBiggerRadio   Check out https://KillBigger.com   The American Precious Metals Exchange at https://apmex.com   Protect your privacy on your phone and computer with https://nordvpn.com/keegan      Chase INK Credit Cards: https://www.referyourchasecard.com/21/IEDS1NQ9H2   Join the discussion at https://www.thefastlaneforum.com/community/threads/kaks-kill-bigger-radio-show.95326/    DISCLAIMER! I am NOT your financial advisor. Do your own research. I advocate heavily that you should make intelligent and informed decisions based on your own understanding or hire someone that does this for you. Kill Bigger™️ and Kill Bigger Media™️ are © Atlas Southwest LLC.  

Foundr Magazine Podcast with Nathan Chan
378: Hosting Steve Jobs and Birthing Giants with Scaling Up's Verne Harnish

Foundr Magazine Podcast with Nathan Chan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 39:05


After growing up around a failed family business, Verne Harnish was determined to use his experience to help young entrepreneurs succeed. 40 years later, he's helped startups across the world scale to become multi-million dollar businesses and worked with some of the most famous entrepreneurs of our time.    Verne, known as the "Growth Guy,” founded the world-renowned Entrepreneurs' Organization, co-founded the Growth Institute, and has written 2 books including Scaling Up, Mastering the Rockefeller Habits.   Listen to Foundr CEO Nathan Chan discuss with Verne about:  Hosting Steve Jobs' first public speech after being fired from Apple Why sales is still the best proven way to get to $1 million in revenue The traits of success he's learned from entrepreneurs like Mark Cuban, Brad Feld, and Nate Blecharczyk  Remembering “the look” of Mark Zuckerberg, Michael Dell, and Steve Jobs Why cofounders scale further faster than single founders  Why every entrepreneur needs to be a little crazy And much more... Who do you want to see next on the podcast? Comment and let us know! And don't forget to leave us a 5-star review if you loved this episode.   Wait, there's more… If you enjoy the Foundr podcast, check out our free trainings. Get exclusive, actionable advice from some of the world's best entrepreneurs.    For more Foundr content, follow us on your favorite platform:  Foundr.com Instagram YouTube Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Magazine

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Wednesday October 6 2021

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 9:39


Great news in our key COVID numbers, which are dropping like a rock - now closing in on Stage 2 range, as City officials continue mulling a reduction from our current Stage 4 precautions to Stage 3. ACL Fest news: a new batch of Weekend 2 tickets are released, Austin Public Health pushes for more masking enforcement for the second weekend, and a pair of brothers are busted for stealing cell phones at the show. Three former Austin mayors come out in favor of Prop A, while progressive office-holders and action groups lobby against. New public safety measures for the East Sixth Street bar district are in progress and are likely to begin this fall. Billionaire-A-Go-Go: Forbes' annual billionaire roster sees two local club members drop off, World's Richest Man Elon Musk may have already informally moved Tesla to Austin, and Michael Dell is out with a new book. History to be made this week at Q2 Stadium with the first ever World Cup Qualifier to be played in Texas, between the U.S. Men and Jamaica. And a warmup is coming for the last part of the week, before a cool-down next week.

Leadership Biz Cafe with Tanveer Naseer
Creating Workplace Environment Where Employees Matter | Leadership Espresso Shot 30

Leadership Biz Cafe with Tanveer Naseer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 12:31


If you're in the leadership space, it's hard not to notice the ongoing debate over remote working versus getting everyone to return to the office. While every industry and organization has to decide for themselves what's the best approach to take for everyone involved, there's been a number of key points that are glaringly missing from these discussions. In this latest edition of my Leadership Espresso Shot series, I wanted to address one of these, namely what kind of workplace environment are you nurturing through your leadership? Is it one that's driving future success or is it one moored in pushing mediocrity? In a recent interview on CNBC, Dell Technologies Chairman & CEO Michael Dell made the following statement: “Through this last 18 months, we all sort of learned work is something we do, it's not a place.” Right now, unfortunately, a lot of the discussion around remote work is focusing on work being about where and when, instead of what and why. I hope you'll check out this episode to discover why this approach will lead to mediocrity instead of the long-term success we all hope to achieve through our efforts as leaders.

Zero Percent
1 - Zero Percent

Zero Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 18:01


The Jewish People make up just .2% of world population. How does a People that makes up virtually zero percent of humanity have such a huge impact on our world?Check out the Dear Rabbi Podcast at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dear-rabbi/id1565016262Episode Transcript:Mark Twain wrote, "If the statistics are right, the Jews constitute but 1% of the human race. Properly, the Jew ought hardly be heard of, but he is heard of, has always been heard of. He is as prominent on the planet as any other people, and his commercial importance is extravagantly out of proportion to the smallness of his bulk. His contributions to the world's list of great names in literature, science, art, music, finance, medicine, and abstruse learning are also way out of proportion to the weakness of his numbers."This 1% is a gross exaggeration. The Jewish people today actually make up way less than a percent. We make up 0.2% of the world's population. Now, math was never my strong point, but if we're going to round 0.2 to the closest number, that's zero. The Jewish people make up just 0% of world population. Now, how does a people who make up just 0% have such a huge impact on the world? As Mark Twain wrote, "The Jew ought hardly be heard of," and yet we cannot escape the fact that the Jewish people have contributed so much to our world. I'm Menachem Lehrfield, and this is Zero Percent, a podcast where we explore the enormous impact a tiny people has made that enhances and affects all of our lives on a daily basis.We will explore ancient wisdom for modern living. As the second president of the United States, John Adams, said, "I will insist that the Hebrews have done more to civilize men than any other nation. If I were an atheist and believed in blind eternal fate, I should still believe that fate had ordained the Jews to be the most essential instrument for civilizing nations." Whether you love the Jewish people or you hate them, it is very difficult to deny the impact that the Jewish people have had on the world, that the Jewish people have had on civilizing nations. I believe that we have access to the longest-running case study on success.Now, as a Jew, I'm so uncomfortable with the topic of Jewish success, and I know many others are as well. Whenever someone begins talking about how successful the Jewish people are, it naturally makes us uncomfortable, but it's hard to deny the numbers. No matter what your definition of success is, the Jew is over-represented. Perhaps the best benchmark of success is the Nobel Prize. It was established by the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel in 1895. Nobel was most well-known for the discovery of dynamite. And at the end of his life, in his will he bequeathed all of his assets to be used to establish five prizes, which we now know as the Nobel Prize.And they'd go to individuals in recognition of cultural or scientific advances in six categories, literature, chemistry, economics, physics, world peace, and medicine. Between 1901 and 2020, last year, the Nobel Prize has been awarded to more than 900 individuals and organizations. Now, how many of those recipients would you expect to be Jewish? Being that the Jewish people make up just 0.2% of world population, we would expect 1.8 Nobel Prize laureates to be Jewish. That would be the proportionate number based on population. In fact, 208 Jewish people have won Nobel Prizes. 208 is an over-representation of more than 11,500%.That's huge, but it's not just in Nobel Prizes that we see such over-representation. Look at practically every arena that can be measured. Can you imagine the scientific world without the contributions of Einstein to modern physics or Freud to psychoanalysis or Asimov to robotics? The scientific world would be a completely different place. And let's say you're going to look at finance and economics as your benchmark of success. It's interesting to note that according to Forbes, Jews make up 22% of the world's top 50 billionaires, 33% of the world's top 15 billionaires, and 28% of the top 25, not to mention finance household names like Goldman Sachs, Rothschild, Warburg, Kohlberg, Kravis and Roberts, Wells Fargo.What would the world of technology look like without Intel's Andrew Grove and Leslie Vadasz, or Google without Sergey Brin and Larry Page, or Oracle's Larry Ellison, or Microsoft's Steve Ballmer, Dell's Michael Dell, Qualcomm's Irwin Jacobs, Facebook without Mark Zuckerberg or Sheryl Sandberg? And what about medicine? There's an old Jewish joke where a Jewish person is finally elected president of the United States, and he calls up his mother and says, "Mom, I'm the president of the United States. Are you going to come to the inauguration?" And she says, "Well, I've got nothing to wear." So he says, "Ma, I'm going to be the president. I'll get you a dressmaker. She'll make you a beautiful dress. Don't worry about that."And she says, "Well, I only eat kosher." He says, "Ma, I'm the president. I'll get you a kosher meal." She says, "Well, how am I going to get there?" He says, "Mom, I'll send Air Force One to pick you up. Just come to the inauguration." So she comes, and she ends up at the inauguration and she's standing there on the reviewing stand, and on her left are all the Supreme Court justices, and on the right is the president's cabinet. And the ceremony begins, and her son, the new president, raises his hand as he's about to be sworn into office, and his mother nudges the person next to her and says, "You see that guy with his hand up? His brother is a doctor."You may be familiar with the stereotype of the nice Jewish doctor, but it comes from somewhere. Throughout the world, consistently on lists of top doctors, you will find Jewish names. And that's not to mention the enormous Jewish contributions to medical research and pharmacology, including the invention of Prozac, Valium, the synthetic fertilizer, radiation, chemotherapy, the artificial kidney dialysis machine, the defibrillator, the cardiac pacemaker, laser technology, not to be confused with Jewish space lasers, the invention of blood transfusions and penicillin, the mammogram, the pill, vaccines against the deadly polio and hepatitis B and measles, not to mention the vaccinating needle itself.And we can't forget about the enormous impact that Dr. Albert Bourla, the CEO of Pfizer, has had in developing the world's first safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine. And Dr. Bourla is the son of Holocaust survivors. Today, Israel is on the forefront of medical innovation. Israel is the home to Teva, the world's largest generic pharmaceutical company. Israel is number one in the world for medical device patents per capita. The medical technology that's coming out of Israel is the stuff of science fiction. I don't know if you saw the ReWalk, which was featured years ago in the hit show Glee, but it's basically a bionic robotic exoskeleton which allows paraplegics the ability to walk and even run.Runners in London and Tel Aviv have actually completed marathons with the ReWalk. Here are paraplegics that thought they would never walk again, and they're running marathons thanks to Israeli technology. The PillCam, which allows doctors to see the inside of the digestive track without any invasive procedures or colonoscopies or anything. You just swallow a pill and they can see the inside of your body. Or this thing called Bio Weld, which is used now instead of stitches or glue, which uses cold plasma, and within minutes, it seals the wound and disinfects it with almost no scarring and no recovery time.And have you seen this thing called Bio-Retina? It's a technology that restores vision to people blinded by retinal disease. It's basically this tiny implantable device that's inserted into the retina in a 30 minute outpatient procedure, and it turns into an artificial retina that melds to the neurons in the eye. And it charges itself with this pair of glasses that it comes with. And if somebody is blind or visually impaired and that's not an option, there's another Israeli technology called OrCam, which is a camera that magnetically attaches to the side of a pair of glasses. You can barely even see it, and it reads text displayed on any surface, and it can also identify objects or specific faces or amounts of currency or anything that somebody who's visually impaired or blind would need to see.So it has this discreet earpiece which will basically, through audio, tell you everything that you would be seeing with your eyes. So blind people can interact with their world without the need of somebody else. It really gives them a sense of independence. There are so many successful cancer treatments coming out of Israel, and we can spend hours discussing the impact the Jewish people have had in the world of medicine. But let's say you want something a little lighter. Maybe entertainment is your benchmark of success. Well, if it is, six of the eight biggest Hollywood studios were founded by Jews. And still today, the rolling credits of almost every single movie can be confused for a Hebrew school roll call. It's just Jew after Jew after Jew.For full transcript please visit: www.joidenver.com/zeropercent/1---zero-percent

Washington Post Live
Michael Dell shares how he took on Silicon Valley and Wall Street to grow his namesake company

Washington Post Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 30:09


Michael Dell, chair and CEO of Dell Technologies, joins Washington Post columnist David Ignatius to discuss his new book, “Play Nice But Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader."

Squawk Pod
Sec. Janet Yellen on Avoiding “Catastrophe,” & Michael Dell Tells All

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 36:33


As the debt ceiling deadline looms, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen says a failure to suspend or raise it could mean “catastrophic” consequences for the U.S. economy and reputation. If Congress does not find a deal by October 18th, the country will default for the first time. Yellen addresses tax concerns, proposals to avoid default, and the longevity of her successor at the Fed, Jerome Powell. Plus, computing legend Michael Dell discusses his new book, “Play Nice But Win,” and recalls starting Dell 37 years ago from a bathroom, with just $1000. He reveals the real, unglamorous stories behind his success, and what it takes to quietly build an 80 billion dollar brand.  In this episode:Janet Yellen, @SecYellenMichael Dell, @MichaelDell Joe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkin

Leadership Next
Michael Dell: We've Only Seen Tech's 'Pre-Game Show'

Leadership Next

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 27:38


Michael Dell had a reputation for not paying attention in school. But apparently, reading computer magazines in the back of his high school classrooms paid off - he went on to found Dell Technologies. This story, and many others, appear in Dell's new book, 'Play Nice But Win.' And today he's sharing several of them on Leadership Next. Alan Murray and Ellen McGirt spend some time digging into Dell's decision to take his company private in 2013 and then return to the public markets in 2018. You may not be surprised to hear that the CEO of Dell Technologies also has a lot to say about tech itself. He believes "nobody is going to be spared" from transformation, that the experience will be "wicked and brutal" but also "wonderful and amazing."

The James Altucher Show
768 - Michael Dell (Part 2): The future of Dell, and the future of technology

The James Altucher Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 28:13


If you missed Part 1, make sure you listened to it before listening to Part 2! Now that Dell is up and running, growing and scaling, Michael Dell walked us through the struggle that the company had faced, the negotiation with the late Steve Jobs, and what does Michael sees in anyone when he was looking for the right candidate for his CEO role. He also talked about the future of Dell, the future tech that he's excited about, and his takes on cryptocurrency and bitcoin! Listen to this Part 2 out of 2, and make sure you check out Part 1 if you missed it!  My new book Skip The Line is out! Make sure you get a copy wherever you get your new book! Join You Should Run For President 2.0 Facebook Group, and we discuss why should run for president. I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast. Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: YouTube Twitter Facebook See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The James Altucher Show
767 - Michael Dell (Part 1): From a Tiny Dorm to Big Time Founder and Leader

The James Altucher Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 25:20


We all have heard of Dell Computers, Dell Server, Dell Monitors, and everything Dell. However, what's the story behind Dell? How did it get started? Who has the idea of breaking apart computers, and put them back again? In this part 1 (of 2 parts) episode, Micahel Dell, an American billionaire businessman, and philanthropist. He is the founder, chairman, and CEO of Dell Technologies, came on The James Altucher Show to talk about his new book, Play Nice But Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader. He also brought us all the way back when he was a student in a tiny dorm room, breaking apart computers, how the idea came to him, and how he brought the idea to life and eventually became one of the world's largest technology infrastructure companies! Listen to this Part 1 out of 2, and Part 2 will come out the same day too! My new book Skip The Line is out! Make sure you get a copy wherever you get your new book! Join You Should Run For President 2.0 Facebook Group, and we discuss why should run for president. I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast. Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: YouTube Twitter Facebook See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

a16z
Cloud Wars and Company Wars: Play Nice But Win

a16z

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 52:57


There are lots of challenges in being public while trying to innovate, and limits to being a private company as well; but it's rare to see a company go public then private then back to public again. As is the case with Dell Technologies, one of the largest tech companies -- which went private 2012-2013 and then also pulled off one of the most epic mergers of all time with Dell + EMC + VMWare 2015-2016 (and which we wrote about here at the time).Is there a method to the madness? How does one not just start, but keep, and transform, their company and business? Especially as it adapts to broader, underlying tech platform shifts. Michael Dell shares all this in his upcoming new book, Play Nice to Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader... he also, tellingly, may be one of the longest-standing founder-CEOs (37 years so far).Because this is really a story about innovation, who decides, who judges, who does it, and where: In the markets, in public, in private; in the both the big picture and the inner detailed workings of a business beyond "cells in a spreadsheet"; and even in fighting -- or harnessing! -- narratives, whether it's the demise-of-PC or cloud wars 1.0 /2.0... And where trends like the cost paradox of cloud, and "end of cloud" edge computing, among others like AI & ML, also come in. In this special book-launch episode of the a16z Podcast with Marc Andreessen, Martin Casado, and Sonal Chokshi debate the Cloud Wars to the Company Wars (along with some behind-scenes stories and even some star wars) with Michael Dell... and whether you can really play nice to win. image: Dell EMC World 2016/ © Dell Inc. The views expressed here are those of the individual AH Capital Management, L.L.C. (“a16z”) personnel quoted and are not the views of a16z or its affiliates. Certain information contained in here has been obtained from third-party sources, including from portfolio companies of funds managed by a16z. While taken from sources believed to be reliable, a16z has not independently verified such information and makes no representations about the enduring accuracy of the information or its appropriateness for a given situation.This content is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be relied upon as legal, business, investment, or tax advice. You should consult your own advisers as to those matters. References to any securities or digital assets are for illustrative purposes only, and do not constitute an investment recommendation or offer to provide investment advisory services. Furthermore, this content is not directed at nor intended for use by any investors or prospective investors, and may not under any circumstances be relied upon when making a decision to invest in any fund managed by a16z. (An offering to invest in an a16z fund will be made only by the private placement memorandum, subscription agreement, and other relevant documentation of any such fund and should be read in their entirety.) Any investments or portfolio companies mentioned, referred to, or described are not representative of all investments in vehicles managed by a16z, and there can be no assurance that the investments will be profitable or that other investments made in the future will have similar characteristics or results. A list of investments made by funds managed by Andreessen Horowitz (excluding investments for which the issuer has not provided permission for a16z to disclose publicly as well as unannounced investments in publicly traded digital assets) is available at https://a16z.com/investments/.Charts and graphs provided within are for informational purposes solely and should not be relied upon when making any investment decision. Past performance is not indicative of future results. The content speaks only as of the date indicated. Any projections, estimates, forecasts, targets, prospects, and/or opinions expressed in these materials are subject to change without notice and may differ or be contrary to opinions expressed by others. Please see https://a16z.com/disclosures for additional important information.

Geek Forever's Podcast
Geek Story EP121 : Michael Dell เปลี่ยนธุรกิจพีซีที่ตกต่ำของเขาให้กลายเป็นเครื่องจักรผลิตเงินในตอนนี้ได้อย

Geek Forever's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 11:53


Michael Dell ผู้บุกเบิกธุรกิจคอมพิวเตอร์ส่วนบุคคล หลังจากเป็นเวลาหลายปีแล้วที่เขาปิดตัวเงียบ และนำพา Dell ออกจากตลาดหุ้นของอเมริกา ตอนนี้เขากำลังพลิกฟื้นจากธุรกิจพีซีที่ตกต่ำ สู่ความทะเยอทะยานครั้งใหม่ที่สุดที่รอเขาอยู่ข้างหน้า แม้ธุรกิจพีซี จะไม่ได้เติบโตเหมือนอย่างที่เคยเป็น แต่ Michael และ Egon Durban ผู้ร่วมก่อตั้งของบริษัท ก็ได้เห็นโอกาสใหม่ เลือกฟังกันได้เลยนะครับ อย่าลืมกด Follow ติดตาม PodCast ช่อง Geek Forever's Podcast ของผมกันด้วยนะครับ ========================= ร่วมสนับสนุน ด.ดล Blog และ Geek Forever Podcast เพื่อให้เรามีกำลังในการผลิต Content ดี ๆ ให้กับท่าน https://www.tharadhol.com/become-a-supporter/ ——————————————– ติดตาม ด.ดล Blog ผ่าน Line OA เพียงคลิก : https://lin.ee/aMEkyNA ——————————————– Geek Forever Club พื้นที่ของการแลกเปลี่ยนข้อมูลข่าวสาร ความรู้ ด้านธุรกิจ เทคโนโลยีและวิทยาศาสตร์ ใหม่ ๆ ที่น่าสนใจ https://www.facebook.com/groups/geek.forever.club/ ========================= ช่องทางติดตาม ด.ดล Blog เพิ่มเติมได้ที่ Fanpage : www.facebook.com/tharadhol.blog Blockdit : www.blockdit.com/tharadhol.blog Twitter : www.twitter.com/tharadhol Instragram : instragram.com/tharadhol TikTok : tiktok.com/@geek.forever Youtube : www.youtube.com/c/mrtharadhol Linkedin : www.linkedin.com/in/tharadhol Website : www.tharadhol.com

The History of Computing
Ross Perot For President

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 10:56


Ross Perot built two powerhouse companies and changed the way politicians communicate with their constituents. Perot was an Eagle Scout who went on to join the US Naval Academy in 1949, and served in the Navy until the late 1950s. He then joined the IBM sales organization and one year ended up meeting his quota in the second week of the year. He had all kinds of ideas for new things to do and sell, but no one was interested. So he left and formed a new company called Electronic Data Systems, or EDS, in 1962. You see, these IBM mainframes weren't being used for time sharing so most of the time they were just sitting idle. So he could sell the unused time from one company to another. Perot learned from the best. As with IBM he maintained a strict dress code. Suits, no facial hair, and a high and tight crew cut as you'd find him still sporting years after his Navy days. And over time they figured out many of these companies didn't have anyone capable of running these machines in the first place, so they could also step in and become a technology outsourcer, doing maintenance and servicing machines. Not only that, but they were perfectly situated to help process all the data from the new Medicare and Medicaid programs that were just starting up. States had a lot of new paperwork to process and that meant computers. He hired Morton Meyerson out at Bell Helicopter in 1966, who would become the president and effectively created the outsourcing concept in computing. Meyerson would become the president of EDS before leaving to take a series of executive roles at other organizations, including the CTO at General Motors in the 1980s before retiring. EDS went public in 1968. He'd taken $1,000 in seed money from his wife Margot to start the company, and his stake was now worth $350 million, which would rise sharply in the ensuing years as the company grew. By the 1970s they were practically printing cash. They were the biggest insurance data provider and added credit unions then financial markets and were perfectly positioned to help build the data networks that ATMs and point of sale systems would use. By the start of 1980 they were sitting on a quarter billion dollars in revenues and 8,000 employees. They continued to expand into new industries with more transactional needs, adding airlines and travel. He sold in 1984 to General Motors for $2.5 billion and Perot got $700 million personally. Meyerson stayed on to run the company and by 1990 their revenues topped $5 billion and neared 50,000 employees. Perot just couldn't be done in business. He was good at it. So in 1988 he started another firm, Perot Systems. The company grew quickly. Perot knew how to sell, how to build sales teams, and how to listen to customers and build services products they wanted. Perot again looked for an effective leader and tapped Meyerson yet again, who became the CEO of Perot Systems from 1992 to 1998. Perot's son Ross Jr took over the company. In 2008, EDS and their 170,000 employees was sold to Hewlett-Packard for $13.9 billion and in 2009 Perot Systems was sold to Dell for $3.9 billion. Keep in mind that Morton Meyerson was a mentor to Michael Dell. When they were sold, Perot Systems had 23,000 employees and $2.8 billion in revenues. That's roughly a 1.4x multiple of revenues, which isn't as good as the roughly 2x multiple Perot got off EDS - but none too shabby given that by then multiples were down for outsourcers. Based on his work and that of others, they'd built two companies worth nearly $20 billion - before 2010, employing nearly 200,000 people. Along the way, Perot had some interesting impacts other than just building so many jobs for so many humans. He passed on an opportunity to invest in this little company called Microsoft. So when Steve Jobs left Apple and looked for investors he jumped on board, pumping $20 million into NeXT Computer, and getting a nice exit when the company went to Apple for nearly half a billion. Perot was philanthropic. He helped a lot of people coming home from various armed services in his lifetime. He was good to those he loved. He gave $10 million to have his friend Morton Meyerson's name put on the Dallas Symphony Orchestra's Symphony Center. And he was interested in no BS politics. Yet politics had been increasingly polarized since Nixon. So Perot also ran for president of the US in 1992, against George Bush and Bill Clinton. He didn't win but he flooded the airwaves with common sense arguments about government inefficiency and a declining market for doing business. He showed computer graphics with all the charts and graphs you can imagine. And while he didn't get even one vote in the electoral college did manage to get 19 percent of the vote. His message was one of populism. Take the country back, stop deficit spending just like he ran his companies, and that persists with various wings of especially the Republican Party to this day. Especially in Perot's home state of Texas. He didn't win, but he effectively helped define the Contract with America that that Newt Gingrich and the 90s era of oversized suit jacket Republicans used to as a strategy. He argued for things to help the common people - not politicians. Ironically, those that took much of his content actually did just the opposite, slowed down the political machine by polarizing the public. And allowed deficit spending to increase on their watch. He ran again in 1996 but this time got far less votes and didn't end up running for office again. He had a similar impact on IBM. Around 30 years after leaving the company, his success in services was one of the many inspirations for IBM pivoting into services as well. By then the services industry was big enough for plenty of companies to thrive and while sales could be competitive they all did well as personal computing put devices on desks across the world and those devices needed support. Perot died in 2019, one of the couple hundred richest people in the US. Navy Lieutenant. Founder. Philanthropist. Texan. Father. Husband. His impact on the technology industry was primarily around seeing waste. Wasted computing time. Wasted staffing where more efficient outsourcing paradigms were possible. He inspired massive shifts in the industry that persist to this day.

This Week in Startups - Video
Google's game-changing ad policy + Michael Dell on “Play Nice But Win,” stories from building a computing giant | E1293

This Week in Startups - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 70:43


First, Jason brings on investor, former ad tech exec, and frequent guest Zach Coelius to discuss the strategic implications of Google's new ad attribution policy (01:43). Then Michael Dell joins for for a full interview (21:54) sharing stories from the early days of building Dell, scrappy supply-chain arbitrage, global expansion, negotiations with Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, the $67B EMC VMware acquisition (57:40) and more!

This Week in Startups - Audio
Google's game-changing ad policy + Michael Dell on “Play Nice But Win,” stories from building a computing giant | E1293

This Week in Startups - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 70:43


First, Jason brings on investor, former ad tech exec, and frequent guest Zach Coelius to discuss the strategic implications of Google's new ad attribution policy (01:43). Then Michael Dell joins for for a full interview (21:54) sharing stories from the early days of building Dell, scrappy supply-chain arbitrage, global expansion, negotiations with Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, the $67B EMC VMware acquisition (57:40) and more!

Founders
In the Company of Giants: Candid Conversations With the Visionaries of the Digital World —Steve Jobs, Michael Dell, Bill Gates, Ken Olsen

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 31:41


What I learned from reading In the Company of Giants: Candid Conversations With the Visionaries of the Digital World by Rama Dev Jager and Rafael Ortiz. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode. You will unlock 216 full length episodes:You can subscribe monthly here or you can get lifetime access to Founders hereYou will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."GET LIFETIME ACCESS TO FOUNDERSIf you'd rather pay monthly you can subscribe here. 

The Tim Ferriss Show
#534: Michael Dell, Founder of Dell — How to Play Nice But Win

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 59:20


Michael Dell, Founder of Dell — How to Play Nice But Win | Brought to you by Wealthfront automated investing, Helix Sleep premium mattresses, and Tonal smart home gym. More on all three below.Michael Dell (@MichaelDell) is chairman and chief executive officer of Dell Technologies, an innovator and technology leader providing the essential infrastructure for organizations to build their digital future, transform IT, and protect their most important information. He is the author of Play Nice But Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader.Michael is an honorary member of the Foundation Board of the World Economic Forum and is an executive committee member of the International Business Council. In 1999, he and his wife, Susan Dell, established the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation.Please enjoy!*This episode is brought to you by Wealthfront! Wealthfront pioneered the automated investing movement, sometimes referred to as ‘robo-advising,' and they currently oversee $20 billion of assets for their clients. It takes about three minutes to sign up, and then Wealthfront will build you a globally diversified portfolio of ETFs based on your risk appetite and manage it for you at an incredibly low cost. Smart investing should not feel like a rollercoaster ride. Let the professionals do the work for you. Go to Wealthfront.com/Tim and open a Wealthfront account today, and you'll get your first $5,000 managed for free, for life. Wealthfront will automate your investments for the long term. Get started today at Wealthfront.com/Tim.*This episode is also brought to you by Tonal! Tonal is the world's most intelligent home gym and personal trainer. It is precision engineered and designed to be the world's most advanced strength studio. Tonal uses breakthrough technology—like adaptive digital weights and AI learning—together with the best experts in resistance training so you get stronger, faster. Every program is personalized to your body using AI, and smart features check your form in real time, just like a personal trainer.Try Tonal, the world's smartest home gym, for 30 days in your home, and if you don't love it, you can return it for a full refund. Visit Tonal.com for $100 off their smart accessories when you use promo code TIM100 at checkout.*This episode is also brought to you by Helix Sleep! Helix was selected as the #1 overall mattress of 2020 by GQ magazine, Wired, Apartment Therapy, and many others. With Helix, there's a specific mattress to meet each and every body's unique comfort needs. Just take their quiz—only two minutes to complete—that matches your body type and sleep preferences to the perfect mattress for you. They have a 10-year warranty, and you get to try it out for a hundred nights, risk free. They'll even pick it up from you if you don't love it. And now, to my dear listeners, Helix is offering up to 200 dollars off all mattress orders plus two free pillows at HelixSleep.com/Tim.*If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Peter Switzer Show
US-based Verne Harnish on creating the Entrepreneurs' Organization with early members Steve Jobs & Michael Dell!

The Peter Switzer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 32:43


Entrepreneurs' Organization founder, speaker and author Verne Harnish shares his insights on business growth with Peter Switzer.

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment
Chicken Soup for the Soul W/ Mark Victor Hansen

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 54:01


In this episode, Jake and Gino talk with none other than Mark Victor Hansen himself. Along with business partner, Jack Canfield, Hansen is best known for creating what Time magazine called "the publishing phenomenon of the decade". Chicken Soup for the Soul books are one of the most successful publishing franchises in the world today, with more than 500 million books sold internationally and more than 100 licensed products. The name "Chicken Soup" was chosen because of the use of chicken soup as a home remedy for the sick. The first Chicken Soup book, published by Health Communications, Inc., sold more than 2 million copies. There are now over 500 million copies in print and in 54 languages worldwide. In 2005, he co-wrote, along with Robert Allen, the book Cracking the Millionaire Code in which he highlights several self-made millionaires such as Bob Circosta, Michael Dell, Bill Gates, Alexander Graham Bell, Oprah Winfrey, and others, using them as examples of how to build wealth. In 2006, Hansen co-wrote, with Art Linkletter, the book How to Make the Rest of your Life The Best of your Life. In 2010, Hansen co-authored, with Robert Allen, the book Cash in a Flash, as the sequel to the New York Times bestseller The One Minute Millionaire. Here are some of the key takeaways: The size of your thinking determines the size of your life. Education draws out the greatness in you and it starts when you self-educate. You elevate by figuring out what you want. So, we need to know the destination we want to be at. Partnering with a mastermind revolutionizes your life. You create a life you visualize for yourself. Listen to this inspiring Podcast with Mark. This could change your life forever. Check out the recent book authored by Mark Victor Hansen: Ask!: The Bridge from Your Dreams to Your Destiny Learn more about Jake & Gino: www.jakeandgino.com Apply for limited time, complimentary multifamily investing training: https://bityl.co/6v71

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Harry Hurst, Co-Founder & CEO of Pipe: Unlocking Revenue as an Asset Class!

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2021 43:37


Ryan Zauk sits down with none other than Harry Hurst, Co-Founder & CEO of Pipe. Harry Hurst is a serial entrepreneur who developed a passion for technology early in life, graduating high school age 12 studying Computer Science. Harry and Pipe Co-Founder Josh Mangel built their first company Skurt, a financial technology company in the mobility space. After four years, Skurt was successfully acquired by Fair in 2018. Pipe was founded in 2019, to unlock the largest untapped asset class in the world — revenue — to empower entrepreneurs and companies to grow their business on their terms without debt or dilution. Harry has raised over $150 million for his companies and is considered an industry expert on financial technology and emerging asset classes. He is also an angel investor and mentor to a number of companies. Pipe is unlocking revenue as an asset class, allowing founders to fund their businesses without the need to raise dilutive equity capital or restrictive debt, by trading their revenue streams on a 2-sided marketplace. Pipe has been an amazing success story of the pandemic, and just raised strategic equity from an all-star cast of investors including Siemens, The Raptor Group, Marc Benioff, Michael Dell, Shopify, HubSpot, 776, Slack, Republic, Chamath Palihapitya, and more. In today’s episode, they cover: - His journey to America and the allure of the American Dream - Raising $6M from David Sacks in just 13 minutes! - How Pipe really works and his vision for becoming the NASDAQ of revenue - A Wharton Fintech-exclusive product roadmap teaser - How Pipe’s incredible round came together - Hiring during COVID and his concept of MicroHubs And much more! Harry Guest Article on Wharton Fintech: https://medium.com/wharton-fintech/how-pipe-is-creating-revenue-as-an-asset-class-66d273001198 -- For more Fintech insights, follow us below: Medium: medium.com/wharton-fintech WFT Twitter: twitter.com/whartonfintech Ryan's Twitter: twitter.com/RyanZauk LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/wharton-fintech-club/

Convo By Design
Lone Star House of Design | A Texas Sized Talk with Kyle Bunting, Jan Showers, Lauren Rotet & Fern Santini

Convo By Design

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 56:32


This is Lone Star House of Design, a podcast about all things design and architecture form the Great State of Texas with a panel conversation featuring some of the biggest names in American design today, and all from Texas. The following conversation is part of the Wellness and Design Leadership Series presented by ThermaSol and you are not going to want to miss a moment of this one featuring a panel of design icons, all from Texas. This is a conversation with Kyle Bunting & friends.I met Kyle Bunting through my friend and amazing publicist, Andrew Joseph. He reintroduced me to Kyle with whom my last contact was not direct but through designer Christopher Kennedy who designed my Small Space, Big Style design house which featured a stunning Kyle Bunting rug. Kyle Bunting is producing some of the most stunning rugs in the world, all from his studio in Austin, Texas. The work is groundbreaking and has turned the Hyde rug, the original luxury item into an art form, unrivaled and completely original. After my conversation with Kyle, he said, “let’s do something really cool” and invited three incredible guests to join for a group chat about the state of design in Texas. This group included; Fern Santini - Santini’s work is completely original, it’s bold and refined with a wild streak that is unmistakeable and wonderful. Fern’s use of furniture, color and materials blends design into a hand crafted sculpture of space, materials and light. Lauren Rottet - Rottet is the complete designer. Architect, interior designer, furniture designer and art curator. Founding principal and president of Rottet Studio. I could list her accolades, but there would be no time left for the conversation.Jan Showers - Showers is another world-class designer from Texas, and I don’t use this term lightly, at all. Her work is elegant, unique and layered, like an Impasto at times, glazing others. Her spaces art artfully placed and painted to create a multi-dimensional environment. That, to me has always been the true essence of design.Some idea came up during our conversation that bears repeating here. Texas design is very different by geography. Austin is funky and weird, yet still a college town and state capitol. The spirit of Austin is strong and diverse base on the the influence of Stevie Ray Vaughan, Kinky Friedman, Michael Dell, Tito Beveridge combined with some of the most interesting architecture you can find around the state capitol and the University of Texas campus. It’s still a relatively small city but it doesn’t feel that way. The addition of a technology hub to the already vibrant music scene and South By South West, Austin is poised for even greater heights but at what price? The traffic, cost of living, loss of architecturally significant structures to make way for more livable space? Yeah, that’s probably coming. Having spent 9 years living in Dallas, I can tell you that this city is rich in arts and cultural experiences. If you ask many outside of Texas, they will tell you about Tom Landry, J.R Ewing and Roger Staubach. Sure, Dallas is a world-class sports town, I get it. But the arts and culture scene in Dallas goes far beyond what you hear about Dallas on ESPN. The City Hall building in Dallas, designed by I.M Pei and Theodore J. Musho is a brutalist statement piece. Pei also designed the Meyerson Symphony Center and with that, added a simply exquisite and acoustic masterpiece to the “Metroplex”. Fair Park, home of the State Fair of Texas is an Art Deco oasis crafted by architect, George Dahl. There is far more to explore, and I encourage you to do just that!
So what about Houston? Oil energy money, right? Sure. There is a significant link between oil barons and the arts, it’s true. Try to find an American city that was built on energy money that does not hav significant art, architecture and design. Houston is no different. The city has incredible art installations, a museum district, architectural representations of almost any era you...

DarrenDaily On-Demand
How the Super-Successful F'ed Their Way to the Top

DarrenDaily On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 7:59


In part five of the special ten-part series, Success Exposed, Darren shares private excerpts from conversations with Richard Branson, Tony Hawk, Michael Dell, and Sara Blakely that reveal the fifth x-factor to super-success. Want more mentorship from Darren? Subscribe to DarrenDaily at DarrenDaily.com.