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The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
When Consolidated Agencies are Not a Holding Company

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 30:13


Tim Ringle is Global CEO of Meet the People, an “international family of unified but independent agencies. In the three months since its inception, Meet the People has acquired 3 agency brands. Tim has bigger plans. He intends to bring in a total of up to 15 agencies, reaching from Canada and the US to Europe and Asia. “We have 400 people in North America right now. We want to be 2,000 people in at most 18 to 24 months globally.” Even though he is acquiring agencies at a fast pace, Tim says what he is not building a holding company. He explains that holding companies have been consolidating the industry, the trend a “survival response” to complications from the digitization of processes and channels and, more recently, because covid has changed how work is done. He says small agencies may need to hire one or more people “just to handle the benefits, taxes, payroll, inflation, and salary increases” of those employees who now want to work from “anywhere,” where “anywhere” has different laws, tax rates, and costs of living and working than at an agency's home office. Tim sees holding companies as a powerful trend. Even though there are 14,000 independent agencies in the United States, six major holding company networks “own sixty percent of the entire media industry within the agency space.” However, Tim says, they often don't act in the best interests of their clients because they are driven from the top by financial rather than client interests. He claims that both small, independent agencies and holding companies often fail in communicating when passing clients from one agency or holding-company-entity to the next. “They're only going to talk to each other if there's some money to be made in between . . . there's a lot of lost information . . . .” In Meet the People's “family,” the agency owns its affiliate agencies, but the people within those affiliate agencies also “own a part of Meet the People.” The network structure provides “a fully integrated approach for brands . . . to cross-pollinate across multiple services,” the opportunity for the agency to build multi-brand micro-offices, and scalable support for dealing with “anywhere” variances. Tim says, “Keep the brand, be the best you can, but let us create connective tissue between the different companies to see if we can increase share volume with a client.” Tim has a lot of experience building global agencies. He says he has learned that it is extremely important, “especially in the beginning of the engagement,” to build trust with the client. To do this, his team of disparate agencies will need to work as one. Tim is bringing his people together physically to take time to create “a deep understanding and culture between all the different offices, people, trades, and brands,” building what Tim describes as an “integrated DNA.” They also will be discussing the implementation of individualized OKRs (Objectives, Key Results), a tech tool for tracking accountability. Tim says his agency is very focused on operational excellence, on brand positioning, on bringing really good entrepreneurs . . . and on hyper-goals. He says it is important to make the right decisions now because, “if you build something with small cracks, they become massive gaps when you are at scale.”  As his agency network continues to grow, Tim is excited about finding “really talented entrepreneurs who want to change the industry who can't or are tapping out” with their skills/abilities/finances and being able, through Meet the People, to provide the experience, capital, and structure and small-enough scale “where they can actually still move things.”  Tim can be reached on his agency's website at: https://www.meet-the-people.com/. Transcript Follows: ROB: Welcome to the Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast I'm your host Rob Kischuk and I'm joined today by Tim Ringle, Global CEO at Meet the People based in New York, New York. Welcome to the podcast, Tim. TIM: Hi, Rob. Thank you for having me. ROB: It's great to have you here. Why don't you start off by telling us about Meet the People, what is the business, and what are you all best at. TIM: I think, to understand what we are building with Meet the People, you have to understand a bit of my background. I've been an entrepreneur in the agency space – primarily digital agency space for 24 years. That sounds long but I'm also 45 years old so I can carry that. I started my first agency literally in the basement of my friend's house. We started as a SEO agency digital marketing agency, very much focused on performance marketing. I was blessed to be able to do that in '98, '99 – when this industry was about to develop and therefore was able build that business to 150 people and then sell the business. After that, I did a reverse takeover of the company that bought my business –and that got me to around 400 people in Europe. So, I started my first business in Germany – my native Germany – and we scaled the 400 people agency that was all across Europe into 1,000 people. It was stock market listed in beautiful Paris. I left that to move to the dark side of the ad industry as I call it. Having built multiple agencies as an independent agency entrepreneur, you were always battling the holding companies, right? And I swore to myself many times because they beat me and sometimes I beat them. That's how it works, right? I swore to them I would never work for them. So, I ended up moving to New York City and working for 1 of the holding companies who always wanted to acquire my business. So, I did that for 3 years within IPG. I have to say the experience was amazing. I really learned a ton of stuff that I couldn't learn from being someone who was leading 1,000 people. Now I was part of 65,000 people. I inherited an agency there – once again, a performance marketing agency – around 1,000 people – and then left it after 3 years scaling it to 3,000 people. So, I've done this a couple of times and what we're building with Meet the People is what I would say is version number four of my vision of what an independent agency network should look like. We're building it with my 24 years of experience of what I liked and disliked in the agencies that I've built in the past. What I liked the most was that people in the advertising industry are mainly driven by culture. If you're good in your trade in advertising, you can get a job anywhere on the client side in tech companies. You can build your own company because marketing, just like legal, is a service that you always need everywhere. So, selling a product, branding a product, coming up with a marketing strategy is something you can use pretty much in every business in the world. It's 1 of the integrated parts. Why do people choose to work for an agency? Because they love the culture in agencies, right? What we're doing at Meet the People – when we looked at the industry and I had – I still have the same vision. I'm building a global agency network as an alternative to the large holding companies. I figured that nobody's talking about the people anymore. Everybody's talking about technology, data, automation, and how computers will replace us, how AI will come up with creatives – all this kind of stuff. It's true that the technology has enabled us to be extremely more efficient. But, in the end, the new Coke logo or the new “just do it” from Nike does not come out of AI or a computer, it comes out of the brain of a human being a creative strategist. So, we believe (or I believe) that we have to remember in the ad industry that it's all about the people. We are a service industry. Without the people who are sitting behind the machines and using the machines, tech enabled, we're not going to produce disruptive, new ideas that actually put a brand on the map. That's why we're building Meet the People. I can obviously talk much more about it. But that's kind of it in a nutshell. ROB: When you say an agency network . . . what does that look like when it's an agency network? It's not a holding company. I'm curious about the differentiation of some of the different agencies within the network and how you think about that – because your website is very people-centric. It's more about the people, the partners, than it is about this brand and this specialization and this other thing we just acquired and all that you see in the holding company world. TIM: Correct. So, why am I not calling it a holding company? A holding company has one purpose – and it is a financial orientation. right? So, a holding company is most a holding company because it is actually managed by finance people. I don't necessarily I don't want to diss anyone. But I would say that a finance-led company most probably will be struggling with creating the best strategy, best creative, and best outcome for their clients. They might create the best outcome for themselves, right? That's why we're not calling ourselves a holding company. We are running this network of agencies who, don't misunderstand me, we do own the agencies – and the people within the agencies own a part of Meet the People. That's the concept. We are building this, first of all, to fulfill a fully integrated approach for brands so, instead of just servicing one client within one specialty with one agency, we are allowing the conversation to be elevated and to cross-pollinate across multiple services. For example, when our creative agency, VSA Partners, out of Chicago, New York, and San Francisco. Beautiful, creative design work and strategy. When they come up with a brand refresh or rebranding or brand strategy – I would love to see that through until you actually can see it on TikTok, Snapchat, Instagram, LinkedIn – wherever that brand comes to life besides on brochures, in magazines, or the logo or the CI. Many independent agencies, because of their size and their financial scrutiny because they're small, can't invest a lot of capital into innovation or additional services. They can't see that journey through. That means you have a lot of inefficient handshakes in between. That happens in holding companies because they're structured that way, but it happens in independent agencies as well. One independent agency is a hundred people might be excellent in creative. The next one might be excellent in social media. But they're only going to talk to each other if there's some money to be made in between. There's a lot of lost information when a chief creative officer comes up with a brand strategy and somebody implements that on social media in community management. We want to make that a much more seamless flow with less barriers for the client but also more excitement for the people involved because you actually see the product living there and a colleague of you in another agency – but it's part of our structure – has basically put that on the social channel or billboard. ROB: When you come to thinking about – there's, obviously, within a holding company lots of capabilities, you're talking about these more seamless handoffs. How do you think about building that team? Did you go out hunting for best of breed agencies to bring them into the group or did you build some capabilities from scratch? How did you think about this? TIM: We were going to do both. We started Meet the People three months ago and since then we had 3 agency brands join us – so we acquired 3 brands. Three agencies and we're going to bring more than 10 – probably 15 plus – companies into Meet the People as a group. We're going to do that in North America – so we already have US, Canada, some capabilities. We're going to do it in Europe and then we're going to do it in Asia. How we decide what to go for depends on what services we need next in that journey. Right now, we have a very strong creative agency with VSA Partners and we have a very strong experiential agency with Public Labels. We have certain services that sit in a similar bucket where the client sees the service, so that adjacent service is part of the scope. If we don't service that ourselves. then we should basically fill that gap either with another agency joining us or with building these capabilities organically with the acquire or actually hire before revenue. Ultimately, we want to have a seamless handshake between the different trades. ROB: We have 2 former guests who have been acquired into a similar opportunity recently – which is interesting. We had Chantel from Imagine Media and Techwood Digital were both acquired. Jared Belski, who was the CEO of 360i, has rolled up 3 or 4 agencies. That's all I know. Is this a trend or is this just 2 people that happen to have done a similar thing and why now? TIM: No, it is a trend. As much as I don't like the traditional holding company model, we have to respect that the holding companies have created an industry. Because there's 14,000 independent agencies in the United States alone. Fourteen thousand and there are six networks and the six networks own sixty percent of the entire media industry within the agency space, right? So they've created an industry. We all live in that ecosystem and that industry. The trend right now and primarily driven by the extreme success of what whatever intention Martin Sorrell, Sir Martin Sorrell, had to bid as for capital. If it was ego, if it was revenge, I don't know. He only knows. But he has been extremely successful from a financial perspective doing that because there is a gap, a vacuum in the Market. So, there's models like that that are older than the S4 Capital MediaMonks model. MediaMonks is only 3 years old but Stagwell MDC by Mark Penn is 5-6 years old and You & Mr. Jones is also 7 years old, I think. So, there's a couple of these what we call an agency rollup network model. They existed for years. What has changed in the industry is covid has accelerated the fact that independent agencies got scrutinized because of their size. Before, when you were 100 people, you could live a very good life as an independent agency. There's two real trends. One is the digitalization of processes and channels. At the same time covid is putting extraordinary pressure on talent, new work. This is all very complicated for smaller companies to handle because now your people tell you, “I want to work from anywhere.” How are you going to do that from a benefits perspective . . . tax perspective? It creates complications. Clients are the same. “Oh, I don't need you to come into my office anymore, but I want to take T&E out of your expenses.” Economy of scale becomes more and more important. A couple of people have understood that, so these networks are created over the last couple of years. But they're also created all over the planet. So there are networks in Asia, networks in Europe, networks in the US. There's only very few who can bridge multiple continents. This is one thing we're going to do with Meet the People. We're going to bridge multiple continents because we believe (or I believe) that our clients want the same quality of service across multiple jurisdictions that are not only North America. So, I've not invented this model, right? They exist. They're very successful. The main reason why they're successful is that, when you have, as I said, 100 people on your P&L, it's very difficult for you to invest a million dollars into innovation technology. You might only have a million dollars of profit and you want to keep some of that. Usually, it's very difficult for them to hire before revenue, to anticipate bigger jumps. In economy of scale, it's easier for us to say, “Ten, twenty percent of our EBITA goes to a business strategy consultancy layer that most agencies can't afford or a technology IP that you actually own as a company. We can make these investments. And that makes it extremely attractive. ROB: How do the capital markets feel about this sort of arrangement? I know there's a lot of money out there looking for yield. I could also see the case that you just have to self-finance this sort of thing if you want to. Where is the money side of the world? Are they looking to fund this sort of thing because they need something to believe in and something that's going to give them better than inflation? Although inflation is getting pretty good now. TIM: Let's make a relatable example. Let's imagine you have a million dollars excess capital right now. You have it lying around. Where are you going to put it? You can put it into crypto. Very risky. You can put it into NFTs. Even riskier. You can put it into traditional venture capital. So, there's a lot of money in the market. But there's also a lot of options in the market. You know pre-IPO, post-IPO, or FinTech, software as a service, space – there's so many categories. The service business as a sector in general or the advertising industry service side of it – not MarTech AdTech – it's not the most attractive industry to invest money. Why? Because you have no tangible assets. The desks, the computers – they're all at home right now. As people, as a company, you maybe own intellectual property. But mostly you have a lot of walking assets and that's your people. For the longest time, the ad industry was not super attractive for larger investors. That has dramatically changed because of the pressure coming from tech. Tech has gotten so heavy on advertising and so relying on advertising. Same time that there's more capital in the market and that a couple of people, including Sir Martin and others, have proven that you can make real money there. Most of the investment in this space is private equity and I would say large family offices. ROB: It's fascinating just to see this emerge. I think I hear what you're saying that you know there's all these different factors in play, right? You have some firms that are a little bit “walking wounded” due to . . . it does get complicated when people want to be in different states and now you're having to pay taxes on your payroll in different states. There's an economy to having 1,000 people, 10,000 people where you know what there's a department that handles that baked into the margins of the overall business. I totally get it. TIM: Yeah, and you don't go through this alone, right? If you have a 50-people business and 20 people decide they don't want to work from New York anymore or LA, they're going to work from anywhere, you need to hire at least 1 more person just to handle the benefits, taxes, payroll plus inflation increases plus salary increases. So, it's complicated. What's important about Meet the People is we give that layer at scale, but the agency brands stay independent in their DNA. We're not changing their brands. VSA Partners that joined us at the beginning of the year is VSA Partners. They've done that. This work for 40 years . . . successful. They're an incredible, talented shop and great people. Why would we change any of that? Doesn't make any sense. Keep the brand, be the best you can, but let us create connective tissue between the different companies to see if we can increase share volume with a client. You're already sitting on an amazing client. You define the strategy. Why don't we talk about who actually builds the website, who actually manages social media? Why don't we talk about it because we already have that relationship? That is very attractive to companies who don't have that client access. There's a lot of independent agencies who are very specialized, who would die to get into a client like Google or IBM or Ford who just can't because they don't have the gravitas.  ROB: When it comes to new and existing business, it sounds like you have some thoughts about the role of location. But the role of location is different from what it used to be. On the one hand you mentioned having offices and having people in these different geographies. But you also had this dynamic where some of the agencies that are joining the network may have played very much off a home field advantage that may not be the case anymore. So, how are you looking at the strategic role of geography? TIM: I think geography stays extremely important. I'm someone who grew up with in-person meetings and built businesses within in-person meetings. I do believe in-person meetings to create chemistry. Especially in the beginning of the engagement with the client, it's extremely important because you're not only buying a service, you're buying the trust into the person across from you. Because there's so many agencies out there. So many service providers out there. Who are you going to go for if the service is extremely comparable and they sadly so are? In the creative space, not as much, but in the digital execution, who does better search than that person – there is a chemistry factor to that. I think in person will stay extremely relevant. Our strategy here is to say, instead of having large headquarters, we're going to have more micro-offices. When we have 10 agencies, let's say in North America, it's extremely likely that we end up having 20 offices all over the place. Instead of having one person in a WeWork, we're going to have 20 people from maybe 5 different agencies in Austin, Texas. Or we're going to have the same in Dallas, or we're going to have the same in San Francisco. We already have 5 offices in North America and anyone from these companies can really work from anywhere within these proximities. We also hire outside of these proximities because we want to have at some point an office in Miami, maybe in New Orleans, and whatnot. So, I foresee that we have certain client-centric larger footprints in New York, LA, San Francisco. We have Boulder, Colorado, we have Chicago, we have Toronto . . . but we're going to have a lot of micro-offices because we need to have flexibility. That's new work. This is part of that. Maybe one of the things we got from covid . . . besides covid. ROB: Really fascinating. Tim, we quite often ask people what lessons they've learned and what they would do differently, but it strikes me that you are actually in the process of getting to do things differently. You know we say, what would you do if you were starting over? You, you have had a chance to do that in some cases. An interesting thing about this model is you're kind of starting on third base but you have agencies who have made it here on their own journeys and you're having to coalesce something together. What are you doing differently in the structuring of Meet the People that you learned in your past and said, “It's got to be different”? TIM: One thing that we're doing the same is creating a deep understanding and culture between all the different offices, people, trades, and brands. I've done this before. The last business I managed for IPG, I ended up having 72 offices around the globe. The business before had 25 offices around the globe and we made sure that these people met physically. It sounds counterintuitive during covid but, the fact that you spend time together workshopping. For example, let's say we have five companies and all their creatives can come together in one location for three days and talk about the differences of their work approach. That would be such a forming experience for them because they all are going to learn from that. You have some people who have done this for 40 years. You have some people who are doing this for 4 years. It's that culture of respect, of understanding, of bringing the different traits together. I think that is extremely powerful. I learned through this journey that you can have you can have the best product in the world. If your people don't believe in it, you're not going to go anywhere. Creating that belief and creating that culture and creating that integrated DNA is a little bit of magic that's extremely important to build a successful business. That's what I learned. What I go to do different, and I kind of promised my wife I would, is travel less. I don't think that's not happening. What I try to do is travel a little bit less because covid allows for that new model. The second thing that I learned is to run an agency a little bit more like an agile tech company. Not because I want to strip away the creativity or anything – none of none of that. The problem in many agencies is that there's a lack of accountability because of a mutual understanding that the creative process is complicated. You know what I mean. Building a tech product is as complicated and needs as much creativity. But somehow there are better levers or control mechanisms in there that allow you to achieve a target in your planning session a little bit quicker and more agile. We want to apply a little bit of startup thinking to a very traditional industry. ROB: I think anybody in the startup industry would claim the same degree of creativity and the same degree of craftsmanship. I'm very much from a software development background and if you want to talk about something that resists measurement. People always say, “Building software is not the same as building a house. You can stamp out houses, but software is a different thing.” Yet within technology there are certain constraints that you talk about. You don't get to just walk away and say, “Well I'm sorry. It'll take some amount of time and we'll show up and it'll be great. There's process to it. TIM: In the advertising industry, that is not always the case. People walk away and they say, “I'm going to come back in a week or two because I don't know when I'm going to come to a product.” I get that because it's creative and it needs time but in many of these trades you can have OKR's, for example. So you can have certain accountability factors or set certain targets. That's how you can manage a large company. A bit more agile and efficient.  ROB: Yeah, so to talk about OKR's for a moment because they're popularly said, but I think sometimes poorly understood. Where did you come to a good understanding of them and how do you think about deploying them? TIM: I've got to be honest with you. This is why I got my management team together in New York this week. They're all here in the office in New York – came in from Germany, London, Connecticut. Sounds like a long trip but we're all coming together. ROB: Can be. TIM: We are coming together right now, here in New York, to decide “how do we implement OKR's within an agency environment” and we're not done with that journey. We're not done with the discussion, but we do know we want to approach it a little bit different than the last 3 times we did it together. I think in six months' time I can answer that question much better. I do believe that OKR's need to be very individualized. Your overall underlying principles are the same, but you have to individually craft it towards your organization because you don't want to over-engineer it as well, right? You need to give people the freedom. So, I will be able to answer that question in three to six months ROB: Sounds good, sounds good. Tim, as you're thinking about what's next for Meet the People and for this evolved holding company model, what's coming up next? What are you excited about? TIM: For us, it's hyper-goals. We have 400 people in North America right now. We want to be 2,000 people in at most 18 to 24 months globally. So, we are very much focused on making the right decisions now because, once you build something with small cracks, they become massive gaps when you are at scale. So, we're very much focused on operational excellence, on our brand positioning, on bringing really good entrepreneurs. When I look at companies, we have to do the financial background checks and stuff like that needs to be in order. But I'm looking much more for entrepreneurs who see that the industry needs to change. That is where the minds are aligned with the companies we are looking at and acquiring and partnering with. That's what I'm most excited about, finding really talented entrepreneurs who want to change the industry who can't or are tapping out with their skills or their abilities or financially and asking, how do I get from 50 to 100 people? How do I get from 100 to 200 people? We bring the experience. We bring the capital. We bring structure where they can actually still move things – because we're not 10,000 people or 5,000 people like our competitors are. So, that's what gets me most excited. Then, obviously, there's always something new in our industry, there's always something new, right? It never stops. I remember when I built my first agency, I thought, when I master search, I'm going to be done with this. Affiliate marketing comes along. Oh well. Then I master affiliate marketing. Then social came and I mastered social. Programmatic came. It never ends – and that's also, to some extent, very exciting because you keep having to learn and adapt. At some point, I will age out, where people will tell me, “Tim you know what? Just drink your coffee. You know we have got it because you don't, and you don't get it anymore.” ROB: (Laughs) Ah, so it's always a struggle to try and figure out what things you might be aging out of and what things are just a little weird. It's always a little bit of both. TIM: That's right. And what's the little bit of bullshit right now in the industry that you can just face over. You don't need to go deep. ROB: I think there were moments early in social where it felt very experimental. It felt very strange. It felt very frothy. We've been through that on an influencer. You were around. I was around. You look at the crypto world and it seems almost like – I could be dead wrong – I think the thing that's most misunderstood but also well observed now about the dot Com era is everything happened eventually. But it didn't happen then. That's maybe where we're at with crypto. I'm not sure. TIM: Well, like crypto is one thing, but then think about NFTs, right?  ROB: Yeah, I'm lumping that in. Yeah TIM: Okay, if you lump it all into one OKR, fair enough. I can talk for hours about my diverse opinions on NFTs and the NFT world. Nevertheless, we have clients who are extremely excited about and who really want to deploy capital, being part of that industry because there's the strong underlying belief of making something really good at the same time. There is this unnecessary social hype on certain topics where I'm thinking, “Guys, you're destroying something that was meant to be really good. I think blockchain and crypto is falling or has fallen into a similar trap where the underlying idea . . . because technically I'm an engineer, right? I got my first pc when I was eleven. Taught myself coding and all this kind of stuff. So, I love the idea of blockchain and decentralized holding of assets and accountability and ledgers. That's amazing. It could solve so many problems in world. The problem is that when dodgecoin comes along in Shibona or whatever, the next thing is, it drags it in the dirt. The underlying technology is incredible. The sad story is people want to get rich fast and lots of them don't. ROB: That's right. It happened before. People built the worst websites in the world for a couple million bucks back once-upon-a-time early internet. TIM: But you remember when you could buy 1 pixel on a website or something like that for a thousand dollars and there were these crazy businesses out there and it's coming back, just differently now. My hope is that just like the dot com bubble . . . yes, there was a hype. Yes, there was a crash but, after that an actual industry developed. So, I'm hoping that we're going to go through the same thing with NFTs and some of these offsprings of crypto. ROB: That makes complete sense. Well, Tim, Thanks for hopping on. Thanks for illuminating us on what's going on in this holding company opportunity, what you're doing with that. I think it's interesting you started and you kind of knew what it looked like to run a large organization. I can imagine starting with 2 people in a closet might not always be the best use of those skills. It's neat to see the industry lining up in a way that that lets us see so much happen so quickly. So, thanks for coming on. Good to have you, Tim. TIM: Thanks Rob for having me. Thank you so much. Really appreciate it. ROB: Alright, be well, thanks, bye.

Lindzanity with Howard Lindzon
Justin Overdorff of Lightspeed on Increasing the GDP of the Internet, and a Macro View of the Fintech Economy (EP.178)

Lindzanity with Howard Lindzon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 47:49


In a Panic with Friends first, I give myself the applause dub for some advice I'd passed to Justin back in 2014. I told him there are so many interesting things happening in fintech broadly, in the big picture, that if he wanted to go work on something for ten years that was really interesting and unknown, but with high asymmetric upside; then making that bet is probably a good move. And that's just what he did. Justin spent about five years at Stripe, the biggest company you've never heard of, unless of course you're in fintech. He's now at Lightspeed, and we're in our first deal together, Payitoff. We discuss all of this, how Justin sees a post-Stripe world, and his inevitable transition to venture capital. Enjoy! Guest - Justin Overdorff, Partner at Lightspeed Venture Partners  howardlindzon.com, lsvp.com  Twitter: @howardlindzon, @jmover, @lightspeedvp, @knutjensen  linkedin.com/in/jmover #fintech #invest #investment #venturecapital #stockmarket #finance 

Like a Boss
Bernardo Fabiani, CEO da TerraMagna. A fintech do agronegócio.

Like a Boss

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 36:13


Bernardo Fabiani é o CEO da TerraMagna, “a fintech do agronegócio”. Fundada em 2017, a TerraMagna nasceu para resolver o crédito no agronegócio brasileiro. Com as próprias palavras do próprio Bernardo, “o Brasil alimenta o mundo” e o crédito nesse ambiente, ainda é ineficiente em algumas modalidades. Formado em engenharia pelo ITA, Bernardo foi Tenente […] O post Bernardo Fabiani, CEO da TerraMagna. A fintech do agronegócio. apareceu primeiro em Like a Boss.

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance
‘Don't let any legacy tie you down': How Piermont Bank blends humans and tech to service SMBs

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 24:32


Welcome to the Tearsheet Podcast. I'm Tearsheet's editor in chief, Zack Miller. While we use the term challenger bank to refer to many of today's top competitors in digital banking, the truth is very few are actually chartered banks. They are a user experience layer on top of an incumbent bank's infrastructure. Not Piermont Bank. Started in 2019, Piermont is a fully chartered commercial bank. It uses a combination of technology and human interaction to serve businesses founder and CEO Wendy Cai-Lee says still aren't serviced. These are businesses with more complexity with accounts receivables and payables, with employees, looking for loans of $750,000 to $10 million -- not the solopreneurs and microbusinesses supported by other challenger banks. Wendy Cai-Lee joins me on the podcast to talk about how Piermont uses its hybrid delivery model to serve this market. We also discuss Piermont's strategy around providing direct to business commercial banking as well as a banking as a service platform targeting fintechs that want to bank a similar customer. Wendy Cai-Lee is my guest today on the Tearsheet Podcast.

Good Morning Business
Julien Zerbib, fondateur et directeur général d'Unlimitd - 01/12

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 6:31


Julien Zerbib, fondateur et directeur général d'Unlimitd, était l'invité de Christophe Jakubyszyn dans Good Morning Business, ce mercredi 1er décembre. Ils sont revenus sur l'alternative à la levée de fonds et à la dette bancaire aux startups pour un financement basé sur les revenus, sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission dulundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Harshul Sanghi, Founder & Global Head of Amex Ventures -- Reflecting on 10 Years of Investing

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 39:26


Gabriela Ariana Campoverde sits down with Harshul Sanghi, Founder and Global Head of Amex Ventures. Harshul has over thirty years of operating experience, and for the past 10 years has led the venture arm of American Express and oversees global investment activity across the company. To date, Amex Ventures has invested in 80+ companies and has offices in New York, San Francisco, and Boston. He has led investments in Abra, Better.com, Bill.com, Boom Supersonic, Boxed, Instacart, Learnvest, FalconX, Finix, Next Insurance, Philanthropi, Plaid, RetailNext, Stripe, Toast, and Turo, among others. Amex Ventures now has a portfolio valued at over $1 billion dollars. In this episode you will hear about: - The birth of Amex Ventures - 10 years of investing - What differentiates Amex Ventures from other corporate VCs - Investment-worthy trends in the payments space - Harshul Sanghi's career - And much more! About Harshul Sanghi Harshul Sanghi founded Amex Ventures in 2011 to accelerate the digital transformation of American Express by investing in and partnering with innovative start-up companies. Prior to joining Amex, Harshul was Managing Director of Motorola Mobility Ventures and has over 30 years of operating experience. About Amex Ventures Amex Ventures invests in and partners with start-ups to accelerate innovation for consumers and businesses. For additional information on Amex Ventures, please visit www.americanexpress.com/us/business/american-express-ventures For more FinTech insights, follow us below: Medium: medium.com/wharton-fintech WFT Twitter: twitter.com/whartonfintech Gabriela's Twitter: twitter.com/byGabyC Gabriela's LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/gcampoverde

Epicenter - Learn about Blockchain, Ethereum, Bitcoin and Distributed Technologies
Nicolas Julia: Sorare – Marrying Fantasy Sports and NFTs

Epicenter - Learn about Blockchain, Ethereum, Bitcoin and Distributed Technologies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 79:51


Sorare is a blockchain sports game which bridges fantasy football and NFT collectibles. A player collects a team of players in the form of NFTs and based on the performance of the players in the real world, scores points. At the end of the tournament, the Sorare participant is ranked and earns rewards.Nicolas Julia, Co-founder & CEO of Sorare, created the game in 2018, way before the NFT craze of 2021. He joined us to chat about fantasy sports and what convinced him of NFTs, working in the football industry and the impact of licenses, and the regulatory push backs they have faced as a company.Topics covered in this episode:Nicolas' background and how he got to into the crypto spaceHow Nicolas got into NFTs in 2018An overview of fantasy sports and SorareWhy did Sorare choose to work with licenses and how they workThe challenges of working in the football industrySorare as a Web3 productThe size and value of the Sorare communityRegulatory push backs against SorareThe motivations behind the numerous platform transitionsThe biggest entrepreneurial lessons Nicolas took away from his time at Stratumn and his vision for SorareEpisode links:Sorare websiteSorare CommunityDiscordSorare on TwitterNicolas on TwitterSponsors:Gnosis Safe: Gnosis Safe is a smart wallet for securely managing digital assets and allows you to define customized access permissions. - https://epicenter.rocks/gnosissafeThis episode is hosted by Friederike Ernst & Sebastien Couture. Show notes and listening options: epicenter.tv/420

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur
997 - Fintech That Helps With Student Loans with Savi's Aaron Smith

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 21:31


997 - Fintech That Helps With Student Loans with Savi's Aaron Smith

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
Payment Security. Hardening The Fintech Ecosystem. Héctor Guillermo Martinez, President, GM Sectec.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 14:41


Héctor Guillermo Martinez, President of GM Sectec, shares his expertise on the fintech industry's cybersecurity challenges and opportunities, how the fintech ecosystem can be hardened, and more. The Payment Security series is brought to you by GM Sectec. In this series, we will discuss how payment security is changing, how your company can ensure compliance, why being secure builds trust with customers, and more. With operations in 50 countries worldwide and headquartered in San Juan, Puerto Rico, GM Sectec has over 50 years of service in the technology and security verticals. To learn more about our sponsor GM Sectec, visit https://gmsectec.com/

Grit & Growth
The Future of Debt: Can Fintech Fill the Gap?

Grit & Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 36:52


How can small businesses gain access to the working capital they need? Zach Bijesse of Payhippo and Tunde Kehinde of Lidya are trying to figure it out. Hear how new technologies are changing the future of lending for small businesses in Nigeria, Africa, and the world.With over 200 million people and 40 million small businesses, Nigeria is the perfect spot to launch a fintech company that's trying to push the boundaries of how businesses get capital. Both Zach Bijesse and Tunde Kehinde saw a huge market opportunity in Nigeria with its sheer size and strong startup culture. Their companies, Payhippo and Lidya, respectively, are using artificial intelligence and machine learning to make lending faster and more accessible for entrepreneurs, and in turn, more successful for this new breed of lender.Zach makes the problem clear: “Businesses can't get money in Nigeria when they need it. It's that simple.” Tunde believes that artificial — and human — intelligence are key to filling the small business lending gap. “Humans are involved in setting the rules. I think on average per loan, we have close to a thousand data points we look at. And so humans are looking to say, based on our assessment criteria, is it working or not working? And if it's not working, how do we tweak the rules to make sure the recollection is done properly?” Likewise Zach's Payhippo endorses ongoing experimentation and the importance of training their algorithms to get better over time. “People forget that you can only train your machine learning algorithm based on your data set. So, you know, we have a few defaults in our loan portfolio. That's not a bad thing. You just have to give loans and figure out what works.”Unlike most entrepreneurs, these two aren't intimidated by competition, even from banks themselves. Instead, they're always looking for opportunities to collaborate and partner. As Zach explains, “there's a $46 billion opportunity for small business lending in Nigeria. Why would Payhippo need to take one hundred percent of the market? Let's keep growing and do what we do. And then once we get a little bit of bandwidth, it'd be great to empower the other guys and collaborate with them. That's really exciting to us because then the whole financial infrastructure develops and it's better for everyone.”Listen to Zach and Tunde's story to learn how technology and new ways of thinking can impact how you approach and solve your specific business and market challenges.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Payments Innovation
Banking as a Service: Your Banking Partners Matter with Trent Sorbe

Payments Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 27:47


If you are going to build your business on top of your BaaS platform, it better be sturdy.  And that means finding a partner bank who understands your goals and needs.  Today's guest, Trent Sorbe, is Founder & President of Central Payments, where he's helping build the sturdy platform businesses need to feel confident in their BaaS business.  In this episode, we discuss: How Central Payments are laying the foundation for Fintech and embedded finance success The importance of a reliable banking partner for fintechs and brands in the BaaS space Why you should never lose sight of the product component  To ensure that you never miss an episode of Payments Innovation, subscribe on Apple Podcasts Spotify, or here and don't forget to check out our YouTube!   Until next time!

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS
584. News: Freetrade breaks crowdfunding records again

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 57:34


Our expert hosts, Benjamin Ensor and Deepa Anikhindi, are joined by some great guests to talk about the most notable fintech, financial services and banking news from the past week. This week's guests include: Polly Jean Harrison, Features Editor, The Fintech Times David Cunningham, Chief Commercial Officer, Lextego With soundclips from: Viktor Nebehaj, CMO, Freetrade Mark Mullen, CEO, Atom Bank Jamie Campbell, Co-Founder, Fronted We cover the following stories from the fintech and financial services space: Freetrade raises crowdfunding at £650m valuation (soundclip from Viktor Nebehaj, CMO, Freetrade) - 3:15 Payhawk raises €99 million to expand payments and expenses solution - 14:25 Irish banks commit €5 million to payment app joint venture Synch - 23:25 Atom Bank moves to a four-day week (soundclip from Mark Mullen, CEO, Atom Bank) - 35:20 Mode Global shares sink after Ocado, Boots and Homebase deny involvement in bitcoin scheme (soundclip from Jamie Campbell, Co-Founder, Fronted) - 45:40 India's Paytm Tumbles Another 13% After First-Day IPO Flop - 46:40 Fronted launches ‘Lifetime Deposit' lending product with the help of fresh £20m funding (soundclip from Jamie Campbell, Co-Founder, Fronted) - 48:25 Nike teams up with Roblox to create a virtual world called Nikeland - 51.20 This episode is sponsored by Primer. Primer is the world's first automation platform for payments. With Primer, merchants and developers have all the underlying infrastructure and "lego blocks" they need to build the best buying experiences for their customers. Learn more and book a demo at primer.io (https://primer.io/?utmsource=11fs&utmmedium=referral&utmcampaign=fintechinsider_) This episode is sponsored by SAS. SAS help their customers make banking simple, safe and rewarding for everyone. They support banks in their goal to treat every customer as an individual. Combining data from across the bank with external information and real-time context delivers unique insight and a deep understanding of customer needs. By applying this insight at the right time via the right channel, SAS help make every customer engagement with the bank a relevant, valuable, and seamless experience. SAS enables banks to embed real-time intelligence in every interaction, helping them make smarter, faster decisions that transform customer experience. To find out more, visit. https://www.sas.com Fintech Insider by 11:FS is a podcast dedicated to all things fintech, banking, technology and financial services. Hosted by a rotation of 11:FS experts including David Brear, Simon Taylor and Jason Bates, who are joined by a range of brilliant guests. We cover the latest global news, bring you interviews from industry experts or take a deep dive into subject matters such as APIs, AI or digital banking. If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe and please leave a review Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/fintechinsiders where you can ask the hosts questions, alternatively email podcasts@11fs.com! Special Guests: Dave Cunningham, Deepa Anikhindi, Jamie Campbell, Mark Mullen, Polly Jean Harrison, and Viktor Nebehaj.

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Xochitl Cazador, Head of Ecosystem Growth at Celo - Making Defi Mobile First

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 30:29


Anirudh Singh sits down with Xochitl Cazador, Head of Ecosystem Growth at Celo. In this episode, they discuss: - Social impact through blockchain technology - Disrupting blockchain through diversity at She(256) - Creating an open financial system through Celo - The $100M Defi for the People initiative And much more! Xochitl Cazador: Xochitl Cazador leads Platform and Builder growth at Celo Foundation. She has extensive experience shaping strategy into execution to drive growth and scale operations. Prior to cLabs, Xochitl spent 15 years driving growth at Cisco, where she managed a $1 billion investment portfolio and led the expansion into 26 emerging markets resulting in 30% year over year growth. She previously served in leadership positions in the Americas, Europe, and Asia where she held roles in product and portfolio management. Xochitl is the granddaughter of Mexican migrant farmworkers and one of the first in her family to graduate from college. She understands firsthand how access to basic financial tools can change lives. Xochitl holds a master's degree from Stanford Graduate School of Business. For more FinTech insights, follow us below: Medium: medium.com/wharton-fintech LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/wharton-fintech-club/ WFT Twitter: twitter.com/whartonfintech Anirudh's Twitter: twitter.com/avsingh_24

The Political Life
Understanding Stablecoins, and the Ever-Changing World of Crypto

The Political Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 18:52


Scott Talbott is Senior Vice President of Government Affairs at the Electronic Transactions Association (ETA) in Washington, D.C. and is responsible for its governmental strategies, and directing ETA's all of policy and advocacy efforts. Talbott has over twenty years of experience advocating for the financial services and FinTech industries.  He has received numerous accolades in his tenure, including being named a top lobbyist by The Hill for eleven years in a row from 2009 to 2020, as well as a “winner” for his work during the economic crisis of 2008 by Washingtonian magazine. In 2010, he appeared in the Oscar-winning film “Inside Job.” Once named NPR's favorite bank lobbyist and the voice of the financial services industry, he frequently testifies before U.S Congress, in state capitols, and the Canadian Senate, and is a regular contributor to both national and international media. Talbott received his B.A. from Georgetown University, cum laude, and his J.D. from George Mason University School of Law. Help us grow! Leave us a rating and review - it's the best way to bring new listeners to the show. Don't forget to subscribe! Have a suggestion, or want to chat with Jim? Email him at Jim@ThePoliticalLife.net  Follow The Political Life on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter for weekly updates.

Our Curious Amalgam
#143 Does U.S. Bank Merger Enforcement Need To Be Revitalized? A Conversation With David Neill

Our Curious Amalgam

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 27:41


U.S. bank mergers are on the rise and so are claims that agencies “rubber stamp” merger applications and need stricter standards. But seen through the history of U.S. banking, does the existing merger review of bank mergers actually need reform? David Neill, Of Counsel at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz and a leading bank merger practitioner, speaks with Anora Wang and Christina Ma on whether modernization is needed or not. Listen to this episode to learn about U.S. bank merger reviews. Related Links: Revising The Bank Merger Guidelines Part I, The Banking Law Journal (Jan. 2021) Revising The Bank Merger Guidelines Part II, The Banking Law Journal (Feb. 2021) Keep Politics Out of Bank Merger Antitrust Policy, Columbia Law School Blue Sky Blog (August 12, 2021) Hosted by: Anora Wang, Davis Wright Tremaine LLP and Christina Ma, Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz

La Academia de Marketing Online
Qué son los NFTs y por qué pueden transformar Internet, con David Roa y JD | Episodio 386

La Academia de Marketing Online

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 56:04


Durante los más de 20 años que llevo trabajando en proyectos de Internet he presenciado varias revoluciones tecnológicas que han cambiado el mundo. Las primeras tiendas online, los primeros blogs, las primeras redes sociales… De vez en cuando surge algo disruptivo que pone todo patas arriba

Business Infrastructure - Curing Back Office Blues
177: Lloyd Lobo Reveals How to Quickly Secure R&D Tax Credits for Funding Business Innovation with Boast.AI

Business Infrastructure - Curing Back Office Blues

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 51:06


Every U.S. Dollar in Research & Development (R&D) tax credit yields $20 in new economic activity. With that kind of return, why don't more small businesses take advantage of these tax credits? Answering that question is what led Lloyed Lobo on his fintech journey. * With a background in software engineering, Lloyed was already familiar with technology companies and enjoyed a successful career leading sales and marketing teams as well as being a serial entrepreneur. One venture was Boast Capital – a consulting firm focused on securing R&D tax credits for businesses. That's when the answer to the unclaimed tax credit question became clear – the reason more than $200 billion USD goes unclaimed globally each year to fund innovation is because of the slow, archaic application-to-funding process. This led to the development of Boast.AI, a software designed to automate the tax credit application process so companies can get more money faster and with reduced audit risk. * In this episode, Lloyed not only shares how you can use Boast.AI to fund your small business' innovation, but he also gives insights on how he and his team built this successful tech startup. Discover the business infrastructure they designed to support rapid growth not only in their customer base but also in their employee base - an increase from 30 to 100 in just five months! As a bonus, you'll also learn Lloyed's four stages for building a startup as well as the ingredients for his scale recipe: customer-centricity, community, and relentless prioritization. * If you want to know how you can claim R&D tax credits to fund your company's growth and how to scale that growth sustainably, then you don't want to miss this episode! *

The Irish Tech News Podcast
The importance of Financial Smart Contracts, Ralf Kubli, Casper Association

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 33:56


Building Robust Financial Smart Contracts and 'Correct by Construction' Proofs, with Ralf Kubli and the Casper Association Ralf Kubli is an experienced executive with a strong background in blockchain, cryptocurrencies, and decentralized technology. Ralf's career spans roles in M&A, sales and executive management positions in large corporations and technology startups. He discovered Blockchain through a Fintech investment in 2015. Since then, Ralf cannot unsee the transformative potential of this technology and has been involved in the blockchain space as an investor, advisor and board member.Ralf holds an MBA from Cornell and an M.A. in History from the University of Zurich. Jamil Hasan is a crypto and blockchain focused podcast host at the Irish Tech News and spearheads our weekend content “The Crypto Corner” where he interviews founders, entrepreneurs and global thought leaders. Prior to his endeavors into the crypto-verse in July 2017, Jamil built an impressive career as a data, operations, financial, technology and business analyst and manager in Corporate America, including twelve years at American International Group and its related companies. Since entering the crypto universe, Jamil has been an advisor, entrepreneur, investor and author. His books “Blockchain Ethics: A Bridge to Abundance” (2018) and “Re-Generation X” (2020) not only discuss the benefits of blockchain technology, but also capture Jamil's experience on how he has transitioned from being a loyal yet downsized former corporate employee to a self sovereign individual. With over ninety podcasts under his belt since he joined our team in February 2021, and with four years of experience both managing his own crypto portfolio and providing crypto guidance and counsel to select clients, Jamil continues to seek opportunities to help others navigate this still nascent industry. Jamil's primary focus outside of podcast hosting is helping former corporate employees gain the necessary skills and vision to build their own crypto portfolios and create wealth for the long-term.

The Fintech Blueprint
Powering the FX behind Africa's trillion-dollar growth, with Aza CEO Elizabeth Rossiello

The Fintech Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 42:36


In this conversation, we chat with Elizabeth Rossiello – the CEO and founder of AZA, an established provider of currency trading solutions which accelerate global access to frontier markets through an innovative infrastructure. Elizabeth founded the company in 2013 in Nairobi, Kenya and has expanded it to 10+ markets across Africa and Europe. Before founding AZA, Elizabeth was a rating analyst for microfinance institutions across sub-Saharan Africa, consulting for Grameen Foundation, Gates Foundation and the Acumen Fund, as well as working with regulators and policy-makers on legislation for financial innovations. Elizabeth co-chairs the World Economic Forum's Council on Blockchain and holds an M.A. in International Business and Finance from Columbia University. More specifically, we touch on ratings agencies and the activity of rating intitutions, M-Pesa and how it influenced the thinking towards a crypto-centric future, Africa's banking landscape and some of the outstanding issues it faces, Bitpesa and how it became Aza, banking infrastructure in Africa, and so so much more!

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS
583. Insights: Can financial services lead the fight against climate change?

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 45:11


Our expert host, Simon Taylor, is joined by some great guests to talk about all things sustainabilty in the financial services sector – in association with Mastercard. There's never been a better or more timely way to go green, and financial services is uniquely placed to have real impact in this space. Following COP26, Simon and the panel look at where we are now, the challenges and opportunities, as well as the role of fintech in driving big changes. This week's guests include: Scott Abrahams, SVP Business Development and Fintech, Mastercard Lee Brown, Operations Manager, Helpful Will Smith, Co-Founder, Tred All of this and much more on today's episode! This episode is sponsored by Temenos. Temenos is the world leader in banking software, serving over 3,000 financial institutions. SCALE 2021 is Temenos' dedicated, virtual developer event, including: insights from industry leaders on current technology trends and how they impact banking; customer presentations; product demonstrations and road-map sessions and opportunities to speak with Temenos experts. Whether you're a developer, consultant or business user, discover the latest technology opportunities and how this can help you deliver bigger, better, faster. Register to attend here. (https://tem.mn/3jYLZlm) This episode is sponsored by Primer. Primer is the world's first automation platform for payments. With Primer, merchants and developers have all the underlying infrastructure and "lego blocks" they need to build the best buying experiences for their customers. Learn more and book a demo at primer.io (https://primer.io/?utmsource=11fs&utmmedium=referral&utmcampaign=fintechinsider_) This episode is sponsored by SAS. SAS help their customers make banking simple, safe and rewarding for everyone. They support banks in their goal to treat every customer as an individual. Combining data from across the bank with external information and real-time context delivers unique insight and a deep understanding of customer needs. By applying this insight at the right time via the right channel, SAS help make every customer engagement with the bank a relevant, valuable, and seamless experience. SAS enables banks to embed real-time intelligence in every interaction, helping them make smarter, faster decisions that transform customer experience. To find out more, visit. https://www.sas.com Fintech Insider by 11:FS is a podcast dedicated to all things fintech, banking, technology and financial services. Hosted by a rotation of 11:FS experts including David Brear, Simon Taylor, Jason Bates and Sarah Kocianski and joined by a range of brilliant guests, we cover the latest global news, bring you interviews from industry experts or take a deep dive into subject matters such as APIs, AI or digital banking. If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe and please leave a review Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/fintechinsiders where you can ask the hosts questions, alternatively email podcasts@11fs.com! Special Guests: Lee Brown, Scott Abrahams, and Will Smith.

The Bid
COP26: Why this climate summit was different

The Bid

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 21:07


The much-anticipated climate summit in Glasgow is now over. Did two weeks of debates and negotiations among governments end in an agreement on how the world will address the most pressing climate issues?Paul Bodnar, BlackRock's Global Head of Sustainable Investing, is back from Glasgow and joins the Bid to break down the big takeaways from COP26, how this summit was different than the first 25 meetings and the necessary work ahead to decarbonize the complexities of the global economy.This material is for informational purposes and is prepared by BlackRock, is not intended to be relied upon as a forecast, research or investment advice, and is not a recommendation, offer or solicitation to buy or sell any securities or to adopt any investment strategy. The opinions expressed are as of date of publication and are subject to change. The information and opinions contained in this material are derived from proprietary and nonproprietary sources deemed by BlackRock to be reliable and are not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness. This material may contain 'forward looking' information that is not purely historical in nature. There is no guarantee that any forecasts made will come to pass. Reliance upon information in this material is at the sole discretion of the reader. Past performance is not indicative of current or future results. This information provided is neither tax nor legal advice and investors should consult with their own advisors before making investment decisions. The value of investments and the income from them can go down as well as up and you may not get back the amount invested.In the U.S. and Canada, this material is intended for public distribution.In the UK and Non-European Economic Area (EEA) countries: this is Issued by BlackRock Investment Management (UK) Limited, authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Registered office: 12 Throgmorton Avenue, London, EC2N 2DL. Tel: + 44 (0)20 7743 3000. Registered in England and Wales No. 02020394. For your protection telephone calls are usually recorded. Please refer to the Financial Conduct Authority website for a list of authorised activities conducted by BlackRock.In the European Economic Area (EEA): this is Issued by BlackRock (Netherlands) B.V. is authorised and regulated by the Netherlands Authority for the Financial Markets. Registered office Amstelplein 1, 1096 HA, Amsterdam, Tel: 020 – 549 5200, Tel: 31-20-549-5200. Trade Register No. 17068311 For your protection telephone calls are usually recorded.For Investors in Switzerland: This document is marketing materialIn Singapore, this is issued by BlackRock (Singapore) Limited (Co. registration no. 200010143N). This advertisement or publication has not been reviewed by the Monetary Authority of Singapore. In Hong Kong, this material is issued by BlackRock Asset Management North Asia Limited and has not been reviewed by the Securities and Futures Commission of Hong Kong. In Australia, issued by BlackRock Investment Management (Australia) Limited ABN 13 006 165 975 AFSL 230 523 (BIMAL). The material provides general information only and does not take into account your individual objectives, financial situation, needs or circumstances. Before making any investment decision, you should assess whether the material is appropriate for you and obtain financial advice tailored to you having regard to your individual objectives, financial situation, needs and circumstances.In Latin America: this material is for educational purposes only and does not constitute investment advice nor an offer or solicitation to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any shares of any Fund (nor shall any such shares be offered or sold to any person) in any jurisdiction in which an offer, solicitation, purchase or sale would be unlawful under the securities law of that jurisdiction. If any funds are mentioned or inferred to in this material, it is possible that some or all of the funds may not have been registered with the securities regulator of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Uruguay or any other securities regulator in any Latin American country and thus might not be publicly offered within any such country. The securities regulators of such countries have not confirmed the accuracy of any information contained herein. The provision of investment management and investment advisory services is a regulated activity in Mexico thus is subject to strict rules. For more information on the Investment Advisory Services offered by BlackRock Mexico please refer to the Investment Services Guide available at www.blackrock.com/mx©2021 BlackRock, Inc. All Rights Reserved. BLACKROCK is a registered trademark of BlackRock, Inc. All other trademarks are those of their respective owners.

STEM Southwest Podcast
078 Discovering Fintech at FinCon21, with Ryan Ruff and Jake Tamarkin

STEM Southwest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 56:05


This week's episode is a double dose of Fin Tech!  Join Bob and Shelly and learn about FinCon21, where money and media meet, and also hear from some of the interesting folks that they met and some great tools for your financial future. Show Notes Watch episode here Ryan Ruff is Head of Fintech Relations at ASA, bridging the gap with the creators of tech and those who want to invest in the development of tech. He is leading the way to create a bridge between technology development and those who want to invest in the future expansion of important tech. Jake Tamarkin is the co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Everyday Life Insurance.  Jake is passionate about using technology to help people make their financial lives easier. Let him explain why he says that “Insurance is Stupid” and just what we can do about it. FinCon21 Fintech Startup Competition ASA SpendPal Everyday Life Insurance   A few of the financial apps that Bob and Shelly use Acorns Acorns automatically invests spare change and provides cashback rewards at select retailers Bumped Bumped turns everyday spending into investing by which users get fractional stock rewards when they spend.  Bitmo Bitmo rewards you for everyday shopping at major brands both online and in-store Travel Freely Travel Freely helps users navigate the process of earning credit card rewards for free travel   Be Greater Than Average Gift of Learning Be Greater Than Average Courses Be Greater Than Average Family Fun! Be Greater Than Average A Semester of STEM Activities E-Book Battling Bots League (Partnership between Be Greater Than Average and Electric Playhouse)   Contact:   Ryan Ruff ryan.ruff@asa.financial (801) 473-5749 Linkedin   Jake Tamarkin (888) 681-3811 Linkedin Twitter  

Plan B Success
Chasing Tech Ventures w/ Elizabeth Dodson, Co-Founder, HomeZada

Plan B Success

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 34:05


Elizabeth Dodson, named as Number One Female Founder in FinTech worldwide by Quesnay (in 2019), is the Co-Founder of HomeZada, software that helps homeowners save time and money managing their property. Her goal is to help reduce the 33% annual income that is spent on your home by 10%. She has 20 years of technology experience on B2B/ B2C platforms driving multi-million dollar sales growth. Elizabeth is also a mentor at Stevenson and Loyola University and an advisory board member at College Track Sacramento.

Mangú Tecnológico
41 - Fintech: ¿con que se come eso?

Mangú Tecnológico

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 43:36


Cuando la tecnología y las finanzas se unen pueden surgir propuestas muy interesantes en favor de nosotros los consumidores de los servicios financieros. En este episodio nos acompaña Virginia Velázquez, directora ejecutiva de la Asociación Dominicana de Empresas Fintech (Adofintech), quien nos ayudará a entender el mundo Fintech, como funciona y cuáles son las ventajas de esta tendencia en crecimiento.

Opto Sessions: Stock market | Investing | Trading | Stocks & Shares | Finance | Business | Entrepreneurship | ETF
#91 - Richard Lightbound - Disruptive Innovation, ROBO Scores & Investing in AI

Opto Sessions: Stock market | Investing | Trading | Stocks & Shares | Finance | Business | Entrepreneurship | ETF

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 57:35


Richard Lightbound is EMEA & Asia CEO of ROBO Global, an index advisory and Research company helping investors capture the unique opportunities presented by Robotics, Artificial intelligence, and Healthcare technology. Each of those themes within the Disruptive Innovation landscape is represented by a ROBO Global index, and cumulatively those indices have accrued close to $5bn worth of assets tracking them. We discuss how the company's strategic advisory board - made up of best-in-class researchers & PhDs - identifies new investment opportunities, which subsectors are currently on ROBO's radar, & how the team uses ‘ROBO scores' to gauge a stock's investment merit. Enjoy!Thanks to Cofruition for consulting on and producing the podcast. Want further Opto insights? Check out our daily newsletter: https://www.cmcmarkets.com/en-gb/opto/newsletter------------------Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results.CMC Markets is an execution-only service provider. The material (whether or not it states any opinions) is for general information purposes only and does not take into account your personal circumstances or objectives. Nothing in this material is (or should be considered to be) financial, investment, or other advice on which reliance should be placed. No opinion given in the material constitutes a recommendation by CMC Markets or the author that any particular investment, security, transaction, or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person.The material has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research. Although we are not specifically prevented from dealing before providing this material, we do not seek to take advantage of the material prior to its dissemination.CMC Markets does not endorse or offer opinions on the trading strategies used by the author. Their trading strategies do not guarantee any return and CMC Markets shall not be held responsible for any loss that you may incur, either directly or indirectly, arising from any investment based on any information contained herein. for any loss that you may incur, either directly or indirectly, arising from any investment based on any information contained herein.

Lindzanity with Howard Lindzon
Roy Erez & Roy Rubin of R-Squared Ventures on How they Think about Investing, Networking, and the Future (EP.177)

Lindzanity with Howard Lindzon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 51:13


What's better than one Roy? Two! We've got Roy Erez and Roy Rubin from R-Squared Ventures on the show today. The two have teamed up to invest in Fintech, Enterprise/SMB SaaS, Marketplaces, and Digital Commerce. They've both founded, run, scaled, and sold businesses where they stayed on as corporate executives post acquisition. As angels, they've invested in over a few dozen startups, and they're both passionate about supporting the companies and founders they back. I think you're really going to enjoy this episode.  Guests - Roy Rubin and Roy Erez, Co-Founders at R-Squared Ventures  howardlindzon.com, R2VC.com  Twitter: @howardlindzon, @royrubin05, @royerez, @knutjensen  https://www.linkedin.com/in/royrubin  https://www.linkedin.com/in/royerez  #fintech #invest #investment #venturecapital #stockmarket #finance 

Stock Market Buy Or Pass?
2 Fintech Stocks To Buy Now | November 2021 Square Sofi Stock Price

Stock Market Buy Or Pass?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 10:05


2 Fintech Stocks To Buy Now | November 2021 Square Sofi Stock Price. Jose Najarro looks at what could be the top 2 growth fintech stocks to buy now. Square Stock Price and Sofi Stock Price are down recently during the market sell-off. https://www.fool.com/jose*A portion of this video is sponsored by The Motley Fool. Visit https://fool.com/josenajarro to get access to my special offer. The Motley Fool Stock Advisor returns are 557% as of 3/31/2021 and measured against the S&P 500 returns of 122% as of 3/31/2021. Past performance is not an indicator of future results. All investing involves a risk of loss. Individual investment results may vary, not all Motley Fool Stock Advisor picks have performed as well.*I do have a position in $SQNewsLetterhttps://www.fool.com/josenajarroDISCORD GROUP!! https://discord.gg/wbp2Z9STwitter: https://twitter.com/_JoseNajarroSome of the questions I want to answer What are the best high-growth stocks to buy in November 2021? what growth stocks to buy in November 2021? What Cheap Stocks to buy? What are good top growth stocks to buy? Top Stocks to Buy Now November-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------DISCLAIMER: I am not a financial advisor.  All content provided on this channel, and my other social media channels/videos/podcasts/posts, is for entertainment purposes only and reflects my personal opinions.  Please do your own research and talk with a financial advisor before making any investing decisions.

Epicenter - Learn about Blockchain, Ethereum, Bitcoin and Distributed Technologies

Avalanche is an open, scalable, and secure smart contracts platform. It targets three broad use cases; building application-specific blockchains, building and launching highly scalable decentralized applications (dapps), and building arbitrarily complex digital assets with custom rules, covenants, and riders (smart assets). It prides itself off on being blazingly fast, low cost, and eco-friendly.Emin Gün Sirer is the Founder & CEO of the Avalanche network. He is also a long time friend of the show, and joined us again for the 4th time after a 5 year break to share his journey since then, which led him to creating Avalanche. We also dove deep into the technical aspects of the protocol and how it fits into the blockchain ecosystem as a whole.Topics covered in this episode:Gun's journey over the past 5 years which led him to creating AvalancheThe unique features and trade-offs in the protocolA deep dive into bridging within AvalancheMEV extraction within the protocolAvalanche consensus - reliance on seed anchorsEpisode links:Episode 76 - From Selfish Miners to The Miner's DilemmaEpisode 103 - Bitcoin-NG – Scientists Versus the ChurchEp 134 - On a Rocky DAOAvalancheAva LabsAvalanche on TwitterGun on TwitterSponsors:Chorus One: Chorus One runs validators on cutting edge Proof of Stake networks such as Cosmos, Solana, Celo, Polkadot and Oasis. - https://epicenter.rocks/chorusoneParaSwap: ParaSwap aggregates all major DEXs and makes sure you beat the market price at every single swap and with the lowest slippage - paraswap.io/epicenterThis episode is hosted by Brian Fabian Crain & Meher Roy. Show notes and listening options: epicenter.tv/419

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS
Bonus: Payments are Eating the World ft. Jeremy Balkin, JP Morgan

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 38:26


Time for a bonus episode! Our expert host, David Brear, is joined by Jeremy Balkin, Global Head of Innovation & Corporate Development, Payments at J.P. Morgan, to take a deep dive into their new report: Payments are Eating the World. Join us for an in depth discussion about Jeremy's career, the report, and all things payments. All of this and much more on today's episode! Fintech Insider by 11:FS is a podcast dedicated to all things fintech, banking, technology and financial services. Hosted by a rotation of 11:FS experts including David Brear, Simon Taylor and Jason Bates, who are joined by a range of brilliant guests. We cover the latest global news, bring you interviews from industry experts or take a deep dive into subject matters such as APIs, AI or digital banking. If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe and please leave a review Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/fintechinsiders where you can ask the hosts questions, alternatively email podcasts@11fs.com! Special Guest: Jeremy Balkin.

Fintech Hunting
Fintech Hunting Episode #108 with the incredible Eric Kujala, VP Product Marketing at Ice Mortgage Technology

Fintech Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 34:14


Ladies and gentlemen welcome to a new episode of the Fintech Hunting Podcast. We have a very special guest for you today. He is an industry thought leader, social influencer, expert in industry automation, one of the best networkers I know, and dear friend. Please help me welcome Eric Kujala Vice President, Product Marketing at ICE Mortgage Technology

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Jimmy Chen, Founder & CEO of Propel -- Making America's Safety Net More User-Friendly

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 39:24


Gabriela Ariana Campoverde sits down with Jimmy Chen, CEO of Propel, a software company dedicated to helping low-income Americans improve their financial health. Propel's mobile app provides Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or SNAP, benefits users with the ability to check their benefit balance -- which was only previously available over a 1-800 number, and more recently offers users a checking account and debit card. In this episode we discuss: - Propel's app which today has 5 million active users - Propel's vision to become a one-stop-shop to manage government benefits and other income, side-by-side - The ways in which the company stood by their users during the pandemic - All about the company's culture - And so much more! Jimmy Chen Jimmy is the Founder and CEO of Propel. Previously, Jimmy was a Product Manager at Facebook, where he led product for Facebook Groups and prior to Facebook worked at LinkedIn. He is passionate about making America's safety net more user-friendly. He is a graduate of Stanford University, where he studied Symbolic Systems. Propel Propel builds software dedicated to helping low-income Americans improve their financial health. For additional information on Propel, please visit joinpropel.com and www.joinproviders.com | Twitter: twitter.com/joinproviders For more FinTech insights, follow us below: Medium: medium.com/wharton-fintech WFT Twitter: twitter.com/whartonfintech Gabriela's Twitter: twitter.com/byGabyC Gabriela's LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/gcampoverde

Distilling Venture Capital
Episode 021 - Oddup; FOCUS ON FINTECH; James Giancotti, Founder & CEO

Distilling Venture Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 37:46


Introduction Welcome to Distilling Venture Capital.  I am your host, Bill Griesinger Distilling VC is a visionary podcast that provides an insightful and informed view of the key trends affecting the VC and tech startup world.  My mission is to cut through and go beyond the hype that tends to dominate the tech landscape.  And provide you with information you can use. Episode Introduction: Welcome back everyone.  I am excited about today´s program because I have the pleasure of welcoming to the show James Giancotti who is the Founder and CEO of a really interesting company called Oddup.   Oddup is a provider of a data-driven, intelligence platform that helps users more efficiently evaluate and understand the startup ecosystem and for digital assets it includes a proprietary Cryptocurrency Rating System.  Oddup provides users with powerful tools and proven methods of data collection and insights for making investment decisions in a more efficient manner…[My attempt at describing the co. and what you do…feel free to give me the succinct, company-preferred version] And, we´ll get into all of that in greater detail…. James, thank you for making the time to be with me on the podcast today… So, before we dig into the meat of what Oddup is and its key offerings, I thought it would be useful if you could tell us a bit about your background and about your journey, more broadly, that ultimately led to the formation of Oddup… Topic Areas Covered: AI and data driven approach, what was the impetus, thesis for developing this into a company in the first place? What is the end-product offering actually and how has it evolved over time? Is it investment research on steroids…or how would you best describe it? Talk about the offerings in more detail;  What is the Startup Rating System, other offerings and services, i.e., Crypto-custody?  Talk about major Customers:  Thomson Reuters, Bloomberg, Google, etc. Key Partners? How would you assess the competitive landscape?  There seems to be a number of newer startups entering this space in different ways Competitive advantages of Oddup offering…Key Value proposition? ´Our main advantage is we have been right often on our valuation assessments which has given our tools and platform credibility as a go-to source.´  Particularly, more recently, we have been very accurate at assessing and valuing crypto and digital asset sectors. How do you get access to all of the detailed information and analysis for what are mostly private companies? Let´s discuss Forge Global, a major private exchange allowing investors to trade shares and evaluate secondary offerings of innovative private companies.  They also offer custody, tools and data in addition trading.  They announced a public offering via a SPAC in September.   Do you view them as an enabler, competitor or other? Is there an interesting story behind the company name? Discuss your recent equity round - $12.8MM Series C  We actually raised the round a year ago.  COVID and pandemic related factors kept us from announcing it until recently.  However, we used the proceeds to build really innovative and quality data analytics tools, especially in the crypto and digital asset sectors. Future plans for capital? Closing Remarks James, what is a good way for those seeking additional information about Oddup to get in touch?  Oddup website:  www.oddup.com Other contact methods you would like to include; Thank you for joining me for this edition of DVC.  I hope you found our discussion today with James Giancotti and Oddup interesting and it gave you things to think about regarding your ability to evaluate, analyze and invest in new economy companies.  I look forward to joining you on my next edition of DVC,  Thank You… Bio: James Giancotti, CEO and Co-founder OddupJames Giancotti is the founder and CEO of Oddup, an early-stage startup ecosystem rating system. James began his career in investment banking and research roles at Goldman Sachs and J.P. Morgan. After nearly a decade of researching companies' financials to determine their value and assessing investment risks and opportunities, he saw firsthand the challenges that most institutional investors constantly confronted. The biggest obstacle was a lack of reliable, collated analyst insights that overcome subjectivity, so he created Oddup to address this problem by giving investors more transparency and objective insights to make the most informed investment decision.  James holds both a Bachelor of Commerce in Business Intelligence and a Bachelor of Law in Intellectual Property from La Trobe University.

The Exchange
The Exchange: Fintech evolves

The Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 22:38


Companies from JPMorgan to Goldman Sachs are upgrading their banking businesses. Al Goldstein, one of the pioneers of peer-to-peer lending and online funding, tells Lauren Silva Laughlin how he reshaped those areas and why he is moving into private equity and venture capital. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Suthichai Podcast
Suthichai Podcast FinTech Crypto Update ซื้อปลาเผา จ่ายคริปโต

Suthichai Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 32:36


Suthichai Podcast FinTech Crypto Update ซื้อปลาเผา จ่ายคริปโต by Suthichai Yoon

Financial Advisor Success
Ep 256: Living On The Cutting Edge Of Advisor Technology To Build A Better Client Experience with Vincent Barbera

Financial Advisor Success

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 89:21


Vincent Barbera is the founder of Newbridge Wealth Management, an independent RIA based out of Philadelphia that oversees nearly $120-million of assets under management for 75 households. Vince stays on the cutting edge of advisor technology by continuously experimenting with new tech tools and by setting a new strategic focus every year to identify and try out a new category of solutions. Listen in as Vince gives a rundown of the technology tools that he has tried this year to improve his client experience, where he finds the latest and greatest in tech to try out, and how he compares the cost of new tools against those he already uses. We also discuss how Vince uses technology in his independent firm to stay competitive without an asset manager's size and scale, and why he has decided not to scale up to the billion-dollar mark but rather slow down and enjoy the ride. For show notes and more visit: https://www.kitces.com/256

Inside Outside
Ep. 274 - Todd Embley, Senior Startup Advocate for Agora on Startup Tech, Trends & Ecosystems

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 24:48


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Todd Embley, Senior Startup Advocate for Agora. Todd and I talk about the new technologies and trends from no-code tools to embedded audio and video platforms, that affect how we see, hear, and interact with each other. We also explore how companies are tapping into startups and startup ecosystems to enable founders to build and impact the world more effectively. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation as the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. I'm your host Brian Ardinger, founder of InsideOutside.IO. Each week. We'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Todd Embley, Senior Startup Advocate for AgoraBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, and as always, we have another amazing guest. Today, we have Todd Embley. He is a Senior Startup Advocate for Agora and a formerly with China Accelerator. So welcome to the show, Todd, Todd Embley: Thank you, Brian. It's good to be here. Brian Ardinger: I'm excited to have you because we've met a while back early in my startup days when I was running NMotion. You were in China. And we met at some global accelerator network conference. I think it was in San Diego, perhaps. So, you spent a lot of time in Asia, as I did. And recently moved back to the states, working for a interesting company called Agora. We had a chance to run into each other again in Lincoln. Todd Embley: Yeah. Thanks very much. I actually did come back from China and moved to the U.S. but now I'm back in Canada. I am Canadian and I'm living in Western Canada. Brian Ardinger: I wanted to start the conversation with the most recent company that you're with is a company called Agora. It's an interesting company for a couple different reasons. And it's a real-time engagement platform that a lot of popular companies are using to build on top of like Run the World, which is something that we've used for our IO Conferences and that. And some of our IO Live events. I think you guys provide like the SDKs and the building blocks to enable these types of startups to build off of. So, I I'd love to get your take, not on just Agora, but you've got an interesting role there as a Startup Advocate. So, what is a Startup Advocate? Todd Embley: It's a great role, for those of us who aren't necessarily adept at selling. And we fall under marketing. And the role is really, if I were to compartmentalize everything that we're about and our ethos and thesis. Is go out into startup land and be as helpful as possible. Try to integrate. You know, we sponsor. I run workshops. I meet with lots and lots of entrepreneurs all the time, and we're just out there trying to be as helpful as possible. And the great thing that the company and the founders and senior leadership have all gotten behind is just be out and be as helpful as possible. And wear the t-shirt while you're doing it. That's almost the be all and end of it. And for those that are really interested in what Agora is and what Agora does, then we can get into that. But essentially, we're not trying to put it in front of everybody and not trying to blast everybody with, with Agora specifically. The team is comprised of people who have been entrepreneurs, been in startups, been in VC, run accelerators. And who have just a lot of empathy for startups and that's kind of where it begins and ends. Brian Ardinger: We see a couple of different companies use this approach of startup advocate type of program to help build their business. Walk me through like, what are the benefits and the reasons why a corporation would want to put together some type of program around this.Todd Embley: You know, I think AWS and what they've been doing for as long as they've been doing it are kind of the benchmark. And they were, I would say the pioneers, at least the most famous pioneers of running programs like this. Our senior leadership had an opportunity in China to talk to the heads of AWS Activate in China.And they divulged some interesting statistics, which I think were the precipice of Agora wanting to build their own startup team as well. And that was that after 15 years of them having a program, they will now attribute up to 65% of AWS revenues today to the activities, you know, over the last 15 years, of their startup program.And what we're trying to do is invest in our future huge customers. Knowing that the world's next billionaire companies, trillion-dollar companies. The unicorns of the future are still just startups today. And if we want to align ourselves correctly with what it takes to build a startup and how hard it is, let's maybe try to get out of their way at the early stages while they're trying to cross the early chasms of, you know, and the difficulties of what it takes. So, from a revenue perspective or from a cost perspective, let's give our stuff for free. You know, until you, their revenue. You can't get blood from a stone. So, while they're still searching for product market fit and revenue, let's let them use our software for free until such time as they are then finding product market fit and then able to start generating revenue. And only at that time, should we then start to talk to them about actually paying for the service? Brian Ardinger: That makes sense. And obviously it seems to be working. I think I read on your website, you've got over 50 billion minutes of engagement on the platform. Probably going up as we speak. I don't know if you can speak to any specific use cases or specifically what you do when it comes to helping these companies get up and off the ground. Todd Embley: Sure. As you alluded to, there are some famous companies that have been using us, especially in the real-time audio space. There are a few NDAs in place. So, you could mention who those companies are. And by all means it's pretty widely known. I necessarily can't speak directly to who some of those more famous ones are. But the nuts and bolts of the program essentially boils down to free minutes. So, my Director, Tony Blank. He and another friend of ours, Paul Ford, used to do this at SendGrid. And that's where they were a big supporter of the Global Accelerator Network where you and I met in the beginning and then the Twilio acquisition of SendGrid. So, he was there. And they were doing a great job as well. And leading on some of the data from their experience there, or Tony's experience there, and then understanding our business and the data that we had over the years that Agora has been thriving. We positioned the amount of minutes at 1 million, we figured 1 million minutes of Agora should be enough for most companies to achieve product market fit and revenue.If you haven't achieved product market fit and revenue, after using a million minutes of Agora, you may have some underlying other issues that are getting in the way of that. But we really feel that upwards of 80%, even 90% of companies who do achieve and use up the million free minutes, should be at a position of having raised money and are revenue positive.At which time we feel comfortable to say, okay, though, now we do have to, for our business purposes, need to, to work on something and we'll hand them over to sales in a gentle way and work on getting them some discounts and start forecasting future usage and things like that. But those are the nuts and bolts.In our world of real-time video, real-time audio, just the real-time engagement aspect of it. There are certain verticals that are really taking off. I think health is obviously a big one where you have doctors and patients or therapists and their clients. We're seeing a lot in fitness, so for coaches training. Doing big group classes. Education is probably our biggest. I think that's a pretty obvious use case of doing real time lessons with teachers and things. But we're also seeing a lot of activity in the area of gaming where people want talk to each other. They want to be on video with each other while playing games together. Live performances and experiences around online virtual concerts or comedy shows or things like that as well. There's a lot of added context that you can get from engaging in real time, over video. That you couldn't get at an actual conference.You know, there are solutions coming around blending those where you might be at the concert, but you'll also have on your phone different camera angles that are available to a viewer. And you can get other contextual information that is happening plus chats with other people at the concert or something like that.And then, you know, a lot of multi-verse. A lot of VR stuff. I mean, I had a conversation with a startup out of New Zealand who was working in the overcoming therapy space, where if you had a phobia of dogs, you know, a psychologist would work with their client, and they would go to a kennel and slowly start to integrate and learn how to overcome. But now we can do that in a VR environment, but overlay a lot of very interesting artificial intelligence, facial recognition. Stuff like that to really be able to measure the things that are almost imperceptible to the human eye, to understand like the dilation of their pupils when faced with a small dog versus a big dog or different breeds or something, just giving a lot more contextual information to help a psychologist really work with their client to overcome a phobia. So, it's fascinating to work with the startups because they are thinking of use cases that we even within Agora can't think of. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn. Brian Ardinger: Well, and that's an interesting thing because the platform itself is really robust. You can do video calls and voice calls and interactive live streaming and real-time messaging and white boarding. And like you said, the toolkits are there. And I think this fits into one of those trends that we've been talking about, where it's never been easier for a startup founder to find the tools they need. They don't necessarily have to build everything from scratch nowadays. They can find partners and no code, low code tools and things like that to get up and going and testing the marketplace a lot easier than ever before. And get to those use case scenarios that a platform tool provider may not have thought of originally. I'm curious to get your take on some of this accessibility to tools that founders didn't have maybe, you know, 10 years ago when we started in this business. Todd Embley: Yeah, it's amazing. I think back to, I used to be with SOSV was the fund, and we were doing kind of an internal conference for all of our portfolio, all of our mentor network. Everybody that had ever been involved with us, including investors in Agora or LPs. And we had a guy named Dave McClure come and speak. And somebody had asked him is your eight-year-old daughter learning how to code. And he said, let me rephrase that. I think what you're asking me is do I think that it is important for very young people to learn how to code and essentially that's what you're looking for. And he said, you know, coding is like learning any other language, you know, in the development of the brain and how that enables young people to really grow. But it is in his opinion, he said it is just kind of a commodity. He said coding is probably going to become a commodity. And we've seen that in the low-code no-code explosion.And then he thought, you know, design would probably not be that far behind. I mean, there probably will be a day in the future where our phones will know everything they need to know about us, where you won't have to necessarily code or design the UI UX CX, of how an app works and feels. Because it can just deploy to our phone and our phone can tell the app how to develop itself as it lands on our home screen, in the way that we prefer it to be from colors to where the settings are or where our profile lives.And we can navigate that so intuitively. It has been absolutely amazing. And I think, you know, as we go, we've launched our app builder where pretty much anybody, even without any coding experience can go on and within 20 minutes create a video conferencing tool that they can use for their family reunion. You know, that is super easy. So yeah, it's been amazing. Brian Ardinger: It is kind of crazy to think what are the uses. I'd imagine obviously COVID has changed the dynamic landscape for you guys, especially. And so maybe let's talk a little bit about that. Some of the trends you're seeing with the move to more remote and more virtual environments. Todd Embley: Anybody who just watches the stock price of Zoom over the last couple of years would understand exactly where this industry has gone, but then factors like the quote unquote Zoom fatigue. And now we're seeing people that want to have more control over the layout and the design and the backgrounds and the information and the chats and emojis and music and all these other things that you can build into it. Because you know, now for instance, all our conferences went virtual, right? So we are now having to figure out how did you run a web summit or you know, like an East Meets West, that Blue Start-ups does in Hawaii or something. How do we now do this online and create a really great experience where everybody can still try to achieve those same outcomes for why they attended in the first place. It's been a pretty amazing growth that has really kind of pushed the boundaries.The work from home, I think has been the biggest thing where everybody's now at home. So, there's working with colleagues. There is collection of data. There is monitoring output and outcomes. And, you know, as a department or as a salesperson or marketing has changed. How do we do now market to people who aren't leaving their homes anymore that has now all changed.It's been such a game changer just in the future of work. I wouldn't say it necessarily changed course, but COVID has absolutely accelerated what we were already starting to think it would be. You know, it's done some damage to the world of coworking spaces, right. Or in-person accelerators or incubators. It's changed how we, even as a startup team go out and find partners and find startups to introduce them to Agora. So, it's had a tremendous impact. Brian Ardinger: You spent a lot of time ecosystem building for lack of a better term. You know, you go to different communities and see what the landscape is in the startup world. And then again, try to help founders navigate that. So, what are you seeing when you travel around to different startup communities and that. What's maybe different than it was five or six years ago? Todd Embley: There's a lot of factors. Entrepreneurship and startup land, as we know it, just even in the last 20 years, let's say since the .com boom and bust. And then, you know, Paul Graham kind of the Godfather of the accelerator starts Y Combinator in 2005. And so, the way investors started investing, and then there was, you know, a lot of information and then Crunchbase and others started coming around. And then, then we had 10 years of data from Crunchbase, somewhere around 2013. That we're now measuring how well people were investing, how well-performing that whole venture financial class was doing.And we've seen things where investors are now looking more at timing of solutions versus not just team and problem, but they had so many investments that were either too early, too late. And they started to recognize that. A lot of funds are starting to look internally and seeing, trying to reinvest inside the value that they've created to capture more of the food on the table versus being so outwardly focused. For our jobs, even in doing ecosystem development, how to startups find us versus how do we find them? If there's no meetups. If we're not able to do in-person startup weekends, then how are we able to find them, to attract them, to support them and to help them. How are investors doing their due diligence? You know, things like DocSend. Right.Having that digital data room with a lot of analytics built into it. So that founders can now not only see who's entering and who's looking at their due diligence documents at, but where in the deck are they spending time? On what slides, what is important? Where are they stopping? Where are they looking at? There's a lot of data and information that they can measure from that as well. I'm not exactly sure if that answers the question, but it is so drastically different. And now we're going back into, you know, web summit is in-person. I'm going to be going to that next week after we record this. That is going to be a different experience as well. And then there's the hybrids that are kind of doing both. It's changed a lot. Brian Ardinger: It is definitely interesting. You know, it's always been hard to find startup founders. A lot of times they're heads down doing their thing. You know, over the last five or six years pre COVID, you started to have a different environment where things like coworking spaces and events like Startup Weekend and that, started to bring some of those folks out and started to get some energy. And then COVID kind of slap that in the face to a certain extent. But now what I'm seeing at least is more collaboration across different communities. So even though I'm based in Lincoln, Nebraska, the network and our reach to different communities for the startups in our backyard, has increased and been beneficial from the standpoint of they're no longer having to be in the middle of flyover country. They can access folks that wouldn't necessarily in the past look outside of their own Sandhill Road area. So, I guess there's pros and cons to this new environment, but I was curious to get your take on that as well. Todd Embley: Constraints, breed Innovation. And COVID has drastically brought a whole new set of constraints just by not being able to meet in person as much. So, I think it's the development and the investment in developing a different skill set. You know, you take one sense away, the other senses improve. And so, we've had to become better at being able to build relationships. And we have video. And we have voice. But suddenly we're tuning in to the video and tuning into the voice. We may not have the same social cues and we may not have the same physical cues to be picking up on things. We used to train entrepreneurs on how to pitch in person. You were on a stage facing an audience. You were standing in front of an investor at a meetup. Here's how you do it. Here's how you talk. Here's how you hold yourself. Be careful of your hands. Don't shift your feet around. You know, there is all these, you know, all this kind of training, which has had to change. Which has had to develop. And now we're reaching out, we're developing partnerships and I think I've seen a lot of ecosystems lean in on having silos or verticals that they're starting to own to be seen as a place.And accelerators are now going virtual, where they're pulling from anywhere. Right. We have a focus. We're vertically focused. And so even if you're in Brazil or you're in Russia or wherever, this is the accelerator that you want to join because the world has just been absolutely flattened. And now this is the best place. This is the best accelerator, and you don't have to fly in and live here. Right? So now you've seen costs of living. People are moving out of the main centers. It's just, it's been a tremendous change. Brian Ardinger: You've spent your life helping founders. And I'd love to get your input on for our founders that are listening to this show. Some of the biggest obstacles or barriers or things that you've seen or can help them overcome. Are there particular tips or tricks that founders should be paying attention to nowadays?Todd Embley: I still think it all starts with the problem. And I still find myself having to talk about deep diving into the problem discussion. And there has been a penchant for the snapshot. And of the landscape as it is today. But I think what we're starting to understand. And what I'm seeing from a lot of questions that come from investors, is it's not as much about what. It's about why. And when you're pitching or talking about what you're doing, you have to start layering in the why.This is our go to market strategy. Great. Doesn't really matter, but why did you choose that? They're being measured on the way they think. The way they process. The way they built. What data did you take in. Which did you keep? And which did you throw away and why? And then what decision and strategy did you make off of that data?And why did you decide to strategize that? Why are you deciding to build this next? Why is this the next iteration of what you're doing, this problem that you're trying to solve? Anybody can Google and get a lot of data on a problem that exists today. But do you have a deep understanding of how we got here? You know, we have this Canadian kind of saying of the Wayne Gretzky, don't go where the puck is, go, where the puck is going to be.And as investors, we're always trying to find the entrepreneurs who are good at figuring out where the puck is going to be. But the only way that they can figure that out, isn't understanding just where the puck is, but how the puck got to where it is. Because only then do we understand the speed and the trajectory and are able to extrapolate off of that to know where it's going with some reasonable degree of accuracy. But we'll never get it right. But that I think is always be factoring in your why. Nobody is going to be blown away by your what because you're still early stage. Unless you have a hundred thousand downloads or a million MRR, you know, it's just not that impressive. Because the only thing that matters is what people use and pay for.So, knowing that. Now, we're just trying to measure size you up as a founder. So lean in on all your why of everything that you're talking about so that they can understand how you develop, how you price, how you see the world. Be unique, be different. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Solid advice. Well, Todd, I want to thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation and sharing your insights and your experiences from the many years of being in the trenches there. I want to encourage people to check out Agora and that. If people want to find out more about yourself or about the startup program at Agora, what's the best way to do that? Todd Embley: Yeah. I mean, if they want to connect with me, LinkedIn is great. Just Todd Embley. I will generally show up. That's a great way to do it. And I'd love to connect. And I love to meet with everybody. And then agora.io/startups is where the entrance to the startup program lives. But Agora.io is where most of the information about Agora lives. And we're happy to talk to anybody, especially partners. Anybody doing events. Anything out there. We'd love to be a part of it. We'd love to sponsor. And try to add value. Brian Ardinger: Well Todd, thanks again for coming on the show. It's great to see you again and look forward to continuing the conversation in the years to come. Todd Embley: Thanks, Brian. It's been great.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

You're A Financial Planner; Now What?
Flexing Your CFP®: Roles in Fintech and RIA Development

You're A Financial Planner; Now What?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Greg Goin CFP®, CIMA®, CLU®,CRPC®, is the Regional Vice President of RIA Markets at Allianz Life. Schyler Adams, CFP®, is the Director of Advanced Strategies and Planning Platforms at Allianz Life. Alongside Hannah Moore, CFP®, they dive into how their CFP® training brought them to unexpected roles and how professionals can look for their dream work in unexpected places.

The Quiet Light Podcast
Cash Back King — How to Get Your Share

The Quiet Light Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 28:34


Chase Harmer is the Founder and CEO of ProfitPay, the first globally connected Fintech marketplace that unifies banking and business without borders. Chase started in the payment processing business, grew his portfolio, and began building technology in 2014. He created ProfitPay to be a card issuer and fraud provider all in one platform, providing value for merchants and consumers.  Since its founding, ProfitPay has grown to over 100 employees, brought in top-level executives, and received $25 million in funding during the year 2020 alone. The company's vision is to redefine traditional finances and create a more profitable future.    In this episode… Are you getting optimal benefits out of your current credit card reward system? What if you could generate revenue on all transactions and increase the value of your business?  With ProfitPay, you can do just that. This all-in-one digital banking platform allows e-commerce businesses to use a virtual card for their manufacturers and earn up to 2% on all transactions. ProfitPay's unlimited cash back feature, zero foreign exchange and cross-border fees, and pre-funded debit card options give e-commerce entrepreneurs freedom, flexibility, and a greater bottom line. In this episode of the Quiet Light Podcast, Joe Valley sits down with Chase Harmer, the Founder and CEO of ProfitPay, to talk about how your e-commerce company can make more money with ProfitPay's banking platform. Chase details the benefits of ProfitPay's virtual cards, shares how his company surpasses the competition, and looks forward to the future of e-commerce.  

CQ on Congress
Fintech Beat: D-Cash: How the Eastern Caribbean created one of the first CBDCs

CQ on Congress

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 35:35


Timothy Antoine, Governor of the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union, shares how the central bank launched one of the world's first central bank digital currencies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hack tu Startup
Ep.20 - Isabel Palao, Co-fundadora y CEO de Máximo: Claves para escalar una fintech para adolescentes en Latinoamérica

Hack tu Startup

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 30:11


Felipe Sánchez, cofundador y CEO de WeKall se tomó los micrófonos de Hack Tu Startup para hablar de emprendedor a emprendedor con Isabel Palao, Co-fundadora y CEO de Máximo, una fintech que ofrece productos financieros asequibles y ágiles para las nuevas generaciones de Latinoamérica. En este episodio hablamos con Isabel de:  Propuesta de valor de una fintech frente a la banca tradicional Cómo entender al usuario para crear un producto Estrategias de comunicación para crear audiencias Puedes conectar con Isabel en LinkedIn Si deseas contactar a Felipe en Linkedin Si quieres más información sobre nuestro siguiente podcast, puedes seguirnos en Instagram o visitar nuestro contenido en www.prodigiogrowth.com Este episodio ha sido posible gracias a Wekall una plataforma para telefonía empresarial y contact center en la nube. Pruébalo gratis hoy aquí.

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS
550. News: Amazon feuds with Visa while Zilch crowned Europe's fastest unicorn

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 57:18


Our expert hosts, Simon Taylor and Benjamin Ensor, are joined by some great guests to talk about the most notable fintech, financial services and banking news from the past week. This week's guests include: Emily Nicolle, Fintech Correspondent, Financial News Clare McKeeve, CEO, Talenthouse With soundclips from: Philip Belamant, CEO & Founder, Zilch Omar Kassim, CEO & Founder, Nomod We cover the following stories from the fintech and financial services space: Amazon to stop accepting Visa credit cards in UK - 4:10 Zilch becomes Europe's fastest ever unicorn with $2bn valuation (soundclip from Philip Belamant, CEO & Founder, Zilch) - 15:45 Talenthouse, Vodeno, and Aion Bank partner to bring embedded banking services to creatives across Europe - 28:12 Nomod raises $3.4M seed to allow merchants to accept payments without hardware (soundclip from Omar Kassim, CEO & Founder, Nomod) - 37:07 Starling snaps up £1BN mortgage book as it seeks to float next year - 45:25 N26 pulls back from the US - 46:54 CMA pushes ‘variable recurring payment' deadline back by six months - 49:02 Miramax Sues Quentin Tarantino Over ‘Pulp Fiction' NFTs - 51:12 This episode is sponsored by Temenos. Temenos is the world leader in banking software, serving over 3,000 financial institutions. SCALE 2021 is Temenos' dedicated, virtual developer event, including: insights from industry leaders on current technology trends and how they impact banking; customer presentations; product demonstrations and road-map sessions and opportunities to speak with Temenos experts. Whether you're a developer, consultant or business user, discover the latest technology opportunities and how this can help you deliver bigger, better, faster. Register to attend here. (https://tem.mn/3jYLZlm) This episode is sponsored by Primer. Primer is the world's first automation platform for payments. With Primer, merchants and developers have all the underlying infrastructure and "lego blocks" they need to build the best buying experiences for their customers. Learn more and book a demo at primer.io (https://primer.io/?utmsource=11fs&utmmedium=referral&utmcampaign=fintechinsider_) Fintech Insider by 11:FS is a podcast dedicated to all things fintech, banking, technology and financial services. Hosted by a rotation of 11:FS experts including David Brear, Simon Taylor and Jason Bates, who are joined by a range of brilliant guests. We cover the latest global news, bring you interviews from industry experts or take a deep dive into subject matters such as APIs, AI or digital banking. If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe and please leave a review Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/fintechinsiders where you can ask the hosts questions, alternatively email podcasts@11fs.com! Special Guests: Clare McKeeve and Emily Nicolle.

Equity
Equity Monday: Paytm's rocky debut gets rockier

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 11:46


Happy Monday everyone, and welcome to a holiday week here in the United States. Yes, we here in the good ol' States will be off the second half of this week. TechCrunch won't grind to a halt, but we will certainly slow down a little bit. But, that doesn't mean that we didn't have a lot to talk about this morning:Shares of Indian fintech giant Paytm fell further today, after a very disappointing first-days trading last Thursday. The company now has lot of ground to make up just to get back to zero.Facebook is delaying the rollout of E2E encryption until 2023, which has us a bit bummed.Also in big tech news, ByteDance is calling it quits on edtech in India.Turning the page to startups, we chatted through three news items this morning: Jina.ai raised $30 million, Deliverr raised $250 million, and Lydia added equity and crypto trading to its French financial superapp.And we closed on the just what the point of a DAO is.Woo! We are back Wednesday morning. Chat soon!

Asia Startup Pulse
ASP Selection | Inside the VC Mind: The rise of Fintech in China, with Wei Hopeman, Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Arbor Ventures

Asia Startup Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 31:31


Final call for signing up for Chinaccelerator 20 Demo Day Nov 24 on Eventbrite. We will soon be back with the brand-new season. Today, ASP selected the special episode that Oscar Ramos sat down with venture capitalist and fintech investor Wei Hopeman. After beginning her career in financial services and investment banking, Wei co-founded Arbor Ventures in 2013, the first VC fund specialized in fintech in the Asian ecosystem. She talks to us about the growth of fintech, the benefits of corporate VCs, and how founders and corporate VCs can improve their interactions with each other.Show notes:1:28 Intro 2:07 How Wei got into financial services 5:46 Going into investment banking 7:30 The growth of fintech in Asia 9:32 The lack of infrastructure in financial services 12:18 Launching fintech in China 15:18 Benefits of corporate VCs 17:08 Key questions a founder should ask corporate VCs 18:31 Key difference between types of VCs 21:02 Educating corporates in working with startups 23:17 Women in VC 30:16 The future of Arbor Venturesthanks to our host Oscar Ramos, guest Wei Hopeman, editor David and Geep, organizer Chinaccelerator and sponsor People Squared. Be sure to check out our website at Chinaccelerator WebsiteFollow us on LinkedIn:  Asia Startup PulseEmail us: team@chinastartuppulse.com

Bankless
93 - Crypto Payments and the DeFi Mullet | Visa's Cuy Sheffield and Anchorage's Diogo Mónica

Bankless

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 91:30


The DeFi Mullet is a classic Bankless thesis that we've begun to watch play out right in front of us. This week, we bring on Cuy Sheffield from Visa and Diogo Mónica from Anchorage to explain the DeFi mullet from the Fintech side of things. This episode explores how crypto payments are extending beyond retail and into institutions, and how Fintech platforms like Visa are leveling up with the utilities provided by Anchorage to support crypto. Blurring the lines between the two worlds is shaping up to be a fascinating corner of our industry, and there's a ton of new concepts to dive into throughout this conversation. ------

Appetite for Disruption:  The Business and Regulation of FinTech
Treasury Prime: The Interface Between Banks and FinTechs

Appetite for Disruption: The Business and Regulation of FinTech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 30:15


Everybody talks about the difference between traditional banks and FinTech companies.  Treasury Prime seeks to facilitate the interactions between the two so that banks can have a FinTech offering and FinTech can have the risk management and compliance of banks.  CEO Christopher Dean is leading Treasury Prime into this world between these two major industries and helping both sides understand each other through education and, most importantly, technology.  He sees a bright future developing from these partnerships and Treasury Prime is committed to facilitating that future.  And his love of start-ups and the process of building a company shines through.

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Aaron Schumm, Founder & CEO of Vestwell - Powering Modern Day Workplace Savings

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 36:01


Anirudh Singh sits down with Aaron Schumm, Founder and CEO of Vestwell. In this episode they discuss: - Aaron's first company, FolioDynamix - Launching Vestwell 6 days after selling FolioDynamix - The small business retirement landscape in the U.S. And much more! Aaron Schumm: Aaron is the founder & CEO of Vestwell, the engine powering modern-day workplace savings and investing programs, such as 401(k) and 403(b) plans. Our cloud-based digital recordkeeping platform provides the underlying architecture to support financial services and payroll partners, who are rapidly working to serve the 30M small businesses in the country. Prior to founding Vestwell, Aaron co-founded FolioDynamix, a wealth management fintech platform. At FolioDynamix, Aaron oversaw the strategy, revenue, marketing, customers and product development. FolioDynamix was acquired by Envestnet (NYSE: ENV). Outside of Vestwell, Aaron has served on the board of directors and the advisory board for several fintech companies, including Quovo (acquired by Plaid), Vestorly, OfColor, and Chalice Financial Network. Aaron holds a B.S. degree in finance from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and an M.B.A. degree from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business. He was included in InvestmentNews' 40 Under 40 and WealthManagement.com's "10 to Watch." For more FinTech insights, follow us below: Medium: medium.com/wharton-fintech LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/wharton-fintech-club/ WFT Twitter: twitter.com/whartonfintech Anirudh's Twitter: twitter.com/avsingh_24

The Diary Of A CEO by Steven Bartlett
E107: Starling Bank: Building a $1.5 Billion Business Against The Odds: Anne Boden

The Diary Of A CEO by Steven Bartlett

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 93:02


The story of how Anne built her business is a genuine blockbuster of entrepreneurship and perseverance. Starling is one of the biggest FinTech companies in the world, with billions in deposits, but after listening to this you'll be amazed how it was possible.  When her co-founder walked out of the company, and took the funding with him, Anne walked in to an office where she was the only employee on the books, and had to start the company she'd built all over again. Little by little, she came back, and a year later landed a mega investment deal in one of the most incredible stories we've ever had on this podcast.  What really shines about Anne is the clear sense of mission she's infused her company with. Anne really cares about doing right by the customer, and cleaning up an industry that historically doesn't have a record of giving people a fair shake. Anne is in business to make the world a better place, and we think after listening to this you'll agree that Anne's story shows business success can come from the most unlikely places.  Topics Humble beginnings Entrepreneurship Starting Starling bank & clashes with Tom at Monzo Raising funding What have you learnt about raising investment? Managing your emotions when running Starling Work life balance - maintaining relationships Key advice you would told your younger self Our last guests question Anne: https://www.instagram.com/anneboden/ https://twitter.com/anneboden Anne's book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/BANKING-How-I-Disrupted-Industry-ebook/dp/B084H6N2GS Our Episode with Tom from Monzo: https://g2ul0.app.link/d0u5WwlOmlb Sponsor: https://uk.huel.com/

WhyFI Matter$
All Things Cryptocurrency (for Teens) ft. CEO of Centric, Joel Clelland

WhyFI Matter$

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 41:56


Happy Thanksgiving!I am super excited to learn more about cryptocurrency from our guest today, Joel Clelland! Joel is the CEO at Centric, which is a digital currency company making strides in the cryptocurrency industry. With over 20 years of extremely diverse career experience, Joel is able to find creative ways to innovate and develop his company.  I'm super excited to learn more about his entrepreneurial journey, improve my understanding of how digital/decentralized currencies work and, in what ways this will impact the GenZ future. To Read the Transcript and for Links in this Episode please visit:https://www.whyfimatters.com/post/all-things-cryptocurrency-for-teens-ft-ceo-of-centric-joel-clelland Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/whyfimatters)

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS
581. Insights: Is the Indian fintech market coming of age?

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 44:45


Our expert host, Bejnamin Ensor, is joined by some great guests to talk about all things Indian fintech. Fintech is one of the fastest-growing technology segments in India, bringing innovation in digital identity, credit scoring, loans, payments, and stock trading. So what does the market look like, what technologies are paving the way, and what opportunities does the ecosystem offer Fintech founders? This week's guests include: Gurjodhpal Singh, India CEO, Tide Aditi Sholapurkar, Co-founder, SALT All of this and much more on today's episode! This episode is sponsored by Temenos. Temenos is the world leader in banking software, serving over 3,000 financial institutions. SCALE 2021 is Temenos' dedicated, virtual developer event, including: insights from industry leaders on current technology trends and how they impact banking; customer presentations; product demonstrations and road-map sessions and opportunities to speak with Temenos experts. Whether you're a developer, consultant or business user, discover the latest technology opportunities and how this can help you deliver bigger, better, faster. Register to attend here. (https://tem.mn/3jYLZlm) This episode is sponsored by Primer. Primer is the world's first automation platform for payments. With Primer, merchants and developers have all the underlying infrastructure and "lego blocks" they need to build the best buying experiences for their customers. Learn more and book a demo at primer.io (https://primer.io/?utmsource=11fs&utmmedium=referral&utmcampaign=fintechinsider_) Fintech Insider by 11:FS is a podcast dedicated to all things fintech, banking, technology and financial services. Hosted by a rotation of 11:FS experts including David Brear, Simon Taylor, Jason Bates and Sarah Kocianski and joined by a range of brilliant guests, we cover the latest global news, bring you interviews from industry experts or take a deep dive into subject matters such as APIs, AI or digital banking. If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe and please leave a review Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/fintechinsiders where you can ask the hosts questions, alternatively email podcasts@11fs.com! Special Guests: Aditi Sholapurkar and Gurjodhpal Singh.

Startuprad.io - Startup podcast from Germany
Fastbill's Exit to Canada Based Unicorn FreshBooks

Startuprad.io - Startup podcast from Germany

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 39:50


Toronto-based fintech unicorn FreshBooks made with Fastbill its first acquisition in Europe.