Podcasts about Azure

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Best podcasts about Azure

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Latest podcast episodes about Azure

Jogabilidade (Games)
Vértice #334 (J): Salt and Sacrifice, Greak, Relic Hunters: Rebels, Mega Man X Dive

Jogabilidade (Games)

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 102:38


Bruno Izidro nos visita para constatar que, enquanto a América Latina nos presenteia com os belos Relic Hunter Rebels e Greak, os EUA decepcionam com Salt & Sacrifice e Taiwan surpreende com Mega Man X Dive. 00:06:54: Greak: Memorie of Azure 00:21:48: Relic Hunters: Rebels 00:46:55: Salt and Sacrifice 01:16:57: Mega Man X Dive Contribua | Twitter | YouTube | Twitch | Contato

DevOps and Docker Talk
GitOps with Pulumi

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 45:10


Unedited live recording of the complete show on YouTube (Ep #164). Includes demos.Bret is joined by David Flanagan, aka @Rawkode Academy, from Pulumi to show off how Pulumi infrastructure-as-code can improve GitOps pipelines. Our conversation focused on what GitOps and Pulumi are and how they work together to manage your infrastructure and app deploys. Streamed live on YouTube on March 24, 2022. ★ Topics ★PulumiProductK8s OperatorK8sGitOpsLaw of Demeter1Password SSH management★ David Flanagan aka Rawkode Academy★Rawkode Academy, Live weeklyRawkode on Twitter★ Join My Community ★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us on our Discord Server Vital DevOpsHomepage bretfisher.com★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

GeekSprech Podcast
#75 - GeekSprech - Experts Live Germany

GeekSprech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 28:53


In dieser Folge geht es um ein Herzensprojekt von mir und meinem Gast Carsten Rachfahl: Die Experts Live Germany 2022 Seit 2018 sind Carsten und ich an dem Thema dran, die Experts Live Events nach Deutschland zu bringen. Warum es nun erst 2022 so weit ist und was für das Event geplant ist erfahrt ihr im Podcast! Ich hoffe wir sehen uns am 08. September 2022 in Erfurt! Mehr Infos zur Experts Live Germany: https://www.expertslive.de

The Cloud Pod
165: The Cloud Pod Angry That Amazon Describes Step Functions as Low Code

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 33:33


On The Cloud Pod this week, the team discusses wholesome local Oakland toast for breakfast. Plus: Hybrid infrastructure is unsustainable, the AWS Proton template library expands, and Amazon angers the team by describing Step Functions as “low-code.” A big thanks to this week's sponsor, Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. This week's highlights

API Intersection
Tips From Microsoft on Creating a Flourishing API Program feat. Balan Subramanian

API Intersection

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 26:16


This week on the API Intersection podcast, we chatted with Balan Subramanian, Partner Director of Product for Azure App Platform Services at Microsoft. At Microsoft, he leads the product team that works on the Azure app platform. This includes microservices frameworks such as Dapr, cloud services such as Azure API platform, Azure Logic Apps for integration, Azure Cache for Redis, Azure Spring Apps and a few other services. Additionally, Balan is responsible for ecosystem enablement for Azure developers–meaning he works with some of the well-known names in the developer community such as Elastic, Confluent, Redis, Nginx etc. and enables them to bring their SaaS to developers with Azure-native integrations.Balan provided a few insights on how Microsoft works to create an enticing partner environment, how they use the design-first approach internally, and how they help customers think of their APIs as products (even when they're not monetized!). Do you have a question you'd like answered, or a topic you want to see in a future episode? Let us know here: stoplight.io/question/

Creation Article Podcast

As popularized by the New Atheist movement, atheists prefer the definition of “atheism” as “lacking belief in god(s)”. So, meet atheists on their own ground: if they want to define atheism as a mere lack of God belief, grant it and continue the discussion. Then, make them see whence their position comes and where it leads. This episode article was written by Ken Ammi and podcast produced by Joseph Darnell out of the CMI-USA office. Become a monthly contributor at our site. You can also help out by telling your family and friends to check out the podcasts.

Screaming in the Cloud
At the Head of Community Development with Wesley Faulkner

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 35:19


About WesleyWesley Faulkner is a first-generation American, public speaker, and podcaster. He is a founding member of the government transparency group Open Austin and a staunch supporter of racial justice, workplace equity, and neurodiversity. His professional experience spans technology from AMD, Atlassian, Dell, IBM, and MongoDB. Wesley currently works as a Developer Advocate, and in addition, co-hosts the developer relations focused podcast Community Pulse and serves on the board for SXSW.Links Referenced: Twitter: https://twitter.com/wesley83 Polywork: https://polywork.com/wesley83 Personal Website: https://www.wesleyfaulkner.com/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D.Corey: What if there were a single place to get an inventory of what you're running in the cloud that wasn't "the monthly bill?" Further, what if there were a way to compare that inventory to what you were already managing via Terraform, Pulumi, or CloudFormation, but then automatically add the missing unmanaged or drifted parts to it? And what if there were a policy engine to immediately flag and remediate a wide variety of misconfigurations? Well, stop dreaming and start doing; visit snark.cloud/firefly to learn more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined again for a second time this year by Wesley Faulkner. Last time we spoke, he was a developer advocate. And since then, as so many have, he's changed companies. Wesley, thank you for joining me again. You're the Head of Community at SingleStore, now. Congrats on the promotion.Wesley: Thank you. It's been a very welcome change. I love developer advocates and developer advocacy. But I love people, too, so it's almost, I think, very analogous to the ebbs and flow that we all have gone through, through the pandemic, and leaning into my strong suits.Corey: It's a big deal having a ‘head of' in a role title, as opposed to Developer Advocate, Senior Developer Advocate. And it is a different role. It's easy to default into the world of thinking that it's a promotion. Management is in many ways orthogonal to what it takes to succeed in an actual role. And further, you're not the head of DevRel, or DevRelopers or whatever you want to call the term. You are instead the Head of Community. How tied is that to developer relations, developer advocacy, or other things that we are used to using as terms of art in this space?Wesley: If we're talking about other companies, I would say the Head of Community is something that's under the umbrella of developer relations, where it's just a peer to some of the other different elements or columns of developer relations. But in SingleStore specifically, I have to say that developer relations in terms of what you think about whole umbrella is very new to the company. And so, I consider myself the first person in the role of developer relations by being the Head of Community. So, a lot of the other parts are being bolted in, but under the focus of developer as a community. So, I'm liaisoning right now as helping with spearheading some of the design of the activities that the advocates do, as well as architecting the platform and the experiences of people coming in and experiencing SingleStore through the community's perspective.So, all that to say is, what I'm doing is extremely structured, and a lot of stuff that we're doing with the efficacy, I'm using some of my expertise to help guide that, but it's still something that's kind of like an offshoot and not well integrated at the moment.Corey: How has it changed the way that you view the function of someone who's advocating to developers, which is from my cynical perspective, “Oh, it's marketing, but we don't tell people it's marketing because they won't like it.” And yes, I know, I'll get emails about that. But how does it differ from doing that yourself versus being the head of the function of a company? Because leadership is a heck of a switch? I thought earlier in my career that oh, yeah, it's a natural evolution of being a mediocre engineer. Time to be a mediocre manager. And oh, no, no, I aspired to be a mediocre manager. It's a completely different skill set and I got things hilariously wrong. What's it like for you going through that shift?Wesley: First of all, it is kind of like advertising, and people may not think of it that way. Just to give an example, movie trailers is advertising. The free samples at the grocery store is advertising. But people love those because it gives an experience that they like in a package that they are accustomed to. And so, it's the same with developer relations; it's finding the thing that makes the experience worthwhile.On the community side, this is not new to me. I've done several different roles, maybe not in this combination. But when I was at MongoDB, I was a technical community manager, which is like a cog in the whole giant machine. But before that, in my other life, I managed social and community interactions for Walmart, and I had, at the slow period, around 65, but during the holidays, it would ramp up to 95 direct reports that I managed.It's almost—if you're a fan of The Princess Bride, it's different than fighting one person. Sometimes it's easier to fight, like, a squad or a gang of people. So, being Head of Community with such a young company is definitely a lot different than. In some ways, harder to deal with this type of community where we're just growing and emerging, rather than something more well-established.Corey: It probably gives you an interesting opportunity. Because back when I was doing engineering work as an SRE or whatever we call them in that era, it was, “Yeah, wow, my boss is terrible and has no idea what the hell they're doing.” So, then I found myself in the role, and it's, “Cool. Now, do all the things that you said you would do. Put up or shut up.”And it turns out that there's a lot you don't see that our strategic considerations. I completely avoided things like managing up or managing laterally or balancing trade-offs in different ways. Yeah, you're right. If you view the role of management as strictly being something that is between you and your direct reports, you can be an amazing manager from their perspective, but completely ineffective organizationally at accomplishing the goals that have been laid out for you.Wesley: Yeah. The good thing about being head of and the first head of is that you help establish those goals. And so, when you take a role with another company saying, “Hey, we have headcount for this,” and it's an established role, then you're kind of like streamlining into a process that's already underway. What's good about this role specifically, a ‘head of,' is that I help with not only designing what are the goals and the OKRs but deciding what the teams and what the team structure should look like. And so, I'm hiring for a specific position based on how it interacts with everything else.So, when I'm coming in, I don't say, “Well, what do you do?” Or, “How do you do it?” I said, “This is what needs to be done.” And that makes it so much easier just to say that if everything is working the way it should and to give marching orders based on the grand vision, instead of hitting the numbers this quarter or next quarter. Because what is core to my belief, and what's core, too, of how I approach things is at the heart of what I'm trying to do, which is really great, in terms of making something that didn't exist before.Corey: The challenge, too, is that everyone loves to say—and I love to see this at different ways—is the evolution and understanding of the DevRel folks who I work with and I have great relationships with realizing that you have to demonstrate business value. Because I struggle with this my entire career where I know intrinsically, that if I get on stage and tell a story about a thing that is germane to what my company does, that good things are going to happen. But it's very hard to do any form of attribution to it. In a different light, this podcast is a great example of this.We have sponsors. And people are listening. Ideally, they aren't fast-forwarding through sponsor messages; I do have interesting thoughts about the sponsors that I put into these ads. And that's great, but I also appreciate that people are driving while they're listening to this, and they are doing the dishes, they are mowing the lawn, and hopefully not turning up the volume too loudly so it damages their hearing. And the idea that they're going to suddenly stop any of those things and go punch in the link that I give is a little out to lunch there.Instead, it's partially brand awareness and it is occasionally the, “Wait. That resonates exactly with the problem that I have.” So, they get to work or they get back in front of a computer and the odds are terrific they're not going to punch in that URL of whatever I wound up giving; they're going to type in whatever phrases they remember and the company name into Google. Now—and doing attribution on something like that is very hard.It gets even more hard when we're talking about something that is higher up the stack that requires a bit more buy-in than individual developers. There's often a meeting or two about it. And then someone finally approaches the company to have a conversation. Now, does it work? Yes. There are companies that are sponsoring this stuff that spend a lot of time, effort, and money on that.I don't know how you do that sort of attribution; I don't pretend to know, but I know that it works. Because these people whose entire job is making sure that it does tell me it does. So, I smile, I nod, and that's great. But it's very hard to wind up building out a direct, “If you spend X dollars sponsoring this, you will see Y dollars in response.” But in the DevOps world, when your internal doing these things, well, okay because to the company, I look an awful lot like an expensive developer except I don't ever write production code.And then—at least in the before times—“So, what does your job do? Because looking at the achievements and accomplishments last quarter, it looks an awful lot like you traveled to exotic places on the company dime, give talks that are of only vague relevance to what we do, and then hang out at parties with your friends? Nice job, how can I get that?” But it's also first on the chopping block when okay, how do we trim expenses go? And I think it's a mistake to do that. I just don't think that story of the value of developer relations is articulated super-well. And I say that, but I don't know how to do a much better job of it myself.Wesley: Well, that's why corporate or executive buy-in is important because if they know from the get-go while you're there, it makes it a little bit easier to sell. But you do have to show that you are executing. So, there are always two parts to presenting a story, and that's one, the actual quantitative, like, I've done this many talks—so that output part—I've written this many blog posts, or I've stood up this many events that people can attend to. And then there's the results saying, people did read this post, people did show up to my event, people did listen to my talk that I gave. But you also need to give the subjective ones where people respond back and say, “I loved your talk,” or, “I heard you on Corey's podcast,” or, “I read your blog posts,” because even though you might not understand that it goes all the way down in a conversion funnel to a purchase, you can least use that stand-in to say there's probably, like, 20, 30 people behind this person to have that same sentiment, so you can see that your impact is reaching people and that it's having some sort of lasting effect.That said, you have to keep it up. You have to try to increase your output and increase your sphere of influence. Because when people go to solve their problem, they're going to look into their history and their own Rolodex of saying what was the last thing that I heard? What was the last thing that's relevant?There is a reason that Pepsi and Coke still do advertising. It's not because people don't know those brands, but being easily recalled, or a center of relevance based on how many touchpoints or how many times that you've seen them, either from being on American Idol and the logo facing the camera, or seeing a whole display when you go into the grocery store. Same with display advertising. All of this stuff works hand in hand so that you can be front-of-mind with the people and the decision-makers who will make that decision. And we went through this through the pandemic where… that same sentiment, it was like, “You just travel and now you can't travel, so we're just going to get rid of the whole department.”And then those same companies are hunting for those people to come back or to rebuild these departments that are now gone because maybe you don't see what we do, but when it's gone, you definitely notice a dip. And that trust is from the top-up. You have to do not just external advocacy, but you have to do internal advocacy about what impacts you're having so that at least the people who are making that decision can hopefully understand that you are working hard and the work is paying off.Corey: Since the last time that we spoke, you've given your first keynote, which—Wesley: Yes.Corey: Is always an interesting experience to go through. It was at a conference called THAT Conference. And I feel the need to specify that because otherwise, we're going to wind up with a ‘who's on first' situation. But THAT Conference is the name.Wesley: Specify THAT. Yes.Corey: Exactly. Better specify THAT. Yes. So, what was your keynote about? And for a bit of a behind-the-scenes look, what was that like for you?Wesley: Let me do the behind-the-scenes because it's going to lead up to actual the execution.Corey: Excellent.Wesley: So, I've been on several different podcasts. And one of the ones that I loved for years is one called This Week in Tech with Leo Laporte. Was a big fan of Leo Laporte back in the Screen Saver days back in TechTV days. Loved his opinion, follow his work. And I went to a South by Southwest… three, four years ago where I actually met him.And then from that conversation, he asked me to be on his show. And I've been on the show a handful of times, just talking about tech because I love tech. Tech is my passion, not just doing it, but just experiencing and just being on either side of creating or consuming. When I moved—I moved recently also since, I think, from the last time I was on your show—when I moved here to Wisconsin, the organizer of THAT Conference said that he's been following me for a while, since my first appearance on This Week in Tech, and loved my outlook and my take on things. And he approached me to do a keynote.Since I am now Wisconsin—THAT Conference is been in Wisconsin since inception and it's been going on for ten years—and he wanted me to just basically share my knowledge. Clean slate, have enough time to just say whatever I wanted. I said, “Yes, I can do that.” So, my experience on my end was like sheer excitement and then quickly sheer terror of not having a framework of what I was going to speak on or how I was going to deliver it. And knowing as a keynote, that it would be setting the tone for the whole conference.So, I decided to talk on the thing that I knew the most about, which was myself. Talked about my journey growing up and learning what my strengths, what my weaknesses are, how to navigate life, as well as the corporate jungle, and deciding where I wanted to go. Do I want to be the person that I feel like I need to be in order to be successful, which when we look at structures and examples and the things that we hold on a pedestal, we feel that we have to be perfect, or we have to be knowledgeable, and we have to do everything, well rounded in order to be accepted. Especially being a minority, there's a lot more caveats in terms of being socially acceptable to other people. And then the other path that I could have taken, that I chose to take, was to accept my things that are seen as false, but my own quirkiness, my own uniqueness and putting that front and center about, this is me, this is my person that over the years has formed into this version of myself.I'm going to make sure that is really transparent and so if I go anywhere, they know what they're getting, and they know what they're signing up for by bringing me on board. I have an opinion, I will share my opinion, I will bring my whole self, I won't just be the person that is technical or whimsical, or whatever you're looking for. You have to take the good with the bad, you have to take the I really understand technology, but I have ADHD and I might miss some deadlines. [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word.Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half dozen manage databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications, including Oracle, to the cloud.To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: I have a very similar philosophy, and how I approach these things where it's there is no single speaking engagement that I can fathom even being presented to me, let alone me accepting that is going to be worth me losing the reputation I have developed for authenticity. It's you will not get me to turn into a shill for whatever it is that I am speaking in front of this week. Conversely, whether it's a paid speaking engagement or not, I have a standing policy of not using a platform that is being given to me by a company or organization to make them look foolish. In other words, I will not make someone regret inviting me to speak at their events. Full stop.And I have spoken at events for AWS; I have spoken at events for Oracle, et cetera, et cetera, and there's no company out there that I'm not going to be able to get on stage and tell an entertaining and engaging story, but it requires me to dunk on them. And that's fine. Frankly, if there is a company like that where I could not say nice things about them—such as Facebook—I would simply decline to pursue the speaking opportunity. And that is the way that I view it. And very few companies are on that list, to be very honest with you.Now, there are exceptions to this, if you're having a big public keynote, I will do my traditional live-tweet the keynote and make fun of people because that is, A, expected and, B, it's live-streamed anywhere on the planet I want to be sitting at that point in time, and yeah, if you're saying things in public, you can basically expect that to be the way that I approach these things. But it's a nuanced take, and that is something that is not fully understood by an awful lot of folks who run events. I'll be the first to admit that aspects of who and what I am mean that some speaking engagements are not open to me. And I'm okay with that, on some level, I truly am. It's a different philosophy.But I do know that I am done apologizing for who I am and what I'm about. And at some point that required a tremendous amount of privilege and a not insignificant willingness to take a risk that it was going to work out all right. I can't imagine going back anymore. Now, that road is certainly not what I would recommend to everyone, particularly folks earlier in their career, particularly for folks who don't look just like I do and have a failure mode of a board seat and a book deal somewhere, but figuring out where you will and will not compromise is always an important thing to get straight for yourself before you're presented with a situation where you have to make those decisions, but now there's a whole bunch of incentive to decide in one way or another.Wesley: And that's a journey. You can't just skip sections, right? You didn't get to where you are unless you went through the previous experience that you went through. And it's true for everyone. If you see those success books or how-to books written by people who are extremely rich, and, like, how to become successful and, like, okay, well, that journey is your own. It doesn't make it totally, like, inaccessible to everyone else, but you got to realize that not everyone can walk that path. And—Corey: You were in the right place at the right time, an early employee at a company that did phenomenally well and that catapulted you into reach beyond the wildest dreams of avarice territory. Good for you, but fundamentally, when you give talks like that as a result, what it often presents as is, “I won the lottery, and here's how you can too.” It doesn't work that way. The road you walked was unique to you and that opportunity is closed, not open anyone else, so people have to find their own paths.Wesley: Yeah, and lightning doesn't strike in the same place twice. But there are some things where you can understand some fundamentals. And depending on where you go, I think you do need to know yourself, you do need to know—like, be able to access yourself, but being able to share that, of course, you have to be at a point where you feel comfortable. And so, even if you're in a space where you don't feel that you can be your authentic self or be able to share all parts of you, you yourself should at least know yourself and then make that decision. I agree that it's a point of privilege to be able to say, “Take me how I am.”I'm lucky that I've gotten here, not everyone does, and just because you don't doesn't mean that you're a failure. It just means that the world hasn't caught up yet. People who are part of marginalized society, like, if you are, let's say trans, or if you are even gay, you take the same person, the same stance, the same yearning to be accepted, and then transport it to 50 years ago, you're not safe. You will not necessarily be accepted, or you may not even be successful. And if you have a lane where you can do that, all the power to you, but not everyone could be themselves, and you just need to make sure that at least you can know yourself, even if you don't share that with the world.Corey: It takes time to get there, and I think you're right that it's impossible to get there without walking through the various steps. It's one of the reasons I'm somewhat reluctant to talk overly publicly about my side project gig of paid speaking engagements, for instance, is that the way to get those is you start off by building a reputation as a speaker, and that takes an awful lot of time. And speaking at events where there's no budget even to pay you a speaking fee out of anyway. And part of what gets the keynote invitations to, “Hey, we want you to come and give a talk,” is the fact that people have seen you speak elsewhere and know what you're about and what to expect. Here's a keynote presented by someone who's never presented on stage before is a recipe for a terrifying experience, if not for the speaker or the audience, definitely [laugh] for the event organizers because what if they choke.?Easy example of this, even now hundreds of speaking engagements in, the adrenaline hit right before I go on stage means that sometimes my knees shake a bit before I walk out on stage. I make it a point to warn the people who are standing with me backstage, “Oh, this is a normal thing. Don't worry, it is absolutely expected. It happens every time. Don't sweat it.”And, like, “Thank you for letting us know. That is the sort of thing that's useful.” And then they see me shake, and they get a little skeptical. Like, I thought this guy was a professional. What's the story and I walk on stage and do my thing and I come back. Like, “That was incredible. I was worried at the beginning.” “I told you, we all have our rituals before going on stage. Mine is to shake like a leaf.”But the value there is that people know what to generally expect when I get on stage. It's going to have humor, there's going to be a point interwoven throughout what I tend to say, and in the case of paid speaking engagements, I always make sure I know where the boundaries are of things I can make fun of a big company for. Like, I can get on stage and make fun of service naming or I can make fun of their deprecation policy or something like that, but yeah, making fun of the way that they wind up handling worker relations is probably not going to be great and it could get the person who championed me fired or centered internally. So, that is off the table.Like, even on this podcast, for example, I sometimes get feedback from listeners of, “Well, you have someone from company X on and you didn't beat the crap out of them on this particular point.” It's yeah, you do understand that by having people on the show I'm making a tacit agreement not to attack them. I'm not a journalist. I don't pretend to be. But if I beat someone up with questions about their corporate policy, yeah, very rarely do I have someone who is in a position in those companies to change that policy, and they're certainly not authorized to speak on the record about those things.So, I can beat them up on it, they can say, “I can't answer that,” and we're not going to go anywhere. What is the value of that? It looks like it's not just gotcha journalism, but ineffective gotcha journalism. It doesn't work that way. And that's never been what this show is about.But there's that consistent effort behind the scenes of making sure that people will be entertained, will enjoy what they're seeing, but also are not going to deeply regret giving me a microphone, has always been the balancing act, at least for me. And I want to be clear, my style is humor. It is not for everyone. And my style of humor has a failure mode of being a jerk and making people feel bad, so don't think that my path is the only or even a recommended way for folks who want to get more into speaking to proceed.Wesley: You also mention, though, about, like, punching up versus punching down. And if you really tear down a company after you've been invited to speak, what you're doing is you're punching down at the person who booked you. They're not the CEO; they're not the owner of the company; they're the person who's in charge of running an event or booking speakers. And so, putting that person and throwing them under the bus is punching down because now you're threatening their livelihood, and it doesn't make any market difference in terms of changing the corporate's values or how they execute. So yeah, I totally agree with you in that one.And, like you were saying before, if there's a company you really thought was abhorrent, why speak there? Why give them or lend your reputation to this company if you absolutely feel that it's something you don't want to be associated with? You can just choose not to do that. For me, when I look at speaking, it is important for me to really think about why I'm speaking as well. So, not just the company who's hiring me, but the audience that I'll be serving.So, if I'm going to help with inspiring the next generation of developers, or helping along the thought of how to make the world a better place, or how people themselves can be better people so that we can just change the landscape and make it a lot friendlier, that is also its own… form of compensation and not just speaking for a speaker's fee. So, I do agree that you need to not just be super Negative Nancy, and try to fight all fights. You need to embrace some of the good things and try to make more of those experiences good for everyone, not just the people who are inviting you there, but the people who are attending. And when I started speaking, I was not a good speaker as well. I made a lot of mistakes, and still do, but I think speaking is easier than some people think and if someone truly wants to do it, they should go ahead and get started.What is the saying? If there's something is truly important, you'll be bad at it [laugh] and you'll be okay with it. I started speaking because of my role as a developer advocate. And if you just do a Google search for ‘CFPs,' you can start speaking, too. So, those who are not public speakers and want to get into it, just Google ‘CFP' and then start applying.And then you'll get better at your submissions, you'll get better at your slides, and then once you get accepted, then you'll get better at preparing, then you'll get better at actually speaking. There's a lot of steps between starting and stopping and it's okay to get started doing that route. The other thing I wanted to point out is I feel public speaking is the equivalent of lifting your own bodyweight. If you can do it, you're one of the small few of the population that is willing to do so or that can do it. If you start public speaking, that in itself is an accomplishment and an experience that is something that is somewhat enriching. And being bad at it doesn't take the passion away from you. If you just really want to do it, just keep doing it, even if you're a bad speaker.Corey: Yeah. The way to give a great talk because you have a bunch of terrible talks first.Wesley: Yeah. And it's okay to do that.Corey: And it's not the in entirety of community. It's not even a requirement to be involved with the community. If you're one of those people that absolutely dreads the prospect of speaking publicly, fine. I'm not suggesting that, oh, you need to get over that and get on stage. That doesn't help anyone. Don't do the things you dread doing because you know that it's not going to go well for you.That's the reason I don't touch actual databases. I mean, come on, let's be realistic. I will accidentally the data, and then we won't have a company anymore. So, I know what things I'm good at and things I'm not. I also don't do hostage negotiations, for obvious reasons.Wesley: And also, here's a little, like, secret tip. If you really want to do public speaking and you start doing public speaking and you're not so good at it from other peoples' perspective, but you still love doing it and you think you're getting better, doing public speaking is one of those things where you can say that you do it and no one will really question how good you are at it. [laugh]. If you're just in casual conversation, it's like, “Hey, I wrote a book.” People like, “Oh, wow. This person wrote the book on blah, blah, blah.”Corey: It's a self-published book that says the best way to run Kubernetes. It's a single page; it says, “Don't.” In 150-point type. “The end.” But I wrote a book.Wesley: Yeah.Corey: Yeah.Wesley: People won't probe too much and it'll help you with your development. So, go ahead and get started. Don't worry about doing that thing where, like, I have to be the best before I can present it. Call yourself a public speaker. Check, done.Corey: Always. We are the stories we tell, and nowhere is it more true than in the world of public speaking. I really want to thank you for taking the time out of your day to speak with me about this for a second time in a single year. Oh, my goodness. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, where can they find you?Wesley: I'm on Twitter, @wesley83 on Twitter. And you can find me also on PolyWork. So, polywork.com/wesley83. Or just go to wesleyfaulkner.com which redirects you there. I list pretty much everything that I am working on and any upcoming speaking opportunities, hopefully when they release that feature, will also be on that Polywork page.Corey: Excellent. And of course, I started Polywork recently, and I'm at thoughtleader.cloud because of course I am, which is neither here nor there. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak about this side of the industry that we never really get to talk about much, at least not publicly and not very often.Wesley: Well, thank you for having me on the show. And I wanted to take some time to say thank you for the work that you're doing. Not just elevating voices like myself, but talking truth to power, like we mentioned before, but being yourself and being a great representation of how people should be treating others: being honest without being mean, being snarky without being rude. And other companies and other people who've given me a chance, and given me a platform, I wanted to say thank you to you too, and I wouldn't be here unless it was people like you acknowledging the work that I've been doing.Corey: All it takes is just recognizing what you're doing and acknowledging it. People often want to thank me for this stuff, but it's just, what, for keeping my eyes open? I don't know, I feel like it's just the job; it's not something that is above and beyond any expected normal behavior. The only challenge is I look around the industry and I realize just how wrong that impression is, apparently. But here we are. It's about finding people doing interesting work and letting them tell their story. That's all this podcast has ever tried to be.Wesley: Yeah. And you do it. And doing the work is part of the reward, and I really appreciate you just going through the effort. Even having your ears open is something that I'm glad that you're able to at least know who the people are and who are making noises—or making noise to raise their profile up and then in turn, sharing that with the world. And so, that's a great service that you're providing, not just for me, but for everyone.Corey: Well, thank you. And as always, thank you for your time. Wesley Faulkner, Head of Community at SingleStore. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a rambling comment telling me exactly why DevRel does not need success metrics of any kind.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

SMB Community Podcast by Karl W. Palachuk
Susanne Tedrick - Cloud Strategy for SMBs

SMB Community Podcast by Karl W. Palachuk

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 31:45


Host Karl interviewed Susanne Tedrick. Susanne is a Cloud Infrastructure Specialist for Azure. She's also a published author, and President of CompTIA's Advancing Tech Talent and Diversity executive council. The conversation covers all of those topics: Susanne's book (Advancing Women in Tech), diversity in the IT workspace, an right-sizing Azure cloud services.  Susanne's speciality at Microsoft is supporting professional sports teams and leagues. Leagues are clearly at the enterprise level with one set of challenges. Teams are generally more in the SMB space, often as small as twenty actual users.     Sponsor Memo: Egnyte  Are you still using on-prem file servers and VPNs to share files with remote workers? Egnyte is a business class cloud sharing solution that works more like your on-prem server than other solutions.  With a security first approach to file sharing and collaboration, Egnyte offers multiple options for sharing files and collecting files from outside sources.And do it all addressing data governance and compliance.  Want to learn more? Check out Egnyte.com/mspradio, and when you do, tell them we sent you.  :-)  

The Azure Security Podcast
Microsoft Defender for Containers

The Azure Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 43:11


In this episode we talk to Shay Amar about Microsoft Defender for Containers, we go into the weeds in places! Also, Azure security news about Confidential Compute VMs, Azure Arc, Sentinel and Ransomware. Michael and Sarah also discuss their experiences with the AZ-500 exam refresh.

Ctrl+Alt+Azure
134 - Compliance with Microsoft Purview

Ctrl+Alt+Azure

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 38:30


(00:00) - Intro and catching up.(03:47) - Show content starts.Show links- Microsoft Purview renaming announcement (Microsoft Blog)- Microsoft Purview pricing (Microsoft)SPONSORThis episode is sponsored by ScriptRunner.ScriptRunner is a great solution to centrally manage PowerShell Scripts and standardize and automate IT tasks via a Graphical User Interface for helpdesk or end-users. Check it out on scriptrunner.com

Screaming in the Cloud
Stepping Onto the AWS Commerce Platform with James Greenfield

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 45:23


About JamesJames has been part of AWS for over 15 years. During that time he's led software engineering for Amazon EC2 and more recently leads the AWS Commerce Platform group that runs some of the largest systems in the world, handling volumes of data and request rates that would make your eyes water. And AWS customers trust us to be right all the time so there's no room for error.Links Referenced:Email: jamesg@amazon.comTranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Optimized cloud compute plans have landed at Vultr to deliver lightning-fast processing power, courtesy of third-gen AMD EPYC processors without the IO or hardware limitations of a traditional multi-tenant cloud server. Starting at just 28 bucks a month, users can deploy general-purpose, CPU, memory, or storage optimized cloud instances in more than 20 locations across five continents. Without looking, I know that once again, Antarctica has gotten the short end of the stick. Launch your Vultr optimized compute instance in 60 seconds or less on your choice of included operating systems, or bring your own. It's time to ditch convoluted and unpredictable giant tech company billing practices and say goodbye to noisy neighbors and egregious egress forever. Vultr delivers the power of the cloud with none of the bloat. “Screaming in the Cloud” listeners can try Vultr for free today with a $150 in credit when they visit getvultr.com/screaming. That's G-E-T-V-U-L-T-R dot com slash screaming. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D. Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. And I've been angling to get someone from a particular department at AWS on this show for nearly its entire run. If you were to find yourself in an Amazon building and wander through the various dungeons and boiler rooms and subterranean basements—I presume; I haven't seen nearly as many of you inside of those buildings as people might think—you pass interesting departments labeled things like ‘Spline Reticulation,' or whatnot. And then you come to a very particular group called Commerce Platform.Now, I'm not generally one to tell other people's stories for them. My guest today is James Greenfield, the VP of Commerce Platform at AWS. James, thank you for joining me and suffering the slings and arrows I will no doubt be hurling at you.James: Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it.Corey: So, let's start at the very beginning—because I guarantee you, you're going to do a better job of giving the chapter and verse answer than I would from a background mired deeply in snark—what is Commerce Platform? It sounds almost like it's the retail website that sells socks, books, and underpants.James: So, Commerce Platform actually spans a bunch of different things. And so, I'm going to try not to bore you with a laundry list of all of the things that we do—it's a much longer list than most people assume even internal to AWS—at its core, Commerce Platform owns all of the infrastructure and processes and software that takes the fact that you've been running an EC2 instance, or you're storing an object in S3 for some period of time, and turns it into a number at the end of the month. That is what you asked for that service and then proceeds to try to give you as many ways to pay us as easily as possible. There are a few other bits in there that are maybe less obvious. One is we're also responsible for protecting the platform and our customers from fraudulent activity. And then we're also responsible for helping collect all of the data that we need for internal reporting to support some of the back-ends services that a business needs to do things like revenue recognition and general financial reporting.Corey: One of the interesting aspects about the billing system is just how deeply it permeates everything that happens within AWS. I frequently say that when it comes to cloud, cost and architecture are foundationally and fundamentally the same exact thing. If your entire service goes down, a few interesting things happen. One, I don't believe a single customer is going to complain other than maybe a few accountants here and there because the books aren't reconciling, but also you've removed a whole bunch of constraints around why things are the way that they are. Like, what is the most efficient way to run this workload?Well, if all the computers suddenly become free, I don't really care about efficiency, so much is, “Oh, hey. There's a fly, what do I have as a flyswatter? That's right, I'm going to drop a building on it.” And those constraints breed almost everything. I've said, for example, that S3 has infinite storage because it does.They can add drives faster than we're able to fill them—at least historically; they added some more replication services—but they're going to be able to buy hard drives faster than the rest of us are going to be able to stretch our budgets. If that constraint of the budget falls away, all bets are really off, and more or less, we're talking about the destruction of the cloud as a viable business entity. No pressure or anything.James: [laugh].Corey: You're also a recent transplant into AWS billing as a whole, Commerce Platform in general. You spent 15 years at the company, the vast majority of that over an EC2. So, either it was you've been exiled to a basically digital Siberia or it was one of those, “Okay, keeping all the EC2 servers up, this is easy. I don't see what people stress about.” And they say, “Oh, ho ho, try this instead.” How did you find yourself migrating over to the Commerce Platform?James: That's actually one I've had a lot from folks that I've worked with. You're right, I spent the first 15 or so years of my career at AWS in EC2, responsible for various things over there. And when the leadership role in Commerce Platform opened up, the timing was fortuitous, and part of it, I was in the process of relocating my family. We moved to Vancouver in the middle of last year. And we had an opening in the role and started talking about, potentially, me stepping into that role.The reason that I took it—there's a few reasons, but the primary reason is that if I look back over my career, I've kind of naturally gravitated towards owning things where people only really remember that they exist when they're not working. And for some reason, you know, I enjoy the opportunity to try to keep those kinds of services ticking over to the point where people don't notice them. And so, Commerce Platform lands squarely in that space. I've always been attracted to opportunities to have an impact, and it's hard to imagine having much more of an impact than in the Commerce Platform space. It underpins everything, as you said earlier.Every single one of our customers depends on the service, whether they think about it or realize it. Every single service that we offer to customers depends on us. And so, that really is the sort of nexus within AWS. And I'm a platform guy, I've always been a platform guy. I like the force multiplier nature of platforms, and so Commerce Platform, you know, as I kind of thought through all of those elements, really was a great opportunity to step in.And I think there's something to be said for, I've been a customer of Commerce Platform internally for a long time. And so, a chance to cross over and be on the other side of that was something that I didn't want to pass up. And so, you know, I'm digging in, and learning quickly, ramping up. By no means an expert, very dependent on a very smart, talented, committed group of people within the team. That's kind of the long and short of how and why.Corey: Let's say that I am taking on the role of an AWS product team, for the sake of argument. I know, keep the cringe down for a second, as far as oh, God, the wince is just inevitable when the idea of me working there ever comes up to anyone. But I have an idea for a service—obviously, it runs containers, and maybe it does some other things as well—going from idea to six-pager to MVP to barely better than MVP day-one launch, and at some point, various things happen to that service. It gets staff with a team, objectives and a roadmap get built, a P&L and budget, and a pricing model and the rest. One the last thing that happens, apparently, is someone picks the worst name off of a list of candidates, slaps it on the product, and ships it off there.At what point does the billing system and figuring out the pricing dimensions for a given service tend to factor in? Is that a last-minute story? Is that almost from the beginning? Where along that journey does, “Oh, by the way, we're building this thing. Maybe we should figure out, I don't know, how to make money from it.” Factor into the conversation?James: There are two parts to that answer. Pretty early on as we're trying to define what that service is going to look like, we're already typically thinking about what are the dimensions that we might charge along. The actual pricing discussions typically happen fairly late, but identifying those dimensions and, sort of, the right way to present it to customers happens pretty early on. The thing that doesn't happen early enough is actually pulling the Commerce Platform team in. but it is something that we're going to work this year to try to get a little bit more in front of.Corey: Have you found historically that you have a pretty good idea of how a service is going to be priced, everything is mostly thought through, a service goes to either private preview or you're discussing about a launch, and then more or less, I don't know, someone like me crops up with a, “Hey, yeah, let's disregard 90% of what the service does because I see a way to misuse the remaining 10% of it as a database.” And you run some mental math and realize, “Huh. We're suddenly giving, like, eight petabytes of storage per customer away for free. Maybe we should guard against that because otherwise, it's rife with misuse.” It used to be that I could find interesting ways to sneak through the cracks of various services—usually in pursuit of a laugh—those are getting relatively hard to come by and invariably a lot more trouble than they're worth. Is that just better comprehensive diligence internally, is that learning from customers, or am I just bad at this?James: No, I mean, what you're describing is almost a variant of the Defender's Dilemma. They are way more ways to abuse something than you can imagine, and so defending against that is pretty challenging. And it's important because, you know, if you turn the economics of something upside down, then it just becomes harder for us to offer it to customers who want to use it legitimately. I would say 90% of that improvement is us learning. We make plenty of mistakes, but I think, you know, one of the things that I've always been impressed by over my time here is how intentional we are trying to learn from those mistakes.And so, I think that's what you're seeing there. And then we try very hard to listen to customers, talk to folks like you, because one of the best ways to tackle anything it smells of the Defender's Dilemma is to harness that collective creativity of a large number of smart people because you really are trying to cover as much ground as possible.Corey: There was a fun joke going around a while back of what is the most expensive environment you can get running on a free tier account before someone from AWS steps in, and I think I got it to something like half a billion dollars in the first month. Now, I haven't actually tested this for reasons that mostly have to do with being relatively poor compared to, you know, being able to buy Guam. And understanding as well the fraud protections built into something like AWS are largely built around defending against getting service usage for free that in some way, shape or form, benefits the attacker. The easy example of that would be mining cryptocurrency, which is just super-economic as long as you use someone else's AWS account to do it. Whereas a lot of my vectors are, “Yeah, ignore all of that. How do I just make the bill artificially high? What can I do to misuse data transfer? And passing a single gigabyte through, how much can I make that per gigabyte cost be?” And, “Oh, circular replication and the Lambda invokes itself pattern,” and basically every bad architectural decision you can possibly make only this time, it's intentional.And that shines some really interesting light on it. And I have to give credit where due, a lot of that didn't come from just me sitting here being sick and twisted nearly so much as it did having seen examples of that type of misconfiguration—by mistake—in a variety of customer accounts, most confidently my own because it turns out that the way I learn things is by screwing them up first.James: Yeah, you've touched on a couple of different things in there. So, you know, maybe the first one is, I typically try to draw a line between fraud and abuse. And fraud is essentially trying to spend somebody else's money to get something for free. And we spent a lot of time trying to shut that down, and we're getting really good at catching it. And then abuse is either intentional or unintentional. There's intentional abuse: You find a chink in our armor and you try to take advantage of it.But much more commonly is unintentional abuse. It's not really abuse, you know. Abuse has very negative connotations, but it's unintentionally setting something up so that you run up a much larger bill than you intended. And we have a number of different internal efforts, and we're working on a bunch more this year, to try to catch those early on because one of my personal goals is to minimize the frequency with which we surprise customers. And the least favorite kind of surprise for customers is a [laugh] large bill. And so, what you're talking about there is, in a sufficiently complex system, there's always going to be weaknesses and ways to get yourself tied up in knots.We're trying both at the service team level, but also within my teams to try to find ways to make it as hard as possible to accidentally do that to yourself and then catch when you do so that we can stop it. And even more on the intentional abuse side of things, if somebody's found a way to do something that's problematic for our services, then you know, that's pretty much on us. But we will often reach out and engage with whoever's doing and try to understand what they're trying to do and why. Because often, somebody's trying to do something legitimate, they've got a problem to solve, they found a creative way to solve it, and it may put strain on the service because it's just not something we designed for, and so we'll try to work with them to use that to feed into either new services, or find a better place for that workload, or just bolster what they're using. And maybe that's something that eventually becomes a fully-fledged feature that we offer the customers. We're always open to learning from our customers. They have found far more creative ways to get really cool things done with our services than we've ever imagined. And that's true today.Corey: I mean, most of my service criticisms come down to the fact that you have more-or-less built a very late model, high performing iPad, and I'm out there complaining about, “What a shitty hammer this thing is, it barely works at all, and then it breaks in my hand. What gives?” I would also challenge something you said a minute ago that the worst day for some customers is to get a giant surprise bill, but [unintelligible 00:13:53] to that is, yeah, but, on some level, that kind of only money; you do have levers on your side to fix those issues. A worse scenario is you have a customer that exhibits fraud-like behavior, they're suddenly using far more resources than they ever did before, so let's go ahead and turn them off or throttle them significantly, and you call them up to tell them you saved them some money, and, “Our Superbowl ad ran. What exactly do you think you're doing?” Because they don't get a second bite at that kind of Apple.So, there's a parallel on both sides of this. And those are just two examples. The world is full of nuances, and at the scale that you folks operate at. The one-in-a-million events happen multiple times a second, the corner cases become common cases, and I'm surprised—to be direct—how little I see you folks dropping the ball.James: Credit to all of the teams. I think our secret sauce, if anything, really does come down to our people. Like, a huge amount of what you see as hopefully relatively consistent, good execution comes down to people behind the scenes making sure. You know, like, some of it is software that we built and made sure it's robust and tested to scale, but there's always an element of people behind the scenes, when you hit those edge cases or something doesn't quite go the way that you planned, making sure that things run smoothly. And that, if anything, is something that I'm immensely proud of and is kind of amazing to watch from the inside.Corey: And, on some level, it's the small errors that are the bigger concern than the big ones. Back a couple years ago, when they announced GP3 volumes at re:Invent, well, great, well spin up a test volume and kick the tires on it for an hour. And I think it was 80 or 100 gigs or whatnot, and the next day in the bill, it showed up as about $5,000. And it was, “Okay, that's not great. Not great at all.” And it turned out that it was a mispricing error by I think a factor of a million.And okay, at least it stood out. But there are scenarios where we were prepared to pay it because, oops, you got one over on us. Good job. That's never been the mindset I've gotten about AWS's philosophy for pricing. The better example that I love because no one took it seriously, was a few years before that when there was a LightSail bug in the billing system, and it made the papers because people suddenly found that for their LightSail instance, they were getting predicted bills of $4 billion.And the way I see it, you really only had to make that work once and then you've made your numbers for the year, so why not? Someone's going to pay for it, probably. But that was such out-of-the-world numbers that no one saw that and ever thought it was anything other than a bug. It's the small pernicious things that creep in. Because the billing system is vast; I had no idea when I started working with AWS bills just how complicated it really was.James: Yeah, I remember both of those, and there's something in there that you touched on that I think is really important. That's something that I realized pretty early on at Amazon, and it's why customer obsession is our flagship leadership principle. It's not because it's love and butterflies and unicorns; customer obsession is key to us because that's how you build a long-term sustainable business is your customers depend on you. And it drives how we think about everything that we do. And in the billing space, small errors, even if there are small errors in the customer's favor, slowly erode that trust.So, we take any kind of error really seriously and we try to figure out how we can make sure that it doesn't happen again. We don't always get that right. As you said, we've built an enormous, super-complex business to growing really quickly, and really quick growth like that always acts as kind of a multiplier on top of complexity. And on the pricing points, we're managing millions of pricing points at the moment.And our tools that we use internally, there's always room for improvement. It's a huge area of focus for us. We're in the beginning of looking at applying things like formal methods to make sure that we can make very hard guarantees about the correctness of some of those. But at the end of the day, people are plugging numbers in and you need as many belts and braces as possible to make sure that you don't make mistakes there.Corey: One of the things that struck me by surprise when I first started getting deep into this space was the fact that the finalized bill was—what does it mean to have this be ‘finalized?' It can hit the Cost and Usage Report in an S3 bucket and it can change retroactively after the month closed periodically. And that's when I started to have an inkling of a few things: Not just the sheer scale and complexity inherent to something like the billing system that touches everything, but the sheer data retention stories where you clearly have to be able to go back and reconstruct a bill from the raw data years ago. And I know what the output of all of those things are in the form of Cost and Usage Reports and the billing data from our client accounts—which is the single largest expense in all of our AWS accounts; we spent thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars a year just on storing all of that data, let alone the processing piece of it—the sheer scale is staggering. I used to wonder why does it take you a day to record me using something to it's showing up in the bill? And the more I learned the more it became a how can you do that in only a day?James: Yes, the scale is actually mind-boggling. I'm pretty sure that the core of our billing system is—I'm reasonably confident it's the largest or one of the largest data processing systems on the planet. I remember pretty early on when I joined Commerce Platform and was still starting to wrap my head around some of these things, Googling the definition of quadrillion because we measured the number of metering events, which is how we record usage in services, on a daily basis in the quadrillions, which is a billion billions. So, it's just an absolutely staggering number. And so, the scale here is just out of this world.That's saying something because it's not like other services across AWS are small in their own right. But I'm still reasonably sure that being one of a handful of services that is kind of at the nexus of AWS and kind of deals with the aggregate of AWS's scale, this is probably one of the biggest systems on the planet. And that shows up in all sorts of places. You start with that input, just the sheer volume of metering events, but that has to produce as an output pretty fine-grained line item detailed information, which ultimately rolls up into the total that a customer will see in their bill. But we have a number of different systems further down the pipeline that try to do things like analyze your usage, make sensible recommendations, look for opportunities to improve your efficiency, give you the ability to slice and dice your data and allocate it out to different parts of your business in whatever way it makes sense for your business. And so, those systems have to deal with anywhere from millions to billions to recently, we were talking about trillions of data points themselves. And so, I was tangentially aware of some of the scale of this, but being in the thick of it having joined the team really just does underscore just how vast the systems are.Corey: I think it's, on some level, more than a little unfortunate that that story isn't being more widely told, more frequently. Because when Commerce Platform has job postings that are available on the website, you read it and it's very vague. It doesn't tend to give hard numbers about a lot of these things, and people who don't play in these waters can easily be forgiven for thinking the way that you folks do your job is you fire up one of those 24 terabyte of RAM instances that—you know, those monstrous things that you folks offer—and what do you do next? Well, Microsoft Excel. We have a special high memory version that we've done some horse-trading with our friends over at Microsoft for.It's, yeah, you're several steps beyond that, at this point. It's a challenging problem that every one of your customers has to deal with, on some level, as well. But we're only dealing with the output of a lot of the processing that you folks are doing first.James: You're exactly right. And a big focus for some of my teams is figuring out how to help customers deal with that output. Because even if you're talking about couple of orders of magnitude reduction, you're still talking about very large numbers there. So, to help customers make sense of that, we have a range of tools that exist, we're investing in.There's another dimension of complexity in the space that I think is one that's also very easy to miss. And I think of it as arbitrary complexity. And it's arbitrary because some of the rules that we have to box within here are driven by legislative changes. As you operate more and more countries around the world, you want to make sure that we're tax compliant, that we help our customers be tax compliant. Those rules evolve pretty rapidly, and Country A may sit next to Country B, but that doesn't mean that they're talking to one another. They've all got their own ideas. They're trying to accomplish r—00:22:47Corey: A company is picking up and relocating from India to Germany. How do we—James: Exactly.Corey: —change that on the AWS side and the rest? And it's, “Hoo boy, have you considered burning it all down and filing an insurance claim to start over?” And, like, there's a lot of complexity buried underneath that that just doesn't rise to the notice of 99% of your customers.James: And the fact that it doesn't rise to the notice is something that we strive for. Like, these shouldn't be things that customers have to worry about. Because it really is about clearing away the things that, as far as possible, you don't want to have to spend time thinking about so that you can focus on the thing that your business does that differentiates you. It's getting rid of that undifferentiated heavy lifting. And there's a ton of that in this space, and if you're blissfully unaware of it, then hopefully that means that we're doing our job.Corey: What I'm, I think, the most surprised about, and I have been for a long time. And please don't take this as an insult to various other folks—engineers, the rest, not just in other parts of AWS but throughout the other industry—but talking to the people who work within Commerce Platform has always been just a fantastic experience. The caliber of people that you have managed to attract and largely retain—we don't own people, they do matriculate out eventually—but the caliber of people that you've retained on your teams has just been out of this world. And at first, I wondered, why are these awesome people working on something as boring and prosaic as billing? And then I started learning a little bit more as I went, and, “Oh, wow. How did they learn all the stuff that they have to hold in their head in tension at once to be able to build things like this?” It's incredibly inspiring just watching the caliber of the people that you've been able to bring in.James: I've been really, really excited joining this team, as I've gotten other folks on the team because there's some super-smart people here. But what's really jumped out to me is how committed the team is. This is, for the most part, a team that has been in the space for many years. Many of them have—we talk about boomerangs, folks who live AWS, go spend some time somewhere else and come back and there's a surprisingly high proportion of folks in Commerce Platform who have spent time somewhere else and then come back because they enjoy the space, they find that challenging, folks are attracted to the ability to have an impact because it is so foundational. But yeah, there's a super-committed core to this team. And I really enjoy working with teams where you've got that because then you really can take the long view and build something great. And I think we have tons of opportunities to do that here.Corey: It sounds ridiculous, but I've reached out to team members before to explain two-cent variances in my bill, and never once have I been confronted with a, “It's two cents. What do you care?” They understand the requirement that these things be accurate, not just, “Eh, take our word for it.” And also, frankly, they understand that two cents on a $20 bill looks a little different on a $20 million bill. So yeah, let us figure out if this is systemic or something I have managed to break.It turns out the Cost and Usage Report processing systems don't love it when there's a cost allocation tag whose name contains an emoji. Who knew? It's the little things in life that just have this fun way of breaking when you least expect it.James: They're also a surprisingly interesting problem. So like, it turns out something as simple as rounding numbers consistently across a distributed system at this scale, is a non-trivial problem. And if you don't, then you do get small seventh or eighth decimal place differences that add up to something that then shows up as a two-cent difference somewhere. And so, there's some really, really interesting problems in the space. And I think the team often takes these kinds of things as a personal challenge. It should be correct, and it's not, so we should go make sure it is correct. The interesting problems abound here, but at the end of the day, it's the kind of thing that any engineering team wants to go and make sure it's correct because they know that it can be.Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half dozen manage databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications, including Oracle, to the cloud.To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: On the one hand, I love people who just round and estimate—we all do that, let's be clear; I sit there and I back-of-the-envelope everything first. But then I look at some of your pricing pages and I count the digits after the zeros. Like, you're talking about trillionths of a dollar on some of your pricing points. And you add it up in the course of a given hour and it's like, oh, it's $250 a month, most months. And it's you work backwards to way more decimal places of precision than is required, sometimes.I'm also a personal fan of the bill that counts, for example, number of Route 53 zones. Great. And it counts them to four decimal places of precision. Like, I don't even know what half of it Route 53 zone is at this point, let alone something to, like, ah the 1,000th of the zone is going to cause this. It's all an artifact of what the underlying systems are.Can you by any chance shed a little light on what the evolution of those systems has been over a period of time? I have to imagine that anything you built in the early days, 16 years ago or so from the time of this recording when S3 launched to general availability, you probably didn't have to worry about this scope and scale of what you do, now. In fact, I suspect if you tried to funnel this volume through S3 back then, the whole thing would have collapsed under its own weight. What's evolved over the time that you had the billing system there? Because changes come slowly to your environment. And frankly, I appreciate that as a customer. I don't like surprising people in finance.James: Yeah, you're totally right. So, I joined the EC2 team as an engineer myself, some 16 years ago, and the very first thing that I did was our billing integration. And so, my relationship with the Commerce Platform organization—what was the billing team way back when—it goes back over my entire career at AWS. And at the time, the billing team was similar, you know, [unintelligible 00:28:34] eight people. And that was everything. There was none of the scale and complexity; it was all one system.And much like many of our biggest, oldest services—EC2 is very similar, S3 is as well—there's been significant growth over the last decade-and-a-half. A lot of that growth has been rapid, and rapid growth presents its own challenges. And you live with decisions that you make early on that you didn't realize were significant decisions that have pretty deep implications 15 years later. We're still working through some of those; they present their own challenges. Evolving an existing system to keep up with the growth of business and a customer base that's as varied and complex as ours is always challenging.And also harder but I also think more fun than a clean sheet redo at this point. Like, that's a great thought exercise for, well, if we got to do this again today, what would we do now that we've learned so much over the last 15 years? But there's this—I find it personally fascinating challenge with evolving a live system where it's like, “No, no, like, things exist, so how do we go from there to where we want to be next?”Corey: Turn the billing system off for 18 months, rebuild—James: Yeah. [laugh].Corey: The whole thing from first principles. Light it up. I'm sure you'd have a much better billing system, and also not a company left anymore.James: [laugh]. Exactly, exactly. I've always enjoyed that challenge. You know, even prior to AWS, my previous careers have involved similar kinds of constraints where you've got a live system, or you've got an existing—in the one case, it was an existing SDK that was deployed to tens of thousands of customers around the world, and so backwards compatibility was something that I spent the first five years of my career thinking about it way more detail than I think most people do. And it's a very similar mindset. And I enjoy that challenge. I enjoy that: How do I evolve from here to there without breaking customers along the way?And that's something that we take pretty seriously across AWS. I think SimpleDB is the poster child for we never turn things off. But that applies equally to the services that are maybe less visible to customers, and billing is definitely one of them. Like, we don't get to switch stuff off. We don't get to throw things away and start again. It's this constant state of evolution.Corey: So, let's say that I were to find a way to route data through a series of two Managed NAT Gateways and then egress to internet, and the sheer density of the expense of that traffic tears a hole in the fabric of space-time, it goes back 15 years ago, and you can make a single change to how the billing system was built. What would it be? What pisses you off the most about the current constraints that you have to work within or around?James: I think one of the biggest challenges we've got, actually, is the concept of an account. Because an account means half-a-dozen different things. And way back, when it seemed like a great idea, you just needed an account; an account was your customer, and it was the same thing as the boundary that you put all your resources inside. And of course, it's the same thing that you're going to roll all of your usage up and issue a bill against. And that has been one of the areas that's seen the most evolution and probably still has a pretty long way to go.And what's interesting about that is, that's probably something we could have seen coming because we watched the retail business go through, kind of, the same evolution because they started with, well, a customer is a customer is a customer and had to evolve to support the concept of sellers and partners. And then users are different than customers, and you want to log in and that's a different thing. So, we saw that kind of bifurcation of a single entity into a wide range of different related but separate entities, and I think if we'd looked at that, you know, thought out 15 years, then yeah, we could probably have learned something from that. But at the same time, when AWS first kicked off, we had wild ambitions for it, but there was no guarantee that it was going to be the monster that it is today. So, I'm always a little bit reluctant to—like, it's a great thought exercise, but it's easy to end up second-guessing a pretty successful 15 years, so I'm always a little bit careful to walk that line. But I think account is one of the things that we would probably go back and think about a little bit more.Corey: I want to be very clear with this next question that it is intentionally setting up a question I suspect you get a lot. It does not mirror my own thinking on the matter even slightly, but I get a version of it myself all the time. “AWS bills, that sounds boring as hell. Why would you choose to work on such a thing?” Now, I have a laundry list of answers to that aren't nearly as interesting as I suspect yours are going to be. What makes working on this problem space interesting to you?James: There's a bunch of different things. So, first and foremost, the scale that we're talking about here is absolutely mind-blowing. And for any engineer who wants to get stuck into problems that deal with mind-blowingly large volumes of data, incredibly rich dimensions, problems where, honestly, applying techniques like statistical reasoning or machine learning is really the only way to chip away at it, that exists in spades in the space. It's not always immediately obvious, and I think from the outside, it's easy to assume this is actually pretty simple. So, the scale is a huge part of that.Corey: “Oh, petabytes. How quaint.”James: [laugh]. Exactly. Exactly I mean, it's mind-blowing every time I see some of the numbers in various parts of the Commerce Platform space. I talked about quadrillions earlier. Trillions is a pretty common unit of measure.The complexity that I talked about earlier, that's a result of external environments is another one. So, imposed by external entities, whether it's a government or a tax authority somewhere, or a business requirement from customers, or ourselves. I enjoy those as well. Those are different kinds of challenge. They really keep you on your toes.I enjoy thinking of them as an engineering problem, like, how do I get in front of them? And that's something we spend a lot of time doing in Commerce Platform. And when we get it right, customers are just unaware of it. And then the third one is, I personally am always attracted to the opportunity to have an impact. And this is a space where we get to hopefully positively impact every single customer every day. And that, to me is pretty fulfilling.Those are kind of the three standout reasons why I think this is actually a super-exciting space. And I think it's often an underestimated space. I think once folks join the team and sort of start to dig in, I've never heard anybody after they've joined, telling me that what they're doing is boring. Challenging, yes. Is frustrating, sometimes. Hard, absolutely, but boring never comes up.Corey: There's almost no service, other than IAM, that I can think of that impacts every customer simultaneously. And it's easy for me to sit in the cheap seats and say, “Oh, you should change this,” or, “You should change that.” But every change you have is so massive in scale that it's going to break a whole bunch of companies' automations around the bill processing in different ways. You have an entire category of user persona who is used to clicking a certain button in this certain place in the console to generate the report every month, and if that button moves or changes color, or has a different font, suddenly that renders their documentation invalid, and they're scrambling because it's not their core competency—nor should it be—and every change you make is so constricted, just based upon all the different concerns that you've got to be juggling with. How do you get anything done at all? I find that to be one of the most impressive aspects about your organization, bar none.James: Yeah, I'm not going to lie and say that it isn't a challenge, but a lot of it comes down to the talent that we have on the team. We have a super-motivated, super-smart, super-engaged team, and we spend a lot of time figuring out how to make sure that we can keep moving, keep up with the business, keep up with a world that's getting more complicated [laugh] with every passing day. So, you've kind of hit on one of the core challenges there, which is, how do we keep up with all of those different dimensions that are demanding an increasing amount of engineering and new support and new investment from us, while we keep those customers happy?And I think you touched on something else a little bit indirectly there, which is, a lot of our customers are actually pretty technical across AWS. The customers that Commerce Platform supports, are often the least technical of our customers, and so often need the most help understanding why things are the way they are, where the constraints are.Corey: “A big bill from Amazon. How many books did you people buy last month?”—James: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: —is still very much level of understanding in some cases. And it's not because they're dumb; far from it. It's just, imagine that some people view there as being more to life than understanding the nuances and intricacies of cloud computing. How dare they?James: Exactly. Who would have thought?Corey: So, as you look now over all of your domain, such as it is, what sucks the most? What are you looking to fix as far as impactful changes that the rest of the world might experience? Because I'm not going to accept one of those questions like, “Oh, yeah, on the back-end, we have this storage subsystem for a tertiary thing that just annoys me because it wakes us up once in a whi”—no, no, I want something customer-facing. What's the painful thing you're looking at fixing next?James: I don't like surprising customers. And free tier is, sort of, one of those buckets of surprises, but there are others. Another one that's pretty squarely in my sights is, whether we like it or not, customer accounts get compromised. Usually, it's a password got reused somewhere or was accidentally committed into a GitHub repository somewhere.And we have pretty established, pretty effective mechanisms for finding all of those, we'll scan for passwords and credentials, and alert customers to those, and help them correct that pretty quickly. We're also actually pretty good at detecting when an account does start to do something that suggests that it's been compromised. Usually, the first thing that a compromised account starts to do is cryptocurrency mining. We're pretty quick to catch those; we catch those within a matter of hours, much faster most days.What we haven't really cracked and where I'm focused at the moment is getting back to the customer in a way that's effective. And by that I mean specifically, we detect an account compromised super-quickly, we reach out automatically. And so, you know, a customer has got some kind of contact from us usually within a couple of hours. It's not having the effect that we need it to. Customers are still being surprised a month later by a large bill. And so, we're digging into how much of that is because they never saw the contact, they didn't know what to do with the contact.Corey: It got buried with all the other, “Hey, we saw you spun up an S3 bucket. Have you heard of what S3 is?” Again, that's all valuable, but you have 300-some-odd services. If you start doing that for every service, you're going to hit mail sending limits for Gmail.James: Exactly. It's not just enough that we detect those and notify customers; we have to reduce the size of the surprise. It's one thing to spend 100 bucks a month on average, and then suddenly find that your spend has jumped $250 because you reused the password somewhere and somebody got ahold of it and it's cryptocurrency-mining your account. It's a whole different ballgame to spend 100 bucks a month and then at the end of the month discover that your bill is suddenly $2,000 or $20,000. And so, that's something that I really wanted to make some progress on this year. Corey: I've really enjoyed our conversation. If people want to learn more about how you view these things, how you're approaching some of these problems, or potentially are just the right kind of warped to consider joining up, where's the best place for them to go?James: They should drop me an email at jamesg@amazon.com. That is the most direct way to get hold of me, and I promise I will get back to you. I try to stay on top of my email as much as possible. But that will come straight to me, and I'm always happy to talk to folks about the space, talk to folks about opportunities in this team, opportunities across AWS, or just hear what's not working, make sure that it's something that we're aware of and looking at.Corey: Throughout Amazon, but particularly within Commerce Platform, I've always appreciated the response of, whenever I report something, no matter how ridiculous it is—and I assure you there's an awful lot of ridiculousness in my bug reports—the response has always been the same: “Tell me more. Help me understand what it is you're trying to achieve—even if it is ridiculous—so we can look at this and see what is actually going on.” Every Amazonian team has been great about that or you're not at Amazon very long, but you folks have taken that to an otherworldly level. I just want to thank you for doing that.James: I appreciate you for calling that out. We try, you know, we really do. We take listening to our customers very seriously because, at the end of the day, that's what makes us better, and that's how we make sure we're in it for the long haul.Corey: Thanks once again for being so generous with your time. I really appreciate it.James: Yeah, thanks for having me on. I've enjoyed it.Corey: James Greenfield, VP of Commerce Platform at AWS. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment—possibly on YouTube as well—about how you aren't actually giving this five-stars at all; you have taken three trillions of a star off of the rating.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Azure Podcast
Episode 424 - Landing Zone Accelerator for API Management

The Azure Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022


Our very own Cynthia Kreng, who is a PM in the Worldwide Customer Success Unit focused on Developer acceleration, talks to us about one their first offerings in API Management.   Media file: https://azpodcast.blob.core.windows.net/episodes/Episode424.mp3 YouTube: https://youtu.be/UusIj1ikvLM Resources: Repo: https://aka.ms/EnterpriseScale-APIM Docs: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/cloud-adoption-framework/scenarios/app-platform/api-management/landing-zone-accelerator   Other resources: Manage Red Hat workloads seamlessly on Azure https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/manage-red-hat-workloads-seamlessly-on-azure/   Accelerating innovation in the diabetic foot market with Azure Health Data Services https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/accelerating-innovation-in-the-diabetic-foot-market-with-azure-health-data-services/   Join us and the developer community to celebrate Azure Static Web Apps https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/join-us-and-the-developer-community-to-celebrate-azure-static-web-apps/     Microsoft Build 5/24-5/26 https://mybuild.microsoft.com/  

The Cloud Pod
164: The Cloud Pod SWIFT-ly Moves Its Money to Google Cloud

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 42:45


On The Cloud Pod this week, Peter's been suspended without pay for two weeks for not filing his vacation requests in triplicate. Plus it's earnings season once again, there's a major Google and SWIFT collaboration afoot, and MSK Serverless is now generally available, making Kafka management fairly hassle-free. A big thanks to this week's sponsor, Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. This week's highlights

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Network Break 382: Intel Charts DPU Roadmap; Juniper Brings Contrail SDN To Kubernetes

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 46:00


This week's Network Break podcast discuss Intel's roadmap for its Infrastructure Processing Units (IPUs). We get more insight into Nokia's deal to provide hardware for Azure, and examine why Juniper has extended its Contrail SDN platform to Kubernetes (hint: because of the cloud). Plus Cisco releases new Wi-Fi capabilities. The post Network Break 382: Intel Charts DPU Roadmap; Juniper Brings Contrail SDN To Kubernetes appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Network Break
Network Break 382: Intel Charts DPU Roadmap; Juniper Brings Contrail SDN To Kubernetes

Packet Pushers - Network Break

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 46:00


This week's Network Break podcast discuss Intel's roadmap for its Infrastructure Processing Units (IPUs). We get more insight into Nokia's deal to provide hardware for Azure, and examine why Juniper has extended its Contrail SDN platform to Kubernetes (hint: because of the cloud). Plus Cisco releases new Wi-Fi capabilities. The post Network Break 382: Intel Charts DPU Roadmap; Juniper Brings Contrail SDN To Kubernetes appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Network Break 382: Intel Charts DPU Roadmap; Juniper Brings Contrail SDN To Kubernetes

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 46:00


This week's Network Break podcast discuss Intel's roadmap for its Infrastructure Processing Units (IPUs). We get more insight into Nokia's deal to provide hardware for Azure, and examine why Juniper has extended its Contrail SDN platform to Kubernetes (hint: because of the cloud). Plus Cisco releases new Wi-Fi capabilities. The post Network Break 382: Intel Charts DPU Roadmap; Juniper Brings Contrail SDN To Kubernetes appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Cloud Security Podcast
Finding Security Holes in Azure Services

Cloud Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 34:42


In this episode of the Virtual Coffee with Ashish edition, we spoke with Yoav Alon, CTO, Orca Security Episode ShowNotes, Links and Transcript on Cloud Security Podcast: www.cloudsecuritypodcast.tv Host Twitter: Ashish Rajan (@hashishrajan) Guest Twitter: Yoav Alon (@yoavalon) Podcast Twitter - @CloudSecPod @CloudSecureNews If you want to watch videos of this LIVE STREAMED episode and past episodes - Check out our other Cloud Security Social Channels: - Cloud Security News - Cloud Security Academy

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien
Real World Enterprise Serverless Java on AWS Cloud

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 66:41


An airhacks.fm conversation with Goran Opacic (@goranopacic) about: sales force automation at ehsteh, Palm Pilot syncing, starting a SaS company, hetzner, Azure, then AWS, running EC2 machines, going serverless, kubernetes and the clouds, running MicroProfile applications on Quarkus and AWS Lambda, one code base - multiple lambdas, Lambda runs on Firecracker VM, OkHTTP on Lambdas, tree shaking with GraalVM, AWS CodeArtifact to cache Maven repositories, Amazon ECR, AWS CodeCommit, databases are hard to split, AWS CodeDeploy with scheduler, code hot swap, managed services is serverless, running AWS Fargate on spot intances, using Eclipse BIRT on AWS Lambda, Goran is AWS Data Hero, Goran Opacic on twitter: @goranopacic, Goran's blog: madabout.cloud

TalkingHeadz on enterprise communications
Talking DRaaS with Dawn-Marie Elder of SIPPIO

TalkingHeadz on enterprise communications

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 31:31


TalkingHeadz is an interview format podcast featuring the movers and shakers of enterprise communications - we also have great guests. In this episode  Dave and Evan  discuss how carrier services can improve services such as Microsoft Teams and Zoom  with Dawn-Marie Elder, GM and COO of SIPPIO. SIPPIO offers a single platform and automation for DRaaS (Direct Routing as a Service), Operator Connect, and Zoom Cloud Peering, These are all cloud-native services on Azure. In this podcast we learn more about SIPPIO and Dawn-Marie, and even uncover a few unmentionables. Dawn-Marie was a pioneer in cloud sales with Microsoft's launch of BPOS (now Microsoft 365). At Avaya she got exposure to Telephony and digital transformation. Dawn-Marie lives in North Carolina. In addition to COO, her other titles include Mother, Wife, and Chief Gardner. 

CloudSkills.fm
146: Learning Kubernetes in the Real World with Richard Hooper

CloudSkills.fm

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 33:39


In this episode Mike Pfeiffer chats with Richard Hooper about working with Kubernetes, learning Azure, and what customers are dealing with when moving towards cloud native.Richard HooperLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/%E2%98%81-richard-hooper-598a1412/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Pixel_RobotsWebsite: https://pixelrobots.co.ukYouTube (Azure Cloud Native): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2Pk9GcHhlVV0R9CQIU6gLwMike Pfeifferhttps://linktr.ee/mikepfeiffer

Ikkunastudio
#139: Ympäristönsuojelu, datanhallinta, tietoturva - kevään kova trio

Ikkunastudio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 40:58


Azure Purview is now Microsoft PurviewMicrosoft's Cloud Growth Propels Quarterly Sales, EarningsAmazon still undisputed king of public cloud, but Microsoft is creeping closer | TechCrunchHow Microsoft measures datacenter water and energy use to improve Azure Cloud sustainability | Azure Blog and Updates | Microsoft AzureIn Microsoft's Activision deal, a future world is at stake (cnbc.com)These are Microsoft's top 10 most popular open-source GitHub repositories - NeowinMicrosoft announces new collaboration with Red Button for attack simulation testing | Azure Blog and Updates | Microsoft AzureMicrosoft issues warning about human-operated ransomware - NeowinGeneral availability: App Service - Networking capabilities added to Basic pricing tier | Azure updates | Microsoft AzureGenerally available: Automated key rotation in Azure Key Vault | Azure updates | Microsoft Azure

Iron Sysadmin Podcast
Episode 121a - Finding software to learn on

Iron Sysadmin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 53:55


Welcome to Episode 121 Main Topic How do I get a hold of expensive software, for the purposes of learning? Check with your school, a LOT of vendors have super-cheap solutions for education.  Your school may be able to provide you a learning license/sub for software you are interested in Less than Legal alternatives Red hat enterprise linux Red Hat Developer Sub https://developers.redhat.com/articles/getting-red-hat-developer-subscription-what-rhel-users-need-know#  Centos literally feeds RHEL, Centos stream is an extremely similar platform. Fedora feeds Centos, Ubuntu Ubuntu Server is free, but you can buy support from Canonical Windows Server Try it on azure's free tier Windows server will run for some time without activation Talk to a partner about a trial https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/downloads/virtual-machines/ https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-edge/tools/vms/  https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/trial  Red Hat Openshift https://developers.redhat.com/openshift/hosting-openshift Trial, ask your account rep OKD is the upstream for Openshift OpenShift Online has a free tier First, are you a student?  What if i Just CANNOT find a demo? Operating Systems VM/Container platforms   Vmware vsphere https://www.vmware.com/try-vmware.html https://customerconnect.vmware.com/en/web/vmware/evalcenter?p=free-esxi7 . Vmware has a surprising number of public trials/demos, and even labs, here: Or just stand-alone esxi?  Industry Software Included with most RHEL subs, but not the dev sub.   Trials are available.  The Katello project is the open source upstream Oracle DB Their site seems to steer you toward an account rep, or their cloud. I believe that oracle will operate without a license, but I do not know that they have an official trial Red Hat Satellite Oracle SaaS and Cloud Aws AWS Free Tier https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/trial  Also, amazon linux is pretty similar to RHEL…  Google compute https://cloud.google.com/compute/  You get a $300 credit to get hooked. Azure https://azure.microsoft.com/en-in/free/  Effectively a 30 day trial, you get $200 to use for 30 days Digital ocean https://try.digitalocean.com/freetrialoffer/  Currently a 60 day/$100 trial Linode $100 trial credit Rotating list of promotions: https://www.linode.com/promotions/ Github Free for all, as far as I know Enterprise: (includes a free trial link) https://github.com/enterprise     Watch us live on the 2nd and 4th Thursday of every month! Subscribe and hit the bell! https://www.youtube.com/IronSysadminPodcast  OR https://twitch.tv/IronSysadminPodcast   Discord Community: https://discord.gg/wmxvQ4c2H6  Find us on Twitter, and Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/ironsysadmin https://www.twitter.com/ironsysadmin Subscribe wherever you find podcasts! And don't forget about our patreon! https://patreon.com/ironsysadmin   Intro and Outro music credit: Tri Tachyon, Digital MK 2http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Tri-Tachyon/ 

Screaming in the Cloud
Making “Devrelopment” Your Own with Priyanka Vergadia

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:29


About PriyankaPriyanka Vergadia is currently a Staff  Developer Advocate at Google Cloud where she works with enterprises to build and architect their cloud platforms. She enjoys building engaging technical content and continuously experiments with new ways to tell stories and solve business problems using Google Cloud tools. You can check out some of the stories that she has created for the developer community on the Google Cloud Platform Youtube channel. These include "Deconstructing Chatbots", "Get Cooking in Cloud", "Pub/Sub Made Easy" and more. ..Links Referenced: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pvergadia/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/pvergadia Priyanka's book: https://www.amazon.com/Visualizing-Google-Cloud-Illustrated-References/dp/1119816327 TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D. Corey: What if there were a single place to get an inventory of what you're running in the cloud that wasn't "the monthly bill?" Further, what if there were a way to compare that inventory to what you were already managing via Terraform, Pulumi, or CloudFormation, but then automatically add the missing unmanaged or drifted parts to it? And what if there were a policy engine to immediately flag and remediate a wide variety of misconfigurations? Well, stop dreaming and start doing; visit snark.cloud/firefly to learn more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. Periodically, I get the privilege of speaking to people who work in varying aspects of some would call it developer evangelism, some would call it developer advocacy, developer relations is a commonly accepted term, and I of course call it devrelopers because I enjoy annoying absolutely everyone by giving things terrible names. My guest today is Priyanka Vergadia, who is a staff developer advocate at Google Cloud. Priyanka, thank you for joining me.Priyanka: Thank you so much for having me. Corey. I'm so excited to be your developer—what did you call it again?Corey: Devreloper. Yes indeed.Priyanka: Devreloper. That is the term I'm going to be using from now on. I am a devreloper. Anyway.Corey: Excellent.Priyanka: Yeah.Corey: I'm starting to spread this out so that eventually we're going to form a giant, insufferable army of people who pronounce it that way, and it's going to be great.Priyanka: It's going to be awesome. [laugh].Corey: One of the challenges, even as I alluded to different titles within this space, everyone has a slightly different definition of where the role starts and stops, just in terms of its function, let alone the myriad ways that can be expressed. In the before times, I knew a number of folks in the developer advocacy space who were more or less worldwide experts in accumulating airline miles and racking up status and going from conference to conference to conference to more or less talk about things that had a tenuous at best connection to where they worked. Great. Other folks have done things in very different ways. Some people write extensively, blog posts and the rest, others build things a sample code, et cetera, et cetera.It seems like every time I talk to someone in the space, they have found some new and exciting way of carrying the message of what their company does to arguably a very cynical customer group. Where do you start and stop with your devrelopment?Priyanka: Yeah. So, that is such—like, all the devrelopers have their own style that they have either adopted or learned over time that works for them. When I started, I think about three years ago, I did go to conferences, did those events, give talks, all of that, but I was also—my actual introduction to DevRel [laugh] was with videos. I started creating my first series was deconstructing chatbots, and I was very interested in learning more about chatbots. So, I was like, you know what, I'm just going to teach everybody, and learn.So like, learn and teach at the same time was my motto, and that's kind of how I got started into, like, okay, I'm going to create a few videos to learn this and teach it. And during the process I was like, “I want to do this more.” And that's kind of transitioned, my move from being in front of customers, which I still end up doing, but I was doing more of just, you know, working with customers extensively to get their deployments done. This was a segue for me to, you know, think back, sit back and think about what's working and what I personally enjoy doing more, and that's what got me into creating videos. And it's like, okay, I'm going to become a devreloper now.And that's kind of how the whole, like, journey started. And for me, like you were pointing out earlier—should I just stop because I've been talking too long? [laugh].Corey: No, keep going. Please, [unintelligible 00:04:10] it's fine.Priyanka: [laugh]. For me, I started—I found my, I would say, in the last two years—it was all before the pandemic, we were all either writing blogs or doing videos or going to conferences, so it was, you know, the pandemic kind of brought us to a point where it's like, “Okay, let's think about—we can't meet each other; let's think about other ways to communicate and how can we make it creative and exciting?”Corey: And the old way started breaking down, too, where it's, “Yay, I'm going to watch an online conference.” “What is it?” “Oh, it's like a crappy Zoom only you don't have to pretend to pay attention in the same way.” And as a presenter, then you've got to modify what you're doing to understand that people's attention spans are shorter, distraction is always a browser tab away, and unlike a physical event, people don't feel the same sense of shame of getting up from the front row and weaving in front of 300 people, and not watching the rest of your talk. I mean, don't get me wrong, I'll still do it, but I'll feel bad about it.Now it's, “Oh, nope, I'm sitting here in my own little… hovel, I'm just going to do and watch whatever I want to do.” So, you've got to—it forces you to up your game, and it—Priyanka: Yep.Corey: Still doesn't quite have the same impact.Priyanka: Yeah. Or just switch off the camera, if you're like me, and just—uh, shut off the camera, go away or do something else. And, yeah, it's very easy to do that. So, it's not the same, which is why it prompted, I think all of us DevRel people to think about new ways to connect, which is for me that way to connect is art and visual aspects, to kind of bring that—because that—we are all whether we accept it or not or like it or not, we're all visual learners, so that's kind of how I think when it comes to creating content is visually appealing, and that's when people can dive in. [laugh].Corey: I am in the, I guess opposite side of the universe from you, where I acknowledge and agree with everything you're saying that people are visual creatures inherently, but I have effectively zero ability in that direction. My medium has always been playing games with words and language. And over time, I had the effectively significantly belated realization that wait a minute, just because I'm not good at a thing doesn't mean that other people might not be good at that thing, and I don't have to do every last part of it myself. Suddenly, I didn't have to do my own crappy graphic design because you can pay people who are worlds better than I'll ever be, and so on and so forth. I don't edit my own podcast audio because I'm bad at that, too.But talking about things is a different story, writing about things, building things is where I tend to see a lot of what I do tend to resonate. But I admit I bias for the things that I enjoy doing and the way that I enjoy consuming things. You do as well because relatively recently, as of time of this recording, you have done what I don't believe anyone actually wants to do. You wrote a book. Now, everyone wants to have written a book, but no one actually wants to write a book.Priyanka: So, true. [laugh].Corey: But it's not like most technical books. Tell me about it.Priyanka: Yeah, I actually never thought I would write a book. If you asked me two years ago—three years ago, I would say, I would have never thought that I would write a book because I am not a text person. So, I don't like to read a lot of texts because it zones out. So, for me, when I started creating some of these sketches, and sharing it on social media and in blogs and things like that, and gotten the attention that it has gotten from people, that's when I was like, okay, ding, ding, ding. I think I can do a visual book with these images.And this was like, halfway through, I'd already created, like, 30 sketches at this point. And I was like, “Okay, maybe I can turn this into a book,” which would be interesting for me because I like doing art-type things along with teaching, and it's not text because I wanted to do this in a very unique way. So yeah, that's kind of how it ended up happening.Corey: I have a keen appreciation for people who approach things with a different point of view. One of your colleagues, Forrest Brazeal, took a somewhat similar approach in the in his book, The Read Aloud Cloud, where it was illustrated, and everything he did was in rhyme, which is a constant source of envy for me, where it's, “Mmm, I've got to find a way to one-up him again.” And it's… he is inexorable, as far as just continuing to self-improve. So, all right, we're going to find a way to wind up defeating that. With you, it's way easier.I read a book, like, wow, this is gorgeous and well-written that it's attractive to look at, and I will never be able to do any of those things. That's all you. It doesn't feel like we're trying to stand at the same spot in the universe in quite the same way. Nothing but love for Forrest. Let's be clear. I am teasing. I consider him a friend.Priyanka: He is amazing. Well honestly, like, I actually got to know Forrest when I decided to do this book. Wiley, who's the publisher, sent me Forrest's book, and he said, “You should look at this book because the idea that you are presenting to me, we could lay it out in this format.” Like, in the, you know, physical format. So, he sent me that book. And that's how I know Forrest, honestly.So, I told him that—this is a little story that I told him after. But anyway, yeah. I—the—[sigh]—I was going to make a point about the vid—the aspect of creating images, like, honestly, like, I designed the aspects of, like, how you layout information in the sketches, I studied a bunch of stuff to come up with, how do I make it precise and things like that. But there's no way this book was possible without some design help. Like, I can't possibly do the entire thing unless I have, like, five years. [laugh]. So—Corey: Right on top of all of this, you do presumptively have a day job as well—and while—Priyanka: Exactly.Corey: This is definitely related. “I'm just going to go write a book.” “Oh, is it a dissertation?” “No, it's going to look more like a children's book than that,” is what they're going to hear. And it's yeah, I'm predicting some problems with the performance evaluation process at large companies when you start down those paths.Priyanka: Exactly. So, I ended up, like, showing all these numbers, like, of the blog views and reads and social media, the presence of some of these images that were going wider. And in the GCPSketchnote GitHub repo got a huge number of stars. And it was like, everybody could see that writing a book would be amazing. From that point on, I was just like, I don't think I can scale that.So, when I was drawing—this is an example—when I drew my first sketch, it took me an entire weekend to just draw one sketch, which is what—I was only doing that the entire weekend—like, assume, like, 16 hours of work, just drawing the one sketch. So, if I went with that pace, this book was not possible. So, you know, after I had the idea laid out, had the process in place, I got some design help, which made it—which expedited the process much, much faster. [laugh].Corey: There's a lot to be said, for doing something that you enjoy. Do you do live sketchnoting during conference talks as well, or do you tend to not do it while someone is talking at a reasonably fast clip, and well, in 45 minutes, this had better be done, so let's go. I've seen people who can do that, and I just marvel in awe at what they do.Priyanka: I don't do live. I don't do live sketching. For me, paper and pen is a better medium so that's just the medium that I like to work with. So, when the talk is happening, I'm actually taking notes on a pen and a paper. And then after, I can sketch it out, faster in a fast way.Like, I did one sketchnote for Next 2020, I think, and that was done, like, a day after Next was over so I could take all the bits and pieces that were important and put it into that sketch. But I can't do it live. That's just one of the things I haven't figured out yet. [laugh].Corey: For me, I was always writing my email newsletter, so it was relatively rapid turnaround, and Twitter was interesting for me. I finally cracked the nut on how to express myself in a way that worked. The challenge that I ran into then was okay, there are thoughts I occasionally have that don't lend themselves to then 140—now 280—characters, so I should probably start writing long-form. And then I want to start writing 1000 to 1500-word blog posts every week that goes out. And that forced me to become a better writer across the board. And then it became about one-upping myself, sort of, live-tweeting conference talks.And the personal secret of why I do that is I'm ADHD in a bottle. Someone gets on stage—you say you zone out when you read a giant quantity of data; you prefer something more visual, more interactive. For me, I'm the opposite, where when someone gets on stage and starts talking, it's, “Okay, get to—yes, you're doing the intro of what a cloud might be. I get that point. This is supposed to be a more advanced talk. Can we speed it up a bit?”And doing the live-tweeting about it, but not just relating what is said, but by making a joke about it, it's how I keep myself engaged and from zoning out. Because let's face it, this industry is extraordinarily boring, if you don't bring a little bit of light to it.Priyanka: Yeah, that is—Corey: And that how to continue and how to do that was hard, and it took me time to get there.Priyanka: Yeah. Yeah, no, I totally agree. Like, that's exactly why I got into, like, training videos and sketches. Like, and videos and also. Like, I come up with, like, fake examples of companies that may or may not exist.Like, I made up a dog shoe making company that ships out shoes when you need them and then return them and there's a size and stuff, like, you have to come up with interesting things to make the content interesting because otherwise, this can get boring pretty quickly, which is going back to your example of, “Speed it up; get to the point.” [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half dozen manage databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications, including Oracle, to the cloud.To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: It's always just fun to start experimenting with it, too, because all right, once I was done learn learning how to live-tweet other people's talk and mostly get it correct because someone says something, I have three to five seconds to come up with what I want to talk about and maybe grab a picture and then move on to the next thing. And it's easy to get that wrong and say things you don't necessarily intend to and get taken the wrong way. I've mostly gotten past that. And—I'm not saying I'm always right, but I better than I used to be. And then it was okay, “How do I top this?”And I started live-tweeting conference talks that I was giving live, which is always fun, but being able to pre-write some tweets at certain times, have certain webhooks in your slide deck and whatnot that fire these things off. And again, I'm not saying that he this is recommended or even a good idea, but it definitely wasn't boring. And—Priyanka: Yeah.Corey: And continue to find ways to make the same type of material new and interesting is one of the challenges because the stuff is complex.Priyanka: Also bite-size, right? Like, it's—I think Twitter is, like, the [unintelligible 00:15:54] words are obviously limiting, but it also forces you to think about it in bite-size, right? Like, okay, if I have a blog post then I'm summarizing it, how would I do it in two sentences? It forces me to think about it that way, which makes it very applicable to the time span that we have now, right, which is maybe, like, 30 seconds, you can have somebody on [unintelligible 00:16:18]Corey: Attention is a rare and precious commodity.Priyanka: Yeah. Yeah.Corey: People who [unintelligible 00:16:21] engagement, I think that's the wrong metric to go after because that inspires a whole bunch of terrible incentives, whereas finding something that is interesting, and a way to bring light to it and have a perspective on it that makes people think about it differently. For me, it's been humor, but that's my own approach to things. Your direction, it seems to be telling a story through visual arts. And that is something we don't see nearly as much of.Priyanka: Yeah. I think it's also because it's something that you—you know, like, I grew up drawing and painting. I was drawing since I was three years old, so that's my way of thinking. Like, I don't—I was talking to another devreloper the other day, and we were talking about—Corey: It's catching on. I love it.Priyanka: —[laugh]. Two different ways of how we think. So, for me, when I design a piece of content, I have my visuals first, and then he was talking about when he designs his content, he has his bullet points and a blog post first. So, it's like, two very different ways of approaching this similar thing. And then from that, from the images or the deck that I'm building up, I would come up with the narrative and stuff like that.My thinking starts with images and narrative of tying, like, the images together. But it's, that is the whole, like, fun of being in DevRel, right? Like, you are your own personality, and bringing whatever your personality, like you mentioned, humor and your case, art in my case, in somebody else's case, it could be totally different thing, right? So, yeah.Corey: Now, please correct me if I'm wrong on this, but an area of emphasis for you has been data analytics as well as Kubernetes, more or less things that are traditionally considered to be much more back-end if you're looking at a spectrum of all things technology. Is that directionally accurate, or am I dramatically is understanding a lot of what you're saying?Priyanka: No, that's very much accurate. I like to—I tend to be on the infrastructure back-and creating pipeline, creating easier processes, sort of person, not much into front-end. I dabble into it, but don't enjoy it. [laugh].Corey: This makes you something of a unicorn, in the sense of there are a tremendous number of devreloper types in the front-end slash JavaScript world because their entire career is focused on making things look visually appealing. That is what front-end is. I know this because I am rubbish at it. My idea of a well-designed interface that everyone looks at and smiles at [unintelligible 00:19:12] of command-line arguments when you're writing a script for something. And it's on a green screen, and sometimes I'll have someone helped me coordinate to come up with a better color palette for the way that I'm looking at my terminal on my Mac. Real exciting times over here, I assure you.So, the folks who are working in that space and they have beautifully designed slides, yeah, you tend to expect that. I gave a talk years ago at the front-end conference in Zurich, and I was speaking in the afternoon. And I went there and every presentation, slides were beautiful. And this was before I was working here and had a graphic designer on retainer to make my slides look not horrible. It was black Helvetica text on a white background, and I'm looking at this and I'm feeling ashamed that it's—okay, I have two hours to fix this. What do I do?I did the only thing I could think of; I changed Helvetica text to Comic Sans because if it's going to look terrible and it's going to be a designer thing that puts them off, you may as well go all-in. And that was a recurring meme at the time. I've since learned that there is an argument—I don't know if it's true or not—that Comic Sans is easier to read for folks with dyslexia, for example. And that's fine. I don't know if that's accurate or not, but I stopped making jokes about it just because if people—even if it's not true, and people believe that it's, “Are you being unintentionally crappy to people?” It's, “Well, I sure hope not. I'm rarely intentionally crappy. But when I do, I don't want to be mistaken for not being.” It's, save it up and use it when it counts.Priyanka: Yeah, yeah. I've—yeah, I think, when it comes to these big events—and like front-end for me is—I would think, like, I actually thought that I would be great at front-end because I have interest in art and stuff. I do make things that [crosstalk 00:20:57]—Corey: That's my naive assumption, too. I'm learning as you speak here. Please continue[.Priyanka: Yeah. And I was just—I thought that I would be and I have tried it, and I only like it to an extent, to present my idea. But I don't like to go in deeper and, like, make my CSS pretty or make this—make it look pretty. I am very much intrigued by all the back-end stuff, and most of my experience, over the past ten years in Cloud has been in the back-end stuff, mainly just because I love APIs, I love—like, you know, as long as I can connect, or the idea of creating a demo or something that involves a bunch of APIs and a back-end, to present an idea in a front-end, I would work on that front-end. But otherwise, I'm not going to choose to do it. [laugh]. Which I found interesting for myself as well. It's a realization. [laugh].Corey: Every time I try and do something with front-end, it doesn't matter the framework, I find myself more confused at the end than I was when I started. There's something I don't get. And anytime I see someone on Twitter, for example, talking about how a front-end is easier or somehow less than, I read that and I can't help myself. It's, “You ridiculous clown. You have no idea what you're talking about.”I don't believe that I'm bad at all of the things under engineering—just most of them—and I think I pick things up reasonably quickly. It is a mystery that does not align with this, and if it's easy for you, you don't recognize—arguably—a skill that you have, but not everyone does, by a landslide. And that's a human nature thing, too. It's if it was easy for me, it's obviously easy for everyone. If something's hard for me, no one would understand how this works and the people that do are wizards from the future.Priyanka: Yep. So true.Corey: It never works that way.Priyanka: Yeah. It never works that way. At least we have this in common, that you don't like to work on front-ends. [laugh].Corey: There's that too. And I think that no matter where you fall on the spectrum of technology, I would argue that something that we all share in common is, it doesn't matter how far we are down in the course of our entire career, from the very beginning to the very end, it is always a consistent, constant process of being humbled and made to feel like a fool by things you are supposedly professionally good at. And oh my stars, I've just learned to finally give up and embrace it. It's like, “So, what's going to make me feel dumb today?”Priyanka: Exactly.Corey: It's the learn in public approach, which is important.Priyanka: It's so important. Especially, like, if you're thinking about it, like that's the part of DevRel that makes it so exciting, too, right? Like, just learning a new thing today and sharing it with you. Like, I'm not claiming that I'm an expert, but hey, let's talk about it. And sure, I might end up looking dumb one day, I might end up looking smart the other day, but that's not the point. The point is, I end up learning every day, right? And that's the most important part, which is why I love this particular job, which is—what did we call it—devreloper.Corey: Devreloping. And as a part of that, you're talking to people constantly, be it people in the community and ecosystem, people who—you say you've talk to customers, but you also talk to these other folks. I would challenge you on that, where when you're at a company like Google Cloud, increasingly everyone in the community in the ecosystem is in one way or another, indistinguishable from being your customer; it all starts to converge at some point. All major cloud providers have that luxury, to be perfectly honest. What do you see in the ecosystem that people are struggling with as you talk to them?And again, any one person is going to have a problem or bone to pick with some particular service or implementation, and okay, great. What I'm always interested in is what is the broad sweep of things? Because when I hear someone complaining that a given service from a given cloud provider is terrible. Okay, great. Everyone has an opinion. When I started to hear that four or five, six times, it's okay, there's something afoot here, and now I'm curious as to what it is. What patterns are you seeing emerge these days?Priyanka: Yeah. I think more and more patterns along the lines of how can you make it automated? How can you make anything automated, right? Like, from machine learning's perspective, how do I not need ML skills to build an ML model? Like, how can we get there faster, right?Same for, like, in the infrastructure side, the serverless… aspect? How can you make it easy for me so I can just build an application and just deploy it so it becomes your problem to run it and not mine?Corey: Oh, the—you are preaching to the choir on that. I feel like all of these services that talk about, “This is how you build and train a machine learning model,” yadda, yadda, it's for an awful lot of the use cases out there, it's exposing implementation details about which I could not possibly care less. It's the, I want an API that I throw something at—like, be it a picture—and then I want to get a response of, “Yes, it's a hot dog,” or, “That's disgusting,” or whatever it is that it decides that it wants to say, great because that's the business outcome I'm after, and I do not care what wizardry happens on the back-end, I don't care if it's people who are underpaid and working extremely quickly by hand to do it, as long as it's from a business perspective, it hits a certain level of performance, reliability, et cetera. And then price, of course, yeah.And that is not to say I'm in favor of exploiting people, let's be clear here because I'm pretty sure most of these are not actually humans on the back-end, but okay. I just want that as the outcome that I think people are after, and so much of the conversation around how to build and train models and all misses the point because there are companies out there that need that, absolutely, there are, but there are a lot more that need the outcome, not the focus on this. And let's face it, an awful lot of businesses that would benefit from this don't have the budget to hire the team of incredibly expensive people it takes to effectively leverage these things because I have an awful lot of observations about people in machine learning space, one of them is absolutely not that, “Wow, I bet those people are inexpensive for me to hire.” It doesn't work that way.Priyanka: It doesn't. Yeah. And so, yeah. I think the future of, like, the whole cloud space, like, when it started, we started with how can I run my server not in my basement, but somewhere else, right? Now, we are at a different stage where we have a different sets of problems and requirements for businesses, right?And that's where I see it growing. It's like, how can I make this automated fast, not my problem? How can I make it not my problem is, like, the biggest [laugh] biggest, I think, theme that we are seeing, whether it's infrastructure, data science, data analytics, in all of these spaces.Corey: I get a lot of interesting feedback for my comparative takes on the various cloud providers, and one thing that I've said for a while about Google Cloud has been that its developer experience is unparalleled compared to basically anything else on the market. It makes things just work, and that's important because a bad developer experience has the unfortunate expression—at least for me—of, “Oh, this isn't working the way I want it to. I must be dumb.” No, it's a bad user experience for you. What I am seeing emerge as well from Google Cloud is an incredible emphasis—and I do think they're aligned here—on storytelling, and doing so effectively.You're there communicating visually; Forrest is there, basically trying to be the me of Google Cloud—which is what I assume he's doing; he would argue everything about that and he'd be right to do it, but that's what I'm calling it because this is my show; he can come on and argue with me himself if he takes issue with it. But I love the emphasis on storytelling and unifying solutions and the rest, as opposed to throwing everything at the wall to see what sticks to it. I think there's more intention being put into an awful lot of not just what you're building, but how you're talking about it, now it's integrated with the other things that you're building. That's no small thing.Priyanka: Yeah. That is so hard, especially when you know the cloud space; like, hundreds of products, they all have their unique requirement to solve a problem, but nobody cares, right? Like, as a consumer, I shouldn't have to care that there are 127 products or whatever. It doesn't matter to me as a consumer or customer, all that matters is whether I can solve my business problem with a set of your tools, right? So, that's exactly why, like, we have this team that I work in that I'm a part of, which has an entire focus on storytelling.We do YouTube videos with storytelling, we do art like this, I've also dabbled into comics a little bit. And we continue to go back to the drawing board with how else we can tell these stories. I know—I mentioned this to Forrest—I'm working on a song as well, which I have never done before, and [laugh] I think I'm going to butcher it. I kind of have it ready for, like, six months but never released it, right, because I'm just too scared to do that. [laugh] but anyway.Corey: Ship and then turn the internet off for a week and it'll be gone regardless, by the time you come back. Problem solved until the reporters start calling, and then you have problems.Priyanka: I might have to just do that, and be, like, you know what world? Keep saying whatever you want to say, I'm not here. [laugh]. But anyway, going back to that point of storytelling, and it's so—I think we have weaved it into the process. And it's going really well, and now we are investing more in, like, R&D and doing more of how we can tell stories in different ways.Corey: I have to say, I'm a big fan of the way that you're approaching this. If people want to learn more about what you're up to—and arguably, as I argue they should get a copy of your book because it is glorious—where's the best place to find you?Priyanka: Thank you. Okay, so LinkedIn and Twitter are my platforms that I check every single day, so you can message me, connect with me, I am available as—my handle is pvergadia. I don't know if they have [crosstalk 00:31:11]—Corey: Oh, this is all going in the [show notes 00:31:13] you need not worry.Priyanka: Okay, perfect. So yeah, I don't have to spell it because my last name is hard. [laugh]. So, you'll find it in the show notes. But yeah, you can connect with me there. And you will find at the top of both of my profiles, the link to order the book, so you can do it there.Corey: Excellent. And I've already done so, and I'm just waiting for it to arrive. So, this is—it's going to be an exciting read if nothing else. One of these days, I'd have to actually live-tweet a reading thereof. We'll see how that plays out.Priyanka: That would be amazing.Corey: Be careful what you wish for. Some of the snark could be a little too cutting; we have to be cautious of that.Priyanka: [laugh]. I'm always scared of your tweets. Like, do I want to read this or not? [laugh].Corey: If nothing else, it at least tries to be funny. So, there is that.Priyanka: Yes. Yes, for sure.Corey: I really—Priyanka: No, I'm excited. I'm excited for when you get a chance to read it and just tweet whatever you feel like, from, you know, all the bits and pieces that I've brought together. So, I would love to get your take. [laugh].Corey: Oh, you will, one way or another. That's one of those non-optional things. It's one of the fun parts of dealing with me. It's, “Aw crap. That shitposter is back again.” Like the kid outside of your yard just from across the street, staring at your house and pointing and it's, “Oh, dear. Here we go.” Throwing stones.Priyanka: [laugh]. I'm excited either way. [laugh].Corey: He's got a platypus with him this time. What's going on? It happens. We deal with what we have to. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Priyanka: Thank you so much for having me. It was amazing. You are a celebrity, and I wanted to be, you know, a part of your show for a long time, so I'm glad we're able to make it work.Corey: You are welcome back anytime.Priyanka: I will. [laugh].Corey: An absolute pleasure to talk with you. Thanks again.Priyanka: Thank you.Corey: Priyanka Vergadia staff developer—but you call it developer advocate—at Google Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on whatever platform you're using to listen to this thing, whereas if you've hated it, please do the exact same thing, making sure to hit the like and subscribe buttons on the YouTubes because that's where it is. But if you did hate it, also leave an insulting, angry comment but not using words. I want you to draw a picture telling me exactly what you didn't like about this episode.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Data Center Therapy
#079 - Remote Work, Zero Trust, Mobile Device Management and More

Data Center Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 40:20


What's better than having a Security-minded Consultant guest on Data Center Therapy, sharing their tips on how to manage endpoints and access in your network? Why, having TWO of them, of course!   Matt “Tech Debt Crusher” Yette and Matt “Magnificent Bastion” Cozzolino welcome back to the virtual studios one Mr. Quinton Barber, Security Consultant for IVOXY as well as one Mr. Hoppy Shaw, End-User Technology Consultant for IVOXY, as they discuss the challenges of remote work and zero trust. Some of the concepts, you, our loyal listeners will hear on this episode include multi-factor authentication, identity management, device compliance and control, mobile device management solutions, Active Directory to Azure migrations, and much, much more.  BYOD for iPhones and Android phones?  Yep, we've got that too. Please be sure to like, share and subscribe wherever quality podcasts are found.  Do you have challenges with securing some of your endpoints?  Reach out to your local IVOXY Account Manager and we'll be able to help secure the devices that you previously didn't have the time or willpower to tackle on your own.  Thanks for listening!  Stay secure, stay (Windows Server) updated, stay (Microsoft) InTune-d in, and stay informed DCT fans!  Catch you again on our next topical episode.  Ciao for now.

Cyber Security Inside
95. Live from The Green Room: Project Amber – Intel's Next Innovation in Confidential Computing

Cyber Security Inside

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 18:53


In this episode of Cyber Security Inside Live from The Green Room, Camille talks with Raghu Yeluri, Intel Senior Principal Engineer and Lead Security Architect from Intel's Vision Conference in Texas. The conversation covers: -  A high-level definition of Project Amber and overview of what confidential computing is. -  At the core, confidential compute is where data and IP get processed and the need to be protected and isolated from the platform and the infrastructure administrators.  -  Why customers are worried about security as they move their workloads to the Cloud and how confidential computing can help address these concerns. -  The three stages of data protection: at rest, in transit, and data protection in use. Most customers want an independent entity to verify the trusted execution environment to ensure it is trustworthy. That trust authority is what we call Project Amber. ...and more. Don't miss it!   The views and opinions expressed are those of the guests and author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Intel Corporation.   Here are some key takeaways: -  Project Amber is a trust authority that verifies the trusted execution environment (TTE) for data projection in use. -  Confidential Computing is a new technology that helps provide data projection, especially as more people move to the cloud.  -  The industry is starting to converge on building confidential compute in the following approaches: Use of trusted execution environments and homomorphic encryption.  -  Trusted execution environments are a way to enable confidential computing.    Some interesting quotes from today's episode: “But the workflow required to verify this in a trustworthy way, is a complex operation. So, the question people ask us is, how do you assure to me that a service like Amber is doing what it is supposed to do? The verification of other trusted execution environments, in an integrity protected in a trustworthy way. How do I trust that you are doing your job correctly? We call that faithful verification.” says Raghu Yeluri   “Most enterprise customers don't like to run in one cloud provider, they want to run their workloads in multiple clouds, some would like to work in Azure, IBM, and Google Cloud, for example. You don't want to have a separate Attestation service.” Raghu Yeluri.   “If I have a client device that is trying to access a service in the cloud, I need to verify my trustworthiness to the cloud service. Before I get access to that service, I could be a bad actor, trying to access a good service that's running in a trusted execution environment. And I can exfiltrate or infiltrate data from there.”   “Confidential compute, it's the new technology focus for the industry right now, especially as more and more people are moving to cloud computing. Some people say it's the biggest transition in computer security since the 1970s.”

Cyber and Technology with Mike
11 May 2022 Cyber and Tech News

Cyber and Technology with Mike

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 11:50


In today's podcast we cover four crucial cyber and technology topics, including: 1.Wiper attacks against vulnerable F5 products detected 2.Researchers uncover new IceApple malware targeting Exchange, IIS 3.Microsoft patches critical Azure flaw that could allow access to tenant data 4.NPM packages used in highly targeted attacks against German firms I'd love feedback, feel free to send your comments and feedback to  | cyberandtechwithmike@gmail.com

Ctrl+Alt+Azure
133 - Performance Efficiency in the Azure Well-Architected Framework

Ctrl+Alt+Azure

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 61:15


(00:00) - Intro and catching up.(05:54) - Show content starts.Show links- Performance Efficiency in WAF (Microsoft Docs)SPONSORThis episode is sponsored by ScriptRunner.ScriptRunner is a great solution to centrally manage PowerShell Scripts and standardize and automate IT tasks via a Graphical User Interface for helpdesk or end-users. Check it out on scriptrunner.com

Unsolicited Response Podcast
Ilan Gendelman of SIGA

Unsolicited Response Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 45:15


Unsolicited Response host Dale Peterson has been skeptical of the cost/benefit of accessing the electrical signals between Level 0 and Level 1 and creating a separate network to send that data to a platform for comparison to data at higher levels and analysis. This is a core part of SIGA's offering. Dale and Ilan discuss what it actually does and doesn't do. What percentage of the Level 0 device communication needs to be monitored to get this information? The cost per sensor. And more. In the end they don't reach the same conclusion, but the decision points are clearer. They finish discussing the back end processing for process variable anomaly detection, and how SIGA plans to compete with large vendors (GE, Siemens, ...), Azure and AWS, PI and specialized system vendors who have developed models. Links SIGA OT Security Site Dale's Pivot To Process Variable Anomaly Detection article

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Putin pwned, EU points finger, NCF counter attack, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 2:49


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight.Episode 235 - 07 May 2022Putin pwned - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/hackers-display-blood-is-on-your-hands-on-russian-tv-take-down-rutube/EU Points finger - https://www.securityweek.com/eu-blames-russia-satellite-hack-ahead-ukraine-invasionChemical phish - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/ukraine-warns-of-chemical-attack-phishing-pushing-stealer-malware/Azure RCE - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/microsoft-releases-fixes-for-azure-flaw-allowing-rce-attacks/NCF counter attack- https://www.zdnet.com/article/government-hackers-made-hundreds-of-thousands-of-stolen-credit-cards-worthless-to-crooks/Hi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Tuesday May 10th, 2022, and this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From BleepingComputer.com:While Russian President Vladimir Putin was giving his "Victory Day" speech, pro-Ukrainian hacking groups defaced the online Russian TV schedule page to display anti-war messages. The name of every programme was changed to "On your hands is the blood of thousands of Ukrainians and their hundreds of murdered children. TV and the authorities are lying. No to war” At the same time, a cyberattack took down the Russian video sharing site RuTube. More details in the link. From SecurityWeek.com:The European Union this week accused Russian authorities of carrying out a cyberattack against a satellite network an hour before they invaded Ukraine. The target was the KA-SAT network operated by Viasat. This is significant as it marks the first time the EU has ever formally accused Russia of carrying out a cyber attack. From BleepingComputer.com:Ukraine's Computer Emergency Response Team is warning of the mass phishing campaign distributing the Jester Stealer malware. The emails warn of impending chemical attacks to scare recipients into opening the XLS attachments, which are of course laced with malicious macros. Additional details in the article. Also from BleepingComputer.com:Microsoft has released updates to address a security flaw affecting Azure Synapse and Azure Data Factory pipelines that could allow remote code execution across the Integration Runtime infrastructure. The vulnerability was found in the third-party ODBC data connector used to connect to Amazon Redshift, in Integration Runtime, in Azure Synapse Pipelines, and Azure Data Factory. Details and a link to the security advisory in the article. And last today, from ZDNet.com:From the One for the Good Guys file. Britain's National Cyber Force, which is a joint effort using the combined resources of the GCHQ and the Ministry of Defence, took direct action against computer networks used by cyber criminals, and made hundreds of thousands of stolen credit cards, worthless to the crooks that stole them. Well done you. That's all for me today. Remember to LIKE and SUBSCRIBE. And as always, until next time, be safe out there.

The CyberHub Podcast
BIG-IP IoC's, Azure Flaw, Spain Sacks Spy Chief, Colonial Fine & More

The CyberHub Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 12:04


BIG-IP IoC's, Azure Flaw, Spain Sacks Spy Chief, Colonial Fine & More Cybersecurity News CyberHub Podcast May 10th, 2022   Today's Headlines and the latest #cybernews from the desk of the #CISO: Technical Details, IoCs Available for Actively Exploited BIG-IP Vulnerability Microsoft releases fixes for Azure flaw allowing RCE attacks QNAP Patches Critical Vulnerability in Network Surveillance Products Hackers are now hiding malware in Windows Event Logs Spain's Spy Chief Sacked Over Phone Hacking Scandal U.S. Proposes $1 Million Fine on Colonial Pipeline for Safety Violations After Cyberattack Tech trade group comes out against Indian cybersecurity law over reporting mandate   Story Links: https://www.securityweek.com/technical-details-iocs-available-actively-exploited-big-ip-vulnerability https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/microsoft-releases-fixes-for-azure-flaw-allowing-rce-attacks/ https://www.securityweek.com/qnap-patches-critical-vulnerability-network-surveillance-products https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/hackers-are-now-hiding-malware-in-windows-event-logs/ https://www.securityweek.com/spains-spy-chief-sacked-over-phone-hacking-scandal https://thehackernews.com/2022/05/us-proposes-1-million-fine-on-colonial.html https://therecord.media/tech-trade-group-comes-out-against-indian-cybersecurity-law-over-reporting-mandate/   “The Microsoft Doctrine” by James Azar now on Substack https://jamesazar.substack.com/p/the-microsoft-doctrine   The Practitioner Brief is sponsored by: Your BRAND here - Contact us for opportunities today! ****** Find James Azar Host of CyberHub Podcast, CISO Talk, Goodbye Privacy, Digital Debate, and Other Side of Cyber James on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-azar-a1655316/ Telegram: CyberHub Podcast ****** Sign up for our newsletter with the best of CyberHub Podcast delivered to your inbox once a month:  http://bit.ly/cyberhubengage-newsletter ****** Website: https://www.cyberhubpodcast.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheCyberHubPodcast Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/c-1353861 s Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CyberHubpodcast/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/cyberhubpodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/cyberhubpodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cyberhubpodcast Listen here: https://linktr.ee/cyberhubpodcast   The Hub of the Infosec Community. Our mission is to provide substantive and quality content that's more than headlines or sales pitches. We want to be a valuable source to assist those cybersecurity practitioners in their mission to keep their organizations secure.   Thank you for watching and Please Don't forget to Like this video and Subscribe to my Channel!   #cybernews #infosec #cybersecurity #cyberhubpodcast #practitionerbrief #cisotalk #ciso #infosecnews #infosec #infosecurity #cybersecuritytips #podcast #technews #tinkertribe #givingback #securitytribe #securitygang #informationsecurity

The Produce Industry Podcast w/ Patrick Kelly
Accelerate Innovation through Technology with Rob Ristovich of ThingLogix - EP189

The Produce Industry Podcast w/ Patrick Kelly

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 22:10


In this week's episode of The Produce Industry Podcast w/ Patrick Kelly we chat with Rob Rastovich the CTO of ThingLogix, a low-code platform built on AWS, Google, and Azure to accelerate innovation and system development, reduce cost and risk, and deliver future-proof applications. We learn about Rob's passion and the love he has for AG.  Recently Rob's team just launched their newest product, Thermic.ai, a wireless temperature and humidity monitoring system that collects data 24/7 and sends alerts when it detects equipment failure. It prevents food spoilage while putting money back in your pocket. When he's not at the forefront of IoT, Rob is maintaining his cattle ranch, Barley Beef, in Central Oregon. The cows roam free-range, eat barley from nearby breweries, and drink from mountain streams. In true CTO fashion, the farm has working wifi across its 200 acres. Join Patrick and Rob this week talk about technology and improving for the future!!!! Technology for farmers should come from Farmers!!! FANCY SPONSORS: Ag Tools, Inc.: https://www.agtechtools.com, Flavor Wave, LLC.: https://flavorwavefresh.com, Noble Citrus: https://noblecitrus.com, Buck Naked Onions/Owyhee Produce, Inc.: http://www.owyheeproduce.com and John Greene Logistics Company: https://www.jglc.com CHOICE SPONSORS: Indianapolis Fruit Company: https://indyfruit.com, Equifruit: https://equifruit.com Arctic® Apples: https://arcticapples.com Sev-Rend Corporation: https://www.sev-rend.com and Golden Star Citrus, Inc.: http://www.goldenstarcitrus.com STANDARD SPONSORS: London Fruit Inc. https://londonfruit.com, Fresh Cravings: https://www.freshcravings.com/ and Freshway Produce: https://www.freshwayusa.com

Cloud Security Podcast
Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) Security Explained

Cloud Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 47:45


In this episode of the Virtual Coffee with Ashish edition, we spoke with Jimmy Mesta, Co-Founder, KSOC Episode ShowNotes, Links and Transcript on Cloud Security Podcast: www.cloudsecuritypodcast.tv Host Twitter: Ashish Rajan (@hashishrajan) Guest Linkedin: Jimmy Mesta Podcast Twitter - @CloudSecPod @CloudSecureNews If you want to watch videos of this LIVE STREAMED episode and past episodes - Check out our other Cloud Security Social Channels: - Cloud Security News - Cloud Security Academy

Adafruit Industries
Testing out the CircuitPython Azure library

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 0:57


We have some fun Azure for IoT projects coming up, but before we get to them, we wanted to test out the CircuitPython AzureIot library over at https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit_CircuitPython_AzureIoT with the new-ish ESP32-S2 TFT Feather. We set up a new device type that would report temperature, humidity, pressure and battery percentage. Then we provisioned a new device and adapted the example to report data from a connected BME280. There's a small fix we need to make to the NTP library to support raw sockets on native wifi devices but otherwise it works very well! Visit the Adafruit shop online - http://www.adafruit.com ----------------------------------------- LIVE CHAT IS HERE! http://adafru.it/discord Adafruit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adafruit Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/ ----------------------------------------- #adafruit #azure #iot