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    Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
    Episode 87: A Brief History of Manufacturing Software

    Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 54:17


    In episode 10 of the podcast (@AugmentedPod (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod)), the topic is “A Brief History of Manufacturing Software.” Our guest is Rick Bullotta, Partner, TwinThread, and co-founder, ThingWorx. In this conversation, we talk about how Rick has shaped manufacturing software history and the lessons learned from being an early employee of Wonderware, the famous precursor to manufacturing automation, back in 1993, a company first sold to British engineering giant Siebe in 1998, which merged with BTR to form Invensys, which, in turn, merged with French multinational Schneider Electric, and later the CTO. Rick Bullotta was also the co-founder of Lighthammer Software which was later acquired by SAP, then in 2009 founding ThingWorx, the first complete, end-to-end technology platform designed for the industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) which was acquired by PTC in 2003. We also touch on his current advice to founders in the industrial space, his board role at Tulip, and what he sees lie ahead for the industry. After listening to this episode, check out Thingworx as well as Rick Bullotta's social profile. * Thingworx (https://www.ptc.com/en/resources/iiot/product-brief/thingworx-platform) * Rick Bullotta (https://www.linkedin.com/in/rickbullotta/) Trond's takeaway: Wonderware, Lighthammer, and ThingWorx are prominent parts of manufacturing software history, and there's a chance that the 4th company he now is involved with, Tulip, also will be. I do things with things is Rick Bullotta's motto. The things he does, he does them well, and it is an internet of things, more than anything else. I, for one, am eagerly listening to what he predicts will happen next. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like episode 4: A Renaissance of Manufacturing or episode 5: Plug-and-Play Industrial Tech. Augmented--the industry 4.0 podcast. Transcript: Augmented reveals the stories behind a new era of industrial operations where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In Episode 10 of the podcast, the topic is a Brief History of Manufacturing Software. Our guest is Rick Bullotta, Partner at TwinThread and Co-Founder of ThingWorx. In this conversation, we talk about how Rick has shaped manufacturing software history and the lessons learned from being an early employee with Wonderware, the famous precursor to manufacturing automation, back in 1993, a company first sold to British engineering giant Siebe in 1998, which then merged with BTR to form Invensys, which in turn merged with French and multinational Schneider Electric and later the CTO. Rick Bullotta was also the Co-Founder of Lighthammer Software which was later acquired by SAP. Then in 2009, founding ThingWorx, the first complete end-to-end technology platform designed for the industrial internet of things, which was acquired by PTC in 2003. We also touch on his current advice to founders in the industrial space, his board role at Tulip, and what he sees lie ahead for the industry. Augmented is a podcast for leaders hosted by futurist, Trond Arne Undheim, presented by Tulip.co, the manufacturing app platform, and associated with MFG Works, the manufacturing upskilling community launched at the World Economic Forum. Each episode dives deep into a contemporary topic of concern across the industry and airs at 9:00 a.m. U.S. Eastern Time every Wednesday. Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast. TROND: Rick, how are you today? RICK: Good morning. TROND: Well, it's a nice morning. I wanted to talk to you about some history. RICK: Sure. TROND: Well, you are a bit of a legend in this field, Rick. You've been basically part of almost every development in this field for several years. I wanted us to spend a little time today, not just going into your history of background as the founder of several startups that have had very significant impact on the industry but also just bring people in a little bit to the environment and how it has changed, and how based on your perspective, you see it evolving. You had a degree from Cornell, and then you went on to fund several companies. Can you bring us back to those days when you were studying industrial engineering at Cornell? What was the environment then for manufacturing? And what was it that brought you into the thought that you would start engaging sort of entrepreneurial software development in manufacturing of all fields? RICK: Just to be clear, I barely graduated. [laughter] So I had a fantastic time in college. But that was when I think we thought of engineers as mechanical engineers, or chemical engineers, the physical aspects of making things, building things, vending product as opposed to...I think software and technology was kind of a nascent concept there, at least certainly in manufacturing. But I actually switched degrees from mechanical engineering to operations research mid-stride there, realizing that looking at pieces of broken metal under a microscope wasn't for me. So I graduated. My degree was in operations research, and actually, my first position was at a very progressive steel company called Lukens Steel, doing essentially industrial engineering work. However, this was what? 1985, dawn of the PC, dawn of a new gen of computing. And some opportunities opened up there to kind of take on some additional responsibilities that involved applying computing to simulations and optimization models, all the stuff that I studied but never thought I'd actually practice. So I'd spend a lot of time in the local library checking out software, take the disc home, teach myself to code. An opportunity then opened up to go into steel plant operation. So I used to run a heat-treating process. And that's one thing that a university degree won't prepare you for, having 15 steelworkers working for you. That's where you get a real education. You also quickly realize that the exception is the rule on the manufacturing floor. And we'll talk later about how it gave me a great appreciation of the importance of the role of people in this whole process and not just technology. But yeah, I spent a few years in that role and then moved back over to an industrial computing group. And we were applying at the time very advanced technology, mini computers, very innovative user interfaces, high levels of automation to some of these processes back at the very site that I worked. And the very operations that I worked at was one of the first places for that. So that's kind of where I got into the technology side of things. But I like to say I was blessed and lucky, right? This crusty, old steel company happened to be very, very committed to investing in technology. And it was a learning opportunity for me. And then, across the years, I moved into systems integration. I did some stuff in discrete manufacturing. I had the opportunity; again, luck sometimes happens here, to work for arguably the first well-known company in the industrial software space company called Wonderware, first IPO in the space. And I joined very early, which is kind of cool. TROND: The Wonderware story is somewhat famous for people inside of manufacturing, but just in case, there are some listeners here who don't really appreciate how early Wonderware was. What was the situation when you created your first product? And why, in your account, has it become so emblematic of that early-early era? And what year are we talking about exactly when that entered the stage with Wonderware? RICK: So late '80s, early '90s Wonderware came on the scene. I joined in; I believe it was '93. And my role there was actually in sales. So you'll find that a lot of my life experiences are all the elements that help build a successful business: sales, marketing, technology. So the founding team there...and there'll be a circle of life moment here in a little bit when we talk about how ThingWorx came to be. The two key co-founders there, Dennis Morin and Phil Huber, recognized the value. And they harnessed the PC revolution and Microsoft Windows. So we're talking Wayback Machine when Windows looked like the Mac user interface. There wasn't a lot of PC application on the plant floor. There were some very interesting companies that I had worked with, competitors to Wonderware but a bit earlier companies like [inaudible 7:28] But we were just kind of at that inflection point where people were comfortable with the role of the personal computer as this kind of human interface to all the automation systems that we had. What Dennis and Phil did was really twofold. And this, I think, ties into a lot of the innovation we're seeing today is they democratized the ability to build applications. They made it easy and fun. So the whole experience wasn't coding; it was very visual. It leveraged kind of a drag and drop experience. You didn't need to understand software to apply it. You could build these incredible applications literally in minutes or hours, connect them to the physical world. I don't know if you've ever seen some of the classic applications they've built. But they're those process mimics, very dynamic graphics that represent the physical world. And I learned a lot during that period about the importance of two things: one is ease of use and empowering others to build applications, particularly in the manufacturer domain. Second was, ironically, the importance of marketing. If there's one thing, that company did extraordinarily well in addition to having a great product was getting the message out there, maintaining a larger-than-life image. And the company grew rapidly to 5 million, 10 million, 15, 20, and on and on, and then IPOed. But there wasn't anybody in history that didn't know the name. Go to a trade show...this is a company that kind of put some perspective. I think the first year I was there; we did about 20 million in revenues. We spent about a million-five on a party. That's kind of the priorities were well balanced there. But what an extraordinary group of people to learn from; I developed lifelong mentors and friends at that company that fast forward to my last company, some of those same people came and joined my team. So it was a complete honor to work with them again, so yeah. TROND: So back in those days, what was it that Wonderware apart from the marketing side, and like you said, the menus and things...first of all, who was the target audience at this point? Was this still process engineers that were doing this, or was it still the IT department managing? RICK: Typically process engineers, and that was the democratization, taking it out of that...let's go back to my time in the steel industry. We were writing Fortran code, PL/M code. We were writing code. We were creating database schema, all the kinds of classic development processes. And it was part of a corporate IT function. Now, this shifted to empowering two main groups, process engineers inside these manufacturing companies and, secondly, a new breed of systems integrators that were very, very focused on this automation domain. So historically, they may have done the physical automation, the PLCs, the actuators, sensing distributed control systems. Now they were able to take on this role. Two other things happened. Just prior to the advent of things like [inaudible 10:42] and Wonderware, that user experience was physical gauges, and push buttons, and things like that, and sliders. Now, it became digital. In a way, this was almost like magic at the time. It's virtual reality. It's like a lot of people the first time...I'll never forget my mother the first time she played solitaire on a PC and that virtual card dragging. It was just utter magic. Well, similar experience here, right? People were able to reproduce these and rapidly reconfigure. But to your point, I would say, yeah, it was those in-house process engineers and the systems integrators that helped implement these systems. TROND: Were you all aware of how innovative you were? I mean, clearly, the marketing department thought you were something special. But did you realize at the time how timeless and etched into manufacturing history Wonderware would become later? Were you aware of how far ahead this was? Or were the customers telling you that clearly? RICK: That's a great question. I think it was a combination of both. We had an almost cult-like customer following that was pretty unique, and it created a lot of energy. They knew we were doing something interesting. But we had very legitimate competitors who were also doing super cool stuff. I think another life lesson here was a lot of companies create great products. To bring great products to market at scale is a whole nother task. It's a whole nother challenge. And I think what we had going for us was an absolutely extraordinary distribution channel, global distribution channels, and very energetic, bright people, independent businesses that could sell, support, implement this technology. That allowed us to achieve scale pretty quickly. But the customers were the primary feedback loop. We won all kinds of awards from the trade rags, all that kind of stuff. I definitely think it was the kinds of applications that the customers were building. That always gives you energy when you see that. TROND: Rick, give me another sense of as we're sort of moving to your next company, just bring us back to that time with the early years of Wonderware. What were some of the things that were challenging to you on the application side then that today we would laugh off and it would just be like a line item? What were some of the things that were really complicated that you were so proud of having accomplished? RICK: Well, let's just take the obvious, which is sort of the inverse of Moore's law. If we turn the clock back that many years, we have half as much compute power every year. And to have a very graphical dynamic user experience, it had to be reliable. I would not underestimate the incredible work that that development team did to take not only a new product in what we built with InTouch, which was the product at the time but also Windows itself. It wasn't evolved. It wasn't mature. It certainly wasn't targeted at these kinds of mission-critical applications. So those were the kinds of things you had to work with. You had to make it robust, reliable, and take advantage of very, very limited compute and visualization capability at the time. It changed the modalities by way...people typically, you know, we were all used to keyboards at the time. Now it's touch; it's a mouse. It's a different means of interaction. And then how do you bring that? Some interesting challenges. Like, I'm a task worker down on the floor in protective equipment and gloves, and how do I interact with that? So all kinds of creative stuff to try and bring a whole new modality of human interaction to a pretty demanding segment. TROND: So what then happened to you? What happened around you leaving Wonderware and moving on to the next challenges? Because you've also had a foray in larger companies, but then you immediately went back to the startup world. Give me a sense of what was your thinking then? RICK: Sure. So there was a little detour as there are often in our careers. [laughs] I left and experimented. I actually came back to Wonderware a second time prior to my first startup in a product management role. I got to see M&A. So we got involved in a couple of key acquisitions that I was intimately involved in. So that was another learning experience for me. Then I saw this opportunity at a level above the Wonderwares of the world, of the OSIsofts of the world, of all these kinds of operational systems that we had. They were islands. No one had that holistic view, a supervisor, an operator. No one was sharing information. And so the light bulb went off. This is actually about when the web technologies were starting to get a little traction, the browser, the Netscape effect, ubiquitous TCP/IP connectivity, Ethernet, and the plants. So that's when the light bulb went off. Let's see if we could do something not dissimilar from the way a Wonderware product will connect all your centers and controllers. Why not provide a unified way to see all the systems that you have? So basically, that's what became Lighthammer, and that was in 1998, we started that company. But the intent was, again, to provide that unified view of first...it was called the Plant Information Portal. That was another cool word at the time, right? Portals. And so that was the objective, it's kind of unified visibility. I started the company with some colleagues that I knew from Wonderware. And we built, I think, something pretty groundbreaking there. TROND: And the situation then was there was this need for almost like an information service to kind of...it was almost like an early portal for the industry in a sense. RICK: I think what we found...the unique thing about the industrial space I like to say that everything's a legacy the moment it gets put in. Everything has proprietary APIs, interfaces, and protocols. My approach has always been solve hard problems because you're going to have fewer competitors, and the value is there. So we tried to solve a pretty hard problem, all these like debubblizing all these different crazy systems that were scattered around. Yeah, so that's really what the objective was initially, unified visibility. But then we realized if people can see that information, why can't other systems? So it rapidly progressed from just being empowering people with information to empowering other lines of business systems. So your supply chain systems, warehouse systems, ERP systems can now be informed with real information in a timely manner. And that was what got us on SAP's radar. TROND: Well, because the point was there that you started discovering the importance of standards. And there were standards at that time, but they were very basic web standards. And you started realizing that even in the side of the industrial field, you had to start depending on that. Is that also what got you involved in the intersection of interoperability and also open sourcing certain types of software? RICK: Yeah. In fact, we were actively involved in a lot of open-source projects. I think that was also early in the open-source world. So if something was broken, no one was going to fix it for you; you fix it, right? TROND: [chuckles] RICK: So yeah, if you want to leverage and get value out of open source, you better be prepared to give back. So as a company, we definitely gave back to a lot of interesting projects that became part of the Lighthammer stack. The other thing that I think is important to understand is, and this pattern repeats itself in my career, is building tools, not applications. My goal was always to empower people to build interesting stuff. They've got the ideas. They've got the innovations living inside them. But if it's hard, if there's friction at every point in the process, cost, time, whatever, they're not going to undertake it, so whether it was Wonderware stuff we were implementing, Lighthammer, ThingWorx. And nowadays, with solutions like Tulip, it really was all about that takedown friction, empower non-technical people to be innovators and do it fast. TROND: So, Rick, then you got on SAP's radar. Tell me a little bit about not necessarily your experience there per se but just the difference for you in having straddled a startup that gets on the radar of a large company, and now you're working in a large company. What's the situation there? What is their understanding of the shop floor, and how does that all work? Because it gets more complicated when you're that kind of a software environment. RICK: Well, I think SAP was a very good place to be for a number of reasons. SAP was dominant in the manufacturing vertical in terms of cost manufacturing. Customers, the vast majority of them ran SAP for their back-office systems. SAP had kind of light solutions for the manufacturing domain but a desire to go deeper. Secondly, they were launching a partner ecosystem at the time. We wanted to prove that, in fact, partners are an integral part to their offerings. So we were able to kind of get that visibility, but also, we started stealing some revenue. So when you start taking customer spend instead of upgrading that module in my ERP system, I'm going to spend a couple hundred thousand dollars on my plant floor. That gets you on the radar too. Interesting sidenote, so after SAP, the salespeople told us something fascinating. If you think about in a typical manufacturing company, there's arguably four to seven times more blue-collar...I hate the term blue-collar, task worker, you know, frontline workers, so to speak. But that's got a new meaning nowadays as opposed to back office. Secondly, we had something that not only had a user license for each manufacturing worker but also manufacturing site costs. So think about comparing selling something to the CFO's office that will run in a data center. The scale and size of the deals were pretty substantial, and there was real value being created. So I think in the first year, our sales grew like 800%, 900% from a pretty good base, having that ready base of manufacturing customers to sell into a global company with global sales and support presence. It's pretty easy to get traction there. TROND: But then you had a stint back at Wonderware before you went on to found a new company. What was that like? So you came back and now kind of almost running the show at Wonderware for a little bit. RICK: No, not really because I think the company...this was an interesting dynamic. The company had grown substantially by that point, so from 60 people in my first experience to probably 800 at that point. I was a remote CTO. This was long before remote work was a thing. It was extremely challenging. And I just think those dynamics kind of made it probably not as effective as I could be. That said, some work that I had done in SAP research is what kind of led to the ideas behind ThingWorx. And I actually think, to be blunt, I think Wonderware at the time could have realized those pretty well. Collectively, we could have brought that product to market probably faster of what became ThingWorx. But it just for a variety of reasons, it wasn't the right time, fit, location, all those kinds of things. So dove back into it again, got the band back together, so to speak. TROND: How did that happen? Because at this point, you're not new to startups, and you have had a taste of the corporate world, in fact, in two leading positions, I guess. What is it that then motivates you to go back into that grind, and then you found a groundbreaking company? [laughs] RICK: Part of it is you feel like you cheated on the test. You've got the scars. You've had the lessons learned. I think we had a pretty well-rounded idea on what the new product was going to be, how we were going to take it to market. So I think we actually went in with a pretty solid plan rather than just A; we're going to do some R&D. Secondly, my business partners at Lighthammer were my business partners at ThingWorx, common investors. And some new folks that I worked with at Wonderware joined the team. It was sort of...I'm not going to say we couldn't fail. There were a lot of things we could have done wrong. But we had an incredible team of people with a lot of experience building companies like this, selling software like this. I had a pretty good feeling that we were on the right track there. TROND: And what exactly was ThingWorx in the early days? Because you read things like machine to machine, and those are terms that only much later...today we call internet of things. But you guys were very, very early, honestly, in that domain to produce products in that space when most people were just starting. Machine to machine didn't mean anything to people back then. RICK: And I think where we did well was going a little bit beyond that. And you'll see, once again, it's a pattern that repeats itself, the importance of people, the machines, and the other systems and processes that people have in their companies. Synthesizing all those together is actually where the value nexus is just massive. Any one of those taken in isolation or the connections between them, yeah, there's value to be done. But so we went in kind of with a broad...rather than just machine to machine. And there were some companies doing cool stuff just for getting updates down to an MRI machine or whatever. But we tried to go beyond that. We also realized early on the classic issue; it's good to know what you don't know. And remote access over unreliable links and all that stuff was something...My team had primarily lived in what we would jokingly call the internets of things. Everything's on the local network. You have different considerations. So we acquired a company, a super team, a small company that had a lot of expertise in the kind of internet of things and that remote connectivity, remote management, and that was this the second wave of rocket fuel to get things going. TROND: That's interesting you say that because I think that temptation for many would be you're so far ahead, and you start building things, and you're building things in the future. But I mean, surely, the reality is the shop floor and other things, and you're dealing with poor internet connections. Forget skills. I mean, you're actually dealing with a network that doesn't scale to your idea. RICK: Exactly right. And it was a very interesting balance between...I oversimplify kind of that industrial IoT is smart, connected operations and things like that, so factories, power plants, and then connected fleets of stuff, trucks, MRI machines, light towers, and cities, radically different requirements. One's 98% on-prem, one's 99.9% cloud, one's intermittent, unreliable, expensive connectivity, one's reliable, isolated. So we built a platform to serve both of those tests. In retrospect, we probably made compromises along the way to accommodate that. But still, today, I think PTC's revenue with ThingWorx is fairly well split between those two domains. But that was an interesting challenge on its own because the requirements were dramatically different. TROND: But again, you got acquired. So is this a pattern in your companies? Or is it more a pattern in the field that, at a certain point...because, I mean, I'm making this up here. But is there something about the industry itself that lends itself very easily to just in order to get that scale, you have to be acquired, and it's very desirable? Or is it more a choice that you each time made to say we've built it to a certain scale? RICK: I think in our segment, there are the rare few that an IPO track makes sense, and it's achievable. I think, for the most part, companies in our domain are...they're talking acquisitions to technology companies, cloud companies, enterprise app companies, industrial automation companies. So they have the luxury of we can be the innovation engine. It doesn't have to come off... If you think about a BigCo that wants to build something organically, every dollar they submit...first of all, they're typically 10 to 20 times, and it's just reality, less efficient in developing software for a variety of reasons. And that money comes off the bottom line. So it's actually an interesting dynamic that it's almost more attractive for them as well. But the ThingWorx story is super interesting in the sense that I told someone the other day...so Jim Heppelmann super visionary right there. He had this concept of the digital twin and IoT connected with products way back. And he actually took some of his best and brightest people, his CTO, a number of other people, moved them out of their office, put them in the Cambridge Innovation Center, and said, "Go create something." Well, along the way, we got introduced to that team. And they came to the conclusion that, hey, it's going to be faster, cheaper. We can get to market capture mindshare quicker through acquisition. And if you think about it, that's a very...immature is not the right word. I don't even know what the word I'm looking for here, but it's you've just been given an opportunity to intrapreneur. You've got a clean sheet of paper, all the fun stuff after grinding out your day job for years. And you make that decision to well; we're not going to do that. We're going to go buy a company. I have huge respect for that. And it turned out to be a very good decision for everyone involved. So that's actually how that happened. We were an intrapreneurial effort at a relatively large company, decided to go and become acquisitive instead. And that's worked out quite well. TROND: So we haven't talked so much about the surrounding companies throughout these years. But were there other companies doing innovative things? I'm not so familiar with the history of all of the kind of less successful or less visible manufacturing IT companies throughout the early '90s. What was wrong with some of those, and why don't we talk about them? I mean, are they also still part of the picture? Were there smaller acquisitions that go into this history? RICK: Yeah, there's actually a lot that we were doing right. It was a big enough pie that the gorilla, you know, in the segment might only have a 20-something percent market share. So it was still fairly fragmented. It's partially because of geography, partially because of different segments, and partially just because it was such a big opportunity. The companion market to a lot of what I was doing, for example, at Wonderware and Lighthammer, was the data side of it. So that's the historian companies. Greatest example of that recently is the acquisition of OSIsoft by AVEVA for $5 billion, biggest little company you never heard of. I mean, just a fantastic success story. They stuck to what they did very well and built essentially a dominant market position. They had competitors with good products as well. But I think they're one of those success stories in that space that's only visible to most people now. We had competitors in almost every company I've ever worked at that had great solutions. But this is, again, where I think the X factor stuff comes into play. Your go-to-market machine, the passion that your team and people have that's contagious. If people really believe and they interact with customers and partners, it's just magic. The second thing was, again, where you're really doing useful stuff for customers. Some companies were software companies. Some companies were really just integration companies masquerading as software companies. But, Trond, you know this. There's no shortage of bright people on this planet, and it's -- TROND: Well, sure, there's no shortage of bright people. But I guess this is the third segment that I wanted us to get into. You kind of have a third career now, which is this portfolio life, I guess. [laughs] You can characterize it yourself, but I don't know how to explain it otherwise where you're seeing, first of all, a number of companies and the maturity, I guess, in the space, that's a little different. But you are in a different stage in your career. And I want to eventually get to Tulip and discuss why you got involved with that. But first, maybe you can address some of these portfolio things that you're doing right now. RICK: Sure. TROND: Obviously, mentoring a lot more and getting involved on the board side. How do you see even just the last five years? What's happening right now? Where are we right now with manufacturing software? RICK: So generically, I would say I'm doing manufacturing and adjacent stuff, kind of IoT industrial. I am so excited that it's cool again, right? Because it was for two decades. It was like -- TROND: Well, you were never concerned about that, surely. [laughs] RICK: But, you know, what's the old...in the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king. So if you were cool within your segment, you didn't have to be that great. And you could have done underselling what we achieved at the different companies. But I think it really has visibility now. There's investment money flowing into it. I think the increasing importance of...we kind of hit that little productivity inflection point where it started to flatten out. People are investing in technology. The challenges around people there's just not a lot of know-how, or there's much less know-how about everything from manufacturing operations to the different tasks that get performed to the technologies. So, how do we offset that? So technology is starting to fill an increasingly important role of focused VCs, and focused investors, and focused incubators around this kind of stuff. I think that's probably the biggest change. And then, like any technology segment, the building blocks, the Lego blocks that we build from, just get better and better and better. Someone that wants to add AI capabilities to their solution today, it's never been easier. I want to add Vision. Now, what you do with it can be very differentiating. But my point is that the building blocks we have today are just better than ever. I think the challenge...what's changed maybe in a negative, I think the way you get to customers, get to market has changed and become more challenging. An example, if you think about a venture-funded or otherwise funded startup, turn the clock back 10 or 15 years. We primarily sold perpetual licenses plus maintenance. So you get a big chunk of revenue upfront. Today in the SaaS and subscription world, in essence, we're all in the financing business. We're financing our cost of sales, our R&D., So the capital requirements for companies in our segment are bigger than they ever have been. And we see that with some of the raises, but that's just a reality. That dynamic perhaps even gets ignored sometimes, but it is a big change. Yeah, and then, you know, just to -- TROND: And what got you to Tulip? RICK: So I think it was actually indirectly through Wonderware, if I recall. So Natan and team and Rony and team were looking around at comparables. What are some companies that have been successful growing a business in this space? And he kind of had the hit list of Wonderware folks that he wanted to talk to. And somewhere, somehow, I don't recall the exact moment, but we connected up, and I got it. When he explained what they were doing. The light bulb went off, and I said, "I'd love to be part of this." So I'm both an investor and advisor in the company. And also, I love smart people, like innovative people. TROND: [laughs] RICK: And there's no shortage of those in Natan's team. So first visit there, seeing what they were doing, meeting the team, it was like, all right, there's something going on here. TROND: So tell me what it is that you saw because I was also...I was at MIT at the time when Natan created the company. And I remember vividly going into the lab or whatever you want to describe his early workspace. Because that's what it was, right? It felt like a lab. RICK: Sure. TROND: But the stuff that was coming out was incredible. What do you think? Was it the product vision, or was it just a capability of the people that you saw early on? And now that you're looking at Tulip and its environment, what is being accomplished right now, would you say with this new app reality? RICK: I think it was the aggregate of all the above. Because great example, if you recall the first demo scenario with the mixed reality projecting instructions onto the work –- TROND: That was crazy. That demo was for me, the demo of all demos in the -- [laughs] RICK: Absolutely. TROND: It was crazy. RICK: And I said, wow, you're taking a very fresh look at a problem here. And obviously, with their collective backgrounds, really interesting mix of skill sets, they're going to do cool stuff. And I think Natan and team would be the first to admit they were coming in with not a lot of domain knowledge. They had been involved in companies that made stuff, but there was a learning curve for sure. And that's what a lot of...not just myself, but they had a lot of advisors, customer feedback, brought in some folks into the team, and then just learned on the job training, engaging with customers, engaging in pilots. So I think it took a year or two to kind of get grounded in what are some of the realities of the shop floor, not that they didn't have a good idea. But once that kind of confluence of smart people, customers starting to do cool stuff with it, and the end the product itself evolving, then that's kind of when the rocket took off. TROND: Well, this is interesting what you're saying here because as I'm interviewing a lot of people who have innovated in this space, time and again, what comes back is this is not just your average software innovation garage. A lab is not a garage. Literally, you can be as smart as you are. You can have a big team of smart people. But unless you get coupled up with that manufacturing shop floor experience, you don't stand a chance, or you just can't build. You can't get past the demo. Tell me more about that one because you have had it ingrained. We talked about this a few minutes ago. You started out that way. But there are so many more innovators these days that they can't; well, maybe they can start out, but they haven't started out on the shop floor, so many of them. RICK: I wish they would...everybody who wants to get in this space needs to do...the equivalent of in law enforcement would be a ride-along. You go and spend a couple of nights working the streets. You realize how things really work. It's not like TV. It's not like you read in your textbooks. So there's no substitute for it, even if it's like super-concentrated real-world experience actually going out and spending some time with customers, real-world experience. But I also think it's the third leg of the stool, which is important. It's the technology expertise and creating products. It's manufacturing domain knowledge and then figuring out how to get it in front of customers and sell it. We can never underestimate the importance of that. So that's another thing that I think Tulip took a lot of very iterative and A/B style testing approaches to go-to-market models and continue to innovate and experiment. It's a challenging space to do low-touch, but they've found a niche with that, particularly as a means to plant seeds of customers that can take a first taste of the technology like, wow, that's pretty awesome. The holy grail, I think, for a lot of companies in our space to try to figure out how to do that. No one's really completely cracked the code yet. So it's a kind of combination model. But the domain expertise, a couple of key hires, for example, a great example is the hires they made in the pharmaceutical industry. So life sciences now has become a really, really powerful vertical for Tulip as a result of bringing in civilian expertise plus the evolution of the product from a platform and tooling and some hardware to application, so the app marketplace that they launched. Now when I'm a buyer, you can approach not only that developer buyer, that integrator buyer, but now you can approach a business buyer and say, "I've got all these apps you can assemble together or just use as is." That was also a maturity thing. So it took the domain knowledge, interaction with customers, and then you can progressively build more into the software itself and less that the customer has to configure. That maturation has been pretty exciting to see. TROND: Rick, we've been through a history here that's very, very exciting to me and, I think to listeners. What's next for the digital factory, for the manufacturing, execution systems, all these acronyms? I tried to shy away from them a little bit because we had so many, many other interesting things to talk about today. But if you're looking to the next decade, the holy grail you mentioned, or this final integration project that would marry software, hardware, shop floor, and considering all the challenges that just the past year has brought us, and let's not even bring into it all of the other challenges of this decade and of this century, if you're going to go into the big words. Where are we headed? RICK: I'll maybe focus on where I hope we head, which looks perhaps a little bit different. I started the discussion with one of the things that I learned in my first job working in the plant flow is the importance of people, the knowledge that they have, the experience that they have. People in a lot of our processes are still the sensor, the algorithm, and the actuator. Like it or not, we haven't yet reproduced the human hand. We haven't yet reproduced the human brain. There are some really unique things about humans. And in that context, I hope that the next decade or so is about collaborative technology and how we use robotics, and AI, and information, and mixed reality to help people be better at what they do. And there's always a risk of dehumanization in something like that where people become interchangeable and they don their Iron Man assembly suit. But I'll maybe take a more optimistic view that it's really...we're going to continue to increase productivity output. But there are so many roles like that that could benefit from the synthesis of all these cool technologies that we have. I maintain that there's no such thing as an AI market. There's no such thing as an IoT market; that they're all just building blocks, right? It's what we assemble to solve some actual problem that is interesting. I'm hoping, and I'm confident, that the bar to implement these things becomes increasingly lower. AR is a great example today. It's hard. Building content is time-consuming and difficult. So maybe that's the next one that needs to bring the content creation to mixed reality, next-gen robotics, codebots, and some really interesting stuff happening there. The democratization of machine vision, and audio, and meta sensing that's happening. TROND: But it's interesting you're saying they're still our building blocks, and they're still our collaboration challenges. And maybe those collaboration challenges are going to have to last longer than a decade, and maybe we need more building blocks. But what comes after that once a critical mass of building blocks get assembled? And you have watched this decade by decade that there's a certain coalescence of building blocks, and then a new platform is formed. But still, in this industry, as you have said, so far, most of the time, these new platforms merge into the more traditional platform players, or they merge into more established. Is that a pattern that you see also in this decade? Or will we see the first mega conglomerates come out of completely new manufacturing combination platforms that are integrating all of these technologies and doing something truly new and can sustain their own new creation, whatever iteration of the manufacturing industry that would become? RICK: And I don't know if it's going to be necessarily the suppliers that become the mega innovators. What may well happen is that the manufacturers themselves start to become because the tools have become so powerful that they become the mega. If you actually take a deep dive into a lot of really innovative manufacturing companies, it's the machines that they built to make the product. It's the processes they use to make the product. That's where some of the real breakthroughs happen. That doesn't come from outside. Now, sometimes suppliers can provide some of that equipment. So maybe this is just an amplifier for that. And the second thing is I know is coming is this massive disintermediation of manufacturing. So we already have companies where the brand owner contracts the design of the product. It contracts people to make the products. It contracts people to service the product and sell the product. So they're literally just the brand name on top of it. Now you matrix that, right? Where you have companies with very, very flexible manufacturing capacity that's additive or traditional. Who knows, right? But I think a manufacturing supply chain 10-20 years from now is going to look radically different. Fewer companies will be making stuff on their own. But the companies that are making stuff will be really applying some innovative technology to be flexible, versatile. That's never going to happen for grunt commodity stuff where the cost to produce matter; you do purpose-built. But increasingly, look at the proliferation rate on new product introductions and electronic products and so many different things in our lives, clothing, right? There are so many things that we could innovate faster if the manufacturing systems themselves could adapt faster. Maybe that's an outcome. TROND: Well, I mean, whichever of these scenarios pan out, it seems to me that at least segments of this industry, if it remains, you know if you can talk about it as one industry anymore, is going to be super exciting. So that brings me, I guess, to just my closing question. If you were to advise a young person today who is maybe thinking about college, or they're thinking about should I follow my passion, which happens to be actually going and making and building things? Or should I get a theoretical education, or is that a false choice? Where should they go today? There's this dichotomy between getting a four-year education versus just going and getting some skills like we have been talking about, so you have some inkling of where you actually need to be to understand in order to produce the innovations. RICK: I think all the above, and let me elaborate on that a little bit. When I was in university, I created my own co-ops in the summer. So I worked...I sought them out. My son's at Drexel University now, and a co-op program is an integral part of his education there. For a lot of folks, getting kids particularly exposed to co-ops and those kinds of internships give you two things. It might tell you what you don't want to do just as much as you want to do, which is I think a lot of people in their career would wish they knew that earlier. It helps you get that real-world experience and just interacting with people. So I think that aspect of in your university education doing a diverse and interesting set of co-ops would be very valuable. Having a liberal arts aspect to any technical education or focus skills education is still valid. You have to know how to read, write, speak, those kinds of things. Design is ever increasingly important. The polymath is going to be a great skill to have. Secondly, learning has never been easier. You've got so many online resources as well. If you need a technical skill, I mean, I could probably learn neurosurgery on YouTube if I really needed to if there was no other option, you know, 60% chance that patient would live. TROND: [laughs] RICK: But we have so many different resources. I'm a believer in lifelong learning. So it's not a static thing. Certainly, a highly specialized skill if you're going to be geneticists doing CRISPR whatever, you need to spend 8-10 years of true rigorous study to master a lot of that kind of stuff. Maybe not; maybe that's even getting easier. TROND: Ricky, you just brought me back to eighth grade and my one-week internship at the National Geological Lab, where I was sorting through minerals. And it's incredible how one week is etched into my mind. I don't think about it every time, and I haven't thought about it for years. But while you were just describing with seeking out these internships, you brought it all back to me. And I can almost remember how the Monday was different from the Tuesday rotation when I went through that institute. There is just no comparison to that kind of real-life experience. RICK: And the other advice that I give any person is versatile set of skills. Do a sales role sometime in your life. You might hate it, you might despise it, but you're going to learn what the salespeople in your company go through. You might love it, and it becomes a career. Communications, what your marketing folks have. Having a diverse set of skills and getting exposure...maybe it happened accidentally for me. Those were the opportunities that presented themselves, but I think having that diverse skill set and toolbox is extremely valuable, particularly if you want to start a company. TROND: Rick, I thank you so much. We have gone way over what I had promised and even my promise to our listeners to be very succinct. But this has been, for me, at least a fascinating roller coaster through your career and throughout manufacturing, both history and future. I thank you very, very much. RICK: My pleasure. TROND: You have just listened to Episode 10 of The Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. And the topic was A Brief History of Manufacturing Software. Our guest was Rick Bullotta, Partner at TwinThread and Co-Founder of ThingWorx. In this conversation, we talk about how Rick has shaped manufacturing software history and the lessons learned from being an early employee at Wonderware, the famous precursor to manufacturing automation, back in 1993, a company first sold to British engineering giant Siebe in 1998, which merged with BTR to form Invensys, which in turn merged with French multinational Schneider Electric and later the CTO. Rick Bullotta was also the Co-Founder of Lighthammer Software, which was later acquired by SAP. Then in 2009, founding ThingWorx, the first complete end-to-end technology platform designed for the industrial internet of things, which was acquired by PTC in 2003. We also touch on his current advice to founders in the industrial space, his board role at Tulip, and what he sees lie ahead for the industry. My take is that Wonderware, Lighthammer, and ThingWorx are prominent parts of manufacturing software history, and there's a chance that the 4th company he now is involved with, Tulip, also will be. I do things with things is Rick Bullotta's motto. The things he does, he does them well, and it is an internet of things, more than anything else. I, for one, am eagerly listening to what he predicts will happen next. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 4: A Renaissance of Manufacturing or Episode 5: Plug-and-Play Industrial Tech. Augmented- the industry 4.0 podcast. Special Guest: Rick Bullota.

    TopJobs im Wandel - DER Berufspodcast
    Claudia Hümpel: Wie man zum Mitarbeitermagneten und Wunscharbeitgeber wird.

    TopJobs im Wandel - DER Berufspodcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 23:50


    Claudia Hümpel ist Expertin für Mitarbeitergewinnung und Teamaufbau und zeigt kleinen Unternehmen und Startups aus der IT- und Tech-Branche, wie sie zum Mitarbeitermagneten und Wunscharbeitgeber für Bewerber*innen werden. Begonnen hat die promovierte Diplom-Mathematikerin als Software-Entwicklerin bei der SAP. Von dort wechselte sie zur IT-Tochter eines Medienunternehmens, wo sie innerhalb kürzester Zeit die Leitung der Software-Entwicklung übernahm und nach weiteren 5 Jahren zur Geschäftsführerin berufen wurde. 2009 zog sie mit ihrer Familie von Hannover in den Süden Wiens, machte sich 2011 als Unternehmens- und Personalberaterin selbständig, gründete 2013 ihre eigene Personalberatung und ist seither in unterschiedlichen Rollen und Projekten hauptsächlich für IT- und Tech-Unternehmen tätig. Internetressourcen und Programme Canva, Trello, Zoom, Melonapp.com, Streamyard Buchempfehlungen Wertvolle Tipps: Man wird nicht Führungskraft, weil man plötzlich Abteilungsleiter ist - man muss es sich verdienen. Die Mitarbeiter machen einen zur Führungskraft. Kontakt zu Claudia Hümpel: LinkedIn, ClaudiaHuempel.com Dieser Berufspodcast richtet sich vor allem an Fach- und Führungskräfte und nicht nur, wenn sie auf Jobsuche sind. Wenn du an Karrierechancen interessiert bist, dann erhältst du für deine Stellensuche viele wertvolle Tipps von erfahrenen Experten. In Interviews kommen erfolgreiche Menschen mit Topjobs zu Wort. Was begeistert sie besonders bei ihrer Aufgabe? Wie haben sie ihre Führungsposition gefunden? Welche Aus- und Weiterbildungen waren für sie relevant? Erfahrene HR Profis informieren dich hier über die sich verändernden Anforderungen im Arbeitsmarkt. Damit bist du immer einen Schritt voraus und der Gestalter deiner erfolgreichen Karriere. CEO's und Geschäftsführer schildern ihren Weg an die Spitze, damit du von den Besten lernen kannst. Sie geben dir viele wertvolle Tipps für deine berufliche Karriere. Weiters sind immer wieder interessante und auch bekannte Redner, Coaches und Trainer dabei. Lass dich auch von ihnen inspirieren und gestalte deine Karriere möglichst erfolgreich. Mein Name ist Christoph Stelzhammer, Inhaber der C. Stelzhammer GmbH veredelt vermitteln und des Berufszentrum.ch. Mitarbeitende zu Höchstleistungen zu bringen und in die richtigen Teams zu integrieren, gehört zu meinen Leidenschaften. Menschen erfolgreich machen und sie dabei zu unterstützen, auf ihrem beruflichen Lebensweg sich selbst sein zu können. Nimm dein Leben in die eigene Hand, folge deiner Bestimmung und lebe deine Talente. Als Fach- und Führungskraft stets authentisch aufzutreten und sich und andere erfolgreich machen. Dafür brenne ich und dieser Podcast ist auch Ausdruck meines persönlichen Lebenszwecks.

    Hot Bets - der Podcast über heiße Aktien
    DAX: „das gefällt mir nicht“ – SAP 110 Euro Kursziel – GOLD & SILBER

    Hot Bets - der Podcast über heiße Aktien

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 6:16


    Berenberg Bank legt sich bei der SAP auf das Kursziel 110 Euro fest. Die Preise für GOLD & SILBER sind attraktiv, eine physische Hinterlegung ist zu empfehlen.

    AKTIONÄR TV-Expertensendung
    Bitcoin, Euro, DAX, SAP, Deutsche Telekom, Uniper, RWE, Shop Apotheke - Märkte am Morgen

    AKTIONÄR TV-Expertensendung

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 11:37


    Der DAX hat gestern ohne Unterstützung der Wall Street einen vergleichsweise ereignisarmen Tag hinter sich gebracht. Die US-Börsen blieben wegen eines Feiertags geschlossen. Die Vorgaben aus Asien sind uneinheitlich.

    WBSRocks: Business Growth with ERP and Digital Transformation
    WBSP340: Grow Your Business by Understanding SAP Business One's Capabilities, an Objective Panel Discussion

    WBSRocks: Business Growth with ERP and Digital Transformation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 63:57


    While you might feel that SAP does not care for the SMB market, SAP Business One is one of the most successful products. SAP Business One incorporates all the great features such as financial control and relationship map, along with the speed of the HANA database. SAP Business One also has a similar data model and architecture as their other product, which provides the SAP experience at a fraction of the costs. But SAP Business One Cloud is not as advanced as its on-prem variant. So is SAP Business One still a potential option for you? Or should you be looking at some other cloud- and web-enabled products?In today's episode, we invited a panel of industry experts for a live discussion on LinkedIn to conduct an independent review of SAP Business One's capabilities. We covered many grounds, including their cloud journey and their strength with their on-prem solution, such as the transactional traceability features similar to their bigger products such as SAP S/4 HANA and SAP Business By Design. Finally, we discussed features such as their sales and assembly BOMs and how they are better suited for project-based manufacturing because they have dates on their operations.For more information on growth strategies for SMBs using ERP and digital transformation, visit our community at wbs.rocks or elevatiq.com. To ensure that you never miss an episode of the WBS podcast, subscribe on your favorite podcasting platform.

    WBSRocks: Business Growth with ERP and Digital Transformation
    WBSP344: Grow Your Business by Understanding Infor LN's Capabilities, an Objective Panel Discussion

    WBSRocks: Business Growth with ERP and Digital Transformation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 64:15


    Infor LN has been the household name for many Automotive and Aerospace companies. If they can't relate with Infor LN, they will definitely recognize BaaN. At one point, when BaaN won Boeing as their account, there was a prediction that BaaN may be a clear threat to SAP. But unfortunately, running an ERP company requires more than just the technical prowess to handle the workload at the SAP levels. BaaN would have been a tragic story. But, good for the product that it found its place in the financially capable hands of Infor. Infor LN has come a long way in its evolution, and the cloud version offers several Infor products integrated with Infor. But where does it stand today in comparison to other similar products?In today's episode, we invited a panel of industry experts for a live discussion on LinkedIn to conduct an independent review of Infor LN's capabilities. We covered many grounds, including their strength in manufacturing complex products such as automotive and aerospace along with how dates at the operational level are the crucial factor to determining the right fit for the ERP products. Finally, we discussed concepts such as handling units, pegging, and global trade compliance that are absolutely essential for large companies to manage all aspects of their scheduling such as service, production, and procurement.For more information on growth strategies for SMBs using ERP and digital transformation, visit our community at wbs.rocks or elevatiq.com. To ensure that you never miss an episode of the WBS podcast, subscribe on your favorite podcasting platform.

    Self Love Ignited with Katie Allen
    107. Learn to Thrive with Imposter Syndrome with Paul Larsen

    Self Love Ignited with Katie Allen

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 52:12


    What if that feeling of being a fraud, that feeling that you're an imposter, could actually be a good thing? The vast majority of people have, at one time or another, felt like an imposter. What matters is not whether or not you feel it, but what you choose to do with it. Todays guest is the wonderful Paul Larsen. He shares his own journey to self love that came to him not from overcoming imposter syndrome, but from embracing it and learning to thrive WITH it. _____ From flipping hamburgers on Main Street to leading HR for Wall Street, Paul has continually reinvented his leadership voice throughout his life, to thrive within the uncertainty of our ever-chaotic world. As an Imposter Syndrome survivor and now a mental-fitness coach, Paul has successfully partnered with hundreds of leaders and teams to help them build a management brand of compassion and collaboration and lead from a mindset of strength and confidence. His amusing and practical corporate life experiences led him to author the award-winning management coaching book, Find Your VOICE as a Leader™ (2016, Aviva Publishing). Paul is honored to work with the incredible global teams and leaders at Twitter, Microsoft, Electronic Arts, SAP, Cisco and Salesforce, along with many successful life entrepreneurs looking to make their mark on the world. A certified executive coach with the Marshall Goldsmith Group, an expert panelist with Forbes Coaches Council, Paul also loves to engage audiences around the world as he shares his insights on finding your purpose, passion and ultimately your true voice as a leader. _____ Connect with Paul:

    The Digital Supply Chain podcast
    Autonomous Supply Chains? A Chat With Pactum CEO Martin Rand

    The Digital Supply Chain podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 23:31


    A large part of a supply chain's workload is negotiating contracts, particularly purchases. What if those negotiations could be automated? That's what Pactum does today - fully autonomous negotiations on behalf of organisations freeing up time, optimising value, and not leaving money on the table.To find out more I invited Pactumm CEO and co-founder Martin Rand to come on the podcast. We had a fascinating conversation covering why automating negotiations is so important, some of the use cases, and where to from here for Pactum.We also talked a bit about AI's achieving sentience!I learned loads, I hope you do too...If you have any comments/suggestions or questions for the podcast - feel free to leave me a voice message over on my SpeakPipe page or just send it to me as a direct message on Twitter/LinkedIn. Audio messages will get played (unless you specifically ask me not to).If you want to learn more about how to juggle sustainability and efficiency mandates while recovering from pandemic-induced disruptions, meeting growth targets, and preparing for an uncertain future, check out our Oxford Economics research report here.And if you want to read up on our Industry 4.0 blueprint repost, head on over to https://www.sap.com/cmp/dg/intro-industry40/index.html, and if you liked this show, please don't forget to rate and/or review it. It makes a big difference to help new people discover it. Thanks.And remember, stay healthy, stay safe, stay sane! 

    CPQ Podcast
    Many CPQ Demos are sub-optimal

    CPQ Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 11:49


    Many CPQ Demos are done each day but many of them are sub-optimal. Why is that and what can be done to improve that? In this episode Frank talks about his experience with CPQ (and Pricing) Demos and provides Tips & Tricks to make better Demos for CPQ Vendors and potential customers. If you have more questions about this contact him at Frank.Sohn@NovusCPQ.com  

    Digital leben
    Podcast "Digital leben" | Folge 57 – Bonusfolge: Lernen aus Digitalisierungsfehlern

    Digital leben

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 31:50


    IT-ler Jörg Müller aus Magdeburg entwickelt seit 20 Jahren digitale Lösungen. Mit Marcel Roth bespricht, warum er jetzt gute und schlechte Beispiele zur "Digitalisierung" sammelt und was sich daraus lernen lässt.

    Steve reads his Blog
    Steve has yet another Chat with Charles

    Steve reads his Blog

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 27:51


    I have had my head down working on some big things since RapidStart CRM growth exploded, and it has been a while since you heard from me. Well, I'm getting back to it with a follow-up chat with Charles Lamanna who recently took over for James Phillips as head of Business Applications for Microsoft. This was my fourth chat with Charles, and it was interesting to back listen to them in order. It really gives you a sense of where Microsoft has come. I managed to catch him in his office having just wrapped up their year-end. Enjoy! If you want to listen to my chats with Charles in order, The first one was October of 2018, the second one was September of 2019, the third one was March of 2020. Transcript Below: Steve: Welcome to the Steve Has a Chat Podcast. Where I call someone out of the blue with a record button on, and hope to have an unscripted conversation about Microsoft business applications. Let's see how it goes. Enjoy. Charles: Hey, this is Charles Lamanna. Steve: Charles. Steve Mordue. How are you doing? Charles: Good. Great to hear from you, Steve. It's been a long time. Steve: It has been a while. Have you got some time for a chat? Charles: For you, anytime. Steve: I appreciate it. Well, I guess the big news for you obviously is putting on the big boy hat, huh? Charles: Yes. I moved up an extra floor in the Advanta building in the Microsoft Campus. Steve: Oh did you? Charles: No, I'm just kidding. But metaphorically speaking at least. Because for folks that don't know, James Phillips leaving in March of this year, I kinda stepped in across all aspects of business applications of Microsoft. And, over the last four years, I've gotten to know the place, know the people, know the business and I'm super excited about the opportunity. And I think the future has never been brighter for business at Microsoft. Steve: Well, I never got the feeling that James held you back, or any of the folks on your team back, but he certainly, we have to give him a lot of credit for really taking this thing to a whole nother level. You weren't here before, I don't think, at least with the business apps, but it was really run by morons before he took over. And he completely turned that thing around and turned it in a whole nother business. And now with you taking over, I'm expecting that to continue. I don't know if there's been some things that have been in your bag that you've wanted to do that James was keeping you from, that you're going to pull out, or if you're just going to continue the path, or what's your thinking now that you've got that gavel? Charles: So definitely not held back. I would say I was super fortunate I worked for James for, I think seven, eight years in total. So I was able to learn a bunch and he was without a doubt, the most supportive manager I've ever had in my career, in terms of both enabling and clearing paths for what we wanted to do from a vision and dreaming perspective. And if it weren't for his support, things like Power Apps would have never gotten off the ground. So, definitely. And I think as we go to the future, we have this amazing foundation. I mean, BizApps is a major and key component and pillar of the Microsoft Cloud. Charles: 10 years ago, you probably would've thought that impossible. Right. To have Dynamics and Power Platform alongside Azure and Office. Now that we're here, let's go take it to the next level. And that's the push, and it's continuing a lot of the great innovation we've already done from a data-first, AI-first approach. Kind of sprinkling in some more collaboration with teams, and really revisiting the end-user experience, the platform, to go increasingly modernize and scale it and make sure that all our components from CRM, to ERP, to Power Platform work great together. Steve: I don't think it could have achieved that status with Dynamics 365 alone. It really took the Power Platform coming into being, I think, to give it the breadth that it needed to be able to get there. With Dynamics 365, we didn't have apps for users to do small things, there was no way it was going to permeate an organization the way the Power Apps do. Charles: Yeah. Yeah, that's right. I say two things are interesting. The first is, Power Platform has allowed us to help more users and more customers with business process transformation, which is what BizApps are all about. Right? Steve: Yeah. Charles: How do you make your sales processes better, your financial processes better, and Power Platform really turbocharged that. And that earned us credibility in a lot of those departments and with a lot of those users, and we have some great data about every user who adopts Power Platform is significantly more likely to adopt Dynamics within the next year or two. So we see that symbiosis working in a way which is incredibly customer-friendly, and it helps our business. Second thing is Power Platform has even helped us reimagine parts of the Dynamics apps themselves. And I think probably two of the best examples are the connectors, which are key to the Power Platform. Charles: You see the connectors starting to show up inside all these Dynamics apps, like Customer Insights uses Power Query for data ingestion, or Viva Sales even connects to Salesforce. So there's this amazing interoperability that we have, and also enabling the end-user. Our team built Viva Sales, even though it's not in the Dynamics or Power Platform brand. But it's this idea of having an integrated experience in Office for sellers, built on connectors and built on the Office integration. So it's changed the way you think about some products, and it's also helped us go expand our user base. Steve: Yeah. I saw I was on a PGI call with that yesterday. Very, very cool stuff. At the last PAC meeting, I was supposed to be on the Viva Sales round table, but I'm like, "Yeah, that sounds boring. I think I'm going to go to this one." And I really, I went to the wrong one, I missed a good one. But you know where I am, right? I'm on the platform. Charles: Yep. Steve: And we're exploding. Our app is continuing to grow on the platform as a low-cost simpler alternative to Dynamics 365 for companies that aren't ready for that. And I'm always bugging you about, "Hey, that cool new feature you guys got in the first-party. When are we going to get that at the platform level? So ISVs, and people that are just building their own stuff from scratch, could take advantage of some of the syncs." We got the Outlook app a while ago, we've been getting some things. And when I saw Viva Sales, that was probably my only disappointment was that, at least as I understand it, it's hardwired to Dynamics or hardwired to Salesforce. And I get that trying to play those two against each other, but it's leaving guys like me out in the cold. Charles: Well, I'd say for Viva Sales, the intent is to support any CRM, and I really do mean that generally. And even customers, because there are customers out there that we talked to today who have homegrown CRMs, they coded 15 years ago. They have a whole dev team still working on it. The idea is to support interoperability with your account records, your lead records, your opportunity records, standard pipeline data. And to do that in a way which works through the connector. So today it'll earn V1, it'll only be Dynamics in Salesforce, but the intent is to make that be a general purpose adapter. And you could have a RapidStart CRM connector, which shows up and supports the contacts the way we want, and it would be connectable. That's not going to happen in the next three months, but that's the ambition. Steve: I can call you in four. Charles: I go down and said... What was that, in four Months? Steve: I can call you in four months. Charles: Yeah. Yes. Yeah. I might not pick up the phone then in four months, no I'm just kidding. Because even talking about, if people are even on Seibal. We should be able to support them with their sales. Because the idea is, you shouldn't have to transform the seller experience at the same pace that you transform your core CRM, your core system of record, and that's just the way the world's moving. Steve: Well, I love the idea that one of the challenges that CRM has always had, of course, is user adoption. It's one more place they need to go to do something. Outlook app helped with that, getting data into CRM without them having to actually go to it. It seems like yet another way for people to engage with their CRM without actually realizing they're engaging with their CRM. Charles: Exactly. Yeah. It's almost like ambient... Yeah for sure. Sorry. Yeah. I say it's almost like ambient CRM basically. How do you make it so that, instead of the user goes to your CRM, the CRM goes to the user where they are. And the outlook app was the beginnings of that. Some of the Team's integrations we've done are the beginnings of that. And that Viva Sales and that whole Viva idea is how do you elevate it? So anywhere you go, your CRM data is accessible without you having to go to a different user interface. Steve: Very cool. Very cool. So I ask you every time we get on a call about exciting features that are coming up. And in particular, maybe even some features that have launched, that didn't take off the way you thought they would and people are just missing something. We have this problem with our app sometimes, people don't understand and so they don't move forward, and it would be perfect for them. And I'm sure there's lots of features and capabilities that you guys broke a sweat building, and know in your heart, this would be awesome, but people don't seem to be getting that. What's a good example of one of those? Charles: I'd say a product which we've had a capability, where we've had a lot of customer usage from a small number of customers, but very deeply and with huge impact, and we wish were with more customers, is probably Conversation Intelligence. I'm not sure if you've seen that around the Sales app, and where that actually will sit in inside of say a phone call or a meeting and help you generate action items, and summaries, and coaching, and help you understand sentiment, and listening and talk ratio. We've used that internally at Microsoft with great success. So our digital sales reps and the folks who work our phones, they are diehard fans. We have this amazing video we released a couple months ago where we actually went out and interviewed these digital sales reps and their managers, and they just were going on and on about how great it is. Charles: And that's rare where you hear that about a piece of technology for a seller. And we have a few other external customers that have gone through that same journey, where they have a thousand digital reps, 2000 digital reps using this and just in love with it. But it's not as pervasive as we thought it would be at this point. And it's one of those things where, it's a product discovery, and easing people into the capability, because then you got to go out of your way to enable it and configure it. So we're doing work now to simplify it, and make it more accessible to more users. And we're doing that partly through Viva Sales, like conversation intelligence, the major capability of Viva Sales. Charles: And the second thing is also, there's even some culture aspects to it. Because if you use it, it's generating transcripts and recordings of a call, and not everyone's necessarily super comfortable with that. So we're even working about how do you enable more features without having to record the call, and how do you enable capabilities without having to get a transcript? Or how do you make it more natural to say, "Hey, I have a sales co-pilot thing. Are you okay if I enable it?" So there's a lot of interesting things, it's never just a technology problem. It's also a discovery and a, I'd say, change culture management problem. Steve: Yeah. I think that's been the challenge with anything AI really. A lot of people, it seem to think it might be a little too futuristic. They look at the benefit and think that's really cool, but they have no idea how to get it. And AI just in general, doesn't feel that approachable to people, even though in certain cases, it's extremely approachable. You don't have to do anything, it's approaching you. So it's a learning curve, you got to wait until my generation dies off and then you guys will see. Charles: I don't have as myopic of you, as you Steve. But I would say that, the big thing that we have to do is, there's been this evolution of AI where the AI is going to be something that automates away what humans do. And what we've realized is, AI is not even remotely close to being able to do that. But what AI can do, is it can turbocharge the people that use it. And so what we're trying to do is, how do we go expose these AI capabilities in a way where you or anyone else who uses them feels so much more productive. And just like when you first got the ability to use PC or a spreadsheet, you're like, "How did I exist before?" We're hoping we'll get to the point where, once you start using some of these AI assistive capabilities, like we've done in Conversation Intelligence, you'll be like, "How did I ever do a customer call before? And I had to take notes on paper while listening as opposed to having the AI take notes for me?" Yeah, exactly. Steve: I'm terrible about that. I'll be chicken scratching over here while I'm talking to people, and then we get off the phone I look at and I can't understand a word I wrote. Charles: Yeah. I like post-it notes next to my desk where I'm always writing stuff down. Steve: Yeah. So what else cool's coming on the horizon that we should be... That sounds like the Conversational Intelligence has been around. Sounds like Viva Sales is going to really bring that to the masses, so that one's on a path. What are some other new things that we should pay attention to that you're able to talk about? Charles: Yeah. Another one of my favorite things, which we've started to reveal some capabilities going back to last Ignite, so November of 2021. And we have some big announcements planned for the second half of 2022, is the new Contact Center related capabilities inside of Dynamics Customer Service. We have Omnichannel, we announced integrated voice, the Nuance acquisition closed, and the Nuance contact center AI team joined my group to align with customer service and contact center. So there's a lot of really exciting innovation happening there. And I'm really excited about the potential to make it super easy to get a comprehensive customer engagement story, without having to wire up eight different pieces of technology and do a ton of different complex integrations. So that's a place where there's a lot of innovation, there's new capabilities, Omnichannel, Power Virtual Agent, even the same type of conversation intelligence applied to support cases, Nuance for their Gatekeeper, which is identity and authentication verification based on voice and biometrics. Charles: There's a lot of cool stuff in that space. And that's one of the places where so many of the customers we work with are trying to improve the customer experience, and to go reduce costs. So I say that's a place where we've had a lot of exciting announcements over the last six to nine months, and we have a whole bunch more planned for the next six to nine months. So I say, stay tuned. And I won't say more than that to avoid getting in trouble by leaking information. But I just say, that's a place to really pay close attention. Steve: Who knew call centers could be cool? Charles: Yeah, exactly. Who would have thought that I'd be talking about contact centers, and how it's the next generation or next frontier of AI applications in 2022. Steve: Oh, well. Well I do have to thank you guys for the low-code advances you've continued to make in that platform. It actually allowed us to launch a, I think we're the first ones to try this, a new Service as a Subscription. Which includes awesome includes deployment, customization, training, everything except development code, which as you know today in so many of these projects, there's so little, if any of that. Charles: Yeah. Steve: Just a few years ago, if you tried to offer something like this, it really would be little more than a support agreement. But now, we're deploying, we're building, we're customizing, we're building entire things for customers all on a monthly subscription. It's an interesting concept, and hopefully I don't go broke, but... Charles: But you know what, it's fascinating. I literally was talking about this with the Power Platform team this morning. About a future where we'll have more partners who are able to sell a comprehensive service agreement, which includes the cloud hosting licenses, but also some incremental custom development and also ongoing maintenance and support. And it'll be almost this whole new industry, which will push a lot of innovation to the edges of the ecosystem, right? Steve: Yep. Charles: Not built by Microsoft, built by partners who really understand particular regions, particular industries, or particular segments. Like y'all are targeting a space where we're not trying to go take Dynamics, CRM, and go bring it down there. You can go build a world-class experience on top of our platform and provide a very much all-in-one, which exactly serves the needs of that audience and that market. And we can stay focused on building the super horizontal platform, which has great performance, great usability, incredible power, those types of things. Steve: Yeah, it sounds great. I'm glad that we had the same idea you guys did. I'll let you know, in a few months, if it was a smart one. Time will tell. Charles: Yes. Yeah. Steve: So, how are the rest of the team doing? It seems like some folks have moved around a little bit in the org, who's moved where? Charles: Yeah. So one of the big things we've been really focused on the engineering side, for the engineering organization, is bringing together strength from a product perspective that target the same type of user. And for example, we have a new customer experience platform team underneath Lori Lamkin, who leads all of our Dynamic Sales apps. So the Core Sales and Viva Sales, as well as commerce, as well as marketing, as well as customer insights. And it's very much focused on revenue generation, customer journeys, customer experiences. And what's great is by bringing those assets together, we have a great answer for B2B customers, as well as B2C. Like if you want to have self service, no touch eCommerce experience with lightweight telesales, you can do that all with those sets of applications. If you want to do a high relationship, high touch B2B sales process, you can do all of that. You're not going to use commerce, but you're probably going to use customer insights and sales, and maybe a little bit of account-based marketing. So we brought together these things, which are solving similar problems under a single leader. And that way the engineering teams can go back and forth between these different places to finish out full end-to-end customer journeys. And so that's a big area that we've spent a lot of time on, and that's a place where it's really the biggest and fastest growing category for us in the Dynamics 365 application portfolio. So that's one interesting example. Jeff Comstock, folks may know him. He's been around Dynamics 365 for a while. He continues customer service, he leads omnichannel, he's done some of this great expansion around the contact center for us. Ray Smith leads our supply chain team. So that includes things like more supply chain. Steve: So Ray moved? Charles: Yeah, yeah, yeah. He by way of acquisition to SAP then moved. He worked in Dynamic Sales for a bit, where people may have known him. And now the supply chain, and really helping us be this new data driven, AI powered, supply chain story for core supply chain execution. Then we also had some exciting announcements around process advisor and the minor acquisition to help turbocharge that. Or Georg Glantschnig who leads our finance room of the house. And basically we call the room of the house, is the collection of products which focus on serving the CFO and the finance department. And that includes the Suplari acquisition, which we had done a couple years ago, as well as the Core Dynamics, 365 finance, HR, and project operations products. Charles: So you can see how we started to build these critical paths around particular departments and particular lines of businesses with our products. And in addition to that, we also of course have Power Platform to support all of it. So it's amazing to see these things come together and converge. And we've been on this incredible run of innovation around Dynamics. I was counting it earlier this year, 29 different products in Dynamics, and really coalesced around these specific areas where we have a lot of energy, and also very well understood. I'd say synergies between the products that we have. So I'd say exciting times. Very exciting times. Steve: Customers are starting to understand it better also. Business Applications was the same thing for a long time. Then it spent the last five years reinventing itself every month, and new things exploding out of Advanta. And I think a lot of customers were having trouble just keeping up with... It's like little whackamole for them. And it takes a little time for customers to absorb what's happening, and what it's for, or what it does, and then to adopt it. And we're seeing that now. We used to have to go out and promote Power Apps to people who didn't understand what this was, or why it was. And now it's the opposite. They always come to us, looking for Power Apps, looking at those sorts of things. So that understanding seems to have finally permeated down to the customer level. But boy, it took a while. Charles: Yeah. It warms my heart. And I would say one of my favorite books is by Jim Collins, 'Good to great.' I always recommend it to folks on my team to read it. And he talks about this idea of the flywheel. It takes time to get a flywheel spinning, for the first period of time it looks like it's barely moving, but then eventually it's going super fast and it's just a blur. And you need to be consistent, and convicted, and believe in the strategy and the approach. And what's amazing about BizApps is for the last four years, we've been on the same mission, the same vision, the same ambition. And we just spend all the folks in advance at turning that flywheel, turning that flywheel. And it's started to reach that blur phase where it's spinning so fast, you can't even see it. Charles: And this, this all started years and years ago with a ton of work, but we're really at that magical moment where customers know what Power Platform is. Customers know that Microsoft gets customer experience and customer engagement. They know that Microsoft can help them optimize their supply chain. And what the good news is once that thing is going, it really builds upon itself, and I think it'll only continue that momentum further. And my favorite story is, I used to always do these executive briefings at Microsoft where we have executives come in from our customers to Redmond and we have a briefing center. It's very nice. And I would always say, let me talk about Power Apps and low-code. Charles: And everybody gives me a blank stare like, "What the heck is Power Apps? What the heck is low-code?" I go in those meetings now, and people know what Power Apps is, and they know the low-code strategy. And the only question is, "how?". Not, "should I?" Or "if?" "How do I do it with you, Microsoft?" And so different from three years ago. So anyway, so you're exactly right. A long winded answer, but I'd say it's exciting to see all of these things come together, and the benefits of just consistently repeating a message that resonates with customers. Steve: I would say at least three quarters of my customer calls today, they're bringing up right out of the gate, "We don't want any development. We want to do everything low-code, no code." So this is coming from the customer side where we used to have to explain to them what low-code, no code meant. Now they're coming demanding, "I only want low-code, no code." I think that they've come to this realization that, while low-code, no code might not be easy enough for your mom to do, it doesn't require a developer, and code does require developer. And once you've got this little blob of code in your environment, it's a black box for you. And so they don't want any of these black boxes. They want everything to be accessible. Steve: Use your knowledge to build us something complex out of low-code, but then I can still go back in there later and manipulate it, adjust it myself, or our team. So they have absolutely bought into that. And I know we originally, a lot of us partners were concerned early on that this was going to reduce the workload for partners, while our workload is more than it has ever been. Although the developers on the bench don't stay as busy as they used to. We've completely pivoted the team from developer heavy to now, we haven't even got a good title for them. A citizen developer doesn't sound right. We tell customers that, but citizen developers is what we've got so... Charles: This guy we found on the street, or gal found on the street, we just asked them to start building out. But no, it makes sense. There is almost this new role which is, it's not just pure coding expertise, it's technical development concept expertise. But even more importantly is business process and solution expertise. And that fusion of those two skill sets, that's the magic. That's what makes it special, because you understand it. Steve: Yeah. The challenge that we have with this brand new model that we just launched, because, first of all, being the first one out there is not always good because people have no idea what you're talking about. They're trying to compare it to other things. But we've got this little caveat that it's all you can eat, everything, except development code. And trying to define what that is hasn't been easy, and you get these customers coming in, "Oh, we're going to need a lot of customization. So this isn't going to work for us." And so you may need a lot of customizations, but you don't need any "development code". Charles: Yeah. Steve: And getting them to grasp that development code and customization are not synonymous, not even close. Charles: Exactly. Steve: Development code is a very small component today of customization. And once I think that they understand that, then we'll probably see more partners coming into a model like this. Because it makes a lot of sense for customers, makes a lot of sense for partners. Charles: Yeah. And if you go look at building solutions that last a decade, this is to your point, code is this little black box opaque thing, which is hard to maintain over time. If it's no code, low-code, it's easy to open it up and reconfigure as business requirements change. And it's how you build solutions that last. And I think we're getting to the phase with business software where customers are expecting to make long term technology bets. You're not going to replace your CRM every five years from now on. It's like building manufacturing plants and warehouses. These are big investments that you need to be able to amortize over a long time, to justify. And so I think to your point, no code doesn't mean no flexibility, no customization, also doesn't mean no agility. It just means you're doing it in a different way. Couldn't say it better myself. Steve: All right. Cool. Hey, listen, I'm going to let you go. I really appreciate you taking the time out of your day here when I caught you, to chat with me about this stuff, always fun talking to you Charles. I'm going to call you in four months and ask you about Viva Sales for the platform. Charles: Sounds good. Sounds good. Steve: I've got you on record there. Charles: So really appreciate you taking the time, giving me a ring, Steve. Hope you have a great rest of the summer. Steve: All right, man. Have a good one. Charles: Yep. You too.  

    The Digital Supply Chain podcast
    Reducing Friction In Product Development - A Chat With Calico's Kathleen Chan

    The Digital Supply Chain podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 12:42


    Product development is obviously a key part of supply chain. In the apparel industry communicating with manufacturers can be challenging, so enter Calico to help reduce that friction.To find out more about how this young startup Calico raised money from Serena Ventures, and is helping direct to consumer brands in the apparel industry more easily connect to their factories, I invited Calico CEO Kathleen Chan to come on the podcast.We had a fascinating conversation. I learned loads, I hope you do too...If you have any comments/suggestions or questions for the podcast - feel free to leave me a voice message over on my SpeakPipe page or just send it to me as a direct message on Twitter/LinkedIn. Audio messages will get played (unless you specifically ask me not to).If you want to learn more about how to juggle sustainability and efficiency mandates while recovering from pandemic-induced disruptions, meeting growth targets, and preparing for an uncertain future, check out our Oxford Economics research report here.And if you want to read up on our Industry 4.0 blueprint repost, head on over to https://www.sap.com/cmp/dg/intro-industry40/index.html, and if you liked this show, please don't forget to rate and/or review it. It makes a big difference to help new people discover it. Thanks.And remember, stay healthy, stay safe, stay sane! 

    Music In Mind
    Music In Mind #52 - A Conversation with Charlene Adzima

    Music In Mind

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 69:30


    This episode is a conversation with Irish fiddle player, violinist, and music educator - Charlene Adzima We discuss topics ranging from teaching philosophies, the history of Irish dance and music, and even some music theory! Charlene's Links: Website - http://charleneadzima.com YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFGCKuYdK4QSbhR--DzDmgQ Instagram - https://instagram.com/fhidileoir Suzuki Association of the America - https://suzukiassociation.org/people/charlene-adzima/ The Lillies of the Midwest Links: Bandcamp - https://theliliesofthemidwest.bandcamp.com/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/TheLiliesOfTheMidwest/ To support my content and get access to bonus videos/music, sign up on my Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/anthonycaulkinsmusic Sap & Claw Elixir - First Tap EP: https://open.spotify.com/album/27B1sqXJfEQ01z07rHC0H8?si=bFGEWOjwQ8aqSGGq9H-C8A Anthony's Links: Website - http://www.anthonycaulkins.com Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/anthonycaulkinsmusic Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/artist/2zZw7ctpzHdIye5atlY8T2 Odysee (Music In Mind) - https://odysee.com/@MusicInMind:f Odysee (Anthony Caulkins) - https://odysee.com/@AnthonyCaulkins:a YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8ZV0fhfBfc2Ehzp-5kQzww Twitter - https://twitter.com/Anthony_C_Music Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/anthony.caulkins/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/anthonycaulkinsmusic Bandcamp - https://anthonycaulkins.bandcamp.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/music-in-mind/message

    We Say Things - an esports podcast with SUNSfan & syndereN
    The episode with Special Guest tsunami

    We Say Things - an esports podcast with SUNSfan & syndereN

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 119:25


    Apply for a job at SAP: https://jobs.sap.com/ Be sure to comment with '#SAPEsports' and your answer to be counted towards the next episode

    Inside SAP S/4HANA
    Inside SAP S/4HANA by Solution Management EP08: Intelligent Technologies - SAP Process Automation

    Inside SAP S/4HANA

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 15:59


    Replacing human intervention on high-volume, repetitive, and time-consuming tasks by machines is no longer a rarity, because it is already an integral part of today's business world. Shifting the responsibility for completing activities from humans to machines to minimize manual effort and human error makes business processes more cost-efficient, error-proof, and consistent. Tune in and listen to our host, Marvin Posch and SAP experts Oren Shatil and Jürgen Butsmann to learn more about next level process automation in SAP S/4HANA Cloud.

    Motley Fool Money
    CEO Shakeups

    Motley Fool Money

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 29:58


    CEOs at Pinterest and Bed, Bath, and Beyond are heading for the exits. And that may be just the beginning. (Time Stamp) Deidre Woollard and Tim Beyers discuss: - Where Pinterest has room to grow. - How stock investors should react to a CEO change. - Nike's move to a direct-to-consumer strategy. Rachel Warren interviews Ali Parsa, CEO of Babylon Health, a digital-first health service provider. (Time Stamp) They discuss the company's journey going public and the exciting frontiers of genetic research. Stocks mentioned: PINS, DOCU, BBBY, PYPL, NKE, SAP, BBLN Host: Deidre Woollard Guests: Tim Beyers, Rachel Warren, Ali Parsa Producer: Ricky Mulvey Engineers: Rick Engdahl, Brandon Gentry

    Billy Newman Photo Podcast
    Billy Newman Photo Podcast | 220 Obsidian Rock, Lightroom Catalog System

    Billy Newman Photo Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 24:11


    Donate to the podcast directly with the links below. ⚡️Donate any amount from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet ( including Cash.App ) to Billy Newman https://strike.me/billynewman ⚡️Donate $5 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay5 ⚡️Donate $11.11 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay11 ⚡️Donate $50 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay50 If you feel you are getting value from this, please help by becoming a supporter and send some sats. *New* You can send a Bitcoin Lightning payment direct from the Cash.app Get a Bitcoin Lightning wallet for free instant transfers https://breez.technology https://muun.com https://bluewallet.io Value streaming payments system enables listeners to send Bitcoin micropayments to podcasters as they listen, in real-time. Start streaming value! It's easy to remember: http://value4value.io/ newpodcastapps.com I use https://fountain.fm If you're looking to discuss photography assignment work, or a podcast interview, please drop me an email. Drop Billy Newman an email here. If you want to look at my photography, my current portfolio is here. If you want to read a free PDF eBook written by Billy Newman about film photography: you can download Working With Film here. If you get value out of the content I produce, consider making a sustaining value for value financial contribution, Visit the Support Page here. You can find my latest photo books all on Amazon here. You can find my latest photo books all on Amazon here. Website Billy Newman Photo https://billynewmanphoto.com/ YouTube https://www.youtube.com/billynewmanphoto Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/billynewmanphotos/ Twitter https://twitter.com/billynewman Instagram https://www.instagram.com/billynewman/ About   https://billynewmanphoto.com/about/ 0:14 Hello, and thank you very much for listening to this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. I wanted to continue on talking about a little bit about vertical video, sort of a strange thing not really used to it in this day and age. But one thing I've noticed is that YouTube YouTube itself is now going to support I think maybe for the last six months has supported vertical video playing or playback, at least on mobile phones, I think iOS and Android within the app. And when I go to the website, still it shows me the player in horizontal, regular video mode and then it shows me the video kind of, I guess pillar boxed in there as a piece of vertical video in a horizontal frame. That's what it shows me on the web. And so I'm interested to see if they'll end up changing that over time or you know, maybe reorient at least a little bit so that it just sort of shows it without the black bars around it. But kind of interesting I'm not sure if I'm totally sold on a format of vertical video outside of the mobile, handheld you know phone experience and so that's probably why they're they're focusing so much just on that that first but definitely interested in kind of seeing the way that the Instagram TV is sort of competing and the vertical video market you know, the produced vertical video market, different Snapchat different than the story stuff that you see on Instagram or Facebook so 1:40 you can see more of my work at Billy Newman photo comm you can check out some of my photo books on Amazon. I think you can look up Billy Numan under the authors section there and see some of the photo books on film on the desert, on surrealism on camping. You cool stuff over there. This last week, I made a trip out to Central Oregon, and it was still really nice. You know, we had a little bit of rain, I think out there last Thursday, Friday and then Saturday, Sunday we it just it just brightened up a ton. It was super crisp, super bright, really cold though. I think my friend David just got out to Eastern Oregon, I think got towards Smith rock. And he said it was super cold out there too. But yeah, this trip, we did like an overnight trip out there. And I think today I just posted a photograph of something I thought was really cool. It's one of the archaeological remains that are out in Eastern Oregon. And there's a whole interesting history about stuff in Eastern Oregon. But the photo that I posted to Instagram and Facebook and all the other places today is a photograph of this rock teepee ring. That's still in very good condition. It's out in Eastern Oregon in this area in between sort of near like where a dry lake bed where once just a lake would have been now what we see in our modern time is just a dry like that. But the cool thing is is as we kind of look around you can see the remnants of an old indian camp that was really quite established in that area. I think it's it's just amazing to get to go see you'll find other artifacts from Indian populations out in Eastern Oregon. Once you start looking around like you'll start noticing ups obsidian ships that are on the ground, or you'll start noticing really unlike some places through a lot of Oregon through a lot of the the less developed less forested areas of Eastern Oregon there's there's a lot less erosion that's taken place natural erosion that's taking place over the last few 100 years, like over here on the west side of the coast with all the deciduous plant matter that comes up. There's a lot of turnover that seems to happen like a lot of the vegetation is going to end up hiding or over growing some of the older encampments or establishments that were made. I mean right now I'm in the Camus Valley. I'm in the Willamette Valley where the calapooia Indians were I'm sure out here in front of me in this big field out toward the Willamette River. There's tons of Indian artifacts, tons of old indian casts, but none of that's really visible because of all the deciduous organic material that's been developed over here. over the many hundreds of years since it's been that there was an Indian population in the area. Now what's interesting about Eastern Oregon is that because it's way more remote, there's very few people out there there's very few people to disturb a lot of things and really, sagebrush doesn't grow very fast. Things don't really move around very fast out there I was there I think maybe more than a decade ago and it was really almost the same as it is now very little has changed out there. You know, there's no new houses, no new development, maybe maybe a fence around the thing. That might be it. But I was really cool. So you get out to this area. You hike out to a spot then you can really see all over the crowd. It's just a ton of black obsidian shucks, these unworked pieces of black obsidian that were carried in by people and then dropped there at some point. And all these pieces were used, I think in the in the in the camp to chip out arrowheads and a ship out of the tools that they would use but it's really cool this tip ring is really the only rule there's a few TP rings like a few smattering of like piles of rocks this teepee ring was really the one that was that was the most established still, it was most upright still. And you wonder like how far back to these go like how far back to these, these stones that were laid into the ground go but they were using sort of like as a foundation for for the tent or the height of the teepee that they would have established there. And then they would, you know, work out of it. And they worked out of it on a bluff, and then they would look out over the, the hill to the Lake area. And yeah, I don't know, there's a whole system out there. But it's really amazing when you really start to, to come in and sort of understand the layout of the land and where people would sort of go. And it's very interesting man, surreal, really to get out. And like be in a spot like that, or sit in a spot sit in the center of the teepee ring where you know, there's people, other men 1000s of years ago, that were doing work and trying to survive out in really what is now a very harsh environment. And back then was still probably quite harsh, at least in the hundreds of years ago. But man, if you start going back 1000s of years, even a few 100 years ago, I guess 500 years ago, a lot of those dry lake areas out in Eastern Oregon really still had at least a marsh or at least a wetland or, or something like that. I mean like similar to summer Lake now you know, parts of the years drive parts of the year, it's filled with water. So it might be a quite a bit more like that now, but I think in the past, it was really 6:36 it was it was just accepted that there was going to be some amount of water in in the lake bed all year round, instead of it being you know, a dry lake bed. And I think it's I think it's supported by the watershed of a few creeks that are in the area. And and out in that area of Eastern Oregon, there's really, I don't think there's really that many, that many drainage is that really go all the way out toward the coast. So I think there's a few parts that are like land lack watersheds, where the water flows into an area and then and then kind of pulls up and makes a large lake there. And well, I know like there's the Klamath lake and then that runs out to the Klamath River. So that ends up getting out to the, to the ocean, but I don't know if like places like goose Lake, or, or just like these inland lake areas, I think they're just fed by the body of water. And I don't really know if a lot of that would actually get back out into the water cycle to head back out to the ocean, and then you know, come back up or something. So it's kind of interesting thinking about just some of the old watershed stuff that used to be out there, how populations used to try and try and work around all that, you know, like you go to a place like fort rock and you read some of the signs. And you look at how back in the Pleistocene area there, that whole region out there was part of, I think, what's called a Peruvian lake. It's like a prehistoric Pleistocene era lake that really took up a huge amount of land out in Central Oregon really what we think of now it's just a large desert area covered with sagebrush, there's really very few land features was actually just all underwater, the land feature of Fort rock that we've used visualize now, I think came about geologically, during the Pleistocene era, era before before the before the Ice Age, and probably a while back before that, but during that time, it was underwater, it was under a lake bed. And so that's where you get that formation is it was underwater, and then it kind of eroded around it this aquifer and lava or LA aquifer magmatic, I met at a certain time and made this big ring, this big guy. It's big fort rock style formation. And that's still what's out there now. But it's really amazing when you get out there and you go see it. And then you kind of start racking with the perspective that this all was once underwater. This is like an inland sea. And then after the ice age or before the Ice Age, there's some evidence of kind of, well, I don't know. Who knows. But there's evidence to show that the Clovis people, the closest tribes, which I think were the ones that at least in modern archaeology have been identified as the group that was first to come over the land bridge first to come into the Northwest and populate parts of the West Coast and into the south and onward and such. But I guess these club is people had had like a specific type of way of building their tools or stone tools that they would use and that's a bit of a way that you can track some things. If you do find an archaeological artifact, you can kind of identify by the technique used to build the stone tool. Like there's, there's different measures I think one of the oldest ones is look for is fluting. And that was a technique used by the Clovis people where they, they were sort of making an arrowhead or spear point really spear points I don't know if they had had flying bows and arrows at that time that far back but they they build these spear points, and they would flute the end the bottom of it. So like if you would imagine they would be kind of this concaved slope. That was those sort of dremeled out of the bottom base of the rock so that you could you could kind of fit that down in the center of a stick really and then and then wind that up. So you kind of make both ends kind of taper off to a point and then you would jam one end into the stick and then wrap it and then you know, put SAP on it or, or, you know, whatever you can do to fasten it down. But I guess that was one of the techniques that was used early on, and that's one of the things that they look for when they're trying to find really old populations in Oregon. Sometimes it's fluid and that doesn't always mean that it's really old though I suppose. But I guess there's like handfuls of different technical or technological generations of stone tool building out there and you can kind of tell a little bit but it's very fascinating stuff and man was it not amazing to get out there and to really recognize it, you know, I was around a natural human manmade, while a semi natural but man made artifact of a home or of an establishment that's as Oh, I don't know how old it is. Maybe it's as old as early Rome, late Rome who would know how old it is in comparison to Europe? I'm not really sure maybe it goes back even further than that. It seems like there's population and that area of Oregon for 1000s of years I think was it the pie you those out there could be different but I know the pie you 11:25 the pie you were south of that area. The pie you were in Lake County I think like through heart Mountain alvord Nevada the now here area all of that was piute. So maybe this was still in the pipe section. But I know that that really you know, like what we've noticed in the last few 100 years if you were to look at the changes of the map even within the United States over the last say take 600 years not even 7000 years think the last 600 years of the United States of America and then look at all the different maps that would be the territorial ranges of those people who ended up being in power during that time. It's really interesting to see and to kind of take note to how something that seems permanent or seems to have the nature of permanence in it when you speak about it like the that was the range of the pie you Indian well was it for 600 years or for that long did it move around? Did they have I don't know territorial engagements was it really that many of them were they there all the time? I don't know any of that information. So it's got an interesting when you sort of think about it, but it could have been any number of large groups of people that probably would have no idea they were called the pie you Indian. But all really very interesting stuff. And man was it so cool to get out there and see. See a real a teepee ring. It's really fun. It's one of the the cooler pieces of archaeological artifacts that I've run into. I mean, you know, you see Patrick glyphs, you see a lot of things, but really, you know, you were sitting in the home of someone that lived 1000s of years ago that lived out in the same place that that I do now. Yeah, really fascinating stuff, but had a blast going out there and getting to check it out. It was really, and I just I love I kind of love this stuff with the with the story with the background to it, where you kind of get to attach some thing that you recognize with it with, with what you get to talk about what you get to show with it. So I thought was really cool story. It was it was really fun to get out there and go see it. I remembered it from years ago. I think I'd seen it about 10 or 1112 years ago. And I think I tried to go back to it, but I didn't really see how to or where it was and I wasn't really sure it's not something on the map. 13:32 You can check out more information at Billy Numan photo comm you can go to Billy Numan photo.com forward slash support, if you want to help me out and participate in the value for value model that we're running this podcast with. If you receive some value out of some of the stuff that I was talking about, you're welcome to help me out and send some value my way through the portal at Billy Newman photo.com forward slash support, you can also find more information there about Patreon and the way that I use it if you're interested or feel more comfortable using Patreon that's patreon.com forward slash Billy Newman photo. 14:12 Data Management stuff that maybe we can talk about some other time. Like how to use hard drives, how many you need, how many backups you need, how to like re archive stuff, and probably just talk about like the Trump like because we're not experts, but just the trouble that we have of trying to sort out the hard drives that we have. And like where the data is, do we have duplicates over like I think you were talking about that today of the duplicate that you have. files in the archive? 14:37 Yeah, I've been putting together I'm also trying to get in shape for 2018 all my photo work for that year. So I've been putting together an archive of all my stuff. And yeah, I'm at that point where I really just have to weed out all the duplicates, but I have so many things. 14:53 Yeah, yeah, I'm definitely there to where there's so many different little parts of files that have been made from the original RAW file that was taken like the original photograph, there's so many derivatives of that that have come out of it over over time, especially if it was a photo that I like that I ranked highly, you know, and then I'd already exported, there's already copies of that as a JPEG, or some other like smaller web sized die, 15:16 I have a lot of different sizes. Yeah. And that's 15:19 the one that I'm trying to get through right now, I'm going to try and go through this catalog. And I'm going to try and sort it out so that I pull like the top few 1000 photos of the last decade, that are the raw files that I really want to be able to work on or get access to, or make new versions over prints over something, whatever that might be. But I just have access to kind of quickly or, you know, like, Oh, yeah, these are all the memories that I'm really after, I want those best versions of the files available to me. But a lot of us are noticing that, like it's really difficult to get to that given like the current archive structure that I have, where it's just all 100,000 photos that I have, yeah, I can't really get the stuff in the way that I need to. So I'm going to try and like figure that out where it's all the best stuff that I want to have with me, right now everything gets archived to the cloud, or to some some cold storage thing, or, you know, to some old hard drive that gets shut off or something but some some place where we get like everything stored there. And then really just like the last like year, or 18 months or so, and like the next six months or so is what I want to be able to, like keep on the harddrive that I'm working on. But we should talk about more like harddrive data stuff. As the year comes in a little bit closer. 16:30 Yeah, I know we're planning on. Or we're kind of in the process of changing around how hard drives are set up for stuff. 16:39 Yeah, we're trying to get I think a little bit bigger stuff because like right now I have a four terabyte hard drive here. That's the one that plugs in. And that one's been great for, like doing some storage stuff. But now like, you know, like the data rates, they just the cost comes down so much that you're able to get a really large size, large capacity, hard drive for not much money. And I think the like the the cost of that is a lot better than some of the cloud storage stuff. And just some of the efforts of trying to put something in the cloud, and then trying to pay to keep it there year after year after year. I'm really looking for a lot of these things that aren't really super important and super high priority to be able to put in some kind of cold storage thing like this, like what we're talking about, where we have a backup of it on a hard drive. That's kind of put aside that we don't have to worry about too much. But kind of like what we noticed, I think like with one of those burned out cables, it's in the trash right now. Is a signal a signal of is that hard drives go bad sometimes, like the hard drive, that we had that portable one where it burned out of the USB port. 17:36 Right? It's terrible. Yeah, yeah. There's nothing on 17:40 it. Yeah. So that Well, yeah. And yeah, he's not backed up. So yeah, that's the thing. There's a back so it would be terrible if you know, one of these hard drives went where it was the like the soul, the soul House of all of the data that we have, especially like all like the decade of photographs that we made and stuff. So I'm really trying to be conscious of trying to keep those in multiple places at the same time. So we've done an effort to put those up on the on like a cloud storage service, which has been okay. But I think it's like, it's not the best version of those files. If I understand, right, it's like a JPEG version. There's a few limitations are added if I understood, right, but it's, it's okay, no, no, we'll try and put a bunch of stuff up on the prime photos service like that. 18:25 I was gonna ask which, which services you're using right now? 18:29 Yeah. But amazon prime cloud services is what I'm trying to use for the photo storage. And they have like unlimited photo uploads for a lot of stuff. And we put up a lot of stuff on that, but you can't keep you have to make it current. There's all this stuff from 2016 and 2017. That wasn't really part of that. And so I need to upload all of that content. I've been in the cloud. 18:51 Sure. Yeah. You just have to keep keep adding to it. Yeah, I 18:55 have to keep that keep some stuff saying Tim, I think he will still there's there's a lot of gaps within like 2015 and 14. And that's all just stuff that we can file ourselves but, but stuff that didn't make it up originally. And so now that I have like this, this like new catalog, like so what I would say before I get out of myself, what I did this weekend is that Yeah, I took the hard drives had this one terabyte hard drive that I use is like my portable drive that's like my storage and stuff like the tank that I have with my laptop when I'm in my bag out on the road. And then as all my photos on it, and it's really just a copy of like the whole photo archive for a long time. But what I've been wanting to do is update that for 2017. Take every photograph I have every JPG DNG file any any RAW file or photo file that I have on my computer on any amount of drives, I want to try and condense that down into one set of files that are organized in some way. And so I wanted to use Lightroom to do that since Lightroom. And its back and when it when it brings in files, it'll bring in files from one hard drive and then write them into a new file architecture on another hard drive. And so I tried to take I tried to take everything and I backed it up into the four terabyte hard drive. And then I brought everything back over. And I filtered it through Lightroom. So that I could get everything put into a new file architecture that matched by by like month and date and year of the file date. And most most of the metadata is correct. But like, you know, Marina, like a lot of the metadata for whatever weird camera or whatever set of film that we had that was scanned by some computer that never had its clock set, and still says 2002. There's all sorts of stuff that has the wrong metadata date, where it shows up, like when my d3 battery died, and instead it was 2007 in February, again, because I was the first date that that computer knew in that camera, and just reverted to that date again. 20:48 So first, 20:51 so it's Miss, it's Miss dated, but it's really fine for most cases. So I was able to bring all this photos back over, I put a new collection together, it was about 500 gigabytes or so. And then it was able to transfer that back over to the to the larger drive. And then the plan is to wipe the go drive, the one that I have with me all the time. And and then bring back over like I was talking about at the beginning, like the top few 1000 photos, and then everything that I'm kind of currently working on for this year. And last year, so there goes a heat, bang, bang, bang, bang sounds like hammers on a pipe, it really does every time exactly what it sounds I never get used to like when it comes into in the fall, and then start popping. It's pretty funny all through the winter, all through spring. styling is like in the 70s. late May. But, but yeah, so we're trying to do like this collection of archiving all these photos, and trying to organize it together. And it's been a fine process so far, but like trying to get your harddrive straightened out, especially when you're a little short on space, because you sort of wait until you start to organize your harddrive until, until you're running low on space and you're like Oh man, I gotta do something, I gotta move these files around so I can kind of get by so and that's what I was running into problems with to where like every hard drive was starting to get full and I go, Oh man, I gotta get like a new hard drive. And like we were just talking about hard drives go bad, especially portable ones, especially the spinning disk drives like the mac book I have now that's an SSD, the solid state systems are going to last a lot longer than the spinning disk disk mechanisms because that magnetic spinning disk plate is going to mechanically fail after some number of miles of revolutions that makes that the motor does that the solid state system has the advantage because there's no moving parts, it's just electricity. And so it's really conceivable that there's really no finite point that that drive will fail. Like most thumb drives or something optical media, it's kind of like thought that that's going to burn out after 20 or 30 years, you're not really even going to be able to use the disk as it's stored unless it's stored like a good condition. But thumb drives and other like solid state media. If if the ROM doesn't lose whatever data was on it, it's likely that you know it'd still be readable if it was damaged. So it's kinda interesting, like how different types of interesting and 23:13 what's not. Yeah. 23:19 Thanks a lot for checking out this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. Hope you guys check out some stuff on Billy Newman photo.com a few new things up there some stuff on the homepage, some good links to other other outbound sources, some links to books and links to some podcasts. Like this blog posts are pretty cool. Yeah, check it out at Billy numina photo.com. Thanks a lot for listening to this episode and the back end

    Climate 21
    How Important Is Storytelling When It Comes To Climate? A Chat With Dan McDougall

    Climate 21

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 43:45


    Creating a narrative is all-important in any sphere.All the more so in the climate space where the stakes are perilously high, and as we heard in last week's episode, climate anxiety is becoming a very real thing. To explore the topic of storytelling, particularly as it pertains to climate I invited multiple award-winning journalist, British Foreign Correspondent of the Year, and filmmaker Dan McDougall to come on the podcast.We had a fascinating conversation discussing all aspects of climate storytelling. Check out the conversation.If you have any comments/suggestions or questions for the podcast - feel free to leave me a voice message on my SpeakPipe page, head to the Climate 21 Podcast Forum, or send it to me as a direct message on Twitter/LinkedIn. Audio messages will get played (unless you specifically ask me not to).And if you want to know more about any of SAP's Sustainability solutions, head on over to www.sap.com/sustainability, and if you liked this show, please don't forget to rate and/or review it. It makes a big difference to help new people discover the show. Thanks.And remember, stay healthy, stay safe, stay sane!Music credit - Intro and Outro music for this podcast was composed, played, and produced by my daughter Luna Juniper

    FreightCasts
    How automation and AI advancements are disrupting the fleet management space EP21 Loaded and Rolling

    FreightCasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 26:08


    In today's episode, Avi Geller, founder and CEO of Maven Machines talks to us about automation and advancements in the fleet management space. We look at driver workflow, challenges of building a TMS / IOT platform, and look at how the trucking industry still lags behind in workflow technology compared to SAP platforms. With more than 60 years of experience in logistics innovation, Dunavant is a family-owned business that has the knowledge to ensure global and domestic shipping practices are efficient and effective. Dunavant generates supply chain proficiency with outstanding, attentive, and expedient customer service. For more information, visit Dunavant.com.Follow Loaded and Rolling on Apple PodcastsFollow Loaded and Rolling on SpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

    Podcast – Sala de Imprensa SAP Brasil
    SAP Cast 80 - SAP Labs Latin America Inauguration Day

    Podcast – Sala de Imprensa SAP Brasil

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 31:38


    Durante o episódio, saiba tudo o que aconteceu no SAP Labs Latin America Inauguration Day em São Leopoldo. O evento da inauguração do terceiro prédio do Labs mostrou o forte investimento da SAP na aceleração da agenda de inovação de clientes, parceiros e sociedade na América Latina. Conheça os especialistas de mercado convidados: Ana Bavon | https://www.linkedin.com/in/anabavon/ CEO & Head de Estratégia B4People Cultura Inclusiva Stefan Ligocki | https://www.linkedin.com/in/stefanligocki/ Especialista em mercado da longevidade, professor e palestrante Suzie Clavery | https://www.linkedin.com/in/suzieclavery/ Employer Branding & Employee Experience Senior Manager no UnitedHealth Group

    The Digital Supply Chain podcast
    Supply Chain Inventory Optimization - A Chat With RGP's Robert Olszak

    The Digital Supply Chain podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 26:56


    In these times of seemingly endless disruption, one powerful strategy for riding the waves is inventory optimization.To learn more about the why's and how's of this, I invited Robert Olszak from global consulting firm RGP to come on the podcast to talk about it.We had a fascinating conversation covering the different inventory optimization options, best practices in inventory optimization, and where to from here.I learned loads, I hope you do too...If you have any comments/suggestions or questions for the podcast - feel free to leave me a voice message over on my SpeakPipe page or just send it to me as a direct message on Twitter/LinkedIn. Audio messages will get played (unless you specifically ask me not to).If you want to learn more about how to juggle sustainability and efficiency mandates while recovering from pandemic-induced disruptions, meeting growth targets, and preparing for an uncertain future, check out our Oxford Economics research report here.And if you want to read up on our Industry 4.0 blueprint repost, head on over to https://www.sap.com/cmp/dg/intro-industry40/index.html, and if you liked this show, please don't forget to rate and/or review it. It makes a big difference to help new people discover it. Thanks.And remember, stay healthy, stay safe, stay sane! 

    Alles auf Aktien
    Russlands offizielle Pleite und 20 Anti-Short-Aktien

    Alles auf Aktien

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 18:00


    In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ berichten die Finanzjournalisten Nando Sommerfeldt und Holger Zschäpitz über schlechte Nachrichten, die für gute Laune sorgen, eine Überraschung bei Tui und die Deals des G7-Gipfels. Außerdem geht es um United Airlines, Royal Carribean, Norwegian Cruise Line, Carnival, AirBnB, Tui, Zendesk, SAP, Adidas, Delivery Hero, Allianz, Siemens, Bayer, Lufthansa, BASF, Hellofresh und Deutsche Post. Morphosys, Adler Group, Varta, Home24, FlatexDegiro, SMA Solar, Shop Apotheke, Deutsche Lufthansa, Westwing, Nordex. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Hörtipps: Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Außerdem bei WELT: Im werktäglichen Podcast „Kick-off Politik - Das bringt der Tag“ geben wir Ihnen im Gespräch mit WELT-Experten die wichtigsten Hintergrundinformationen zu einem politischen Top-Thema des Tages. Mehr auf welt.de/kickoff und überall, wo es Podcasts gibt. +++Werbung+++ Hier geht's zur App: Scalable Capital ist der Broker mit Flatrate. Unbegrenzt Aktien traden und alle ETFs kostenlos besparen – für nur 2,99 € im Monat, ohne weitere Kosten. Und jetzt ab aufs Parkett, die Scalable App downloaden und loslegen. Hier geht's zur App: https://bit.ly/3abrHQm Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

    Principled
    S7E17 | Campaigns, not courses: Why communications matter to corporate training

    Principled

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 25:42


    What you'll learn in this podcast episode Good training is not quick to create. It takes time, effort, and years of instructional design experience. And too often, best-in-class training gets derailed by inadequate communications. An effective, attention-grabbing communications strategy is just as important as the quality of the learning itself. How can companies ensure that they're designing training and communications that produce positive learning experiences and—ultimately—business outcomes? In this episode of LRN's Principled Podcast Damien DeBarra, leader of Curriculum Design and Communications Strategy at LRN, and Tomaso Manca, learning director at LRN, discuss the importance of intentional curriculum design when developing corporate onboarding. Listen as the two talk about what best practices organizations should consider in their approach.   Principled Podcast Show Notes [1:28] - What is meant by the idea of campaigns, not courses? [3:47] - Best practices for incentivizing learners. [6:11] - The benefits for learners. [7:31] - How does LRN approach this campaign-based strategy? [9:46] - Examples of ways to retain the attention of your audience. [11:54] - Tactics used by LRN to bring the idea of campaigns, not courses to life. [15:00] - Tips to ensure people don't feel overwhelmed by your campaign. [17:30] - The LRN difference in this approach. [20:40] - Advice for people looking to implement this approach for the first time. Featured Guest:  Tomaso Manca has created exciting learning events for more than 20 years. As a Learning Director at LRN, he works with clients to create engaging learner experiences that support behavioral changes.  Before joining LRN, Tomaso spent more than six years as a Learning Manager at Interactive Services. Prior to that, he worked as Best Practices Global Learning Manager at Thomson Reuters, supporting the learning of their Sales Organization.  Tomaso holds an M.A. in Economics from Yale University.       Featured Host:  Damien DeBarra brings more than 20 years' experience to the instructional design and strategic workforce planning spaces.  As a Senior Advisory Learning Solutions Manager at LRN, he focuses on creating training solutions that ensure business buy-in and connect hiring practices to day-one learning roll-outs. In the last few years, Damien has helped organizations such as United Airlines, Sun Life Financial, SITEL, Astellas, MFS Investments, and SAP create 90-day action plans for their solutions and develop supporting communication strategies. He has worked with over 200 clients in areas ranging from retail to pharmaceuticals, call centers to nuclear plant manufacturing. Prior to LRN, Damien spent more than nine years as the Learning Solutions Director and Head of Instructional Design at Interactive Services. He has also worked as an instructional designer at NCALT, Electric Paper, and Epic. Damien received his BA from Maynooth University.     Principled Podcast Transcription Intro: Welcome to the Principled Podcast. Brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership, and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders and workplace change makers. Damien DeBarra: Good training is not quick to create. It takes time, effort, and years of instructional design experience. Best in class training is too often ruined by inadequate or authoritarian style communications. An effective attention grabbing communication strategy is just as important as the quality of the learning itself. So, how can you ensure that you're designing training and communications that produce positive learning experiences and ultimately positive business outcomes? Hello, and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled Podcast. I'm Damien DeBarra, the leader of curriculum design and communication strategies at LRN. Tomaso Manca: And I'm Tomaso Manca, learning director at LRN. As co-host for this episode, we are going to be talking about the importance of intentional curriculum design when developing corporate onboarding, and what best practices to consider in your approach. All right, Damien, let's dive in. Something I've been hearing a lot at LRN is the idea of campaigns and not courses. What do we mean by that? Damien DeBarra: So campaigns, not courses, it's taken from the name of a talk we did recently at the Learning Technologies Conference in the UK just a month or two ago. And it's reflective of a conversation, which we have a lot here at LRN, which you hear in production, in our delivery teams and in the advisory team where I work. And that is the... We often semi-jokingly refer to it as, "the tragedy." "The tragedy" is that, we see world class learning materials being delivered to the business with a sort of, "or else" style communication. So if you think about it like, the client comes to us and says, "look, it's really important for us to roll out this training initiative around..." For example, B E and I, we make them a world class e-learning course. We develop a brilliant interactive classroom version of that for those who can't do online. We animate fully bespoke, beautiful videos. There's a whole plethora of support materials ready for the learners to help apply to the job. And the people who've partnered with us are really super psyched and can't wait for the business to get at this. But then the email goes out saying, "Hey, do this course by Friday, or else." It's devastating to your efforts, because as we sometimes like to joke a little bit, people who take online training, particularly online training, they're a little bit like people who ring call centers. And that is that they're already slightly irritated before they get to you. And if you do anything to give them an opportunity to opt out, to give them an opportunity to let that email slide down the inbox and just be ignored, they'll likely grasp it. And it's not because people don't want to learn on the job, it's simply that it's one email and another hundred inside of the day. They've probably got a job to do. They've already got training. They might be behind on... So any kind of blunt order to do a course really doesn't help. So instead, what we try and do is catch people's attentions and then incentivize them, or if you like, seduce them or draw them towards actually exploring those learning assets. Tomaso Manca: Very interesting, Damien. Can you share the best practice for incentivizing learners? Damien DeBarra: Sure. Well, we tend to do it slightly differently for... with each client, with each partner and differently for each communication strategy, depending on what's being taught or what needs to be learned. But there does seem to be an emerging best practice and it is nascent, it's really emerging, but that is the move away from what you might call the one and done training deployment towards a more campaign based approach. Campaigns, they're spread out over slightly longer periods of time. The amount of minutes a learner spends in their chair doing the training should be the same, or if even possible, less than whatever they did the previous year. But the campaign is spread out rather. And it's made up... The idea is use microburst trainings and snappy communications. Really engaging videos, try and keep them under one minute, two minutes, maximum. Job aids with exploratory questions to help you focus, and then whatever the medium, whatever the channel, we try and focus on using simple repeated messaging across a period of time in multiple channels.  And if possible, we try and get that messaging going through the business, not just from an actor, as aware in a voiceover, but rather from real people within the organization. So real people within that business, diverse voices and if possible local leaders. So it brings a degree of authenticity to it, but again, back to that idea of, we need to catch people's attention. So whatever communication it is you're sending out around your training launch, it really needs to get people's attention. It has to stand out from the other 99 emails that you might have received that day. The response we want is, we want people to see a headline in an email and go, "oh, what's that?" And click to open it. And it's... It is about drawing people in and avoiding the language you normally associate around training. The very instructional designer language, the very people and culture departments. So human resources department's language, moving away from all that language around learning and trying to make it sound and feel not like training but more like a marketing campaign for something really cool. That's going to make you better at your job. Tomaso Manca: So we're talking about using language that draws the learner in, within a campaign based strategy. What are the benefits for our learners? Damien DeBarra: Well, there's a number of them, as we said, the first one is to try and take the sting out of being asked to do training when you've already got a multiple... a long series of tasks to do in your day. So as we said, we know people, a lot of people... if we give them an opportunity to leave that email alone, they will. Also... I alluded to this a couple of months ago, that language of instructional design we're all kind of used to hearing, "by the end of this course, you will be able to..." Whilst that has its place, if we can use a different kind of tone and approach, what you might call a more magazine style of writing, it's much more human. It's much more relatable. And it benefits the learner because, basically we want to try and increase and drive engagement.    So it's about trying to make the materials not sound like training, it's something that's going to be where you're being talked at. And the benefit of the learner is, as I say, primarily engagement. Keep them guessing, kind of engaged in thinking, "what's going to happen next? What's this about?" You've told them there's something in it for them, but using good copywriting and clever headlines, and also simple questions to draw people into wanting the answers to those questions. So the benefit, I'd say probably in summary, if you were to reduce it to one word, it would probably be engagement. Tomaso Manca: And how does LRN approach this campaign based strategy? Damien DeBarra: Well, like I said, it's different for every partner, but there are common tools. So, the idea is to have a carefully targeted communication strategy that is, we determine what the core messages are that we want in the comms campaign. We determine when we want to release them. Not everything should go out at the same time. And we want to repeat those as a series of simple focus messages through multiple channels. So yes, the email is the obvious one, because that's... things go to the inbox. It's the primary point to contact, but we also like to use internal communications channels. So for example, if you're within the Microsoft Office environment, as many of our clients are, let's start pushing stuff through Microsoft teams or through Yammer or through Slack, if that's where your environment is for internal discussion. And also, it doesn't have to be digital. So for example, we create off, sometimes physical assets. So posters that go on walls in common areas within manufacturing environments is a classic one. Tent cards that sit on tables with a QR code. Again, seductive headline. "What's that about?" You take your phone out, maybe scan a QR code and it launches you to a 62nd advertisement about the campaign. So we do it a multiplicity of different ways, but the idea is that we work with you, your partners and communication specialists within those partners, to create a calendar strategy that's tailored for your needs. It's about getting the right messages and the right headlines delivered in the right channels. It's important to spread the messaging across different channels to make sure that we hit everybody in as many places as we can, at the same time as trying not to oversaturate the business with too many communications. So it's a bit of a balancing act between those two things. Tomaso Manca: These are great points, Damien. I think it's important to make sure, as you were saying, to cut through the noise. Ensure that the learners hear what they need to hear in a form that resonates and connects with them. You want to engage and excite people, as you were saying. Damien DeBarra: Exactly. You do. You want to engage and excite people. And in fact, I'll just throw the microphone back to you for a second and ask you. You've written stuff like this as well, and had a lot of experience of this at the deployment level, at the individual communication level. Could you give us a couple of examples of what that looks like tactically? Some of the approaches and ideas you've used. Tomaso Manca: Well there are a few things to keep in mind, first of all, talk about real people and real issue that will resonate with your audience. And use messages that are simple and direct. For instance, with a client of ours, a large multinational food conglomerate, we have scheduled design workshops that focus on creating targeted messages. Representatives from the target audience are invited to each workshop and they help tailor the message and provide immediate feedback on whether the message will resonate with their peers or not. You also want to deliver those messages using multiple formats to ensure you capture the attention of your audience, something you already touched upon. A good example is a communication program you are creating for a large chemical company. Every month, we generate a message that fits within the client's larger communication initiatives. And so far we used a variety of medium. We use graphically announced email blasts. Actual poster to be placed in the client's office, and short videos. We plan on adding podcasts and user generated video content next. And speaking about medium, the choice of medium barriers depending on the message and the desire to impact. You want to ensure that the content and the format go hand in hand, that they're aligned and true to your brand, your voice and your audience. The feedback we keep receiving from our clients is that these tips really help engage in their audiences as the messages come across as relevant, flexible, and timely. I know I covered only a handful of examples, so I'm going to bounce it back over to you then and ask you, what additional tech do we use at LRN to really bring campaigns, not courses, to life? Damien DeBarra: So it's a little bit of the kitchen sink approach. Our strategies leverage the full LRN toolkit. So we've mentioned multichannel approaches like, using emails, using online training, but we also can design virtual classroom events. There's the email and comms campaigns I've mentioned. Internet, banner adverts, SharePoint, or WordPress built websites, to back up the training materials. But we also have our... We have a campaign manager tool, which allows you, the client, to log into the LRN platform, plan out the entire comm strategy, put all the copy... and schedule the entire thing, to send out the emails or the comms at exactly the time you want weeks and months in advance. And it enables you to do a load of work up front and then sit back and let the system take care of it. Ultimately, we can write the... work out the comm strategy for you, write the copy and the headlines and provide the visual assets, and then hand them over to the partner to deliver themselves. This is a 50-50 split on what partners want. Some want to control that release themselves internally, and others want us to do everything for them, or have a tool that does everything for them. But we use everything, job aids and videos, microsites. Also help lines, chat channels in teams and Slack and other tools like that. And then crucially there's one overlooked thing, which is leader accountability programs. In the past, we've grandly called this, the accountability principle. And that's a slightly fancy pants way of saying something quite simple but very important. And that is... That if you bring leaders into the process of the training, it has a dramatic effect. So if you consider the two... the following two ideas... following two communications, "Hey Tomaso, I want you to do this training course by the end of the month." That's of relative interest. If I say in the communication, "Hey, Tomaso, I need you to do this training by the end of the month." And one week afterwards, your leader slash manager is going to have a conversation with you about this for 10 minutes. I think your interest level, your amount of skin in the game dramatically increases. And an even better version of that is, "Hey Tomaso, do the course." Now then you're going to talk to your leader, "and by the way, this affects, or connects to your annual performance review." That's a really powerful incentive. So, a leader accountability and leader involvement, or just general accountability for your participation in training is very, very powerful. So it nudges the learner, we think, from being potentially passive, into a very active role within their own learning journey. Tomaso Manca: I could see that having clear incentives linked to the overall job performance is a very powerful motivator. I really like, also, the imagery you used of the kitchen sink approach. And I'm also thinking that some people might hear this expression and worry that it could lead to information overload. What are some tips to make sure that people don't feel overwhelmed by your campaign? Damien DeBarra: Yeah, it's a really important concern because it can go too far. I saw a campaign recently we were designing, when it was getting out of hand. We were sending out, potentially discussing sending out 8, 9, 10 communications around something which was actually only a 30 minute training course. And that's probably far too excessive. So you have to work with the partner to make sure that we're not overdoing it. And also, it's about being judicious and careful in what you say in the communications. So two obvious things to say, the first of which is, if you're sending somebody an email about a training initiative, make it short. Make sure that the email is written as snappily, and as eyecatchingly as the training should be written itself. And then the second thing is, if you're worried that people are getting too many communications and there's too much training and too much time spent on training is a common complaint we hear.      Actually make a virtue of the issue of time. So for example, you can say to the learner, "put the time into the title." So let's say something like, "the 20 minute code of conduct training." Okay, that's a very awful title, but put the time into the title and say something like, "invest 20 minutes in doing this now. And you'll be prepared for your annual review." "Spend 30 minutes on this training course, and you'll be able to do this, this, and this in your job." So again, it's back to what you and I often talk about the whiffing. The, "what's in it for me?" Explain to the learner how much time... how little time you want them to spend. In fact, "look, we've reduced it to 20 minutes, because we've heard you, there's too much training. It's taking too long. We heard you, it's now down to 10 minutes every month." So again, if it's a campaign and it's spread out across a quarter, rather than asking them to do a 40 minute course, tell them, "you're going to do 10 minutes every week for the next four weeks. And as a result, you're going to be safe in your job. The company's going to benefit and you'll be ready for your performance to do... and you'll be able to serve your customers and our communities and our shareholders." And so on. So I would say if you're worried about them... if the partners expressing their concern or you have a concern about there being too much time spent on this, or if it's just overload, make a virtue of talking about how it actually saves time in the long run. Tomaso Manca: Makes sense to me. And when it comes to this approach, what do you think is the LRN difference? Damien DeBarra: So I could probably talk to you all day about tech and campaign managers and our disclosure tools and how there's a lot of technology to talk about. But actually, sometimes I think that the power of good copywriting can't be underrated. So we deploy a lot of cutting edge technology to drive solutions, but sometimes the most powerful tool we've got is one simple eye-catching headline. So we know, as we've just been discussing, that learners are time poor. They're training wary, so we place a strong emphasis on getting their attention using snappy headlines to drive people to the training assets. Tomaso Manca: Interesting. Can you share some more examples of successful copywriting? Damien DeBarra: I can probably share a few headlines. I won't name the partners themselves, but one springs to mind is, Large North American Financial Firm. That's as far as I'll go in describing it. And their problem was, very much like we were just discussing, learners getting way too many communications around having to do training. The communications were a bit on the blunt side, borderline rude in one or two... in cases. And learners were telling us via data in surveys and in focus groups that they were just really quite fed up with this. So the approach we took was, we knew that we had to get their attention in five to 10 seconds. Getting their eyeballs or they were gone. So what we did was, we opened up a campaign, and the first email in the campaign, the headline said, and it was deliberately written in capital letters. It said, "I can't wait to do compliance training this year." And then when you clicked on the mail, the next line was, "said, no one ever." That's the headline to grab your attention. And then the next thing is, it said, "we hear you. We've got it. You've told us through focus groups that it's taking too long to do training. So what we've done is, we've reduced everything down to 20 minute buckets per quarter or per month." I think it was. Another example was, from the same campaign in fact, was that, for reasons which aren't entirely understood or there seems to be a different set of reasons for different clients, fishing scans spike in August and September. So what we did there was, we sent out an email. I think it was in August and the headline in that one was, "you are a danger to yourself and others." So deliberately provocative headlines. And there's about 12 different subjects in that communications campaign, but they all took that approach. I hesitate to call them click bait headlines, because that's an awful term, but it was something designed to make you go, "what? What's that?" And hopefully you click. Again, that principle of having got their attention with the headline within 30 seconds or even 30 words. You should tell them in the first paragraph this is why you've clicked and this is what you're going to get and how long it's going to take you to do it. And again, that thing, the whiff and "what's in it for me" explaining that, if you do this, it will make you better at your job, et cetera. So getting their attention and explaining what the value is for them. Tomaso Manca: And I can see that it all boils down to writing. Damien, you've touched... certainly you've touched on a lot of great points about the value of taking what we are calling a campaign, not courses, approach. And I think this will inspire a lot of our listeners to consider for their own training. So what advice would you give to people who are looking to implement this approach for the first time? Damien DeBarra: Well, at the risk... That's a great question. So at the risk of potentially starting with something negative, get ready for resistance. A lot of the times the heartbreaking thing we hear sometimes when we're talking to our partners is, I kind give them this pitch and then they say, "that's brilliant. That's never going to work here." See, it's that classic line. "That's fantastic, now let me tell you why I won't work for our company." And it's because a lot of people are wedded to the particular calendar of release at one time of the year. And we understand that's a necessity for certain partners and clients, particularly if it's a very big program. We understand why they might want to get it all done in one quarter so the learners don't feel it's dragging on over the year. But if you have one particular smaller training initiative, you might consider that campaign based approach, but get ready for resistance. People will be skeptical about it. Some folks just won't want to do it. You also, when you get into doing communications around this, you'll also need to bring in other partners from across the business. So traditionally, if you're the training manager at a company, small to medium enterprise, I don't know, a couple of hundred staff, the training department might be you... might be just one person. But now you're talking comm, so you've got to bring in your communications team. They have their own calendars. They have their own priorities for things that need to be communicated to the business. And a common one we hear is... from our learning and development partners is, "that's great, but the communications team are already telling me there's too many communications." So get ready for that conversation. Get ready to try and influence the other stakeholders in your business to understand the benefits of taking this different approach. And to do that, you might try and arm yourself. This is easier said than done. Too massive, right? But you might try and arm yourself with a case to make that change. And that's in the form of some data. So are you able to get a survey from your current learners on... let's say on your last year's training on, how your learners liked it? Get that survey data. Now that might be painful because that survey data might reveal that they really don't like the training and it can be hard not to take that personally. And you might think to yourself, "do I really want people in the business scene, the feedback we're getting?" And an even more powerful... Sometimes in addition to a cluster of data from a large number of learners, is anecdotal information taken from focus groups. So a classic trick... not trick, but a classic approach we've done a few times is to bring in a group of learners into a focus group. Keep the training and development people out of the room. That might sound cruel, but you want people to feel free to speak freely. And of that five or six people, you might have a bit of a spectrum of learners. That is saying a couple of learners who have been in the business a number of years, who'd probably be training wary, that might be a bit tired of all this. And maybe a couple of learners who are newbies who've just gone through the training, have not yet been at the company long enough to be completely drawn into the culture, and they can often give you very fresh observations. So I suppose what I'm saying is, get ready to have the conversations and get ready for that resistance, but also try to strike a balance. As I said, if there's a possibility you can overdo this, where you can go hog wild, go crazy and start communicating to the business on everything. And that can become even more irritating than the blunt once a year communication. So there's a balance to be struck all the time. I hope that answers your question. Not sure I have. Tomaso Manca: Oh, absolutely. It does. And it opens up a lot of other questions. You and I can probably be talking about strategy for the rest of the day, but it looks like we are out of time for today. Damien DeBarra: Yeah, we should probably wrap it up. And it's always great talking to you about this stuff Tomaso. Thanks for the time. Tomaso Manca: Likewise. And thanks to our listeners. My name is Tomaso Manca. Damien DeBarra: And I'm Damien DeBarra. And I'd like to thank you all for listening to the principal podcast by LRN. Outro: We hope you enjoyed this episode. The Principled Podcast is brought to you by LRN. At LRN, our mission is to inspire principled performance in global organizations, by helping them foster winning ethical cultures, rooted in sustainable values. Please visit us at LRN.com to learn more. And if you enjoyed this episode, subscribe to our podcast on Apple podcasts, Stitcher, Google podcasts, or wherever you listen. And don't forget to leave us a review.  

    Unofficial SAP on Azure podcast
    #98 - The one with different Low-code platforms working together (Holger Bruchelt) | SAP on Azure Video Podcast

    Unofficial SAP on Azure podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 24:15


    In episode 98 of our SAP on Azure video podcast we talk about General availability announcements: SAP Private Link is now GA and also GitHub Copilot. Then we look at the Lessons from the Cyber War report published by Brad Smith and the Neptune Software IMPACT festival 2022. This is then also the focus of todays episode: using the Neptune DXP Platforms API Factory we expose SAP services and create a Power Platform customer connector. This connector can then be used to create a Power Automate flow which for example can be surfaced in Microsoft Excel. https://www.saponazurepodcast.de/episode098 https://youtu.be/d4lwugF4NIA

    Startup Insider
    SumUp sammelt über 590 Mio. Euro ein und erhöht Bewertung auf 8 Mrd. Euro (Mobile Payment • mPOS • London)

    Startup Insider

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 30:41


    In der Nachmittagsfolge begrüßen wir heute Marc-Alexander Christ, Co-Founder und CFO von SumUp, und sprechen mit ihm über die erfolgreiche Finanzierungsrunde über 590 Millionen Euro. SumUp verkauft mobile Lesegeräte für bargeldloses Bezahlen und bietet eine breite Palette an Finanzdienstleistungen an. Neben der Bedienung großer Geschäftskunden wie DHL, Bosch oder Free Now hebt sich die Geschäftsidee von SumUp von den meisten Finanzdienstleistern und Banken ab, indem das Startup auch insbesondere Kleinunternehmern Zugang zu benutzerfreundlichen Zahlungslösungen wie Kartenterminals und Online-Zahlungsarten jeglicher Art anbietet. Mittlerweile vertrauen nach Unternehmensangaben ca. 4 Millionen Händler auf die Lösung des FinTechs. SumUp wurde im Jahr 2012 von Jan Deepen, Marc-Alexander Christ, Petter Made und Stefan Jeschonnek in Berlin gegründet. Mehr als 3.500 Mitarbeitende unterstützen die Kundinnen und Kunden in 35 Ländern. Das Startup hat sich dazu verpflichtet, 1% seiner Einnahmen in den Bereichen Unternehmertum, Bildung und Umwelt zu spenden. SumUp hat in einer Finanzierungsrunde eine Investition in Höhe von 590 Millionen Euro erhalten. Die Investitionssumme verteilt sich je zur Hälfte auf Eigen- und Fremdkapital. Damit wird die Unternehmensbewertung des Berliner Unternehmens auf 8 Milliarden Euro angehoben, womit es kurz nach Celonis, N26 und Personio zu einem der wertvollsten deutschen Unicorns aufsteigt. Zu den Investoren gehört der US-amerikanische VC Bain Capital Tech Opportunities, der u.a. Athena Health, Mixpanel, When I Work, Axtria, BioCatch, HAST Pathways, Hudl, Bionexo und Buildertrend im Portfolio hat. Ein weiterer Investor ist die US-amerikanische Investmentgesellschaft Blackrock, welche mit einem verwalteten Vermögen von über 10 Billionen US-Dollar der größte Vermögensverwalter der Welt ist. Sie ist u.a. mit Anteilen zwischen 1% und 9% an allen 40 DAX-Unternehmen, wie Adidas, Volkswagen, Henkel, SAP, Deutsche Post oder BASF beteiligt. Weitere Kapitalgeber sind u.a. das New Yorker Private-Equity-Haus Centerbridge, der texanische Hedgefonds Crestline und Btov Partners aus Berlin. Mit dem frischen Kapital möchte SumUp seine Produktpalette weiter ausbauen, um Unternehmen jeder Form und Größe auf der ganzen Welt gleiche Wettbewerbsbedingungen zu bieten.

    The Cloud Pod
    169: The CloudPod bounces back with Elastic Disaster Recovery

    The Cloud Pod

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 20:55


    On The Cloud Pod this week, half the team whizzes through the news in record time. Plus: AWS Elastic Disaster Recovery, Google Distributed Cloud adds AI, ML and Database Solutions, and there's another win for NetApp with Azure VMware Solution. A big thanks to this week's sponsor, Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. This week's highlights