Podcasts about patient care

Prevention of disease and promotion of wellbeing

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Latest podcast episodes about patient care

The Good, The Bad, The Family
Understanding Surrogate Partner Therapy

The Good, The Bad, The Family

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 74:39


Today's guests are Angela Porter, licensed professional clinical counselor, and Andrew Heartman, certified surrogate partner.  On this episode we explore the dynamic between surrogate partners, clients, and therapists. We identify ways that this can impact how a person relates to others, provide healing, and change lives. Andrew shares how being a surrogate partner has impacted his personal life, and together we work toward de-stigmatizing surrogate partner therapy so it can become more accessible. Make sure to follow me on social media and check out my website for more information and resources.   Want to learn more? Check out these resources Andrew provides: TV documentary about SPT Andrew's website The presentation Dr. Heather Howard and I did for ISSWSH, "Surrogate Partner Therapy: Tools and Lessons that all Providers can apply to Patient Care" is 2nd on this page of videos and interviews. Surrogate Partner Collective Surrogate Partner Code of Conduct Legal and Ethical Statement How SPT has changed since its inception. Professional Courses (eligible for AASECT CEs): Collaborating with Surrogate Partners in the Triadic Model How to Help Generalize Surrogate Partner Therapy International Professional Surrogates Association (IPSA)

MedEvidence! Truth Behind the Data
Victory over Viruses: RSV, COVID, & Flu

MedEvidence! Truth Behind the Data

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 39:07


MedEvidence! Radio is a monthly live broadcast from WSOS 103.9 FM / 1170 AM with Kevin Geddings and Dr. Michael Koren from St. Augustine, Florida. This month's MedEvidence Radio discusses all the various viruses coming our way this season.  We will dive into:RSV - Respiratory Syncytial VirusCOVIDFlu  Developing virus strategy planVaccine effectsAntibody levelsDr. Michael Koren is a practicing cardiologist and CEO at ENCORE Research Group. He has been the principal investigator of 2000+ clinical trials while being published in the most prestigious medical journals.  Dr. Koren received his medical degree cum laude at Harvard Medical School and completed his residency in internal medicine with a fellowship in cardiology at New York Hospital/Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center/Cornell Medical Center.  On a personal note, Dr. Koren has a life-long interest in history, technology, Public Health, and music. He has written two musical plays.More information and to Participate in Clinical Research Rate, Review, and Subscribe to the MedEvidence! podcast to be notified when new episodes are released.Follow MedEvidence! on Social Media to discover the Truth Behind the Data.FacebookInstagramTwitterLinkedInPowered by ENCORE Research Group at www.ENCOREDOCS.comOriginal Air Date: October 26, 2022#MedEvidence #patientcare #clinicalresearch #clinicaltrials #research #RSV #COVID #Flu #coldplan

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Cancer Topics - Impact of Implicit Racial Bias on Oncology Patient Care and Outcomes

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 26:50


"What exactly is implicit racial bias? How does it manifest in physician-patient interactions and what is the potential impact of such bias on oncology patient outcomes? In this ASCO Education Podcast episode, Dr. Lauren M. Hamel (Wayne State University) and Dr. Nimish Mohile (University of Rochester) share their insights and perspectives on these topics with host Alissa A. Thomas (University of Vermont). If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org. Resources: Blindspot: The Hidden Biases of Good People by Mahzarin R. R. Banaji and Anthony G. Greenwald Implicit Associations Test 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge   TRANSCRIPT Dr. Nimish Mohile: We had a patient a few years ago who had presented to our clinic, who ended up having a diagnosis of primary central nervous system lymphoma, and she was a young black woman, and it took about nine months for her to get that diagnosis. She had gone into multiple emergency rooms, she was only 22, had not had prior interaction with the medical system, but based on some of her socioeconomic demographics, her skin color, she was never given the kinds of testing that any other patient I think should have gotten at that time.   Dr. Alissa Thomas: Hello, and welcome to another episode of ASCO Education podcast. Today's topic is, 'Implicit racial bias and its impact on patient care.' My name is Alissa Thomas, and I'm a Neurologist and Neuro-Oncologist at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. I'm delighted to introduce our two guest speakers; Dr. Lauren Hamel, who is an Associate Professor of Communication and Behavioral Oncology at Wayne State University, and the Co-program Leader of the Population Studies and Disparities Research Program of the Karmanos Cancer Institute. Her ongoing research explores racial attitudes in non-verbal behavior of oncology patients and physicians, and how those behaviors influence treatment decisions. Dr. Nimish Mohile is a Professor of Neurology and Oncology at The University of Rochester. He also serves as the Diversity Officer, Associate Chair for Career Development and Leadership, and Neuro-Oncology Division Chief. I'll get us started with the first question, really a definition. What do we mean by the term, ‘implicit racial bias'? Dr. Lauren Hamel: I'm happy to go first. I think understanding what the definition of what implicit racial bias is is really important. You know, for good or for ill, over the last few years, it's gotten a lot more attention. And I think what's important to remember about it is that it's not a cognizant or a conscious bias, and it really is implicit, and it really is more of an association than it is anything else. It's sort of like the built-up associations that we have for anything. You know, could be race, could be gender, any number of demographics, or other factors that make our lives as humans. So, you know, associating certain aspects of people with positive or negative valuations. I think when we're talking about implicit racial bias, it's kind of like the gut associations we have for members of different racial groups. So often, it's kind of paired with "white is good, black is bad." It's a very rudimentary description of it, but that's a real kind of basic association that this kind of definition is built around. Dr. Nimish Mohile: Yeah, I would agree with that. I think that's a great discussion of what this is. I think it's really important for us to remember that these are really ingrained behaviors. It's, based on, you know, how we've been socialized and conditioned. And I think it's helpful to also put it in the framework of knowing that we all have some biases, we all probably have racial biases, and age biases, and other kinds of biases, and there's no sort of good or bad about having these biases. And the important part of this is, how do we recognize some of the biases that we have so that we can be more conscious about how we might fix those or think differently about the patients that we're seeing so that it doesn't result in actions that can be harmful. Dr. Lauren Hamel: Yeah, I agree with everything that Dr. Mohile just added. It is these ingrained associations. Really, it isn't about blaming ourselves for them because it's kind of the result of how our brains are structured. But to his point, it's once we know that we have them, and you know, we have data showing how they affect our behavior, it's then on us to identify them and then work to mitigate them. Dr. Alissa Thomas: Thank you. How do racial biases in patients and physicians influence treatment decisions or ultimately, how does this affect patient outcomes in Oncology? Dr. Lauren Hamel: You know, I think the direct relationship between certain biases and outcomes is still kind of being uncovered and investigated. But there are some interesting patterns that have been uncovered in data, specifically in the Oncology context too, because as you can imagine, a variety of professional organizations and groups examine the influence of bias. But just within Oncology, we see physicians who have higher levels of implicit bias who tend to see their patients who are black as less trustworthy, less educated, and less adherent to treatment recommendations. We also know that higher levels of implicit bias may be associated with less aggressive treatment programs recommended for black patients. We see some associations between levels of implicit bias and verbal dominance. But what was I think, especially interesting, is that we also see patterns of kind of perceptions from the patients that these physicians are communicating with. So, we see some manifestations in behavior, but we also see patients kind of “picking up” on some of these, whether or not they can identify them as bias necessarily. But for example, we see that patients who are seeing a physician with higher levels of implicit bias tend to see their physicians as less patient-centered, and less trustworthy. And I think that's a really important piece to identify because these biases are by definition kind of operating outside of our own consciousness, but they're manifesting themselves in a way that the people that we're communicating with are noticing. Dr. Nimish Mohile: We had a patient a few years ago who had presented to our clinic, who ended up having a diagnosis of primary central nervous system lymphoma, and she was a young black woman, and it took about nine months for her to get that diagnosis. She had gone into multiple emergency rooms, she was only 22, had not had prior interaction with the medical system, but based on some of her socioeconomic demographics, her skin color, she was never given the kinds of testing that any other patient I think should have gotten at that time. That was a real sort of wake-up call for our clinic, because as some of you know, this is a disease that we can really treat, especially in younger patients. So, there's real consequences to these kinds of biases. And some of them are personal, the ways they're ingrained in us, but some of them are built into our systems, and it's based on; what our ERs are designed like, where our hospital systems are, what kind of relationships we have with primary care physicians in different communities, what kind of access some of our patients have to primary care physicians. This patient in particular didn't have great access to primary care, so she didn't have this other team of people to advocate for her and to say, "Hey, you know, this is something really different in this patient, and we need to take this seriously." So, I think it can get complicated as we think about biases in ourselves, in other people, in the whole health system, and then also as we get out of our health system, some of these things are so influenced by what's going on in our communities. Dr. Lauren Hamel: Yeah, I think that's a really important point. At least with my work, I examine kind of at the interpersonal level, but these biases, as Dr. Mohile points out, exist in all levels of our society, and they interact, and they're-- I don't want to say additive, it's probably much more exponential. But yeah, it's a layer, on top of layer, on top of layer problem. Dr. Alissa Thomas: So, Dr. Mohile, you commented earlier that part of it is recognizing these biases in ourselves. Can you discuss how we might approach this with the impact of an anti-racism education program has been in your department and applications for that? Dr. Nimish Mohile: So, we've worked on anti-racism in our department on a couple of levels. One of the main levels is just building awareness for individuals to understand that they have biases, that they have racial biases, and starting to understand why they have those. So, we've gone through exercises like book clubs and talks, for people to really do some of that self-reflective work to understand how they've been conditioned as they grew up. I've personally done that and have found it very revealing and understood some of the biases that I grew up with based on people I was around, and based on my schools, and based on segregation within my school systems. So, I think that that's one piece of it. I think another piece is we don't often get taught about the history of racism in the United States, and how widespread it is. It's a very small part of our curriculums, and I think we have to take it upon ourselves now in our medical systems to go through that education. Education that we probably should have had all through elementary school, high school, college, we have to do that learning now because then we can really start seeing that impact of race on our society. And I think for physicians specifically, what is that impact of racism on patient care in our medical systems and how it's been ingrained in US healthcare. Understanding that we had segregated hospitals right until the 1960s, those are all things that were in the lifetimes of still practicing Oncologists. One of the things we did for our other professional society that I belong to, The American Academy of Neurology, is we did develop an anti-racism education program that focused on understanding this history and this historical lens in healthcare, reviewing the impact that anti-racism has on our colleagues. So, what does that mean for black physicians or physicians from other underrepresented groups and how they interact with our health systems, how they're treated, what does it mean for their roles in academic departments? Then talking about how we can connect being anti-racist with the goals of health equity. So, how can we change the systems that we have control of to have healthcare that's more fair? And then finally, how do we engage trainees and physicians in really developing anti-racism action plans? One of the important things about anti-racism is that you really have to be active, it's not a passive experience. You have to take action to change all these systems around us that are embedded with racism. Dr. Alissa Thomas: Thank you. Along the same line, Dr. Hamel, you recently co-authored a study of a longitudinal implicit bias training curriculum. And can you tell us something about this project and what's come of it? Dr. Lauren Hamel: Yeah, so it came about a little more than a year ago and kind of coincided happily with an executive directive made by our state's governor requiring implicit bias training, so we were able to kind of design it so it met those requirements. But really what the goal is, is to approach implicit bias with a 360 view. So, what are all of the issues related to it? What are the scientific underpinnings? What are the measurements? What are the pros and cons of those measurements and what we've used, and what they've shown in terms of influence on our individual behavior, our decision-making, kind of how we relate to people who might be different than us. And certainly, expanding beyond racial groups — we've looked at gender, we're looking at age, things like structural racism. So, we're trying to kind of have a comprehensive view of it. And I think, you know, one thing, and it sounds like Dr. Mohile and his group have done a really nice job of tracking what happens after those. Because, you know, I think one-off sessions are better than nothing, certainly. Awareness is critical, but also, tracking like, what does this do for our attitudes, perceptions, and behavior? And that's not easy. And so really, you know, trying to invest in tracking how things change. So, we've had a full year of assessments, we've seen some improvements in people's attitudes and perceptions. But now what we really need to start doing is tracking certain behavioral aspects, and I think that's where the next step needs to be. Our next year is just about to kick off in a couple of weeks. So, I think that that's where we need to start putting our effort where it's—okay, we've gotten kind of institutional support, the leaders of both the University's School of Medicine and also the Cancer Institute have been encouraging this, which I think is really critical, because even though it's a lot of individual work if you want these changes, you really have to have the support and buy-in from the leaders of the institution. So, we've got that, we have interest, you know, we've established a really consistent and impressive participation in terms of each session. We've had upwards of 200 people attending each session, so people want this information. Now, according to the state, they also are required to have it. So, I think building up on that now, we've established a lot of good pieces of it, but now let's start doing a better job of tracking how does this affect long-term perceptions, attitudes, and behavior. Dr. Nimish Mohile: Every cancer center and department should be doing what Dr. Hamel is doing. The risk of the one-off trainings is that people come out of an implicit bias workshop and think, “Well, I'm fixed. I don't need this anymore, now I can go on and take care of patients without bias.” And you really need that time to really work on those things and start to fix some of those attitudes that we have. Dr. Lauren Hamel: Yeah. Because the associations get built up over a lifetime. You know, that's not something you're going to fix in an hour. It's a campaign, it's a marathon, to be sure. Dr. Alissa Thomas: So, you've both touched on something that a lot of this is about perception, and it's not just what we say verbally, but non-verbal behavior. It plays into implicit racial bias. Dr. Hamel, can you talk a little about your study of non-verbal synchrony, and can you describe differences between non-verbal behavior with doctors and patients of the same race compared to those of different races? Dr. Lauren Hamel: Yeah, absolutely. And you know, a lot of my work focuses on nonverbal behaviors. On the study you referenced, we were looking at something a little bit more kind of in line with how implicit bias acts. It sort of manifested unconsciously. So, this whole idea of non-verbal synchrony is kind of this non-conscious coordination of movement that happens between two people. And this is a construct that's been studied for decades in a number of settings, but we were the first to be able to examine it in an oncology setting, and also comparing diads of different racial makeup. We were able to take like real video-recorded data of naturally-occurring treatment discussions. We had a set of videos that included black patients in a similar set with white patients. And we used automated software to track their behavior and determine how coordinated they were over time. We actually observed more coordinated behavior between black patients and their physicians compared to white patients and their physicians. Some literature is non-verbal synchrony is sort of seen as always good, and there's also some new data showing that maybe it could be evidence of trying to repair a relationship. We're very early phases, I'm not in a position to offer kind of a best practice with this, but I think the point is, is that we do see differences. There is a coordinated behavioral difference between dyads. We're also starting to look at how that level of coordination is influenced by attitudes including implicit bias. So, I think identifying a difference is important, but now I think it's on us to now figure it out. Like, what is that the result of? And then, what does that do for the patient in terms of short and long-term outcomes? So, does that affect their perceptions of their physician? Does it affect their perceptions of the recommended treatment? Does it affect adherence to that treatment? Dr. Alissa Thomas: How can we do better? How can doctors improve non-verbal and verbal communication methods with our patients? Dr. Nimish Mohile: I can speak a little bit about verbal communication. I think this work on non-verbal communication is fascinating. I'd love to hear where that comes out because it's something I think we're not really thinking about very much, and I'm not surprised that there's differences there. I think sometimes with communication, just having an awareness in that you might be communicating differently with someone can be helpful. In many of our institutions, we sometimes go through coaching with our communication, particularly with Oncology patients, where you have someone witnessing how you're interacting with that patient, and what kind of verbal and non-verbal cues you're giving, how you make eye contact. I think there's models there that we could really be thinking about, not just focused on some of the stuff that oncology has been focused on, like, delivering bad news or end-of-life discussions, but also on these issues of racial bias or age bias, and see what we could do differently in those areas. Dr. Lauren Hamel: Yeah, I completely agree. And I think decades of research have shown that patient-centered communication skills are something that can be taught, learned, and improved upon. Maybe not just regarding the issues related to racial bias and other racial attitudes, but you know, for helping to improve a number of outcomes for patients. So, I think, that kind of focus, I mean there are very clear, well-established frameworks and methods around that, I think that was just, you know, something we already have in our toolbox that we can use. But I think also things like building up trust within a community, I think is critical, for really any kind of medical institution that operates within a community should be, you know, trusted by the community it's in. And there's a number of strategies that can be implemented to build up that level of trust. So, you're kind of looking at like the outside going in. A lot of these the data that I'm referring to right now are coming out of the primary care setting. But I think people like us that are in an Oncology setting are certainly well poised to start testing these in Outpatient Oncology clinics. And I think just like what we're doing right now, making the topic of race, racism, implicit bias, something that we can have in a number of settings. And I think Dr. Mohile made a really good point. Like, we're not taught this like we're taught like grammar, and, you know, math. This is a part of our lives too, and you know, it's having big effects on huge swaths of our population. So, I think normalizing these conversations is a really important step, too. Dr. Nimish Mohile: In the United States, we're particularly uncomfortable talking about racism. Even within our medical teams, we don't know how to do that. So, what do you do if you're on rounds and you see another provider have some kind of verbal or non-verbal communication that, you know, might not be appropriate, or you think that there's a racial bias in the way we're treating or talking to a patient? That's not something we know how to deal with. We don't know how to bring that up. And so, I think that that's something that within health systems, we need to start working on. We have great models for this. When we think about the transitions we've made over the last 20 years in patient safety, we have elevated these conversations about patient safety. If there's a medical error by anyone on a team, it's something we're open to discussing, not blaming, and then really having a conversation about how can we fix this next time. You know, can we work towards doing that with something like racial bias? One of the things we've started doing in our department is that one of our mortality and morbidity conferences each year is focused on racism. So, a scenario where we think that there might have been differing treatment to a patient based on race, and then having an open discussion about that, going through some of the literature about that, and just practicing some of those conversations with each other as faculty, and medical providers, physicians, nurses, advanced practice providers, of being able to name racism as one of these problems. And then we really try to model that behavior on teaching rounds, so that with our medical students and residents, and fellows, we're also having these conversations about how could racism be at play in this patient's story, and how they got to their diagnosis, and in their outcomes, and an acknowledgement that racism is having some effect on this patient's ability to get screened for cancer, and potentially, their ability to have the same survival as another patient. Dr. Alissa Thomas: Thank you. That's so helpful to think about how to elevate this through departments and people who may be less aware of the issue and raising awareness. You both have touched a lot on communication between patients and providers, and there's a theme here that it's not just the doctor-patient relationship, but also the patient's community, and the medical team, that support that physician. Can you elaborate a little bit more about that, about how we communicate to the patient and the community they represent, and the provider and the team that they represent? Dr. Lauren Hamel: Having active, mature, genuine involvement of community members within a cancer hospital or cancer institute, I think is really important. I know my work has benefited from those who have come before me that established really strong connections with people who are, either survivors, care caregivers, advocates, you know, people who are very devoted to their particular neighborhood, community, that work really closely with us and provide feedback on a lot of the interventions that we design. So, one thing that I work in with all of my research is, as I'm developing an intervention that I think will improve either communication with a physician or another care provider, I certainly would never implement that without getting that thoroughly vetted by the people who it's going to affect. My clinician colleagues are always really generous with their time. It's a little bit more challenging to get community member feedback, but I do believe that it is, I mean, not just worth it for my own research success, but also for the mission and the purpose of what we're trying to do here. So, if you seek out feedback from a community group or community members who are willing to give you their honest opinion, and you know, you have to be in a position to receive that feedback with grace and professionalism, I think that's an important piece of it. Like, you want to have that connection, you don't want to just kind of have a checkbox. You know, you really want them involved in what you're doing. I'm using my own personal experience, but I'm sure there's far greater levels of, you know, system-level issues where something similar could be implemented. Dr. Nimish Mohile: I agree with that. I think this is really hard, and I think our medical systems are just starting to learn how to do some of this work. So, I'd echo what Dr. Hamel said about really getting input from members of those communities. I think many cancer centers are trying to do more outreach into communities, and that's not that easy. We have to really start by kind of building that trust, and building a philosophy where it's really about helping that community, as opposed to getting more patients from that community, or getting more trial participants from that community, or being able to check off boxes for our NIH grants from those communities. It really needs to be a genuine approach of, what does this community need? Because we don't often know that answer. And so, we have to start with that curiosity, and then determine how can we help those communities with the resources that we have. And I think cancer centers can do this optimally if the entire health system does that, that's where you can really start building some of that trust. Dr. Alissa Thomas: Thank you. For those of us that want to know more, would you be able to share some practical tools or resources that are available for healthcare professionals who want to learn more about implicit racial bias, either on an individual or institutional level? Dr. Lauren Hamel: I think one of the first things someone can do is take an Implicit Association Test, or an IAT, as it's often referred to. They're all housed at Project Implicit, at Harvard's website - google IAT, it'll take you right there. No identifiable data are collected from the individual test taker, but it gives people a sense of what's being measured. You know, it's not a character assessment, it's a measure that's designed to test your associations. And I think just having that experience makes you a much more informed consumer of this kind of science because I think it's important to keep a critical eye. You know, if we're scientists, we have to be critical. And I think this really helps people kind of get to a point where they can understand the science a little bit more effectively, but maybe also can reduce a little defensiveness that inevitably comes up when these kinds of data are discussed. So, I would do that. And then the second thing would be, there's a wonderful book called, Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People, it's written by Doctors Greenwald and Banaji, and they are basically credited for creating the Implicit Association Test, as we know it. It's a relatively easy read, and it can really give you a sense of how these kinds of associations affect our decision-making and communications. I would take those two, as a way to start. Dr. Nimish Mohile: I agree with both of those. I'd say that many of our health systems have implicit bias workshops and trainings, and sometimes they're online, sometimes they're in person. They do have varying sort of quality. I encourage people to just look at those trainings a little bit differently than they look at all of the other trainings that we're forced to do. To go into those with a little bit of an open mind and a learning experience, rather than one to just sort of check boxes and move on. I think you can learn some things about yourself from them. One of the things I encourage folks to do if they're interested in more information about anti-racism is to do something like the 21-day Racial Equity Challenge - you can Google that. Kind of small bite-size openings, and then there's talks about biases, but also helps you sort of understand some of the foundations of racial inequity in this country. Dr. Alissa Thomas: Thank you so much. That's all the time we have for today. I really want to say thank you to Dr. Hamel, and Dr. Mohile for sharing your perspectives on addressing implicit racial bias in oncology, and tips for improving communication with patients and providing culturally-sensitive care. And thank you to ASCO for providing this platform for us to discuss. Thank you to all of our listeners, we appreciate you turning into this episode of ASCO Education podcast.   Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click," Subscribe." Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the Comprehensive Education Center, at: education.asco.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy, should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.  

Relentless Dentist
How Dentists Can Become A Respected Boss Without Being Bossy

Relentless Dentist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 15:34


In this episode, I discuss The 6 Principles Of Highly Effective Leadership. So, if you want to: Build a dental team of productive and responsible employees, Create a practice culture of caring, courage, and candor, Surround yourself with a high-performance team so you can enjoy workdays that are more profitable and less frustrating, Tune in now! Follow us on IG and TikTok for daily value videos so that you can grow your practice! You can find show notes and more information by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/Respected-Boss Relentless Dentist is a dental podcast by Dr. Dave Maloley.

Badass Dental BossLady Podcast

Welcome to Episode 61 of the re-launched Dental Boss Lady Leadership Academy Podcast with Dr. Terri Pukanich. In today's episode we are gonna be discussing how to talk so patients will listen. We will talk about how to approach an appointment and the importance of asking questions. We will also discuss how to create awareness for your patients and why they must motivate themselves. All this and much more, up next. Bullet points (01:50) Dental BossLady's new website (02:30) Doing an engagement survey (07:30) A brand new course: How To Talk So Patients Will Listen (08:30) Understanding the difference between customer service and customer experience (09:48) Why patients must motivate themselves (14:34) How to approach the appointment (15:37) Don't make assumptions, ask questions instead (17:37) Don't go into your examinations completely blind (18:39) Creating awareness for your patients: Be a neutral reporter of findings (29:06) Talk your think (33:33) Be on purpose, do everything with intention (35:03) Give the patient room to think (42:22) Listen to your patient

Neurosurgery Podcast
Episode 120: Return to Duty - Patriotic Patient Care

Neurosurgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 29:47


A conversation with David Simons and Jarred Shewey Find Return to Duty (and contribute!) at https://www.returntoduty.us/

Radiology Imaging Cancer Podcasts | RSNA
Episode 14: Web-Based Global Breast Imaging Curriculum

Radiology Imaging Cancer Podcasts | RSNA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 31:34


In this months episode, trainee editorial member Xiaoyang Liu, MD-PhD speaks with Toma Omofoye, MD about her development of a customized interactive web-based global breast imaging curriculum with self-assessment for radiologists in low- and middle-income countries.  Helen C. Redman, MD & Marten F. Klop Education Scholar Grant: an estate gift made by Marten F. Klop, husband of RSNA's first female President and past R&E Board of Trustees Chair, Helen C. Redman, MD. The Foundation is grateful for Dr. Redman and Mr. Klop's enduring legacy in seeding the future of radiology.

Next in Health
A 360 view inside Innovaccer's one-stop platform for better patient care

Next in Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 35:09


Tune in to PwC's Next in health to hear how Innovaccer's leading data and analytics platform is helping to shape the transformation of healthcare. Topics include: A 360 view inside a patient's financial data, clinical information, and demographic information all in one platformLeveraging new programs such as ACO reach, and value-based care programs in order to keep patients at the center of the healthcare ecosystemThree key components for data readiness in value-based careFor more information, please visit us at: https://www.pwc.com/us/en/industries/health-industries/health-research-institute/next-in-health-podcast.html.

Relentless Dentist
The Three Domains Of Discipline Dentists Need To Succeed

Relentless Dentist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 20:50


In this episode, I give dentists a new way to view discipline. So, if you want to: Maintain a calm and confident practice owner presence, Schedule your success, Guarantee personal and practice growth so you can make more while working less, then Tune in now! Follow us on IG and TikTok for daily value videos so that you can grow your practice! You can find show notes and more information by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/Domains-of-Discipline Relentless Dentist is a dental podcast by Dr. Dave Maloley.

Pharmacy Podcast Network
Did Tricare & Express Scripts put profits over patient care? | PBM Reform Podcast

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 41:20


The Express Scripts decision removes the option for Tricare beneficiaries to get prescriptions at the pharmacies of their choice. The National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) CEO B. Douglas Hoey, PharmD, MBA, warns that “access to needed medications for Tricare beneficiaries is in peril.”   This decision is estimated to impact hundreds of thousands of beneficiaries relying on certain pharmacies (or locations) to get prescriptions—those who cannot get their prescription at the pharmacy of their choice may fall out of care.   Consequently, patients may lose access to the potentially lifesaving treatments that specialty and independent pharmacies can provide, especially for patients with critical illnesses such as HIV, among other illnesses. In a recent analysis, experts suggested that the contract, made with the US Department of Defense (DOD), could shrink the retail pharmaceutical network by 15,000 pharmacies.   Guest  Alan Rosenbloom President & CEO Senior Care Pharmacy Coalition 

Health and Medicine (Video)
Stem Cell Clinical Trials and New Therapies for Patients: Alpha Clinic Director's Panel - Sanford Stem Cell Symposium 2022

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 58:49


CIRM-funded Alpha Stem Cell Clinics are a network California medical centers that specialize in delivering stem cell clinical trials to patients. Sandra Dillon shares how their work has impacted treatments for her rare cancer. Maria T. Millan, M.D., Mehrdad Abedi, M.D., Daniela A. Bota, M.D., Ph.D., Sheila Chari, Ph.D., Noah Federman, M.D., Catriona Jamieson, M.D., Ph.D., Sean Turbeville, Ph.D., and Leo D. Wang, M.D., Ph.D., then discuss current clinical trials and the future of stem cell research. Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 38400]

Science (Video)
Stem Cell Clinical Trials and New Therapies for Patients: Alpha Clinic Director's Panel - Sanford Stem Cell Symposium 2022

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 58:49


CIRM-funded Alpha Stem Cell Clinics are a network California medical centers that specialize in delivering stem cell clinical trials to patients. Sandra Dillon shares how their work has impacted treatments for her rare cancer. Maria T. Millan, M.D., Mehrdad Abedi, M.D., Daniela A. Bota, M.D., Ph.D., Sheila Chari, Ph.D., Noah Federman, M.D., Catriona Jamieson, M.D., Ph.D., Sean Turbeville, Ph.D., and Leo D. Wang, M.D., Ph.D., then discuss current clinical trials and the future of stem cell research. Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 38400]

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 116: Benefits of Breastfeeding

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 19:59


Episode 116: Benefits of breastfeedingBy Timiiye Yomi, MD. Editing and comments by Hector Arreaza, MD.Dr. Yomi explains the benefits of breastfeeding for mother and baby. Three doctor listeners share their experiences with breastfeeding. You are listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California, a UCLA-affiliated program sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. This podcast was created for educational purposes only. Visit your primary care provider for additional medical advice.Breastfeeding is the process by which a child is fed breast milk. It is an ancient practice that dates to pre-historic times. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding as the sole source of nutrition for babies for about 6 months and can be continued for as long as both mother and baby desire it, while the World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life and up to 2 years with appropriate complementary foods.Human milk has many advantageous anti-infective and immunologic properties, making it the ideal nutritional source to optimize the infant's well-being. Of the over 130 million babies born every year in the world, only 42% of mothers breastfeed their newborn within the first hour of life, 38% practice exclusive breastfeeding, and over 50% breastfeed for up to 2 years. In this segment, we will be talking about the many benefits of breastfeeding to both children and mothers.Benefits to the baby: Breast milk has the right amount of nutrients and fluids needed for a baby's growth and development.It is easier to digest than formula, and breastfed babies have less gas, fewer feeding problems, and less constipation.It contains antibodies that protect infants from illnesses like otitis media, gastroenteritis, and respiratory illnesses like asthma and allergies, especially in children breastfed beyond 6 months. It reduces the risk of atopic dermatitis, NEC, Celiac Disease, Crohn's Disease and ulcerative colitis, Late-onset sepsis in the preterm infant, and childhood leukemia.Reduces the risk of childhood obesity, HTN, and type 1 and 2 diabetes  Breastfed infants have a lower risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).Breastfed infants have been shown to have better cognitive development.Benefits to the mother:Promotes weight loss and some degree of contraceptive for mothersWomen who breastfeed longer have been shown to have lower rates of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, breast and ovarian cancer in premenopausal women, thyroid cancers, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoporosisReduces the risk of post-Partum depressionBreastfeeding triggers the release of oxytocin that promotes uterine involution and may decrease the amount of postpartum hemorrhage.Additional benefits:Promotes mother-infant bonding Cheap and economical for families and societyConvenientIn summary, breastfeeding delivers a lot of health, nutritional and emotional benefits to both children and mothers. When not contraindicated, we encourage mothers to engage in this practice as it presents babies with a healthy start in life.The benefits of breastfeeding cannot be overstated. However, we recognize that some mothers have challenges breastfeeding. For those mothers, we say you are a great mother if you take good care of your baby, even if you cannot breastfeed him/her.Testimonials:Breastfeeding is highly recommended by healthcare professionals, and in most cases, it is a natural and smooth process. However, it is not always free of challenges. You will listen to testimonials about three different breastfeeding experiences. All these testimonials are anonymous and written by advanced-level healthcare providers. Their experiences fall on a spectrum ranging from positive and easy to negative and difficult.Testimonial #1: My grandma told me so.When I was pregnant with my first child, I was already keenly aware of the benefits of breastfeeding because by that time, I was established in my profession as a health care provider. I looked forward to breastfeeding my newborn. However, when my baby was born, I found that my breast anatomy made it extremely difficult for my baby to latch on. While it is possible for women to breastfeed with inverted nipples, for me and my baby, it did not work out. I felt like a failure as a new mother.  When my grandma came to visit me and my newborn, I told her how frustrated I was with my body.  She replied, “yah, sorry about that; you got those from me!” Yes, inverted nipples are a genetic trait, and 10-20% of women are born with inverted nipples. I had been feeling alone in my plight, but after talking with my grandma, I realized there were other women struggling just like me!  Although I was very disappointed that I couldn't breastfeed, I didn't let that deter me from giving breast milk to my baby. Where there is a will, there is a way! I decided to bottle-feed my baby with my pumped breast milk. It was extra work and a bit time-consuming, but for me, the health benefits for both my baby and me were worth it. Thankfully, I am blessed with a supportive husband who took on the nighttime feedings while I pumped milk. I could only keep up this pumping routine for 3 months before my maternity leave ended. While I would have preferred my baby to receive breast milk for longer, I find peace in the saying, “something is better than nothing.” If only there had been wearable breast pumps back then, I'm sure I could have given my baby breast milk for much longer. Technology today is amazing!  While I encourage all my patients to breastfeed, my personal experience has made me empathetic to the physical challenges and even heartache that women experience over breastfeeding. I always keep in mind that every woman and baby's situation is unique, and I also give myself grace for what I initially felt was a shortcoming as a new mother.  Testimonial 2: Fed is best.I have been a breastfeeding advocate since medical school.Prior to the delivery of my first baby, I had my breast pump and bag ready. I had all the handouts about different breastfeeding techniques, positions, and all the available community resources.  I had the tablets and teas that would stimulate milk production. I was ready!When I delivered my beautiful baby girl, she had trouble latching and it was very painful for me. All through that first night at the hospital, I requested the lactation coaches to come to the bedside to guide me, and they came by every shift. They even gave me all these extra syringes and tubes to feed my baby. We ended up feeding her with donor's milk at the hospital. We even fed her via a syringe the first few nights. I was never able to get her to latch. I drank my water and my tea, I  took my tablets, and I was able to pump some milk,filling only 1/4 -1/2 of the bottle each time, only about 3-6 cc from each breast in a 20–30-minute session. My baby started to be fed with formula and my breast milk. I continued to pump during my lunch breaks when I returned to work. I did this until she turned 6 months old, then I stopped.My second baby was able to latch a few times in the hospital. I felt so relieved that I would be a successful breastfeeder, but she started to get jaundiced because of inadequate intake. We decided to give her donor milk again. At home, I still could not breastfeed, but I was able to pump. I even bought the hands-free Willow pump, thinking I could pump while charting or seeing patients, but it was not for me. My baby alternated feedings between breast milk and formula. I stopped pumping at 3 months.It was quite frustrating to not successfully latch and breastfeed. Somehow, I had this feeling as the song goes, “ I did my best, but I guess my best wasn't good enough”. Thankfully, one of my pediatric colleagues put my mind at ease. She said, “fed is best.” Indeed, my baby girls have grown to be beautiful, healthy babies, and our bond is strong. Now I counsel with grace and consideration. My  mantra before was “breast is best”; now, it is “fed is best.”Testimonial #3: A mother of seven.I had seven babies, and each of them had different experiences with breastfeeding. I'd like to share with you how it went. Breastfeeding my first baby was relatively easy. He was a cooperative, calm infant and caught on quickly to the process. Baby number two was 6 weeks premature, so in the first week, he kept falling asleep, but as he got a bit older, things went well. Baby number 3 was born with a cleft lip and alveolar ridge, and breastfeeding was necessary. The breast tissue filled up the cleft in his lip, so he was able to grow normally until big enough for reparative surgery. He did have a bit of nipple confusion when I had to return to work. Baby three actually continued some token breastfeeding for a couple of weeks when his newborn sister was co-nursing. Because the breast is a demand-organ, increased suckling increases milk productivity, so neither child was deprived of milk. Baby four adapted well.Baby five was a somewhat slow learner but, with persistence, ultimately did well. Baby six also was an eager learner, but when she was 9 months, decided that she had had enough of breastfeeding, so we stopped. Baby seven adapted too well and breastfed for a couple of years. Several babies were breastfed during my pregnancies without issues. In my opinion, the first week is when you must teach a baby how to breastfeed, and it is generally the most difficult. If you can tough it through that first week, things become a lot easier. Babies have their own personalities and their own way of learning, so whereas one baby will prove a natural at the task, another may require a bit more patience. Breastfeeding and working can be challenging, but I was able to continue breastfeeding and return to work. It took determination and the reversal of day and night feeds. I didn't get much sleep at first, but the babies stayed so much healthier due to the immune benefits of breastfeeding, which meant less time off work with a sick child!If you have a “special needs” baby, and this includes premies and children with orofacial problems, breastfeeding prevents nutritional issues. Breastfeeding provided me with a special feeling of tranquility and peace, that's why it may reduce the risk of postpartum depression. Also, the luxury of being able to feed anytime, anywhere, was very helpful for me!All seven of our kids have advanced degrees, and several have their doctorates. I would like to think that breast milk played a role in their academic success. I think breastfed babies are smarter! ____________________________Conclusion: Now we conclude episode number 116, “Benefits of breastfeeding.” We hope your knowledge about breastfeeding was enriched by Dr. Yomi's presentation and that the testimonials gave you a broader perspective on the breastfeeding experience. This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Timiiye Yomi, Chelsea Dunn, Carmen Ruby, Anna Stewart, and three anonymous doctor mothers. Audio edition by Adrianne Silva.Even without trying, every night, you go to bed a little wiser. Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. We want to hear from you. Send us an email at RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. See you next week! _____________________Links: Madore LS, Fisher DJ. The Role of Breast Milk in Infectious Disease. Clin Perinatol. 2021 Jun;48(2):359-378. doi: 10.1016/j.clp.2021.03.008. PMID: 34030819. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34030819/American Academy of Pediatrics. (2021). Benefits of breastfeeding, Patient Care. Retrieved from https://www.aap.org/en/patient-care/breastfeeding/breastfeeding-overview/Westerfield KL, Koenig K, Oh R. Breastfeeding: Common Questions and Answers. Am Fam Physician. 2018 Sep 15;98(6):368-373. PMID: 30215910. https://www.aafp.org/pubs/afp/issues/2018/0915/p368.htmlRoyalty-free music used for this episode: Gushito, Latin Pandora by Videvo, downloaded on May 06, 2022, from https://www.videvo.net

Relentless Dentist
Who Are Dentists Trying To Please When They Set Their Fees?

Relentless Dentist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 25:45


How do you know when it's time to raise your fees? Doc, if you want to: Retain your top team members, Understand the different dental patient value systems, and Keep up with inflation so you can succeed in a volatile economy, then Tune in now! Check out our New Case Study, “Discover How To Recession-Proof Your Dental Practice In The Next 60 Days So That You Increase Profits & Avoid Losing Key Team Members” now at: http://thenorecessiondentist.com/casestudy. Follow us on IG and TikTok for daily value videos so that you can grow your practice! You can find show notes and more information by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/dentists-fees Relentless Dentist is a dental podcast by Dr. Dave Maloley.

Mentor Moments
Season 2 Episode 3 - Anna Zelinske MA, CRC, CCM

Mentor Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 26:05


Mentor Moments Season Two Episode 3! Story Moments: Everyone has a story to tell. Our unique stories shape our lives and the individuals we become. This season Mentor Moments will feature individuals sharing their story moments. Each episode will illustrate how seemingly little life moments ultimately shaped our careers in ways that were unpredictable and personally fulfilling. Season two of Mentor Moments will kick off with a special 3 episode interview with Anna Zelinske. Anna is the Director of Programs and Services for Patient Care at The ALS Association St. Louis Regional Chapter. In this episode Anna will share with us how she found her passion to be in the helping profession and she will also share how changing life roles helped her advance in her career. Missouri Rehabilitation Association Eastern Chapter Maryville University Rehabilitation Counseling Maryville University Rehabilitation Counseling Youtube MRA Eastern Chapter Blog

eCW Podcast
How RPM Improves Management of Complex Patient Care

eCW Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 10:32


At Brookhaven Heart & MD365, Dr. Sateesh Joseph and staff use Remote Patient Monitoring to more closely monitor patients' high blood pressure, enabling providers to reduce in-office visits, improve outcomes, and focus more of their efforts on those complex cardiac patients who need more attention.

WBUR News
What to know about Question 2, which would require dental insurers to spend a minimum rate on patient care

WBUR News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 5:01


The 'Yes on 2' campaign says this initiative is about transparency and making sure dental insurance premiums go to patient care and not executive salaries. The 'No on 2' campaign says the measure could trigger price hikes and cause people to lose dental coverage. Experts say there aren't likely to be big changes to the system.

The Resilience Lab
Caregiver performance and resilience.

The Resilience Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 34:11


To really provide world-class patient care, caregivers need to be able to perform at their best. In walks our guest today, Brian Ferguson, the CEO and Founder of Arena Labs.Arena Labs is changing the way frontline healthcare professionals are trained, pioneering the field of High Performance Medicine and caregiver resilience.In today's episode, Brian discusses leading-edge research regarding the caregiver's dilemma, burnout, and high performance. Brian talks with Rex Miller about the importance of caregivers learning to manage and navigate the stress of being on the frontlines of healthcare and how healthcare institutions can provide better patient experiences by investing in caregiver performance and resilience.Follow The Resilience Lab:On InstagramOn LinkedInThe Resilience Lab is an Imagine a Place Production.

Relentless Dentist
The 4 Dental Patient Personas & How to Speak To Them

Relentless Dentist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 19:44


There's SO MUCH more to case acceptance than value and price. Doc, if you want to: understand the radical difference between fast decision-makers and slow decision-makers, build trust with both your logical and emotional patients, get inside the mind of your patients so you can skyrocket your treatment plan acceptance, Then tune in now! Check out our New Case Study, “Discover How To Recession-Proof Your Dental Practice In The Next 60 Days So That You Increase Profits & Avoid Losing Key Team Members” now at: http://thenorecessiondentist.com/casestudy.   Follow us on IG and TikTok for daily value videos so that you can grow your practice!   You can find show notes and more information by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/dental-patient-personas  

MindSet Playbook
The Illness of Medicine

MindSet Playbook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 37:20


Dr. Michael J. Young, esteemed urologist and author shares how one experiences medical treatment from both sides of the table. Who doctors now work for, what's happened to patient care, and how we could have the most expensive healthcare in the world and rank only 30th in longevity.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
How Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Affect RN Retention and Patient Care

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 24:36


AMN Healthcare's most recent biannual Survey of Registered Nurses uncovered some telling insights in what nurses across the U.S. are thinking and feeling, specifically in relation to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Join Dr. Cole Edmonson as he discusses the importance of these findings and how it affects patients' care.This episode is sponsored by AMN Healthcare.

Write Medicine
Between the Cracks: Designing Multidisciplinary Provider Education to Ensure Equitable Patient Care

Write Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 39:28 Transcription Available


Multi-disciplinary education has expanded in the last decade or so as a way to ensure that healthcare teams cooperate, coordinate care and communicate to make care more patient-centered, continuous and reliable. On this episode of Write Medicine I talk with Lorna Lucas, MSM, a healthcare education professional and advocate for equitable healthcare. We discuss the role of multidisciplinary education in improving patient outcomes, the challenges in delivering and evaluating multidisciplinary education, and interventions that emerged during the early months of the COVID 19 pandemic to provide psychosocial support for both professionals and patients. Lorna shares the need to focus on designing and delivering educational content in a holistic, equitable, and patient-centric way that fosters interdisciplinary collaborative practice. She says, “We must look holistically at the team dynamic. It's great to have everyone performing at the top of their medical discipline. However, coordinated care requires attention between the cracks.” In this episode we talk about the importance of the following: ✔️ Local/onsite champions to support multidisciplinary education✔️ Deep listening to perspectives in each discipline ✔️ Ensuring that everyone involved feels heard✔️ Emphasizing a comprehensive team approach to address challenges, many of which are operational✔️ Designing and delivering programs that work with everyone's role in mind  We also touched on the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted existing disparities and inequities in education. She described how educators can play a role in providing psychosocial support for health professionals and how this support can improve patient outcomes. Connect with Lornae:  Lornapomicter@gmail.comLinkedInConnect with AlexTwitterLinkedInHosted and produced by Alexandra Howson PhD, CHCP➡️ Join the Write Medicine community➡️ Fall Series: WriteCME Clinic☕ Buy me a Coffee⭐ Review the podcast

Back Shed Bible Study
Training Medical Professionals to Live Out Their Faith - Guest Bob Mason

Back Shed Bible Study

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 34:33


Bob Mason works with the Medical Strategic Network to train medical professionals in living out their faith within their profession.Website Reference:  www.medsn.orgBook Reference:  Gray Matter by David Levy, M.D.  Scripture Reference:  2 Timothy 2:2Watch on YouTube: youtube.com/sunrisecommunitychurchWatch live on Mondays at 10am: www.facebook.com/sunrisecommunityonline/liveSong: Fredji - Happy Life (Vlog No Copyright Music)Music provided by Vlog No Copyright Music.Video Link: https://youtu.be/KzQiRABVARk

MedBoard Matters
PAs and their role in patient care

MedBoard Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 37:41 Transcription Available


Have you ever wondered what a physician assistant (PA) is and what role they play in patient care? In this episode of MedBoard Matters, host, Jean Fisher Brinkley talks with Molly Calabria, PA-C (President) and Meg Beal, MMS, PA-C (President-Elect) of the North Carolina Academy of Physician Assistants about their backgrounds, educational journeys, history of the PA profession, and more.Host: Jean Fisher BrinkleyGuests: Molly Calabria, PA-C and Meg Beal, MMS, PA-CProducer: Sylvia French-HodgesFollow the North Carolina Medical Board on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.Email your questions to: podcast@ncmedboard.org.

Improve Healthcare
Importance of Medical-Surgical Nursing in Safe Care Delivery w/ AMSN CEO Dr. Terri Hinkley

Improve Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 25:07


Dr. Hinkley  was hired by the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses (AMSN) and the Medical-Surgical Nursing Certification Board (MSNCB) in August 2017. She has over 32 years in acute care nursing in the healthcare setting. She has ten years of association management leadership experience, having held executive positions in both individual membership associations and certification boards. The Academy AMSN, under her leadership, earned an association industry award for a suite of COVID-19 resources designed specifically for med-surg nurses and employers and was recognized by the association industry as “one of 100 healthcare associations that will save the world”. Hinkley's industry experience and education allow her to contribute tangible expertise in board governance, innovation, competency frameworks, education development, and board governance but also deep knowledge of the future of work and learning, and the strategies needed to lead professional membership-based and certification organizations in the 21st century.Terri was elected as the President of the American Board of Nursing Specialties (ABNS) in July 2021 and is a Director on the Board of Directors for the Institute of Credentialing Excellence (ICE), the Nurses on Boards Coalition (NOBC), and the Otsuka Patient Assistance Fund. She received her RN from Centennial College, BScN from York University, an Executive MBA from Athabasca University, and an Ed.D. in the Executive Leadership (ELP) Human and Organizational Learning (HOL) Program at the George Washington University. Learn more Academy of Medical Surgical Nurses Listen to Ted Talk by Kathleen Bartholomew

Relentless Dentist
The Assertive Leadership Mistakes Dental Practice Owners Make

Relentless Dentist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 26:21


The best dental team members long for Assertive Leadership. Yet, few ever receive it. So, If you want to avoid the typical practice owner frustration that comes from passive, aggressive and passive-aggressive behaviors, If you want to give your team exactly what they need from you, If you want to work in a high-truth environment so you can consistently enhance your team's unity and productivity,  Then, tune in now! Check out our New Case Study, “Discover How To Recession-Proof Your Dental Practice In The Next 60 Days So That You Increase Profits & Avoid Losing Key Team Members” now at: http://thenorecessiondentist.com/casestudy. You can find show notes and more information by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/Assertive-Leadership Relentless Dentist is a dental podcast by Dr. Dave Maloley.

KidneyTalk - An Online Radio Show By Renal Support Network
10/11/2022 - Life as a Patient Care Technician

KidneyTalk - An Online Radio Show By Renal Support Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022


Thirty years ago, John Larsen entered the dialysis healthcare field and never looked back. As a Patient Care Technician (PCT), John lives on the front lines at the dialysis clinic where he works. From start to finish, PCTs play an essential role at dialysis treatment centers. They spend a great deal of quality time with their patients and have a unique opportunity to develop special relationships with them. Listen in to what motivates John and keeps him engaged in his rewarding career.

Relentless Dentist
How Dental Practice Owners Can Feel The Confidence of an Everyday Winner!

Relentless Dentist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 21:56


Doc, do you ever feel like you're playing a losing game? In this episode, I discuss how dental practice owners can win Every Day. So, If you want to use the powerful WOOP framework, If you want to work a 4-step system that sets you up for enduring success, If you want to experience authentic practice owner confidence so you can have your best year every year, Tune in now! Check out our New Case Study, “Discover How To Recession-Proof Your Dental Practice In The Next 60 Days So That You Increase Profits & Avoid Losing Key Team Members” now at: http://thenorecessiondentist.com/casestudy. You can find show notes and more information by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/dental-owners-confidence Relentless Dentist is a dental podcast by Dr. Dave Maloley.

Physician's Weekly Podcast
Get Back to Patient Care With MSOs & Cilia's Key Cancer Role

Physician's Weekly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 19:47


Management Service Organizations (MSOs) can help you delegate the business side of medicine so you can focus on patient care. Dr. MedLaw explains, including, how MSOs factor into the corporate practice of medicine and more.  Also, did you know cilia play an important role in early beginnings of cancer in neural crest cells? Lukas Sommer, PhD, discusses his teams' research in developmental and cell biology.Enjoy listening!https://www.anatomy.uzh.ch/en/research/sommer.htmlZingg D, Debbache J, Peña-Hernández R, Antunes AT, Schaefer SM, Cheng PF, Zimmerli D, Haeusel J, Calçada RR, Tuncer E, Zhang Y, Bossart R, Wong KK, Basler K, Dummer R, Santoro R, Levesque MP, Sommer L. EZH2-Mediated Primary Cilium Deconstruction Drives Metastatic Melanoma Formation. Cancer Cell. 2018 Jul 9;34(1):69-84.e14. 

Anesthesia Patient Safety Podcast
#118 Requirements for Safe and Effective Anesthesia Patient Care in NORA

Anesthesia Patient Safety Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 18:29 Transcription Available


Welcome to the next installment of the Anesthesia Patient Safety podcast hosted by Alli Bechtel.  This podcast is an exciting journey towards improved anesthesia patient safety. Do you take care of patients in NORA locations? If so, then this is a must-listen episode. We are reviewing NORA anesthesia patient safety threats. Plus, we'll talk about ideas for possible solutions related to space planning in NORA and working collaboratively on a multidisciplinary team across a variety of different locations while maintaining safety and efficiency. © 2022, The Anesthesia Patient Safety FoundationFor show notes & transcript, visit our episode page at apsf.org: https://www.apsf.org/podcast/118-requirements-for-safe-and-effective-anesthesia-patient-care-in-nora/

Generation Digital Workforce
189. Freeing up Clinicians to Focus on Patient Care

Generation Digital Workforce

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 22:06


Embracing Automation Across All Sectors of Healthcare . The healthcare industry has perpetually been burdened by heavy administrative tasks, largely driven by regulatory requirements and staffing shortages. On this podcast, Brad Hairston speaks with Patrick Lovelace, Senior Director Healthcare Strategy at SS&C Blue Prism and a Registered Nurse, who explains how all sectors of healthcare have the opportunity to use intelligent automation to free clinicians from administrative work so that they can do what they do best. . Here's what we talked with Patrick about: * Why healthcare is ripe for automation * The opportunity to reduce healthcare spending by $500B * How the automation potential compares across the various healthcare sectors – providers, payers, life sciences * The pace of emerging technology adoption of in healthcare * Healthcare automation success stories * Opportunities in healthcare created by the merger of SS&C and Blue Prism . To ensure that you never miss an episode of Transform NOW, be sure to subscribe!

AMA COVID-19 Update
Nutrition education for patient care and physician self-care with Stephen Devries, MD

AMA COVID-19 Update

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 15:42 Very Popular


What physicians need to know about nutrition education both for patient care and self-care with Stephen Devries, MD, executive director of the nonprofit Gaples Institute and an adjunct associate professor of nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. American Medical Association CXO Todd Unger hosts. Access "2022 Update: Nutrition Science for Health and Longevity: What Every Physician Needs to Know" via AMA Ed Hub™ here: https://edhub.ama-assn.org/gaples-institute-ed/provider-referrer/7893 To learn more about the Gaples Institute Nutrition and Lifestyle Education, visit https://edhub.ama-assn.org/gaples-institute-ed

Mentor Moments
Season 2 Episode 2 - Anna Zelinske MA, CRC, CCM

Mentor Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 28:33


Mentor Moments Season Two Episode 2! Story Moments: Everyone has a story to tell. Our unique stories shape our lives and the individuals we become. This season Mentor Moments will feature individuals sharing their story moments. Each episode will illustrate how seemingly little life moments ultimately shaped our careers in ways that were unpredictable and personally fulfilling. Season two of Mentor Moments will kick off with a special 3 episode interview with Anna Zelinske. Anna is the Director of Programs and Services for Patient Care at The ALS Association St. Louis Regional Chapter. In this episode Anna will share with us how she found her passion to be in the helping profession and she will also share how changing life roles helped her advance in her career. Missouri Rehabilitation Association Eastern Chapter Maryville University Rehabilitation Counseling Maryville University Rehabilitation Counseling Youtube MRA Eastern Chapter Blog

BackTable Podcast
Ep. 248 Staff Culture with Dr. Peder Horner (on location at CIRSE)

BackTable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 49:50


In this episode, Dr. Aaron Fritts interviews Dr. Peder Horner about the impact of staff culture on patient care, how to manage bad players, and how to maintain an active role in shaping a healthy work culture. --- CHECK OUT OUR SPONSORS Accountable Physician Advisors http://www.accountablephysicianadvisors.com/ Accountable Revenue Cycle Solutions https://www.accountablerevcycle.com/ --- EARN CME Reflect on how this Podcast applies to your day-to-day and earn AMA PRA Category 1 CMEs: https://earnc.me/49cHUg --- SHOW NOTES We begin by discussing why staff culture is important. In IR, many people are coming out of a toxic training program and are now expected to be department leaders. We take after our mentors, and we pick up both good and bad habits. So where does healthy staff culture start? Dr. Horner explains that it starts from the top. You have to play an active role in molding the culture, otherwise it will remain toxic or simply be uninspiring. Next, we ask Dr. Horner how he inspires his staff. He shares many values as a parent and a leader. If he is tired and as a result doesn't smile while at work, it can set the mood for a case, similarly to how it can add up and impact a home relationship on a day to day basis. When employees have negative feelings at work, this results in worse patient care. Lastly, we talk about how to maintain culture once you have a good team onboard. Dr. Horner believes in checking in frequently by asking his techs and nurses how they are doing. He prioritizes their career growth and mobility, which he says may lose him employees over time, but in turn makes people enjoy coming to work because they feel like they are improving and advancing. He says you must be selfless as a leader. If you expect everything to stay static, you're doing your staff and patients a disservice. Even a great team, if left static, will not go far. He encourages personal and professional development among his staff which is a huge part of the culture of growth he believes in. --- RESOURCES Harvard Business Review: https://hbr.org Paper on Work Culture and Patient Care: https://asqblog.com/2015/02/25/barsade-oneill-2014-whats-love-got-to-do-with-it-a-longitudinal-study-of-the-culture-of-companionate-love-and-employee-and-client-outcomes-in-a-long-term-care-setting/

ASIAN AMERICA: THE KEN FONG PODCAST
Ep 392: Yuri Sudhakar & Rick Abe @ Nudj Health

ASIAN AMERICA: THE KEN FONG PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 58:29


In this fascinating and informative episode, Yuri Sudhakar and Rick Abe joined me to share about their latest venture. Nudj Health is a tech-enabled health service that integrates evidence-based mental, behavioral, and social health aspects of patient care in collaboration with physician organizations nationwide. In short, Nudj Health has created a way for people's doctors to help them achieve their health goals like never before.

Relentless Dentist
How To Create Mega-Competitive Dental Practice Advantages

Relentless Dentist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 31:18


Relentless Dentists, you have to discover the insane power of a carefully crafted flywheel. If you want to truly: harness the forces of momentum and compounding; hear about the four flywheels that can shift your practice from Good to Great; enjoy more cash flow so you can push mega-competitive advantages for your dental practice; This episode is for you! Check out our New 30-minute Case Study Video, “Discover How To Recession-Proof Your Dental Practice In The Next 60 Days So That You Increase Profits & Avoid Losing Key Team Members” now at: http://thenorecessiondentist.com/casestudy. You can find show notes and more information by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/Dental-Practice-Advantages Relentless Dentist is a dental podcast by Dr. Dave Maloley.

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Brooks D. Cash, MD, FACP, FACG, FASGE, AGAF, RFF - An Exploration of Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Chronic Idiopathic Constipation in a Unique Era of Patient Care: Incorporating an Individualized Approach to Help

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 60:07


Go online to PeerView.com/CYP860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this animated activity, Dr. Brooks D. Cash shares expert guideline-based strategies to confirm a diagnosis of IBS-D, IBS-C, or CIC, highlighting key differential diagnoses to rule out and alarm features that warrant further investigation. You will be able to translate the latest clinical findings related to current over-the-counter and prescription treatments for IBS-C, IBS-D, and CIC, as well as gain insight into the clinical use of newer/novel treatment options. Dr. Cash also shares effective communication strategies you can use with your patients to increase their participation in their care and maximize their treatment satisfaction. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Integrate appropriate, validated testing measures to make definitive, timely diagnoses of IBS/CIC; Treat IBS/CIC in accordance with current evidence and guidelines, recognizing the appropriate use of new and emerging therapeutic agents; and Implement strategies to establish effective communication and help patients with IBS/CIC increase participation in their care.

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Brooks D. Cash, MD, FACP, FACG, FASGE, AGAF, RFF - An Exploration of Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Chronic Idiopathic Constipation in a Unique Era of Patient Care: Incorporating an Individualized Approach to Help

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 60:07


Go online to PeerView.com/CYP860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this animated activity, Dr. Brooks D. Cash shares expert guideline-based strategies to confirm a diagnosis of IBS-D, IBS-C, or CIC, highlighting key differential diagnoses to rule out and alarm features that warrant further investigation. You will be able to translate the latest clinical findings related to current over-the-counter and prescription treatments for IBS-C, IBS-D, and CIC, as well as gain insight into the clinical use of newer/novel treatment options. Dr. Cash also shares effective communication strategies you can use with your patients to increase their participation in their care and maximize their treatment satisfaction. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Integrate appropriate, validated testing measures to make definitive, timely diagnoses of IBS/CIC; Treat IBS/CIC in accordance with current evidence and guidelines, recognizing the appropriate use of new and emerging therapeutic agents; and Implement strategies to establish effective communication and help patients with IBS/CIC increase participation in their care.

KGO 810 Podcast
Nikki Medoro - Kaiser Therapists Continue to Strike Over Working Conditions Affecting Patient Care

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 13:26


As mental healthcare workers at Kaiser in Northern California enter their seventh week of their strike, the Morning Show with Nikki Medoro welcomes therapist Ilana Marcucci-Morris to explain why Kaiser's latest proposal was rejected over the weekend, saying it's not over pay but better working conditions so their qualified members can best serve their patients.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Brooks D. Cash, MD, FACP, FACG, FASGE, AGAF, RFF - An Exploration of Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Chronic Idiopathic Constipation in a Unique Era of Patient Care: Incorporating an Individualized Approach to Help

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 60:31


Go online to PeerView.com/CYP860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this animated activity, Dr. Brooks D. Cash shares expert guideline-based strategies to confirm a diagnosis of IBS-D, IBS-C, or CIC, highlighting key differential diagnoses to rule out and alarm features that warrant further investigation. You will be able to translate the latest clinical findings related to current over-the-counter and prescription treatments for IBS-C, IBS-D, and CIC, as well as gain insight into the clinical use of newer/novel treatment options. Dr. Cash also shares effective communication strategies you can use with your patients to increase their participation in their care and maximize their treatment satisfaction. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Integrate appropriate, validated testing measures to make definitive, timely diagnoses of IBS/CIC; Treat IBS/CIC in accordance with current evidence and guidelines, recognizing the appropriate use of new and emerging therapeutic agents; and Implement strategies to establish effective communication and help patients with IBS/CIC increase participation in their care.

PeerView Family Medicine & General Practice CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Brooks D. Cash, MD, FACP, FACG, FASGE, AGAF, RFF - An Exploration of Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Chronic Idiopathic Constipation in a Unique Era of Patient Care: Incorporating an Individualized Approach to Help

PeerView Family Medicine & General Practice CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 60:31


Go online to PeerView.com/CYP860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. In this animated activity, Dr. Brooks D. Cash shares expert guideline-based strategies to confirm a diagnosis of IBS-D, IBS-C, or CIC, highlighting key differential diagnoses to rule out and alarm features that warrant further investigation. You will be able to translate the latest clinical findings related to current over-the-counter and prescription treatments for IBS-C, IBS-D, and CIC, as well as gain insight into the clinical use of newer/novel treatment options. Dr. Cash also shares effective communication strategies you can use with your patients to increase their participation in their care and maximize their treatment satisfaction. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Integrate appropriate, validated testing measures to make definitive, timely diagnoses of IBS/CIC; Treat IBS/CIC in accordance with current evidence and guidelines, recognizing the appropriate use of new and emerging therapeutic agents; and Implement strategies to establish effective communication and help patients with IBS/CIC increase participation in their care.

Radiology Imaging Cancer Podcasts | RSNA
Episode 13: Imaging Technology to Fight against Cancer

Radiology Imaging Cancer Podcasts | RSNA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 23:35


Dr. Shah Islam MBBS BSC (Hons) FRCR interviews Drs. Yantian Zhang, PhD and Robert Nordstrom, PhD about their article recently published in the Radiology: Imaging Cancer journal. Celebrating Contributions of Imaging Technology to Fight against Cancer at the 50th NCA Anniversary. Zhang and Nordstrom. Radiology: Imaging Cancer 2022; 4(5):e220085. Drs. Zhang and Nordstrom both serve in leadership roles at the National Cancer Institute. They have jointly authored a very insightful and uplifting editorial, providing an outlook towards to what's on the horizon for the next 50 years of Cancer Imaging Research and Clinical Translation.

Advancing Health
[Special Edition] How Prior Authorizations Can Harm Patient Care

Advancing Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 22:26


In medical care, prior authorization was originally intended to ensure patients received appropriate care that was in line with tested methodologies. Today, “prior authorization” has become a dreaded term…often signaling delayed care and undue financial burdens posed to patients and care providers alike. In some cases, the process of prior authorization has actually put patient lives at risk. What changed over time? Most of all, what can be done about it now? In this special edition podcast, two colleagues who are very well informed about the hazards and pitfalls of the overuse or misuse of prior authorizations in the course of patient care. Terrence Cunningham directs AHA's Administrative Simplification Policy, and Andrea Preisler is senior associate director, Administrative Simplification Policy.

Interviews by The Smart Chiropractor
Adjusting Seminars & Patient Care with Dr. David Graber

Interviews by The Smart Chiropractor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 27:07


Dr. David Graber, Founder of Graber Seminars, is an experienced chiropractor in Parsippany NJ and owner of Graber Chiropractic Center. He developed and teaches over 20 different post-graduate courses in Chiropractic technique and theory, low-tech rehabilitation, and case management nationally.

Relentless Dentist
The Top 10 Pillars For Dentists Who Want To Have A More Powerful Presence

Relentless Dentist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 18:51


Most dentists are forgettable and ignorable. Find out why that is such a big problem in our industry. Doc, if you want to: Know the 4 questions every patient is asking about you, Understand how being forgettable can stress you out and kill a dental career, Figure out how to be the most respected dentist around so you can drive case acceptance and grow your practice in these turbulent times… Tune in now! Dr. Maloley also recorded a 30 minute case study video for you: Discover How To Recession-Proof Your Dental Practice In The Next 60 Days So That You Increase Profits & Avoid Losing Key Team Members You can find show notes and more information by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/powerful-presence Relentless Dentist is a dental podcast by Dr. Dave Maloley.

Bulletproof Hygiene
PATIENT CARE: Complete Health Heroes with Geralyn Beers

Bulletproof Hygiene

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 61:53


Bulletproof Hygiene Podcast Episode 82 Host: Charissa Wood, RDH Guest: Geralyn Beers Key Takeaways:IntroductionAha MomentsTest, Treat And Retest RoutineLifestyle Factors CorrelationOral Disease, Alzheimer's Disease And DementiaOral Contributions To Cognitive Decline References:Hygiene Mastermind - https://bulletproofmastermind.com Summit - https://bulletproofsummit.com/ Mighty Networks: Bulletproof Hygiene completehealthheroes.com ( BULLETPROOF LISTENERS SAVE $500 OFF COMPLETE HEALTH HEROES PROGRAM! Use coupon code BPH500 at checkout. ) apollohealthco.com American Academy for Oral and Systemic Health - https://www.aaosh.org/American Dental Hygienists' Association - https://www.adha.org/"Say AHH" Oral Health Documentary - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47rmKUA-M9s Nutritious Hygiene with Barbara Tritz - https://youtu.be/8iBuuQvmS8U Barbara Tritz -  https://www.instagram.com/queenofdentalhygiene/?hl=en Tweetables:We are limited when there's a whole systemic disease going on. Charissa WoodWe're all perfectionists. Geralyn BeersIt is a constant battle of trying to find that healthy balance. Charissa WoodPatients appreciate that you want to partner with them. Geralyn Beers

Grounded in Greek
Grounded in Patient Care with Kosta Sakellariou

Grounded in Greek

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 44:43


Kosta Sakellariou is a radiological technologist at a major healthcare system in the East Bay. The host geeks out with him on anatomy and Kosta shares insights into the field he's been in for the past 14 years, CT scans, and radiation safety. He discusses how his Greek upbringing impacts his approach to work and how the Greek language aided him in studying the medical terms in school.

Bulletproof Hygiene
PATIENT CARE: Anti-Anxiety Medications with Tom Viola

Bulletproof Hygiene

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 41:28


Bulletproof Hygiene Podcast Episode 81 Hosts: Charissa Wood, RDH  & Brittany Simon, CRDH, BASDH Guest: Tom Viola Key Takeaways:IntroductionAnxiety Disorder Report Cannabis as Self-Medication For Anxiety Over the Counter Sleep Aids Psychotherapeutic Drug Side Effects References: Hygiene Mastermind - https://bulletproofmastermind.com Summit - https://bulletproofsummit.com/ Mighty Networks: Bulletproof Hygiene Tweetables: Be the bartender. Listen. Tom Viola You gotta have a poker face as a dental hygienist. Tom Viola Treat patients as if they are one of the members of your family. Tom Viola

Relentless Dentist
4 Surefire Ways To Transform Your Dental Practice

Relentless Dentist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 20:49


Doc, have you noticed how we work isn't working like it used to? If you want to: Avoid using utterly obsolete management styles, Know how to create a first-class employee experience so that you surround yourself with a high-performance team, and Have the best dental practice in town, Tune in now! Check out our New Case Study, “Discover How To Recession-Proof Your Dental Practice In The Next 60 Days So That You Increase Profits & Avoid Losing Key Team Members” now at: http://thenorecessiondentist.com/casestudy You can find show notes and more information by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/transform-dental-practice Relentless Dentist is a dental podcast by Dr. Dave Maloley.

Relentless Dentist
The 7 EMPIRES Of A Modern Dental Practice Owner

Relentless Dentist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 26:30


Do you know what's more important today than a business or financial plan for dental practice owners? Doc, if you want to... Learn why you should be building 7 EMPIRES, Remove the problems of the Slave, Save, and Retire Method, and Know why breaking away from social norms is critical for Practice Owner Confidence so you can avoid your next F@#k This Event, Then tune in now! Follow us on IG and TikTok for daily value videos so that you can grow your practice! You can find show notes and more information by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/7-Empires Relentless Dentist is a dental podcast by Dr. Dave Maloley.