Podcast appearances and mentions of Steve Ballmer

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Latest podcast episodes about Steve Ballmer

Screaming in the Cloud
Letting the Dust Settle on Job Hopping with Brian Hall

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 36:37


About BrianI lead the Google Cloud Product and Industry Marketing team. We're focused on accelerating the growth of Google Cloud by establishing thought leadership, increasing demand and usage, enabling our sales teams and partners to tell our product stories with excellence, and helping our customers be the best advocates for us.Before joining Google, I spent over 25 years in product marketing or engineering in different forms. I started my career at Microsoft and had a very non-traditional path for 20 years. I worked in every product division except for cloud. I did marketing, product management, and engineering roles. And, early on, I was the first speech writer for Steve Ballmer and worked on Bill Gates' speeches too. My last role was building up the Microsoft Surface business from scratch and as VP of the hardware businesses. After Microsoft, I spent a year as CEO at a hardware startup called Doppler Labs, where we made a run at transforming hearing, and then two years as VP at Amazon Web Services leading product marketing, developer advocacy, and a bunch more marketing teams. I have three kids still at home, Barty, Noli, and Alder, who are all named after trees in different ways. My wife Edie and I met right at the beginning of our first year at Yale University, where I studied math, econ, and philosophy and was the captain of the Swim and Dive team my senior year. Edie has a PhD in forestry and runs a sustainability and forestry consulting firm she started, that is aptly named “Three Trees Consulting”. We love the outdoors, tennis, running, and adventures in my 1986 Volkswagen Van, which is my first and only car, that I can't bring myself to get rid of.Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/IsForAt LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brhall/ Episode 10: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/podcast/screaming-in-the-cloud/episode-10-education-is-not-ready-for-teacherless/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. Set up a meeting with a Redis expert during re:Invent, and you'll not only learn how you can become a Redis hero, but also have a chance to win some fun and exciting prizes. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Writing ad copy to fit into a 30 second slot is hard, but if anyone can do it the folks at Quali can. Just like their Torque infrastructure automation platform can deliver complex application environments anytime, anywhere, in just seconds instead of hours, days or weeks. Visit Qtorque.io today and learn how you can spin up application environments in about the same amount of time it took you to listen to this ad.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined today by a special guest that I've been, honestly, antagonizing for years now. Once upon a time, he spent 20 years at Microsoft, then he wound up leaving—as occasionally people do, I'm told—and going to AWS, where according to an incredibly ill-considered affidavit filed in a court case, he mostly focused on working on PowerPoint slides. AWS is famously not a PowerPoint company, and apparently, you can't change culture. Now, he's the VP of Product and Industry Marketing at Google Cloud. Brian Hall, thank you for joining me.Brian: Hi, Corey. It's good to be here.Corey: I hope you're thinking that after we're done with our conversation. Now, unlike most conversations that I tend to have with folks who are, honestly, VP level at large cloud companies that I enjoy needling, we're not going to talk about that today because instead, I'd rather focus on a minor disagreement we got into on Twitter—and I mean that in the truest sense of disagreement, as opposed to the loud, angry, mutual blocking, threatening to bomb people's houses, et cetera, nonsense that appears to be what substitutes for modern discourse—about, oh, a month or so ago from the time we're recording this. Specifically, we talked about, I'm in favor of job-hopping to advance people's career, and you, as we just mentioned, spent 20 years at Microsoft and take something of the opposite position. Let's talk about that. Where do you stand on the idea?Brian: I stand in the position that people should optimize for where they are going to grow the most. And frankly, the disagreement was less about job-hopping because I'm going to explain how I job-hopped at Microsoft effectively.Corey: Excellent. That is the reason I'm asking you rather than poorly stating your position and stuffing you like some sort of Christmas turkey straw-man thing.Brian: And I would argue that for many people, changing jobs is the best thing that you can do, and I'm often an advocate for changing jobs even before sometimes people think they should do it. What I mostly disagreed with you on is simply following the money on your next job. What you said is if a—and I'm going to get it somewhat wrong—but if a company is willing to pay you $40,000 more, or some percentage more, you should take that job now.Corey: Gotcha.Brian: And I don't think that's always the case, and that's what we're talking about.Corey: This is the inherent problem with Twitter is that first, I tend to write my Twitter threads extemporaneously without a whole lot of thought being put into things—kind of like I live my entire life, but that's neither here nor there—Brian: I was going to say, that comes across quite clearly.Corey: Excellent. And 280 characters lacks nuance. And I definitely want to have this discussion; this is not just a story where you and I beat heads and not come to an agreement on this. I think it's that we fundamentally do agree on the vast majority of this, I just want to make sure that we have this conversation in a way, in a forum that doesn't lend itself to basically empowering the worst aspects of my own nature. Read as, not Twitter.Brian: Great. Let's do that.Corey: So, my position is, and I was contextualizing this from someone who had reached out who was early in their career, they had spent a couple of years at AWS and they were entertaining an offer elsewhere for significantly more money. And this person, I believe I can—I believe it's okay for me to say this: she—was very concerned that, “I don't want to look like I'm job-hopping, and I don't dislike my team. My manager is great. I feel disloyal for leaving. What should I do?”Which first, I just want to say how touched I am that someone who is early in their career and not from a wildly overrepresented demographic like you and I felt a sense of safety and security in reaching out to ask me that question. I really wish more people would take that kind of initiative. It's hard to inspire, but here we are. And my take to her was, “Oh, my God. Take the money.” That was where this thread started because when I have conversations with people about those things, it becomes top of mind, and I think, “Hmm, maybe there's a one-to-many story that becomes something that is actionable and useful.”Brian: Okay, so I'm going to give two takes on this. I'll start with my career because I was in a similar position as she was, at one point in my career. My background, I lucked into a job at Microsoft as an intern in 1995, and then did another internship in '96 and then started full time on the Internet Explorer team. And about a year-and-a-half into that job, I—we had merged with the Windows '98 team and I got the opportunity to work on Bill Gates's speech for the Windows '98 launch event. And I—after that was right when Steve Ballmer became president of Microsoft and he started doing a lot more speeches and asked to have someone to help him with speeches.And Chris Capossela, who's now the CMO at Microsoft, said, “Hey, Brian. You interested in doing this for Steve?” And my first reaction was, well, even inside Microsoft, if I move, it will be disloyal. Because my manager's manager, they've given me great opportunities, they're continuing to challenge me, I'm learning a bunch, and they advised not doing it.Corey: It seems to me like you were in a—how to put this?—not to besmirch the career you have wrought with the sweat of your brow and the toil of your back, but in many ways, you were—in a lot of ways—you were in the right place at the right time, riding a rocket ship, and built opportunities internally and talked to folks there, and built the relationships that enabled you to thrive inside of a company's ecosystem. Is that directionally correct?Brian: For sure. Yet, there's also, big companies are teams of teams, and loyalty is more often with the team and the people that you work with than the 401k plan. And in this case, you know, I was getting this pressure that says, “Hey, Brian. You're going to get all these opportunities. You're doing great doing what you're doing.”And I eventually had the luck to ask the question, “Hey, if I go there and do this role”—and by the way, nobody had done it before, and so part of their argument was, “You're young, Steve's… Steve. Like, you could be a fantastic ball of flames.” And I said, “Okay, if [laugh] let's say that happens. Can I come back? Can I come back to the job I was doing before?”And they were like, “Yeah, of course. You're good at what you do.” To me, which was, “Okay, great. Then I'm gone. I might as well go try this.” And of course, when I started at Microsoft, I was 20, 21, and I thought I'd be there for two or three years and then I'd end up going back to school or somewhere else. But inside Microsoft, what kept happening as I just kept getting new opportunities to do something else that I'd learned a bunch from, and I ultimately kind of created this mentality for how I thought about next job of, “Am I going to get more opportunities if I am able to be successful in this new job?” Really focused on optionality and the ability to do work that I want to do and have more choices to do that.Corey: You are also on a I almost want to call it a meteoric trajectory. In some ways. You effectively went from—what was your first role there? It was—Brian: The lowest level of college hire you can do at Microsoft, effectively.Corey: Yeah. All the way on up to at the end of it the Corporate VP for Microsoft Devices. It seems to me that despite the fact that you spent 20 years there, you wound up having a bunch of different jobs and an entire career trajectory internal to the organization, which is, let's be clear, markedly different from some of the folks I've interviewed at various times, in my career as an employer and as a technical interviewer at a consulting company, where they'd been somewhere for 15 years, and they had one year of experience that they repeated 15 times. And it was one of the more difficult things that I encountered is that some folks did not take ownership of their career and focus on driving it forward.Brian: Yeah, that, I had the opposite experience, and that is what kept me there that long. After I would finish a job, I would say, “Okay, what do I want to learn how to do next, and what is a challenge that would be most interesting?” And initially, I had to get really lucky, honestly, to be able to get these. And I did the work, but I had to have the opportunity, and that took luck. But after I had a track record of saying, “Hey, I can jump from being a product marketer to being a speechwriter; I can do speechwriting and then go do product management; I can move from product management into engineering management.”I can do that between different businesses and product types, you build the ability to say, “Hey, I can learn that if you give me the chance.” And it, frankly, was the unique combination of experiences I had by having tried to do these other things that gave me the opportunity to have a fast trajectory within the company.Corey: I think it's also probably fair to say that Microsoft was a company that, in its dealings with you, is operating in good faith. And that is a great thing to find when you see it, but I'm cynical; I admit that. I see a lot of stories where people give and sacrifice for the good of the company, but that sacrifice is never reciprocated. And we've all heard the story of folks who will put their nose to the grindstone to ship something on time, only to be rewarded with a layoff at the end, and stories like that resonate.And my argument has always been that you can't love a company because the company can't love you back. And when you're looking at do I make a career move or do I stay, my argument is that is the best time to be self-interested.Brian: Yeah, I don't think—companies are there for the company, and certainly having a culture that supports people that wants to create opportunity, having a manager that is there truly to make you better and to give you opportunity, that all can happen, but it's within a company and you have to do the work in order to try and get into that environment. Like, I worked hard to have managers who would support my growth, would give me the bandwidth and leash early on to not be perfect at what I'm doing, and that always helped me. But you get to go pick them in a company like that, or in the industry in general, you get—just like when a manager is hiring you, you also get to understand, hey, is this a person I want to work for?But I want to come back to the main point that I wanted to make. When I changed jobs, I did it because I wanted to learn something new and I thought that would have value for me in the medium-term and long-term, versus how do I go max cash in what I'm already good at?Corey: Yes.Brian: And that's the root of what we were disagreeing with on Twitter. I have seen many people who are good at something, and then another company says, “Hey, I want you to do that same thing in a worse environment, and we'll pay you more.”Corey: Excellence is always situational. Someone who is showered in accolades at one company gets fired at a different company. And it's not because they suddenly started sucking; it's because the tools and resources that they needed to succeed were present in one environment and not the other. And that varies from person to person; when someone doesn't work out of the company, I don't have a default assumption that there's something inherently wrong with them.Of course, I look at my own career and the sheer, staggeringly high number of times I got fired, and I'm starting to think, “Huh. The only consistent factor in all of these things is me. Nah, couldn't be my problem. I just worked for terrible places, for terrible people. That's got to be the way it works.” My own peace of mind. I get it. That is how it feels sometimes and it's easy to dismiss that in different ways. I don't want to let my own bias color this too heavily.Brian: So, here are the mistakes that I've seen made: “I'm really good at something; this other company will pay me to do just that.” You move to do it, you get paid more, but you have less impact, you don't work with as strong of people, and you don't have a next step to learn more. Was that a good decision? Maybe. If you need the money now, yes, but you're a little bit trading short-term money for medium-and long-term money where you're paid for what you know; that's the best thing in this industry. We're paid for what we know, which means as you're doing a job, you can build the ability to get paid more by knowing more, by learning more, by doing things that stretch you in ways that you don't already know.Corey: In 2006, I bluffed my way through a technical interview and got a job as a Unix systems administrator for a university that was paying $65,000 a year, and I had no idea what I was going to do with all of that money. It was more money than I could imagine at that point. My previous high watermark, working for an ethically challenged company in a sales role at a target comp of 55, and I was nowhere near it. So okay, let's go somewhere else and see what happens. And after I'd been there a month or two, my boss sits me down and said, “So”—it's our annual compensation adjustment time—“Congratulations. You now make $68,000.”And it's just, “Oh, my God. This is great. Why would I ever leave?” So, I stayed there a year and I was relatively happy, insofar as I'm ever happy in a job. And then a corporate company came calling and said, “Hey, would you consider working here?”“Well, I'm happy here and I'm reasonably well compensated. Why on earth would I do that?” And the answer was, “Well, we'll pay you $90,000 if you do.” It's like, “All right. I guess I'm going to go and see what the world holds.”And six weeks later, they let me go. And then I got another job that also paid $90,000 and I stayed there for two years. And I started the process of seeing what my engagement with the work world look like. And it was a story of getting let go periodically, of continuing to claw my way up and, credit where due, in my 20s I was in crippling credit card debt because I made a bunch of poor decisions, so I biased early on for more money at almost any cost. At some point that has to stop because there's always a bigger paycheck somewhere if you're willing to go and do something else.And I'm not begrudging anyone who pursues that, but at some point, it ceases to make a difference. Getting a raise from $68,000 to $90,000 was life-changing for me. Now, getting a $30,000 raise? Sure, it'd be nice; I'm not turning my nose up at it, don't get me wrong, but it's also not something that moves the needle on my lifestyle.Brian: Yeah. And there are a lot of those dimensions. There's the lifestyle dimension, there's the learning dimension, there's the guaranteed pay dimension, there's the potential paid dimension, there is the who I get to work with, just pure enjoyment dimension, and they all matter. And people should recognize that job moves should consider all of these.And you don't have to have the same framework over time as well. I've had times where I really just wanted to bear down and figure something out. And I did one job at Microsoft for basically six years. It changed in terms of scope of things that I was marketing, and which division I was in, and then which division I was in, and then which division I was in—because Microsoft loves a good reorg—but I basically did the same job for six years at one point, and it was very conscious. I was trying to get really good at how do I manage a team system at scale. And I didn't want to leave that until I had figured that out. I look back and I think that's one of the best career decisions I ever made, but it was for reasons that would have been really hard to explain to a lot of people.Corey: Let's also be very clear here that you and I are well-off white dudes in tech. Our failure mode is pretty much a board seat and a book deal. In fact, if—Brian: [laugh].Corey: —I'm not mistaken, you are on the board of something relatively recently. What was that?Brian: United Way of King County. It's a wonderful nonprofit in the Seattle area.Corey: Excellent. And I look forward to reading your book, whenever that winds up dropping. I'm sure it'll be only the very spiciest of takes. For folks who are earlier in their career and who also don't have the winds of privilege at their backs the way that you and I do, this also presents radically differently. And I've spoken to a number of folks who are not wildly over-represented about this topic, in the wake of that Twitter explosion.And what I heard was interesting in that having a manager who has your back counts for an awful lot and is something that is going to absolutely hold you to a particular company, even when it might make sense on paper for you to leave. And I think that there's something strong there. My counterargument is okay, so you turn down the offer, a month goes past and your manager gives notice because they're going to go somewhere else. What then? It's one of those things where you owe your employer a duty of confidentiality, you owe them a responsibility to do your best work, to conduct yourself in an ethical manner, but I don't believe you owe them loyalty in the sense of advancing their interests ahead of what's best for you and your career arc.And what's right for any given person is, of course, a nuanced and challenging thing. For some folks, yeah, going out somewhere else for more money doesn't really change anything and is not what they should optimize for. For other folks, it's everything. And I don't think either of those takes is necessarily wrong. I think it comes down to it depends on who you are, and what your situation is, and what's right for you.Brian: Yeah. I totally agree. For early in career, in particular, I have been a part of—I grew up in the early versions of the campus hiring program at Microsoft, and then hired 500-plus, probably, people into my teams who were from that.Corey: You also do the same thing at AWS if I'm not mistaken. You launched their first college hiring program that I recall seeing, or at least that's what scuttlebutt has it.Brian: Yes. You're well-connected, Corey. We started something called the Product Marketing Leadership Development Program when I was in AWS marketing. And then one year, we hired 20 people out of college into my organization. And it was not easy to do because it meant using, quote-unquote, “Tenured headcount” in order to do it. There wasn't some special dispensation because they were less paid or anything, and in a world where headcount is a unit of work, effectively.And then I'm at Google now, in the Google Cloud division, and we have a wonderful program that I think is really well done, called the Associate Product Marketing Manager Program, APMM. And what I'd say is for the people early in career, if you get the opportunity to have a manager who's super supportive, in a system that is built to try and grow you, it's a wonderful opportunity. And by ‘system built to grow you,' it really is, do you have the support to get taught what you need to get taught on the job? Are you getting new opportunities to learn new things and do new things at a rapid clip? Are you shipping things into the market such that you can see the response and learn from that response, versus just getting people's internal opinions, and then are people stretching roles in order to make them amenable for someone early in career?And if you're in a system that gives you that opportunity—like let's take your example earlier. A person who has a manager who's greatly supportive of them and they feel like they're learning a lot, that manager leaves, if that system is right, there's another manager, or there's an opportunity to put your hand up and say, “Hey, I think I need a new place,” and that will be supported.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. 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Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I have a history of mostly working in small companies, to the point where I consider a big company to be one that has more than 200 employees, so, the idea of radically transitioning and changing teams has never really been much on the table as I look at my career trajectory and my career arc. I have seen that I've gotten significant 30% raises by changing jobs. I am hard-pressed to identify almost anyone who has gotten that kind of raise in a single year by remaining at a company.Brian: One hundred percent. Like, I know of people who have, but it—Corey: It happens, but it's—Brian: —is very rare.Corey: —it's very rare.Brian: It's, it's, it's almost the, the, um, the example that proves the point. I getting that totally wrong. But yes, it's very rare, but it does happen. And I think if you get that far out of whack, yes. You should… you should go reset, especially if the other attributes are fine and you don't feel like you're just going to get mercenary pay.What I always try and advise people is, in the bigger companies, you want to be a good deal. You don't want to be a great deal or a bad deal. Where a great deal is you're getting significantly underpaid, a bad deal is, “Uh oh. We hired this person to [laugh] senior,” or, “We promoted them too early,” because then the system is not there to help you, honestly, in the grand scheme of things. A good deal means, “Hey, I feel like I'm getting better work from this person for what we are giving them than what the next clear alternative would be. Let's support them and help them grow.” Because at some level, part of your compensation is getting your company to create opportunities for you to grow. And part of the reason people go to a manager is they know they'll give them that compensation.Corey: I am learning this the interesting way, as we wind up hiring and building out our, currently, nine-person company. It's challenging for us to build those opportunities while bootstrapped, but it is incumbent upon us, you're right. That is a role of management is how do you identify growth opportunities for people, ideally, while remaining at the company, but sometimes that means that helping them land somewhere else is the right path for their next growth step.Brian: Well, that brings up a word for managers. What you pay your employees—and I'm talking big company here, not people like yourself, Corey, where you have to decide whether you reinvesting money or putting in an individual.Corey: Oh, yes—Brian: But at big companies—Corey: —a lot of things that apply when you own a company are radically departed from—Brian: Totally.Corey: —what is—Brian: Totally.Corey: —common guidance.Brian: Totally. At a big company, managers, you get zero credit for how much your employees get paid, what their raise is, whether they get promoted or not in the grand scheme of things. That is the company running their system. Yes, you helped and the like, but it's—like, when people tell me, “Hey, Brian, thank you for supporting my promotion.” My answer is always, “Thank you for having earned it. It's my job to go get credit where credit is due.” And that's not a big part of my job, and I honestly believe that.Where you do get credit with people, where you do show that you're a good manager is when you have the conversations with them that are harder for other people to have, but actually make them better; when you encourage them in the right way so that they grow faster; when you treat them fairly as a human being, and mostly when you do the thing that seems like it's against your own interest.Corey: That resonates. The moments of my career as a manager that I'm proud of stuff are the ones that I would call borderline subversive: telling a candidate to take the competing offer because they're going to have a better time somewhere else is one of those. But my philosophy ties back to the idea of job-hopping, where I'm going to know these people for longer than either of us are going to remain in our current role, on some level. I am curious what your approach is, given that you are now at the, I guess, other end for folks who are just starting out. How do you go about getting people into Cloud marketing? And, on some level, wouldn't you consider that being a form of abuse?Brian: [laugh]. It depends on whether they get to work with you or not, Corey.Corey: There is that.Brian: I won't tell you which one's abuse or not. So first, getting people into cloud marketing is getting people who do not have deeply technical backgrounds in most cases, oftentimes fantastic—people who are fantastic at understanding other people and communicating really well, and it gives them an opportunity to be in tech in one of the fastest-growing, fastest-changing spaces in the world. And so to go to a psych major, a marketing major, an American studies major, a history major, who can understand complex things and then communicate really well, and say, “Hey, I have an opportunity for you to join the fastest growing space in technology,” is often compelling.But their question kind of is, “Hey, will I be able to do it?” And the answer has to be, “Hey, we have a program that helps you learn, and we have a set of managers who know how to teach, and we create opportunities for you to learn on the job, and we're invested in you for more than a short period of time.” With that case, I've been able to hire and grow and work with, in some cases, people for over 15 years now that I worked with at Microsoft. I'm still in touch with many of the people from the Product Marketing Leadership Development Program at AWS. And we have a fantastic set of APMMs at Google, and it creates a wonderful opportunity for them.Increasingly, we're also seeing that it is one of the best ways to find people from many backgrounds. We don't just show up at the big CompSci schools. We're getting some wonderful, wonderful people from all the states in the nation, from the historically black colleges and universities, from majors that tend to represent very different groups than the traditional tech audiences. And so it's been a great source of broadening our talent pool, too.Corey: There's a lot to be said for having people who've been down this path and seeing the failure modes, reaching out to make so that the next generation—for lack of a better term—has an easier time than we did. The term I've heard for the concept is ‘send the elevator back down,' which is important. I think it's—otherwise we wind up with a whole industry that looks an awful lot like it did 20 years ago, and that's not ideal for anyone. The paths that you and I walked are closed, so sitting here telling people they should do what we did has very strong, ‘Okay, Boomer' energy to it.Brian: [laugh].Corey: There are different paths, and the world and industry are changing radically.Brian: Absolutely. And my—like, the biggest thing that I'd say here is—and again, just coming back to the one thing we disagreed on—look at the bigger picture and own your career. I would never say that isn't the case, but the bigger picture means not just what you're getting paid tomorrow, but are you learning more? What new options is it creating for you? And when I speak options, I mean, will you have more jobs that you can do that excite you after you do that job? And those things matter in addition to the pay.Corey: I would agree with that. Money is not everything, but it's also not nothing.Brian: Absolutely.Corey: I will say though you spent 20 years at Microsoft. I have no doubt that you are incredibly adept at managing your career, at managing corporate politics, at advancing your career and your objectives and your goals and your aspirations within Microsoft, but how does that translate to companies that have radically different corporate cultures? We see this all the time with founders who are ex-Google or ex-Microsoft, and suddenly it turns out that the things that empower them to thrive in the large corporate environment doesn't really work when you're a five-person startup, and you don't have an entire team devoted to that one thing that needs to get done.Brian: So, after Microsoft, I went to a company called Doppler Labs for a year. It was a pretty well-funded startup that made smart earbuds—this was before AirPods had even come out—and I was really nervous about the going from big company to startup thing, and I actually found that move pretty easy. I've always been kind of a hands-on, do-it-yourself, get down in the details manager, and that's served me well. And so getting into a startup and saying, “Hey, I get to just do stuff,” was almost more fun. And so after that—we ended up folding, but it was a wonderful ride; that's a much longer conversation—when I got to Amazon and I was in AWS—and by the way, the one division I never worked at Microsoft was Azure or its predecessor server and tools—and so part of the allure of AWS was not only was it another trillion-dollar company in my backwater hometown, but it was also cloud computing, was the space that I didn't know well.And they knew that I knew the discipline of product marketing and a bunch of other things quite well, and so I got that opportunity. But I did realize about four months in, “Oh, crap. Part of the reason that I was really successful at Microsoft is I knew how everything worked.” I knew where things have been tried and failed, I knew who to go ask about how to do things, and I knew none of that at Amazon. And it is a—a lot of what allows you to move fast, make good decisions, and frankly, be politically accepted, is understanding all that context that nobody can just tell you. So, I will say there is a cost in terms of your productivity and what you're able to get done when you move from a place that you're good at to a place that you're not good at yet.Corey: Way back in episode 10 of this podcast—as we get suspiciously close to 300 as best I can tell—I had Lynn Langit get on as a guest. And she was in the Microsoft MVP program, the AWS Hero program, and the Google Expert program. All three at once—Brian: Lynn is fantastic.Corey: It really is.Brian: Lynn is fantastic.Corey: I can only assume that you listened to that podcast and decided, huh, all three, huh? I can beat that. And decided that—Brian: [laugh].Corey: —instead of being in the volunteer to do work for enormous multinational companies group, you said, “No, no, no. I'm going to be a VP in all three of those.” And here we are. Now that you are at Google, you have checked all three boxes. What is the next mountain to climb for you?Brian: I have no clue. I have no clue. And honestly—again, I don't know how much of this is privilege versus by being forward-looking. I've honestly never known where the heck I was going to go in my career. I've just said, “Hey, let's have a journey, and let's optimize for doing something you want to do that is going to create more opportunities for you to do something you want to do.”And so even when I left Microsoft, I was in a great position. I ran the Surface business, and HoloLens, and a whole bunch of other stuff that was really fun, but I also woke up one day and realized, “Oh, my gosh. I've been at Microsoft for 20 years. If I stay here for the next job, I'm earning the right to get another job at Microsoft, more so than anything else, and there's a big world out there that I want to explore a bit.” And so I did the startup; it was fun, I then thought I'd do another startup, but I didn't want to commute to San Francisco, which I had done.And then I found most of the really, really interesting startups in Seattle were cloud-related and I had this opportunity to learn about cloud from, arguably, one of the best with AWS. And then when I left AWS, I left not knowing what I was going to do, and I kind of thought, “Okay, now I'm going to do another cloud-oriented startup.” And Google came, and I realized I had this opportunity to learn from another company. But I don't know what's next. And what I'm going to do is try and do this job as best I can, get it to the point where I feel like I've done a job, and then I'll look at what excites me looking forward.Corey: And we will, of course, hold on to this so we can use it for your performance review, whenever that day comes.Brian: [laugh].Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time to speak with me today. If people care more about what you have to say, perhaps you're hiring, et cetera, et cetera, where can they find you?Brian: Twitter, IsForAt: I-S-F-O-R-A-T. I'm certainly on Twitter. And if you want to connect professionally, I'm happy to do that on LinkedIn.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to those things in the [show notes 00:36:03]. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it. I know you have a busy week of, presumably, attempting to give terrible names to various cloud services.Brian: Thank you, Corey. Appreciate you having me.Corey: Indeed. Brian Hall, VP of Product and Industry Marketing at Google Cloud. I am Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an insulting comment in the form of a PowerPoint deck.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Living Unscripted Podcast
#BehindTheBROADcasters - How To Stuff A Senator Into An RV

Living Unscripted Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 22:46


This week was Silicon Slopes Summit aka THE tech event of the year. We rubbed shoulders with some of the biggest names in the industry...and by rubbed shoulders we mean, Caitlin may have gently assaulted Mitt Romney and Steve Ballmer, it's fine. Also, Dwayne Wade was the man, oh and Apple's CEO, Tim Cook, did not confirm or deny whether Steve Jobs is still alive. So, there's that. We are breaking down the week from our POV...and we think we're hilarious. #BehindTheBROADcasters is where we share our opinions and get vulnerable with you. No guests. Just US, Brooke and Caitlin, and our soapbox of course. We are peeling back the layers and going UNSCRIPTED about whatever we feel like. No offense intended, but ya know, we can be offensive so hang on for the ride and grow some thick skin.   SPONSORS Silicon Slopes https://siliconslopes.com/ https://www.instagram.com/siliconslopes/?hl=en   FOLLOW US Follow Living Unscripted Podcast https://www.instagram.com/livingunscriptedpodcast/?hl=en Follow Caitlin https://www.instagram.com/caitlinhhansen/?hl=en Follow Brooke https://www.instagram.com/brooke_mangum/?hl=en Subscribe to our YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYoaGeTb_LnJ-qKNRcWUeUA?sub_confirmation=1

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Lessons from the Silicon Slopes Tech Summit

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 7:40


Strictly Business
Steve Ballmer Builds a Basketball Mecca for the Future

Strictly Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:50


Los Angeles Clippers chairman Steve Ballmer outlines his vision for his “mecca” of basketball with team's new arena that is scheduled to open in Inglewood, Calif. in 2024. Ballmer enthusiastically describes the cutting-edge tech touches and focus on sustainability that went into the design. And he weighs in on the future of NBA's television rights deals at the national and local levels.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Strictly Business
Steve Ballmer Builds a Basketball Mecca for the Future

Strictly Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:50


Los Angeles Clippers chairman Steve Ballmer outlines his vision for his “mecca” of basketball with team's new arena that is scheduled to open in Inglewood, Calif. in 2024. Ballmer enthusiastically describes the cutting-edge tech touches and focus on sustainability that went into the design. And he weighs in on the future of NBA's television rights deals at the national and local levels.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Screaming in the Cloud
What GitHub Can Give to Microsoft with Jason Warner

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:47


About JasonJason is now the Managing Director at Redpoint Ventures.Links: GitHub: https://github.com/ @jasoncwarner: https://twitter.com/jasoncwarner GitHub: https://github.com/jasoncwarner Jasoncwarner/ama: https://github.com/jasoncwarner/ama TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined this week by Jason Warner, the Chief Technology Officer at GifHub, although he pronounces it differently. Jason, welcome to the show.Jason: Thanks, Corey. Good to be here.Corey: So, GitHub—as you insist on pronouncing it—is one of those companies that's been around for a long time. In fact, I went to a training conducted by one of your early folks, Scott Chacon, who taught how Git works over the course of a couple of days, and honestly, I left more confused than I did when I entered. It's like, “Oh, this is super awful. Good thing I'll never need to know this because I'm not really a developer.” And I'm still not really a developer and I still don't really know how Git works, but here we are.And it's now over a decade later; you folks have been acquired by Microsoft, and you are sort of the one-stop-shop, from the de facto perspective of, “I'm going to go share some code with people on the internet. I'll use GitHub to do it.” Because, you know, copying and pasting and emailing Microsoft Word documents around isn't ideal.Jason: That is right. And I think that a bunch of things that you mentioned there, played into, you know, GitHub's early and sustained success. But my God, do you remember the old days when people had to email tar files around or drop them in weird spots?Corey: What the hell do you mean, by, “Old days?” It still blows my mind that the Linux kernel is managed by—they use Git, obviously. Linus Torvalds did write Git once upon a time—and it has the user interface you would expect for that. And the way that they collaborate is not through GitHub or anything like that. No, they use Git to generate patches, which they then email to the mailing list. Which sounds like I'm making it up, like, “Oh, well, yeah, tell another one, but maybe involve a fax machine this time.” But no, that is actually what they do.Jason: It blew my mind when I saw that, too, by the way. And you realize, too, that workflows are workflows, and people will build interesting workflows to solve their use case. Now, obviously, anyone that you would be talking to in 2021, if you walked in and said, “Yeah, install Git. Let's set up an email server and start mailing patches to each other and we're going to do it this way.” They would just kind of politely—or maybe impolitely—show you out of the room, and rightfully [laugh] so. But it works for one of the most important software projects in history: Linux.Corey: Yeah, and it works almost in spite of itself to some extent. You've come a long way as a company because initially, it was, “Oh, there's this amazing, decentralized version control system. How do we make it better? I know, we're going to take off the decentralized part of it and give it a central point that everything can go through.” And collaboratively, it works well, but I think that viewing GitHub as a system that is used to sell free Git repositories to people is rather dramatically missing the point. It feels like it's grown significantly beyond just code repository hosting. Tell me more about that.Jason: Absolutely. I remember talking to a bunch of folks right around when I was joining GitHub, and you know, there was still talk about GitHub as, you know, GitHub for lawyers, or GitHub for doctors, or what could you do in a different way? And you know, social coding as an aspect, and maybe turning into a social network with a resume. And all those things are true to a percentage standpoint. But what GitHub should be in the world is the world's most important software development platform, end-to-end software development platform.We obviously have grown a bunch since me joining in that way which we launched dependency management packages, Actions with built-in CI, we've got some deployment mechanisms, we got advanced security underneath it, we've Codespaces in beta and alpha on top of it now. But if you think about GitHub as, join, share, and see other people's code, that's evolution one. If you see it as world's largest, maybe most developed software development platform, that's evolution two, and in my mind, its natural place where it should be, given what it has done already in the world, is become the world's most important software company. I don't mean the most profitable. I just mean the most important.Corey: I would agree. I had a blog post that went up somewhat recently about the future of cloud being Microsoft's to lose. And it's not because Azure is the best cloud platform out there, with respect, and I don't need you to argue the point. It is very clearly not. It is not like other clouds, but I can see a path to where it could become far better than it is.But if I'm out there and I'm just learning how to write code—because I make terrible life choices—and I go to a boot camp or I follow a tutorial online or I take a course somewhere, I'm going to be writing code probably using VS Code, the open-source editor that you folks launched after the acquisition. And it was pretty clear that Atom wasn't quite where the world was going. Great. Then I'm going to host it on GitHub, which is a natural evolution. Then you take a look at things like GitHub Actions that build in CI/CD pipelines natively.All that's missing is a ‘Deploy to Azure' button that is the next logical step, and you're mostly there for an awful lot of use cases. But you can't add that button until Azure itself gets better. Done right, this has the potential to leave, effectively, every other cloud provider in the dust because no one can touch this.Jason: One hundred percent. I mean, the obvious thing that any other cloud should be looking at with us—or should have been before the acquisition, looking at us was, “Oh, no, they could jump over us. They could stop our funnel.” And I used internal metrics when I was talking to them about partnership that led to the sale, which was I showed them more about their running business than they knew about themselves. I can tell them where they were stacked-ranked against each other, based on the ingress and egress of all the data on GitHub, you know, and various reactions to that in those meetings was pretty astounding.And just with that data alone, it should tell you what GitHub would be capable of and what Azure would be capable of in the combination of those two things. I mean, you did mention the ‘Deploy to Azure' button; this has been a topic, obviously, pre and post-acquisition, which is, “When is that coming?” And it was the one hard rule I set during the acquisition was, there will be no ‘Deploy to Azure' button. Azure has to earn the right to get things deployed to, in my opinion. And I think that goes to what you're saying is, if we put a ‘Deploy to Azure' button on top of this and Azure is not ready for that, or is going to fail, ultimately, that looks bad for all of us. But if it earned the right and it gets better, and it becomes one of those, then, you know, people will choose it, and that is, to me, what we're after.Corey: You have to choose the moment because if you do it too soon, you'll set the entire initiative back five years. Do it too late, and you get leapfrogged. There's a golden window somewhere and finding it is going to be hard. And I think it's pretty clear that the other hyperscalers in this space are learning, or have learned, that the next 10 years of cloud or 15 years of cloud or whatever they want to call it, and the new customers that are going to come are not the same as the customers that have built the first half of the business. And they're trying to wrap their heads around that because a lot of where the growth is going to come from is established blue chips that are used to thinking in very enterprise terms.And people think I'm making fun of them when I say this, but Microsoft has 40 years' experience apologizing to enterprises for computer failures. And that is fundamentally what cloud is. It's about talking computers to business executives because as much as we talk about builders, that is not the person at an established company with an existing IT estate, who gets to determine where $50 million a year in cloud-spend is going to go.Jason: It's [laugh] very, [laugh] very true. I mean, we've entered a different spot with cloud computing in the bell curve of adoption, and if you think that they will choose the best technology every time, well, history of computing is littered with better technologies that have failed because the distribution was better on one side. As you mentioned, Microsoft has 40 years, and I wager that Microsoft has the best sales organizations and the best enterprise accounts and, you know, all that sort of stuff, blah, blah, blah, on that side of the world than anyone in the industry. They can sell to enterprises better than almost anyone in the industry. And the other hyperscalers—there's a reason why [TK 00:08:34] is running Google Cloud right now. And Amazon, classically, has been very, very bad assigned to the enterprises. They just happened to be the first mover.Corey: In the early days, it was easy. You'd have an Amazon salesperson roll up to a company, and the exec would say, “Great, why should we consider running things on AWS?” And the answer was, “Oh, I'm sorry, wrong conversation. Right now you have 80 different accounts scattered throughout your org. I'm just here to help you unify them, get some visibility into it, and possibly give you a discount along the way.” And it was a different conversation. Shadow IT was the sole driver of cloud adoption for a long time. That is no longer true. It has to go in the front door, and that is a fundamental shift in how you go to market.Jason: One hundred percent true, and it's why I think that Microsoft has been so successful with Azure, in the last, let's call it five years in that, is that the early adopters in the second wave are doing that; they're all enterprise IT, enterprise dev shops who are buying from the top down. Now, there is still the bottoms-up adoption that going to be happening, and obviously, bottom-up adoption will happen still going forward, but we've entered the phase where that's not the primary or sole mechanism I should say. The sole mechanism of buying in. We have tops-down selling still—or now.Corey: When Microsoft announced it was acquiring GitHub, there was a universal reaction of, “Oh, shit.” Because it's Microsoft; of course they're going to ruin GitHub. Is there a second option? No, unless they find a way to ruin it twice. And none of it came to pass.It is uniformly excellent, and there's a strong argument that could be made by folks who are unaware of what happened—I'm one of them, so maybe I'm right, maybe I'm wrong—that GitHub had a positive effect on Microsoft more than Microsoft had an effect on GitHub. I don't know if that's true or not, but I could believe it based upon what I've seen.Jason: Obviously, the skepticism was well deserved at the time of acquisition, let's just be honest with it, particularly given what Microsoft's history had been for about 15—well, 20 years before, previous to Satya joining. And I was one of those people in the late '90s who would write ‘M$' in various forums. I was 18 or 19 years old, and just got into—Corey: Oh, hating Microsoft was my entire personality.Jason: [laugh]. And it was, honestly, well-deserved, right? Like, they had anti-competitive practices and they did some nefarious things. And you know, I talked about Bill Gates as an example. Bill Gates is, I mean, I don't actually know how old he is, but I'm going to guess he's late '50s, early '60s, but he's basically in the redemption phase of his life for his early years.And Microsoft is making up for Ballmer years, and later Gates years, and things of that nature. So, it was well-deserved skepticism, and particularly for a mid-career to older-career crowd who have really grown to hate Microsoft over that time. But what I would say is, obviously, it's different under Satya, and Scott, and Amy Hood, and people like that. And all we really telling people is give us a chance on this one. And I mean, all of us. The people who were running GitHub at the time, including myself and, you know, let Scott and Satya prove that they are who they say they are.Corey: It's one of those things where there's nothing you could have said that would have changed the opinion of the world. It was, just wait and see. And I think we have. It's now, I daresay, gotten to a point where Microsoft announces that they're acquiring some other beloved company, then people, I think, would extend a lot more credit than they did back then.Jason: I have to give Microsoft a ton of credit, too, on this one for the way in which they handled acquisitions, like us and others. And the reason why I think it's been so successful is also the reason why I think so many others die post-acquisition, which is that Microsoft has basically—I'll say this, and I know I won't get fired because it feels like it's true. Microsoft is essentially a PE holding company at this point. It is acquired a whole bunch of companies and lets them run independent. You know, we got LinkedIn, you got Minecraft, Xbox is its own division, but it's effectively its own company inside of it.Azure is run that way. GitHub's got a CEO still. I call it the archipelago model. Microsoft's the landmass underneath the water that binds them all, and finance, and HR, and a couple of other things, but for the most part, we manifest our own product roadmap still. We're not told what to go do. And I think that's why it's successful. If we're going to functionally integrate GitHub into Microsoft, it would have died very quickly.Corey: You clearly don't mix the streams. I mean, your gaming division writes a lot of interesting games and a lot of interesting gaming platforms. And, like, one of the most popularly played puzzle games in the world is a Microsoft property, and that is, of course, logging into a Microsoft account correctly. And I keep waiting for that to bleed into GitHub, but it doesn't. GitHub is a terrific SAML provider, it is stupidly easy to log in, it's great.And at some level, I wish that would bleed into other aspects, but you can't have everything. Tell me what it's like to go through an acquisition from a C-level position. Because having been through an acquisition before, the process looks a lot like a surprise all-hands meeting one day after the markets close and, “Listen up, idiots.” And [laugh] there we go. I have to imagine with someone in your position, it's a slightly different experience.Jason: It's definitely very different for all C-levels. And then myself in particular, as the primary driver of the acquisition, obviously, I had very privy inside knowledge. And so, from my position, I knew what was happening the entire time as the primary driver from the inside. But even so, it's still disconcerting to a degree because, in many ways, you don't think you're going to be able to pull it off. Like, you know, I remember the months, and the nights, and the weekends, and the weekend nights, and all the weeks I spent on the road trying to get all the puzzle pieces lined up for the Googles, or the Microsofts, or the eventually AWSs, the VMwares, the IBMs of the world to take seriously, just from a product perspective, which I knew would lead to, obviously, acquisition conversations.And then, once you get the call from the board that says, “It's done. We signed the letter of intent,” you basically are like, “Oh. Oh, crap. Okay, hang on a second. I actually didn't—I don't actually believe in my heart of hearts that I was going to actually be able to pull that off.” And so now, you probably didn't plan out—or at least I didn't. I was like, “Shit if we actually pulled this off what comes next?” And I didn't have that what comes next, which is odd for me. I usually have some sort of a loose plan in place. I just didn't. I wasn't really ready for that.Corey: It's got to be a weird discussion, too, when you start looking at shopping a company around to be sold, especially one at the scale of GitHub because you're at such a high level of visibility in the entire environment, where—it's the idea of would anyone even want to buy us? And then, duh, of course they would. And you look the hyperscalers, for example. You have, well, you could sell it to Amazon and they could pull another Cloud9, where they shove it behind the IAM login process, fail to update the thing meaningfully over a period of years, to a point where even now, a significant portion of the audience listening to this is going to wonder if it's a service I just made up; it sounds like something they might have done, but Cloud9 sounds way too inspired for an AWS service name, so maybe not. And—which it is real. You could go sell to Google, which is going to be awesome until some executive changes roles, and then it's going to be deprecated in short order.Or then there's Microsoft, which is the wild card. It's, well, it's Microsoft. I mean, people aren't really excited about it, but okay. And I don't think that's true anymore at all. And maybe I'm not being fair to all the hyperscalers there. I mean, I'm basically insulting everyone, which is kind of my shtick, but it really does seem that Microsoft was far and away the best acquirer possible because it has been transformative. My question—if you can answer it—is, how the hell did you see that beforehand? It's only obvious—even knowing what I know now—in hindsight.Jason: So, Microsoft was a target for me going into it, and the reason why was I thought that they were in the best overall position. There was enough humility on one side, enough hubris on another, enough market awareness, probably, organizational awareness to, kind of, pull it off. There's too much hubris on one side of the fence with some of the other acquirers, and they would try to hug us too deeply, or integrate us too quickly, or things of that nature. And I think it just takes a deep understanding of who the players are and who the egos involved are. And I think egos has actually played more into acquisitions than people will ever admit.What I saw was, based on the initial partnership conversations, we were developing something that we never launched before GitHub Actions called GitHub Launch. The primary reason we were building that was GitHub launches a five, six-year journey, and it's got many, many different phases, which will keep launching over the next couple of years. The first one we never brought to market was a partnership between all of the clouds. And it served a specific purpose. One, it allowed me to get into the room with the highest level executive at every one of those companies.Two allow me to have a deep economic conversation with them at a partnership level. And three, it allowed me to show those executives that we knew what GitHub's value was in the world, and really flip the tables around and say, “We know what we're worth. We know what our value is in the world. We know where we sit from a product influence perspective. If you want to be part of this, we'll allow it.” Not, “Please come work with us.” It was more of a, “We'll allow you to be part of this conversation.”And I wanted to see how people reacted to that. You know how Amazon reacted that told me a lot about how they view the world, and how Google reacted to that showed me exactly where they viewed it. And I remember walking out of the Google conversation, feeling a very specific way based upon the reaction. And you know, when I talked to Microsoft, got a very different feel and it, kind of, confirmed a couple of things. And then when I had my very first conversation with Nat, who have known for a while before that, I realized, like, yep, okay, this is the one. Drive hard at this.Corey: If you could do it all again, would you change anything meaningful about how you approached it?Jason: You know, I think I got very lucky doing a couple of things. I was very intentional aspects of—you know, I tried to serendipitously show up, where Diane Greene was at one point, or a serendipitously show up where Satya or Scott Guthrie was, and obviously, that was all intentional. But I never sold a company like this before. The partnership and the product that we were building was obviously very intentional. I think if I were to go through the sale, again, I would probably have tried to orchestrate at least one more year independent.And it's not—for no other reason alone than what we were building was very special. And the world sees it now, but I wish that the people who built it inside GitHub got full credit for it. And I think that part of that credit gets diffused to saying, “Microsoft fixed GitHub,” and I want the people inside GitHub to have gotten a lot more of that credit. Microsoft obviously made us much better, but that was not specific to Microsoft because we're run independent; it was bringing Nat in and helping us that got a lot of that stuff done. Nat did a great job at those things. But a lot of that was already in play with some incredible engineers, product people, and in particular our sales team and finance team inside of GitHub already.Corey: When you take a look across the landscape of the fact that GitHub has become for a certain subset of relatively sad types of which I'm definitely one a household name, what do you think the biggest misconception about the company is?Jason: I still think the biggest misconception of us is that we're a code host. Every time I talk to the RedMonk folks, they get what we're building and what we're trying to be in the world, but people still think of us as SourceForge-plus-plus in many ways. And obviously, that may have been our past, but that's definitely not where we are now and, for certain, obviously, not our future. So, I think that's one. I do think that people still, to this day, think of GitLab as one of our main competitors, and I never have ever saw GitLab as a competitor.I think it just has an unfortunate naming convention, as well as, you know, PRs, and MRs, and Git and all that sort of stuff. But we take very different views of the world in how we're approaching things. And then maybe the last thing would be that what we're doing at the scale that we're doing it as is kind of easy. When I think that—you know, when you're serving almost every developer in the world at this point at the scale at which we're doing it, we've got some scale issues that people just probably will never thankfully encounter for themselves.Corey: Well, everyone on Hacker News believes that they will, as soon as they put up their hello world blog, so Kubernetes is the only way to do anything now. So, I'm told.Jason: It's quite interesting because I think that everything breaks at scale, as we all know about from the [hyperclouds 00:20:54]. As we've learned, things are breaking every day. And I think that when you get advice, either operational, technical, or managerial advice from people who are running 10 person, 50 person companies, or X-size sophisticated systems, it doesn't apply. But for whatever reason, I don't know why, but people feel inclined to give that feedback to engineers at GitHub directly, saying, “If you just…” and in many [laugh] ways, you're just like, “Well, I think that we'll have that conversation at some point, you know, but we got a 100-plus-million repos and 65 million developers using us on a daily basis.” It's a very different world.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: One of the things that I really appreciate personally because, you know, when you see something that company does, it's nice to just thank people from time to time, so I'm inviting the entire company on the podcast one by one, at some point, to wind up thanking them all individually for it, but Codespaces is one of those things that I think is transformative for me. Back in the before times, and ideally the after times, whenever I travel the only computer I brought with me for a few years now has been an iPad or an iPad Pro. And trying to get an editor on that thing that works reasonably well has been like pulling teeth, my default answer has just been to remote into an EC2 instance and use vim like I have for the last 20 years. But Code is really winning me over. Having to play with code-server and other things like that for a while was obnoxious, fraught, and difficult.And finally, we got to a point where Codespaces was launched, and oh, it works on an iPad. This is actually really slick. I like this. And it was the thing that I was looking for but was trying to have to monkey patch together myself from components. And that's transformative.It feels like we're going back in many ways—at least in my model—to the days of thin clients where all the heavy lifting was done centrally on big computers, and the things that sat on people's desks were mostly just, effectively, relatively simple keyboard, mouse, screen. Things go back and forth and I'm sure we'll have super powerful things in our pockets again soon, but I like the interaction model; it solves for an awful lot of problems and that's one of the things that, at least from my perspective, that the world may not have fully wrapped it head around yet.Jason: Great observation. Before the acquisition, we were experimenting with a couple of different editors, that we wanted to do online editors. And same thing; we were experimenting with some Action CI stuff, and it just didn't make sense for us to build it; it would have been too hard, there have been too many moving parts, and then post-acquisition, we really love what the VS Code team was building over there, and you could see it; it was just going to work. And we had this one person, well, not one person. There was a bunch of people inside of GitHub that do this, but this one person at the highest level who's just obsessed with make this work on my iPad.He's the head of product design, his name's Max, he's an ex-Heroku person as well, and he was just obsessed with it. And he said, “If it works on my iPad, it's got a chance to succeed. If it doesn't work on my iPad, I'm never going to use this thing.” And the first time we booted up Codespaces—or he booted it up on the weekend, working on it. Came back and just, “Yep. This is going to be the one. Now, we got to work on those, the sanding the stones and those fine edges and stuff.”But it really does unlock a lot for us because, you know, again, we want to become the software developer platform for everyone in the world, you got to go end-to-end, and you got to have an opinion on certain things, and you got to enable certain functionality. You mentioned Cloud9 before with Amazon. It was one of the most confounding acquisitions I've ever seen. When they bought it I was at Heroku and I thought, I thought at that moment that Amazon was going to own the next 50 years of development because I thought they saw the same thing a lot of us at Heroku saw, and with the Cloud9 acquisition, what they were going to do was just going to stomp on all of us in the space. And then when it didn't happen, we just thought maybe, you know, okay, maybe something else changed. Maybe we were wrong about that assumption, too. But I think that we're on to it still. I think that it just has to do with the way you approach it and, you know, how you design it.Corey: Sorry, you just said something that took me aback for a second. Wait, you mean software can be designed? It's not this emergent property of people building thing on top of thing? There's actually a grand plan behind all these things? I've only half kidding, on some level, where if you take a look at any modern software product that is deployed into the world, it seems impossible for even small aspects of it to have been part of the initial founding design. But as a counterargument, it would almost have to be for a lot of these things. How do you square that circle?Jason: I think you have to, just like anything on spectrums and timelines, you have to flex at various times for various things. So, if you think about it from a very, very simple construct of time, you just have to think of time horizons. So, I have an opinion about what GitHub should look like in 10 years—vaguely—in five years much more firmly, and then very, very concretely, for the next year, as an example. So, a lot of the features you might see might be more emergent, but a lot of long-term work togetherness has to be loosely tied together with some string. Now, that string will be tightened over time, but it loosely has to see its way through.And the way I describe this to folks is that you don't wake up one day and say, “I'm going on vacation,” and literally just throw a finger on the map. You have to have some sort of vague idea, like, “Hey, I want to have a beach vacation,” or, “I want to have an adventure vacation.” And then you can kind of pick a destination and say, “I'm going to Hawaii,” or, “I'm going to San Diego.” And if you're standing on the East Coast knowing you're going to San Diego, you basically know that you have to just start marching west, or driving west, or whatever. And now, you don't have to have the route mapped out just yet, but you know that hey, if I'm going due southeast, I'm off course, so how do I reorient to make sure I'm still going in the right direction?That's basically what I think about as high-level, as scale design. And it's not unfair to say that a lot of the stuff is not designed today. Amazon is very famous for not designing anything; they design a singular service. But there's no cohesiveness to what Amazon—or AWS specifically, I should say, in this case—has put out there. And maybe that's not what their strategy is. I don't know the internal workings of them, but it's very clear.Corey: Well, oh, yeah. When I first started working in the AWS space and looking through the console, it like, “What is this? It feels like every service's interface was designed by a different team, but that would—oh…” and then the light bulb went on. Yeah. You ship your culture.Jason: It's exactly it. It works for them, but I think if you're going to try to do something very, very, very different, you know, it's going to look a certain way. So, intentional design, I think, is part of what makes GitHub and other products like it special. And if you think about it, you have to have an end-to-end view, and then you can build verticals up and down inside of that. But it has to work on the horizontal, still.And then if you hire really smart people to build the verticals, you get those done. So, a good example of this is that I have a very strong opinion about the horizontal workflow nature of GitHub should look like in five years. I have a very loose opinion about what the matrix build system of Actions looks like. Because we have very, very smart people who are working on that specific problem, so long as that maps back and snaps into the horizontal workflows. And that's how it can work together.Corey: So, when you look at someone who is, I don't know, the CTO of a wildly renowned company that is basically still catering primarily to developers slash engineers, but let's be honest, geeks, it's natural to think that, oh, they must be the alpha geek. That doesn't really apply to you from everything I've been able to uncover. Am I just not digging deeply enough, or are you in fact, a terrible nerd?Jason: [laugh]. I am. I'm a terrible nerd. I am a very terrible nerd. I feel very lucky, obviously, to be in the position I'm in right now, in many ways, and people call me up and exactly that.It's like, “Hey, you must be king of the geeks.” And I'm like, “[laugh], ah, funny story here.” But um, you know, I joke that I'm not actually supposed to be in tech in first place, the way I grew up, and where I did, and how, I wasn't supposed to be here. And so, it's serendipitous that I am in tech. And then turns out I had an aptitude for distributed systems, and complex, you know, human systems as well. But when people dig in and they start talking about topics, I'm confounded. I never liked Star Wars, I never like Star Trek. Never got an anime, board games, I don't play video games—Corey: You are going to get letters.Jason: [laugh]. When I was at Canonical, oh, my goodness, the stuff I tried to hide about myself, and, like, learn, like, so who's this Boba Fett dude. And, you know, at some point, obviously, you don't have to pretend anymore, but you know, people still assume a bunch stuff because, quote, “Nerd” quote, “Geek” culture type of stuff. But you know, some interesting facts that people end up being surprised by with me is that, you know, I was very short in high school and I grew in college, so I decided that I wanted to take advantage of my newfound height and athleticism as you grow into your body. So, I started playing basketball, but I obsessed over it.I love getting good at something. So, I'd wake up at four o'clock in the morning, and go shoot baskets, and do drills for hours. Well, I got really good at it one point, and I end up playing in a Pro-Am basketball game with ex-NBA Harlem Globetrotter legends. And that's just not something you hear about in most engineering circles. You might expect that out of a salesperson or a marketing person who played pro ball—or amateur ball somewhere, or college ball or something like that. But not someone who ends up running the most important software company—from a technical perspective—in the world.Corey: It's weird. People counterintuitively think that, on some level, that code is the answer to all things. And that, oh, all this human interaction stuff, all the discussions, all the systems thinking, you have to fit a certain profile to do that, and anyone outside of that is, eh, they're not as valuable. They can get ignored. And we see that manifesting itself in different ways.And even if we take a look at people whose profess otherwise, we take a look at folks who are fresh out of a boot camp and don't understand much about the business world yet; they have transformed their lives—maybe they're fresh out of college, maybe didn't even go to college—and 18 weeks later, they are signing up for six-figure jobs. Meanwhile, you take a look at virtually any other business function, in order to have a relatively comparable degree of earning potential, it takes years of experience and being very focused on a whole bunch of other things. There's a massive distortion around technical roles, and that's a strange and difficult thing to wrap my head around. But as you're talking about it, it goes both ways, too. It's the idea of, “Oh, I'll become technical than branch into other things.” It sounded like you started off instead with a non-technical direction and then sort of adopted that from other sides. Is that right, or am I misremembering exactly how the story unfolds?Jason: No, that's about right. People say, “Hey, when did I start programming?” And it's very in vogue, I think, for a lot of people to say, “I started programming at three years old,” or five years old, or whatever, and got my first computer. I literally didn't get my first computer until I was 18-years-old. And I started programming when I got to a high school co-op with IBM at 17.It was Lotus Notes programming at the time. Had no exposure to it before. What I did, though, in college was IBM told me at the time, they said, “If you get a computer science degree will guarantee you a job.” Which for a kid who grew up the way I grew up, that is manna from heaven type of deal. Like, “You'll guarantee me a job inside where don't have to dig ditches all day or lay asphalt? Oh, my goodness. What's computer science? I'll go figure it out.”And when I got to school, what I realized was I was really far behind. Everyone was that ubergeek type of thing. So, what I did is I tried to hack the system, and what I said was, “What is a topic that nobody else has an advantage on from me?” And so I basically picked the internet because the internet was so new in the mid-'90s that most people were still not fully up to speed on it. And then the underpinnings in the internet, which basically become distributed systems, that's where I started to focus.And because no one had a real advantage, I just, you know, could catch up pretty quickly. But once I got into computers, it turned out that I was probably a very average developer, maybe even below average, but it was the system's thinking that I stood out on. And you know, large-scale distributed systems or architectures were very good for me. And then, you know, that applies not, like, directly, but it applies decently well to human systems. It's just, you know, different types of inputs and outputs. But if you think about organizations at scale, they're barely just really, really, really complex and kind of irrational distributed systems.Corey: Jason, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about who you are, what you're up to, how you think about the world, where can they find you?Jason: Twitter's probably the best place at this point. Just @jasoncwarner on Twitter. I'm very unimaginative. My name is my GitHub handle. It's my Twitter username. And that's the best place that I, kind of, interact with folks these days. I do an AMA on GitHub. So, if you ever want to ask me anything, just kind of go to jasoncwarner/ama on GitHub and drop a question in one of the issues and I'll get to answering that. Yeah, those are the best spots.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to those things in the [show notes 00:33:52]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Jason: Thanks, Corey. It's been fun.Corey: Jason Warner, Chief Technology Officer at GitHub. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review in your podcast platform of choice anyway, along with a comment that includes a patch.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Zero Percent
1 - Zero Percent

Zero Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 18:01


The Jewish People make up just .2% of world population. How does a People that makes up virtually zero percent of humanity have such a huge impact on our world?Check out the Dear Rabbi Podcast at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dear-rabbi/id1565016262Episode Transcript:Mark Twain wrote, "If the statistics are right, the Jews constitute but 1% of the human race. Properly, the Jew ought hardly be heard of, but he is heard of, has always been heard of. He is as prominent on the planet as any other people, and his commercial importance is extravagantly out of proportion to the smallness of his bulk. His contributions to the world's list of great names in literature, science, art, music, finance, medicine, and abstruse learning are also way out of proportion to the weakness of his numbers."This 1% is a gross exaggeration. The Jewish people today actually make up way less than a percent. We make up 0.2% of the world's population. Now, math was never my strong point, but if we're going to round 0.2 to the closest number, that's zero. The Jewish people make up just 0% of world population. Now, how does a people who make up just 0% have such a huge impact on the world? As Mark Twain wrote, "The Jew ought hardly be heard of," and yet we cannot escape the fact that the Jewish people have contributed so much to our world. I'm Menachem Lehrfield, and this is Zero Percent, a podcast where we explore the enormous impact a tiny people has made that enhances and affects all of our lives on a daily basis.We will explore ancient wisdom for modern living. As the second president of the United States, John Adams, said, "I will insist that the Hebrews have done more to civilize men than any other nation. If I were an atheist and believed in blind eternal fate, I should still believe that fate had ordained the Jews to be the most essential instrument for civilizing nations." Whether you love the Jewish people or you hate them, it is very difficult to deny the impact that the Jewish people have had on the world, that the Jewish people have had on civilizing nations. I believe that we have access to the longest-running case study on success.Now, as a Jew, I'm so uncomfortable with the topic of Jewish success, and I know many others are as well. Whenever someone begins talking about how successful the Jewish people are, it naturally makes us uncomfortable, but it's hard to deny the numbers. No matter what your definition of success is, the Jew is over-represented. Perhaps the best benchmark of success is the Nobel Prize. It was established by the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel in 1895. Nobel was most well-known for the discovery of dynamite. And at the end of his life, in his will he bequeathed all of his assets to be used to establish five prizes, which we now know as the Nobel Prize.And they'd go to individuals in recognition of cultural or scientific advances in six categories, literature, chemistry, economics, physics, world peace, and medicine. Between 1901 and 2020, last year, the Nobel Prize has been awarded to more than 900 individuals and organizations. Now, how many of those recipients would you expect to be Jewish? Being that the Jewish people make up just 0.2% of world population, we would expect 1.8 Nobel Prize laureates to be Jewish. That would be the proportionate number based on population. In fact, 208 Jewish people have won Nobel Prizes. 208 is an over-representation of more than 11,500%.That's huge, but it's not just in Nobel Prizes that we see such over-representation. Look at practically every arena that can be measured. Can you imagine the scientific world without the contributions of Einstein to modern physics or Freud to psychoanalysis or Asimov to robotics? The scientific world would be a completely different place. And let's say you're going to look at finance and economics as your benchmark of success. It's interesting to note that according to Forbes, Jews make up 22% of the world's top 50 billionaires, 33% of the world's top 15 billionaires, and 28% of the top 25, not to mention finance household names like Goldman Sachs, Rothschild, Warburg, Kohlberg, Kravis and Roberts, Wells Fargo.What would the world of technology look like without Intel's Andrew Grove and Leslie Vadasz, or Google without Sergey Brin and Larry Page, or Oracle's Larry Ellison, or Microsoft's Steve Ballmer, Dell's Michael Dell, Qualcomm's Irwin Jacobs, Facebook without Mark Zuckerberg or Sheryl Sandberg? And what about medicine? There's an old Jewish joke where a Jewish person is finally elected president of the United States, and he calls up his mother and says, "Mom, I'm the president of the United States. Are you going to come to the inauguration?" And she says, "Well, I've got nothing to wear." So he says, "Ma, I'm going to be the president. I'll get you a dressmaker. She'll make you a beautiful dress. Don't worry about that."And she says, "Well, I only eat kosher." He says, "Ma, I'm the president. I'll get you a kosher meal." She says, "Well, how am I going to get there?" He says, "Mom, I'll send Air Force One to pick you up. Just come to the inauguration." So she comes, and she ends up at the inauguration and she's standing there on the reviewing stand, and on her left are all the Supreme Court justices, and on the right is the president's cabinet. And the ceremony begins, and her son, the new president, raises his hand as he's about to be sworn into office, and his mother nudges the person next to her and says, "You see that guy with his hand up? His brother is a doctor."You may be familiar with the stereotype of the nice Jewish doctor, but it comes from somewhere. Throughout the world, consistently on lists of top doctors, you will find Jewish names. And that's not to mention the enormous Jewish contributions to medical research and pharmacology, including the invention of Prozac, Valium, the synthetic fertilizer, radiation, chemotherapy, the artificial kidney dialysis machine, the defibrillator, the cardiac pacemaker, laser technology, not to be confused with Jewish space lasers, the invention of blood transfusions and penicillin, the mammogram, the pill, vaccines against the deadly polio and hepatitis B and measles, not to mention the vaccinating needle itself.And we can't forget about the enormous impact that Dr. Albert Bourla, the CEO of Pfizer, has had in developing the world's first safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine. And Dr. Bourla is the son of Holocaust survivors. Today, Israel is on the forefront of medical innovation. Israel is the home to Teva, the world's largest generic pharmaceutical company. Israel is number one in the world for medical device patents per capita. The medical technology that's coming out of Israel is the stuff of science fiction. I don't know if you saw the ReWalk, which was featured years ago in the hit show Glee, but it's basically a bionic robotic exoskeleton which allows paraplegics the ability to walk and even run.Runners in London and Tel Aviv have actually completed marathons with the ReWalk. Here are paraplegics that thought they would never walk again, and they're running marathons thanks to Israeli technology. The PillCam, which allows doctors to see the inside of the digestive track without any invasive procedures or colonoscopies or anything. You just swallow a pill and they can see the inside of your body. Or this thing called Bio Weld, which is used now instead of stitches or glue, which uses cold plasma, and within minutes, it seals the wound and disinfects it with almost no scarring and no recovery time.And have you seen this thing called Bio-Retina? It's a technology that restores vision to people blinded by retinal disease. It's basically this tiny implantable device that's inserted into the retina in a 30 minute outpatient procedure, and it turns into an artificial retina that melds to the neurons in the eye. And it charges itself with this pair of glasses that it comes with. And if somebody is blind or visually impaired and that's not an option, there's another Israeli technology called OrCam, which is a camera that magnetically attaches to the side of a pair of glasses. You can barely even see it, and it reads text displayed on any surface, and it can also identify objects or specific faces or amounts of currency or anything that somebody who's visually impaired or blind would need to see.So it has this discreet earpiece which will basically, through audio, tell you everything that you would be seeing with your eyes. So blind people can interact with their world without the need of somebody else. It really gives them a sense of independence. There are so many successful cancer treatments coming out of Israel, and we can spend hours discussing the impact the Jewish people have had in the world of medicine. But let's say you want something a little lighter. Maybe entertainment is your benchmark of success. Well, if it is, six of the eight biggest Hollywood studios were founded by Jews. And still today, the rolling credits of almost every single movie can be confused for a Hebrew school roll call. It's just Jew after Jew after Jew.For full transcript please visit: www.joidenver.com/zeropercent/1---zero-percent

Adam Carolla Show
Part 2: Comedian Pete Lee, plus the News (ACS Sept 30)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 74:38


Comedian Pete Lee is in studio at the top of Part 2, and Adam talks to him about how different their dads were, even though they both grew up getting into fights. Pete also talks about embracing his manliness, getting road head, and receiving boob pics based on the podcasts he appears on. Later they talk about not wanting to censor yourself as a comedian, and watching his mom yell at Gloria Steinem. In the last part of the show, Gina reads news stories about R. Kelly, Bill Cosby, Greta Thunberg, and Steve Ballmer. Please support today's sponsors: XChairAdam.com SimpliSafe.com/ADAM TommyJohn.com/ADAM LiquidIV.com enter ADAM TRICOCatsAndDogs.com Geico.com PlutoTV

Adam Carolla Show
Part 1: Gina Grad Returns! Plus Steakhouse Observations, and Listener Calls (ACS Sept 30)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 73:59


Adam welcomes Gina Grad back to the studio after her wedding weekend. Adam then shares an update on attending Natalia's volleyball game, and the guys complain about the current state of music. Adam also talks about some recent steakhouse observations, and Gina gives a recap of her wedding experience. Later, the guys take some listener calls, and Adam rants about sensitivity training requirements in the workplace. Before the break, the gang talks about the unique storytelling style of Paul Harvey. Please support today's sponsors: XChairAdam.com SimpliSafe.com/ADAM TommyJohn.com/ADAM LiquidIV.com enter ADAM TRICOCatsAndDogs.com Geico.com PlutoTV

The Arash Markazi Show
Kawhi Leonard: "I'm here for the long run."

The Arash Markazi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 42:00


The Mightier 1090's Arash Markazi and producer Ji Hae Wiley talk about Kawhi Leonard saying he wants to be with the Clippers for the long run as the team opens training camp in San Diego. Join the Bleav Network, Arash Markazi and producer Ji Hae Wiley as they talk about all things LA sports related.And do not forget to follow or subscribe to The Arash Markazi Show on Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, & I Heart Radio. Also check out his daily columns on themorningcolumn.comMusic Credit: Alright by Kendrick LamarHumble by Kendrick LamarI Get Around by 2PacTo Live and Die in L.A. by 2PacSocial Media Outlets:Twitter, Instagram & Facebook: @arashmarkazi @1090themightierSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Dunktown
S3E48 -Katie Heindl + NBA Summer Vacations

Dunktown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 49:10


Dancing on a Boat! Katie Heindl (Dishes & Dimes, Uhh Basketball) joins Agata and Anastasia to discuss player summer vacations. Katie shares what makes a perfect vacation, how she spent her summer, and her favorite players to follow. The gang also chats Summer League, Golf Camp, the Amalfi Coast, Dwyane Wade & Gabrielle Union, Serge Ibaka's filming schedule, the Antetokounmpo brothers, JR Smith's college life, LaMelo hates school, Steve Ballmer's enthusiasm, Klay & Rocco, yachts, and the baby Jalens. Did the gang have the best summer ever? Hit play to find out!

Buck Bandit Podcast
STEVE BALLMER DROPS 1.8 BILLION ON CLIPPERS, REED DOLLAZ VS MURDA MOOK & MORE + ALL STAR SPOTLIGHT @Pauly Shore

Buck Bandit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 45:13


On this S2 E33 We talk about @Murda Mook VS @ReedDollazTV Battle, @SteveBallmer Drops 1.8 Billion on New @LA Clippers Stadium, we also discuss the 1st NBA Player Made & Team Made Super Teams + THIS WEEK'S ALL STAR SPOTLIGHT GOES TO @Pauly Shore , Our new Segment called "Things I Never Knew" inspired by @Tony Baker featuring @Real Cole World "Unforgettable Moment" featuring @Taylor Swift @Kanye West "Things to Watch" Featuring Major League Movie @CharlieSheen & @WesleySnipes also @SocialProofPodcast Hosts @BuckBanditReno & @BuckBanditP Sponsers: @BuckBanditStudio & @BuckBanditClothing (Video Version on Youtube & Audio Version on all Platforms) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/buckbanditpodcast/support

Sporticast
Billionaire Ballmer's $1.8 Billion Arena / LeBron's Production Company

Sporticast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 25:55


Scott and Eben discuss Steve Ballmer's plans for the Clippers' new $1.8 billion arena in Los Angeles. They also talk about an investment in LeBron James' media company, SportRadar's IPO and a viral NFL video. 'Sporticast' is a new podcast hosted by business journalists Scott Soshnick and Eben Novy-Williams from Sportico that will deliver the inside scoop on the intersection of money and sports. From billion-dollar valuations to team sales, sponsorship contracts and media rights, go behind the scenes on the deals that power the global sports economy. For more coverage and information, be sure to check out sportico.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lakers Talk with Allen Sliwa
HR 1: AD... Top Five?

Lakers Talk with Allen Sliwa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 52:32


Allen opens talking about Anthony Davis and the question if he is a Top Five talent or Top Five player. Laker fans react. ESPN's Ramona Shelbourne joins Allen and talks about the AD 'Top Five' discussion, Steve Ballmer's comment about Laker fans feeling threatened and Ballmer also owning the Forum now... what will he do with it? Allen ask if Lakers fans are threatened by Ballmer's financial prowess... 

The JAYREELZ Podcast
Padres & Yanks Playoff Hopes Dashed? Cardinals Fly To NL Wild Card! NFL Week 2 Winners/Losers. Concern For Crimson Tide? Koepka/DeChambeau Co-Exist At Ryder Cup? Chara Missing Link For NY!?

The JAYREELZ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 84:00


Autumn is on deck here in 2021, but so is the latest Episode #215 as it delivers nothing but fire, passion and intensity as I bring you up to speed on all that's happening in the world of sports. Here's what's on tap: (5:56) We're into the homestretch of the MLB season and the Wild Card chase is front and center as two of its preseason favorites (i.e. Padres & Yankees) are on the cusp of early vacations this fall. Will they fare well over the last two weeks and make the playoffs? As for the teams that are riding high, the Cardinals are primed to play the winner of the Dodgers or Giants as they've steamrolled to the second spot of the Wild Card race. I'll have an up to the minute recap of all that's going on in the pennant races throughout the AL & NL and put to rest the 2021 NY Mets and the wonderful documentary, Once Upon A Time in Queens, the ESPN 30 For 30 Documentary on the 1986 Mets. (37:14) NFL Week 2 had some tense moments, but overall wasn't captivating any of the fans hearts or imaginations. My winners (Ravens, Raiders) and losers (Saints, Seahawks) highlight this past week, as well as, thoughts on my beloved Steelers in losing to Las Vegas at home, the rest of the schedule this past Sunday and my knockout pick for Week 3. (56:08) Is there concern for the Alabama defense? They displayed a few warts that we haven't seen for some time. Could there be a loss on their schedule in the near future? Is QB Bryce Young on the fast track to a Heisman Trophy? I'll review the latest rankings in this rather quiet Week 3 in college football, with a look to an even quieter Week 4. (1:04:49) The Ryder Cup kicks off the weekend this Friday at Whistling Straits in Wisconsin. How will the Americans play against their brethren overseas? Will the Bryson Dechambeau-Brooks Koepka rivalry come to a boil during this tournament? Also, as good as he's been of late, how is Patrick Cantlay the #1 player in the world? I'll share some thoughts on this. (1:10:00) As NHL training camp approaches, the Islanders signed a player whose career comes full circle, but may be impactful. Is Zdeno Chara the missing piece that the team needs to get themselves to the Stanley Cup? Will his leadership and experience be enough to put them over the top? (1:15:23) The Association is kind of low key, but there are a couple of things to discuss. John Wall and the Rockets have agreed to a divorce. What teams may be in play? The announcement of new Bucks play by play TV announcer is historic. Clippers owner, Steve Ballmer, has his sights set on a new arena in Inglewood to establish some presence and identity in LA, to distance themselves from their current roommates, the Lakers (aka The Expendables). (1:19:23) To wrap up, I'll have my Hero and Zero of the Week. Please subscribe, leave a rating and post a review on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spreaker, Stitcher, Spotify, Luminary, Amazon Music and iHeartRadio or wherever you get your podcasts. If you'd like to contribute to the production of the podcast, please visit my Patreon page at: www.patreon.com/TheJAYREELZPodcast Many thanks for all of your love and support. Intro/outro music by Cyklonus. LINKS TO SUBSCRIBE, RATE & REVIEW: APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-jayreelz-podcast/id1354797894 SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1gkdtgroTFlaqPW1EBjVDr SPREAKER: https://www.spreaker.com/show/the-jayreelz-podcast_2 STITCHER: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/jason-s-nazario/the-jayreelz-podcast iHEARTRADIO: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/256-the-jayreelz-podcast-43104270/ LUMINARY: https://luminarypodcasts.com/listen/jason-s-nazario/the-jayreelz-podcast/f9527dd9-47ea-4ed9-92cf-32af9bfa95ad?country=US SPOTIFY TRAILER: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7nZZlvPRAly5irLRSG2qxq?si=rTKCQKnZRNC_VK-_uIWNJA AMAZON MUSIC: https://www.amazon.com/The-JAYREELZ-Podcast/dp/B08K58SW24/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=the+jayreelz+podcast&qid=1606319520&sr=8-1 SPOTIFY PODCAST LINK: https://open.spotify.com/show/1gkdtgroTFlaqPW1EBjVDr

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers
Steve Ballmer takes shots at Lakers fans while celebrating his future arena. Plus, Kareem talks!

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 40:10


Last Friday, the Clippers officially broke ground on their future arena (the Intuit Dome), set to debut in Inglewood during the 2024-2025 NBA season. As to be expected, their insanely rich, insanely hyper, and occasionally insanely "I said too much" owner Steve Ballmer was at the center of the action. As such, the ceremony was predictably huge on spectacle, and social media wasn't shy about pointing out how bored Kawhi Leonard and Paul George looked while watching much of the pageantry. Then again, that's how Ballmer rolls, and as long as Clipper fans enjoyed it (which they probably did) and the building's great (which it undoubtedly will), these kinda silly aesthetics are irrelevant. The bottom line is the Clippers will have a new home enhancing their identity in L.A. However, Ballmer also took a few unsolicited shots at Laker fans feeling insecure about the Clippers boldly planting their new flag, which feels like a potential repeat of past mistakes poking the bear. Ballmer's not entirely wrong that some Laker fans shouting "I don't care about the Clippers!!!" feels "protest too much." Frankly, Laker fans should care. This team is good, well run and finally has an owner who wants to win. This franchise is no longer a laughingstock walkover. But until the Clippers have WAY more accomplishments to their name, better to just leave the Lakers alone, rather than risk another "Streetlights over Spotlights" embarrassment. And finally, during a great interview with Marc Stein, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar gave his blessing to LeBron James to eventually pass him on the NBA all-time scoring list. The Kamenetzkys discuss what this says about Kareem as a person and a basketball legend, and what people can learn from this attitude. (In the meantime, the entire interview provides another reminder that Kareem is the GOAT of Impressive people.) Hosts: Andy and Brian Kamenetzky SEGMENT 1: The Clippers broke ground on a new arena and holy crap, was the ceremony Ballmer-esque!!! SEGMENT 2: Ballmer took a few shots at insecure Laker fans. Not a wise idea. SEGMENT 3: Kareem's comments about LeBron. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Camello's Corner
"Time For A Fresh Start"

Camello's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 72:40


"Camello's Corner" is joined by NBC Los Angeles sports reporter/writer Michael J Duarte to talk about the Clay Helton firing; who could be the next coach of the Trojans; could interim Donte Williams be a candidate if the team does well; the Dodgers embark on a big road trip, could series against Cincy be a good thing or bad thing in potential Wild Card showdown; the status of Chris Taylor and AJ Pollock; what Gavin Lux has meant since being called up again; Trea Turner and Max Scherzer, best trade deadline deal ever?; the Clippers break ground on a new site in Inglewood to be future home arena; the impact on the team and the city; how owner Steve Ballmer is thinking many moves ahead for the future of the club

Lakers Nation Podcast
Lakers Roster Update, Clippers Throw Shade, Anthony Davis At Center, And More

Lakers Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 54:31


We break down the latest addition (and subtraction) to and from the Lakers' roster, discuss Steve Ballmer's shot at Lakers fans, Anthony Davis playing more center, and tons more...

ClipCast
Clippers Groundbreaking

ClipCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 73:49


Chris Wylde is in the building with Kawhi Leonard, Paul George, Steve Ballmer, Coach Ty Lue and Burbank Hank's favorite Inglewood Mayor Butts for the groundbreaking of the brand new home of the LA Clippers the Intuit Dome Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Arash Markazi Show
Clippers break ground on new arena

The Arash Markazi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 42:00


The Mightier 1090's Arash Markazi and producer Ji Hae Wily talk about the Clippers breaking ground on their new $1 billion arena in Inglewood and talk to Jon Price from SportsInformationTraders.com.Join the Bleav Network, Arash Markazi and producer Ji Hae Wiley as they talk about all things LA sports related.And do not forget to follow or subscribe to The Arash Markazi Show on Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, & I Heart Radio. Also check out his daily columns on themorningcolumn.comMusic Credit: Alright by Kendrick LamarHumble by Kendrick LamarI Get Around by 2PacTo Live and Die in L.A. by 2PacSocial Media Outlets:Twitter, Instagram & Facebook: @arashmarkazi @1090themightierSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Arash Markazi Show
Clippers to break ground on new arena

The Arash Markazi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 42:00


The Mightier 1090's Arash Markazi and producer Ji Hae Wiley talk about the Clippers planning to break ground on their new $1 billion arena next week in Inglewood.Join the Bleav Network, Arash Markazi and producer Ji Hae Wiley as they talk about all things LA sports related.And do not forget to follow or subscribe to The Arash Markazi Show on Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, & I Heart Radio. Also check out his daily columns on themorningcolumn.comMusic Credit: Alright by Kendrick LamarHumble by Kendrick LamarI Get Around by 2PacTo Live and Die in L.A. by 2PacSocial Media Outlets:Twitter, Instagram & Facebook: @arashmarkazi @1090themightierSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Green Connections Radio -  Women Who Innovate With Purpose, & Career Issues, Including in Energy, Sustainability, Responsibil

Earth's Data Speaks - Olivia Martin, USAFacts.org “Really use the information…We hope that it helps you develop opinions… (that help you) vote, contact your representatives…We really hope that this report among others will empower…people and as voters to, to use the data, to hold their government accountable.” Olivia Martin, USAFacts on Electric Ladies Podcast   What is the Earth saying this year? We see lots of reports from various sources, but the ones that government officials and business leaders tend to rely on are from government sources, whether those sources are local, state or federal. What does the information say about the State of Earth in 2021 and where does that data come from?   Listen to this fascinating interview with data scientist Olivia Martin of USAFacts on Electric Ladies, the podcast formerly known as Green Connections Radio, with host Joan Michelson.  USAFacts is a nonprofit founded by former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer to collect and analyze data from all government sources, no matter how granular they need to get. And, they make sense of it for the rest of us, translating what the Earth's data is telling us, so we can use it. You'll hear: How USAFacts.org collects this information and keeps it up to date. How they analyze and organize it, and find sources to fill in the gaps, so we can use it. What Earth is saying in 2021 – and the loud alarms about climate change we need to heed. How you can use this data – to vote, contact your representatives and hold government accountable. Plus, insightful career advice from an old soul in a young lady…. and more. “Whenever you're a woman in a field that is typically not dominated by women, which is very true in the data space …I think having confidence in yourself and having confidence in the research you've done and your own preparation is important.” Olivia Martin on Electric Ladies podcast   Read Joan's Forbes articles on this here and here on the data. You'll also want to listen to (some of these are under the name Green Connections Radio): Olivia Martin, USAFacts: on their 2020 State of the Earth report. Katharine Hayhoe, Ph.D., Climate Scientist, Time “100 Pioneer,” and University of Texas Professor Kathleen Rogers, President, Earth Day Network on citizen scientists collecting climate data. Heather Long, Economics Reporter, the Washington Post, on how women suffer in this economic crisis. Michelle Wyman, Executive Director of National Council of Science and the Environment on how to talk to policymakers about science to keep science in policy decisions. Subscribe to our newsletter to receive our podcasts, blog, career advice and special coaching offers.. Thanks for subscribing on Apple Podcasts or iHeartRadio and leaving us a review! Reach us on Twitter @joanmichelson @electricgalspod    

T42
Ep 53: Hungry Ghost Festival, Shan Deadlifts, Pandas, De*Kosh, the Ballmer Peak

T42

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 57:43


In this episode, we talk about the Hungry Ghost Festival, do a rundown on a number of recent happenings, and discuss the Ballmer Peak and how alcohol could actually help us perform better. +++ Music used "Victory" by Monplaisir; "Camper" by Phillip Gross; "Level 4" by Monplaisir; "Japan", "Too Grimy", and "Seattle" by Yung Kartz. Check them out on freemusicarchive.org.

通勤學英語
每日英語跟讀 Ep.K185: 微軟福特合作開發電動車軟體與超跑賣光光

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 3:20


更多通勤學英語Podcast單元: 每日英語跟讀Podcast,就在http://www.15mins.today/daily-shadowing 精選詞彙 VOCAB Podcast,就在https://www.15mins.today/vocab 語音直播 15mins Live Podcast, 就在https://www.15mins.today/15mins-live-podcast 文法練習 In-TENSE Podcast,就在https://www.15mins.today/in-tense 歡迎到官網用email訂閱我們節目更新通知。   每日英語跟讀 Ep.K185: About Cars - Microsoft, Ford team up on electric car software   Microsoft will expand its Hohm consumer energy management software to work with Ford Motor Company electric cars, the two companies announced Wednesday. 微軟將把其「Hohm」消費者能源管理軟體擴大應用在福特汽車公司的電動車上,這兩家公司週三宣布。 With Hohm, future owners of Ford's electric vehicles will be able to determine when the best times will be to recharge their vehicles at home, executives from the two companies said at a press conference in New York. 透過「Hohm」,未來福特電動車的車主將可判定在家為車子充電的最佳時間,兩家公司主管在紐約記者會上說。 As consumers start using electric and hybrid electric vehicles en masse, electric companies will experience surges of power demand in the evenings when people come home from work and plug in their automobiles for recharging, explained Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer. 隨著消費者普遍開始使用電動及油電混合車,當民眾下班回家,將插頭插上為車子充電時,電力公司晚間將感受到電力需求劇增,微軟執行長鮑默解釋說。 The two companies pledged to work with utilities and municipal power companies so the software can determine when the most affordable times will be for consumers to recharge their vehicles. 這兩家公司矢言與公用事業及市立電力公司合作,以便讓該軟體能夠判定何時才是消費者為他們車子再充電的最划算時間。 Hohm is a Microsoft service that analyzes home electricity usage, suggesting changes for power savings. 「Hohm」是微軟的一項服務,負責分析家庭用電情況,並提出節能的調整建議。   Next Article   "Revenge-Spending" clears out Lamborghini for Most of 2021「報復性花錢」買光藍寶堅尼2021年大部分產量   Lamborghini said it's almost sold out for the year as an easing pandemic unleashes a free-spending attitude among consumers confined to their homes for months. 藍寶堅尼公司說,由於防疫措施放寬掀起被困家中數月的消費者大膽放手花錢,他們今年的車子幾乎賣光。 The Italian supercar brand is set for "strong growth" in 2021 and has sold about 10 months of its production capacity, Chief Executive Officer Stephan Winkelmann said in an interview at the Milano Monza Motor Show. 這家義大利超級跑車品牌已賣出該廠大約10個月份的產量,預期2021年將「強勁成長」,執行長史帝芬.溫克曼在米蘭車展接受訪問說。 "Despite a two-month shutdown due to the pandemic, Lamborghini ended 2020 as its second-best year ever," Winkelmann said, as crowds swarmed the over 60 brands on show including Ferrari NV, Porsche and McLaren Automotive Ltd. in a sign of normal life resuming in major cities like Milan. 「儘管因為疫情停工了2個月,藍寶堅尼2020年表現仍創有史以來次佳的一年」,溫克曼說,同時,民眾蜂擁參觀參展的法拉利、保時捷、麥拉倫汽車等60多個品牌,透露出像米蘭這樣的大城市,生活正恢復正常。Source article: https://news.ltn.com.tw/news/world/paper/401099 ; https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1461980

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers
It's Only August, But LeBron James Is Coming For the Doubters

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 35:00


Summer League for the Lakers might be a relatively sleepy time - if anyone playing for the sort of Lakers right now ends up playing a role with the big team this season, things have likely gone off the rails in indescribably horrible fashion - but that doesn't mean there's no intrigue. LeBron James and Russell Westbrook appeared courtside together in Vegas, and then LeBron put out a (now seemingly mandatory?) Insta workout post/message-to-the-haters that got a bunch of people's attention. Now, pretty much everyone thinks the Lakers are going to be really good, and it's just a question of whether the ultimate result is a championship. But that's neither here nor there. What matters are the fictions athletes construct for themselves. So what is LeBron doing? Next, Seth Partnow at The Athletic has a great breakdown of why predicting results this year is so tricky. Russ is a statistical anomaly of his own (good and bad), and there's really no template for any of what we're about to witness, given how singular Westbrook and James are. We discuss. Finally, L.A.'s other squad made a move Sunday, one that raised an eyebrow not just because it sent Pat Beverley and Rajon Rondo to Memphis for Eric Bledsoe, but because it saved Steve Ballmer tens of millions in luxury tax payments. Was it a cost savings move? A basketball move? Both? What does it say not only about Ballmer, but how all NBA owners operate, including Jeanie Buss? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Indeed Get started RIGHT NOW with a SEVENTY-FIVE DOLLAR SPONSORED JOB CREDIT to upgrade your job post at Indeed.com/HangUp Theragun Try Theragun for THIRTY-DAYS starting at only one hundred ninety-nine dollars. Go to Therabody.com/LockedOn RIGHT NOW and get your Gen 4 Theragun TODAY. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Arash Markazi Show
Kawhi commits to Clippers

The Arash Markazi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 42:00


The Mightier 1090's Arash Markazi and producer Ji Hae Wiley talk about Kawhi Leonard signing a four-year contract to stay with the Clippers.Join the Bleav Network, Arash Markazi and producer Ji Hae Wiley as they talk about all things LA sports related.And do not forget to follow or subscribe to The Arash Markazi Show on Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, & I Heart Radio. Also check out his daily columns on themorningcolumn.comMusic Credit: Alright by Kendrick LamarHumble by Kendrick LamarI Get Around by 2PacTo Live and Die in L.A. by 2PacSocial Media Outlets:Twitter, Instagram & Facebook: @arashmarkazi @1090themightier & @HaeJhoSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The History of Computing
Microsoft's Lost Decade

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 21:38


Microsoft went from a fledgeling purveyor of a BASIC for the Altair to a force to be reckoned with. The biggest growth hack was when they teamed up with IBM to usher in the rise of the personal computer. They released apps and an operating system and by licensing DOS to anyone (not just IBM) and then becoming the dominant OS they allowed clone makers to rise and thus broke the hold IBM had on the computing industry since the days the big 8 mainframe companies were referred to as “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” They were young and bold and grew fast. They were aggressive, taking on industry leaders in different segments, effectively putting CP/M out of business, taking out Lotus, VisiCalc, Novell, Netscape, `and many, many other companies.   Windows 95 and Microsoft Office helped the personal computer become ubiquitous in homes and offices. The team knew about the technical debt they were accruing in order to grow fast. So they began work on projects that would become Windows NT and that kernel would evolve into Windows 2000, phasing out the legacy operating systems. They released Windows Server, Microsoft Exchange, Flight Simulators, maps, and seemed for a time to be poised to take over the world. They even seemed to be about to conquer the weird new smart phone world. And then something strange happened. They entered into what we can now call a lost decade. Actually there's nothing strange about it. This happens to nearly every company. Innovation dropped off. Releases of Windows got buggy. The market share of their mobile operating system fell away. Apple and Android basically took the market away entirely. They let Google take the search market and after they failed to buy Yahoo! they released an uninspired Bing. The MSN subscriptions that once competed with AOL fell away. Google Docs came and was a breath of fresh air. Windows Servers started moving into cloud solutions where Box or Dropbox were replacing filers and Sharepoint became a difficult story to tell.  They copied features from other companies. But were followers - not leaders. And the stock barely moved for a decade, while Apple more than doubled the market cap of Microsoft for a time. What exactly happened here? Some have blamed Steve Ballmer, who replaced Bill Gates who had led the company since 1975 and if we want to include Traf-O-Data - since 1972. They grew fast and by Y2K there were memes about how rich Bill Gates was. Then a lot changed over the next decade. Windows XP was released in 2001, the same year the first Xbox was released. They launched the Windows Mobile operating system in 2003, planning to continue the whole “rule the operating system” approach. Vista comes along in 2007. Bill Gates retires in 2008. Later that year, Google launches Chrome - which would eat market share away from Microsoft over time. Windows 7 launches in 2009. Microsoft releases Bing in 2009 and Azure in 2010. The Windows phone comes in 2010 as well, and they would buy Skype for $8.5 billion dollars the next year. The tablet Microsoft Surface coming in 2012, the same year the iPad was released. And yet, there were market forces operating to work against what Microsoft was doing. Google had come roaring out of the dot com bubble bursting and proved how money could be made with search. Yahoo! was slow to respond. As Google's aspirations became clear by 2008, Ballmer moved to buy them for $20 billion eventually growing the bid to nearly $45 billion - a move that was thwarted but helped to take the attention of the Yahoo! team away from the idea of making money.  That was the same year Android and Chrome was released. Meanwhile, Apple released the iPhone in 2007 and were shipping the 3G in 2008, taking the mobile market by storm. By 2010, slow sales of the Windows phone were already spelling the end for Ballmer.  Microsoft had launched Windows CE in 1996, held the smaller Handheld PC market for a time. They took over and owned the operating system market for personal computers and productivity software. They were able to seize a weakened and lumbering IBM to do so.  And yet they turned into that lumbering juggernaut of a company. All those products and all the revenues being generated, Microsoft looked unstoppable by the end of the millennium. Then they got big. Like really big. And organizations can be big and stay lean - but they weren't.  Leaders fought leaders, programmers fled, and the fiefdoms caused them to be slow to jump into new opportunities. Bill Gates had been an intense leader - but the Department of Justice filed an anti-trust case against Microsoft and between that and just managing hyper-growth along the way they lost a focus on customers and instead focused inward. And so by all accounts, the lost decade began in 2001. Vista was supposed to ship in 2003 but pushed all the way back to 2007. Bing was a dud, losing billions out of the gate. By 2011 Google released Chrome OS - an operating system that was basically a web browser bootstrapped on Linux and effectively what Netscape founder Marc Andreesen foreshadowed in a Time piece in the early days of the browser wars. Kurt Eichenwald of Vanity Fair wrote an article called MICROSOFT'S LOST DECADE in 2012, looking at what led to the lost decade. He pointed out the arrogance and the products that, even though they were initially developed at Microsoft, would be launched by others first. It was Bill Gates who turned down releasing the ebook, which would evolve into the tablet. The article explained that moving timelines around pushed developing new products back in the list of priorities. The Windows and Office divisions were making so much money for the company that they had all the power to make the decisions - even when the industry was moving in another direction.  The original employees got rich when the company went public and much of the spunk left with them. The focus shifted to pushing up the stock price. Ballmer is infamously not a product guy and he became the president of the company in 1998 and moved to CEO in 2000. But Gates stayed on in product. As we see with companies when their stock price starts to fall, the finger pointing begins. Cost cutting begins. The more talented developers can work anywhere - and so companies like Amazon, Google, and Apple were able to fill their ranks with great developers.  When organizations in a larger organization argue, new bureaucracies get formed. Those slow things down by replacing common sense with process. That is good to a point. Like really good to a point. Measure twice, cut once. Maybe even measure three times and cut once. But software doesn't get built by committees, it gets built by humans. The closer engineers are to humans the more empathy will go into the code. We can almost feel it when we use tools that developers don't fully understand. And further, developers write less code when they're in more meetings. Some are good but when there are tiers of supervisors and managers and directors and VPs and Jr and Sr of each, their need to justify their existence leads to more meetings. The Vanity Fair piece also points out that times changed. He called the earlier employees “young hotshots from the 1980s” who by then were later career professionals and as personal computers became pervasive the way people use them changed. And a generation of people who grew up with computers now interacted with them differently. People were increasingly always online. Managers who don't understand their users need to release control of products to those who do.  They made the Zune 5 years after the iPod was released and had lit a fire at Apple. Less than two months later, Apple released the iPhone and the Zune was dead in the water, never eclipsing over 5 percent of the market and finally being discontinued in 2012. Ballmer had predicted that all of these Apple products would fail and in a quote from a source in the Vanity Fair article, a former manager at Microsoft said “he is hopelessly out of touch with reality or not listening to the tech staff around him”. One aspect the article doesn't go into is the sheer number of products Microsoft was producing. They were competing with practically every big name in technology, from Apple to Oracle to Google to Facebook to Amazon to Salesforce. They'd gobbled up so many companies to compete in so many spaces that it was hard to say what Microsoft really was - and yet the Windows and Office divisions made the lions' share of the money. They thought they needed to own every part of the ecosystem when Apple went a different route and opened a store to entice developers to go direct to market, making more margin with no acquisition cost to build a great ecosystem.  The Vanity Fair piece ends with a cue from the Steve Jobs biography and to sum it up, Jobs said that Microsoft ended up being run by sales people because they moved the revenue needle - just as he watched it happen with Sculley at Apple. Jobs went on to say Microsoft would continue the course as long as Ballmer was at the helm. Back when they couldn't ship Vista they were a 60,000 person company. By 2011 when the Steve Jobs biography was published, they were at 90,000 and had just rebounded from layoffs. By the end of 2012, the iPhone had overtaken Microsoft in sales. Steve Ballmer left as the CEO of Microsoft in 2014 and Satya Nadella replaces him. Under his leadership, half the company would be moved into research later that year. Nadella wrote a book about his experience turning things around called Hit Refresh. Just as the book Microsoft Rebooted told the story of how Ballmer was going to turn things around in 2004 - except Hit Refresh was actually a pretty good book. And the things seemed to work. The stock price had risen a little in 2014 but since then it's shot up six times what it was. And all of the pivots to a more cloud-oriented company and many other moves seem to have been started under Ballmer's regime, just as the bloated company they became started under the Gates regime. Each arguably did what was needed at the time. Let's not forget the dot com bubble burst at the beginning of the Ballmer era and he had the 2008 financial crises. There be dragons that are micro-economic forces outside anyones control.  But Nadella ran R&D and cloud offerings. He emphasized research - which means innovation. He changed the mission statement to “empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.” He laid out a few strategies, to reinvent productivity and collaboration, power those with Microsoft's cloud platform, and expand on Windows and gaming. And all of those things have been gangbusters ever since. They bought Mojang in 2014 and so are now the makers of Minecraft. They bought LinkedIn. They finally got Skype better integrated with the company so Teams could compete more effectively with Slack. Here's the thing. I knew a lot of people who worked, and many who still work at Microsoft during that Lost Decade. And I think every one of them is really just top-notch. Looking at things as they're unfolding you just see a weekly “patch Tuesday” increment. Everyone wanted to innovate - wanted to be their best self. And across every company we look at in this podcast, nearly every one has had to go through a phase of a lost few years or lost decade. The ones who don't pull through can never turn the tide on culture and innovation. The two are linked. A bloated company with more layers of management inspires a sense of controlling managers who stifle innovation. At face value, the micro-aggressions seem plausible, especially to those younger in their career. We hear phrases like “we need to justify or analyze the market for each expense/initiative” and that's true or you become a Xerox PARC or Digital Research where so many innovations never get to market effectively. We hear phrases like “we're too big to do things like that any more” and yup, people running amuck can be dangerous - turns out move fast and break things doesn't always work out.  We hear “that requires approval” or “I'm their bosses bosses boss” or “you need to be a team player and run this by other leaders” or “we need more process” or “we need a center of excellence for that because too many teams are doing their own thing” or “we need to have routine meetings about this” or “how does that connect to the corporate strategy” or “we're a public company now so no” or “we don't have the resources to think about moon shots” or “we need a new committee for that” or “who said you could do that” and all of these taken as isolated comments would be fine here or there. But the aggregate of so many micro-aggressions comes from a place of control, often stemming from fear of change or being left behind and they come at the cost of innovation.  Charles Simonyi didn't leave Xerox PARC and go to Microsoft to write Microsoft Word to become a cog in a wheel that's focused on revenue and not changing the world. Microsoft simply got out-innovated due to being crushed under the weight of too many layers of management and so overly exerting control over those capable of building cool stuff. I've watched those who stayed be allowed speak publicly again, engage with communities, take feedback, be humble, admit mistakes, and humanize the company. It's a privilege to get to work with them and I've seen results like a change to a graphAPI endpoint one night when I needed a new piece of data.  They aren't running amuck. They are precise, targeted, and allowed to do what needs to be done. And it's amazing how a chief molds the way a senior leadership team acts and they mold the way directors direct and they mold the way managers manage and down the line. An aspect of culture is a mission - another is values - and another is behaviors, which make up the culture. And these days I gotta' say I'm glad to have witnessed a turnaround like they've had and every time I talk to a leader or an individual contributor at Microsoft I'm glad to feel their culture coming through. So here's where I'd like to leave this. We can all help shape a great culture. Leaders aren't the only ones who have an impact. We can all innovate. An innovative company isn't one that builds a great innovative product (although that helps) but instead one who becomes an unstoppable force due to lots of small innovations at every level of the organization. Where are we allowing politics or a need for control and over-centralization stifle others? Let's change that.

Voice of the Fans
Voice of the Fans- Week 147

Voice of the Fans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 153:06


After Cleavon embarrassing kisses up to Steve Ballmer we talk about Giannis NBA Finals take over, Candace and Luka on the cover of NBA2K22. We also touch on Sherman's arrest, the NFL sack #'s get adjusted and the Top 10 Fantasy Football RB's. And lastly we talk MLB All Star Game Shohei Otani and Jake Paul vs Tyrone Woodley --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cambufmsncom/support

WordPress Radio
221. Hablemos de bloques…

WordPress Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 85:34


Desde WordPress 5.0 la vida está llena de... bloques. Y si algo incluye WordPress 5.8 van a ser bloques... ¡Bloques, bloques, bloques! (ni Steve Ballmer).

What's Next|科技早知道
S5E17 | 贝索斯卸任,新任CEO安迪·贾西什么来头

What's Next|科技早知道

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 31:19


亚马逊成立 27 周年这一天,杰夫·贝索斯(Jeff Bezos)正式卸任 CEO。 1994 年 7 月 5 日,贝索斯创办了亚马逊。27 年来,他凭借激进、强势的风格,将一个图书电商变成了今天横跨多个领域的互联网巨头。 现在的亚马逊要经历成立以来的首次换帅,大家都难掩对继任者安迪·贾西(Andy Jassy)的好奇,他究竟是如何获得贝索斯首肯的? 实则贾西是亚马逊的元老,已为公司服务了 24 年,也是亚马逊精英高管团队「S 团队」的成员。贝索斯和贾西既是工作伙伴,亦是生活密友。 正是贾西带领着 AWS 团队,才成功将亚马逊从电子商务巨头转变为一家高利润的技术公司,创建并主导了云基础设施市场。据 2021 年 Q1 财报,亚马逊领先的云计算业务在 Q1 营收同比增长 32% ,至 135 亿美元,占亚马逊总营收的 12.5% 。 科技媒体 PingWest品玩/硅星人主笔杜晨在这期节目中和我们聊了聊安迪·贾西是谁,曾打下亚马逊云计算江山的他,将怎样引领亚马逊新时代,以及贝索斯的「退休」生活可能会怎么过。欢迎收听! ▼主播 丁教,声动活泼联合创始人 ▼嘉宾 杜晨,科技媒体 PingWest 品玩/硅星人主笔 ▼主要话题 [01:11] 谁是 Andy Jassy [05:43] 云计算霸主 AWS [07:21] 工作伙伴亦是生活密友 [09:36] S 团队,亚马逊的「内阁」? [11:30] 换帅后的 Big Tech 们 [16:23] 亚马逊新时代要坚守阵地 [18:09] 美国在线零售领域的独特存在 [26:21] 贝索斯的「退休生活」 ▼延伸阅读 - 安迪·贾西 (Andy Jassy) (https://www.businessinsider.com/who-is-andy-jassy-amazon-jeff-bezos-2021-2):1997 年加入亚马逊。2021 年,贾西接任贝索斯成为该公司 27 年历史上的第二位首席执行官。 - S团队(S-team):S 团队包括贝索斯最信任的顾问,贝索斯定期与该小组会面,以做出关键的商业决策。 - 亚马逊 Day 1 文化 (https://aws.amazon.com/executive-insights/content/how-amazon-defines-and-operationalizes-a-day-1-culture/):一种文化和运营模式,将客户置于亚马逊所做一切的中心。 - 史蒂芬·鲍尔默(Steve Ballmer):2000 年 1 月至 2014 年 2 月担任微软公司首席执行官,现为洛杉矶快船队拥有者。 - 萨提亚·纳德拉(Satya Nadella):2014 年 2 月 4 日,微软董事会宣布萨提亚·纳德拉担任首席执行官和董事会董事。 - 杰夫·布莱克本(Jeff Blackburn):2021 年 6 月重返亚马逊,担任全球媒体和娱乐组织的高级副总裁。 - 亚当·塞利普斯基(Adam Selipsky):2021 年 5 月重返亚马逊,接替安迪·贾西担任 AWS 新任CEO。 - Parler:社交网络平台,主要使用者包括特朗普的支持者、保守派、右翼及极右派分子。 - Twitch:一个面向视频游戏的实时流媒体视频平台。 - Netflix 原创纪录片:美国工厂 (https://movie.douban.com/subject/30390700/) 。 ▼音乐 Comprehension-Frank Jonsson ▼Staff 监制^ 荻青 后期^ Luke 运营^ Yao 封面设计^ 饭团 ▼关于节目 原「硅谷早知道」,全新改版后为「What's Next|科技早知道」。放眼全球,聚焦科技发展,关注商业格局变化。 ▼关于我们 声动活泼的宗旨是「用声音碰撞世界」,并致力于为人们提供源源不断的思考养料。 - 我们已有这些播客:声东击西 (https://etw.fm/episodes)、反潮流俱乐部 (https://fanchaoliuclub.fireside.fm/) 、泡腾VC (https://popvc.fireside.fm/)、声动早咖啡 (https://sheng-espresso.fireside.fm/) - 欢迎在各大社交媒体上与我们互动,搜索 声动活泼 - 期待你与我们发邮件反馈,邮箱地址是:ting@sheng.fm - 如果你喜欢我们的节目,也欢迎打赏支持:https://www.shengfm.cn/donation - 加入听众社群,请添加声小音微信 shengfm1 Special Guest: 杜晨.

Alley-oop
Alley-oop #189: TAROL A SUNS?!?

Alley-oop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 46:26


Hardenék Párizsban. A 75 éves logó. Ballmer 100 milliárd felett. Az első két döntő tapasztalatai. A tokiói olimpia három éremesélyese.

ESPN Daily
How Team Owners Avoid Millions in Taxes

ESPN Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 37:01


Franchise owners are some of the wealthiest Americans. Los Angeles Clippers owner Steve Ballmer's net worth is estimated at more than $100 billion. He's just one of the billionaires in ProPublica's investigation on how teams are handled, when it comes to owners' tax liability. Investigative reporter Robert Faturechi of ProPublica walks us through the tax code as it relates to franchise executives, and how they may wind up paying lower taxes by percentage than not only the players for whom they write their checks, but the workers at their arenas as well. Then Greg Wyshynski tells us how back-to-back Stanley Cup Champions the Tampa Bay Lightning are celebrating fresh off the ice, literally, with a limited-edition beer.

Tecnocast
200 – A Microsoft que ninguém esperava

Tecnocast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 62:08


No que você pensa quando ouve o nome Microsoft? Numa empresa dinâmica, preocupada em estar onde o usuário está, aberta à inovação e com foco em serviços? Anos atrás, a companhia criada por Bill Gates e administrada por Steve Ballmer não seria associada a nada disso. Sob o comando de Satya Nadella, no entanto, as coisas mudaram, tanto em termos de cultura interna quanto de modelos de negócios. No episódio de hoje, analisamos a trajetória da Microsoft nos últimos sete anos e a guinada da empresa de uma lógica de venda de produtos para assinatura de serviços. Também falamos, é claro, sobre o aguardado lançamento do Windows 11, e como ele dialoga com a atual conjuntura da Microsoft. Então dá o play e vem com a gente! ## Participantes Thiago Mobilon Paulo Higa Felipe Ventura Emerson Alecrim ## Créditos Produtor: Josué de Oliveira Edição e Sonorização: Ariel Liborio Arte da capa: Vitor Pádua

The Surreal and Absurd Club
Ep. 123 One Less Hot Mike

The Surreal and Absurd Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 31:56


Solo podcasts are hard. It's short. It's about July 4th, Iron Man 2, Steve Ballmer, snakes and poop.     That's it.   Sorry.   RATE   REVIEW   REDO SNAKES ON A PLANE BUT ON A PATIO   @TheSAClubPod - Twitter/Instagram

Pardon My Take
Dungeons & Dragons, Chris Paul To The Finals, Brooke Lopez Respect Tour, NIL & Fyre Fest

Pardon My Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 119:29


Brooke Lopez is our new King as the Bucks take a series lead (00:02:48 - 00:09:16). The Suns get to the Finals and Chris Paul's legacy game. Ballmer acted nuts and Pat Beverley went out with a bang (00:09:16 - 00:28:41). NIL talk and our first sponsored athlete, AOC (00:28:41 - 00:36:29). Bryson's caddy quits on him and the question of whether we should feel bad at all is proposed (00:36:29 - 00:45:27). Tim Woods joins the show to continue our Dungeons and Dragons game and we hunt and kill Billy, again (00:45:27 - 01:39:16). Fyre Fest of the week to wrap up the show. http://barstool.link/athletes

Dirty Sports
EPISODE 741: Trevor Bauer's Sticky Situation

Dirty Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 94:29


Joe and Andy open the episode talking Steve Ballmer, Chris Paul and the Suns advancing to the NBA Finals. Next they discuss Bobby Bonilla day and the Trevor Bauer sexual assault allegations. Then they talk NCAA athletes profiting from NIL and take a call from Dabo Swinney. They finish the show with DirtBall calls and a CWS update. www.millerlite.com/dirtysports Subscribe on YouTube - www.youtube.com/DirtySports Follow us on Instagram: www.instagram.com/thedirtysports/ Follow us on Twitter - www.twitter.com/thedirtysports Follow Andy Ruther on IG - www.instagram.com/AndyRuther/ Follow Joe Praino on IG - www.instagram.com/JoePraino/

Sports 56 Mornings with Peter and Anthony
Sports 56 Mornings 07-01-21 hour 1

Sports 56 Mornings with Peter and Anthony

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021


Peter and Anthony talk about the Suns advancing to the NBA Finals, Steve Ballmer's celebration and more.

No Dunks
Chris Paul Leads Phoenix Suns To NBA Finals Berth!

No Dunks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 71:13


On Thu.'s ep. of No Dunks, the guys discuss Chris Paul leading his Suns to the 2021 NBA Finals, who now holds the distinction of "Best Basketball Player to Never Make the Finals," whether Patrick Beverley deserves to be suspended for pushing CP3 in the back, Paul George's incredible postseason run, and Steve Ballmer's thigh-squeezing celebration. That, plus Jerry Colangelo says LeBron James' Olympic career is likely over, Team Canada is in the driver's seat, JJ Redick's great tweet, Leigh's old car, what to watch for in tonight's Hawks-Bucks Game 5, and more. Subscribe to No Dunks on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/NoDunksInc Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis
07/01/2021 - The Best Of Outkick the Coverage

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 56:01


Jonas Knox and Brady Quinn dive right into your Thursday with CP3 and the Suns huge Gm 6 blowout win over the Clippers. They talk Suns advancing to the NBA Finals, Pat Bev's back shove and wonder out loud about what the Clip's owner Steve Ballmer was doing with thigh grips on-camera. Brady tries to put a damper on the "Bobby Bonilla Day" celebration. The fellas talk the Saints great drafting resume and dive into another award-winning round of Headline or Lie! Plus, they talk hot dog eating contest, Giannis' knee injury...and Jonas' knee injury. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis
07/01/2021 - Hour 1 - The Clip Lose Their Grip

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 45:32


Jonas Knox and Brady Quinn get your Thursday jumpin' as they get right into CP3 and the Suns huge Gm 6 blowout win over the Clippers. They talk Suns advancing to the NBA Finals, Pat Bev's back shove and wonder out loud about what the Clip's owner Steve Ballmer was doing with thighs grips on-camera. The fellas talk today, July 1 marking the date that some college athletes can begin to earn money from their Image and Likeness. Plus, they celebrate "Bobby Bonilla Day!" Beware, there is math involved. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Toucher & Rich
The Bankroll Boy$ // Steve Ballmer's Wild Celebration - 7/1 (Hour 2)

Toucher & Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 42:36


(00:00) Joe Murray and Dan Lifshatz are the Bankroll Boy$ and join Toucher & Rich for their weekly segment. Did Joe Murray bite off more than he can chew with Nick's local Bachelor Party? The guys also touch on the NBA Playoffs, the Phoenix Suns, McGregor vs Poirier 3 and the degenerate special. (26:11) Steve Ballmer had a wild celebration for Nicholas Batum's three-pointer. Watch Toucher & Rich every morning on Twitch! Watch them live or whenever you want: Twitch.tv/thesportshub See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Equity
Equity Monday: Big iPads, and Ballmer-era Google

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 6:37


Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch's venture capital-focused podcast where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.This is Equity Monday, our weekly kickoff that tracks the latest private market news, talks about the coming week, digs into some recent funding rounds and mulls over a larger theme or narrative from the private markets. You can follow the show on Twitter here and myself here.First, happy belated birthday to Chris Gates, one of the founding members of the show. His birthday was yesterday, and while he's on vacation for two weeks, we still wanted to give him a shoutout. Chris is a very good person, a good friend, a good father, a good partner. He's kind, supportive, and hilarious. And he has a very good beard.But Equity waits for no single person, regardless of their merit, so on we went! Here's today's show:Stocks are a bit blah this morning, though set to rise in the United States. Cryptos are up a little.From the weekend, Venmo is getting into ecommerce, and Apple loves Surface.From this morning: Binance is beefing with the United Kingdom, and appears to be winning, which is somewhat humorous.On the funding round beat, Slice raised $20 million, Botrista raised $10 million, and Thursday raised $3.5 million.We wrapped with this.The Equity crew is back on Wednesday for our deep-dive, this week focusing on the creator economy which should be good fun. Chat then!

Hate That You Love It w/ Devan Costa

Devan rants about how pathetic the Los Angeles Clippers are and why nobody in LA will ever root for them and why they totally suck and how embarrassing Steve Ballmer is as an owner. Then we get into how Trae Young is the greatest malnourished basketball player of all time. Lots of other shit is discussed. It's a very fun episode. Enjoy! Get weekly bonus episodes: https://www.patreon.com/HateWatchPodcast Available on all platforms. Listen on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/hate-watch-with-devan-costa/id1459356319 Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/devancosta Follow on IG: https://www.instagram.com/devanjamescosta/

Had I Known
Episode 53 - Gillian Zucker

Had I Known

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2021 43:04


When Gillian Zucker heard Steve Ballmer was buying the LA Clippers she knew being President of the team would be the perfect job for her. This week she shares insight into her career through professional sports, how she landed her current job, and what it's like as one of the highest ranking women in professional sports. This episode was recorded as a live event. Please consider donating to Hamilton College as part of this event. All music by Doctuh Michael Woods.

The Max Kellerman Show
Hour 1: Don't Blame Anthony Davis

The Max Kellerman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 41:32


Max starts the show by saying that we shouldn't blame Anthony Davis for the Lakers losing this series. Then…Mike Trudell-Lakers Sideline Reporter feels that the way this season went for the Lakers was like a tax that came due after going through the bubble and winning the title last year. After that, Max takes some calls on the Lakers and callers wonder who he going to root for now that the Lakers are out of the playoffs? Also,  Max says if the Clippers lose this series that Steve Ballmer should petition to move the team to Seattle as they don't belong in LA. Max ends the first hour with calls.

The Stephen A. Smith Show
Hour 1: Don't Blame Anthony Davis

The Stephen A. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 41:32


Max starts the show by saying that we shouldn’t blame Anthony Davis for the Lakers losing this series. Then…Mike Trudell-Lakers Sideline Reporter feels that the way this season went for the Lakers was like a tax that came due after going through the bubble and winning the title last year. After that, Max takes some calls on the Lakers and callers wonder who he going to root for now that the Lakers are out of the playoffs? Also,  Max says if the Clippers lose this series that Steve Ballmer should petition to move the team to Seattle as they don’t belong in LA. Max ends the first hour with calls.

Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre
Lakers Blot Out the Suns, the Fraudulent Miami Heat + Radio host and columnist Arash Markazi

Straight Fire with Jason McIntyre

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 48:45


On today's episode, Jason and Producer Rob kick things off with a deep dive into the Los Angeles Lakers blowout victory over the Phoenix Suns. The Lakers defense is impregnable, and LeBron James and Anthony Davis are as dominant as ever. Phoenix was already fighting an uphill battle coming into this series but with Chris Paul banged up it feels like a foregone conclusion at this point. #LakersIn5 appears like a lock once again. Moving over to the Eastern Conference, can anyone explain what happened to the Miami Heat? Last year in The Bubble, Jimmy Butler, Bam Adebayo and Tyler Herro led a tough-minded crew that made a run to the NBA Finals. Now? They look like a group that's already planning their summer vacations. Maybe the Heat were never all that good to begin with. Later, radio host and columnist Arash Markazi swings by to discuss why the Los Angeles Clippers were never able to really capitalize on the Lob City Era featuring Chris Paul, Blake Griffin and DeAndre Jordan, why CP3 tends to rub opponents - and some of his own teammates - the wrong way with his on-court demeanor, why a first round series exit to the Dallas Mavericks could force the Clippers to blow up the Kawhi Leonard-Paul George tandem, why not even billionaire owner Steve Ballmer could lift the 'Clippers Curse', how Kawhi's reputation as a 'winner' may have already taken a hit in just two seasons with the Clippers, and much more! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Colin Cowherd Podcast
61. Phil's PGA Masterpiece, 1st Round NBA Playoff Matchups and Knicks Buzz with Ric Bucher

The Colin Cowherd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 48:22


On this episode of The Colin Cowherd Podcast, Colin reacts to Phil Mickelson's instant-classic major win at the PGA Championship (1:00). His guest is longtime NBA Insider Ric Bucher, who joins the discussion about Lefty's historic major win (4:00), and dives into reaction from the weekend of 1st Round NBA Playoff action, including why Blazers/Nuggets feels like it could go 7 (13:00), the Jrue Holiday difference for the Bucks (15:00), if Steve Ballmer could nuke his front office if the Clippers lose to the Mavs (17:00), if the Suns are a real problem for the Lakers (21:00), why Knicks fans should keep their expectations in check despite the first taste of hope in decades (28:00), the case for Zion to ultimately wind up with the Knicks (31:00), and why the Grizzlies have done a better job building around Ja Morant than the Pelicans have done building around Zion (36:00). Make sure you follow Colin and The Volume on Twitter for the latest content and updates and check out FanDuel for the best wagering and daily fantasy action! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – May 10, 2021

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 160:47


DPD Chief James Craig retires, Seth Rogen v. James Franco, Bill Gates divorce over Jeffrey Epstein, "COVID" murderer David Anthony, RIP Tawny Kitaen, and Tim Tebow's NFL return makes it time to call Tebow Superman Stu.Remember "You're A Grand Old Flag"? Drew's been singing it for some reason. It takes us down a Tiny Tim rabbit hole.Medina Spirit ate cough syrup-urine-soaked hay and it helped him with the Kentucky Derby. Matt Riley is in jeopardy of losing his big win... but he can always fall back on soccer.James Craig is stepping down as Detroit Police Chief and expected to announce plans to run for Governor as the Republican candidate. Despite Roop Raj giving Fox 2 credit, Charlie LeDuff continues to break news on No BS News Hour.Michigan has finally hit the 55% vaccination threshold.Vax Live aired this weekend leading BranDon to want the vaccine taken out of him. Drew coins the term "Marklecide".Congrats to CHRISTOPHER BARBER!Happy belated Mother's Day to Debbie Rowe... even though she sold her kid to a pedophile.Ted Williams' people need to get back to us so we can help him campaign for Governor of Ohio. UPDATE: Ted has already BAILED on the people of Ohio.We may never see Pineapple Express 2 as Seth Rogen appears to have broken up with James Franco.Entertainment Weekly has declared Bowen Yang the future of comedy.Melinda Gates continues to pile on Bill Gates as it's leaked that his friendship with Jeffrey Epstein lead to the divorce. We learn that nerdy Bill is actually a party-boy, Steve Ballmer gets dragged into the divorce and check out Bill's vertical.Drew Crime includes the sexual assault debacle at EMU, covers the murder of Gretchen Anthony that was blamed on Covid, and 20/20 featured the murder of little girl Riley Fox.Jeff Bezos' Amazon reviews have been released. He also bought a new boat. A big one.Tim Tebow is getting a second shot in the NFL. We check in with our main man from Detroit Sports 105.1, Stu (Shoe?). Bring back Jags-Tebow.com! Ben Affleck and JLo are just banging away in every state.RIP Tawny Kitaen.Washington Nationals broadcaster, F.P. Santangelo, is in hot water over sexual misconduct allegations.Kirk Gibson remains Drew's best friend, but an incredible ping pong rivalry is brewing.Some pipeline has been hacked and the losses are being passed onto us.Social media is dumb but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).