Podcast appearances and mentions of Al Gore

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45th Vice President of the United States

  • 1,297PODCASTS
  • 1,887EPISODES
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  • Oct 13, 2021LATEST
Al Gore

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Best podcasts about Al Gore

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Latest podcast episodes about Al Gore

The Remnant with Jonah Goldberg

Dust off your calculators, because beloved economic policy wonk Brian Riedl is back on The Remnant to discuss everything you've ever wanted to know about the federal budget, spending, taxes, and deficits. He also touches on the right's curious lurch toward industrial policy and common good capitalism, and why conservatives and progressives alike can't resist the prospect of a free lunch. Is the Laffer Curve a force for evil? How progressive is the U.S. tax code? And why is Joe Biden so determined to outspend Mack the Knife?    Show Notes: -Brian's page at the Manhattan Institute -Brian's previous Remnant appearance -Brian's latest chart book -Simpson-Bowles and the art of budget negotiations -Brian in The Dispatch on taxing the rich -How does the U.S. tax code compare with other countries? -The great Nordic myth -Jack Kemp and tax reform -Al Gore and class warfare See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pat Gray Unleashed
Time for a New Coin? | 10/6/21

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 95:04


John Kerry seems to say that President Biden was “literally not aware” of what transpired over the AUKUS sub deal. Kamala Harris gets backlash for not correcting a student about her perception of Israel. Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen comes forward about the company hiding info and how it needs more regulation. Many workers in the entertainment industry may go on strike over working conditions. Jen Psaki gets pressed on the new Build Back Better plan costing zero? Another parent speaks up against CRT at a school board meeting. Billie Eilish talks to her fans about Texas' new abortion law. She doesn't like it. Al Gore is making stuff up about climate change again. Al Gore sings a song about climate change! Joe Bastardi joins the show to talk about the "phony climate war." Is the weather really worse now than it has been throughout history? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Casual Conspiracy Podcast
Episode 31 - Climate Change

Casual Conspiracy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 86:01


Casual Conspiracy Podcast Store Join Chris, Matt, and Ibrahim to talk about Al Gore, carbon, desertification, topsoil runoff, water, solar cycles, food, political theater, renewable energy, Bitcoin, Elon Musk, and Jesus Christ . Join in on the discussion on social media by sharing your thoughts. Recorded on May 26th, 2021 Episode 31 - Climate Change Email Us: show@casualconspiracypodcast.com Social Media: Casual Conspiracy Podcast Facebook Group Casual Conspiracy Podcast MeWe Group Casual Conspiracy Podcast on Twitter Show Links:

What's The Tea?
Episode 369: The Tea 369 - I Can Smell The Basement

What's The Tea?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 63:23


On this episode we begin with TDMNGDS and then clock the tea on Al Gore, the CA recall election results, Alanis Morrisette, Sting, JoJo's new EP, anxiety and early onset season depression, the Hey Boo of the Week Sports Segment, baseball, US Open, Andrew Wiggings, Draymond Green, Jonathan Issac, Meanwhile On Instagram and much, much more.You can become a Patreon Saint at www.patreon.com/whatstheteapod.Visit our website www.whatstheteapod.comFollow us on Twitter @R2ThaEdgy @nicju @gooddaysaints #WTTPodSend us an email gooddaysaints@gmail.comLeave us a voicemail 302-570-0832 (0TEA)

Burning Man LIVE
Philosophy Smackdown with Jason Silva

Burning Man LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 52:06


Stuart and Andie talk with Jason Silva, philosopher, futurist, and host of National Geographic's Brain Games, Shots of Awe, and the Flow Sessions podcast. Their talk is a wild ride through the nature of reality. It's a mind-melting mind-meld of meanings as burners and as earthlings. It's a hint on how to — as Larry Harvey said — “wash your own brain." They discuss life, death and how a bicycle can induce synchronicity and reverie.  They explore how psychedelics can induce pivotal mental states of suggestibility for brainwashing ourselves for the better, or succumbing to delusional thinking, or both. They discuss scheduling nowness and eternity. They try to control their ecstatic surrender, and if you listen closely, you may hear a love story hidden between all the philosophy quotations. Finally, they explore key ingredients to Burning Man's secret sauce that doesn't exist. But then again, does existence even exist? https://www.thisisjasonsilva.com/https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClYb9NpXnRemxYoWbcYANsAhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xzm6YkEw8NU

Humankind on Public Radio
Healthy Planet, Healthy People

Humankind on Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


The chair of the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the winner of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize (along with former Vice President Al Gore), has made a surprising recommendation for the most immediate impact a person can have toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions: change what you eat. Emissions from automotive vehicles are one leading […]

NBC Nightly News
Wednesday, September 23, 2021

NBC Nightly News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 19:09


FDA authorizes vaccine booster for older adults, high risk individuals, more than 5,000 migrants still waiting beneath Del Rio bridge, and Al Gore on worsening climate crisis. 

The Climate Champions
Dr. Josh Feder, Global Advisory Board, OurWorldToo and Medical Director, Positive Development - Episode 101

The Climate Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 36:28


Dr. Josh Feder, Global Advisory Board, OurWorldToo; Medical Director, Positive Development; Editor In Chief, The Carlat Child Psychiatry Report; with special interest helping children and families living with autism; Al Gore's Climate Reality Project

The Leslie Marshall Show
National Implications of California Recall; Status Check on the Economy

The Leslie Marshall Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 41:27


The guest host for today's show is Brad Bannon. Brad runs Bannon Communications Research, a polling, message development and media firm which helps labor unions, progressive issue groups and Democratic candidates win public affairs and political campaigns. His show, 'Deadline D.C. with Brad Bannon,' airs every Monday from 3-4pm ET. Brad is first joined by John Nichols, the National Political Correspondent for 'The Nation,' and Author of the new book, "The Fight for the Soul of the Democratic Party." (Available for purchase here: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48624170-the-fight-for-the-soul-of-the-democratic-party) John's Twitter handle is @NicholsUprising. The two analyze the national political implications of Gavin Newsom's resounding victory in California's gubernatorial recall election.  They also preview the upcoming Virginia and New Jersey gubernatorial elections coming later this year.  They finish the interview by discussing the impact that former Democratic Congressman Beto O'Rourke will have as a new candidate in the 2022 Texas Governor's race. Then, Brad is joined by Dr. Robert Shapiro.  Dr. Shapiro is the Chairman of Sonecon, an economic advisory firm and a Senior Fellow of the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University. The two analyze the state of the U.S. economy, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell threatening to refuse to raise the debt ceiling, and how President Biden's infrastructure plan would affect the economy. Dr. Shapiro is an internationally-known economist who has advised, among others, President Bill Clinton, Vice President Al Gore, Jr., British Prime Ministers Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, and then U.S. Senators Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. He was Under Secretary of Commerce for Economic Affairs in the Clinton Administration. His website is Sonecon.com and his Twitter handle is @RobShapiro. Brad writes a political column every Sunday for 'The Hill.' He's on the National Journal's panel of political insiders and is a national political analyst for WGN TV and Radio in Chicago and KNX Radio in Los Angeles. You can read Brad's columns at www.MuckRack.com/Brad-Bannon. His Twitter handle is @BradBannon. Watch a video broadcast of this episode here on Twitter/Periscope: https://www.pscp.tv/w/1ypKdgqgDMnxW Or here on Facebook Live: https://www.facebook.com/DeadlineDCWithBradBannon/videos/567853211314943

Progressive Voices
Leslie Marshall Show -9/20- California Recall Election's National Implications; Economy Status Check

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 41:27


The guest host for today's show is Brad Bannon. Brad runs Bannon Communications Research, a polling, message development and media firm which helps labor unions, progressive issue groups and Democratic candidates win public affairs and political campaigns. His show, 'Deadline D.C. with Brad Bannon,' airs every Monday from 3-4pm ET. Brad is first joined by John Nichols, the National Political Correspondent for 'The Nation,' and Author of the new book, "The Fight for the Soul of the Democratic Party." (Available for purchase here: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48624170-the-fight-for-the-soul-of-the-democratic-party) John's Twitter handle is @NicholsUprising. The two analyze the national political implications of Gavin Newsom's resounding victory in California's gubernatorial recall election. They also preview the upcoming Virginia and New Jersey gubernatorial elections coming later this year. They finish the interview by discussing the impact that former Democratic Congressman Beto O'Rourke will have as a new candidate in the 2022 Texas Governor's race. Then, Brad is joined by Dr. Robert Shapiro. Dr. Shapiro is the Chairman of Sonecon, an economic advisory firm and a Senior Fellow of the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University. The two analyze the state of the U.S. economy, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell threatening to refuse to raise the debt ceiling, and how President Biden's infrastructure plan would affect the economy. Dr. Shapiro is an internationally-known economist who has advised, among others, President Bill Clinton, Vice President Al Gore, Jr., British Prime Ministers Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, and then U.S. Senators Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. He was Under Secretary of Commerce for Economic Affairs in the Clinton Administration. His website is Sonecon.com and his Twitter handle is @RobShapiro. Brad writes a political column every Sunday for 'The Hill.' He's on the National Journal's panel of political insiders and is a national political analyst for WGN TV and Radio in Chicago and KNX Radio in Los Angeles. You can read Brad's columns at www.MuckRack.com/Brad-Bannon. His Twitter handle is @BradBannon. Watch a video broadcast of this episode here on Twitter/Periscope: https://www.pscp.tv/w/1ypKdgqgDMnxW Or here on Facebook Live: https://www.facebook.com/DeadlineDCWithBradBannon/videos/567853211314943

Stu Does America
Ep 351 | The Left's Expiring Narratives: Compassion Until Inauguration | Guest: Gregory Wrightstone

Stu Does America

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 44:20


Stu Burguiere highlights the leftist phenomenon where liberal politicians just lie about their beliefs and policy up until the point they get elected and then implement their own corrupt goals anyway. And the best part? Their constituency just GOES WITH IT. Amazing. Then, geologist and author Gregory Wrightstone swings through the studio with a handful of inconvenient facts about climate change that you probably haven't seen on Al Gore's TikTok this year. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Healthy Human Revolution
Focusing on the Essentials | Greg McKeown

Healthy Human Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 46:52


Greg McKeown's Key Accomplishments Include… Greg McKeown has dedicated his career to discovering why some people and teams break through to the next level—and others don't. The definitive treatment of this issue is addressed in McKeown's New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less. As well as frequently being the #1 Time Management book on Amazon, this book challenges core assumptions about achievement to get to the essence of what really drives success. McKeown is the CEO of McKeown Inc. Clients include Adobe, Apple, Google, Facebook, Pixar, Salesforce.com, Symantec, Twitter, VMware and Yahoo!. His writing has appeared or been covered by The New York Times, Fast Company, Fortune, HuffPost, Politico, and Inc. Magazine. He is among the most popular bloggers for the Harvard Business Review and LinkedIn's Influencers group: averaging a million views a month. McKeown has been interviewed on numerous television and radio shows including NPR, NBC, FOX, and as a regular guest on The Steve Harvey Show. Entrepreneur voted his interview at Stanford University the #1 Must-See Video on Business, Creativity and Success. Essentialism was voted by Goodread as the #1 Leadership and Success Book to Read in a Lifetime. McKeown is an accomplished public speaker. He has spoken to hundreds of audiences around the world including in Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, China, England, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan and Singapore. Highlights include speaking at SXSW, interviewing Al Gore at the Annual Conference of the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland and receiving a personal invitation from Haakon, Crown Prince of Norway, to speak to his Annual Innovation Conference. McKeown challenges conventional wisdom in a unique and engaging style from the first moment to the last instant. As the event organizer at Greater Public said after McKeown addressed their 1,000-person conference, “I have been part of this event for 16 years and McKeown is the best speaker we have ever had!” McKeown is an active Social Innovator. Serving as a Board Member for Washington D.C. policy group Resolve and as a mentor with 2 Seeds, a non-profit incubator for agricultural projects in Africa. He has also been a speaker at non-profit groups including The Kauffman Fellows, Net Impact and Stanford University: he recently gave back to Stanford University by co-creating a popular class called, Designing Life, Essentially. He serves as a Young Global Leader for the World Economic Forum. He recently moderated a session at the “Summer Davos” in China called, “Unpacking Social Innovation Models for Maximum Impact”, served as a panelist at the “Sharpening Your Creative Edge” working session at the Forum. Prior to this, McKeown collaborated in the research and writing of Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter and worked for Heidrick & Struggles' Global Leadership Practice assessing senior executives. Originally from London, England, McKeown now lives in Calabasas, California with his wife, Anna, and their four children. He did his graduate work at Stanford University. To connect with Greg: https://gregmckeown.com/

!Please Remain Calm!
9/11 9+11 Years Later

!Please Remain Calm!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 58:30


We talk about where we were on 9/11/2001, & realize how old that makes us now. Danny gives insight into what the firefighters felt going into that building & how unique and dangerous the situation was for the FD. He also talks about talking to younger firefighters about that day & how those events changed his view of the job. We talk about the real reaction and feeling that day & week, as well as the layout & timeline of the events and reactions. We talk about the changes in the world since then, desensitization to mass death, effects on the course of history, defense contractors, Pat Tillman, the economy, Al Gore, Covid, old movie references, Danny's art skills, & more. 

Wisecracker
Ep. 56 - Best Weird Guy

Wisecracker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 70:11


Oh yes hell yeah it's the 9/11 special. We talk baked goods, being more Christ like, identification bracelets, new patriots, Bush drunk on 9/11, elementary voodoo rituals, talkin shit on Al Gore, booster drip, Homo Simpson, dresses for men, getting choked out by a woman, weird dude, being attacked at the bar, hot Terrorist, cars, tools, sports, beer, sex, money, drugs, and other. Join the tubboys by subscribing to the $1 Patreon for weekly bonus episodes and subscribe to the Youtube channel to watch webcam footage of the cast. Weekly Premium Episodes: patreon.com/wisecracker Need Advice? Email your questions to wisecrackerpodcast@gmail.com and we'll answer them! RATE AND REVIEW ON ITUNES Subscribe to the youtube channel to watch the podcast with video. Follow @DRSAMNAISMITH Follow @macnaismith Follow @FrankCMarasco

There Will Be Books
Episode 66 "September Book Nominations"

There Will Be Books

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 58:31


Is that time again, we're nominating and selecting our book of the month. This month we set up the parameters a tad differently, and nominated classic books or authors that we tragically haven't read. Lots of great nominations this month! Plus, we discuss Al Gore and his divorce email. Enjoy! Books mentioned: Joseph Andrews by Henry Fielding Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott The Red and the Black by Stendhal To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf Bouvard and Pecuchet by Gustave Flaubert The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton Contact Us: Instagram @therewillbbooks Twitter @therewillbbooks Email willbebooks@gmail.com Goodreads: Therewillbebooks ko-fi.com/therewillbbooks patreon.com/therewillbbooks

The Jason & Scot Show - E-Commerce And Retail News

EP275 - Mickey Drexler on DTC Mickey Drexler is the former CEO of Ann Taylor, The Gap, J. Crew, and is a former board member of Apple and Warby Parker. He is currently the CEO of Alex Mill, a digitally native vertical brand, founded by his son Alex Drexler. He has been dubbed the “Merchant Prince” for his successful turn around of Ann Taylor, and his dramatic transformation of The Gap. In this broad ranging interview, we cover his distinguished career, his opinion about the recent direct to consumer trends, and much more. The interview is full of juicy tidbits including: Getting kicked out of a Levi's meeting after turning The Gap into a vertical integrated brand with its' own label. His efforts to sell J. Crew to Amazon. He turned down Steve Jobs first request to serve on the Apple Board of Directors, and how he later helped Steve and Ron design the Apple retail store. Steve Jobs desire to be a direct to consumer brand. The pros and cons of intuition versus data to select merchandise. His cameo on Breaking Bad. How Old Navy was partially inspired by Targets early private label efforts. And much more Episode 275 of the Jason & Scot show was recorded on Wednesday September 8th, 2021. http://jasonandscot.com Join your hosts Jason "Retailgeek" Goldberg, Chief Commerce Strategy Officer at Publicis, and Scot Wingo, CEO of GetSpiffy and Co-Founder of ChannelAdvisor as they discuss the latest news and trends in the world of e-commerce and digital shopper marketing. Transcript Jason: [0:24] Welcome to the Jason and Scot show this is episode 275 being recorded on Wednesday September 8th 2021 I'm your host Jason retailgeek Goldberg and as usual I'm here with your co-host Scot Wingo. Scot: [0:39] Hey Jason and welcome back Jason and Scot show listeners. Jason last week we did a deep dive into the Warby Parker and all boobs s-1 filings which was a lot of fun and we got a lot of really good conversation out there with listeners talking about digitally native vertical Brands and we thought you know who could we bring on that keep this conversation going who has experience with wholesale Brands retailers in a vertically integrated d2c brand I'm pretty sure there's only one person in our industry that checks all those boxes and it is industry luminary Mickey Drexler we are very excited to have Mickey on the show Welcome Mickey. Mickey: [1:19] Thank you for having me and I'm excited to be here. Jason: [1:23] Oh my gosh Mickey we are we are thrilled to chat with you I'm eager to get into all the juicy topics going on in the industry and kind of cover your background but we have to start with the most important thing first and you may not know this Mickey but Scott as very successful in the e-commerce industry and he's invested a lot of his earnings from that industry into the car wash industry and. The reason I bring this up is because you you have famously been on the TV Show Breaking Bad. And I think that Scott is basically the plot for Breaking Bad is that. Scot: [2:05] Yeah I'm sitting on pallets of cash right now. Mickey: [2:08] One of the highlights of my life nine takes but it was really a lot of fun and I love that show. Scot: [2:17] It is a it is a great one. Jason: [2:19] One of the best shows on TV. Yeah so yeah we could probably do a whole show about breaking bad which I'm going to resist the temptation so, Mickey normally we start up the show by letting the guest kind of tell us a little bit about their background that could be tricky in your case because a lot of us orders probably know some of the highlights of your background and your backgrounds amazing but like when you meet someone that doesn't know you like how do you describe your career. Mickey: [2:50] Well I say I'm a retailer and I leave it at that, no reason to go further sometimes people after the fact say gee I didn't know you are who you are and cetera but if they want to know then maybe answer some specific questions, but I don't give them my resume. Jason: [3:16] Nice well for the sake of our listeners I am going to break it down a little bit although I appreciate the the humility of it and you you tell me if I have a ride but like you grew up in the Northeast and and started your career in the apparel industry so you work for a bunch of storied apparel retailers Abrams and Strauss Macy's Bloomingdale's and if I ever write your first big job that I don't think that many people remember is you were the CEO at Ann Taylor. Mickey: [3:51] Yes by the way the Northeast means the Bronx to move is that was very special in my life so that's who I grew up. And my first after the three I had joined say Bloomingdale's then briefly Macy's, Then I then I decided I did not want to work in the department store business anymore and I was fortunate enough to, become CEO banjo which is a tiny company losing a lot of money owned by a larger company that happened on Brooks Brothers and probably never heard of the other companies who spoke to March around anymore, and I did that for four years and we were then taken over by big bureaucratic department store, and I decided I was never more disappointed at that point in my life I was a pretty young guy, and I wanted to leave because they didn't appreciate the business we were in it was all about bureaucracy was Alex Stewart. Who then eventually like to play towards I'm not sure who they bought but so I left I left a mess a mess I left it in Taylor. And moved to Gap in San Francisco. Jason: [5:14] Yep and then for other young kids listening to the podcast Gap is going to sound like this famous iconic brand but when you joined in the late 80s um they haven't may be achieved all of their success yet and so like, frankly you you are traded in for being that the CEO that led this, enormous expansion and growth both financially and in terms of popular awareness of the Gap and I want to say you, you watched a couple of the Gap Brands like Old Navy and Gap Kids and somewhat relevant to the conversations we have on this show a lot I think you made a pretty significant decision to take Gap from being a wholesaler that sold a fair amount of other people's Goods to a vertically integrated brand that primarily focused on making your own goods and selling them direct to Consumers through your stores do I have that right. Mickey: [6:09] Yeah yeah correct I joined Gap you don't mind if I correct details I join Gap, at the end of 1983, which is then it started as a hundred percent Levi's company they only bought from Levi's and then when I got there was about one-third of their business was Levi's, and long story short, I learned in my retail life than especially having worked alongside Brooks Brothers which was at the beginning of the decline Franklin, in the mid-80s but they were they own their label and they didn't sell wholesale them, and they did not have to worry about competitors etc etc and going on sale. [7:05] They also with the highest profit company in a relatively small conglomerate of retailers and the reason was their margins were very high. Because again they weren't dealing with competitive sales my department store experience was the opposite, if you're in buying wholesale someone else will put the goods on sale and of course today you know 30 years later plus it's the standard. [7:35] And so I decided when I got to Ann Taylor. [7:39] To own our own label over time I didn't want to deal with competitors who have the same Goods as we did and we did, to consumer or whatever you call it today and that was in 1980 1980, 1970 actually 74 5 trans legally 1980 exactly I joined them in 1980 so when I hear about direct-to-consumer today being the new heart area, it's been there has been a number of your few of us who did it, and through a profit point of view it was the only way I wanted to go not want to buy wholesale we, leave ours ironically after nearer to kick this out because they said we were copying them I'll never forget the lunch was a long boring lunch in San Francisco, and I said after I said they should have told us that right at the beginning so we didn't have to go through this long boring lunch when they when they then said would not sell you anymore well frankly I didn't really care and when you have news like that, you figure it out better than you don't have these like, so we stopped being buying wholesale from Levi's and great brand virus they were no hugely monstrous plan, and we did it on their own but that was fine and that's how it began. Jason: [9:08] That's amazing and I'm totally with you it's I talked to all these young entrepreneurs that just started a new direct to Consumer brand and many of them are under the misguided impression that it's a new business model that they just invented. Mickey: [9:21] I know well there's a few of us then and now there are many many of us, but it is what it was it was not where you could build a business and wake up in the morning and control, your inventory and your prices when I joined the apple board in, I think years later in 1999 Steve Jobs basically felt that's what he wanted to do with apple that was his first year there. And he wanted to go direct and of course she did continue doing business with Walmart and Target and all that but he became. Direct, probably the greatest retailer ever and but you know it's a standard today and there's nothing new about it in fact it's old and it is what it is. Jason: [10:18] Yeah no I tease people that the very first merchants of all times I you know made their own rugs and sold them direct to Consumer so that's that was the first Model like wholesale is the newer the newer model. And so I do so then the next chapter is going to be J.Crew and we're going to go back and talk about some of the interesting issues that you confronted in some of these places but I do want to just highlight, I assume you still follow the Gap the, I would check out because it seems like you took them predominantly Direct in a lot of their news lately I don't know you fought it but they have a partnership with Walmart for their home goods and I just saw something today that they announced that they're going to distribute Athleta which is there they're their work out a pair of brand on this doing really well through REI so it's almost like they're it's interesting that they're now adding some wholesale back to their mix. Mickey: [11:13] Yep well each company is entitled to you know they all have a point of view they have a vision and I think that's what there is is can argue with it. Jason: [11:24] Yeah no and obviously pros and cons to all of these so then you left the Gap was it around 2000 2002 something like that. Mickey: [11:33] Yes I think I left in I think 2001 yeah yeah they say I think I left in 2001, in fact September 26 to be exact. 2001 and I started at J.Crew who's counting January I think 25th or something in 2002. Jason: [11:58] Awesome and what was the circumstances that J.Crew when you started. Mickey: [12:03] Well it was a mess a complete mess by the way I know you mentioned this but I started Old Navy I do it you probably know that story right. Jason: [12:16] No no tell us. Mickey: [12:18] Well it's an interesting story there's an article in the New York Times page 4 5. In terms of some some things I never forgot that like that and I read about Target Corporation then known as they Hudson starting a company to copy the gap. And what do you do when someone wants to copy you get emotional you get crazy and then you fly to Minneapolis to the Mall of America and say okay I want to see what it looks like. And I walked in on you say probably four minutes and I said this is way way off so I was relieved, because to me everyone would sewing machine is your competitor potential, I walked out and said you know is a big research company you know they I know they do a lot of research very successful and today more than ever, stopping Chicago on the way back to San Francisco I visited. Two stores demographics would be a price point below where Gap trailer very few me we were very much. [13:29] Not expecting, and I spoke to the store managers which you have to do in this world today you speak to who deals with customers it's like I've always done that it's my rule in any case they taught me a lot of lessons, Gap was too expensive for this area things are always on sale and I knew that I pick those tubes that low-margin stores, long story short got flew to San Francisco thinking about that, check the jeans Business 80 percent of genes in America than was sold 25 years ago sold below $30 a hundred percent of our genes are above 30 dollars, so I say this is not this is not a stupid idea, for them because we are considered a little more expensive I gave 10 of our Associates, then two hundred dollars each I assign. Them to shop certain categories: Target Walmart then you came on versions and come back. [14:39] Let's discuss it in one week they all came back bottom line is, they care about product they carry about price they couldn't care less if it ended 99 Cents 87 cents as Walmart used to do, etcetera and and right after that meeting I just said we're going to do it we're going to open up, our version of it was called everyday hero, and a few people from Jenny mean who worked at Marvin's was running for the gap, Jeff Eiffel we moved over we started with a small group to do what was then had no name. [15:23] And Don Fisher was always you know he was always pretty open about entrepreneurial stuff and I said was starting his company we didn't have a name long story short, I couldn't come up with the name I was in Paris going to the airport and I see a bar on Rue Saint Germain called Old Navy. And I said to Maggie who was with me marketing I think what a great name for a company, registered the next day in America no one had it and that was the name now of course my board didn't really like name you know but to me your name your kids you're not going to have a negotiation over what you name them, we have a negotiation I hard to naming companies that have with horrible names and later on I'll tell you how we got the Old Navy from olden days, and that was the beginning first store open whole Gap Warehouse only had three names and I said, we do this and we have no gaps in five years so then the next door is called Old Navy and that's how we started today it's about probably 80 and 90% of the earnings of the Gap Corporation I'm guessing. But tremendously successful. Jason: [16:38] Yeah that has been the tide that has lifted all the the Gap boats for a while. And yeah that that is amazing you raise something that I have to ask though because it comes up a lot I work with a lot of Brands and these days I spend a lot of time cautioning them about how good the retailers are becoming it inventing their own Brands and and their first reaction is always the same is your trip to Minneapolis like you know targets not very good at this I'm not very worried right, and I think that was absolutely true back then and in many categories it still is true but I would argue that in some categories, and Target more so than most is getting darn good at this and you look today at like cat and Jack and they're very successfully competing with with Baby Gap and and you know sort of traditional brands. Mickey: [17:30] Hundred hundred percent I totally agree but you know what you're good at and the products right. And I think their inspiration I was told was the crew cuts I don't know if that's true or not I'm not the kids business anymore and I don't pay attention, but absolutely true look if it's a vision, and and the product is right and I always say the product has to be right and in their case you know the price is right well the past its product, quality of product value and that's by the way we did oh maybe that's the story in any business right product right value. Right marketing and emotional connection to it and then we had operated retail. And the style and taste is all for us it's very important. Jason: [18:23] So then we mentioned that you you started that that January a J.Crew which was a mess at the time, and I want to say one of the things you did for J.Crew kind of mirroring the Old Navy story is launched the Madewell brand there. Mickey: [18:41] Well I did that before I join J.Crew. I bought the name Madewell from a fellow named David Mullen who was it really nice company, hear that David used to work with me in wash it was a wash consult very talented guy showed me the name before I went to J.Crew, I love the longer it's very hard to name a company and the name immediately resonated with me, and I should Wanted You by Sly can't afford it, and so I paid $125,000 for the name which you know once you finish with those naming companies which I wouldn't want to do they'll charge you a million dollars will come up and bad names no offense the main companies. But but I thought the name 1937 already it had history it had a feeling it had emotion so I bought the name and tucked it away, and when we went public when we turn Jake you around, see I was there to about three or four years to you actually turn around always starts a year and a half later and that's three years later or whenever I thought it was time to start me. [20:04] So that's what we start the username and that was unlike every day unlike the everyday hero. Target this was a this was more complicated because the Old Navy was price point or two or three below gas. [20:25] This one and I might say was the first company to get to a billion dollars in sales as fast as they did until Apple get there. So it took off like a rocket at Old Navy like a rock it was really a very nice toy and maybe well was much more difficult, we took it we had a number of different people leading it, and we just couldn't get it going the right way I made a number of mistakes in opening up. Bedroom state which knows things it was real estate wasn't on Vine and that didn't work, we just didn't get our act together for at least four years in five years, and I was really upset because I said you know this is taking away from the value of our public company so we must 15 and 20 million dollars a year which I think we were maybe 15 million a year, you know you take the multiple of the stock and all the sudden you know the company's worth three hundred million dollars less because we're starting made well, so that kind of aggravated me couldn't get rid of that aggravation way things are but then some set. [21:43] I came back to the corporation he left for you or two and he was putting to be in charge of. Male and he did an incredible job and so he and I work very closely together. And I always merchandising Missouri involved. [22:06] And he did the design and he had a vision for design I had a vision well the storefront, it was kind of a I was always inspired by I think they're still around but I'm not sure a bread bread store in the village called the suvi oh maybe, I don't know if it's still there to be the bakery yes I always loved the way the storm was so we designed a store. I kind of felt like a see it was the studio I'm just actually look at a picture again we fun and we built a really I was really pleased with the store but I was not pleased with how the business was going, and some sack pinion looking at the storefront now online beautiful store and it's beautiful store goal, and emotion, and then when he came in the rest then this is starting to take off like a rocket plus woman named Mary. Who was jeans made merry new Mary knew more veggies. [23:19] And she joined us from Jay Vernon and Mary came in. Thanks Gary Pierson and she and some set and it takes people to do it we put together we became a major genes, that was our vision the best kind of jeans that not crazy designer prices and the company took off also at some point like a lock. And that was the story of Nemo. And you know all the retail to be all the over companies to Fashion they hit a wall at times and then they come back or they don't come back, and hitting a wall is part of what goes on every company I've been involved as hit a wall at some point it's a wall in any me to save it and bring it back or it or it continues to have a hard time. Jason: [24:17] For sure the side note another company hit a wall sadly was Vesuvio which is a hundred year old Bakery in SoHo I have some good news bad news they had a Hiatus and they reopened in like 20/20 so the last and I was is in SoHo they were they were open I had not heard what has happened since the pandemic and I can imagine it wasn't a great time for them so I hope they're doing well. Mickey: [24:43] We'll check it out and we'll let you know that's cool. Jason: [24:47] Awesome so then I do want to kind of just wrap up the clear stuff and then we're going to dive in a little deeper on a few of the things that we've already talked about but so today you are Alex Mill and do you want to tell us a little bit about Alex. Mickey: [25:01] Yeah sure Alex my son or Alex. Jason: [25:03] We're both I was waiting for you to tell that yes. Mickey: [25:08] Well my son started the business in 2005 13, and he just started I was very involved and I pretty much had nothing to do with it at all which he reminded me when I started here, he says you know you don't even wear our t-shirts which were famous for. And he was right I just didn't pay any attention and I probably should have but he didn't ask me really and he was a wholesale come. And we do business it was kind of cool we had a little bit of a cult following and and I'm allergic to high prices which really gets translated as too bad value, you know I don't mind high prices in certain categories or where you get what you pay for for a you know the prices are ridiculous but you might learn from his luggage or whatever from a mess, but we designer clothes in general so he went along I went along he. [26:18] When I left J.Crew I didn't think anything about his business but when some stack. Who is he quit he had a non-compete and I was his age. So we need help I hope to get jobs in the industry part-time jobs freelance because he walked away from a very very big job, and so the day his non-compete was up, I that was the day he was a beginning of a new Alex will be in some segments and do each other, and Alex was very happy that he would find some partner and some seconds considered the founder of the company he's a major shareholder long of Alex and myself, and he joined us. [27:16] And then I was very happy kind of had a job again because I was doing stuff but not doing what I love to do which is be involved in building a company Vision etcetera, so I joined I think it was about two and a half years ago I'm not even sure the day. And we had a little tiny office which I'm now we doubled the space instead, that we start to build a business and we had a vision and a woman's and Alex and I at the beginning or I would say it wasn't a marriage made in heaven, it's the it's the come one since when and it took a lot of work and a lot of a lot of help. And we finally listening I'm going to say that he's going to listening to his mother my wife about making certain that he and I get along and I did that with him, it was like another else conversation and it's been really really nice over the last number of months but it's hard. To be with your dad and I was trying to figure out is he. Someone I work with or is he my son and it's extremely difficult and he kept dealing with me as whatever I done. [28:40] And so now he's you know he's a partner along with some set and and Hussein. And we hired a team and it's very hard to start a company I had the bank of Gap in the Bank of J.Crew in my other two startups now I didn't have their back. And so we funded us elves which in a way is really good I also do want to have for the first time in my life. Too many opinions that weren't right and that was a blessing even though you know I'm doing this for a million years, if we're right we're right if we're wrong way wrong but my best board members were always people I knew anyway not necessarily on the board. But when you have a money partner which I certainly did they think about profits they think which is nothing wrong with it but, take its long-term to build a profitable company, and when you have hit a wall you succeed if you're good at it I always had a kind of ability to. Knock down and I just get right back up and I don't stop. [30:00] But some cases that doesn't happen but here we are independent Leo and not negotiating colors or Styles or what someone else thinks we should do. We're expanding in the business is starting to really kind of take off now so I'm really excited I've always been excited. It's about the taste quality I look at the landscape out there. And I think this is not a lot of things going on that I feel or what I would say are incredibly impressive there are those winners, and you all know who they are so what I'm hearing so I think we're all excited but small you know. But that's small anymore 20 people work there and we all have like multiple jobs which is good I've say snorts growing pretty rapidly, so and you know that's our mission. Jason: [31:03] My I have a some great empathy for your son Alex I'm a fourth-generation retailer and I think I can imagine poor Alex just wanted his famous dad to wear his t-shirts and he got an activist investor instead. Mickey: [31:15] What your fourth generation retailer. Jason: [31:19] Yeah yeah my family sort of started out in the in the grocery and then later jewelry business, I did want to highlight you've referenced it a couple times that you're also you had a long stint on the board at Apple and I want to say I've been, worked with Ron Johnson the number of times and I've seen some interviews with Steve Jobs and in both cases they reference you as the the retail Savvy board member and Apple. Mickey: [31:46] I met Steve in I loved Steve idolized ski and I still love him to this day, he was extraordinary and I give very slowly thinking about the way he died went through, and to excuse me per. Steve we met what he wants he gets when he doesn't stop at anything the most seductive human being I've ever met in my life, we met at a mutual friend's birthday party in Napa Valley came up to me and we start the shoes and, you don't say what's the job so long Steve you know a niche wasn't and we're talking and he. [32:32] Got in touch with me after that asked if I would join this board, and I said no I don't like public companies now I took my schmuck anti schmuck pills after the okay, because hello is that a bad word to say she's no and I realized holy shit, and I just you know I was yeah I was on a board you know bless them family board, in other words and items on a number of other boards and I get bored very quickly on boards because that's the way I am and I need to be action busy, and I'm not a technologist I don't know much about it but. So a year later he came to me after becoming come to me and said you join my board I will join Apples by Gap store, well Steve hate Sports also, but he and I said deal why because God will he be amazing on the board, just as a factor of not going along with everything already. [33:50] And he became a pain in the ass to the number of people who isn't always on Tiny going and what's up this kind of but he privately we had a really nice strong relationship. And she joined the board I would say made a few enemies on the board because he whatever he thinks he says that's it he says. And and sometimes he says it doesn't make people happy so so that's essentially what happened so in any case I join these board. And first thing he wanted me to do was to design a store. [34:31] And we had a really bad looking store and that he designed and then we got a warehouse which we used to do with my old company, and we got a warehouse you designed a brand new store in the warehouse p.m. for 5,000 square feet and. The store was really good-looking that's basically what happens students are today simple it showed off the price. And it wasn't a story that was czechia where the product was competing with the design and that was our first Apple Store, and then after that I just you know he asked me about color of iPods he always want to review the colors Etc. You know it's like you're 16 years and lives through extraordinary success and you know appreciate it I don't know you and appreciate it well he was alive and well. But just I just always you know he went to the meetings he started every single meeting for it spent most of his time on the. [35:46] And you don't find that many people and many companies they spend most of their time necessary not on product that was steamed on product, things tough he was titled in an infant in a good way in my mind you know Obama didn't call him back, one morning he wanted to President Obama to launch the first iPhone he was Furious Obama didn't get that I'll never forget that, he says how do you not call me back like this light in four hours Al Gore was on the boy houses Steve I'll get him to call you back whatever. [36:24] You know Obama told and back when you had a minute came back and says he's going to launch the iPhone pushing never did but that's what Steve wanted to believe anyway amazing amazing run, an amazing person he and Johnny I everyday had lunch and every day was you know what's the future going to hold. For apple and he the other thing he did, is he kind of made me for sure and numbers feel stupid at the end of a board meeting I wasn't in technology guys sometimes I'd say something that you look the righteousness gee how can I say that, and then you can bury yourself and say oh I don't want to disappoint Steve yeah but he was to me was a special unique gift to the world. And I miss him and I think the world misses in today. Scot: [37:18] Absolutely, because I'm the entrepreneur on the program Jason has a fancy corporate job and a title that has more words that I can keep track of the so you've been a successful entrepreneur for decades what advice would you give to an aspiring entrepreneur listening to the show like what are, distill down some of the things you've learned through there. Mickey: [37:36] I was explaining to him that every single day this we haven't really nice marketing business we do well but every day I come to work. And I reach for the sky. [37:52] And I'm trying to explain that no matter what we're doing oh he also time says I'm too critical of things or people or whatever and I said you know Alex everyday. I come to work I said every day you come to work I come to work and I look for what. Could be better not for what you write and I think a lot of people have a hard time with that vision is, where you going how you get there with the unknowns is critical, so people say well how do you do this that and the other thing and I said I had a photograph of what Gap should be I didn't in Maine. I didn't J.Crew and I actually I did yet in J.Crew and I didn't Old Navy and I didn't so I had a photograph in my mind we get sale in one Business book. Because it was actually misses you by I had to do with those. [38:56] That didn't work but yet not them to get up into the skill set whose huge toes. What you need to do and I can't speak about Instinct in other areas but I think Instinct judgment. Seeing around corners where they say skate to where the puck is going. Is extremely important in the fashion business and knowing when to go knowing when to stop when things slow down extremely. [39:30] Picking the right team is something rules that rules but got to pick the right partners and when you make a mistake in a partnership and so many of us don't do this for cleanup face up to you but. [39:46] And do something of that. You know and the bigger companies are no longer into the smaller company like this. About your all living together and it doesn't take long and when you're writing your own checks, that's a big difference when you're writing your own checks which I know most people probably don't have the ability to do, it's very different than the private Equity the joint venture etc etc but he country each business, as if you own it it's your money in and that's part of it and then you know we will passion, I say leadership curiosity I think anyone was not curious in my mind can't do well running a company, they have to be curious unless it's look like you speak about technology I just assumed the same rules. But building a retail company it's kind of like painting a very beautiful picture as to what we'll stick together you know I once went twice went to visit Ford motor. Design. [41:01] Headquarters and the first time I got was because Anna meaning with Jeff Sons yeah. Surrender they show the new Mustang this is probably seven. The co-host and I said he says what do you think of the car in front of all these people I said it's a very cool looking car. [41:26] The wheels are really big and I would never want to Market or sell a car for have one myself with a wheels are bad, I know it's kind of silly ish but it's not it's putting together a painting and there's nothing worse, there are worse things in wheels that stand out like a sore thumb so he invited me to, Detroit with designer factors Co didn't go with me which I thought says. He's no one not because of Nations and it was seven people designing the one car. Now you understand why the cars a lot of cases look like they look. Steve always wanted to talk he would have done now they were to get when I he was he was fascinated with Tesla very impressed night, from his point of view it wasn't I said I know if you remember the to see your test sports car. Scot: [42:28] Register yeah. Mickey: [42:29] I said Steve it's such an ugly looking Paris looks to me like you are pathetic it's not about the course looks you can always design a beautiful car it's about what's inside. Mechanics engineering but anyway I think. You know as for me I'm accused of being a micromanager you really better be, you better care about the wheels better care about this hear about that Medicare by recalling about he just you know we have a few new bad colors in Arabic in Arabic. The color is of opinion L and if you buy three good colors and then two bad ones you don't morejon out on the product because you have bad colors which I don't think people pay enough attention to. And I could know what I'm trying to think what else to go on. Scot: [43:23] You know I know we're running up on time but just quickly quickly so you you kind of were very early on what this kind of direct to Consumer now there's this whole digitally native vertical brand what what do you think's driving that Trend and where do you think it goes. Mickey: [43:39] Yeah I think it continues to go because if you're buying wholesale you know the pricing is all off. And I saw that when I was you know young guy you know like when I was at Bloomingdales I was 23. Alexander's department store maybe Fourth Generation member states they I was a swimsuit sweater and t-shirt. And everything else I wasn't I didn't do that for terribly wrong but for the year I was in there you are Alexander's cut their prices. In the middle of June and I'll never forget I had a couple my prices we had a policy to meet price. Young kid in the business and I was Furious Alexander's just here and now my my profits and margins. Then what to help. Because I hadn't worked out on my bathing suits that was a stupid rule but it wasn't a bad I kind of like the idea of Crisis competitors that was the beginning, what's happened to the last 30 or 40 years T.J.Maxx the most important department store. [44:58] And you know the word stimuli, we have all the discounts that and you go online and you we had a big discussion here yesterday you said well we sell this to Nordstrom Rack and he said well if it was an existing item, we want think if it isn't bad covers and they said you can't miss anything going to go online, given a look for this island yes my little bit Nordstrom Rack will whoever Valance T.J.Maxx before you see Alex Mill so the pricing. Is critical so white and a lot of what I did was also because who I always admired Ralph Lauren Bailey – pricing and I know all these things cost and so I said we can put together. A design team that will hopefully be as good as a design team ourselves if we do that I say I don't I don't want to have another problem. [45:59] So the prophets were always all the retailers are inflated in America in Goods that are wholesale purchases, because it is plant safety and cost, and here we might sell 250 you spend fifty yourself Bloomingdale's 425 and hundred twenty-five goes to 275 or $300 is the difference. In pricing so TJ Max knows that really long Ross stores. Everyone knows it and and I think that's why I don't think there's a future to be in that business. And I sit to the parks to excited family with a lot and probably not have to hear this but. Jason: [46:46] Yeah no department stores listen to our show I promise I'm. Mickey: [46:52] So I said I really don't want to see I said where you going to be in five years or ten years if everything you bought. Is available at a discount and that's the truth. So and I have friends in the business they do hello mrs. with teaching marks they do with most of the partner stories and what does that leave you and Caroline Woods is a great coach. And really smart nice person but what is forty fifty sixty billion dollars huge profits so, and really big believer must now this is where I'm standing in the luxury business is not. We have they probably can do it now via makes does. They do with brilliantly I guess the other one you know they have they can probably do it who's those customers probably like it exclusivity they like paying more money and so on and so forth but it works through that I think it does, so so I know if I knew the answer to that question with that pricing thing is huge. Jason: [48:06] No it's a it's a big issue for the industry to figure out and people that don't are going to. Have it have a challenging future I think as you've highlighted I did want to ask you a question so, if anyone Google's Mickey Drexler your you're gonna find all these business articles with your picture on the cover and some variation of this title that we've all given you the merchant Prince um and that the kind of just I hope you're okay with it seems like you get that title whether you want it or not. The gist of all those is that man, Mickey had a really good run of picking a lot more winners than losers of therefore it having the the products that that consumers wanted and you know they're there for achieving a bunch of financial success for your various businesses and I've always wanted to ask you, is in your mind is that success as a merchant is that we're you better than other people at, identifying the trends that were emerging in what people wanted or were you better at getting people to want what what you liked. Mickey: [49:19] I think it's a little box I think our industry is lacking. Merchants today as much as I've seen over the last many many decades. I don't know what it is but I think you have a sense of seeing around corners you must see around the corners, I believe except if you're a seller if you're a Discounter and you're good at it you don't have to see around the corners just have to Source right, and I have the right price and have a great way to view or but those businesses are out there I don't really know them well. But that's important in most business not enough you know, worthy I think mostly eyeglasses they sell what's true of all of us most of what we sell, are what we would call her oh it items iconic but you have to feel it you have to see it. You have to have an inch and in the instinct is incredibly. [50:39] I think I was talking to a friend yesterday and he said in his 15 year old is now color rather than know what need p is. The expanse was something I said you know it's interesting I said to Henry I said do, is there anyone in your family who is musical I always ask someone that question whoever I interview, and sure enough Henry's wife plays very good these though and Henry was a musician. [51:13] Growing up. And now here's their son they are very talented musician artist creative there's always some kind of. DNA is connection is fine and it always also depends on who works I was very lucky, I started working for a woman named King Marcin I didn't work for she's the best Fortune taste Isle and when I got to Bloomingdale's like this young. [51:42] And I was after the first day in the house was checking on what they gave me a department to run, Stand start that's it you're the buyer one department and Katie Mercy was my mentors go off to Europe together factories and I guess I learned from her, and she the best merchants in the company if she wasn't a woman she's Co she was fantastic but there is something you get. Fun styling taste that you were born with and I think that's true in stinking with anything in the world. Tonight and it's not a scientific illusion but I everyone I interview I kind of want to know what their parents did. [52:30] For what this family that might have been a grandfather and a lot of especially creative it. So so I think that's really important the other part of the question is mostly was what you're going with and then creating your maker, well there's a lot of things under the radar and if you go after it you create demand for the people just don't expose it so we have recording a items we bring in, old mr. white we doing that way of doing this and they take off like crazy because someone wanted. And understanding what someone might want and Steve Jobs has tasks. [53:17] Is all part of the skill set with meeting. I'm not too bad Commodities during this price I thought would worry Parker bids was absolutely brilliant at figuring. What's out there with the stylish kind of cool pumping where people are going to pay $95 for their eyeglasses the only thing I say that Neil and Davis I think we need to at times. Balance or if you read Tales they could probably leave me come to my newest company of record I said I think you can have one more fun and I prices and however Orange. But the most important so then just like friends but no I think you you kind of born I see, I see him every time you sit down and look at it woman and she gets it it's in her blood why she has. And she's had a chief Merchant and see something and feels it and knows it and you know and then you have to be go to the message you're not quitting. [54:23] You have to know numbers you have to get Four Kings you have to figure out how long it'll be around you know has has everything. To the end of the numbers of databases we've been doing data since with 23 years old, whatever you always needed you need to know how much to buy anything happens to the forecast and you need to know how many sizes you do but now they have another fancy name for it. Act like merchandising second you're not going to succeed in affection. Jason: [54:58] I think you just answered my next question but that's like so obviously the traditional merchandising you have this science part which is the math and the forecasting and open a by and all that good stuff and you have the intuition which like to a certain extent seems like a god-given talent the, what's interesting to me is lately some of these new companies that have been born and Amazon being a great example like they used to hire a lot of merchants in every category so that have a, pet food buyer and you know and apparel buyer and a battery by or whatever they've kind of gotten rid of the merchant title and they've gone all-in on the data so they call it hands off the wheel and they let the computer decide what to buy, instead of a merchant and I've told lesser extent I think Katrina it Stitch fix, has that model a little where she uses data to inform her product a lot more and then you think of like she in and the Uber fast fashion space is, is that a future Trend like do you see that mostly working for these discount categories is that. Mickey: [56:03] Well I think you can argue Amazon but you know I thought when when I was I thought Amazon should have purchased J.Crew. I thought it would be really smart purchase they get a culture fashion and style. I think they'd be dangerous if they could figure that out. [56:30] And so we had someone approached them and of course it was done yeah not the personally I won't be there. I think that. If you look you can't even Stitch fix success but you cannot argue with kind of goods they sell if you. I like what I do I love I love what I do and it's about taste and style and if you do that for. Many have a point of view you'll probably do well so I need you to it is really good at the Bronx Science I couldn't get arrested enhanced you G I was always really good, I think you have to be good so I guess I do all the stuff they do I do. We're just hiring people do single stitch. We haven't been there but then again we are you know my choices to be the style formation with fun and emotion I give credit to any company. Whatever they do is stand financially successful of your poems but I don't know enough about Stitch fix lots of opportunities and Stitch fix. Jason: [57:50] Chien have you follow them at all. Mickey: [57:52] Like they're wildly successful I don't follow them when it's but you know. Jason: [58:00] It seems like they're a lot more about like plugging into all the social media you know like picking up the latest trends on on Instagram and Tick-Tock and things like that and then like you know super fast supply chain 2, didn't get those Trends in. Mickey: [58:16] Yeah and then again I care about quality and I care about all the stuff maybe bit different but if they're really from Julia. Jason: [58:25] It is it's a Chinese company they don't love for people to know that. Mickey: [58:29] Yeah well you know I wanted but sourcing their secretary like giveaway Price is Right. Jason: [58:36] Yeah it's super inexpensive like some people call it disposable fashion which is probably a. Mickey: [58:41] Yeah this is not what we want to do it's a kid's business on young business. I don't know we'll see how I like you know my company's that well so we'll see. [59:01] But but no I think the maths we really need a good mind and and for me I'm a huge micro. I'm looking at. Right now jumpsuit made dead which is brand-new and we're going to sell a lot of it is you know we just put it it's kind of comes naturally if you have the big jumps in the cellar. And and so you know you always create but you're not creating months Salem I just looked at. [59:36] I'm just really upset I looked at it I see why did me five men were 87 and it's $295 I said that's important just came in yesterday to the bad mark. And usually they can get away with doing that as a rebuttal so when you got it. And right now syllables troops crossed because it's not being self so you kind of get something you kind of knowing side and sort of okay. It's just bad news and it's not us. And you have to have a sense like covers the same thing most of them look alike so that the finger it comes. I think it's an offender brand new bottle and it's made by making sure it's a really good looking car and. I looked at it I said I don't want to renew pop color something that's you know not everyone's driving it's a very good looking car and you can see it's going to be a big guy. Because it's really designed well you know part talking about it over. Jason: [1:00:48] No I'm trying to switch. Mickey: [1:00:50] It's called The Defender I like your car like this. Not to me but you work committee should whatever but you could see the second Network, Tina news needles and I think it is I see a lot of them and cars used to be a lot more interesting design, then they are too maybe it's because is definitely people decide on here maybe it's the vision see it's hard to find cars and is Towing it. You know you all have an interest in cars. No we talked to what good looking car and not a lot of them are right so and I used to collect isn't nice. But but I kind of collecting child fantasize you've been having some cool cars but they are all kind of well design. They were uniquely designed and today you know it's a different world. Marker 06 Jason: [1:01:52] Yeah no for sure and it's it, interesting there sort of both out there there's you know people that you know still go for that unique distinctive looking care about the Aesthetics and there's people that you know just want to take an Uber for, for transportation so seems like a parallel is going in the same direction as that there's you know strong stuff with a strong point of view and that's that's quality and unique and then you know there's some people that you know just want, affordable inexpensive sweatshirt. Mickey: [1:02:23] Sure was were those for sure but you know I like the integrity. And not expensive I personally don't like expensive too expensive you know I mean I know maybe this is for sure. Jason: [1:02:43] Yeah well is it Mickey we could go on for hours but it has happened again we have used up all of our allotted time and I actually think. Mickey: [1:02:53] I'm having so much fun here guys. Jason: [1:02:55] I know I know why we will record the Extended Cut and you and I can just keep chatting. Mickey: [1:03:02] Anytime seriously. Jason: [1:03:04] You're our new guest host you're in. Mickey: [1:03:08] All right listen thanks a lot I appreciate the time and the questions and the schmoozing you know I do like two shoes so this is a great shoes. [1:03:26] Never ever I was on that I was on Instagram for about a minute and I came off like I don't want to forget. Scot: [1:03:36] Okay well you if people want more you exclusively come to the Jason Scott show that's where you'll be going. Mickey: [1:03:41] Anytime. Jason: [1:03:42] We really appreciated the time and enjoyed chatting with you and until next time happy commercing.

Armstrong & Getty Podcast
September 8, 2021 - Fat Al Gore

Armstrong & Getty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 39:41


Hour 3 of A&G features Climate Truth, Buzzfeed Liberals, Wackadoodle Teachers, and Renting to Own a home.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSFO Podcast
September 8, 2021 - Fat Al Gore

KSFO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 39:41


Hour 3 of A&G features Climate Truth, Buzzfeed Liberals, Wackadoodle Teachers, and Renting to Own a home.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Armstrong and Getty
Fat Al Gore

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 45:44


Hour 3 of A&G features Climate Truth, Buzzfeed Liberals, Wackadoodle Teachers, and Renting to Own a home. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
They Think Like Communists Because They Are Communists

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 57:39


Until 1990, Communists and Muslims were not allowed to hold office. Then on November 18, 1990, President GHW Bush and Congress QUIETLY repealed the McCarran Warner Act of 1952 forbidding Muslims and Communists from holding office. Members of that traitor congress were: Dick Cheney, John McCain, Joe Biden, Al Gore, John Kerry, Mitch McConnell, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi...

Mornings with Ken
Apologies to Al Gore

Mornings with Ken

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 30:14


Social Security and more

Shine
Water Stewardship: Create Necessary Alliances in Leadership and Business with Greg Koch

Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 114:55


How we take care of water is a necessity. Water is a finite resource- we only have the amount that we have. Water is life. We are 70% water. Water is spiritual, it's healing, it's cooling. It's beautiful. And in this interview, I speak with my friend and colleague, and water protector and sustainability expert Greg Koch, about the nexus between food, water energy, and our consumption habits and limits on our resources. For example, how many greenhouse gases can we put in the atmosphere? How much debt can we tax our economy? How many limits can our planet take regarding tin, aluminum, Tesla batteries before it's too much? We speak to our current environmental crisis of climate change. We bring attention to the topic of water stewardship and how we can all be more environmentally responsible as individuals and businesses. In this episode, you will learn that all water problems are knowable, solvable and affordable. We actually have enough technology and data to be able to solve for the water problems, but it requires that we set up a conscious and inclusive environment for water. Greg Koch is a globally recognized leader and technical director at Environmental resource management (ERM? with over 100 countries in water resource management, community and stakeholder engagement in conflict resolution. Greg also excels in sustainability strategy, sustainable development, adaptation and resilience and related policy and finance. SHINE Links: Leading from Wholeness Executive Coaching Leading from Wholeness Learning and Development Resources Shine: Ignite Your Inner Game to Lead Consciously at Work and in the World by Carley Hauck Contact Carley Hauck     Resources mentioned in this episode: NY Times Article - “A Hotter future is certain: How hot is up to us” NY Times Article - “How much hotter is your hometown than when you were born?” Creating 21st Century Abundance through Public Policy Innovation: Moving Beyond Business as Usual by Greg Koch and William Sarni Greg Koch on LinkedIn     The Imperfect Shownotes   Carley Hauck 00:01   Hi, this is Carley Hauck. Welcome to another episode of the SHINE podcast. This podcast is all about the intersection of three things, conscious, inclusive leadership, the recipe for high performing teams and awareness practices. I am offering three episodes a month. Before I tell you about our topic today, can you go over to Apple podcasts and hit the subscribe button. That way you don't miss any of our incredible interviews. And if you love this episode, which I imagine you will, please write a positive review, or share it with friends and colleagues on your favorite social media channel. It really helps. Thank you.   Our topic for today is water stewardship: create necessary alliances with leaders and business with Greg Koch.   One of the reasons I began this podcast in May of 2019 was due to all the research I was conducting for my new book, Shine: Ignite Your Inner Game to Lead Consciously at Work and in the World. The podcast came about due to my desire to bring education, awareness, and then to inspire calls of action to be the change as individuals and business so that we together could solve some of our greatest challenges. The biggest challenge that has been a large motivator for me personally and the reason why I wrote my book was climate change.   I had been following the science for many years, and as a result began teaching on the intersection of leadership and spirituality, and consciousness so that we could be more mindful of our consumption. And I brought that into so many of the work that I've been doing with different leaders and businesses.   So this episode is about water stewardship. As our world becomes warmer, July was the hottest month in recorded history. Glaciers are melting, our oceans are becoming hotter. And all the marine life is struggling to flourish.   How we take care of water is a necessity. Water is a finite resource we have the amount that we have. Water is life. We are 70% water. Water, spiritual, it's healing, it's cooling. It's beautiful. And in this interview, I speak with my friend and colleague, also water protector. I'll call him Greg Koch, about the nexus between food, water energy, and our consumption habits and limits on our resources. For example, how many greenhouse gases can we put in the atmosphere? How much debt can we tax our economy? How many limits can our planet take regarding tin, aluminum, Tesla batteries before it's too much? We speak to our current environmental crisis of climate change. And the most recent IPCC climate report, which is the sixth report. We bring attention to the topic of water stewardship, and how we can all be more responsible and how we consume how to take responsibility as individuals and businesses. In this episode, you will learn that all water problems are knowable, solvable and affordable.   We actually have enough technology and data to be able to solve for the water problems, but it requires that we set up a conscious and inclusive environment for water. Greg Koch is a globally recognized leader with over 100 countries in water resource management, community and stakeholder engagement in conflict resolution. Greg also excels in sustainability strategy, sustainable development, adaptation and resilience and related policy and finance. He is a lead consultant at ERM. We all have the responsibility and opportunity to be the change. Listen to one of my favorite SHINE podcast episodes ever.   Carley Hauck 05:10   Hi, everyone. Thank you for joining the SHINE podcast. I feel delighted to be here today with my new friend and colleague, Greg Koch, thank you so much for joining.   Thank you. Thanks for having me.   Well, I know that we have a lot of really wonderful things to speak about. And one of the first questions I'd like to ask you is, how would you define conscious and inclusive leadership?   Greg Koch 05:39   I first say that it has become paramount to my work. And I feel a hallmark of the success that I've had, and that success has always been collective with communities and inclusivity. But first a bit of history. I'm originally from Germany, an educated and trained engineer. And so for the first 10 years of my professional life, things were very direct, very quantitative, very objective, I had the opportunity to leverage those skills, and to begin to have a better understanding of water issues around the world, and water being so local, and so emotional, and I don't mean emotional in a pejorative sense, emotional baggage, not that there's anything wrong with even that. But what I mean is we people are tied across all cultures to water in ways that are fundamentally different from lots of other sustainability issues.   We're tied to it spiritually, even religiously. Everyone needs it, everyone has a stake in it. And you could see where I'm leading is that when you step into a watershed, a community, for whatever reason, you're motivated to work on water solutions. You realize, at some point, hopefully, early on, that all that water is being shared by everyone, and that everyone needs to be a part of understanding the challenges and being a part of the solution. And so inclusive, is a fundamental prerequisite, of trying to address serious water challenges. And so I have grown.   That was a beautiful answer.   Thank you. So where does consciousness come in? And I'd say obvious, well, not perhaps not obviously. But they go hand in hand, in that, when water is stressed, we could say this for a lot of stressful or challenging situations. In addition to including everyone, because you need to solve the problem, and this was the hardest thing for me to do. And that is to be conscious of their perspective. And their perspective, their demands, and have to be accepted. Because no one's using water for the sake of using water, you use water because of how fundamental it is to your life. So whether you're a mother, or a corporation, or the environment, you have to put your mind in, in a way that appreciates the perspective everyone has. And accepted at face, you don't have to agree with it. But if you're not consciously trying to understand those different perspectives, and help people understand yours, then you don't have the first step towards inclusion.   Inclusion isn't just bringing everyone together in the same room or the same field, particularly around a challenging topic, and then maybe more so for water. You have to understand the different perspectives and accept every one of them at face value before you can take that inclusive environment and try to work towards a solution.   Carley Hauck 09:40   Thank you. Well, and Greg, one of the reasons that I was so excited to have you on the podcast to share your experience and your passion and your expertise around water is because as you're saying, you know we all need it, to survive. It's fundamental. I mean, we're 70% water, right. And it is a way that we are all gathering, so to speak, to use the same resource. And when we're looking at the greater picture, which is people and planet, and that's our motivation for how we're leading for how businesses, hopefully solving for some of these larger problems that are impacting people and planet in a more negative way.   That's, that's really leading with more consciousness. And I know that you're based in Atlanta. And just to kind of bring this to some of the things you were speaking to in 2019, I went through Al Gore's Climate Reality leadership training, which happened to be in Atlanta. And what was so wonderful about that training, and the trainings that he does is that he really focuses on the region or the area of where that training is.   So at the time, I was living in the Bay Area of California, but I came to Atlanta, and there were 1200 of us from all over the world from all over, you know, different parts of the country. But the speakers, and the focus was on that area of Georgia, of Florida, a little bit of North Carolina, and what was going to be impacted in those areas by climate change, because it's different all around the country. Like right now, I have relocated to North Carolina, where there's a lot of water right now, you know, we've had different storms come through.   And I'm actually temporarily in Oregon, in Bend, Oregon. And it has been so incredibly dry. And it was in the high 90s to 100 degrees for the first few weeks that I was out here. And just recognizing how people are adapting and struggling with the difficulty of that.   And so that kind of brings us, you know, back to sustainability and your passion for this topic and why you've actually chosen to hone in on water. And so I feel curious, where did that start? How did that begin?   Greg Koch 12:27   Well, it started with my engineering background. And at the time, I had moved from engineering, consulting to work for the Coca Cola company. And initially, my work was, you know, inside the four walls of the business. So water efficiency, water use, storm water, wastewater management. But over time, myself and Coca Cola began to have a greater appreciation of the challenges that the business was facing, but also the communities that they were a part of were facing. And that led to 15 years of maturity on my part where I transformed myself into someone who not not just focused on water, but focused on solutions. And what drew me to that is two things.   You led the Global Water stewardship program? Correct?   I did, while I was there, for a period of time until I left their great company and they still have a wonderful water stewardship program and many other things. I am really proud of what I did there, and happy to work with other clients now in my consulting role. But back to why water. two fundamental reasons.   The first is water, there's a danger in thinking of water in the binary litany of sustainability topics. So you take major sustainability crises around the world, including the United States, you have safety issues, you have disease, you have poor education, you have social inequity, you have air pollution, you have excess carbon emissions, you have waste and litter. Right. And so you're marching down this litany of big challenges. And what they all share in common is that the desired outcome is less or none of those things. Right. So they're all bad disease, child labor, forced labor, pollution, and the desired place is well, we need to reduce or eliminate that.   And the danger when you get to water is to keep that binary thinking that's not true with water, water. Yes, there are places it's being wasted. And we can talk about that. But in a sense, you really can't waste water, not at least at the global scale, water is a finite resource. It's infinitely renewable, we have the amount we have.   And the other thing is that, beyond that non binary nature of it, it's largely, most people look at water, and they have a positive opinion and a positive experience. You bathe your child, you, you bathe yourself, you go swimming, you go sailing, you know, most people have this daily visceral connection with water, that's a positive one, most people's first memory of water, learning how to swim, you know, at Grandma's lake house, or whatever the case may be.   And so at its heart, water is a positive, right. And you could extend that thinking at a higher level to say, well, Water is life. Alright, we're 70% water, you don't want to reduce your water footprint, you'll get thirsty, then you'll dehydrate, and then bad things will happen. And when we look for life, there's a lot of things that life can use. But we always look for water, whether we're in Mars, around the moon, or wherever, because we know how fundamental it is. And that's a positive thing. So that's one reason that makes me so passionate about water.   16:45   The other is that while there are lots of different forms of water stress around the world, all of those are solvable. First of all, they're knowable, they're solvable, and they're affordable. And you cannot say that for any other sustainability challenge that you have enough data and enough technology today that is affordable, and can be implemented.   Carley Hauck 17:18   I love that. They're knowable, they're solvable, and they're affordable, affordable. Well, I'm gonna ask you some more difficult questions. Yeah, sure. Yeah, go ahead.   Greg Koch 17:30   No, I mean, that, that that says at all, so when, so but so what's the crux? What's the crux that the Kruk is the crux is first, to set up that inclusive conscious environment that respects everyone's need for water that's inalienable and understands their perspective on why they need or want the water they want? And what condition and at what time to then be able to introduce solutions, whether they're technological based or process and policy based.   If you have that enabling environment from the beginning, then you're never going to lack for Well, let's pull this technology and let's make this regulatory change. Right. There's still challenges around getting agreement and getting agreement on the timing. But one thing I like to say about water solutions is the soft stuff is the heart stuff. Right? So hard stuff, meaning infrastructure, pumps, pipes, technologies, hard stuff, meaning reservoirs and collection systems and even data, right?   That stuff's easy. I mean, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, I mean, humankind has been capturing water, storing it, moving it and even treating it for 1000s of years. And yes, we have better ways of doing that today. And there's still room for innovation. But there's enough technology and data out there. So that's not the hard stuff.   The soft stuff is the hard stuff, the soft stuff being How do you build an inclusive, conscious, enabling environment that respects everyone's need for water, and seeks an equitable outcome, and then allocates the funding, which is completely affordable, compared to a lot of the other challenges that the world faces, whether you call them sustainability or not.   Carley Hauck 19:40   Great, great. Well, I'm gonna bring it back to water. But I want to bring it to another conversation that you and I had talked about a few weeks ago where we were talking about climate change. And I was naming it as probably one of the largest complexities that we as humanity face and you challenged me and said, You believed that climate, one of the biggest problems related to climate change was population growth, economic development. And we could even think of resource scarcity as part of that. And I'd love just to hear a little bit more from you on that topic.   Greg Koch 20:23   Yeah. Well, I'll go a step further and say that while climate change is real, is serious and needs attention at a much accelerated pace than the world has done today. It is not the biggest issue facing the world. Let me explain.   First of all, in summary, there are many challenges that exist today that have existed throughout most of human history are getting worse, and will continue to get worse in the future, independent of a changing climate. Climate change is a force multiplier.   And you can say, yes, it's the biggest issue facing us today because of the urgency in solving it. But it doesn't make it the biggest issue short of existential, existentially meaning, if we all went extinct because of climate change. Well, then, of course, but when you look back, and really take climate change out of the equation and say, What is the challenge the world is facing? Yes, it's being driven by population growth and economic development, more people with better lifestyles, less poverty, less infant mortality, those are actually all good things.   But what has happened today, and what I think the biggest challenge is, it's called the Nexus, the nexus between food, water and energy. And it all is underpinned by this concept of limitations, right? So the world is bumping up against a lot of limits. One of those limits is how much greenhouse gases we can put into the environment and not cause global warming. Okay, so that's climate change. That is certainly one of the limits that we're facing. But we're facing limits in terms of how much air pollution beyond greenhouse gases, how much water pollution, how much arable farmable land there is, how much government debt and personal debt, those are also limits. Right?   There's limits on other resources, such as phosphate, tin, lithium for all of our cell phones and Tesla batteries and things like that. Those limits are being approached or even exceeded, and they have been getting there independent of climate change, they're getting worse, even as climate change is happening. And solving for climate change isn't going to solve those limitations. You can design it such but why is that such a big challenge?   You could say, well, I have solutions to water pollution or food security or what have you. But because we're approaching those limits, the solution for one of those can cause problems for the other two. Right? I'll give you an example.   If you're in the United States, and you have a car that uses gasoline, you can see it right on the pump up to 10% ethanol. That's a government mandated and government subsidized program. And it all centers around corn production to make industrial grade ethanol. 15 years ago, there was hardly any corn for ethanol in the fuel supply in the United States. Now it's close to 60% of corn that's grown, goes into ethanol production. Okay, that's a renewable fuel, decreases our dependence on foreign oil is cleaner. So you say, Oh, that's a good thing. Well, you've solved a single variant. you've provided as a single variant solution in a multivariate problem, meaning let's grow more corn and make ethanol for all the good reasons that that that can be considered. But what has led to it's led to a historic rise in the price of corn. You don't see it and I don't see it because I can't if I ever bought a bushel of corn, you know, you buy a couple years of corn or things with corn.   Corn derivatives in it. But that price is really high. And, and then you've also created water stress in places that you would think are water abundant, like Canada, a lot more acreage now being put under the plow to grow corn to meet this ethanol demand. And now you partly solved an energy problem, while causing previously non existent food and water problems. And so that nexus of those three, in a world where we're facing those limits, to me is the biggest challenge.   Carley Hauck 25:41   Thank you. I wanted to actually ask you about another problem as well, I was recently reading about how Lake Mead is drying up, and it's over allocated. And Lake Mead and the Colorado River apparently, well, they're created for melted snows that pour and flow from the Lipitor pass in the Rocky Mountains. And then seven western states really utilize that water for their, you know, for their water needs. And so those states are California, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Nevada and Arizona. And then there's also 29 tribes and Mexico that are also depending on that water. And apparently there have been some successive treaties that have been signed on how much they're going to receive an S us from the river and the dams. But those agreements are expiring in 2025. And when we have such low water, like, how are they going to renegotiate that? Who's going to get what, and then we know that California is in a huge drought as well. And so it's just it's such a complexity, how we're going to solve for that.   Greg Koch 27:03   It is. And there's two things to recognize, from a historical standpoint, and from a reality standpoint, that make a solution on how to allocate what little water there may be even more difficult. The first is the allocation scheme, both international treaties and individual and multi state agreements about how much water each person can get, or each state can get from the Colorado River were negotiated, let me check my dates 1930s 1940, somewhere around the time where the Hoover Dam was built that created Lake Mead. I'm not getting the dates exactly right. But that was based on historical snowpack measurements that assumed that that would be status quo going forward. Well, the droughts we're seeing today, again, let's Park climate change over here, but I will bring it back in.   There's a lot of scientific research. But early indications are that what we're seeing today, what we saw in California, back in 2014, what we're seeing today throughout the West, that that's actually normal conditions. And what we based all of our planning on was a period of time that we had records for, that just happened to be abnormally wet, and snowy and colder. The reality is, if you take all that away, and you think northern Mexico, Arizona, Southern Utah, Southern California and Nevada, those are deserts. Those are extremely arid areas, yet we have millions of people living, we've got tons of agriculture, we have Las Vegas, right? We have all these things that only can be there, because we've captured and allocated over allocated and are diverting all that water. If it wasn't for that manmade intervention, those places would remain scarcely populated, not being farmed, and they would be very dry.   So it's artificially enabled because of what we did, in terms of moving water around and allocating it. And now we're seeing that that allocation and those beliefs were probably based on a historically wet period, and what we're seeing today might be the norm. And so where does that lead you?   Carley Hauck 29:51   I wanted to make just one extra comment because I think it's interesting. I read this other article in the LA Times that was speaking to the drought of California and apparently because there's been such little rainfall, normally Northern California would have I think enough water coming from the Sierras. But right now Southern California actually is doing better with the allocation of water, because it's coming from a different source as you were talking about the storing of it. But historically, you know, Southern California has less water, because as you said, it's more of a desert climate.   Greg Koch 30:31   And so it's interesting that California, of all those states, you've mentioned, actually has priority rights, you know, when the government has to start, and they already have, and they will continue to limit the allocation for the other states. California's agreement doesn't expire, I think, until the late 2030s. So other places will not get enough water, maybe no water, and California will get water. So those communities will see that water flowing by knowing that it's headed to California, only because of the way the contracts and agreements were repent years ago.   Carley Hauck 31:08   And I also just feel curious, not that you should be the end all know all of water, but I'm in Oregon right now. And what's interesting is that it is incredibly dry here. I mean, I went to the Oregon coast, just for the weekend, because I just needed moisture. And the Deschutes river is this incredible river and there's lakes all around, bend where I am, but it is so dry. It feels like such an interesting juxtaposition. And I know that it's lower, the water is lower here than it has been in a very long time. But it feels so interesting that they can both be like the climate can be so dry. And yet there's a lot of water here visibly, because it's coming from glaciers. And I feel curious, you know, half the state is very wet, or again, and then where I am right now it's a desert. And so I guess I feel curious, like what do you think about Oregon as far as how they're going to fare with water?   Greg Koch 32:14   Well, I think Oregon and the states below it, and above it, that whole western United States corridor, the conditions you're seeing today might be what over a long period of time are normal and everything that we've experienced in the couple 100 years that we've basically been the United States before native peoples was that was abnormal. Right? And so where does that lead you?   I started going down that line earlier. If you were in the middle of the Sahara Desert, you would never say, hey, there's a drought. Now, it's just always like that. So you could see, I could see a point where you have to stop calling the conditions that you're facing in Oregon and California and all those a drought. Maybe that's just the way it is. That's the climate that you have, and you're not in a drought. You just happen to live in a very arid part of the world that used to have this brief period of a few 100 years where it was wet.   How does climate change come in? in a major way, okay. You're wet in Oregon and a lot of that to glacier melt. They can only melt to a point where they don't exist. And that's happened around the world. But when you look at the models, particularly for those Western Rockies, right the Cascades, the Uinta mountains down into Utah, this year, Nevada's climate change models all call for there to be more precipitation.   Now I use the word precipitation, which you know means snow, ice or rain. But that precipitation because of warmer temperatures is going to come in the form of rain versus snow. Right? So glaciers, the Sierra Nevada snowpack, think of those as Lake Mead. Those are huge reservoirs that build up through the winter and then slowly melt and release that water over the spring and summer and into the fall. But if even more precipitation falls in the winter, but it comes in the form of rain, there's no storage for it, it's just going to run off and ultimately end up in the Pacific.   So that's a big problem. That's a big problem. You could have wetter winters, but still have greater water scarcity because you don't have that natural reservoir of the snowpack, the snow and ice pack. slowly melting   Carley Hauck 35:00   So we're talking a little bit about water scarcity on the West. But then what do you see happening on the East? With the, you know, with more hurricanes and tropical storms where there's a lot more water, but then how do we store it? Right?   Greg Koch 35:17   Yeah, I'd say the biggest problem in the East and and it also exists out West. So it just compounds the problems that you have is infrastructure, water infrastructure. So think of water pipes, bringing your drinking water, sewage pipes, stormwater drains, 99% of that is out of sight, to underground and out of sight means out of mind. It's not sexy, it's not, you don't want to see it. Right? You just assume 3am. I can walk into my bathroom, turn the tap and get clean drinking water. I'll flush the toilet and it's all taken care of?   Well, the average age of infrastructure in the US is about 75 years old. It's underfunded, it's under maintained. It's underpriced in terms of the tariffs that are collected. And there's a lot of reasons why it's under priced that way. But that is leading to a problem. Can we maintain the level of service that we've experienced and been able to grow our economies and populations with this crumbling infrastructure?   Carley Hauck 36:34   And I'm wondering if you know, part of what you talk about in your your book that you authored, creating 21st century abundance through public policy innovation, moving beyond business as usual, does that pipe some of the responsibility on changing the system and structures so that we are able to actually innovate around how we're storing water and how we're implementing all of this?   Greg Koch 37:06   It does. And it provides some real examples of how you can even improve, not just maintain, but improve the level of water, infrastructure and service and be able to afford it. There's several different approaches that me and my coauthor William Sarni detail in the book, but staying on the theme of infrastructure, let me give you an example that I think shows you the type of thinking. So you recall earlier I mentioned waters underpriced in most places in the United States, you pay a very small amount for water. And there's a lot of pushback if water rates come into being or go up.   So why is that? Well, back to the beginning of this discussion, you know, water is emotional, it's spiritual, it's, it's to human right? It's inalienable. And when you bring that thinking into a municipal water system, and there's parallels in water in nature, water and agriculture, but let's stick in urban areas. You run into danger. It's like if water is a human right, how can you charge me anything for it, let alone more for it, it falls from the sky. You can't lease the rain, you can you know, it's, Hey, come on. It's water, human rights should be free?   Well, I'd say it's up to governments to decide how much they want to charge customers, particularly the underprivileged, that, and I think they should solve for that. And there's a great example of how that's done in South Africa that we can talk about, but here's the problem that they're facing, they're confusing. And therefore people are confused. Government is confusing water, the substance from water services.   So when you buy electricity, when you buy your gigabytes for your Wi Fi in your smartphone, when you buy gasoline for your car or diesel, right, you are buying a substance. You're buying electrons, you're buying radio waves, you're buying gallons of gas. You can't see them, you don't think about them. You don't want to see them in terms of gas might be a safety issue. You never think about, I'm buying a substance yet look at your bill, you are being paid for an amount of electrons called kilowatt hours, gigabytes of data, those are radio waves effectively electrons, you are paying for a substance. And of course you're paying for however many gallons or liters of gas that you buy.   But you don't think of them in that way. You think of those as services. I'm buying more lighting, security, convenience, I'm buying entertainment. I'm buying connectivity. I'm buying mobility, right? That's how you think of those substances you buy, you think of the services that they enable.   And one of the things that we talk about in the book is that mind shift needs to happen for water. Water- the substance- at your tap is free. But who's going to collect it, move it, treat it, pipe it chlorinated, chlorinated, and get it to your tap, and then do the opposite with your stormwater and wastewater. All that infrastructure, costs, money, takes labor, chemicals, energy, those are all services. And if you add up the true cost of all those services, your water bill should be about what your electricity bill is, yet it's a 10th a 20th. of that. And that's led to these infrastructure issues being underfunded, because of the confusion of the substance versus the service.   So the latest UN, IPCC, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report came out, and it's dire. Some people are calling it the final warning to humans. It shows that a lot of the early predictions are being manifest. And that time is running out if it hasn't already, on some drastic level of climate change, global warming and the implications that that has.   42:12   I experienced what they're forecasting firsthand a few weeks ago at a family reunion. And most of us live in the southeast United States, I'm in Atlanta, it's hot and humid. Others are in Sarasota, or Charlotte. And so we purposely chose a place in the mountains out west, east of Seattle, thinking we'll be on a river, it'll be nice and cool. Maybe sleep with the windows open at night. The lowest daytime temperature in the eight days we were there was 94. The highest was 105. And everyone says Oh, but it's a dry heat, which it was. But that didn't make 105 degrees any less comfortable.   Add to that for about three days, during the middle of that vacation. There was smoke in the valley that we were in from wildfires that were nearby. And that made it almost impossible to go outside. You know, we had, we'd started saying, okay, when it's really hot, we'll just try to do everything before noon and then just relax or float in the river or what have you. But then when you add wildfires and the smoke around that, then the air quality is such that you really you're just inside and it's no big bummer. Right?   And so you know if that's climate change, and that's going to happen more often. And for longer durations in places you wouldn't expect. And we did not expect that they're certainly the 105 degree heat, then that's a cause for alarm.   So what to do. And and it's a segue into how I help clients in this regard. So when you look at the UN report, it's based on a lot of complicated models, and it takes a global view. And yes, that view can be disaggregated at the local level. But that's still just a zoom in on a global model. What's more useful to people, to communities, to companies in the different places that they operate, is saying, Okay, alright, I get global warming, but I don't live all over the globe. I live and work or manufacture in a certain place. What do the models say is going to happen in that place?   And that's a level of analysis that you can start with the global models, but you have to do a lot of sophisticated calculations and modeling to try to determine what the boundary of the local area that you're looking at is, how it's being influenced by these global changes, to try to come up with a forecast of what is this valley? or What is this community? or What is this region, at a local level going to face? That's much more useful to people, you know, if you were planning for water supplies, or droughts or increased heat, then knowing that, you know, the world might warm 1.5 to 4.5, or greater degrees centigrade, really doesn't help you particularly if you think in Fahrenheit most Americans do.   But so that's the global average, what does it mean for me, in Asheville, or Atlanta, or Seattle. And so that's part of what we do that we find is very helpful to clients because it gives them that local view. And then they can share that information with others, which we encourage, to say, look, we're all going to face this situation, what can we do collectively?   Carley Hauck 46:19   Now, I also appreciate you sharing that I don't recall if I shared this with you. But it might have been one of our previous conversations in March of 2019. I went through Al Gore's Climate Reality leadership training, and he does a few of them a year all over the world. And he picks regional, you know, in geographic areas, and my training happened to be in Atlanta. So he was very much focused on bringing in speakers that could speak to what was happening in this, you know, southeast area, and how flooding is going to happen here. And this is going to happen here based on all of the science and even though at the time, I lived in California, I was still part of that cohort of 1200 folks, and because I grew up in Florida and have family in Florida, it was helpful. And it was helpful regardless.   But I think, to your point, you know, how does this affect me, right? Because most people are very self motivated, versus some of us that are more altruistically motivated, but at the same time, you can hold both. And so I feel curious, in your work, how are you supporting clients? And what's a typical client that you might serve? Because I know your area is water stewardship?   Greg Koch 47:47   Well, it's water and climate. Yeah. And so one of the ways we help clients is translating those global models and projected impacts of climate change to the local level. My clients are typically larger, multinational companies, a lot of them are in the consumer goods, business, or industry. So Procter and Gamble, Unilever, companies like that, but I also have clients in the oil and gas sector in the renewable energy sector. You know, really wide pharmaceuticals, really a wide area.   And so when it comes to climate change, the first place we can help them is having a granular understanding of what's going to happen, where they're located. And that's usually multiple locations in terms of their manufacturing plants. So okay, here's global climate change what's happening in these 20 or 30 places that leads to more meaningful responses on their part, to prepare themselves for the coming change.   Now, you say, Well, what are they doing to prevent the change? And there are a lot of clients, a lot of companies in general around the world are setting targets to reduce their emissions. That fuel they directly burn on site or in their vehicles for their say distribution fleet. They're trying to reduce emissions in the electricity and energy they purchase, trying to buy from renewable sources of energy versus fossil fuels-   Or to do carbon offsets or to really know how effective that is in the long term would be better if we weren't emitting emissions anyway, right?   Yeah, my feeling on carbon offsets if they are, quote unquote, gold standard, then yeah, carbon. The carbon footprint of the world is being reduced but that reduction might happen on the other side of the planet.   And I heard a quote, an analogy that I like, it's like buying a carbon offset credit is like, going for a run in Atlanta and having somebody in Iowa take a shower for you. Right? I think it can help, but it kind of excuses what you're doing.and puts it on somewhere else. At some point there aren't going to be any more carbon credits, and people are going to need to actually reduce their own emissions.   Carley Hauck 50:36   I love that. You just said that. Thank you. Greg Koch 50:46     Yeah. Now, company setting goals is expected, is welcome. I help clients do that. But I first asked them, 'What are they doing to advocate for government change?' Because, you know, the UN report for climate change, rightly belongs there, this is global warming, global climate change, and the scale of the globe's climate isn't going to be solved by any number of corporations making reductions in their emissions. That's good. That's welcome. That'll help. But you're going to need government, governments, global governments, the UN and individual governments at the state, federal, local, you name it level, to make some tough decisions about changing the way we produce and use energy.   And they can incentivize that which they have with subsidies for solar and wind power, they could tax it in terms of a carbon tax and a trading scheme, which exists in many parts of the world. Fossil fuels, and that's gonna be extinguished. But the point is, you know, be while you set, you know, I tell clients, while you set goals for your own business, how are you using your voice? Right, you know, that that's your footprint? What about your blueprint? Right, what are you doing, to advocate for the right policies?   And I find a lot of clients actually welcome that right now, there's a lot of uncertainty. You know, let's take the United States, for instance, is the Biden administration going to come up with a carbon tax? Or are they not? And if they do, which industries would be subject to it? And how much would that tax be? Is it enough to mitigate climate change, so on and so on, that's a lot of uncertainty, that you can sit around and wait to resolve itself.   You can advocate for that change, right? In fact, a lot of businesses say, look, I wish you just to remove the uncertainty and say we're going to tax carbon at $25 a ton, starting in 2025. And it'll be a level playing field, people can incorporate the change that's necessary and embedded into their business model. And yes, costs get passed on. But it removes the uncertainty because what you're left with now, is largely a altruistic fear, or investor driven push for companies to set these targets, you know, for a company to say, Look, I'm gonna get off the grid and produce all my energy by solar wind, some renewable form, fine, it can be done, and some have done it. But it's almost impossible to ever recover those costs.   So they're doing it because of fear of climate change, of reputation of investor pressure, maybe other stakeholder pressure. That's great. But that's right off their bottom line. And so, you know, I always ask them to have my clients and we thought about advocating, you know, whether you do it yourself or you do it through a trade association for your industry, or at some level to say, this is a problem, climate change, we want a solution. And us setting our own little goals will only get the world so far. So that's really how I advise clients on climate change.   Carley Hauck 54:42   Thank you. I don't know if you can speak you know, to this specifically, because I'm sure there's a confidentiality clause but you mentioned that one of your companies that you've supported as you knew every multinational company, and they're known as a company that really is more aligned with ESGs, you know, environmental, social governance and and creating more of those commitments and I'm seeing, and I'm grateful to see this shift is that companies that are making, you know, millions, billions of dollars like Salesforce, Amazon, they're giving a certain amount of their profits towards, for example, climate change I believe in.   I wrote this in my book, January 2020. Bezos at that time, this was right before the pandemic awarded $10 billion towards climate change now, how that is being distributed, how it's being regulated? Who knows, where's it going? You know, since then Amazon has done incredibly well, in the last year and a half. And so I haven't seen the targets, but I know that there are more checks being written. And so you said to advocate for government, but if government, you know, isn't cutting that money, or isn't making those changes, I do think that there is a responsibility and an opportunity for business to be a force for good, and to utilize their voice, their influence, because a lot of government officials, you know, tend to be elected through money that might, you know, lobbying that might be coming from businesses. And so I think it's kind of all combined. What do you think about that? Your perspective?   Greg Koch 56:38   You have to appreciate the scale of government versus the scale of business. Right? So a lot of people might say, well, businesses should just bite the bullet and donate half of their profits or 100% of their profits to some cause. Let's say that's climate change, since that's the most pressing crisis we're facing.   Now, when you look at the scale of business versus government, it is not apples and oranges. It's apples and hammers, the scale of government is in the trillions and 10s of trillions of dollars, the scale of business is in the billions of dollars. And there's a big difference between a billion and those three more zeros to get to a trillion. In the book I co authored, I took the top 1000 corporations in the world and their annual profits for the year that I analyzed, and said, Okay, how much is that profits? That was about $800 billion. So almost a trillion dollars. And so if the top 1000 corporations gave away all of their profits, 100% for 10 years, what do you have, and I equated it to the problem in the world around safe drinking water access.   And that amount of money. You know, there's a lot of people in the world who don't have affordable, reliable access to safe drinking water in their homes, all over the world, including in Georgia, and North Carolina, and, of course, many parts of the developing world. So that's a goal within the Sustainable Development Goals. There's a goal number six, which is all things related to water, and a sub goal within SDG. Six is safe drinking water, that amount of money over 10 years is enough to solve just that sub goal. Right. So that calls for the top 1000 corporations in the world to take 100% of their profits for 10 years, which is kind of unrealistic. But even if they did that, that only solves part of one of 17 SDG goals. So to say that companies ought to donate more. You can say that, but if they donated everything, it wouldn't be nearly enough because the scale of government is so much bigger.   I mean, just take the United States, for instance, Congress now is debating and probably will soon pass a five and a half trillion dollar budget, excess budget, to do all the things they want to do, including parts of the New Clean deal and things like that. That would be all of corporations for five years and all their profits just to come up with that but governments have that scale. And so it doesn't excuse philanthropy and direct corporate action. But it's sort of a red herring to say, well, business should do more.   There's only so much they can do. And if they gave away all their profits, and they all became charities, it's nowhere near enough money to solve the problem. So that's why I say, do what you can give what you can as a corporation, but also use your voice to advocate government to make the tough decisions that are needed.   Carley Hauck 1:00:30   That's really wonderful. It's a three fold action sequence, just to summarize what you said. So it's advising businesses to bring climate change into their operations? How can they lower their carbon emissions? How can they really reduce them, not just have offsets? How then do we also take some of our profits, and really align with social and environmental responsibility in giving to maybe help with some of the sub goals of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, because I think, again, more is better than none. But then to really advocate for the government, and to, you know, put some pressure on some to hold some accountability for the government to do the wise and good thing for all.   And not to get into politics very much at all. But you know, our last president denied climate change. So we are behind the mark on a bigger level. And, you know, we we have some, I think, very important shifts and changes that we need to make right now, you know, in the next couple years, there is urgency, because if we are to reduce our emissions by 50%, in 10 years, which is what they're forecasting, so that we have a chance for humanity to not have this horrible suffering, like you were experiencing just a small bit on the west coast.   When we had our first conversation, several weeks ago, I was in Bend, Oregon, I was there for six weeks. And the entire time that I was there, it was 93 to 108. And I have, I felt like I was baking from the inside out. Bend is a beautiful place. But I really couldn't enjoy it because I was so tired. And so exhausted every day. So it's, yeah, it's real.   And, and then I'm back here and, you know, and outside of Asheville, which is kind of a temperate rainforest, and it feels like a jungle. And they're just such different climates. And this is a bubble. Like I'm very aware most of our country does not look like where I am. But that's why I landed here. From the fires of the Bay Area 10 months ago. Yeah. So anyway, long, longer tangent there.   But let's talk a little bit more about water, if you're open to that. And also thank you for the book that you wrote. It sounds like a really wonderful contribution. I have not read it yet. But we will be sure to leave a link in the show notes for people that want to learn more about that. It sounds like such a huge undertaking to be able to analyze and understand what's really happening.   Greg Koch 1:03:38   Thank you. Thank you so much. Yeah, so water. As we've chatted already, water is under a lot of stress, and that stress is growing independent of climate change. Right? So you can argue about climate change all you want. Flint, Michigan, and those problems with lead and drinking water had nothing to do with climate change. Right? The lack of safe drinking water to almost 4 billion people around the world has nothing to do with climate change, right?   So there are water quality problems, lack of infrastructure, water scarcity, droughts, floods, storms, all of these things exist today. And climate change is making them more unpredictable, more intense, and and have greater duration. And so water, right you know, climate change is a shark has been often said than water is its teeth. So there's a lot of reasons for business. And therefore my work with my clients to look at water, in conjunction with or even independent of climate change, which is more of a sort of a future type planning but even today, there are problems.   Now, what I find is that most businesses in the clients I work with, but even in general, they do a really good job of managing water in the four walls of, say the factory, right. So they bring it in, they pay for that. They use it efficiently, they look for ways to reuse it. They treat their wastewater before they discharge it, and they manage stormwater that falls on their property, right? And that's table stakes, they should do that. And they need to always do that. independent of regulations. And by and large business does a good job with that.   Where I come in, is where we see that clients are exposed to more water stress in the watershed, and communities that they're a part of, we help them analyze that water stress and determine what impacts that could have on them. And that's a big aha, for a lot of clients, because it puts them in two mindsets, and that's always my goal. And when I achieve it with a client, I feel really good because I know some really good things are gonna happen in that community and watershed.   One, you have to get them to truly appreciate that water is a shared resource. They are sharing that water, with their neighbors, with nature, with other industries, even their competitors, of course, with people all around them wherever they're located. Right, it's not their water. It's not someone else's water independent habit, our government may or may not sort of manage it, but water is shared. And so when you recognize that water is shared, that means if it's under stress, you're going to have to work with those with whom you share that water, in partnership to address issues, right. So one leads to the other.   The other big aha, I aim for clients to achieve is to understand that water is transient, right? It's you know, get some water and put it in a bucket and put it in your room and say I own that five gallons of water. Well, good luck. If you do nothing, and you never tip it over and a dog doesn't come in and drink it, it'll eventually all evaporate, right?   Water is heavy, water likes to move, water is in a continuous cycle. And you know, that's a, that's a very easy but illustrative example to say, you don't really own water, it's transient, right? It's going to come into your home, your body, your factory, your ecosystem and move on somewhere else. And so what that leads to, along with this shared concept is the concept of stewardship.   Alright, so stewardship is defined as taking care of something for a period of time. So a shepherd stewards the flock of sheep, for instance, right? Shepherd may own the sheep or not, but they'll move on eventually into something wool or die of old age or, you know, other things. So it's a good analogy, because it says, Okay, I have to take care of this water. And it's water that I share. So you get these two concepts. I'm sharing this, and I have to steward it while it's in my control at some level.   And when you achieve those two mindset changes, I find that it's very powerful for companies to then say, Okay, well, I know what water stress issues I'm facing. And I know how to solve them at the end of the pipe and my four walls, but that's not going to solve the problem. I'll have to continue throwing money at it. The problem is still getting worse. It's impacting my employees and where they live in that community. It's impacting maybe my customers, maybe my suppliers. It's impacting my neighbors, people that share this water with me. So, yes, I ought to do things in my own control. But since I'm a steward who shares that water, I seek partnerships, the local government and local community, NGOs, peers, even competitors And that's the big aha. And it leads to some really exciting types of projects and partnerships.   Carley Hauck 1:10:09   Great. Let's bring it to the consumer and the individual. Because a lot of folks, you know, might be really looking at water like what's happening with the water in my community, how is it being treated? Are the rivers or the lakes if I have those nearby? Are they even safe to swim in? I don't know if you do any advising around that, but I'll just give a personal example.     So when I was living in Bend, there is a river called the Deschutes that goes through the river, or sorry, goes through the town. And everybody's in it. They're kayaking and stand up paddleboarding. It's a huge part of the culture there, even though it's very hot and dry people are in the water, especially in the summer, and the waters are clean. You know, it's coming from glaciers, it's cold. But then where I live now, outside of Asheville, the French Broad River is another river that goes through the town of Asheville, and everybody tells me don't swim in that river. You can fall in it, but then get out, don't swim in it, I think. Why is this river so polluted? Why is there not a responsibility to clean it up? And so me being a person that wants to be a good steward of the water for however long I'm here, I've been thinking, Okay, so how can I use my voice? How can I speak up about things that matter to me that will benefit the whole? And why is this not being cared for? I am wondering if you could just support me as an individual, and how that might translate to others because this is my, you know, geographic area, right, going back to the beginning of our conversation.   Greg Koch 1:12:00   So you've touched on one of the biggest problems not with water, not just in the United States, but around the world. But the United States is a great example. Because when you look at water quality, right, there's three things that are impacting it. And two of them have been largely solved. And the big challenge is that third one. Okay.   So starting with the Clean Water Act in 1972, created by the EPA. Before that, businesses weren't required to treat their wastewater and municipalities weren't required to treat their wastewater and you had things like Love Canal, your listeners can Google that. You had rivers catching on? Love Canal, yeah, Google Love Canal, okay. Google, Pittsburg Rivers on fire. I mean, basically, you had raw industrial effluent being discharged into the environment and raw sewage being discharged by cities.   The Clean Water Act came along, and over a period of a few decades. Now, there are strict regulations in place with very strict enforcement. Nothing's perfect. But businesses have to have an industrial wastewater discharge permit that is heavily regulated, they have to treat their water to a certain level before they discharge it to the sewer. And if they go directly into the environment, it's a whole different ball of wax with a lot more control.   So by and large, industrial, chemical, wastewater, is being treated. Similarly. Communities, from Chicago to Asheville to tiny communities around the world, now all have to fully treat their wastewater before it's discharged into the environment. So why do we still have polluted rivers? One is, neither of those are perfect. But it should still be swimmable if that's all that was going in there.   So it comes to the third. And the concept is called non Point Source runoff. A good example of non Point Source meaning a point would be here's the municipal sewage treatment, that's a point or here's a factory and there's their discharge. pipe. That's a point, a non point. A good example is a parking lot. Right, you got a parking lot in front of a grocery store and a lot of people's cars drip a little bit of oil or whatever it is, and then the rain comes and that rain picks up those contaminants and contaminates the water. So that is a source of contamination.   But the biggest one, which is also non-point, is farming. Farms do not need to treat water that leaves their site, whether it leaves a storm water, or it infiltrates into groundwater. Now, farming, agriculture uses 70-75% of the world's water. And they're applying fertilizers, they're applying pesticides and fungicides. And to the extent those aren't fully incorporated into the biomass of the plant, which most cases they're not, then you're going to have run off with those agro chemicals. And that causes a lot of problems in water quality.   Carley Hauck 1:15:58   And so that's one of the horrible parts of the animal agriculture system, which you and I were talking about before we hit record, but you know, that's a huge, Oh, what's the word I want to use? I mean, it's definitely adding to the warming of the planet just based on all of the practices and the carbon that's coming from the animals. And that would be a whole nother conversation.   Greg Koch 1:16:28   It would, but it's not just animals. I mean, it's it's row crops. It's corn, its wheat, its peas, its carrots, it's Yeah, you exacerbate that? Particularly when it gets concentrated? You know, you're part of mono cropping? Yeah, mono cropping. But in North Carolina, you know, there's a lot of concentrated livestock. So chicken farms, hog farms, right, that are, you know, I could argue their point sources right here, the 10 acre plot of land that has 5000 pigs on it, and it discharges its wastewater I mean, if that's not a point source, then then what is? The same with, you know, chicken, you know, chicken farms in the long rows of chicken houses, and, you know, they have waste coming out of those. And so, so yeah, you, you, you exacerbate the water pollution. And you have climate issues when you talk about livestock and meat in general. But agriculture at large is a huge source of water quality problems, and it's almost completely unregulated.   Carley Hauck 1:17:45   Wow. Thank you for sharing that. Yeah. So I want to pull it back to the climate report, and I'm tracking all of our conversations. So I'm gonna summarize it kind of in as skillful of a bundle as I can, so that listeners can actually really understand how they might want to take action with all this wonderful information you're giving.   When we look at this massive climate report, the sixth one, you know, as you said, it's really talking about what's happening globally. But there are maps that are being shown of how it's going to impact you know, the West Coast versus the East Coast. And most of my listeners of the podcast are in the United States, but they're also in other countries. But just for the purposes of the dominant listeners, what could you forecast regarding drought and water from the west coast to the east coast. In our last conversation, we were talking about how California is actually getting their water from other states. But we know that California is really running out of water, but they have such a massive population. So based on the geography of the climate maps right now. What do you think is going to be happening in the next few years from the west coast to the east coast? I mean, the East Coast is getting more water from these hurricanes and storms and the West Coast, at least from what I can tell, is having more drought and fires but I would love if you can break it down even more and where is a safe place? You know? Or maybe maybe not safe, climate resilient, right? Where is more climate resilient? And how do we support more climate resiliency, in the places that we are? Greg Koch 1:19:52   Well, let me say that, that second part, how do we support climate resilience, where we are is what we should all be focused on. I don't think the time now is. Where's that place in northern Canada? We can all go running because you're right that that's a bit alarmist and I'm not going to advocate for that.   But so yeah, call your congressperson, call your senator and say, I want action on climate change, I want it for myself, I want it for my grandchildren, etc, etc. Reduce your own carbon footprint in in ways that are meaningful. Encourage your friends and families to do that. But use your voice and use your vote. Some of the more powerful dollars, no shop with your products, right? Yep. right about that a lot on the podcast. So let's look, West Coast, East Coast, and what is forecasted? I'll just give one example from each coast, right?   Yes, you see droughts, you see wildfires, which have always happened and will continue to happen but are anticipated to to be more frequent and last longer and be more intense. But the big, forecasted change in the West Coast. That doesn't get a lot of press but it is. To me, one of the biggest problems is precipitation. Much of the west coast from the Rockies West, regardless of what state you're in, get their water from snow and ice that falls on the Sierra Nevada or the Cascades or the Rockies. It's all part of the Rockies, the Wasatch Mountains in Utah. What have you.   And so snow and ice fall and you've got a nice snowpack that's actually measured, and then it melts slowly over spring and summer. And feeds downstream communities from San Diego to Seattle. Okay. Large generalization but pretty accurate. So that snow and ice pack is a reservoir. Think of it as a lake, right? And the temperature is the dam. Right? Because it's still frozen. And then it slowly melts and on it comes like Deschutes river and bend oregon. That's snow and ice melt.   Right? It's snow melt.   So what if and this is what's forecasted? You actually get more precipitation in the winter. But because it's warmer, that precipitation comes as rain and not snow. Right?   Right. So what's gonna happen to the rain, it's not going to wait till summer, it's going to go downhill. And there's nowhere to store it. There's not enough places to store it. So it just ultimately will run off eventually, somewhere in the Pacific Ocean. And that's a huge problem. And in fact, if you read the UN Climate report that we talked about earlier, and this got picked up in the press, it rained for the first time in recorded history at the highest glacier in Greenland. Right? So Greenland's got this huge snow ice pack. Right. And so more and more snow. It rained up there.   Yeah, Right versus snow. And so think about that in the Sierra Nevada. I mean, forget about skiing and stuff. We're talking about as you're losing that reservoir, and all that water goes off. Now, even if you don't have a drought, there's just no water coming from the mountainside. And so even if the temperatures were cooler, it does, where's the water? It was supposed to be fed to us over the spring and summer. Right.   On the east coast. I think one of the biggest near term sort of 10 year problems is storms and storm surges. And probably the best place to see that in action today, as we speak, is Miami Beach. Right. But you could extend that to Galveston, Texas to New Orleans to Biloxi you know, really the whole Gulf Coast and up the e

This or Something Better
EP 43: Pioneering the End of Waste with Scott Hamlin of Looptworks

This or Something Better

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 39:54


Each year in the US, Approximately 17 million tons of textile waste are placed into landfills and Scott Hamlin is on a mission to change that. Scott is the founder of Looptworks, a Portland, Oregon based company that re-purposes and upcycles abandoned, pre-consumer and post-consumer materials into limited edition products. Their end goal: zero waste. From leather airplane seats, to NBA jerseys and Patagonia fly fishing waders, Lootpworks takes these unwanted products and materials and transforms them into something new, useful and incredibly unique. And, in the process they limit the use of natural resources and reduce carbon emissions.  In this episode, Scott will share with you easy ways to reduce your consumption and make more sustainable choices.    About Scott Hamlin Scott Hamlin is the founder and CEO of Looptworks, a certified B corporation and mission-driven brand that gives new, higher value life to excess textile materials in pursuit of circularity.  With industry experience at adidas AG, Jockey International and Royal Robbins, Hamlin is considered a thought leader on the circular economy. His passion is focused on re-imagining product creation with a focus on zero waste and closed loop manufacturing methods. By re-using the world's pre and post-consumer excess, the Portland, Oregon based brand aims to eliminate global textile waste, while inspiring people to reduce their impact on the planet. Hamlin was recognized for his work in the area of sustainable capitalism and was selected to participate on a panel with former Vice President and Nobel Peace Laureate, Al Gore as a pioneer of sustainable industries. He has served as the keynote speaker at Temple University's Social Entrepreneurship Conference, as well as speaking engagements at Harvard University, The Green Biz Forum, Sustainable Brands, and many other universities and business conferences both in the US and internationally.   Connect with Scott LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/scott-hamlin-b989415/ Website https://www.looptworks.com Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Looptworks Instagram https://www.instagram.com/looptworks/ Twitter https://twitter.com/looptworks

The Jacki Daily Show
Al Gore's Spoons, TX Nuke Dump, Coal's Back, HunterNation | Guests: K. Braun; T. Taylor; M. Perales

The Jacki Daily Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 107:01


Al Gore is back, this time finding ways to stunt Africa's growth on the basis that offering abundant, affordable fossil fuels or nuclear energy to the world's destitute is not green. Ken Braun, Senior Investigative Researcher with Capital Research Center, and author of “Al Gore Offers Africa Electricity by the Spoonful,” reveals the sacrifices Gore demands of the world's poor, while making few of his own.   Then, the country's largest freshwater aquifer, the Ogallala, and the country's largest oil & gas play, the Permian Basin, are under threat from a plan to dump all the nation's high-level radioactive waste atop of both… and so-called environmentalists arenowhere to be found. The Texas Governor and legislature are fighting back, with both Democrats and Republicans making a rare, united front against the federal and foreign actors who are steamrolling the will of the people. Jacki talks about this disastrous plan with representatives from Fasken Oil & Ranch – attorney Monica Perales and Tommy Taylor, Director of Oil & Gas Development.   Next, yet another of Jacki's predictions (we like to call them “prophecies,” but they're really just common sense) has been fulfilled: Coal is back and making money. Even in its darkest days of cascading bankruptcies, Jacki opined that coal will always have a future for as long as world population continues to boom. Even the poorest countries will see increased demand for energy as they move up to a more motorized and modernized future. Countries will not starve their people or economies to meet the regressive “green” goals of the United Nations, nor should they. Until alternatives are vastly improved, coal has a future. It is dense, cheap, transportable, and quickly dispatchable at times of high demand (say, Texas in a February winter storm), which is more than we can say for coal's overhyped “competition.” The fundamentals made this one an easy call.   Then, one of Jacki's dreams came true as she was able to visit Ted Nugent's Texas ranch, take in his concert from the front row, and hear from Ted and his wife, Shemane, a plan to activate hunters across America to show up to vote, protecting the culture of freedom. We at The Jacki Daily Show are conservationists to the core, as are the great Americans at HunterNation: conserving nature and conserving our heritage and inalienable rights. Every last one of us should get involved at hunternation.org. Jacki is a Lifetime Member!

Barjory Buffet: The Cruise Detective
One Man's Trash is Another Man

Barjory Buffet: The Cruise Detective

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 56:45


Barjory climbs out of a watery grave and into the trash to stage a rematch with her nefariousest foes! Now she must navigate three villains, The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, flashbacks to her first case, former Vice President Al Gore, and a whole lotta Neil in this epic-poem-length episode!! Written by Rachel Crowe and Brad BeidemanEdited by Brad BeidemanRachel Crowe as: Barjory BuffetBrad Beideman as: Neil GregKaylin Mahoney as: Dr. Kelpsy QuariumWill Stryker as: Aloejandro van AlvessGreg Goodness as: The Satin SeagullEli Lutsky as: King Al GoreMelissa Strype as: Marjomin BuffetJoey Pleasants as: Benjory BuffetJordan Wold as: Niles GregElijah Katz as: Rodge BadgebeachNako Narter as: LennyKelsey Buckley as: BennyMagi Calcagne as: Narrator And check out our Between the Scenes podcast, early episode releases, postcard club, and more(?!) on our Patreon: patreon.com/bbthecd

Darker Days Radio
#185: Al Gore was a Ghoul? (DC by Night RPG Review!)

Darker Days Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 92:20


Chigg and Mike review the classic Vampire sourcebook DC by Night, a city rife with intrigue, violence, and the boogeyman of the Sabbat. Luckily Ventrue prince Marcus Vitel is there to keep everything stable. Right? Stick around after the credits for a bonus episode recorded after an adventure on the streets of DC! Be sure to check us out on Facebook or through our Discord server https://discord.gg/GGuRKAn. To stay up to date, subscribe through iTunes or Spotify!          Links For This Episode:   Darker Days Link Tree: http://linktr.ee/darkerdaysradio Full Metal RPG: https://fullmetalrpg.podbean.com/ Realm of Fire: https://realmoffire.podbean.com/ Darker Days Discord: https://discord.gg/GGuRKAn   Want more spooky stories and sinister plot hooks? Check out Secret Frequency Files 2:

Cyrus Says
feat, Nidhie Sharma

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 65:14


On this episode, Cyrus is joined by filmmaker and author Nidhie Sharma, to talk about her new book 'Invictus: The Jungle that Made Me', her thrilling real life journey of being lost in the dense jungles of Tawang in Arunachal Pradesh, 10,000 feet above sea level at the Indo-China border as a child. Cyrus and Nidhie also talk about Nidhie writing for the Emmy nominated show 'Inside Edge', her first book 'Dancing with Demons' - India's first boxing fiction novel, growing up as an army child, directing a documentaries on climate for Al Gore's Current TV, and lots more. Tune in for a very fun conversation.Follow Nidhie on Twitter & Instagram: https://twitter.com/IamNidhieSharma and https://www.instagram.com/iamnidhiesharmaAlso, subscribe to Cyrus' YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCHAb9jLYk0TwkWsCxom4q8AYou can follow Antariksh on Instagram @antariksht: https://instagram.com/antarikshtDo send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or e-mailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.comDon't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @BoredBroacha (https://www.instagram.com/boredbroacha)In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussaysYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

This Climate Business
The new era of farming with Melissa Clark-Reynolds

This Climate Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 40:56


What future does sheep and beef farming have in a climate changed world? Serial entrepreneur and relentless optimist, Melissa Clark-Reynolds sits on the board of Beef & Lamb and sees a bright future for New Zealand farmers if the sector and government can get the settings right. Hint: it doesn't involve pine trees. In a wide-ranging interview covering turtles, synthetic meat, Al Gore and of course Covid-19, Melissa shares her vision for a low-emissions, high-equity future.

PARANOID With Patrick Simpson
HISTORY: The 2000 election

PARANOID With Patrick Simpson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 46:10


Today we recap the controversial 2000 election. Early into the night Al Gore was given the state of Florida, and virtually the election. But late into the night the tide started to turn and began a nasty 5 week battle that would determine who would lead America into the 21st century.

Michael and Us
PREVIEW - #262 - Al Gore Lives On My Street

Michael and Us

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 3:52


PATREON EPISODE - https://www.patreon.com/posts/55227370 Al Gore changed the way millions of people think about the climate crisis, but a full 15 years after the intended wake-up call of AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH (2006), the crisis is worse than ever. We look back at the documentary and analyze why Gore's brand of neoliberal environmentalism hasn't worked. PLUS: the Canadian election, The Sopranos, and tales of small-town political corruption.

Ratchet & Respectable
Matching Thighs

Ratchet & Respectable

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 42:48


Aaliyah's “One In A Million” is (finally) available; Kanye is having the most lucrative promo tour ever; Only Fans is no longer selling sex (starting soon); The Great Plate Debate is back (again); Marlon Wayans is (was?) a proud Mama's Boy; Jeopardy is (still) in shambles *sigh*; Beyoncé's ass breaks Al Gore's Internet Ritual is offering my listeners 10% off during your first 3 months. Visit ritual.com/RATCHET to start your Ritual today.  Birch is giving 200 dollars off ALL mattresses and 2 free eco-rest pillows at BirchLiving.com/ratchet 20% OFF your first purchase! Just go to my special URL: OnyxAndRose.com/RATCHET Get Amazon Music at amazon.com/RATCHETPOD Go to Canva.me/ratchet to get your FREE 45-day extended trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword
Thursday, August 19, 2021 - Great Clues GALORE

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 11:35


A crisp Thursday offering from the pen of Oliver Roeder, today's crossword had lots of sparkling clues. The pièce-de-résistance was 36A, Life preserver? ... or a hint to six squares in this puzzle, CEREALBOX (and we'll just pause here to let that sink in

Tech Won't Save Us
How Neoliberalism Seized the Internet w/ Dan Greene

Tech Won't Save Us

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 57:20


Paris Marx is joined by Dan Greene to discuss how the Clinton administration reframed poverty through the lens of the internet and how that transformed the missions of key institutions like libraries and schools.Dan Greene is an assistant professor at University of Maryland's College of Information Studies. He is the author of “The Promise of Access: Technology, Inequality, and the Political Economy of Hope.” Follow Dan on Twitter at @Green_DM.

My Climate Journey
Ep. 170: Lila Preston, Partner & Head of Growth Equity Strategy at Generation Investment Management

My Climate Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 55:44


Today's guest is Lila Preston, Head of the Growth Equity Strategy for Generation Investment Management.Lila joined Generation in 2004 and serves as Head of the Growth Equity Strategy. Prior to joining Generation, Lila was a Director in Development & Finance at VolunteerMatch and a Fulbright Fellow in Chile, where she worked on forestry and conservation projects. Lila currently serves as a Board Director at Nature's Fynd as well as a Board Observer at Toast and CiBO Technologies. In addition, she is a member of the Social Mission Board at Seventh Generation, is on the Board of Advisors at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, and is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum. Lila received a BA in English Language and Literature from Stanford University and an MBA from London Business School.I was looking forward to sitting down with Lila and learning more about Generation Investment Management. In this episode, Lila walks me through Generation's mission, her climate journey, and how Generation evaluates companies to invest in. We also have a lively discussion about ESG investing, greenwashing, and the ethics of partnering with fossil fuel companies as we head towards a clean future. Lila is a great guest, and this episode is a must-listen.Enjoy the show!You can find me on twitter @jjacobs22 or @mcjpod and email at info@myclimatejourney.co, where I encourage you to share your feedback on episodes and suggestions for future topics or guests.Episode recorded July 23rd, 2021For more information about Generation Investment Management: https://www.generationim.com/For more information about this episode, visit: https://myclimatejourney.co/episodes/lila-preston

Unbroken: Healing Through Storytelling
51: From Murder to Forgiveness with Azim Khamisa

Unbroken: Healing Through Storytelling

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 46:10


Azim Khamisa is an inspiration and I first heard about him throughThe Forgiveness Project and his wonderful TED talk with Ples Felix, thegrandfather of the man who shot his son.He has been hailed by dignitaries such as the Dalai Lama, former President BillClinton, and Al Gore; Azim carries his inspirational message of forgiveness,peace, leadership and hope into the world.Following the murder of his son in 1995, Azim Khamisa founded the TariqKhamisa Foundation (TKF.org), which started a subsequent forgivenessmovement that has reached millions.Every time I hear him speak I am moved, especially when he talks about therebeing two victims at both ends of the gun and had that realisation just a fewhours after his son had been shot.He has received over 80 local, national and international awards:- In 1997 he received the National Crime Victims Special CommunityService Award presented by President Clinton and Attorney General JanetReno. - In 2002, he received Search for Common Ground's prestigious awardalongside Desmond Tutu and Ted Koppel- In 2004, he participated in the Synthesis Dialogues with His Holiness the DalaiLama which was hosted by Pope John Paul at his summer palace inCastelgandolfo, Italy  - In 2006 he was given the "Spirit of Crazy HorseAward  from the Reclaiming Youth Network alongside Mohammad Ali.- In addition, Azim has been the recipient of the California Peace Prize in 2003and the Pepsi Freedom Heroes Award in 2006. He has received several otherPeacemaker of the Year awards.With a strong passion to share his message with the youth and to inspirenonviolent leaders become proactive as peacebuilders, Azim, in addition, hasgiven over 1,000 presentations to over a million students worldwide. He is apublished author of five books.Some key points from our interview:How he believes that the universe doesn't give us any more pain than you can handle.How he reached out in forgiveness to Tony Hicks grandfather, Ples Felixto begin the process of healing and together they established the TariqKhamisa Foundation. How being a Sufi Muslim has supported him during his grief process andguided him for the future.How when he first met Tony in prison he says he was able to climb intohis eyes and touch his humanity and realised that the spark in him wasno different from himself.How he supported Tony in prison and advocated for his parole hearing.How he started the Tariq Khamisa Foundation to “Kids killing kids”through education, mentorship and community service programsYou can find out more about Azim here:https://www.azimkhamisa.comhttps://www.ted.com/talks/azim_khamisa_and_ples_felix_what_comes_after_tragedy_forgiveness*                                     *                                             *                               You can find out more about Madeleine, her story and her memoir, Unbroken,  from her website: https://madeleineblack.co.uk/Watch the Podcast via YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/c/MadeleineBlackUnbroken

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2680: The Electoral College

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 3:49


Episode: 2680 What happens when no presidential candidate receives a majority of electoral votes?  Today, we vote for president.

The Kevin Jackson Show
Ep. 21-304 - Lies, Lies, and More Lies

The Kevin Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 38:40


In this episode, disinformation is more than just lying. Why the CEO of Pfizer is not fully vaccinated. The Fed targets states who lift WuFlu restrictions, but won't comment on lockdown states with higher numbers.

American Thought Leaders
Naomi Wolf on Censorship, Vaccine Passports, and the Reversal of ‘My Body, My Choice'

American Thought Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 38:37


“I can't believe that the left, with its long tradition of fighting for free speech” is “just giving [that] up,” says feminist author and journalist Naomi Wolf. Wolf, a longtime liberal and former adviser to the political campaigns of both Bill Clinton and Al Gore, breaks down the dangers she sees inherent to vaccine passports and a “scary marriage” of government, big pharma, and Big Tech censorship. “We've reached a kind of digital Stalinism,” Wolf says. Wolf is the founder and CEO of DailyClout.io, a platform helping people engage in the democratic process. This episode was filmed at the FreedomFest conference in South Dakota.

Culture Factor 2.0
Bruce Daisley: Make Work Better

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 47:56


Bruce Daisley LinkedinBruce Daisley WebsiteBruce Daisley TwitterEat Sleep Work Repeat BookBruce Daisley's other book, The Joy of WorkThe Good Jobs Strategy, Zeynep TonPriya Parker, The Art of Gathering  

This Moment
Episode 37 replay "A Moment of Truth Featuring Al Gore"

This Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 40:05


This week we replay episode 37 which features former U.S Vice President Al Gore. Join us as Mr. Gore talks about his journey to becoming one of the most recognizable voices in environmentalism today. Also discussed is the impact of Mr. Gore's film An Inconvenient Truth, COVID's impact on wildlife and social injustices. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Acquired
Andreessen Horowitz Part I

Acquired

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 125:47


We kick off Season 9 with a classic: Part I of the a16z story. How did this brand new venture firm charge out of the gates in 2009, going from zero to disrupting the entire venture industry overnight? You probably know Marc & Ben's history with Netscape and Loudcloud/Opsware... but what about the Black Panthers, Nintendo 64, Al Gore, Doug Leone, Masayoshi Son, and an epic feud with Benchmark Capital that became Silicon Valley's version of the Hatfields and the McCoys? Buckle up, Acquired's got the truth. If you love Acquired and want more, join our LP Community for access to over 50 LP-only episodes, monthly Zoom calls, and live access for big events like emergency pods and book club discussions with authors. We can't wait to see you there. Join here at: https://acquired.fm/lp/ Sponsors: Thank you to Pilot for being our presenting sponsor for all of Acquired Season 9! Pilot takes care of startups' bookkeeping, tax and CFO services so busy founders can focus on what matters, which is building the company. To paraphrase Jeff Bezos's famous AWS analogy: bookkeeping and tax don't make your product any better — so you should let Pilot handle them for you. In fact Pilot is backed by Bezos himself via Bezos Expeditions, along with an all-star roster of other investors including Sequoia, Index, and Stripe. They are truly the gold standard for startup bookkeeping, and many of the companies we work with run on them. You can get in touch with Pilot here: https://bit.ly/acquiredfmpilot , and Acquired listeners get 20% off their first 6 months! (use the link above) Thank you as well to Pitchbook and to Nord Security. You can learn more about them at: https://bit.ly/acquiredpitchbook https://bit.ly/acquirednord Links: David Streitfeld's great NYT piece on the Horowitz family: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/22/technology/one-family-many-revolutions-from-black-panthers-to-silicon-valley-to-trump.html Marc on the Tim Ferriss Show: https://tim.blog/2018/01/01/the-tim-ferriss-show-transcripts-marc-andreessen/ 2003 Marc in SF Gate: https://www.sfgate.com/business/ontherecord/article/OPSWARE-INC-On-the-record-Marc-Andreessen-2525822.php#photo-2684736 Carve Outs: Ben: The Elephant in the Brain: Hidden Motives in Everyday Life: https://www.amazon.com/Elephant-Brain-Hidden-Motives-Everyday/dp/0190495995 David: Resonant Arc Podcast / YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFzWAEPDGiY34bGpwM_DWmA Episode Sources: [Google Doc link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1DDb2nGfvnQ_XV4qs6qoHE084eS0J8cP74gTfdr736GE/edit# ] http://1997.webhistory.org/www.lists/www-talk.1993q1/0099.html http://allthingsd.com/20130125/go-west-young-geek-chris-dixon-on-why-he-became-a-silicon-valley-vc-at-andreessen-horowitz-and-more-video/ http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/det/1789/Marc-Andreessen/ http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2015/08/20-years-on-why-netscapes-ipo-was-the-big-bang-of-the-internet-era/ https://a16z.com/2011/05/09/microsoft-buys-skype/ https://a16z.com/2011/06/30/meet-our-new-general-partner-jeff-jordan/ https://a16z.com/2017/04/07/todd-and-freddy-okta/ https://a16z.com/2018/09/25/michael-ovitz-entertainment-culture-negotiation-talent/ https://a16z.com/2019/06/20/slack/ https://a16z.com/2019/11/20/brand-building-a16z-ideas-people-marketing/ https://a16z.com/2019/11/26/a16z-podcast-how-what-why-500th-episode-behind-the-scenes/ https://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/06/15/andreessen-horowitz-hires-a-female-partner-from-outcast-communications/ https://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/03/andreessen-horowitz-starts-second-fund/ https://books.google.com/books?id=zyIvOn7sKCsC&pg=PA15#v=onepage&q&f=false https://charlierose.com/videos/12907 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andreessen_Horowitz https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Horowitz https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Panther_Party https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Browser_wars https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Horowitz https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_H._Clark https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Jordan_(venture_capitalist) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Andreessen https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Ovitz https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosaic_(web_browser) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Betty_Van_Patter https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netscape https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ning_(website) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spyglass,_Inc. https://fortune.com/2011/07/12/skype-the-inside-story-of-the-boffo-8-5-billion-deal/ https://fortune.com/2021/01/20/tech-and-crypto-funder-andreessen-horowitz-wants-to-replace-the-media-that-might-be-bad-news-for-investors/ https://fortune.com/longform/jeff-jordan-vc/ https://greatness.floodgate.com/episodes/marc-andreessen-was-netscape-an-overnight-success https://money.cnn.com/2009/07/02/technology/marc_andreessen_venture_fund.fortune/index.htm https://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2005/07/25/8266639/ https://newrepublic.com/article/162227/david-horowitz-profile-trump-propagandist-radical-leftist https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ben-horowitz-02-25-20/id814550071?i=1000466601994 https://techcrunch.com/2009/02/20/andreessen-on-charlie-rose-i-am-creating-a-fund-full-video/ https://techcrunch.com/2010/06/20/andreessen-horowitz-celebrates-first-year-with-new-general-partner-john-ofarrell/ https://techcrunch.com/2014/03/27/andreessen-horowitz-raises-massive-new-1-5-billion-fund/ https://techcrunch.com/2018/06/25/andreessen-horowitz-has-a-new-crypto-fund-and-its-first-female-general-partner-is-running-it-with-chris-dixon/ https://techcrunch.com/2019/05/01/a16z-ushers-in-new-fund-strategy-with-2-75b/ https://techcrunch.com/2021/06/24/andreessen-horowitz-triples-down-on-blockchain-startups-with-massive-2-2-billion-crypto-fund-iii/?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAADZwBJIiwmoiePFPnoZk3s1WbLc0aUfwh4wj_nMnhEi5nYQ0Q1xfZfmYDhSbKEsY22uz29mILPEgwMe6RNf3pL8Jmpa6t8I3D19mTdP2c5zWv5jnGf2VNMFgB6UcS4o_5nTs2ymb7QON0OtJ4X4aiHWgNAW5auKjI6Hq65Unz0x8 https://thehistoryoftheweb.com/browser-wars/ https://tim.blog/2018/01/01/the-tim-ferriss-show-transcripts-marc-andreessen/ https://venturebeat.com/2009/08/19/first-andreessen-horowitz-investment-apptio-raises-14m/ https://web.archive.org/web/20110407235346/http://bhorowitz.com/2011/04/06/andreessen-horowitz-has-a-new-200mm-co-investment-fund/ https://web.archive.org/web/20120212181829/http://www.engineer.ucla.edu/visitor-links/alumni/alumni-profiles-1/ben-horowitz-ms-201990 https://www.acquired.fm/episodes/episode-42-opsware-with-special-guest-michel-feaster https://www.amazon.com/Hard-Thing-About-Things-Building/dp/0062273205 https://www.businessinsider.com/benchmark-website-2012-11 https://www.coindesk.com/andreessen-horowitz-doubles-down-on-crypto-investments-with-new-515m-fund https://www.coindesk.com/andreessen-horowitz-rakes-in-2-2b-for-third-crypto-venture-fund https://www.economist.com/technology-quarterly/2011/09/03/disrupting-the-disrupters https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexkonrad/2019/04/02/andreessen-horowitz-is-blowing-up-the-venture-capital-model-again/?sh=6f3cdbfc7d9f https://www.justice.gov/sites/default/files/atr/legacy/2006/03/03/20.pdf https://www.jwz.org/blog/2019/03/brand-necrophilia-part-7/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffjordan1/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/mcopeland/ https://www.newcomer.co/p/the-unauthorized-story-of-andreessen https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/05/18/tomorrows-advance-man https://www.nytimes.com/1995/08/10/us/with-internet-cachet-not-profit-a-new-stock-is-wall-st-s-darling.html https://www.nytimes.com/1995/08/10/us/with-internet-cachet-not-profit-a-new-stock-is-wall-st-s-darling.html https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/22/technology/one-family-many-revolutions-from-black-panthers-to-silicon-valley-to-trump.html https://www.quora.com/How-did-Netscape-Navigator-make-money https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1660134/000119312517080301/d289173ds1.htm https://www.sfgate.com/business/ontherecord/article/OPSWARE-INC-On-the-record-Marc-Andreessen-2525822.php#photo-2684736 https://www.statista.com/statistics/203734/global-smartphone-penetration-per-capita-since-2005/ https://www.theinformation.com/articles/these-guys-are-very-different-inside-andreessen-horowitzs-rise https://www.theringer.com/2017/6/8/16045766/jeff-jordan-andreessen-horowitz-vc-pickup-basketball-ab4e54928186 https://www.wired.com/1999/02/aol-names-andreessen-cto/ https://www.wired.com/story/andreessen-horowitz-new-crypto-fund-iii/ https://www.worth.com/a-decade-later-how-has-andreessen-horowitz-changed-silicon-valley/ https://www.wsj.com/articles/andreessen-horowitzs-returns-trail-venture-capital-elite-1472722381 https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424053111903480904576512250915629460 https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB984080550858322401 https://youtu.be/PbW-1k3ZOA4 https://youtu.be/k5pbximmZdI http://cseweb.ucsd.edu/~little/OldSites/CSE_Uptime/v4.7-8/xmosaic.html https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xpm-1999-09-11-9909110235-story.html https://www.wikiwand.com/en/List_of_web_browsers http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2014/01/mosaic/ http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2014/01/chapter-1-part-2-netscape-the-big-bang/ http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2014/02/chapter-1-part-3-netscape-the-big-bang/  

The Steve Gruber Show
Gregory Wrightstone, Jeff Bezos Had to Spend Billions and Burn tons of Fuel into the Atmosphere To Reinforce his Commitment to Fight Climate Change

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 8:30


Gregory Wrightstone, is a geologist and the Executive Director of the CO2 Coalition in Arlington Virginia. He is bestselling author of Inconvenient Facts: The Science that Al Gore doesn't want you to know. Jeff Bezos Had to Spend Billions and Burn tons of Fuel into the Atmosphere To Reinforce his Commitment to Fight Climate Change

The Big Travel Podcast
121. Sam McManus; Adventure Travel When the World Closes, Costa Rica, Green Northern Spain and the Unexpected Pull of Home  

The Big Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 33:28


Just as the world was closing Sam McManus from YellowWood Adventures took a daunting gamble and hopped on a plane to Costa Rica. We talk about how the pandemic can change travel (even for the better), tourism being potentially a means for good, eco-tourism and re-forestation, surfing, small pueblos in the green hills of Northern Spain, his wonderful travelogue about his explorations - Wax and Gold Journeys in Ethiopia & Other Roads Less Travelled - and feeling the pull of friends, family and home.    On this episode we cover:    Second only returning guest   His wonderful travelogue - Wax and Gold Journeys in Ethiopia & Other Roads Less Travelled   Ethiopia and the inspiration to go there   Tribal country and the civil war in Ethiopia   Sending money to his business partner to escape the conflict   The terrible plight of his business partner in Ethiopia    The famine in Ethiopia being caused by the regimes   Ethiopia being surprisingly verdant    Camping out in the remote Tigray region    Making his business about remote regions    Touring Oman, Lebanon, Mongolia    The pandemic putting a stop to the tours    Booking a one way flight to Costa Rica on the eve of the UK lockdown   Adventures during a global pandemic   Sleepless nights in hostels whilst people were fleeing the country   Studying and surfing Costa Rica for a year   Planting trees and ecotourism in South America   The positive financial impact of tourism    Compared to the negative impact of over tourism    Barcelona going from over-tourism to empty    Carbon compensation and biodiversity   Partnering with a food giving charity in Lebanon   Partnering with an animal protection charity in northern Spain   Climate change speeding up    The opportuning to reset travel after the pandemic    Feeling a huge shift in investors starting to care    Al Gore – the sustainability revolution will happen with ‘the speed of the digital revolution'    Lisa contrasting Sam's lockdown in Costa Rica to hers at home in the cold with no school!   Spending his lockdown in a tropical paradise    Making lasting friendships in difficult circumstances abroad    Driving down to the Picos de Europa in Northern Spain    National Geographic asking for an article on Beirut    Writing an 80000 word travel anthology   Achieving life goals,   Living and being locked down in rural northern Spain   Falling back in love with the UK   Home and friends again   Listening to classic music in the car and getting stick for it   

View from the Cheap Seats with the Sklar Brothers

At the top of the show, Jason and Randy discuss the importance of athletes coming out. Then they are joined by Adam Ray to discuss Seattle's new hockey team, Kraken! Quick hits: Fan banned after hitting Red Sox player, German team leaves after racist taunt, and more. To wrap, the guys talk to Al Gore! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Post Corona
Unexpected Presidential Advisors - with Gary Ginsberg

Post Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 59:32


Who do presidents, prime ministers and business leaders listen to in the midst of managing a crisis? It's a question that's always interested me, from my time in government and business and also as a moon-lighting student of history. I thought about that a lot during the covid pandemic. On this podcast series, we've talked about how the formal channels in our governments performed these past 18 months. But how about those unofficial channels from outside the government that wind up shaping our leaders' thinking and approach to world-changing events. Think about the number of informed practitioners that government leaders had access to during Covid, outside the regular bureaucracy of government. Practitioners in everything from the markets, to experience with supply chains, to the front lines of medicines. How many of these people had relationships with our leaders from a previous time in their lives, that could or should have made their mark during this moment? We are talking about a different category of presidential advisor. It's what Gary Ginsberg calls “First Friends”, the title of his new book - the subtitle is “The Powerful, Unsung (And Unelected) People Who Shaped Our Presidents” Gary has a fascinating background, having advised Governor Bill Clinton in his selection of Al Gore as vice-president, and served in the Clinton White House and Justice Department. He also worked for Rupert Murdoch, Jeff Bewkes at Time Warner, Masa Son at Softbank and Mike Bloomberg. He informally advised Israel's former prime minister during a tumultuous time in US-Israel relations. He's worked with a lot of leaders up close and observed how they make decisions. Gary's book is a compelling history of the way US presidents have relied on outside counsel in the midst of chaos. He gives us plenty to think about how our current and future leaders will navigate the next crisis, and who they should rely on.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2625 - Not-So-Free and Fair Elections & the Assassination of Jovenel Moïse w/ Mark Joseph Stern & Brian Concannon w/ Mark Joseph Stern & Brian Concannon

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 67:18


Sam and Emma host Slate's Justice and Courts writer Mark Joseph Stern to dive into last week's SCOTUS rulings on voting rights restrictions and then Brian Concannon from Project Bluelight, joins to discuss Haitian Prime Minister Jovenel Moïse's assassination. Emma, Sam, and Mark pick up their discussion from last week on the heels of two massive SCOTUS decisions centering on free and fair elections. They first touch on Justice Roberts's 40 year battle against Section 2 of the VRA, coming to a close in Brnovich v DNC where the Court ruled that disparate impact cannot apply to forms of voting (absentee and early) that were not present during the 1982 writing of the law. Next, they explore the Americans for Prosperity v Becerra ruling that takes on the only regulations left by Citizens United, overturning the disclosure requirement, before Stern looks forward from these decisions towards the conservative Court's target of campaign finance laws. Brian Concannon then joins to help us contextualize the assassination of Haitian President-turned-Dictator Moïse within both Haitian domestic politics and as a result of centuries-long destructive intervention and by the U.S. Emma and Sam round out the first half by previewing Sam's debate with Yaron Brook, and admiring JD Vance's ability to prove mainstream media wrong about “reasonable” conservatives once again. And in the Fun Half: Libertarian and Chairman of the Board at the Ayn Rand Institute Yaron Brook joins to debate Sam on the validity and possibility of free markets, where the internet came from (sorry Al Gore), why the correlation between the development of capitalism and the triangle slave trade actually DIDN'T build immense wealth for the Global North, because it also destroyed the South, and whether or not every-day citizens should be responsible for the knowledge of the experts they are advised by, and if society should mitigate mistakes that people make. Then, the crew reflects on the conversation, before pondering the deeper reasons that folks like Tucker Carlson's and Matt Walsh's desire to watch children, TX Gov challenger Allen West reminds us of the horrors of Marx's ultimate weapon of… progressive income tax, plus, your IMs! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsor: Stamps.com: Anything you can do at the Post Office, you can do at Stamps.com. You personally print official U.S. postage 24/7 for ANY letter, ANY package, ANY class of mail, for ANYWHERE. Right now listeners get a special offer that includes a 4-week trial PLUS free postage AND a digital scale without any long-term commitment. Just go to Stamps.com, click on the Microphone at the TOP of the homepage and type in MAJORITYREPORT. Literati is the subscription book club that makes it easy to find unique and interesting books for your kids by delivering great stories straight to your doorstep. For a limited time, go to literati.com/majority to start your free trial. Harry's owns a German factory that's been honing razor blades for 100 years – they source their steel from Sweden and own the entire manufacturing process, allowing them to keep prices low. New U.S. customers can redeem a Harry's trial set at Harrys.com/MAJORITYREPORT. You'll get: A 5-blaze razor -featuring their new, sharper blades, a weighted handle, foaming shave gel with aloe, and a travel cover to protect your blade when you're on the go. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt's podcast, Literary Hangover, at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover, or on iTunes. Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn

The Rubin Report
Tucker Carlson's Shares Shocking Proof that US Govt. Spying on Him | DIRECT MESSAGE

The Rubin Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 34:47


Dave Rubin of The Rubin Report talks about the return of mask mandates, Tucker Carlson being the target of NSA spying, CNN ratings plummeting, Joy Behar smearing Andy Ngo, and Al Gore denouncing voter recounts. First, Dave shares Tucker Carlson's proof that his show has been a target of government surveillance. Spying on journalists is illegal, but you probably won't hear much about it since it's done under the Biden administration. Next, CNN's ratings collapsed, with Jake Tapper's show suffering a massive loss of 75% of his audience. Dave shares a clip from "The View" of Joy Behar smearing Andy Ngo without any evidence. Finally, Dave shares a clip of Al Gore missing the irony of his mocking people participating in the Arizona vote audit. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pat Gray Unleashed
Al Gore's Message to Donald Trump | 6/29/21

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 95:07


The Democrats continue their push for police reform. Gas prices are soaring again. Should Olympic athletes be allowed to turn their backs on the national anthem at the podium? The Supreme Court decides not to hear a LGBTQ case involving gendered bathrooms. Now the Left is claiming that we should not gender animals. There is an update on the pastor who was arrested in Canada. Media and politicians were caught not wearing masks until just before going on air. Should members of the U.S. military be required to get vaccinated? Al Gore shows up again to criticize Trump and talk about climate change. Kamala finally visited the border. It was not the right one, but she did visit the border. AOC goes on a rant about increased crime rates. AOC has a new challenger for her seat in Congress. Kathy Barnette continues her run for U.S. Senate from Pennsylvania. 61% of Americans do not side with the radial Left. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rubin Report
Shocking Mask Reversal: WHO Says Vaccinated People Must Wear Masks | DIRECT MESSAGE

The Rubin Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 26:18


Dave Rubin of The Rubin Report talks about why the WHO is urging vaccinated people to wear masks, Brian Stelter having an insane rant about Fox News inciting violence, and Al Gore's advice for Trump. First, Dave discusses how the WHO just announced that due to the Delta variant, vaccinated people should keep wearing face masks. Will we see states bring back their mask mandates to follow science? Next, Dave shares a clip of Brian Stelter's analysis of Sean Hannity to make the case that he is secretly encouraging violence. This is from CNN, who brought you the “fiery, but mostly peaceful” coverage of the riots in Kenosha. Finally, Dave shares a clip of Al Gore attacking former President Donald Trump and disguising it as advice.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices