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Japanese conglomerate company

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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about softbank

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Latest podcast episodes about softbank

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing
Nagraj Kashyap (SoftBank Vision Fund) - His Three Consumer Investment Themes, How Fund 2 is Different From Fund 1, and How He Invests in Tech and Non-Tech Businesses

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 48:22


Our guest today is Nagraj Kashyap, Managing Partner of SoftBank's Vision Fund one of the world's largest venture capital fund, with over $100 billion in capital. Nagraj leads their consumer investment practice for north America. It was amazing chatting with him about how Vision Fund 2 is different from fund 1, his thesis around the future of healthcare the ecommerce stack and how he thinks about scale for non-tech consumer businesses. WIthout further ado, here's Nagraj. What was your initial attraction to investing in consumer focused businesses? How did you end up joining Softbank? How is Vision Fund 2's focus different from Fund 1? Why should founders partner with the Vision Fund? What is your decision-making process? How do you get to a decision quickly in today's market? How do you leverage your platform? Walk us through your due diligence process. When a founder comes to you, how do you think about the size of problem they are solving? How are you thinking about today's market climate? Do you think valuations are high? What's your target cadence for consumer investments? There's been alot of investment in direct-to-consumer healthcare. What's your thesis around the future of healthcare?Wellness and preventative care Where is the opportunity when it comes to the ecommerce stack serving consumer brands? How do you think about scale in non-software businesses/consumer brands? I.e. Vuori What's one thing you would change about venture capital? What's one book that inspired you personally and one book that inspired you professionally?Professionally: Innovator's Dilemma Personally: American Sickness What's one piece of advice you have for founders?

Just Go Grind with Justin Gordon
#315: Suman Siva, Co-Founder and CEO of Marco, on Creating Cohesive Company Culture via Employee Engagement Experiences

Just Go Grind with Justin Gordon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 27:22


Suman Siva is the Co-Founder and CEO of Marco, a platform for discovering, planning, and booking high-quality experiences. Marco is helping companies and teams up-level their next Zoom happy hour or offsite and do something collaborative and engaging via virtual experiences that evolve modern teams into thriving cultures. Suman has spent his career advising, operating, and investing in consumer tech companies and marketplaces, and now he's excited to be working on building one! His experience includes working as a Growth Advisor to marketplaces at Basis One, investing at SoftBank Vision Fund Consumer Internet, and consulting at Bain. Topics Covered by Suman Siva in this Episode How Marco is bringing companies and teams together through their experiences platform How Suman's time investing in the experiences space at SoftBank led to him founding Marco The evolution of Marco and how the pandemic led to a pivot Shifting from B2C to B2B Their go-to-market strategy and exploring paid acquisition Expanding into enterprise solutions The pain point that Marco is addressing and their current business model Their journey raising nearly $3M in capital Getting early traction Suman's transition from investor to entrepreneur How Marco is enabling the creator economy Their opportunistic approach to hiring part-time, distributed employees Marco's Future of Culture E-Book The types of experiences Marco's customers are looking to engage in How they're zooming in on inclusivity in the workplace The trends Suman is expecting to see regarding in-person versus virtual offerings Listen to all episodes of the Just Go Grind Podcast: https://www.justgogrind.com Follow Justin Gordon on Twitter: https://twitter.com/justingordon212

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: The Memo: Never Before Revealed Metrics; A Full Breakdown of Unit Economics Behind JOKR, How Does Emerging Markets Compare to Developed Economies & The Biggest Misnomers on Quick Commerce with Ralf Wenzel, Founder & CEO @ JOKR

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 44:18


Ralf Wenzel is the Founder & CEO @ JOKR, a global platform for instant retail delivery at a hyper-local scale serving both the US and LATAM. Ralf has raised over $260M for the company, most recently valuing it at $1.2BN. Prior to JOKR, Ralf spent 7 years as the Founder & CEO @ foodpanda, as well as, enjoying roles as Chief Strategy Officer @ Delivery Hero, Interim Chief Product and Experience Officer @ WeWork and even moving to the other side of the table as a Managing Partner with Softbank. In Today's Episode with Ralf Wenzel You Will Learn: 1.) What is the unit economic breakdown for quick commerce business models? What levers can be used to improve it over time? 2.) Comparing the US to LATAM: What is the AOV (average order value) in the US vs LATAM? What is the order frequency in the US vs LATAM? How does labour cost vary when comparing LATAM to the US? How does real estate cost for fulfilment centres differ when comparing LATAM to the US? How do product margins on a per product basis differ when comparing US to LATAM? 3.) New Market Growth and Maturation: What is the payback period for new markets? How has this changed over time? How does the payback period reduce with every new market being opened? What % of AOV is spent on marketing when a new market is opened? How does this marketing spend change over time? In mature markets, how much new customer acquisition is organic vs paid? What is the average weekly growth rate in new vs mature markets? 4.) Business Model Expansions: How does Ralf and JOKR approach the potential for private label goods? How does private label change the margin structure of the goods? What have been their lessons from starting their first private label goods? How does Ralf approach the ability to integrate advertising and paid search? What is needed for paid search and advertising to be a meaningful part of the business?

Wharton Digital Health Podcast
Yury Yakubchyk, Elemy, on destigmatizing mental health to expand access to pediatric behavioral care

Wharton Digital Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 41:45


In this episode, we connected with Yury Yakubchyk, the founder and CEO of Elemy. Elemy is an industry leading tech enabled provider of high quality pediatric behavioral care. Inspired by his own personal journey in overcoming childhood ADHD, Yury co-founded Elemy to repair the flawed model of care for childhood behavioral conditions such as autism. Under Yury's leadership, Elemy has grown from 109 employees at the time of the company's seed round to more than 1,000 employees at present. Elemy raised $219M in their Series B funding round, catapulting the startup to unicorn status with a total valuation of $1.15B. Elemy's investors include prominent names such as SoftBank, Chelsea Clinton, and Ashton Kutcher. We discussed: Inspired by the hustle of the informal economy of Queens, Yury co-founded two startups prior to Elemy. The common thread across all of his companies is solving a complex problem in an industry where consumers face many pain points. Elemy's focus on caring for high acuity pediatric populations through a hybrid model of care run on an integrated software platform that coordinates caregivers physically visiting patients at home. The importance of destigmatizing mental health to accelerate the expansion of pediatric behavioral health services to more patients in need.

How I Raised It - The podcast where we interview startup founders who raised capital.
Ep. 223 How I Raised It With Suman Siva Of Marco Experiences

How I Raised It - The podcast where we interview startup founders who raised capital.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 34:23


Produced by Foundersuite (www.foundersuite.com), "How I Raised It" goes behind the scenes with startup founders who have raised capital. This episode is with Suman Siva of Marco Experiences (https://www.marcoexperiences.com/), a platform that sells bespoke retreat packages to help foster company culture. In this episode, Suman talks about what it was like when he worked at Softbank Vision Fund, advice for pitching Slow Ventures, tips for building out a network of fellow founders, and more. The Company recently raised a seed round of just under $3M, led by Slow Ventures and Flybridge Partners. Other investors included The Community Fund, Jeff Housenbold (former head of consumer tech investing at SoftBank's Vision Fund), James Beshara (former CEO of Tilt), and Sonia Nagar (General Partner at the Pritzker Group). How I Raised It is produced by Foundersuite, makers of software to raise capital and manage investor relations. Foundersuite's customers have raised over $3 Billion since 2016. Create a free account at www.foundersuite.com/

Learn to Lead
Learning to Lead a Unicorn

Learn to Lead

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 23:25


Wes Schroll is a serial entrepreneur who started his first company at 14-years old. After two small start up ventures, he wrote a business plan for what would one day become Fetch Rewards during his sophomore year at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In March of 2021, Fetch closed its Series D round of financing with $220 Million led by SoftBank. Fetch is a bonafide "Unicorn" with a valuation of over $1 Billion. On this episode, we discuss some of the lessons Wes has learned along the way, how it felt for him to realize the Fetch Rewards app has more daily users than there are residents of New York City, and his trouble with productivity advice. Finally, Wes shares his approach to hiring leaders in his organization and why the two most important things he looks for are how well they understand the product and whether or not they can give and receive feedback.

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Whoop Founder, Will Ahmed on How CEOs Can Perform at their Highest Level, Why There is Value in Struggle Early On, Why Realism is Overrated in Startups and How To Create a Culture of Delegated Decision-Making

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 41:38


Will Ahmed is the Founder and CEO @ Whoop, the company on a mission to unlock human performance with their wearable device that is your digital fitness and health coach. To date, Will has raised over $400M for the company with the last round valuing Whoop at $3.6BN and with a cap table including the likes of Softbank, Accomplice, Founder Collective, Foundry Group, IVP and more. In Today's Episode with Will Ahmed You Will Learn: 1.) How Will went from being a professional athlete and college student to founding one of the hottest startups in fitness and healthcare? What are the similarities and differences of being an athlete and being a CEO? 2.) What does Will mean when he says, "there is value in the struggle early on"? How does Will advise founders on when to give up vs when to stay the course? If Will had not struggled with funding in the early days, would the Whoop journey be different? How does Will advise founders when it comes to taking funding when it is on the table? What are the nuances to this? 3.) In what way does Will believe "realism is overrated"? When does Will believe it is good to be realistic? In what ways can it be good to be idealistic? How did Will get some of the largest sports stars on the planet to use Whoop in the early days? Why did Will always refuse to pay sports stars to use Whoop? What were the benefits of doing this? 4.) How does Will define high performance? Why does Will believe it is crucial for leaders to disassociate their own personal feelings from the progress of their company? What advice does Will give to leaders in an attempt to do this? What has Will done to be a better CEO in the last year? What does Will believe are his biggest weaknesses as a CEO?  Item's Mentioned In Today's Episode with Will Ahmed Will's Favourite Book: Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of NIKE

Aprende, ahorra e invierte con Mauricio de Medina
Ep. 110 Masayoshi Son | El cazador de unicornios

Aprende, ahorra e invierte con Mauricio de Medina

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 16:02


Masayoshi Son es un emprendedor japonés fundador y CEO de Softbank, un conglomerado enfocado en invertir en proyectos innovadores. Este inversionista ha hecho su fortuna de aprox 25,000 millones de dólares apostando fuerte en empresas de tecnología, energía y finanzas. Su fondo de inversiones ha financiado el crecimiento de empresas tales como, Alibaba, Foxconn, ARM, Vodafone, WeWork, Rappi, Kavak, Clip, Bitso por mencionar algunas. Masayoshi Son tiene el récord de haber tenido la pérdida más grande de fortuna personal de la historia al tener una disminución de riqueza del orden de 77,000 millones de dólares. Su vida ha estado plagada grandes aciertos pero también de fracasos que hoy dia lo han llevado a ser la persona numero 68 mas rica del mundo. Conoce su historia en este podcast. Para ver más videos, tips, cursos de educación financiera e información útil me encuentras en: https://www.facebook.com/DeMedinaMau https://twitter.com/DeMedinaMau https://www.instagram.com/demedinamau https://www.linkedin.com/in/mauricio-de-medina O visita: https://www.mauriciodemedina.com Aprende, ahorra e invierte.

The Frye Show
#168: Santiago Suarez - Cofounder & CEO Addi - Tienes que Ver la Siguiente Carta, No Hay Plan B

The Frye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 97:19


“Los top executives son obsesivos con los detalles. Lo que tu te das cuenta es que ellos operan a 10000 pies y a un pie. Nunca operan a 5000 pies. Están obsesionados con cada detalle o sobre el futuro” - Santiago Suarez ( 

Business Standard Podcast
Company of the year - Ola

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 7:05


36-year-old Bhavish Aggarwal is feeling like Tesla CEO Elon Musk nowadays. After all, he is running two unicorn startups -- Ola and its spin-off Ola Electric.  Drawing parallels to the world's richest person, Aggarwal confessed to sleeping in Ola Electric's factory in Tamil Nadu as it ramps up production of its newly-launched electric scooter.  He has had a rollercoaster of a year, to put it mildly. Most of the action took place at the Ola Electric factory 120 kilometres away from its headquarters in Bengaluru.  Ola began the year on a subdued note. Its core ride-sharing business was in the doldrums, slowly recovering back to the pre-pandemic levels. The upturn would be thrown of the course again in the next few months in the second wave of pandemic. Its FY21 revenue nosedived 63% to Rs 983 crore. And around this time, Ola Electric, the EV unit spun off from Ola in 2019, commenced the construction of its two-wheeler factory.    The factory was meant to roll out 2 million scooters annually in the first phase and 10 million by mid-2022. The EV foray coincided with the government's extension of the FAME-2 subsidy scheme for another two years.  But its plans have been hobbled by supply chain issues. The company was able to get the plant up and running in just over six months. It promised first scooter deliveries in October, but pushed it to mid-December. The delay was blamed on the global semiconductor shortage by the company. The first batch of 100 units was handed over to customers on December 16, with pomp and show.  Expanding its footprint, Ola ventured into the used cars business in September. While in November, it launched a 10-minute grocery delivery service joining the rush of quick commerce startups. Ola has plans to foray into personal finance, vehicle loans and micro-insurance. It also runs a food delivery business by leveraging its multi-brand cloud kitchens.  But a recent spate of exits at the leadership level perhaps gives us the sense that Ola is biting off more than it can chew. In August, the gross merchandise value of Ola's cab business crossed pre-Covid levels. The mobility business is showing maturity. It may not require heavy intervention but ensuring quality in customer service is still the key. On this front, customer complaints have not fallen on deaf ears and the company is finally taking steps to fix the most important issue of cab drivers cancelling rides.  India has no dearth of visionary entrepreneurs who can attract hundreds of millions of dollars in funding in an instant. Aggarwal is among those that are leading the pack, attracting funds from the likes of SoftBank, Tiger Global and Falcon Edge Capital.  As the year was coming to a close, Aggarwal has been able to take Ola's valuation to $7.3 billion and that of Ola Electric's to $5 billion, a no easy feat. After a year that has taught hard lessons to Bhavish Aggarwal, an eventful 2022 awaits him. Ola is planning an IPO in the first half of next year and is preparing to launch a super app with all its offerings. As for Ola Electric, Aggarwal says they are still at the start of their journey. Watch video

Daily Compliance News
December 28, 2021 the Tribute to Desmond Tutu Edition

Daily Compliance News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 7:23


In today's edition of Daily Compliance News: ·       Somali President suspends PM amid corruption probe. (Bloomberg) ·       Credit Suisse seeking docs on Softbank and Greensill. (Reuters) ·       Use of RICO continues to expand. (WSJ) ·       Desmond Tutu passes away. (NYT) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Startup Insider
Jokr sammelt 260 Mio. Dollar ein und wird zum Unicorn

Startup Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 40:09


In der Mittagsfolge begrüßen wir heute Ralf Wenzel, CEO und Founder von Jokr, und sprechen über die Finanzierungsrunde in Höhe von 260 Millionen US-Dollar in das neue Unicorn.

WSJ Minute Briefing
U.S. Life Expectancy Fell by 1.8 Years in 2020, CDC Says

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 2:16


The NHL plans to pull out of the 2022 Beijing Olympics as it contends with a Covid-19 outbreak. Japan's SoftBank is finalizing a $4 billion loan from a group led by Apollo Global Management. Keith Collins hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Business Standard Podcast
Market wrap: Indices recover; Sensex ends 497 pts up, Nifty holds 16,750

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 4:35


Top headlines   Benchmarks bounce back; Sensex ends 497 pts up, Nifty holds 16,750 Snapdeal files DRHP to raise Rs 1,250 crore through fresh issue C E Info Systems sees bumper debut at 53% premium CMS Info Systems IPO off to a slow start on day one   Headline indices bounced back in trade in line with global equity markets, as investors looked for value in beaten-down shares. IT, metals and index heavyweight Reliance Industries led the up-move, while select financials came under selling pressure in the latter half of the trading day.   The BSE Sensex opened with a positive gap of almost 500 points, and marched ahead to hit a high of 56,901, up over 1,000 points from its previous close. The index, however, pared gains towards the end of the day and settled 497 points higher at 56,319.   The NSE Nifty, meanwhile, surged to an intra-day high of 16,936 but eventually closed at 16,771, up 157 points.   IT stocks - HCL Technologies and Wipro - closed 4 per cent and 3.6 per cent higher, respectively. They were the major gainers among the Sensex 30 pack. Tata Steel, UltraTech Cement, Sun Pharma, Tech Mahindra, Titan, and RIL rallied between 1.5 per cent and 3 per cent.   Among major losers, PowerGrid Corporation closed 1.5 per cent lower. Further, investors also booked profits in banking stocks like Axis Bank, Bajaj Finance and SBI.   The BSE Midcap and the Smallcap indices finished with gains of 1.4 per cent and 1.3 per cent, respectively. The overall breadth was also fairly positive, with more than two advancing shares for every declining stock on the BSE.   Individually, MapmyIndia parent C E Info Systems had a bumper listing today. The stock listed 53.6 per cent higher than its issue price of Rs 1,033 per share on the BSE. The stock, however, pared some of its gains and eventually ended 33 per cent higher at Rs 1,376.    The shares of Adani Enterprises also rose nearly 2 per cent on the BSE after the company announced that it had received a Letter of Award from the Uttar Pradesh Expressways Authority to implement three major stretches of the greenfield Ganga Expressway.   That apart, state-run telecom company MNTL hit an over four-year high of Rs 29.90 after it rallied as much as 17 per cent on the back of heavy volumes on the BSE. The stock of the telco hit its highest level since January 2018.   On the downside, the shares of Unitech ended 5 per cent lower amid reports that the Enforcement Directorate had arrested promoters Ajay Chandra and Sanjay Chandra in a money-laundering case.   Among sectoral indices, the BSE Metals index surged 3 per cent, the Consumer Durables index was up 2.2 per cent, while the IT, Telecom and Realty indices rallied around 1.5 per cent each.   Meanwhile, in the primary market, SoftBank-backed Snapdeal filed the Draft Red Herring Prospectus for its initial public offering to raise up to Rs 1,250 crore through a fresh issue. The offer also consists of an offer-for-sale of up to 30.77 million equity shares by existing shareholders.   Besides, the IPO of CMS Info Systems was off to a slow start and was subscribed 40 per cent on day one of bidding. The retail quota was subscribed 79 per cent.

Café com Investidor
#56 - Rodrigo Baer, sócio do Softbank para Early Stage

Café com Investidor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 41:16


O dinheiro de venture capital está farto e muitas startups têm feito de duas a três rodadas neste ano. Para Rodrigo Baer, que cuida de early stage no Softbank, há exageros tanto do lado dos investidores, como dos empreendedores. Nesta entrevista ao Café com Investidor, Baer: - explica a estratégia early stage do Softbank - fala sobre os setores que interessam ao fundo - comenta sobre o tamanho dos cheques e o valor do fundo - discute os aportes para empresas early stage no Brasil - alerta sobre o risco de "crunch" no mercado brasileiro - e avalia a maturidade do ecossistema local de empreendedorismo

365 Driven
From Fired to Focused - with John Tarnoff - EP 229

365 Driven

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 55:35


John Tarnoff is an executive and career transition coach, speaker, and author who supports mid and late-career professionals in defining, planning, and achieving more meaningful and sustainable careers. Having been fired from 39% of jobs during his 35 years as a film producer, studio executive and tech entrepreneur, he learned how to turn setbacks into successes. He reinvented his own career at 50, earning a master's degree in counseling psychology to share his career lessons with others.   Since leaving entertainment in 2010, John has coached individuals and groups, including Bank of America, Bridgewater Assoc., Levi-Strauss, Softbank, TD Ameritrade, and Thrive Global. He has been named a Top Influencer in Aging by PBS/NextAvenue.   John is the author of the best-selling book, Boomer Reinvention: How to Create Your Dream Career Over 50, and is here today on the 365 Driven podcast to share his lessons on career transition in your 50's and beyond. John and Tony discuss how the events of 2020 have changed the traditional office setting, and what is expected looking forward.   For more information about this episode, visit: https://365driven.com/episode229/

HRchat Podcast
#373: The Great Resignation and Gig Work w/ Tiffany Pham, Mogul

HRchat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 23:11


In this HRchat episode, we look at ways to empower unrepresented groups in the workplace and consider tech to help level the playing field.  Bill Banham's guest is Tiffany Pham, Founder & CEO of Mogul, a leading diversity recruitment company. She developed the first version of Mogul, which through its patent-pending inventions now enables recruitment access to over 430MM women and diverse professionals across 195 countries. Praised by Sheryl Sandberg as “the number one platform” and referred to as "the perfect business" by Melinda Gates, Mogul is backed by investors SoftBank, Hearst Corporation, the Founders of Comcast, LinkedIn Learning, and Match.com.A TV personality, Tiffany has been a Judge on the TLC TV Show "Girl Starter" and is a cast member on The History Channel TV Shows “The Machines That Built America” and "The Toys That Built America." In 2021, she became the face of Lexus, appearing in their “More Than Intelligence” TV campaign. She has appeared across advertising campaigns for Asana, Amazon Audible, Naturalizer, Dell, Captain Morgan, Visa, LUNA, Bumble and bumble, and GoDaddy.Questions For Tiffany Include:You've had side hustles in your career. Share your story. Can you also suggest why it's important for young women who are starting out in their careers to get a wide variety of experiences in different fields, and how that approach ultimately benefited your career?How much of The Great Resignation and the scramble for talent do you attribute to the rise of the gig economy since the start of Covid? As a successful CEO and author of two books, what advice do you have for our listeners about how to achieve their goals?What trends do you see happening in the year ahead for HR and Talent pros?We do our best to ensure editorial objectivity. The views and ideas shared by our guests and sponsors are entirely independent of The HR Gazette, HRchat Podcast and Iceni Media Inc.   

Forward GC

This week: Trump Media is under federal investigation, SoftBank's COO wants a bigger payday, and CalTech is lawyering up. Plus, alternative legal providers, a Tennessee mistrial, and Cravath gets an update.

Creando LatAm
Eduardo della Maggiora: Betterfly

Creando LatAm

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 50:30


Betterfly es una plataforma tecnológica de beneficios que empodera a las personas para vivir su mejor vida. La plataforma llega a los usuarios a través de sus empleadores con un modelo B2B2C. Quienes usan Betterfly pueden convertir su ejercicio y sus buenos hábitos de vida en donaciones sociales o en un seguro de vida que crece con el tiempo. La historia de Eduardo es una historia sobre descubrir la fragilidad de la vida, y, entendiendo eso, medir tu vida de acuerdo al impacto que estás teniendo, sin tener miedo a tomar decisiones drásticas y poco convencionales. Después de trabajar en banca y antes de ser emprendedor, Eduardo se dedicó a correr triatlones por algunos años y alcanzó varios logros que años atrás hubieran parecido imposibles. Hoy por hoy Betterfly crece a pasos agigantados y hace poco cerraron su serie B de $60M con la participación de Softbank y QED Investors. Síguenos: Instagram LinkedIn Facebook www.creandolatampodcast.com creandolatam@gmail.com

Fintech Leaders
Brian Barnes, Founder/CEO of M1 Finance – Scaling a Unicorn, How to Buy a Bank, and The Incredible Power of Compounding

Fintech Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 18:36


Miguel Armaza sits down with Brian Barnes, Founder & CEO of M1 Finance, one of the fastest growing financial super-apps offering automated investing, borrowing, and banking products in the US.Founded in Chicago just five years ago, M1 currently manages over $6 billion for its clients and has raised over $300 million from top names including Softbank, Coatue, Clocktower, and Left Lane. We cover: M1's meteoric rise over the past couple of years and why these are the early days for the company.The power of compounding. It took M1 18+ months to reach $100M AUM, but now they're adding that number weekly!The fascinating and unique story of how Brian, personally bought First National Bank of Buhl, one of the smallest banks in the US. The thought process that drove this transaction and his plans for the future of the bank.Advice and reflections for aspiring entrepreneurs and why he enjoys mentoring up and coming founder Want more podcast episodes? Join me and follow Fintech Leaders today on Apple, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app for weekly conversations with today's global leaders that will dominate the 21st century in fintech, business, and beyond.Miguel Armaza is Co-Founder & Managing General Partner of Gilgamesh Ventures, a seed-stage investment fund focused on fintech in the Americas. He also hosts and writes the Fintech Leaders podcast and newsletter.Miguel on LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/3nKha4ZMiguel on Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Jb5oBcFintech Leaders Newsletter: bit.ly/3jWIpqp

The Brave Marketer
How This 100% Electric Jet Company Thinks About Marketing

The Brave Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 22:28


Jessica Bryndza, CMO at Lilium (an aerospace company that's developed a 100% electric, 7-seater jet), is challenging conventional players in the industry from both a user experience and global impact standpoint. She also shares what it's been like for her to market a pre-revenue company that won't be available until 2024.  In this episode we also discuss: Her brave marketing moment: collaborating with Rolling Stones Magazine, The Weeknd and Childish Gambino on the launch of Google Play Music Covid's impact on the adoption of DTC companies and how direct to consumer companies are going to market and connecting with their customers in unique ways Examples of purpose driven companies, led by women, that are challenging their industries The connection between your employer brand and the success of your external facing brand in the market   Guest Bio: Jessica Bryndza is the CMO at Lilium, an aerospace company based in Munich that's developed a 100% electric, 7-seater jet with zero operating emissions. Jessica is a Marketing leader with over two decades of B2B and B2C experience. She's has helped redefine the way both startup and Fortune 500 companies like American Express, Uber, Google, and Softbank develop brand marketing strategies and global campaigns. She has consistently worked to connect with those companies' diverse customers (and employees) through stories, campaigns live & digital experiences, and cultural moments. Brave Pick: This week's Brave Pick of the Week is Nervos Network. Check out their website here. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ About this Show: Brave is at the forefront of a new online privacy frontier and has unique insight into the future of marketing and advertising in a cookieless world. If you're an agency, brand marketer or entrepreneur challenged by the changes in ethical advertising, consumer privacy and buyer expectations, this podcast will provide a backstage view of how influential marketers at top brands and agencies are responding to what's next.   Music by: Ari Dvorin Hosted by: Donny Dvorin

Squawk on the Street
Commerce Secretary Reacts to the Jobs Report, Omicron and the Volatile Market Week, the FTC Sues to Block Nvidia-Arm Deal, DocuSign Plunges and Its CEO Says “We Weren't Executing.”

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 43:48


Wrapping up a volatile week for stocks, Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer and David Faber discussed market reaction to the November jobs report, which showed non-farm payrolls up by a lower-than-expected 210,000 but the unemployment rate fell and the labor participation rate edged higher. The anchors interviewed Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo about White House reaction to the jobs report and President Biden's strategy for battling the COVID-19 omicron variant. Chip sector news also in the spotlight: The Federal Trade Commission said it is suing to block Nvidia's planned $40B deal to acquire chip designer Arm from Softbank, while shares of Marvell Technology soared on quarterly results. On the flip side, stay-at-home stock darling DocuSign plunged more than 30-percent on a Q3 loss and weaker-than-expected guidance. The anchors reacted to this mea culpa from CEO Dan Springer: “We weren't ready. We weren't executing.”

TechCrunch Startups – Spoken Edition
Social app IRL makes its first acquisition with deal for digital nutrition company AaBeZe Labs

TechCrunch Startups – Spoken Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 5:11


IRL, the SoftBank-backed social app and recent unicorn, is today announcing its first acquisition.

How I Raised It - The podcast where we interview startup founders who raised capital.

Produced by Foundersuite (www.foundersuite.com), "How I Raised It" goes behind the scenes with startup founders who have raised capital. This episode is with Phil Libin of Mmhmm (https://www.mmhmm.app/), a communications company that is creating a better way to communicate via video — both in real-time and asynchronously. Phil previously founded note-taking app Evernote. He was also a VC at General Catalyst and co-founder of product studio All Turtles. In this episode, Phil talks about why he moved to Bentonville Arkansas from San Francisco, how he came up with the idea for Mmhmm, ways to be impressive to investors, thoughts on round timing, why speed of iteration is so critical, what he's doing differently now as an "older" founder, and much more. The Company recently raised $100 million from SoftBank's Vision Fund, with participation from Sequoia Capital, Mubadala Investment Co., Human Capital, World Innovation Lab and others. How I Raised It is produced by Foundersuite, makers of software to raise capital and manage investor relations. Foundersuite's customers have raised over $3 Billion since 2016. Create a free account at www.foundersuite.com/

Squawk Pod
Grab-ing the Biggest SPAC; Supporting Peng Shuai

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 31:30


The omicron variant lands in the United States with its first known case appearing in California. The White House is out with new guidance on how to deal with the new variant by tightening travel restrictions, extending mask mandates, and rapid tests that may be costing consumers. Joe Kernen, Becky Quick, and Andrew Ross Sorkin discuss how this news might be influencing investors and the Fed. And the largest Southeast Asian company to list in the U.S. has gone public on the Nasdaq. SoftBank-backed “super app” Grab debuted in the largest SPAC merger of all time. Grab CEO & Founder Anthony Tan discusses the size of the company's market. Plus, the Women's Tennis Association announced they will boycott tournaments in China to protect the safety of their players, a move in support of Peng Shuai.In this episode:Anthony Tan, @AnthonyPY_TanJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

Latitud Podcast
#71 - The runway from seed to exit: Rodrigo Baer, SoftBank

Latitud Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 45:27


With over 10 years of experience in Brazil's VC scene, Rodrigo Baer was hearing pitches and offering offering term sheets long before the LatAm capital craze started. He has an unquestionable understanding of the country's entrepreneurial landscape, and is a believer of sharing knowledge with the world, which he has been doing for the last four years through his Youtube channel "Pergunte ao VC".Previously a partner with Redpoint Ventures and a board member for companies such as Movidesk and Cortex Intelligence, he is now a Managing Partner for SoftBank's Latin America fund with a $5bn initial commitment and then an additional $3bn being allocated.Today, Rodrigo and I are going over:Qualities VCs look for in foundersCommon questions founders have about exit strategiesSoftBank's plans with the latest LatAm fundBuilding something new? Apply for the Latitud Fellowship at apply.latitud.com

WSJ Tech News Briefing
How One South Korean App Is Helping Asia Embrace the Metaverse

WSJ Tech News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 14:27


SoftBank is investing in Zepeto, a South Korean app popular with young women, where they can buy their 3-D avatars virtual versions of luxury fashion items. It's a sign that while the metaverse may not be fully here yet, opportunities for users and investors are starting to take shape. Wall Street Journal tech reporter Jiyoung Sohn joins WSJ Tech News Briefing host Zoe Thomas to discuss the app and why the Asian market may be faster at adopting apps for the metaverse. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Joe Benigno and Evan Roberts
Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks

Joe Benigno and Evan Roberts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 1:28


Evan gets duped by a fake Twitter account. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

EG Property Podcasts
Following the ”spectacular” demise of Softbank-backed tech giant Katerra, meet the four former employees who have regrouped to lead the roll out of London-based Modulous in the US

EG Property Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 38:47


When US-based tech giant Katerra shut down operations in June, it sent a ricochet through the construction technology sector.  After raising billions of dollars' worth of funding, the Softbank-backed modular pioneer collapsed under debt following the pandemic.  Now, four of the group's former executives have joined forces once more to lead the US roll-out of another modular start-up, one much closer to home. On this episode of Tech Talk Radio, EG head of content Emily Wright is joined by Janet Stephenson, Kassi Mast, Eva Talbot and Jennifer Caldwell; the Seattle-based team which will run the US arm of London start-up Modulous.  The expansion follows Modulous's £5m capital raise from investors including Blackhorn Ventures, Cemex Ventures, Groundbreak Ventures, Goldacre and the UK Government's future fund.  For more on how these four former Katerra executives plan to harness their pre-existing skills to lead this expansion and why being a team of four women was a happy coincidence based on talent and talent alone, tune in to this week's episode of Tech Talk Radio.  

Screaming in the Cloud
Breaking the Tech Mold with Stephanie Wong

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 45:02


About StephanieStephanie Wong is an award-winning speaker, engineer, pageant queen, and hip hop medalist. She is a leader at Google with a mission to blend storytelling and technology to create remarkable developer content. At Google, she's created over 400 videos, blogs, courses, and podcasts that have helped developers globally. You might recognize her as the host of the GCP Podcast. Stephanie is active in her community, fiercely supporting women in tech and mentoring students.Links: Personal Website: https://stephrwong.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/stephr_wong TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the things that makes me a little weird in the universe is that I do an awful lot of… let's just call it technology explanation slash exploration in public, and turning it into a bit of a brand-style engagement play. What makes this a little on the weird side is that I don't work for a big company, which grants me a tremendous latitude. I have a whole lot of freedom that lets me be all kinds of different things, and I can't get fired, which is something I'm really good at.Inversely, my guest today is doing something remarkably similar, except she does work for a big company and could theoretically be fired if they were foolish enough to do so. But I don't believe that they are. Stephanie Wong is the head of developer engagement at Google. Stephanie, thank you for volunteering to suffer my slings and arrows about all of this.Stephanie: [laugh]. Thanks so much for having me today, Corey.Corey: So, at a very high level, you're the head of developer engagement, which is a term that I haven't seen a whole lot of. Where does that start and where does that stop?Stephanie: Yeah, so I will say that it's a self-proclaimed title a bit because of the nuance of what I do. I would say at its heart, I am still a part of developer relations. If you've heard of developer advocacy or developer evangelist, I would say this slight difference in shade of what I do is that I focus on scalable content creation and becoming a central figure for our developer audiences to engage and enlighten them with content that, frankly, is remarkable, and that they'd want to share and learn about our technology.Corey: Your bio is fascinating in that it doesn't start with the professional things that most people do with, “This is my title and this is my company,” is usually the first sentence people put in. Yours is, “Stephanie Wong is an award-winning speaker, engineer, pageant queen, and hip hop medalist.” Which is both surprising and more than a little bit refreshing because when I read a bio like that my immediate instinctive reaction is, “Oh, thank God. It's a real person for a change.” I like the idea of bringing the other aspects of what you are other than, “This is what goes on in an IDE, the end,” to your audience.Stephanie: That is exactly the goal that I had when creating that bio because I truly believe in bringing more interdisciplinary and varied backgrounds to technology. I, myself have gone through a very unconventional path to get to where I am today and I think in large part, my background has had a lot to do with my successes, my failures, and really just who I am in tech as an uninhibited and honest, credible person today.Corey: I think that there's a lack of understanding, broadly, in our industry about just how important credibility and authenticity are and even the source of where they come from. There are a lot of folks who are in the DevRel space—devrelopers, as I insist upon calling them, over their protests—where, on some level, the argument is, what is developer relations? “Oh, you work in marketing, but they're scared to tell you,” has been my gag on that one for a while. But they speak from a position of, “I know what's what because I have been in the trenches, working on these large-scale environments as an engineer for the last”—fill in the blank, however long it may have been—“And therefore because I have done things, I am going to tell you how it is.” You explicitly call out that you don't come from the traditional, purely technical background. Where did you come from? It's unlikely that you've sprung fully-formed from the forehead of some god, but again, I'm not entirely sure how Google finds and creates the folks that it winds up advancing, so maybe you did.Stephanie: Well, to tell you the truth. We've all come from divine creatures. And that's where Google sources all employees. So. You know. But—[laugh].Corey: Oh, absolutely. “We climbed to the top of Olympus and then steal fire from the gods.” “It's like, isn't that the origin story of Prometheus?” “Yeah, possibly.” But what is your background? Where did you come from?Stephanie: So, I have grown up, actually, in Silicon Valley, which is a little bit ironic because I didn't go to school for computer science or really had the interest in becoming an engineer in school. I really had no idea.Corey: Even been more ironic than that because most of Silicon Valley appears to never have grown up at all.Stephanie: [laugh]. So, true. Maybe there's a little bit of that with me, too. Everybody has a bit of Peter Pan syndrome here, right? Yeah, I had no idea what I wanted to do in school and I just knew that I had an interest in communicating with one another, and I ended up majoring in communication studies.I thought I wanted to go into the entertainment industry and go into production, which is very different and ended up doing internships at Warner Brothers Records, a YouTube channel for dance—I'm a dancer—and I ended up finding a minor in digital humanities, which is sort of this interdisciplinary minor that combines technology and the humanities space, including literature, history, et cetera. So, that's where I got my start in technology, getting an introduction to information systems and doing analytics, studying social media for certain events around the world. And it wasn't until after school that I realized that I could work in enterprise technology when I got an offer to be a sales engineer. Now, that being said, I had no idea what sales engineering was. I just knew it had something to do with enterprise technology and communications, and I thought it was a good fit for my background.Corey: The thing that I find so interesting about that is that it breaks the mold of what people expect, when, “If someone's going to talk to me about technology—especially coming from a”—it's weird; it's one of the biggest companies on the planet, and people still on some level equate Google with the startup-y mentality of being built in someone's garage. That's an awfully big garage these days, if that's even slightly close to true, which it isn't. But there's this idea of, “Oh, you have to go to Stanford. You have to get a degree in computer science. And then you have to go and do this, this, this, this, and this.”And it's easy to look dismissively at what you're doing. “Communications? Well, all that would teach you to do is communicate to people clearly and effectively. What possible good is that in tech?” As we look around the landscape and figure out exactly why that is so necessary in tech, and also so lacking?Stephanie: Exactly. I do think it's an underrated skill in tech. Maybe it's not so much anymore, but I definitely think that it has been in the past. And even for developers, engineers, data scientists, other technical practitioner, especially as a person in DevRel, I think it's such a valuable skill to be able to communicate complex topics simply and understandably to a wide variety of audiences.Corey: The big question that I have for you because I've talked to an awful lot of folks who are very concerned about the way that they approach developer relations, where—they'll have ratios, for example—where I know someone and he insists that he give one deeply technical talk for every four talks that are not deeply technical, just because he feels the need to re-establish and shore up his technical bona fides. Now, if there's one thing that people on the internet love, it is correcting people on things that are small trivia aspect, or trying to pull out the card that, “Oh, I've worked on this system for longer than you've worked on this system, therefore, you should defer to me.” Do you find that you face headwinds for not having the quote-unquote, “Traditional” engineering technical background?Stephanie: I will say that I do a bit. And I did, I would say when I first joined DevRel, and I don't know if it was much more so that it was being imposed on me or if it was being self-imposed, something that I felt like I needed to prove to gain credibility, not just in my organization, but in the industry at large. And it wasn't until two or three years into it, that I realized that I had a niche myself. It was to create stories with my content that could communicate these concepts to developers just as effectively. And yes, I can still prove that I can go into an hour-long or a 45-minute-long tech talk or a webinar about a topic, but I can also easily create a five to ten-minute video that communicates concepts and inspires audiences just the same, and more importantly, be able to point to resources, code labs, tutorials, GitHub repos, that can allow the audience to be hands-on themselves, too. So really, I think that it was over time that I gained more experience and realized that my skill sets are valuable in a different way, and it's okay to have a different background as long as you bring something to the table.Corey: And I think that it's indisputable that you do. The concept of yours that I've encountered from time to time has always been insightful, it is always been extremely illuminating, and—you wouldn't think of this as worthy of occasion and comment, but I feel it needs to be said anyway—at no point in any of your content did I feel like I was being approached in a condescending way, where at every point it was always about uplifting people to a level of understanding, rather than doing the, “Well, I'm smarter than you and you couldn't possibly understand the things that I've been to.” It is relatable, it is engaging, and you add a very human face to what is admittedly an area of industry that is lacking in a fair bit of human element.Stephanie: Yeah, and I think that's the thing that many folks DevRel continue to underline is the idea of empathy, empathizing with your audiences, empathizing with the developers, the engineers, the data engineers, whoever it is that you're creating content for, it's being in their shoes. But for me, I may not have been in those shoes for years, like many other folks historically have been in for DevRel, but I want to at least go through the journey of learning a new piece of technology. For example, if I'm learning a new platform on Google Cloud, going through the steps of creating a demo, or walking through a tutorial, and then candidly explaining that experience to my audience, or creating a video about it. I really just reject the idea of having ego in tech and I would love to broaden the opportunity for folks who came from a different background like myself. I really want to just represent the new world of technology where it wasn't full of people who may have had the privilege to start coding at a very early age, in their garages.Corey: Yeah, privilege of, in many respects, also that privilege means, “Yes, I had the privilege of not having to have friends and deal with learning to interact with other human beings, which is what empowered me to build this company and have no social skills whatsoever.” It's not the aspirational narrative that we sometimes are asked to believe. You are similar in some respects to a number of things that I do—by which I mean, you do it professionally and well and I do it as basically performance shitpost art—but you're on Twitter, you make videos, you do podcasts, you write long-form and short-form as well. You are sort of all across the content creation spectrum. Which of those things do you prefer to do? Which ones of those are things you find a little bit more… “Well, I have to do it, but it's not my favorite?” Or do you just tend to view it as content is content; you just look at different media to tell your story?Stephanie: Well, I will say any form of content is queen—I'm not going to say king, but—[laugh] content is king, content is queen, it doesn't matter.Corey: Content is a baroness as it turns out.Stephanie: [laugh]. There we go. I have to say, so given my background, I mentioned I was into production and entertainment before, so I've always had a gravitation towards video content. I love tinkering with cameras. Actually, as I got started out at Google Cloud, I was creating scrappy content using webcams and my own audio equipment, and doing my own research, and finding lounges and game rooms to do that, and we would just upload it to our own YouTube channel, which probably wasn't allowed at the time, but hey, we got by with it.And eventually, I got approached by DevRel to start doing it officially on the channel and I was given budget to do it in-studio. And so that was sort of my stepping stone to doing this full-time eventually, which I never foresaw for myself. And so yeah, I have this huge interest in—I'm really engaged with video content, but once I started expanding and realizing that I could repurpose that content for podcasting, I could repurpose it for blogs, then you start to realize that you can shard content and expand your reach exponentially with this. So, that's when I really started to become more active on social media and leverage it to build not just content for Google Cloud, but build my own brand in tech.Corey: That is the inescapable truth of DevRel done right is that as you continue doing it, in time, in your slice of the industry, it is extremely likely that your personal brand eclipses the brand of the company that you represent. And it's in many ways a test of corporate character—if it makes sense—as do how they react to that. I've worked in roles before I started this place where I was starting to dabble with speaking a lot, and there was always a lot of insecurity that I picked up of, “Well, it feels like you're building your personal brand, not advancing the company here, and we as a company do not see the value in you doing that.” Direct quote from the last boss I had. And, well, that partially explains why I'm here, I suppose.But there's insecurity there. I'd see the exact opposite coming out of Google, especially in recent times. There's something almost seems to be a renaissance in Google Cloud, and I'm not sure where it came from. But if I look at it across the board, and you had taken all the labels off of everything, and you had given me a bunch of characteristics about different companies, I would never have guessed that you were describing Google when you're talking about Google Cloud. And perhaps that's unfair, but perceptions shape reality.Stephanie: Yeah, I find that interesting because I think traditionally in DevRel, we've also hired folks for their domain expertise and their brand, depending on what you're representing, whether it's in the Kubernetes space or Python client library that you're supporting. But it seems like, yes, in my case, I've organically started to build my brand while at Google, and Google has been just so spectacular in supporting that for me. But yeah, it's a fine line that I think many people have to walk. It's like, do you want to continue to build your own brand and have that carry forth no matter what company you stay at, or if you decide to leave? Or can you do it hand-in-hand with the company that you're at? For me, I think I can do it hand-in-hand with Google Cloud.Corey: It's taken me a long time to wrap my head around what appears to be a contradiction when I look at Google Cloud, and I think I've mostly figured it out. In the industry, there is a perception that Google as an entity is condescending and sneering toward every other company out there because, “You're Google, you know how to do all these great, amazing things that are global-spanning, and over here at Twitter for Pets, we suck doing these things.” So, Google is always way smarter and way better at this than we could ever hope to be. But that is completely opposed to my personal experiences talking with Google employees. Across the board, I would say that you all are self-effacing to a fault.And I mean that in the sense of having such a limited ego, in some cases, that it's, “Well, I don't want to go out there and do a whole video on this. It's not about me, it's about the technology,” are things that I've had people who work at Google say to me. And I appreciate the sentiment; it's great, but that also feels like it's an aloofness. It also fails to humanize what it is that you're doing. And you are a, I've got to say, a breath of fresh air when it comes to a lot of that because your stories are not just, “Here's how you do a thing. It's awesome. And this is all the intricacies of the API.”And yeah, you get there, but you also contextualize that in a, “Here's why it matters. Here's the problem that solves. Here is the type of customer's problem that this is great for,” rather than starting with YAML and working your way up. It's going the other way, of, “We want to sell some underpants,” or whatever it is the customer is trying to do today. And that is the way that I think is one of the best ways to drive adoption of what's going on because if you get people interested and excited about something—at least in my experience—they're going to figure out how the API works. Badly in many cases, but works. But if you start on the API stuff, it becomes a solution looking for a problem. I like your approach to this.Stephanie: Thank you. Yeah, I appreciate that. I think also something that I've continued to focus on is to tell stories across products, and it doesn't necessarily mean within just Google Cloud's ecosystem, but across the industry as well. I think we need to, even at Google, tell a better story across our product space and tie in what developers are currently using. And I think the other thing that I'm trying to work on, too, is contextualizing our products and our launches not just across the industry, but within our product strategy. Where does this tie in? Why does it matter? What is our forward-looking strategy from here? When we're talking about our new data cloud products or analytics, [unintelligible 00:17:21], how does this tie into our API strategy?Corey: And that's the biggest challenge, I think, in the AI space. My argument has been for a while—in fact, I wrote a blog post on it earlier this year—that AI and machine learning is a marvelously executed scam because it's being pushed by cloud providers and the things that you definitely need to do a machine learning experiment are a bunch of compute and a whole bunch of data that has to be stored on something, and wouldn't you know it, y'all sell that by the pound. So, it feels, from a cynical perspective, which I excel at espousing, that approach becomes one of you're effectively selling digital pickaxes into a gold rush. Because I see a lot of stories about machine learning how to do very interesting things that are either highly, highly use-case-specific, which great, that would work well, for me too, if I ever wind up with, you know, a petabyte of people's transaction logs from purchasing coffee at my national chain across the country. Okay, that works for one company, but how many companies look like that?And on the other side of it, “It's oh, here's how we can do a whole bunch of things,” and you peel back the covers a bit, and it looks like, “Oh, but you really taught me here is bias laundering?” And, okay. I think that there's a definite lack around AI and machine learning of telling stories about how this actually matters, what sorts of things people can do with it that aren't incredibly—how do I put this?—niche or a problem in search of a solution?Stephanie: Yeah, I find that there are a couple approaches to creating content around AI and other technologies, too, but one of them being inspirational content, right? Do you want to create something that tells the story of how I created a model that can predict what kind of bakery item this is? And we're going to do it by actually showcasing us creating the outcome. So, that's one that's more like, okay. I don't know how relatable or how appropriate it is for an enterprise use case, but it's inspirational for new developers or next gen developers in the AI space, and I think that can really help a company's brand, too.The other being highly niche for the financial services industry, detecting financial fraud, for example, and that's more industry-focused. I found that they both do well, in different contexts. It really depends on the channel that you're going to display it on. Do you want it to be viral? It really depends on what you're measuring your content for. I'm curious from you, Corey, what you've seen across, as a consumer of content?Corey: What's interesting, at least in my world, is that there seems to be, given that what I'm focusing on first and foremost is the AWS ecosystem, it's not that I know it the best—I do—but at this point, it's basically Stockholm Syndrome where it's… with any technology platform when you've worked with it long enough, you effectively have the most valuable of skill sets around it, which is not knowing how it works, but knowing how it doesn't, knowing what the failure mode is going to look like and how you can work around that and detect it is incredibly helpful. Whereas when you're trying something new, you have to wait until it breaks to find the sharp edges on it. So, there's almost a lock-in through, “We failed you enough times,” story past a certain point. But paying attention to that ecosystem, I find it very disjointed. I find that there are still events that happen and I only find out when the event is starting because someone tweets about it, and for someone who follows 40 different official AWS RSS feeds, to be surprised by something like that tells me, okay, there's not a whole lot of cohesive content strategy here, that is at least making it easy for folks to consume the things that they want, especially in my case where even the very niche nature of what I do, my interest is everything.I have a whole bunch of different filters that look for various keywords and the rest, and of course, I have helpful folks who email me things constantly—please keep it up; I'm a big fan—worst case, I'd rather read something twice than nothing. So, it's helpful to see all of that and understand the different marketing channels, different personas, and the way that content approaches, but I still find things that slip through the cracks every time. The thing that I've learned—and it felt really weird when I started doing it—was, I will tell the same stories repeatedly in different forums, or even the same forum. I could basically read you a Twitter thread from a year ago, word-for-word, and it would blow up bigger than it did the first time. Just because no one reads everything.Stephanie: Exactly.Corey: And I've already told my origin story. You're always new to someone. I've given talks internally at Amazon at various times, and I'm sort of loud and obnoxious, but the first question I love to ask is, “Raise your hand if you've never heard of me until today.” And invariably, over three-quarters of the room raises their hand every single time, which okay, great. I think that's awesome, but it teaches me that I cannot ever expect someone to have, quote-unquote, “Done the reading.”Stephanie: I think the same can be said about the content that I create for the company. You can't assume that people, A) have seen my tweets already or, B) understand this product, even if I've talked about it five times in the past. But yes, I agree. I think that you definitely need to have a content strategy and how you format your content to be more problem-solution-oriented.And so the way that I create content is that I let them fall into three general buckets. One being that it could be termed definition: talking about the basics, laying the foundation of a product, defining terms around a topic. Like, what is App Engine, or Kubeflow 101, or talking about Pub/Sub 101.The second being best practices. So, outlining and explaining the best practices around a topic, how do you design your infrastructure for scale and reliability.And the third being diagnosis: investigating; exploring potential issues, as you said; using scripts; Stackdriver logging, et cetera. And so I just kind of start from there as a starting point. And then I generally follow a very, very effective model. I'm sure you're aware of it, but it's called the five point argument model, where you are essentially telling a story to create a compelling narrative for your audience, regardless of the topic or what bucket that topic falls into.So, you're introducing the problem, you're sort of rising into a point where the climax is the solution. And that's all to build trust with your audience. And as it falls back down, you're giving the results in the conclusion, and that's to inspire action from your audience. So, regardless of what you end up talking about this problem-solution model—I've found at least—has been highly effective. And then in terms of sharing it out, over and over again, over the span of two months, that's how you get the views that you want.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: See, that's a key difference right there. I don't do anything regular in terms of video as part of my content. And I do it from time to time, but you know, getting gussied up and whatnot is easier than just talking into a microphone. As I record this, it's Friday, I'm wearing a Hawaiian shirt, and I look exactly like the middle-aged dad that I am. And for me at least, a big breakthrough moment was realizing that my audience and I are not always the same.Weird confession for someone in my position: I don't generally listen to podcasts. And the reason behind that is I read very quickly, and even if I speed up a podcast, I'm not going to be able to consume the information nearly as quickly as I could by reading it. That, amongst other reasons, is one of the reasons that every episode of this show has a full transcript attached to it. But I'm not my audience. Other people prefer to learn by listening and there's certainly nothing wrong with that.My other podcast, the AWS Morning Brief, is the spoken word version of the stuff that I put out in my newsletter every week. And that is—it's just a different area for people to consume the content because that's what works for them. I'm not one to judge. The hard part for me was getting over that hump of assuming the audience was like me.Stephanie: Yeah. And I think the other key part of is just mainly consistency. It's putting out the content consistently in different formats because everybody—like you said—has a different learning style. I myself do. I enjoy visual styles.I also enjoy listening to podcasts at 2x speed. [laugh]. So, that's my style. But yeah, consistency is one of the key things in building content, and building an audience, and making sure that you are valuable to your audience. I mean, social media, at the end of the day is about the people that follow you.It's not about yourself. It should never be about yourself. It's about the value that you provide. Especially as somebody who's in DevRel in this position for a larger company, it's really about providing value.Corey: What are the breakthrough moments that I had relatively early in my speaking career—and I think it's clear just from what you've already said that you've had a similar revelation at times—I gave a talk, that was really one of my first talks that went semi-big called, “Terrible Ideas in Git.” It was basically, learn how to use Git via anti-pattern. What it secretly was, was under the hood, I felt it was time I learned Git a bit better than I did, so I pitched it and I got a talk accepted. So well, that's what we call a forcing function. By the time I give that talk, I'd better be [laugh] able to have built a talk that do this intelligently, and we're going to hope for the best.It worked, but the first version of that talk I gave was super deep into the plumbing of Git. And I'm sure that if any of the Git maintainers were in the audience, they would have found it great, but there aren't that many folks out there. I redid the talk and instead approached it from a position of, “You have no idea what Git is. Maybe you've heard of it, but that's as far as it goes.” And then it gets a little deeper there.And I found that making the subject more accessible as opposed to deeper into the weeds of it is almost always the right decision from a content perspective. Because at some level, when you are deep enough into the weeds, the only way you're going to wind up fixing something or having a problem that you run into get resolved, isn't by listening to a podcast or a conference talk; it's by talking to the people who built the thing because at that level, those are the only people who can hang at that level of depth. That stops being fodder for conference talks unless you turn it into an after-action report of here's this really weird thing I learned.Stephanie: Yeah. And you know, to be honest, the one of the most successful pieces of content I've created was about data center security. I visited a data center and I essentially unveiled what our security protocols were. And that wasn't a deeply technical video, but it was fun and engaging and easily understood by the masses. And that's what actually ended up resulting in the highest number of views.On top of that, I'm now creating a video about our subsea fiber optic cables. Finding that having to interview experts from a number of different teams across engineering and our strategic negotiators, it was like a monolith of information that I had to take in. And trying to format that into a five-minute story, I realized that bringing it up a layer of abstraction to help folks understand this at a wider level was actually beneficial. And I think it'll turn into a great piece of content. I'm still working on it now. So, [laugh] we'll see how it turns out.Corey: I'm a big fan of watching people learn and helping them get started. The thing that I think gets lost a lot is it's easy to assume that if I look back in time at myself when I was first starting my professional career two decades ago, that I was exactly like I am now, only slightly more athletic and can walk up a staircase without getting winded. That's never true. It never has been true. I've learned a lot about not just technology but people as I go, and looking at folks are entering the workforce today through the same lens of, “Well, that's not how I would handle that situation.” Yeah, no kidding. I have two decades of battering my head against the sharp edges and leaving dents in things to inform that opinion.No, when I was that age, I would have handled it way worse than whatever it is I'm critiquing at the time. But it's important to me that we wind up building those pathways and building those bridges so that people coming into the space, first, have a clear path to get here, and secondly, have a better time than I ever did. Where does the next generation of talent come from has been a recurring question and a recurring theme on the show.Stephanie: Yeah. And that's exactly why I've been such a fierce supporter of women in tech, and also, again, encouraging a broader community to become a part of technology. Because, as I said, I think we're in the midst of a new era of technology, of people from all these different backgrounds in places that historically have had more remote access to technology, now having the ability to become developers at an early age. So, with my content, that's what I'm hoping to drive to make this information more easily accessible. Even if you don't want to become a Google Cloud engineer, that's totally fine, but if I can help you understand some of the foundational concepts of cloud, then I've done my job well.And then, even with women who are already trying to break into technology or wanting to become a part of it, then I want to be a mentor for them, with my experience not having a technical background and saying yes to opportunities that challenged me and continuing to build my own luck between hard work and new opportunities.Corey: I can't wait to see how this winds up manifesting as we see understandings of what we're offering to customers in different areas in different ways—both in terms of content and terms of technology—how that starts to evolve and shift. I feel like we're at a bit of an inflection point now, where today if I graduate from school and I want to start a business, I have to either find a technical co-founder or I have to go to a boot camp and learn how to code in order to build something. I think that if we can remove that from the equation and move up the stack, sure, you're not going to be able to build the next Google or Pinterest or whatnot from effectively Visual Basic for Interfaces, but you can build an MVP and you can then continue to iterate forward and turn it into something larger down the road. The other part of it, too, is that moving up the stack into more polished solutions rather than here's a bunch of building blocks for platforms, “So, if you want a service to tell you whether there's a picture of a hot dog or not, here's a service that does exactly that.” As opposed to, “Oh, here are the 15 different services, you can bolt together and pay for each one of them and tie it together to something that might possibly work, and if it breaks, you have no idea where to start looking, but here you go.” A packaged solution that solves business problems.Things move up the stack; they do constantly. The fact is that I started my career working in data centers and now I don't go to them at all because—spoiler—Google, and Amazon, and people who are not IBM Cloud can absolutely run those things better than I can. And there's no differentiated value for me in solving those global problems locally. I'd rather let the experts handle stuff like that while I focus on interesting problems that actually affect my business outcome. There's a reason that instead of running all the nonsense for lastweekinaws.com myself because I've worked in large-scale WordPress hosting companies, instead I pay WP Engine to handle it for me, and they, in turn, hosted on top of Google Cloud, but it doesn't matter to me because it's all just a managed service that I pay for. Because me running the website itself adds no value, compared to the shitpost I put on the website, which is where the value derives from. For certain odd values of value.Stephanie: [laugh]. Well, two things there is that I think we actually had a demo created on Google Cloud that did detect hot dogs or not hot dogs using our Vision API, years in the past. So, thanks for reminding me of that one.Corey: Of course.Stephanie: But yeah, I mean, I completely agree with that. I mean, this is constantly a topic in conversation with my team members, and with clients. It's about higher level of abstractions. I just did a video series with our fellow, Eric Brewer, who helped build cloud infrastructure here at Google over the past ten decades. And I asked him what he thought the future of cloud would be in the next ten years, and he mentioned, “It's going to be these higher levels of abstraction, building platforms on top of platforms like Kubernetes, and having more services like Cloud run serverless technologies, et cetera.”But at the same time, I think the value of cloud will continue to be providing optionality for developers to have more opinionated services, services like GKE Autopilot, et cetera, that essentially take away the management of infrastructure or nodes that people don't really want to deal with at the end of the day because it's not going to be a competitive differentiator for developers. They want to focus on building software and focusing on keeping their services up and running. And so yeah, I think the future is going to be that, giving developers flexibility and freedom, and still delivering the best-of-breed technology. If it's covering something like security, that's something that should be baked in as much as possible.Corey: You're absolutely right, first off. I'm also looking beyond it where I want to be able to build a website that is effectively Twitter, only for pets—because that is just a harebrained enough idea to probably raise a $20 million seed round these days—and I just want to be able to have the barks—those are like tweets, only surprisingly less offensive and racist—and have them just be stored somewhere, ideally presumably under the hood somewhere, it's going to be on computers, but whether it's in containers, or whether it's serverless, or however is working is the sort of thing that, “Wow, that seems like an awful lot of nonsense that is not central nor core to my business succeeding or failing.” I would say failing, obviously, except you can lose money at scale with the magic of things like SoftBank. Here we are.And as that continues to grow and scale, sure, at some point I'm going to have bespoke enough needs and a large enough scale where I do have to think about those things, but building the MVP just so I can swindle some VCs is not the sort of thing where I should have to go to that depth. There really should be a golden-path guardrail-style thing that I can effectively drag and drop my way into the next big scam. And that is, I think, the missing piece. And I think that we're not quite ready technologically to get there yet, but I can't shake the feeling and the hope that's where technology is going.Stephanie: Yeah. I think it's where technology is heading, but I think part of the equation is the adoption by our industry, right? Industry adoption of cloud services and whether they're ready to adopt services that are that drag-and-drop, as you say. One thing that I've also been talking a lot about is this idea of service-oriented networking where if you have a service or API-driven environment and you simply want to bring it to cloud—almost a plug-and-play there—you don't really want to deal with a lot of the networking infrastructure, and it'd be great to do something like PrivateLink on AWS, or Private Service Connect on Google Cloud.While those conversations are happening with customers, I'm finding that it's like trying to cross the Grand Canyon. Many enterprise customers are like, “That sounds great, but we have a really complex network topology that we've been sitting on for the past 25 years. Do you really expect that we're going to transition over to something like that?” So, I think it's about providing stepping stones for our customers until they can be ready to adopt a new model.Corey: Yeah. And of course, the part that never gets said out loud but is nonetheless true and at least as big of a deal, “And we have a whole team of people who've built their entire identity around that network because that is what they work on, and they have been ignoring cloud forever, and if we just uplift everything into a cloud where you folks handle that, sure, it's better for the business outcome, but where does that leave them?” So, they've been here for 25 years, and they will spend every scrap of political capital they've managed to accumulate to torpedo a cloud migration. So, any FUD they can find, any horse-trading they can do, anything they can do to obstruct the success of a cloud initiative, they're going to do because people are people, and there is no real plan to mitigate that. There's also the fact that unless there's a clear business value story about a feature velocity increase or opening up new markets, there's also not an incentive to do things to save money. That is never going to be the number one priority in almost any case short of financial disaster at a company because everything they're doing is building out increasing revenue, rather than optimizing what they're already doing.So, there's a whole bunch of political challenges. Honestly, moving the computer stuff from on-premises data centers into a cloud provider is the easiest part of a cloud migration compared to all of the people that are involved.Stephanie: Yeah. Yeah, we talked about serverless and all the nice benefits of it, but unless you are more a digitally-born, next-gen developer, it may be a higher burden for you to undertake that migration. That's why we always [laugh] are talking about encouraging people to start with newer surfaces.Corey: Oh, yeah. And that's the trick, too, is if you're trying to learn a new cloud platform these days—first, if you're trying to pick one, I'd be hard-pressed to suggest anything other than Google Cloud, with the possible exception of DigitalOcean, just because the new user experience is so spectacularly good. That was my first real, I guess, part of paying attention to Google Cloud a few years ago, where I was, “All right, I'm going to kick the tires on this and see how terrible this interface is because it's a Google product.” And it was breathtakingly good, which I did not expect. And getting out of the way to empower someone who's new to the platform to do something relatively quickly and straightforwardly is huge. And sure, there's always room to prove, but that is the right area to focus on. It's clear that the right energy was spent in the right places.Stephanie: Yeah. I will say a story that we don't tell quite as well as we should is the One Google story. And I'm not talking about just between Workspace and Google Cloud, but our identity access management and knowing your Google account, which everybody knows. It's not like Microsoft, where you're forced to make an account, or it's not like AWS where you had a billion accounts and you hate them all.Corey: Oh, my God, I dread logging into the AWS console every time because it is such a pain in the ass. I go to cloud.google.com sometimes to check something, it's like, “Oh, right. I have to dig out my credentials.” And, “Where's my YubiKey?” And get it. Like, “Oh. I'm already log—oh. Oh, right. That's right. Google knows how identity works, and they don't actively hate their customers. Okay.” And it's always a breath of fresh air. Though I will say that by far and away, the worst login experience I've seen yet is, of course, Azure.Stephanie: [laugh]. That's exactly right. It's Google account. It's yours. It's personal. It's like an Apple iCloud account. It's one click, you're in, and you have access to all the applications. You know, so it's the same underlying identity structure with Workspace and Gmail, and it's the same org structure, too, across Workspace and Google Cloud. So, it's not just this disingenuous financial bundle between GCP and Workspace; it's really strategic. And it's kind of like the idea of low code or no code. And it looks like that's what the future of cloud will be. It's not just by VMs from us.Corey: Yeah. And there are customers who want to buy VMs and that's great. Speed up what they're doing; don't get in the way of people giving you their money, but if you're starting something net-new, there's probably better ways to do it. So, I want to thank you for taking as much time as you have to wind up going through how you think about, well, the art of storytelling in the world of engineering. If people want to learn more about who you are, what you're up to, and how you approach things, where can they find you?Stephanie: Yeah, so you can head to stephrwong.com where you can see my work and also get in touch with me if you want to collaborate on any content. I'm always, always, always open to that. And my Twitter is @stephr_wong.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:40:03]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me.Stephanie: Thanks so much.Corey: Stephanie Wong, head of developer engagement at Google Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me that the only way to get into tech these days is, in fact, to graduate with a degree from Stanford, and I can take it from you because you work in their admissions office.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Artificial Intelligence in Industry with Daniel Faggella
Using AI to Improve Financial Collections - with Sanjay Deshmukh of Findability Sciences

Artificial Intelligence in Industry with Daniel Faggella

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 27:30


Our guest this week is Sanjay Deshmukh, Executive Vice President of Findability Sciences. Findability is a SoftBank-backed firm here in the Boston area with about 100 employees around the world. In this episode, he discusses how Findability is applying artificial intelligence in the world of collections. He also talks about the personalization of messaging, optimizing the use of call center agents, and categorization. This episode is brought to you by Findability Sciences. If you're a listener here but not yet a subscriber on emerj.com, you can download our free PDF brief called “The AI in Financial Services Cheat Sheet” at emerj.com/fin1.

The Full Ratchet: VC | Venture Capital | Angel Investors | Startup Investing | Fundraising | Crowdfunding | Pitch | Private E
309. The Future of Softbank and Vision Fund 2, Creative Monetization of User Growth, and Why VC's Missed on Zoom (Nagraj Kashyap)

The Full Ratchet: VC | Venture Capital | Angel Investors | Startup Investing | Fundraising | Crowdfunding | Pitch | Private E

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 38:47


Nagraj Kashyap of Softbank joins Nick to discuss The Future of Softbank and Vision Fund 2, Creative Monetization of User Growth, and Why VC's Missed on Zoom. In this episode we cover: Nagraj's Background and Path to VC. How do you think through horizontal, vertical, or geographic expansion and when the right time is to do so? What did other VC's miss about Zoom? How do you evaluate an opportunity? What key things are you looking for in a consumer startup?  Missed a recent episode? Go to The Full Ratchet blog and catch up! Also, follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Mark Bell's Power Project
MBPP EP. 627 - Get More Sleep In Less Time ft. Matteo Franceschetti

Mark Bell's Power Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 67:12


Matteo is the Co-Founder and CEO of Eight Sleep, the sleep fitness company. Eight Sleep developed a proprietary technology which is redesigning sleep by developing cutting-edge AI and machine learning models to track bio signals during the night and optimizing body recovery and rest while asleep. The end goal of the Pod is to compress sleep and scan your body while asleep to monitor your health. Eight Sleep is currently used by pro athletes and top performers across multiple industries and was recognized as one of TIME's "Best Inventions" in 2018 and 2019, was named one of Fast Company's "Most Innovative Companies" in 2018, and has raised over $150M in funding from leading investors, including Founders Fund, Softbank, Khosla Ventures, YCombinator, Valor Equity Partners, General Catalyst, Naval Ravikant, and Patrick Collison. Special perks for our listeners below! ➢Vertical Diet Meals: https://verticaldiet.com/ Use code POWERPROJECT for free shipping and two free meals + a Kooler Sport when you order 16 meals or more! ➢Vuori Performance Apparel: Visit https://vuoriclothing.com/powerproject to automatically save 20% off your first order! ➢Magic Spoon Cereal: Visit https://www.magicspoon.com/powerproject to automatically save $5 off a variety pack! ➢8 Sleep: Visit https://www.eightsleep.com/powerproject to automatically save $150 off the Pod Pro! ➢Marek Health: https://marekhealth.com Use code POWERPROJECT15 for 15% off ALL LABS! Also check out the Power Project Panel: https://marekhealth.com/powerproject Use code POWERPROJECT for $101 off! ➢LMNT Electrolytes: http://drinklmnt.com/powerproject ➢Piedmontese Beef: https://www.piedmontese.com/ Use Code "POWERPROJECT" at checkout for 25% off your order plus FREE 2-Day Shipping on orders of $150 Subscribe to the Podcast on on Platforms! ➢ https://lnk.to/PowerProjectPodcast Subscribe to the Power Project Newsletter! ➢ https://bit.ly/2JvmXMb Follow Mark Bell's Power Project Podcast ➢ Insta: https://www.instagram.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ https://www.facebook.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mbpowerproject ➢ LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/powerproject/ ➢ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/markbellspowerproject ➢TikTok: http://bit.ly/pptiktok FOLLOW Mark Bell ➢ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marksmellybell ➢ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarkBellSuperTraining ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/marksmellybell ➢ Snapchat: marksmellybell ➢Mark Bell's Daily Workouts, Nutrition and More: https://www.markbell.com/ Follow Nsima Inyang ➢ https://www.breakthebar.com/learn-more ➢YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/NsimaInyang ➢Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nsimainyang/?hl=en ➢TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@nsimayinyang?lang=en Follow Andrew Zaragoza on all platforms ➢ https://direct.me/iamandrewz #PowerProject #Podcast #MarkBell

How I Raised It - The podcast where we interview startup founders who raised capital.
Ep. 217 How I Raised It With Jesse Draper Of Halogen Ventures

How I Raised It - The podcast where we interview startup founders who raised capital.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 36:32


Produced by Foundersuite (www.foundersuite.com), "How I Raised It" goes behind the scenes with startup founders and investors who have raised capital. This episode is with Jesse Draper of Halogen Ventures, a VC fund that invests in startups led by women. In this episode, Jesse talks about how she leveraged her Valley Girl Show and blog to build her network, how she pitched 500 investors to close 50, tips for first time VC fund managers, advice for courting fund-of-funds and RIAs, what types of startups she is looking to invest in, and much more. Halogen Ventures has raised over $50 million across multiple funds. Jesse Draper is a 4th generation venture capitalist and one of Marie Claire's ‘Most networked women in America'. Draper has invested in over 60 early stage deals including The Skimm (with GV), Glamsquad (with SoftBank), Hopskipdrive (with Greycroft), ThisisL. (acquired by P&G), and Eloquii (acquired by Walmart). How I Raised It is produced by Foundersuite, makers of software to raise capital and manage investor relations. Foundersuite's customers have raised over $3 Billion since 2016. Create a free account at www.foundersuite.com.

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第五季*【EP. 254】#655 經濟學人導讀 feat. 國際時事 feat. 新聞評論【資誠聯合會計師事務所 (PwC);日本軟銀集團 (SoftBank);德國疫情 OMG;烏克蘭 ft. 北溪天然氣管道二號】

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 35:43


❗⁠您的一杯咖啡錢 = 我們遠大的目標!捐款支持我們:https://pse.is/3jknpx

Fill or Kill
Avsnitt 345 - Inflationscase

Fill or Kill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 42:38


I dagens avsnitt: Rapportförlorare (Storytel, G5, Peloton, Sinch m.fl) Softbank i Sinch AT&T och Discovery Inc Tesla Inflationstrades Metaverse Krypto Tack Vontobel! Kika in Trade of the Week https://vonto.be/fillorkill_w45 Ha koll på vår hemsida! www.fillorkill.se

Squawk Box Europe Express
SQUAWK BOX, TUESDAY 9TH NOVEMBER, 2021

Squawk Box Europe Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 25:16


The S&P breaks 4,700 for the first time, and the major indices close at record highs as infrastructure stocks pop on the back of President Biden's big spending bill. But Asian shares are mixed Tuesday, despite a surge in Softbank, after the group yields to investor pressure and unveils a $9 billion stock buyback. Crypto surges, with heavyweights Bitcoin and Ether both hitting new all-time highs ahead of a major Bitcoin software upgrade next week. The Netherlands joins a COP26 commitment to end public financing of fossil fuel projects, but some motor giants hold out on signing a deal to end new car emissions by 2040 - as former U.S. President Obama urges more action. And Euronext cuts ties with the London Stock Exchange for its clearing operations, saying it will clear all trades on its newly acquired Italian platform by 2024.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Fintech Leaders
Brynne McNulty Rojas, Co-Founder/CEO of Habi – Transforming a Trillion Dollar Real Estate Market & Harnessing Data to Power the Latin America PropTech Revolution

Fintech Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 29:37


Miguel Armaza sits down with Brynne McNulty Rojas, Co-Founder and CEO of Habi, a PropTech company that is streamlining the traditionally opaque home buying process in Latin America revolutionizing the real estate market in the region.Founded in 2019, Habi has raised over $100 million from investors, including SoftBank, Inspired Capital, Tiger Global, Homebrew, Clocktower, 8VC, and many more.Brynne and Miguel explore:- Building Habi and a deep dive of the exciting PropTech revolution taking place in Latin America.- Their recruiting approach to attract those crucial first employees, developing Habi's culture, and a rundown of the company's four key values and why they were written in English, rather than Spanish.- Habi's secret data analytics machine and how they've been able to scale to over 30k real estate pricings per month.- Fundraising lessons for entrepreneurs… and a lot more!Want more podcast episodes? Join me and follow Fintech Leaders today on Apple, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app for weekly conversations with today's global leaders that will dominate the 21st century in fintech, business, and beyond.Miguel Armaza is Co-Founder & Managing General Partner of Gilgamesh Ventures, a seed-stage investment fund focused on fintech in the Americas. He also hosts and writes the Fintech Leaders podcast and newsletter.Miguel on LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/3nKha4ZMiguel on Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Jb5oBcFintech Leaders Newsletter: bit.ly/3jWIpqp

FT News Briefing
Elon Musk's Twitter followers say sell

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 9:59


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.comhttps://www.ft.com/content/64380f52-df32-4ad7-b2b6-fec42ee95ce1Federal Reserve governor Randal Quarles' decision to leave the US central bank next month creates yet another opening for the Biden administration to fill amid uncertainty about the institution's leadership, Tesla shares fell nearly 5 per cent on Monday after millions of Twitter users polled by chief executive Elon Musk concluded that he should sell 10 per cent of his stake in the electric carmaker. Plus, SoftBank founder Masayoshi Son has promised an $8.8bn share buyback programme over the next 12 months. 30-day free trial of the Moral Money newsletter: http://www.ft.com/cop26podcastTesla shares slide after Musk's Twitter poll backs stake sale - with Richard Waters https://www.ft.com/content/2ac226d6-0eba-4f97-91c1-fb70076c20b0Fed governor Randal Quarles to leave post next month - with James Politi https://www.ft.com/content/6e312624-0399-4d76-85e9-80e61f1f8c91SoftBank unveils $8.8bn share buyback following investor pressure - with Kana Inagaki https://www.ft.com/content/ca7df7d4-7e7e-43b2-85d6-36432d0d9d66The FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon and Marc Filippino. The show's editor is Jess Smith. Additional help by Peter Barber, Gavin Kallmann and Michael Bruning. The show's theme song is by Metaphor Music. The FT's global head of audio is Cheryl Brumley. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Business Matters
Tesla shares fall after Elon Musk Twitter poll

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 52:33


Voters in a Twitter poll have urged Elon Musk to sell 10% of his stake in Tesla in order to pay tax. More than 3.5 million Twitter users voted in the poll, with nearly 58% voting in favour of the share sale. The vote could see him dispose of nearly $21bn of stock. Long term Tesla investor, Ross Gerber, President of Gerber Kawasaki Investments tells us what the poll is all about, and what investors like him make of it. Also on the programme, Delta airlines CEO Ed Bastian warns of the potential for long queues at airports as travel to the US returns to normal. We hear why the Japanese investment giant Softbank is feeling the affects of policy clampdowns in China. And as COP26 moves into its second week we hear from businesses trying to make a difference right now. Warren East of Rolls Royce talks about the company's push into small scale nuclear reactors, whilst Gajen Kandiah, the chief executive of Hitatchi Vantara tells us how his company are using AI, to protect rainforests from deforestation. The BBC's Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Alison Schrager, Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute in New York City, and by the Wall Street Journal's Tokyo bureau chief Peter Landers. (Picture: Elon Musk. Picture credit: Pool/Getty Images)

TRASHFUTURE
Amazon for Legends

TRASHFUTURE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 71:29


This week, Riley, Milo, Hussein, and Alice discuss The Hut Group--an attempt to make British Amazon with direct sales of health goods, financed with SoftBank capital--and its yoked fifty-something founder. We also discuss the Owen Paterson affair in all its cynical splendour. And, of course, there's a new song. Hope you enjoy! If you want access to our Patreon bonus episodes, early releases of free episodes, and powerful Discord server, sign up here: https://www.patreon.com/trashfuture If you're in the UK and want to help Afghan refugees and internally displaced people, consider donating to Afghanaid: https://www.afghanaid.org.uk/ *MILO ALERT* Check out Milo live dates here: https://www.miloedwards.co.uk/live-shows *WEB DESIGN ALERT* Tom Allen is a friend of the show (and the designer behind our website). If you need web design help, reach out to him here:  https://www.tomallen.media/ Trashfuture are: Riley (@raaleh), Milo (@Milo_Edwards), Hussein (@HKesvani), Nate (@inthesedeserts), and Alice (@AliceAvizandum)

Equity
Equity Monday: Elon Musk reinvents corporate governance

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 11:08


This is Equity Monday, our weekly kickoff that tracks the latest private market news, talks about the coming week, digs into some recent funding rounds and mulls over a larger theme or narrative from the private markets. You can follow the show on Twitter here. I also tweet.The stock market wasn't incredibly dramatic this morning, from an index-viewpoint. Crytpos were slightly more exciting but only moderately. A host of earnings results this week should provide us with fireworks, however.And on the subject of crypto regulation, news from Congress isn't great for fans of coins and chains. And the rising popularity of NFT games could put consumers in bad tax territory.The SoftBank Vision Fund 1 posted poor results, harming SoftBank's earnings, and leading to the company promising a huge share buyback.And Elon Musk made news not only for tweeting some sort of dick joke at an American Senator, but also for polling Twitter regarding whether or not he should sell 10% worth of Tesla shares. That's one way to do corporate governance, I suppose.Matter Labs raised $50 million, while H2O.ai raised $100 million.And weekend chat concerning this piece detailing Google's history with AMP underscores just how much trust is being lost between major American tech companies and their communities.We are back Wednesday! Hugs!

WSJ Minute Briefing
Twitter Users Back Elon Musk's Proposed Sale of Tesla Stock

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 2:35


Japan's SoftBank reports a $3.5 billion quarterly net loss after the value of its investments in Chinese companies took a hit from Beijing's stricter rules on the tech industry. A U.S. federal appeals court temporarily blocks the Biden administration's Covid-19 vaccination rules for big private companies. Keith Collins hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Squawk Box Europe Express
SQUAWK BOX, MONDAY 8TH NOVEMBER, 2021

Squawk Box Europe Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 26:16


President Biden's $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill passes the House of Representatives after months of political infighting, with a vote on the larger 'Build Back Better' bill in the days ahead. Wall Street hits record highs, as investors cheer a massively improved jobs report. But a slump in tech valuations across Softbank's Vision Fund pushes it into the red for the second quarter, as the Japanese conglomerate posts a net loss of $3.5 billion dollars. Berkshire Hathaway's cash pile hits a record high, despite aggressive buybacks, and as third quarter operating profit jumps 18-percent on a continued recovery in its railroad, utilities and energy businesses. China posts a record trade surplus, as exports surge more than expected - with year to date exports now exceeding those for the whole of last year. And Engie enters exclusive talks with Bouygues over a 7-billion euro sale of its energy services unit, as the French energy group continues its shift to renewables.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

the Joshua Schall Audio Experience
Is the MyProtein "Gain Train" Slowing Down?

the Joshua Schall Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 19:00


Did the MyProtein "gain train" slow to a halt or was The Hut Group (THG) owned sports nutrition brand just slowing down briefly to pick up more supporters at the station? THG expects its THG Nutrition segment to sustain a 20% YoY growth rate in 2021, but the latest quarter only showed MyProtein up 13.4%. I believe this is just a short-term slowing, as the solid performance this quarter was against the highest growth quarter in 2020 for THG Nutrition. With over 80% of revenues coming from repeat customers, THG continues to have high category conviction. THG Nutrition is much better equipped than the competitive landscape to handle the current challenging market dynamics. The is because THG Nutrition controls more of its value chain, so the company has less exposure to the outside environment. THG Nutrition is also vertically integrated with six global production facilities that span traditional supplement formats to food and beverages. This will allow them to keep steady inventory levels heading into the "pulled forward" Q1 demand that should hit earlier this year. Additionally, THG has a massive global fulfilment network that is also going through a complete automation overhaul with the help of fellow SoftBank investment portfolio member AutoStore. The increased logistics automation and ongoing cost improvement program will help them offset the recent inflationary environment to sustain its market positioning. There's a great deal of positive activity happening at THG Nutrition directly and with THG Ingenuity that supports it. Add that to the elevated global interest/demand for the functional food, beverages, and nutritional supplements and it's very likely THG Nutrition could possibly reach $1 billion in revenue in 2022. FOLLOW ME ON MY SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS LINKEDIN - https://www.linkedin.com/in/joshuaschallmba TWITTER - https://www.twitter.com/joshua_schall INSTAGRAM - https://www.instagram.com/joshua_schall FACEBOOK - https://www.facebook.com/jschallconsulting MEDIUM - https://www.medium.com/@joshuaschall

The Business of Esports
Episode #160: StreamElements $100M Raise, Gaming Picks & Shovels, Streaming & VOD Tools Future

The Business of Esports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 47:17


In this episode with special guest Doron Nir (Co-Founder of StreamElements), we discuss StreamElements raising $100 million in a recent investment round, the transformational effect of a SoftBank investment, the future of picks and shovels for streaming and VOD, how StreamElements compares to their competitors, StreamElements looking to hire, how StreamElements works with content creators, and so much more!

FT News Briefing
Bond investors and central banks

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 10:00


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.comhttps://www.ft.com/content/d6716d79-4cbd-4955-b07b-64740a4a6d5bThe White House has said Opec+ risks imperilling the global economic recovery by refusing to speed up oil production increases, and SoftBank founder Masayoshi Son is facing pressure to announce a new stock buyback programme next week. Plus, the FT's markets editor, Katie Martin, explains how inflation has complicated the relationship between markets and central banks. 30-day free trial of the Moral Money newsletter: http://www.ft.com/cop26podcastWhite House says Opec risks imperilling economic recovery - with Derek Brower https://www.ft.com/content/4a2fc7b2-c963-4418-9997-d1bf203c3a35SoftBank under pressure from investors to prop up share price​​https://www.ft.com/content/d5fe83e9-f663-4cdb-90b6-6663683c6ba1Global bonds rally strongly after Bank of England leaves investors ‘wrongfooted' - with Katie Martin https://www.ft.com/content/a9c896fc-34a4-44a9-9499-085c3f5c40ecThe FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon and Marc Filippino. The show's editor is Jess Smith. Additional help by Peter Barber, Gavin Kallmann and Michael Bruning. The show's theme song is by Metaphor Music. The FT's global head of audio is Cheryl Brumley. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News
Big Crypto News - Wrapped XRP (wXRP) - Aaron Rodgers Bitcoin - Biden Stablecoin Regulations - DCG $10B

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 22:24


Wrapped XRP (wXRP) on the Ethereum will be live in December which is great news for those that want to access XRP within Ethereum wallets, DeFi, and smart contracts. NFL player Aaron Rodgers will be paid in Bitcoin. Stablecoins are a compelling payment option, but they need to be regulated, Biden administration report says. Grayscale-parent Digital Currency Group tops $10 billion valuation with SoftBank, Alphabet investments.Hext trust CEO Interviews - https://youtu.be/BeAlL6a5tSI & https://youtu.be/dWxkj5vJgDQ

Tacos and Tech Podcast
San Diego Tech News Weekly – October 15, 2021

Tacos and Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 27:48


This Week in SD Tech: Local investors Section 32 and Qualcomm Ventures recently invested in Gretel AI and AmionX respectively Union Tribune releases list of 26 phenomenal women to know in San Diego, including many tech leaders SoftBank invests $400 million in activewear maker Vuori The Top Tech Awards recently honored many local technologists and leaders The largest public companies in San Diego saw major stock gains in the first half of 2021

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: The Rise of Quick Commerce and Why CPGs ARe Misaligned Being Powered By Ad Spend, The 5 Core Components Consumers Care About When Ordering Today & Why Amazon and Alibaba Will Not Be The Big Players in 10 Years with Ralf Wenzel, Founder & CEO

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 37:54


Ralf Wenzel is the Founder & CEO @ JOKR, a global platform for instant retail delivery at a hyper-local scale. To date, Ralf has raised over $170M for the company from the likes of GGV Capital, Balderton, Softbank and Kaszek, just to name a few. Prior to JOKR, Ralf spent close to 7 years as the Founder & CEO @ foodpanda as well as enjoying roles as Chief Strategy Officer @ Delivery Hero, Interim Chief Product and Experience Officer @ WeWork and even moving to the other side of the table as a Managing Partner with Softbank. In Today's Episode with Ralf Wenzel You Will Learn: 1.) How Ralf made his way into the world of startups and came to found foodpanda? What were his biggest takeaways from foodpanda that have impacted how he thinks about scaling JOKR today? 2.) Fulfillment Centres: What are the selection criteria when deciding what is the right location for a fulfillment center? How does real estate cost differ when comparing LATAM to the US? How does Ralf think about the balance between consumer choice and SKU minimization? In what way does Ralf believe they have a moat due to their catalog management system? 3.) The Driver: Why is JOKR different to every other provider in the way they employ their riders? Does it not severely impact their margins by providing equal benefits across their entire rider workforce? How many drops per hour is a good level of driver efficiency? What have been Ralf's biggest lessons when it comes to driver retention? 4.) The Consumer: How did JOKR acquire their first consumers on the demand side? What marketing strategies worked? What did not work? Is Ralf concerned by the immense amount of money invested in the space driving customer acquisition prices way higher? How has Ralf seen CACs change over time in mature markets? 5.) Expansion Opportunities: How does Ralf feel about incorporating own brand products, produced by JOKR over time? How does this change the margin profile of the business? How does Ralf feel about paid search as a core part of their business? Will CPGs be able to pay to be ranked higher in JOKR?