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defense to criminal charges that is distinct from an exculpation

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Best podcasts about Excuse

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Latest podcast episodes about Excuse

Chronicles of Hoodie Craig
Episode 140 | "The Run It Back"

Chronicles of Hoodie Craig

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 103:26


Excuse the quality of this episode, Hubstro forgot his mic but that didn't stop the foolishness. New music and sports. Y'all know what it is. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chroniclesof-hoodie-craig/support

Unsportsmanlike Conduct
Oct 15 Seg 5 - They brought out the Gyros!

Unsportsmanlike Conduct

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 17:02


Excuse our chewing

Bill Whittle Network
Loser Avoidance: How You Nurture Fear of Failure to Excuse Your Refusal to Try

Bill Whittle Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 28:00


Is fear of failure the ultimate dream killer, or do you nurture it as an excuse for your refusal to try? Loser avoidance behavior can become a compelling drug to paralyze you from taking action. Bill Whittle and Zo Rachel step into the battle. The Virtue Signal is a production of our Members, who have succeeded in advancing great ideas for more than a decade with their generous contributions. To join the team, visit https://BillWhittle.com

UF Health Podcasts
Metabolism no longer a ready excuse for weight gain

UF Health Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


Sorry, folks. You might not be able to blame that bulging waistline on slowing…

UF Health Podcasts
Metabolism no longer a ready excuse for weight gain

UF Health Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


Sorry, folks. You might not be able to blame that bulging waistline on slowing…

Charlottesville Community Engagement
October 14, 2021: Boyles resigns as Charlottesville City Manager; Friendship Court agreement reauthorized by EDA

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 18:27


Today’s Patreon-fueled shout-out is for the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign, an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. The leaves have started to fall as autumn set in, and as they do, this is a good time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!On today’s show:Charlottesville City Manager resigns, citing personal and professional attacks from Nikuyah WalkerThe Charlottesville Economic Development Authority reauthorizes a performance agreement with the Piedmont Housing Alliance for the redevelopment of Friendship CourtCharlottesville moving forward with planning for climate adaptation The Charlottesville Economic Development Authority has reauthorized a performance agreement with the Piedmont Housing Alliance for a loan for the redevelopment of Friendship Court. Piedmont Housing Alliance would pay the money back through the incremental tax revenue the city would get from a more intense residential development. Here’s Economic Development Director Chris Engel. (staff report)“Typically, our performance agreements are done to encourage business development, job creation, capital investment that creates office space or an industrial building,” Engel said. “In this case, the public good if you will is the rehabilitation and addition of not public housing, but affordable housing that would be owned and managed on a long term basis by the Piedmont Housing Alliance.” The city is currently considering using this tool to finance improvements to Stribling Avenue. This is also the same mechanism that was proposed by the owner of the skeleton Landmark hotel. In this case, the 11.75 acre property is assessed at $8.185 million this year, which yields $77,714 in property taxes for the city. When the first phase of redevelopment is completed, the value is projected to be over $20 million, which Engel said would bring in an additional $190,000. Piedmont Housing Alliance would get that increase through a transfer from the Economic Development authority. “This is a very complicated, complex deal to get this to all come together,” Engel said.This is separate from the nearly $16 million in capital funds city taxpayers will contribute to all four phases of redevelopment. Under this agreement, Piedmont Housing Alliance would collect the funding up to $6 million.“There’s not a profit making opportunity here for anybody but it’s an opportunity to see additional affordable housing added to the city again and an old site that needs rehabilitation,” Engel said. The EDA approved the reauthorization with little debate. The original agreement was written up by former city attorney John Blair before he became the acting city manager after former city manager Tarron Richardson resigned. Engel said the Piedmont Housing Alliance is ready to begin construction. Their website has not been updated with information about redevelopment since last October when a December start-date for construction was expected. More information as it comes in. Charlottesville’s efforts to create a Climate Adaptation Plan move forward this month with a community forum to get input on potential threats from more extreme weather patterns. The October 25 event will be the first steps for the city to complete a Climate Vulnerability Assessment. “As part of the city’s climate action effort, it has committed to developing a plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to prepare and respond to our changing climate,” said Susan Elliott, the city’s climate protection program manager..Participants are being asked to review a webinar recorded on October 7 where representatives from ICLEI described Charlottesville’s projected climate hazards and gave an overview of the process. Another pre-forum webinar will be held on October 15. (register) The Community Forum on October 25 will begin at 5:30 p.m. (register)Charlottesville City Council will have to appoint someone to serve as City Manager as of Monday, November 1. The five-member elected body held an emergency closed session Tuesday afternoon to discuss “Urgent Personnel Matters.” “I move that we accept the resignation of Chip Boyles, effective October 29, 2021 per the letter that he has sent to Council,” said City Councilor Heather Hill as she read a motion coming back from closed session. Council voted 5-0 to accept the resignation, but there was no sense of who would take over as city manager. There are two deputy city managers who were hired by Boyles, both of whom have a collective tenure of seven months. Ashley Marshall has been Deputy City Manager for Racial Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion since May and Sam Sanders has been Deputy City Manager for Operations since August. Before we get back to Boyles, there was also news of another person leaving city government. In an earlier motion, Hill disclosed the departure of the city’s Information Technology department, Sunny Hwang. He’s served in that position since September 2018 according to his LinkedIn profile, which has not yet been updated. There are also vacancies at the tops of the parks department and the public works department. Back to Boyles. Boyles was hired in January to replace John Blair, who served as interim city manager after Dr. Tarron Richardson resigned in September. In his resignation letter, Boyles said he had been hired to help the organization get back on its feet after a “time of turbulence and organizational instability.” “This success was disrupted with my decision to to change the leadership of the City Police Department,” Boyles wrote. “I continue to support my decision taken on this matter, but the vitriol associated with this decision of a few vocal community members and the broken relationship with Mayor Walker have severely limited my ability to be productive towards the goals of City Council.”Boyles said personal and professional attacks from Walker and others were beginning to hurt his mental health. He resigned to protect himself and his family. To recap, Boyles terminated the contract of Chief RaShall Brackney on September 1, 2021, triggering a ferocious outcry from Walker. She spent much of the September 7 meeting using her privileges as Mayor to force a conversation about the topic. For context, go back and listen to the September 8 edition of this newsletter. The soundbites for the read of the newsletter today come from the October 4, 2021 meeting of Council, and the last hour or so of the meeting. The agenda listed a formal discussion of the matter at the conclusion of other business. Boyles defended his decision, which was his alone to make under the city’s charter. Boyles’ explanationBoyles said Brackney had moved the department toward being a more just and fair system, but said surveys conducted by the Police Benevolent Association indicated low morale.“It became to me evident that some type of change needed to be made that while we had been making strides in one area, the implementation into the department itself was in jeopardy,” Boyles said. That soundbite comes from about an 11 minute explanation that Boyles gave. For some more background, I refer you to the August 20 “response from the city” to those PBA surveys. The statement also describes the resignations of two members of the SWAT team and the termination of a third. (read the statement)What followed were questions from the rest of the Council. Councilor Michael Payne said he was concerned about the timing of the incident.“It has to be stated that, one, the PBA is an organization that is one that is not friendly to reform,” Payne said. “Those organizations across the country are not friendly to officers being disciplined and held accountable for mistreatment.” Vice Mayor Sena Magill said she wanted Boyles to write down his vision for the city.“I have seen the team that you are building in City Hall and I believe that you are focused on a team that wants to bring Charlottesville into 21st century practices on a lot of things including a teamwork environment,” Magill said.Councilor Heather Hill.“We’re not condoning any of the behaviors that were rightfully dealt with in the police department and that we are committed to a very way of policing in the city of Charlottesville,” Hill said. In his comments on October 4, Councilor Lloyd Snook referred to a closed session from mid August after the disciplinary actions described in the statement were made. “When Chief Brackney explained to use in closed session on August 16 I believe it was what the evidence was of the SWAT team officers conduct, showed us a few snippets of video,” Snook said. “Every Councilor in the room, every senior management person in the room was satisfied with the chief’s decision.”Snook said the City Manager has the right and power to fire the police chief.“The only issue for us quite frankly is whether we fire the city manager for firing the police chief,” Snook said. On October 4, Snook said the answer was no.But for Mayor Nikuyah Walker, the answer was not no. Walker’s cross-examinationWalker used her time to ask Boyles a series of pointed questions, including this one about internal surveys. “How did you arrive from looking at the survey that the Chief was the issue based on those surveys,” Walker asked.“Most of the survey was built around the command staff and answers were regarding the individual command staff but it was just an overall leadership from both the questions that were included in the survey and then the chance for the officers to comment,” Boyles said. Let’s skip ahead a little to another section.“So these issues arose and you didn’t afford her a conversation to talk with her about the issues that you had come to learn and create a plan with her to rectify those issues,” Walker said.“I did,” Boyles said. “And one of our meetings after a lot of this started becoming evident, I asked her about preparing a plan to try to address some of these items. The response was that a plan wasn’t needed and what did I have in mind to put into a plan.”Boyles said that was not his area of expertise. Let’s skip ahead. Walker quoted from the September 17 op-ed Boyles wrote for the Daily Progress.“So, in the immediacy of the decision in the op-ed piece that you wrote that the CPD was ‘gripped in chaos’,” Walker said.“Yes, it was my understanding that some of the leadership positions were not going to be staying if Chief Brackney were staying,” Boyles said. This line of questioning continued. Walker said her information said only two of six members of the command staff were set to leave. “So, you consider two of six people to be chaos?” Walker said. “No, I think it extends beyond,” Boyles said. “It’s the statements from the survey of people looking for other jobs, wanting to be out of the police department. There is no smoking gun in this.”Walker went through many of the comments and read through them out loud. She also wanted to pin down Boyles on what conversations he had with regional leaders about policing issues. Boyles said those were conversations were private and in confidence.“Okay, Chip, so since all of these people are secretive and you think that’s okay, because what you want us to do on whether or not you want to stay here or not based on some random conversations we had without talking to you about?” Walker asked.”That’s a decision you all will make,” Boyles said. “As I stated earlier, I’m here to fulfil the direction of Council. I took this job knowing. I think I’ve even stated for me there’s a job evaluation every other meeting. I accept that.”The questioning continued. At one point, there was to have been a press conference after the release of the August 20 statement.“And then, Chief Brackney arrived at a meeting, right, Chip? And you had changed course by that time that there’s no longer going to be a press conference,” Walker said.“Yes,” Boyles responded. “We had a disagreement over wanting to show the videos that you all saw in your closed session.” A little later on in the cross-examination, Councilor Hill brought a specific incident related to how former Police Chief Brackney responded to feedback. Go back to the tape to learn more about that but Walker asked Hill to read the email in question. “Okay, do you want to pull that email up?” Walker asked“I’m happy to find it, but I don’t think it’s necessary right now,” Hill said. “I’m just saying you are trying to pick specific examples. I don’t want to go down this path with you.”“I’m not,” Walker said, her voice rising. “I was open to whatever you all presented. I asked and allowed you all you to talk first because I’m just trying…”“We were trying to be respectful,” Hill said. “Excuse me?” Walker asked.“We were trying to be respectful of the process,” Hill said. “This is not the appropriate forum to get into all of this.”“You were not trying to be respectful of any process,” Walker said. “I have been on this Council and I know how you operate.”“I’d like for us to move on,” Hlll said. The conversation went back to that meeting after the August 20 press release. Boyles explained the dynamic that was leading him to make a decision. “That meeting was a good indication similar to what Councilor Hill was just talking about when we began to disagree over the videos and other issues, Chief Brackney just left the meeting which again gave me concern of being able to work with that type of interaction, with that type of relationship,” Boyles said. Boyles acknowledged that Brackney had told him that she had felt targeted by members of the community as well as internally. “My knowledge of that comes from what she’s told me and I certainly believe it to be true,” Boyles said. Walker was clear she was not going to let Boyles forget his decision to terminate Brackney. “I can go on about every city manager that has been here, and you are never going to, I told you this, Chip,” Walker said. “You’re never going to live past this decision.”Soon after, Walker quoted from the book White Rage to make part of her point and chastised her fellow Councilors for trying to control her.“Have I made 100 percent of the right decisions?” Walker asked. “No. Have you all made 100 percent of the right decisions? No. You haven’t. But again, your white gaze gets to determine who wins in a situation like this.”Earlier this year, Walker wrestled with whether to seek a second term before announcing in May she would be a candidate. She withdrew from the race on September 8, citing the racism of her fellow Councilors. Walker raised no campaign funds this year. The conversation on October 4 continued, and the rest of the discussion is available to watch.  Now it’s perhaps a better use of our time to think ahead to Council’s next meeting on October 18, as well as the four regular meetings of the year. Two new Councilors will join in January when Walker and Hill’s terms are up. Who will be the city manager? Who will be mayor? Who will be running the city This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Say anything less and you just might get another five. "Excuse me while we flex!" BIG Thank you to The Steve Harvey Nation. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Changing the Rules
Episode 89: What is The Luckiest People in the World All About?, Guest, Ray Loewe

Changing the Rules

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 24:14


Guest Co-host:  Bill Hughes:  w.hughes@verizon.net Transcription:Kris Parsons00:03Welcome to changing the rules, a weekly podcast about people who are living their best life and how you can figure out how to do it too. Join us with your lively host Ray Loewe, better known as the luckiest guy in the world.Ray Loewe00:15Good morning, everybody, and welcome to changing the rules. The podcast that's designed for the luckiest people in the world, and showcasing other of the luckiest people in the world who do a really good job of dealing with rules. You know, all through our lives were handed a series of rules by people that kind of want to exert control over us for some reason. early in life, we get our parents who make us rules, then the schools make us rules, the church makes us rules, our jobs, make us rules. And you know, one of the problems with rules is that they're necessary. But when you're living your life under somebody else's rules, you're not living your own life. So the luckiest people in the world are really good at dealing with rules, and changing them and making them work for us. So today, we have a little different kind of program, we're gonna introduce Bill Hughes in a moment. And Bill is going to be our co-host for the month of October. And he's going to help us bring in some interesting guests to showcase as the luckiest people in the world. And Bill did something. He's going to put my back up against the wall today because he decided that he was going to interview me, and I have no idea how the heck this is gonna work but Bill Hughes say hello, hello. Okay. And Bill Hughes is a longtime friend. He's been on our podcast many, many times. And he is a coach and has been a coach for a long time, I've known Bill for 30 plus years, he's been a mentor to me, He always comes up with great ideas, and he's had great insight into life and the meaning of life. So Bill, how do you want to do this? Well, I guess the best way to do it is just simply to start and that's to open it up, I actually want to kind of go through a few areas, I don't know, I believe we're going to probably end up splitting this up a little bit. Because again, interviewing the host of a show is a little bit different than interviewing a attendee or somebody who had who is part of the subject matter of changing the rules.  But by the way, Bill behave because I'm going to get even with you. Yeah, I'm sure you will, I'm sure you will. But that, you know, we can deal with this, we can deal with it. So in looking at, at what this whole process or what this whole program attempts to do, and how it does it, the thing that attracted me to it originally was the fact that I agree, I think that people should control their own lives and have some direction in that. And I know that there's a great deal of reticence about doing that simply because everybody's got responsibilities and things that holds them back from doing what they really want to do. And ultimately, they get to the end of their life and hopefully they've done it. And if they haven't done it that I guess the regrets are profound. And hopefully, by participating in this community, that Ray has set up, we can attract people that believe that they have something in them, but don't know where that is. But to do that, I think that I'd like to examine a little bit further, exactly how Ray got started. Because if we go back over the years, when did you realize this was the direction that you wanted to take your focus? Well, it took a while and I'm not. You know, I guess what you're saying is when did I become conscious of what I want to do, and uh it occurred over a period of time. And this is true by the way of most people who consider themselves lucky because the answers don't occur immediately. So I started as a financial advisor I worked for 45 years in my own firm and dealt with a lot of great people. And the problem is that when we solve we're not just money problems. I mean the basic goal here was to have enough money to get kids through college and then have enough money to put away retirement money so that you can retire the way you want. And it's this comment the way you want that I think is the critical piece because One of the things that we found is that most people had problems of visualizing the future of visualizing a period of time after work when they were going to live life. And I think the way we were told this by our parents is these were supposed to be the golden years. And that meant that you had to have enough gold to be able to live life the way you want. But how do you know what that is? How do you put together this concept of, of what you want your life to be? Well, I guess the other question that always seems to come up is, is you may have some fantasy about what that might be. But other things seem to get in the way. I mean, folks have families they're responsible for, they've got jobs that they're engaged in, they have there just seems to be this, this notion that you can't break inertia, you know, you're kind of stuck on a glide path. And before you know it, 10 years have gone by. So is there is there a particular event that you've found that has or occurs in someone's life that that causes them to take pause? What would what would that? What would that look like? Yeah, actually, there are a couple of them. And that's a good question. So going back to my financial advisory life, okay, one of the things I noticed is that we found many, many people who had successfully put away money, they had a lot of money. And they, they complained every time we met them, that they hated their job, and yet they wouldn't leave. And the question was why? And I'm not going to answer that right now. Which is, it's there seem to be this disconnect, I hate what I'm doing. Okay, but and I have the money to be able to do anything I want but I don't. Okay. So somewhere in there, there's an indication that there's a comfort level, that people are comfortable with their past, they know what it is, you know, there's something about getting up every morning and going back to your work about hanging out with the people that you know, are there, as opposed to saying, I'm going to break from this and go into new. There's a second event, and this one really hit home. And this event didn't occur until about five years ago, by the way, and I'm a swimmer, I went to our National Senior Games, I did my swimming thing. And I met a guy by the name of John. And John was over on this Chinese carrying around this whole batch of metals. I think there were six of them. And five of them were gold, and one was silver. And so I went up to him because he looked older than me and I said, John, when did you win your medals? And how'd you do this? And I later found out in the course of things that john won his medals in the 100-104 age group, okay. And his medals that he won at 103. By the way, we're in the shot put, the discus, the hammer throw, you know events that I can even imagine doing. And yet, here's this guy, 103 years old. And by the way, one of his medals was silver. He got beat by a crummy, 101-year-old and one of his events. So so so the whole thing, when you look at this, and you start to think about this, is here's a guy at 103, who's living his life to the fullest, he's out winning medals and celebrating with his friends. And then your vision, the other group of people that if they're lucky enough to reach 100, are starting in a wheelchair in a nursing home somewhere. And I started thinking about, okay, so how did this occur? Where do you want to be? And how, how do you help people get here, where they're active, and they're involved? We don't know that we're going to live to the 100. But many of us are, okay. It's not a bad goal to aspire to, as long as you're not in that wheelchair, you know, and you're out doing things. The second thing that really occurred to me here, Bill was, you think about this if you're lucky enough to live that long. What are you going to do with all these bonus years that you get? You know, my parents lived into the early 70s. My father did. He didn't have a lot of time after he retired to make decisions and to enjoy life. But today, many of us are going to live longer and how are you going to utilize that life? What are you going to do with it? Are you just gonna sit around and play cards all day and wait to die? Or what's going to happen? Well thinking back about your swimmer? Did you ever have a chance to talk with him in any depth as far as when he started doing this and why this became a passion for him that carried him into his, I'd say years that go well beyond scheduled retirement? Well, I think um the answer to that is really know that I am an end-up discussion, no, but it did have enough of a discussion to realize that this was just part of his life. He, he just decided it long ago that he wanted to stay physically fit, that he didn't want to sit in a wheelchair somewhere or sit in a chair and let life go by. He wanted to be active. And the second part and this was obvious, he had a whole lot of people who knew who he was. So he had a friendship based around this. And in other words, this was just a piece of his life that he thought that was important. And he followed it. And I think I think that's the key is to understand what the piece of this life is for you. And then to follow it.  Okay so, I know you've the other thing that that's come up on a number of these calls, maybe not a whole lot, but a couple of them that stand out, in my mind, are people that hit a life event. Maybe they have a mild stroke, or they have a close brush with death, is this the thing that needs to happen for somebody to finally wake up and say, Hey, you know, yeah, the sands in the hourglass are going to run out. And if they do, and I haven't done what I wanted to do, I'm going to die with my song in me. You know, unfortunately, for many people, that is what has to occur, they don't move until some event occurs that says, hey, I have to take action. And the advantage of the people who are truly lucky is that they're able to sit down and do a little planning and a little bit of visualization and decide where they want to go on what they want to do. You know, there are so many things that you can do with life. And for a long part of our lives, work gets in the way work eats up 8, 10, 12 hours a day, five days a week, and it inhibits you from doing a whole lot of things that you might want to do. The key is to be able to visualize what are some of these things that you might want to do. And if you can't visualize them, to go on off and try to try different things, and get a feel for what you might want to do. And let your life expand. I think the tendency is for people to stay put to stay in a comfort level until an event occurs. But the lucky people don't do that they don't have to. But is the luckiest person a perception of somebody else looking at the results that you've gotten from some venture or some excursion that you've taken that turned into something a little bit more involved? Or is it really truly luck. I mean, I think in many cases, you make your own luck. And so the luckiest person to me is more of a perception it's me looking as an outsider into the results that they're getting from something that they discovered and decided to pursue. So how would somebody that's following a normal path, like you follow the normal pathway of being engaged in financial services? That was your that was your thing. That's the passion that you had, and you had a number of, of areas that were areas of focus. But during that time, there was something else that you were doing along the way that kept you engaged in something that allowed you to stay passionate. And ultimately, even as a financial advisor, I often looked at you as someone who was the luckiest person just by virtue of the results that you got there.  Yeah, let's, let's answer this in two pieces over here. So I think the first piece that you have to answer is what do we mean by lucky? You know, there are a lot of people who say, you know, I won a million dollars in the lottery is a lucky person, okay. That's not what we're talking about uh, but we're talking about is how people feel. there's a feeling here that makes you feel lucky. It's when all of a sudden your life is taking form that you feel like you're making progress. You're enjoying every day you're moving in a direction that makes you happy. And that's what we're really talking about. Now, now two if you can rephrase the question that you asked me I'll actually try and answer. oh boy, that now you're gonna have to try to remember something? Again, you're engaged in life activities, it's raising kids, it's making an income, it's paying bills is doing all these things. So what are you looking for during the course of those actions that allows you to stay engaged in a way that's, that's compelling and gratifying? Well, again, I'm one of the luckiest people in the world here, uh my old job being a financial adviser was to work with some of the greatest people in the world. These were, these were people that motivated me every day, when you sit down and you look at people who are dealing with all these problems that you're talking about, they're dealing with kids, they're trying to pay for college, they're trying to figure out how to make enough money to do things. But among the people that I happen to deal with, these were people that had some insight about what they wanted in life, and what was important to them. And, and, you know, although a lot of people would say, Gee, I want to travel, I can't wait to get my kids up to a certain age, the luckiest people incorporate their kids into their life in the future to they're part of their life, and they're always part of their life. But I think the difference is that they sit down and they start to think about what are the things that fascinate and motivate them? Okay, if you think about this Bill, wouldn't it be great to be able to wake up every morning and have on your calendar, things that you really, truly enjoy doing that fascinated and motivated you, and allowed you to expand your horizons allowed you to grow in life, as opposed to having your life become smaller and smaller and smaller?Bill Hughes16:58I think a lot of people listening to this might be thinking, so I make a list or what do I do? How do I go through the self-discovery to maybe reorient my path? Ray Loewe17:12Yeah, you  do make a list, among other things. So there are a couple of things and by the way, we have a book that we just completed writing it, it will not be out for a couple of months yet. But the book talks about the luckiest people in the world. And there's a planning process and there that talks about how the luckiest people get lucky. So I think one of the things that you do, first of all, is you sit down and you say what are the things that are working in my life, the things that I enjoy doing that work? And the idea is that you want to keep those going. And then you look at the things in your life that aren't working. And you say how do I stop doing these? How do I not have to deal with each anymore? And there's not a tried and true method of doing this. I just think if you work at it, it happens. Okay? This concept of lists and visions is absolutely critical to and, and probably even more important than that is whatever your list is, and your vision is now you need to constantly expand that and look for how do I keep it going. And you do that by talking to other people.Bill Hughes18:34One of the things I've noticed about a lot of folks that we've interviewed over time, is that they all seem to have one attribute that really sticks out in my mind at least anyway and that is they seem to have a gratitude for things or where does that play a part in this?Ray Loewe18:49Well, yeah, you have to understand you know, if you're going to do things that make you happy, I think gratitude is a natural part of it. But you have to take the time to make sure that you understand that you're lucky when things work for you and that you should be grateful to other people and you should be grateful for those gifts that you've been given. And the fact that you are just makes you feel happier and happier and happier and more and more grateful and it just grows it snowballs. So how would you build something like that into your process? Well, you tell me, what do you do? What? I'm going to turn the tables on you here. I figured it was only a matter of time. So what do you do? What do you do? Every day that makes you appreciate your day and makes you know when you're making progress in your life and when you're not what do you do?Bill Hughes19:48Well, again not to get not to stray too far. Because I think that at some point we will be breaking this into the next section which gets into a lot more depth. I think as far as precisely how to do that. But for the individual, I think that it's really an attitude thing, it's being able to look forward to things getting out of even getting out of bed in the morning, and looking around and realizing that you got a fresh slate, you got a chance to make a difference in something. And being able to, to, I guess, embrace that perspective. So how does Ray get out of bed in the morning? And what do you look at when you first get up?Ray Loewe20:30Okay, so you just hit a key point right there. And the key point is, basically, what are you doing to make life better for other people, okay. Because if you're totally selfish about this whole concept of being a luckiest person in the world, you're not going to go anywhere, you have to make a difference. And, and I think that I've seen too many people that I would not call the luckiest people in the world, who generally are content, they're generally happy. They're ambling through life, they're busy. But they're not doing anything that's meaningful. They're not doing anything that's driving them. One. One of the reasons why we're doing this podcast right now is that I get excited every week when I get to talk to a new and different person, and I find out what they're doing. And all of a sudden, I become energized. And I think the people that we interviewed become energized. And we find out that there are a lot of people out there that just aren't sitting on their duff. They are out there, trying to do some things for other people, and they get joy and happiness out of doing that. Just like they do get joy and happiness out of taking a cruise. So So part of this then has something to do with being a little bit more observant in life than just self-focus. You've got to be and you do this pretty well, in the sense that you're you seem to always have your eyes open for interesting people. Yeah, uh you know I've always felt this way I, you know, I've used an expression, a lot of Hey, Bill, you're an interesting person. You know, now in some ways, that's a backhanded compliment, okay. But the difference is I mean it, if I need somebody that interests me, or fascinates me, I want to know more about that person. And I'm going to keep digging into that relationship until such time as it goes the other way. And then you kind of phase-out of the relationship. And the whole key here is to continue to meet people that expand your horizon that make you think about things you want to do and make you excited about life. You know, when we're gonna have to break in this podcast a little bit, because we're getting near the end of our time, but we're gonna continue this next week. And when we continue this, one of the things I want to do is, is to talk about some of the mindsets that the luckiest people will have. Cause they are interesting, and they're unique. And they differentiate what I think the luckiest people are from others that are not. Sounds like a plan. Good so so let's, let's end this podcast right now. We're going to be back next year. Next week. Excuse me, I'm Bill Hughes is going to continue this interview. And we're going to probe into what makes the luckiest people lucky. And how can you I think we're going to expand a little bit and get into how can you join the community of the luckiest people in the world that can help you do this?  Sounds good. Okay, so Taylor, let's end this session. And we'll be back next week with another changing rules episode. Kris Parsons23:51Thank you for listening to changing the rules, a weekly podcast about people who are living their best life, and how you can figure out how to do that too. Join us with your lively host of Ray Loewe, better known as the luckiest guy in the world.

The Break Room
Mule Excuse Post Game Monday - WEEK 5

The Break Room

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 15:34


It looks like Tommy WON'T get to cash in on his bet with Gene & Danger. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dermot & Dave
What's The Worst Excuse You've Ever Given To Your Boss?

Dermot & Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 7:39


''There's a bit of work being done to the house and I have to be here'' - this is always a classic go to when trying to get the day off work because you're 'sick'! [audio mp3="https://media.radiocms.net/uploads/2021/10/12111032/BernardOShea_Excuses_1210.mp3"][/audio] Comedian, Bernard O'Shea joined Dermot and Dave to share what he thinks might be the most fool proof excuse to give your boss! The lads aren't too convinced. Click the Play button above to hear the full chat. 

Grove Park Baptist Church
October 10, 2021 "Excuse the Glove: The Work of Jesus" The Reverend Marc Sanders

Grove Park Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:09


Scripture: Hebrews 4:12-16 The Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost

Lynn Cullen Live
Mon., October 11 Episode

Lynn Cullen Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 61:07


"'Excuse me Founding Fathers, but if “all men are created equal”, then how do the people who greeted Europeans as they came to these shores, how are they reduced to being “merciless savages”? Are they not equal?' - Lynn Cullen on "merciless Indian savages' being included in the Declaration of Independence"

The Bert Show
Is She Wrong For Using Her Husband's Addiction As An Excuse To Steal Money From Him? 

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:13


She recently found out that her husband is spending THOUSANDS a week on his OnlyFans addiction. As a stay-at-home mom, this upset her for multiple reasons. One reason is that he barely gives her money for groceries and essentials.Because of this, she's secretly been sending herself money from his account. Is she wrong for doing this?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

Hey Now! Hey Now!
Animation Classics: Space Jam

Hey Now! Hey Now!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 45:42


Sufferin Succotash! Excuse us while we SLAM DUNK into your podcast subs! In this episode, we'll be discussing a Looney Tunes and Michael Jordan classic - Space Jam. So put down your carrot (we're looking at you Bugs), lace up your Nikes and pull up your lucky North Carolina shorts … [Porky Pig] ww-www-we're- we're www we're off to Moron Mountain! Th-th-th-that's all, folks!Pro Tip: Best listened to with some... Jam? Makes sense.Find us on Instagram! @heynowheynow, @sandfordemily, @barneyleigh93We are delighted to announce that our nostalgic gift card & wrapping paper collection is officially LIVE! You can browse the full range, in collaboration with Zoe Spry here: https://www.zoespry.com/copy-of-greetings-cards Hurry! The Julie Andrews one is selling out in Genovia

Gravetop Church
Scary Truths pt. 2 [PLEASE EXCUSE ME]

Gravetop Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 49:47


To give or learn more, visit https://www.gravetopchurch.com/

Christ Church (Moscow, ID)
Darwinism: Modern Man's Great Excuse

Christ Church (Moscow, ID)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 41:12


The Brilliant Idiots
Excuse Me Miss Lady

The Brilliant Idiots

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 113:09


This week Charlamagne, Andrew, and Wax discuss mask mandates, Sage Steele's comments about Brarack Obama, Squid Game, Charlamagne talks about becoming a dad again, Breastfeeding in public, Dave Chapelle, ask an idiot, and more!!! Tha Gods Honest Truth merch www.cthashow.myshopify.com Head Over to www.theandrewschulz.com for Andrews latest tour info. Head to www.blackeffect.com to check all the podcasts on the Black Effect Podcast Network.

GAA on Off The Ball
Hurling with James Skehill: Excuse me this makes me angry | Striking to bring Micheál Donoghue back

GAA on Off The Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 25:00


All Ireland winner James Skehill reflects on the latest reports as Galway search for a new manager and offers an insight into Micheál Donoghue's exit. OTB AM with Gillette | #BestFaceForward

BAT & SPIDER
76 KISS MEETS THE PHANTOM OF THE PARK

BAT & SPIDER

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 72:53


Hey you Star Children and Cat.. people! We dredged the Hudson to find this beaut from late, great, 1978. KISS Meets the Phantom of the Park! Excuse the show this week, we were so busy rocking and rolling all night that we really let our conversation about this flick, and KISS in general, take center stage. Also, Dale's audio got REAL REAL weird at the end so things got a little abrupt for the last few minutes. It's fine. It's all fine. How are you? Welcome to Bat & Spider. On this show we strive to talk about low-rent horror movies for your pleasure and ours. Please join in as we laugh and swoon along to these terrible treasures of low budget yore. Join our DISCORD Order Black Castle Zine and Haunted Cassette Get your Bat & Spider STICKERS here Get a sweet new Bat & Spider t-shirt here! All sale proceeds go to The Movement For Black Lives. Technical Adviser: Slim of 70mm Theme song composed and performed by Tobey Forsman of Whipsong Music. Follow Bat & Spider on Instagram Follow Chuck and Dale on Letterboxd. Bat & Spider Watchlist Send us an email: batandspiderpod@gmail.com. Leave us a voice message: (315) 544-0966 Artwork by Charles Forsman batandspider.com Bat & Spider is a TAPEDECK podcast.

Philly Take with RB
This Excuse From Ben Simmons & Rich Paul Is Hilarious, Sixers-Pacers Trade, & Allen Iverson Comments

Philly Take with RB

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 15:18


According to NBA Insider Jordan Schultz, sources say the Philadelphia Sixers have inquired about Caris LeVert & Malcolm Brogdon in a potential Ben Simmons trade with the Indiana Pacers. In other news, Ben Simmons & Rich Paul come up with their worst excuse yet as they are starting to feel the heat from holding out. Lastly, Allen Iverson had some interesting things to say about the Sixers. #Sixers #Pacers #BenSimmons #AllenIverson #CarisLeVert #MalcolmBrogdon #NBA #NBANews Make sure to check out the following sportsbook offer from BetMGM in order to win $200 in free bets. Your wager can win or lose and you still get $200. You MUST use this link: https://affiliate.betql.co/BETMGMRB and sign up/create an account on BetMGM, deposit at least $10 into your account, place your first bet, and win $200 in free bets as long as the team you bet on scores a TD in the game. Make sure to check out BetQL's Sportsbook Sign Up Offers page at the following link: https://affiliate.betql.co/offers. You may be eligible to claim free bonus or risk free offers upon signing up at your choice of multiple Sportsbooks. BETQL DISCOUNT CODE: Use the following link: https://try.betql.co/rb/ and enter the discount code RB for 25% off any subscription offering at BetQL. Philly Take with RB Merch Store: https://philly-take-with-rb.creator-spring.com/ Subscribe to Philly Take with RB on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZ6xo8_BSzZJVYfWEqEt1Gw INSTA: https://www.instagram.com/rbphillytake/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/RBPhillyTake

The Common Man Progrum
Twins Excuse Computer! Common Man Progrum HOUR 2

The Common Man Progrum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 43:02


Common Man Progrum HOUR 2 --Five Questions --Golf Phenom Isabella McCauley --Twins Excuse Computer

Positive Forward Motion
If It Matters

Positive Forward Motion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 5:51


If it matters to you, you will find a way. If not, you will find an excuse. This week discover how to identify and overcome the excuses that are holding you back from what you can become!

Jim Hightower's Radio Lowdown
The Grand Larceny of Bank(er) Robbery

Jim Hightower's Radio Lowdown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 2:10


Exciting news from Wall Street: Our wealth markets are booming! Everything from the Dow Jones Average to gold prices are rocketing to new records, showering us with wealth from above. Oh… wait. Maybe you're one of the big majority of workaday Americans who don't own stocks or gold, so maybe you're not celebrating Wall Street's big boom. But just chill, because conventional corporate wisdom assures us that the wealthy will invest their good fortunes in enterprises that eventually will produce trickle-down gains for everyone. Excuse my rudeness, but let's take a peek at how those who're reaping today's big-buck bonanza are actually investing that wealth. Look at Wall Streeters themselves. The big banks have been making money like… well, like bankers, with their stock prices zooming up by 28 percent just since January. So, how are these moneyed elites spending this windfall? Not by making job-creating investments, but by simply giving the money to their big shareholders, including their own top executives – nearly all of whom are already among the richest people on Earth. The main way they do this is through a slight-of-hand called a “stock buyback.” The honchos simply cash out the bulk of that 28 percent increase in the value of the banks' stock price, using that money to repurchase more of their banks' own stock from lesser shareholders. Hocus-pocus, this manipulation artificially pumps-up the value of the stock these insider shareholders already own – making each of them even richer than rich, although they've done absolutely nothing to earn this increased wealth. It's not a small scam. JPMorgan Chase is now sinking $30 billion into buying its own stock. Wells Fargo is shifting $18 billion into the scheme, and Bank of America is throwing $25 billion into its buyback. Hello – Wall Street bankers are the biggest robbers in America.

The Break Room
Mule Excuse Post game Monday - WEEK 4 - Bills VS Houston

The Break Room

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 13:01


Tommy made his predictions Friday, now it's time to recap how those picks went! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Land of Israel Network
Israel Uncensored: Iron Dome Isn't an Excuse to Let Hamas Off the Hook

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 25:20


Israel's Iron Dome anti-missile defense system has been in the news over the past several weeks as radical members of Congress tried to de-fund the project. While Congress ultimately approved a bill to finance the Iron Dome, on this week's Israel Uncensored with Josh Hasten, Josh says that with or without Iron Dome, Israel must respond harshly to every rocket fired, regardless if the system successfully shoots the projectiles out of the air. He argues that Iron Dome's efficiency should not be a factor for Israel in doing everything possible to prevent Israeli children from having to run to the shelters. The bottom line is that one rocket is one too many, and the terrorists must pay a heavy price, which will deter them from firing. Photo Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Flickr_-_Israel_Defense_Forces_-_Iron_Dome_Intercepts_Rockets_from_the_Gaza_Strip.jpg

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Could Using the Right Multi-Factor Authentication Save You?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 83:13


Could Using the Right Multi-Factor Authentication Save You? I had a good friend who, this week, had his life's work stolen from him. Yeah. And you know what caused it? It was his password. Now, you know what you're supposed to be doing? I'm going to tell you exactly what to do right now. Let's get right down to the whole problem with passwords. I'm going to tell you a little bit about my friend this week. He has been building a business for. Maybe going on 10 years now, and this business relies on advertising. Most companies do so in some way; we need to have new customers. There's always some attrition. Some customers go away. So how do we keep them? We do what we can. How do we get new customers? For him, it was. Advertising, primarily on Facebook. He did some Google ads as well, but Facebook is really where he was focused. So how did he do all of that? Here's the bottom line you have to, if you are going to be advertising on Facebook, you have to have an advertising account. The same thing's true. Google. And then, on that account, you tie in either your bank account or your credit card. I recommend a credit card so that those transactions can be backed up. And on top of all of that now, of course, you have to use a pixel. So the way the tracking works is there are pixels on websites, about those already. And the bottom line with the pixels. Those are also. Cookies are about the pixels are used to set a cookie so that Facebook knows what sites you've gone to. So he uses those. I use those. In fact, if you go to my website, I have a Facebook pixel that gets set. And the reason for all of that is so that we know with. I'd be interested in something on the site. So I know that there are many people interested in this page or that page. And so I could, I have not ever, but I could now do some advertising. I could send ads to you so that if you were looking at something particular, you'd see ads related to that, which I've always said. It is the right way to go. If I'm looking to buy a pickup truck, I love to see ads for different pickup trucks, but if I don't want a car or truck, I don't want to see the ads. It isn't like TV where it sometimes seems every other ad is about. Car or a pickup truck. It drives me crazy because it's a waste of their money in advertising to me. After all, I don't want those things. And it's also not only just annoying in money-wasting. There are better ways to do targeting. And that's what the whole online thing is. Anyways, I told you about that because he had set up this pixel years ago. Basically, the Facebook pixel gets to know you. All of the people who like you that might've bought from you. Cause you can have that pixel track people through your site, your purchase site, they know what you purchase on the shopping cart, et cetera. And you can identify these people over on Facebook and their ads because they abandoned the cart or whatever it is you want to do there. So there's just a whole ton of stuff that you can do for these people. And it's so bad. It is so valuable. It takes years to build up that account. Years to put that pixel in place. And our friend here, he had done precisely that. Then he found that his account had been compromised. And that is a terrible thing in this case because the bad guy used his account to place ads. So now there are really two or three problems here. We'll talk about one of them. Why was the bad guy going after him? He has been running ads on Facebook for a long time. So as far as Facebook is concerned, his account is credible. All of the ads he runs don't have to be reviewed by a human being. They can go up almost immediately. He doesn't have to wait days for some of these things to go up. So our bad guy can get an account like his that has years' worth of advertising credibility and now start advertising things that are not correct. So there again is part of the value of having one of these older accounts for advertising. And so the bad guy did that use his credibility. And then secondly, he used 25 grand worth of my friend's money to run ads. Also, of course, very bad, very bad. So I sat down with him. In fact, it was this last week, and I was out on a trip with just a vacation trip. It was absolutely fantastic. I never just do vacation. It's always business plus work whenever I do anything like this, but I was on a trip last week. And so my eldest son who works closely with me, and he's also part of the FBI InfraGard program. So I had him reach out to my friend, and he helped them out, and they talked back and forth. So here's the problem that he has. And I'm trying to figure out a perfect way to solve this. And I haven't figured that out yet. And if you guys have an idea because you are the best and brightest, you really are. So go ahead and drop me an email at me@craigpeterson.com if a good way around this particular problem, which is he has. This Facebook could count and many other accounts, including his website, hosting account, email account, et cetera. And. He has people who manage his ads for him. Who operates his website for him, who put up some promotions, advertising, and everything else. So these are third-party. This is what we generically call a supply chain, risk people who are not him have access to his stuff, his private property. And how does he do it, or how did he do it? Is he went ahead and gave them. Access by giving them accounts or passwords. How well were they guarding their passwords and their accounts? So the first thing I had my friend do was going to haveIbeenpwned.com. I had him put in his email address, the one he uses the most, and it showed up in five different. Hacks data dumps. So these are five various sites where he had used that same email address in this case. And he found out that in those five cases, the bad guy's got his passwords and personal information. All bad. And he went ahead and cleaned it up. So I said put in the password because have I been, pwned also let you check your password, just see if it has been used by someone else and then stolen. So there are billions of passwords in this database. It's incredible of all of these known passwords. So he put in his password, and no, it had not been stolen, but the problem is how about the people that were managing his ads on Facebook and managing his Facebook ad. We're the usernames, which are typically the email addresses and the passwords kept securely. That's a supply chain thing I'm talking about, and that's where I'd love to get him. But from you guys, me@craigpeterson.com. If you think you have a good answer, What we've been doing. And our advice to him was use one password. That's the only one to use. I don't trust last pass anymore. After their last big hack where they got hacked one password, the digit one password. And go ahead. And set it up. And in a business scenario, you can have multiple vaults. So have a vault. That's just for people that are dealing with your Facebook ad account, maybe have another vault for people who are posting for you on Facebook. Or better yet when it comes to Facebook, go ahead and have an intermediary that is trusted the, if this, then that, or there's a few of them out there that can see that you put the post up on the website and automatically posted on Facebook. So you don't have to get. All of these people, your passwords, but again, it's up to you. You got to figure out if that makes sense to you that those are the types of things that I think you can do. And that is what we do as well. Now, one of the beauties of using one password like that, where you're not sharing all of your passwords to everything you're sharing, the minimum amount of login information that you possibly can share is that if they leave your employees, All you have to do is remove their access to the appropriate vault or vaults, or maybe all of your vaults. And this is what I've done with people that worked for me in the US and people would work for me overseas, and there have been a lot of them and it has worked quite well for me. So with one pass, We can enforce password integrity. We can make sure the passwords on stolen. One password ties automatically into have I been postponed. If a password has been exposed, if it's been stolen online, it's a great way to go. Now I've got an offer for you guys who are listening. I have a special report that I've sold before on passwords, and it goes through talks about one password. He talks about the last pass, which I'm no longer really recommending, but give some comparisons and how you can use these things. Make sure you go and email me right now. Me, Me@craigpeterson.com. That's ME at Craig Peterson dot com and just ask me for the password special report, and I'll be glad to get that on-off to you. There is a lot of good detail in there and helps you, whether you're a home user or a business. So the next step in your security is multi-factor authentication. Interesting study out saying that about 75% of people say that they've used it for work or for business, but the hard numbers, I don't think they agree One of the things that you have to do is use good passwords. And the best way to do that is to use a password manager. I was talking about a friend of mine who had been hacked this last week and his account was hacked. His Facebook ad account was hacked. We asked him if we could reach out to. BI and he said, sure. So we checked with the FBI and they're looking to turn this into a case, a real case, because they've never seen this type of thing, the hijacking of an advertising account who hijacked it. And why did they hide jacket? Was this in preparation maybe for. Playing around with manipulating our next election cycle coming up. There could be a lot of things that they're planning on doing and taking over my friend's account would be a great way to have done it. So maybe they're going to do other things here. And our friends at the FBI are looking into it. How now do you also keep your data safe? Easily simply. When we're talking about these types of accounts, the thing to look at is known as two factor authentication or multifactor authentication. You see my friend, if he had been using multi-factor authentication. I would not have been vulnerable. Even if the bad guys had his username, email address and his password, they still would not be able to log in without having that little six-digit code. That's the best way to do multi-factor authentication. When we're talking about this code, whether it's four or 5, 6, 8 digits long, we should not be using our cell phones to receive those. At least not as text messages, those have a problem because our phone numbers can be stolen from us and they are stolen from us. So if we're a real target, in other words, they're going after you. Joe Smith and they know you have some, $2 million in your account. So they're going after you while they can, in most cases, take control of your phone. Now you might not know it and it doesn't have to be hacked. All they have to do is have the phone company move your phone number to a new phone. Once. So that means one of the things you need to do is contact your telephone vendor, whoever it is, who's providing new that service. That's a company like Verizon sprint T-Mobile a T and Tone of those companies that are giving you cell service, you have to contact them and set up a pass. So that if they have a phone call coming in and that phone call can be faked. So it looks like it's coming from your phone, even if there was a phone call coming in, whether it's coming from your phone or not, they have to get that password or passcode that you gave them. And once they have that passcode now, and that's great, but if you don't have that in there targeting you specifically, then you're in trouble. So for many of us really it may not make a huge difference. But I would do it anyways. I have done it with every one of my cell phone carriers now. A couple of decades set up a password. So the next step is this multifactor authentication. If I'm not supposed to get it via text message to my phone, how do I get it? There are a couple of apps out there. There's a free one called Google authentic. And Google authenticator runs on your phone. And once it's there on your phone and you are setting it up on a website, so Facebook, for instance, your bank, most websites out there, the bigger ones, all you have to do is say, I want to set up multi-factor authentication, and then it'll ask you a case. So how do you want to do it? And you can say, I want an app and they will display. A Q R code. That's one of those square codes with a bunch of little lines inside of it. You're seeing QR codes before they become very common. And you take your phone with the Google authenticator app. Take a picture. Of that little QR code on the screen, and now it will start sinking up so that every 30 seconds Google authenticator on your phone will change that number. So when you need to log back into that website, it's going to ask you for the code. You just pull up Google authenticator and there's the code. So that's the freeway to do it. And not necessarily the easiest way to. Again, going back to one password. I use this thing exclusively. It is phenomenal for keeping my passwords, keeping them all straight and then encrypted vault, actually in multiple encrypted vault it's so that I can share some of them. Some of them are just strictly private, but it also has that same authenticator functionality built right into it. Microsoft has its own authenticator, but you can tell Microsoft that you want to use the standard authenticator. Of course, Microsoft has to do everything differently. But you can tell it. And I do tell it, I want to use a regular authenticator app, not Microsoft authenticator. By the way. That's why I advise you to don't use the Microsoft authenticator, just use one authenticator for all of the sites, and then Microsoft will give you that same QR code. And then you can take that picture and you're off and running. Next time you log in, it asks you for the code and instead of texting it to you to your phone smarter, otherwise it will not. That require you to open up your authenticator. So for me, for instance, when I'm logging into a website, it comes up and asks for the username, asked for the password. Both of those are filled out automatically by one password for me. And then it asks for that code identification code and. One password automatically puts it into my pace to buffer copy-paste, buffer, and I just paste it in and they've got the code. So I don't have to remember the codes. I don't remember passwords. I don't have to remember usernames or email addresses. One password remembers them all for me. Plus it'll remember notes and other things. So you can tell, I really one password. We use it with all of our clients. That's what we have for them. And it does meet even a lot of these DOD requirement on top of. Depending again, how much security you need. We will use duo D U O and it also has this authenticator functionality and we will also use UBI keys. These are those hardware key. They do oh, can provide you with hardware tokens. Those are those little tokens that can go onto your key ring. That show a changing six-digit number every 30 seconds. And that's the same number that would be there in your smartphone app. Your one password or Google authenticator smartphone. Hopefully, I didn't confuse you too much. I think most of the reason we're not using the security we should is because we're not sure how to, and we don't know what we're going to be. And I can see that being a big problem. So if you have questions about any of this, if you would like a copy of my password security, special report, just send an email to me. M e@craigpeterson.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's S O N.com. I'll be glad to send it to you. Also, if you sign up for my newsletter there on my website@craigpeterson.com, you are going to get. I was hold little series of the special reports to help you out, get you going. And then every week I send out a little bit of training and all of my articles for the week. It's usually six to 10 articles that I consider to be important so that, what's going on in the cybersecurity world. So you can. With it for yourself, for your family, for your business. Craig peterson.com. According to researchers. 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram made them feel worse. And you know what Facebook knew and knows Instagram is toxic for teen girls. There's a great article that came out in the Wall Street Journal. And I'm going to read just a little bit here from some of the quotes first. When I went on Instagram, all I saw were images of chiseled bodies, perfect. Abs and women doing 100 burpees in 10 minutes, said, Ms.  Now 18, who lives in Western Virginia. Amazing. Isn't it. The one that I opened now with 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram, I made them feel worse. So that is studies again, that looks like yeah, these were researchers inside Instagram and they said this in a March, 2020 slide presentation that was posted to Facebook's internal message board that was reviewed by the wall street journal quote comparisons on Instagram can change how young women view and describe themselves. Apparently, for the past three years, Facebook has been conducting studies into how Instagram is affecting its millions of young users. Now, for those of you who don't know what Instagram is, it allows these users to create little stories, to have. Pictures videos of things that they're doing, and it's a lifestyle type thing you might've heard, of course, of how this I don't know what it is. Kidnapping murder plot. These, this young couple and the body I think was found up in Wyoming. I'm trying to remember, but of her and it's yeah, there it is. It wasn't my OMI. And I'm looking up right now, Gabby potato. That's who it is. She was what they called a micro influence. And I know a lot of people who can loom, that's what they want to be. There's a young lady that stayed with us for a few months. She had no other place to live. And so we invited her in here and we got some interesting stories to tell about that experience. And it's, a little sad, but anyhow, she got back up on her feet and then she decided she was going to become an influence. And what an influencer is someone that has a lot of followers. And of course, a lot means different numbers. You get these massive influencers that have tens of millions of people that quote, follow unquote them. And of course, just think of the Kardashians they're famous for. Being famous, nothing else. They have subsequently done some pretty amazing things. At least a few of them have. We've got one of those daughters who now was the first earliest billionaire. I think it was ever youngest. So they have accomplished some amazing things after the fact, but they got started. By just becoming famous by posting on these social media sites. So you get a micro-influencer, like Gabby Petito, who is out there posting things and pictures. And you look at all of these pictures and, oh my gosh, they're up at this national park. Oh, isn't she so cute. I'll look at her boyfriend. They'll look so good together and people. Fall for that image, right? It's just like Photoshopping these pictures of models, changing them. There've been some real complaints about those over the years. So Instagram sets these kids up with these pictures of people that are just totally unrealistic. One of the slides from a 2019 presentation says, quote, we make body. Excuse me. We make body image issues worse for one in three teenage girls teams, blame Instagram for increases in the rate of anxiety. And depression said another slide. This reaction was unprompted and consistent across. Groups among teens is this according to the wall street journal who reported suicidal thoughts, 13% of British users, and 6% of American users trace the desire to kill themselves to Instagram. Again, according to one of these presentations, isn't this just absolutely amazing. And you might've heard it discussed a little bit. I saw some articles about it, obviously in the news wall street journal had it, but this is a $100 billion company, Instagram. That's what their annual revenues. More than 40% of Instagram users are 22 years old and younger. And about 22 million teens log into Instagram in the US each day, compared with 5 million that log into Facebook, the younger users have been declining. Facebook it's getting the population there is getting older and older on Facebook. In average teens in the us spend 50% more time on Instagram than they do on Facebook. And also tick-tock, by the way I took talk has now surpassed YouTube in some of these metrics. Quote, Instagram is well-positioned to resonate and win with young people said a researcher's slide posted internally. Inside Facebook. Another post said there is a path to growth. If Instagram can continue their trajectory. Amazing. So Facebook's public phase has really tried to downplay all of these negative effects that the Instagram app has on teens, particularly girls, and hasn't made its research public or available to academics or lawmakers who have asked for it. Quote, the research that we've seen is that using social apps to connect with other people. Positive mental health benefits said Mark Zuckerberg. He's the CEO of course of Facebook. Now this was 2020. In March one at a congressional hearing, he was asked about children and mental health. So you see how he really lawyered the words that they can have positive mental health benefits, but Facebook's own internal research seems to show that they know it has a profound negative effect on a large percentage of their users. Instagram had Adam Moseri told reporters in may of this year, that research he had seen suggest the app's effect on team's wellbeing is likely quote quite small. So what the wall street journal seems to be pointing out here is that Facebook is not giving us the truth on any of this stuff. It's really sad. We've got to be careful. No, apparently Mr. Moseri also said that he's been pushing very hard for Facebook to really take their responsibilities more broadly. He says they're proud of this research. I'm just summarizing this before we run out of time here, but it shows the document. Internal documents on Facebook show that they are having a major impact on teen, mental health, political discourse, and even human trafficking. These, this internal research offers an unparalleled picture. Courtney told the wall street journal of how Facebook is acutely aware that the products and systems central to its business success routine. Fail great article. I've got it in this week's newsletter. You can just open it up and click through on the link to the wall street journal. They have a paywall and I hate to use payroll articles, but this one's well worth it. And they do give you some free articles every month. So if you're not on that newsletter, you can sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. You'll get the next one. If you miss a link today, if you want some, the special report on passwords, et cetera, just email me directly. Give me a few days to respond. But me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. We've all worked from home from time to time. At least if we're somehow in the information it industry, I want to talk right now about why you need a personal laptop. Even if the business is providing you with a laptop. Laptops are something that was designed to be personal, but many of us are using them as our main computer. I know I often am using my laptop, a couple of my kids and my wife. It's really their main computer, even though they all have other computers that they could potentially be using, laptops are just handy and you have them with, you can take them with you. We've got workstation set up that are kind of. Workstations, if you will, where there are three screens set up and they're all hooked up into one central screen controller that then has a USBC connection that goes right into the, your laptop. So you can be sitting there with four screens on your Mac laptop on your mac pro if you need four screens, it's really handy. No question. Many of us have a laptop for home and a laptop for business. And many of us also look at it and say, oh wow, this is a great laptop I got from work. It's much better than my home laptop. And you start to use the business laptop for work. At home. Okay. That's what it's for. Right. But then we start to use that business laptop for personal stuff. That's where the problems start. We've seen surveys out there that are shown. Then half of workers are using work issue devices for personal tasks that might be doing it at home. They might be doing it at the office. Things like personal messages, shopping, online, social media, reading the news. So the prospect of using your work laptop as your only laptop, not just for work, but also for maybe watching some movies, group chat and messaging, reading, fan fiction, paying bills, emailing to family or friend. It just seems not. It's so tempting. It's just natural. I'm on it. I'm on it all day long. Why wouldn't I just use it? And this is particularly true for people who are working from home, but we have to be careful with that. It's really something that you shouldn't be doing for a couple of reasons. One that. Top that's a business. Laptop is the property of the business. It's just like walking home with boxes, full of pencils and paperback in the old days, it is not yours to use for personal use. We also have to assume, assume since it is the company's laptop that hopefully it's been secure. Hopefully they haven't set up. So it's going through a special VPN at the office and it's going through special filters, maybe snort filters or something else. That's doing some deeper inspection on what's coming through your laptop. Well, there are also likely on that laptop. Tools that are monitoring your device. Things like key loggers, biometric tracking, Jill location, software that tracks your web browser and social media behavior, screenshot, snapshot software, maybe even your cam. Is being used to keep track of you. I know a number of the websites that I've used in the past to hire temporary workers. Those workers have to agree to have you monitor what they're doing. These hourly workers, subtle take screenshots of their screen, unbeknownst to them. Pictures from the cameras at random intervals. Again, unbeknownst to them, it'll track what they're doing. And so I can now go in and say, okay, well he billed me five hours for doing this. And I look at his screen and guess what? He wasn't doing that for all of those five hours that he just billed me. Well, the same thing could be true for your company, even if you're not paid by the hour. Right now, we're looking at stats that show over half of the businesses that are providing laptops for the employees to use more than half of them are using monitoring software. And through this whole lockdown, the usage of these different types of monitoring systems has grown. Now there's some of the programs you're using. You might be VPN in, you might be using slack or G suite enterprise, all good little pieces of software. They can monitor that obviously, but it goes all the way through to the business. And using your slack access as paid for, by the businesses also idiotic to do things like send messages to your buddies, set up drinks after work, complain to other people about someone else in the business, your boss, or otherwise your it, people at the business can see all of that. They can see what you're doing with slack. Even if you have a separate personal account. It's still more likely that you'll end up mixing them up if you're logged into both on the same computer. So the bottom line is if you are on a work computer, whether it's a laptop or something else, you can reasonably assume that I T can see everything. That's not. They own it. Okay. And they have to do some of this stuff to protect themselves. We put software on laptops for companies not to spy on employees. That's none of our business, but we put software on computers for employees. To make sure they stay safe. Think of what happens when your computer, your laptop, whatever it might be, connects to the company's network. Now that can be through a VPN. It can be because you take your laptop home or on the road when you're traveling and you bring it back into the office. If that computer is infected, somehow now you've brought that infection into the office. And that's how a lot of the malware works. It goes from computer to computer. So once they get in that front door where there's through a website and email that you clicked on or in a computer that you're bringing into the office, they can start to move around. Now it's not just your activity. And this is an interesting article from the verge by Monica chin. It's not just your activity that they can see on your laptop, but in many cases, they're also able to look at anything you're downloading any of your photographs or videos that you might've sinked up from your smart. Laura loading these types of things, your text messages on your work device for safekeeping, or just because it's your primary device might seem harmless, right? Cause you're just going to remove them before you hand it in. But some companies such as Apple won't allow you to wipe your device before handing it in regardless of how personal the contents are. And that makes sense too, because many times an employee leaves. And they don't give the company all of the information that they have, that they're obliged to give back to their employer. Things that they've been working on, customer information, et cetera. So Manalive, there are plenty of other devices out there. Hopefully if you leave your company with plenty of notice, moving a bunch of things off your work device in the last few days, uh, might raise some eyebrows at the. And I'm saying hopefully, because they should notice that sort of thing, because it could be malicious activity. It could be an insider risk that maybe they're not even aware of. There's so much you could go wrong here. So bottom line don't use the work laptop for home. So what should you use? You know, my personal recommendation. Almost always is get a Mac. They are safer to use the patches that they get are usually not destructive. You know, sometimes you can install a patch for windows and now your machine just won't work anymore. Right. You've had that happen. I know every last one of us out there that are tried to install Microsoft patches for a while have had that happen to them. All of a sudden the patch has completely messed up your computer and you are so out of luck, it's ridiculous. Right? So don't, you know, hopefully don't do that, but I like the max because they are basically safer than windows. And also because the patches just work on them, apple tends to get them out in plenty of time to try and protect us the next level. If he can't afford an apple and. Apple laptops really are not expensive when you consider how long they last and the quality that components, they are not expensive at all. But if you can't afford that, the next thing I would look at is getting a Chromebook. There are a lot of companies that make Chromebooks Chrome is an operating system from Google. It's similar to Android. Google keeps the Chromebooks up-to-date. They patch them quite regularly and make sure that there aren't nastiness is going on. You just have some of the same issues and Android has patches might take a while to get to you because it has to go through the vendor that made the Chromebook. You might have a Chromebook for Sam from Samsung, for instance, it's not Google's even though it's called a Google Chromebook. Now Chromebooks rely heavily on the cloud services that Google provides, but they can also run just locally. So with a Chromebook and you can get them for as little as 150 bucks, but remember you get what you pay for. Or as much as I've seen them in the $2,000 price range with fancy GPU's, local storage and other things, but at 150 bucks, it could be well worth it for you. It lets you do the regular word processing. Just think of what you can do with Google docs, spreadsheets against Google docs, spreadsheets, all of those types of things are built into it. You can. Cruz the web, obviously using Google Chrome on your Chromebook. And send and receive email, which is what most people do. That's really kind of all, most people do at home. So consider that as well. I also like iPad. They are quite safe again, but they tend to be more expensive and they can do pretty much everything. And now with Android support built right into Google Chromebooks, you can even run Android apps. So there you go. Keep safe and be safe out there. Right. Have a hack free life. Make sure you get my newsletter. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. The national cyber director, Chris Inglis said that we need cyber bullets, that cyber bullets are part of the war on hacks. And it makes sense on one level. But when you get into the reality, it's a much different story..  I had an interesting email this week from a listener. Actually he sent it about two weeks ago when I finally was able to get to it this week and responded, and he was pointing out how there are some things that I talk about on the show that I put into my newsletter that are really good. And. I'm paraphrasing here but theoretical to so many people, there's some things that you can figure out pretty easily yourself. Some things you can do yourselves and other things that are just different. To do still. And a lot of that has to do with the websites you go to in order to maintain your passwords. And he was complaining specifically about bank of America and how you can, according to what he has found here in the real world, you can come up with a. Password a 20 character long password that is going to keep everything nice and safe at trend to be generated. You're using one password and great. So you set your password up in bank of America's account, and then you try and log in later, and it doesn't work because it lets you put 20 character passwords and when you're creating it, yeah. But the login screen only takes the first 16. So of course they'd home match. You see it's things like that really are pushing us back, holding us back. But I'd say pushing us back from being secure as a country, there, there just aren't enough people paying enough attention to make sure this cyber security, even the basic stuff like passwords and two factor authentication are being done properly. So one of the things I wanted to make sure you guys were aware of is I need to know when you're having these problems, because what I want to do is put together some trainings to show you exactly how to do it. Because on some websites you were saying, it's pretty hard to use one password he's paying for it, but it's kinda difficult for him. And I think in some ways, a lack of understanding. Then, it can be difficult to spend a bunch of time trying to watch some training videos for some of the software. And so I want to hear when you're having problems so I can do what I did for him this week and spend a little time, write some stuff up, and I even am reaching out to some of this website. People like bank of America who are really messing up cyber security for people who are trying to do the right thing and writing them and saying, Hey, listen, I'm part of the FBI InfraGard program. I'm a member of it. I paid a lot of attention to cybersecurity. Heck I ran the training for the FBI InfraGard program for a couple of years, and there are some real things lacking. In the login anyways, and this one particular case of the cybersecurity, but I don't know all of this stuff. I'm not using all of these things and I have a disadvantage over you guys, and that is that I've been doing this for so long. I've forgotten what it's like to not know it. Does that make sense? So if you have something that I've talked about on the show, that's appeared in my newsletter and you're having some confusion over, let me know. Just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. What he did is he just hit reply to my newsletter. And of course, that goes to me and me@gregpeterson.com and it tracks it. So I know I need to reply, so I can sit down and go through and answer people's questions. I sent out a lot of the copies of my password, special report to people you guys had requested specifically some of the. People out there had requested a little bit of help. And I had sent out an email to most of the people that I could identify as being business people. I sent out a little thing saying, Hey, listen, if you could use half-hour my help, let me know myself or my team. And then, again, you can just send me an E Craig. So I answered a lot of those questions this week. And in fact, that's how I come up with much of what I cover here on the show. You guys ask the questions and that's how I know that it's a real problem. If I understand it, that's one thing. But for the people who don't do cybersecurity as their primary job or a strategy, I get it. I can get why you guys are confused. So make sure you get my weekly newsletter. So you can find out about all of the trainings, the free stuff, the paid courses, and. It's easy. Just go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. That's Craig Peterson, P E T E R S O N. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. And I'm more than glad. Add you to that list. And there are now thousands of people on that list to get my email pretty much every week. If you miss it one week, it's probably, cause I just got too busy, but I put out all my show notes. I put it all a little bit of training notes, all. The us government is supposedly getting ready to fire what they're calling cyber bullets in response to these significant hacking attacks. This is what they're calling a comprehensive strategy to dissuade. Adversaries. And this is all from the national cyber security director, Chris Inglis. This is from an article in American military news.com by Chris Strome. That was out this week. And of course I included that in my newsletter this week as well, coming out. Today or tomorrow, depends on how this all goes right with the weekend. I got to help a buddy out today, but president Joe Biden has been really talking about how do we use cyber weapons to retaliate. For instance, he gave a list of industries that Russia should not be. As though Putin himself is running all of these hacks or come out of Russia. Yeah, certainly there are some that are part of their military, but there many of them that are just bad guys that are trying to make some money, we should feel sorry for them. So Biden gives him this list and says, Hey, listen, if you attack any of these various industries or actually portions of our economy, We are going to retaliate. We have seen the us retaliate under President Trump and the retaliation. Of course he did all kinds of economic stuff to stop it. And much of which has been reversed by president Biden's administration, but also he attacked them directly in. Down some power systems there in the Moscow area, which I thought was really kinda cool. So kudos to President Trump for doing that and for president and Biden now to say, Hey, we are going to attack back. Of course. The biggest question is. What would we be attacking? How would we be attacking it? And for what reason, for instance, the red Chinese have gone after our office of personnel management, OPM records and got them all back in 2015. So they now know everything about everybody that had a secret security clearance or the took a paycheck from the federal government. All of those records, they would get their hands on them and get them on all of the records a lot. So Inglis was in front of the let's see here, the, yeah, he was a former director of the national security agency. He's the first to hold his Senate-confirmed position at the white house, this national cyber director position. And he says there is a sense that we can perhaps fire some cyber bullets and shoot our way out of this English set at the conference. It was hosted by the way, by the national security agency and a nonprofit group, he said that will be useful in certain circumstances. If you had a clear shot at a cyber aggressor and I can take them offline, I would advise that we do so as long as the collateral effects are acceptable. Yeah. What we have done here under president Biden administration is we have shut down some people who were operating illegally, we have shut down some cyber actors that were attacking us. So we've been doing that, but it isn't exactly. Wow. We just saw a muzzle flash over there. And so we are returning fire to the area of that muzzle flash, because as I've said many times before, we just don't know. Where in fact that bullet is coming from, it makes it a lot more difficult. English went on to say there's a larger set of initiatives that have to be undertaken. Not one of those elements is going to be sufficient to take this. Out let's see here, the us should make clear to Russia now their adversaries, what kinds of attacks would prompt a response, which is what president Biden did when he was talking with, of course, President Putin over there, red lines of both good and bad red lines are clear and crisp. Although I got to say many of our administrations have. Really done anything about it. It's the red line in the sand and Syria president Obama didn't do anything when they stepped over that red line. So yeah. And then with what we just finished doing in Afghanistan, where we drew a red line and said, we're going to protect all of you who helped us. And then we not only abandoned them, but we abandoned Americans behind there. I don't think a lot of people aren't going to believe us. So here's the last statement here. And again, this is an article in American military news from our cyber chief is the government actions. Aren't always going to be broadcast. In some cases, it's not helpful to broadcast those for all of mankind to see another one. We are doing some things behind the scenes. And I have certainly seen some of the results of those over the last few years. Stick around.  You're listening to Craig Peterson online@craigpeterson.com. You've got a smartphone and there are some new versions out, right? New hardware, new software, Android iOS. How long should you keep that device? How long can you stay safe with that older device? Apple has now done something. Different something they've never done before. One of the reasons that apple equipment tends to be safer than almost anything else out there is that they have, what's known as a closed ecosystem. There's arguments both directions here on whether that's safer or not. But the real advantage when it comes to cybersecurity is there are only. So many versions of the iPhone out there. What are we now in a couple of dozen versions of the hardware platform that makes it easier for apple to be able to support older versions of the software and multiple pieces of hardware, much easier than for, let's say Microsoft windows. It doesn't even have a single. Platform or Android, where there are hundreds of hardware platforms out there and tens of thousands of versions of the hardware, because one model phone can contain many. Changes different types of hardware to talk to the cell towers or the screen you name it. So it's very hard to keep up. Android has for quite a while now supported three versions of their operating system. Of course, we're talking about Google, but Android operating system. So they support the current release. Of Android and the Breviary release is two previous releases in fact of Android. Now that is frankly a pretty good thing to know, but there's over a billion Android devices out there that are no longer supported by security updates. We've got Android 10, nine, and eight that are fairly supported right now. We're actually up to Android 12. So here's how it works. If you've got Android version 10 out, if that's the main one, then you can continue to do. Eight and nine and get updates, security updates. But then here's the problem, everybody, those security updates are coming out of Google, but that does not mean that they are making it all the way to you. So there you go. It's one thing for Google to provide updates, but if you can't get them because your phone manufacturer is not supporting them, you've got trouble Samsung. Is probably the best company other than maybe Google and the Google Pixel phone. Samsung's the best company to go to. If you want some longer-term support. Many of these other companies just don't provide support past the current version. So keep that in mind as well. Android 12 was the 12th major version of Android announced by Google, February, 2021. And it is starting to roll out a Android. The 11th, 11 is the one that was out in February of last year. At least it was announced then. And we're, they're coming out, they're getting pushed out. So basically Google is saying the current version plus two prior versions. And that usually gives you about a four or maybe even a five year window. So if you're. An Android device from a major manufacturer, particularly Samsung on the Android side, your device is going to be good for at least four years, maybe five years now on the, and by the way, you don't necessarily have to upgrade the. You could be continuing to run an older release saw, as I mentioned earlier, if it version 11 is the current one that's out there being supported, which it is right. 12 is early still, but version 11, that means two prior versions still get security updates. You don't get featured. Dates, you don't get the new stuff, but you get security updates. So Android 11, the current one that means 10 and nine get security updates. So you don't, you're not being forced to do an upgrade. Most people don't upgrade their phones from an older major release to a newer major release. In other words, they don't try and go from Android eight to Android 11. Because in fact, most of the time, the hardware manufacturer doesn't support it. That's why there's over a billion Android devices out there right now that cannot get security updates. So have a look at your phone and your vendors. See what you're running. You probably want to do an update because most phones cannot get any support on the, in the apple side. Things are a lot different with Apple iOS, which is the operating system used on the iPhone and the I pad apple has always forced you to move to the next major version. No, they only force you to do that. If they support the hardware. And I've got to say kudos to them, they're still supporting the iPhone six S which came out quite a while. The iPhone success is something that my wife has been using and that I had as well. In fact, she got my old iPhone success, but that's a six-year-old. Phone came out in September of 2015. So it is still getting security updates, and we'll probably continue to get them. Not only is it getting security update this six-year-old iPhone success is getting the latest and our iOS operating system. It's getting iOS 15. Isn't that just amazing? Yeah, exactly. And so not just security updates, like you might get from some of the other vendors out there, Android vendors. So the apple keeps their arms around you for quite a while. Here's, what's changed now with Apple and iOS, the, for the first time ever in the iOS world, Apple is not forcing you to upgrade. So you're not being forced to upgrade to iOS 15. You can continue to run iOS 14. And that's how apples got around the security patches in the past, because what happens is you get the updates and installs them. Basically. There's no reason for you not to upgrade your phone. And so you do so apple never had to worry about releasing some of these fixes for really old versions of iOS. Although they have done that from time to time. In the Mac iOS side, Apple has done a couple of good things. The, where they always have supported basically three releases, what Google's doing with Android. So you now have a new feature. If you will, with iOS, here's a PSA for everyone. Public service announcement. You don't have to take the iOS 15 upgrade. Now I did. I put it on my iPhone and I seem to have some sort of a problem with messages where it's telling people that my phone has notifications turned off, which it does not. So I haven't figured that one out yet. I'll have to look into that a little bit more, but. This is nice because that means you're not going to have to upgrade your iPhone to iOS 15. You'll still get security updates for iOS 14, something Apple's never done before. We'll see if they continue this. We will see if they match Google going back. Three releases in Android. It just never been done before over on the iOS. So good news for them. Also course in the windows world and the Mac world, you really should upgrade the operating system as much as you can. Windows 11 though, man, windows 11. And I said this to my newsletter. I warned you guys is going to be a nightmare. For many people. You are not going to be able to do an automatic upgrade unless you have the newest of hardware, with the highest end of features, Craig peterson.com. One of the very big ransomware operations is back online. And now we have some inside information from one of the contractors working for this ransomware organization and oh yeah, there's an FBI tie, too.. This organization, ransomware gang, almost business, whatever you might want to describe them as is known as revolt. They have a few other names, but that's the really big one. And they are basically the 800 pound gorilla in the ransom. Business, you might be using cloud services right now. Maybe you use Microsoft's email service. Their Microsoft 360, I think, is what they call it now and use it for email and various other things pretty handy. It's mostly in the cloud. Computers you own or operate or have to maintain. I think that makes some sense too, but here's the bottom line it's software as a service right now, salesforce.com software as a service, Oracle has their accounting stuff. QuickBooks online, all software as a service. It isn't just those legitimate businesses that I just mentioned. That are using the cloud that are providing software as a service where you're paying monthly or however frequently. And you're getting this software as a service. That's what that means. Typically it means it's in the cloud and you don't have any real control over it. That's what this ransomware gang has been doing. This gang known as rebill. They all appear to be in. And there's some interesting stuff. That's come out. A transcript was released of an interview with one of their contractors. Now the original interview was in Russian. So I read through a translation of the Russian. I have no idea how good it is, but it is being quoted by a bank. Insider magazine that you might be familiar with bank info, security. That's one of the places that I follow. And there's a few interesting things that he talked about that I want to get into, but these are the people who have been behind things like the colonial pipeline attack and some of the other very large attacks, the way they work, their business model is. You can license their software, their ransomware software, and you go after a business or a government agency, whatever it might be, you get that ransomware software inside. And the reveal gang will take a percentage of the money that you have in rent. Now, how is that for a, an interesting business model, right? Taking something that the rest of the world has been using, and then take that model and put it into the legal side of the world. For three weeks, during this whole reveal ransomware attack, this summer turns out that the FBI secretly withheld the key that could have been used to decrypt. And computers that reveal had infected with ransomware and looks like kids up to maybe 1500 networks. Now those are networks, not just computers. That includes networks run by hospitals, schools, and businesses, including critical infrastructure businesses. The way the FBI got their hands on this decryption game. Is by penetrating reveal gangs servers. So they got into it. They were able to grab the keys and then the FBI waited before. Did anything with it. See, what they were trying to do is catch the people behind reveal. And so they didn't want to release information, get information out there to the press that might tip off those bad guys over there in Russia. And then shut down their operations. But as you might know, because I mentioned it here before the reveal gang went offline on July 13th, before the FBI could really track them down. And then the FBI didn't release the key until July 21st. And then I think it was Malwarebytes released a decryption tool. So if you had been hacked by the gang, you could. Now, remember it isn't reveal itself. That's doing most of them. Ransomware hacking if you will or a placement it's small guys. And that's why some people, including this contractor that apparently worked for the reveal gang itself says, people think that it's the Russian government, that it's Putin, that's doing this. He said, in fact, it's not it's small guys. And people like me are getting four or five hours a night. Because we're working so hard trying to make a whole of this work, come up with the new software approaches. We have to provide code tech support unquote to our affiliates, as well as tech support to the people who have had their computers and their data ransomed. So it a real interesting mix. Absolutely. Interesting mix. Now Christopher Ray here a couple of weeks ago, he's the FBI director told Congress that cool. We make these decisions as a group, not unilaterally. To the FBI and working with other government agencies, these are complex decisions designed to create maximum impact. And that takes time and going against adversaries, where we have to marshal resources, not just around the. But all over the world. So this Russian based gang first appeared in 2019, they've been around, they've been exporting large amounts of money from businesses for a very long time. One of the interest he'd things I think about all of this is that this reveal gang has their software as a service, and they provide it to quote affiliates, quote that, go ahead and then install the software, get you to install it on your computers in order to ransom you a double whammy ransom you, but there's now reports out there that there's a secret back door in the ransomwares code that allow. Rebill to go around their affiliates and steal the proceeds. How's that for hilarious, you've got a bad guy who goes in and gets the software from revolt, pays them a commission, and then reveal apparently has been jumping in on these customer support chats. In other words, you just got nailed and because you got nailed with ransomware, you have to go to. Chat room. And so you go in there and you're getting customer support on how to buy Bitcoin and how to transfer to their wallet. And apparently revival is getting right in the middle and is extorting money from these people directly instead of having the affiliates do it pretty amazing. So here's this part of this interview? It was aired on the Russian news outlet, London. And was trans translated by yeah. Flashpoint. Here are the guys that got the full transcript of the interview. He says in the normal world, I was called a contractor, doing some tasks for many ransomware collectives that journalists considered to be famous. Money is stolen or extorted with my hands, but I'm not ashamed of it. I do. And again, this goes into the thinking of many of these bad guys of Americans are all rich and they don't deserve what they have. He said, let's put it this way. This is a very time consuming job. And if you've earned enough, then you can quit the game. But chronic fatigue, burnout, deadline. All of these words from the life of ordinary office workers are also relevant for malware developers. So there you go. You should feel sorry for these malware developers who are developing software to steal millions from you and. Down our critical infrastructure. Hey, join me online. Craig peterson.com. And if you subscribe to my weekly newsletter right there on the site, I'll send you a few of my special reports. The most popular ones will come to you right there in your email box. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. We all pretty much have some form of insurance. And we're going to talk right now about the types of cyber insurance you may have. Now this might be through your homeowners policy or perhaps a rider on a business policy.  Many of our homeowners policies have started coming with cyber insurance. So we're going to talk about that. What is it? Businesses as well are also using cyber insurance and I'm sure you've heard of insurance basically called LifeLock and what that's all about. So let's kind of start. When we have a breach in a business, usually what happens is information about our customers is stolen. Look at some of the biggest breaches in history where we. Hundreds of millions of our personal records stolen Equifax breach is an example of a huge breach where we had all kinds of personal information that was stolen by the bad guys. Now, some of this information gets stale pretty quickly, but of course, other parts of it like our address, our social security number, they are probably not going to change for years. If for. No, of course our social security number will never change the social security administration. Just doesn't reissue them for very many reasons at all. And they do not reissue a social security number was stolen online because. Just about everybody's has, so what does a company like LifeLock do? They keep an eye on your credit report for you. And they're looking at what's going on new accounts that are open. They look at various other things, just related to that. And they, at that point say, wait a minute, something weird is happening. Now my credit cards, for instance, I have a credit card that if let's say I buy two of the same thing, one after the other and the, both the same price that credit card company pops a message right up on my phone saying, Hey, did you just buy two? Of these $15 things from and I can say yes or no, if I'm out on the road and I am purchasing gas, the credit card can pop up on my phone and it does and say, Hey, will you just trying to buy gas at this gas station? Because what'll happen as you use the credit card at the pump. And the pump says it was denied and then up at pops and yeah. Okay. No, that was me. And they said, okay, we'll try the transaction. Okay. And we'll approve it next time. And that's all automated. And that has nothing to do with LifeLock. LifeLock is there to more or less detect that something happened and if something happened and it was a bad guy and basically your identity was stolen. So they might be trying to buy a Ferrari in your name or maybe a 10 year old, four Ford focus, whatever it might be. And. They will help you try and clean it. That's what they do. So that's why it's cheap. And I don't know that it's terribly useful to you if you're really concerned. Go ahead and do that, but do keep an eye on your credit report. I do as well. My bank has free credit reporting for me, my credit card. Same thing. Free credit reporting that lets me know everything that's going on. So that's an easy way to tell WhatsApp. And there are different types of cyber insurance beyond this sort of thing, beyond the LifeLocks of the world. And many of us just get our cyber insurance through our homeowner's policy. It's a little rider. And businesses can buy cyber insurance as well. We have cyber insurance, that's underwritten by Lloyd's of London and we provide a $500,000 or million-dollar policy to our clients. As well, because that's what we do is cyber security, right? So the idea is if one of our clients gets hit, we have some insurance to back us up, but of course we go a lot further. It's almost like the LifeLock where if you do get hit by ransomware or something else, we will help you get back in business. We'll help restore your data. We'll help you with providing you. The information you need in order to do press releases, which agencies you need to contact, which of your customers you need to contact. And we've got scripts for all of that. So you can send it all out and just take care of it. So the idea is you don't want ransomware. So you hire us. We are extremely likely to keep ransomware out of your systems. And on top of that, if you are hit with ransomware, we restore everything. LifeLock does not do that. Obviously they all, I'll only do stuff after the fact and the cyber insurance you buy from an insurance agency is much the same, and there's a huge caveat with these policies that we're buying for our businesses and for our homes. And that is. They have a checklist at the insurance companies. Did you do this and this? And if you did, then they might payout if you did not, they may not payout. In fact, pay outs on cyber insurance policies are not known because. Bottom line. They really don't payout. Okay. I'm looking at some numbers right now and about paying ransoms and everything else. You may or may not. You got to have a look at it. Many of these policies are never paid out by the cyber insurance covers. They usually just regular insurance companies, but it's a special rider. And what they do is they say, Hey, listen, you did not follow the rules, so we're not going to payout. And there are many cases. If you go online and do a search, just use duck, go and say cyber insurance, payout. Lawsuits I'm doing that right now is. And it'll come up and show. Oh, okay. Does it cover lawsuits? Why are liability claims so costly? Yeah, exactly. A 2% payouts is talking about here. I'm invoicing, the most common cyber insurance claim denial. Yeah, it goes on and on. There are a lot is an act of war clause could nix cyber insurance payouts. That's another big one that they've tried to use. So the cyber insurance company will say, Hey, that was China attacking you. Therefore it was an act of. And you can bet if there is a big hack, they will use that. Think of what happens with the hurricanes coming onshore. How much do they push back on payouts? Especially with the real big one, it would bankrupt them. So we gotta be very careful. There are some different types of  cyber insurance. Policies do which have different types of coverages. You've got the first party lost loss, I should say. So that's you to covering you and your loss, your first-party expenses, third party liability. Each one of those has specific parameters. So sub-limit retention and others. First-party losses are usually including the loss of revenue due to business interruption. First party expenses would include all of the services and resources that you needed to use to recover from attack like forensic or system rebuilding services. These third-party liabilities. May cover expenses and legal fees related to potential damage caused by the incident to third parties like partners, customers, or employees whose sensitive information may have been compromised. So read them carefully. Be very careful. There are next-generation, cyber insurance policies are going even further and make these types of services. Prior to any incident to reduce exposures and prevent incidents in the first place. Now we don't provide insurance. We are not an insurance company, but that's basically what we're trying to do here. Not become an insurance company, but to make sure. The businesses have the right services so that the likelihood of anything happening or is extremely low. And then following up after the fact it's different obviously than insurers in and insurance, the guardians, Jessica Crispin had a great article about a couple of weeks ago that I've been hanging on. And it's talking about this tattle where that's been incorporated into the computers we're using at home. Now we're specifically talking about employers that are putting this. The software on computers, they belong to the companies. A lot of businesses are worried. If workers are at home or where we can't see them, how do we know that they're actually working, not watching Netflix or something else on. They have, of course, come up with software that can reassure your boss. It does things like take snapshots of what you're doing. Record your keystrokes grabs photos from. Picture from your camera. There's a new program called sneak, which makes your webcam take a photo of you about once a minute and makes available to the supervisor to prove you're not away from your desk. There's no warning in advance. It just takes that photograph catches your doom. Pretty much anything can be absolutely anything. Then, it's the type of thing you'd expect the national security agency to do. So there are some good reasons for this lack of trust because sometimes employees have not been doi

Faith Covenant Audio Podcast
Excuse Me: - Week 4: I'd share but ________

Faith Covenant Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 33:46


Ever notice how we're quick to want things but quick to come up with excuses for why we can't get there? Whether it's sacrificing time, or something we enjoy, excuses abound. But what if we didn't let those excuses get in the way of our spiritual lives? Join us at Faith Covenant Church as we explore how to get beyond our excuses and on to God's best for us.

Chicks on the Right Podcast
Hour 2, 09-30-21: Psaki's excuse for Biden's sinking poll numbers, Speed, and Spaddendum

Chicks on the Right Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 35:45


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Views from the Sidelines Podcast
What's Your Excuse? | w/ Jasper Bowling

Views from the Sidelines Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 60:55


In this episode, I have the pleasure of bringing on Jasper Bowling. Jasper was born with only one hand and has never let that affect his work ethic in the gym or in the sports he played in. I brought Jasper on today to discuss: - His fitness journey - How he got started and things he did to stay consistent - The creativeness of training with only one hand and seeing amazing results from it And more! Jasper's story is incredibly inspiring and the theme of this episode remains...What's your excuse? Connect with Jasper Connect with AustinBook Your Free Discovery CallInstagramFree Email ListWebsite

Ninja Coaching Coast To Coast
Don't Let Content Creation Become an Excuse

Ninja Coaching Coast To Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 28:54


Creating content for social media or enhancing your pre-listing packet can be very useful tools as a realtor, but when these activities are consuming your entire day, it's time to step back and put your Ninja Nine back at the top of your priority list. If you're finding yourself hung up on the idea that you'll get to your systems once you've done something else, you may be making excuses for inactivity. On today's episode, Matt and Garrett talk about what happens when agents get stuck on creating the “perfect” content to the point that they neglect other, more important foundational activities. Or worse, their overthinking and preoccupation with creating content yields no results at all. Our hosts discuss the importance of knowing what consumers are actually looking at - if you spend hours and hours pouring over your newsletter, only to stick it in an unmarked envelope never to be opened, it's not the best use of your valuable time. Matt and Garrett encourage us to take advantage of the products and services offered by our brokers, to set time blocks to make sure we don't get bogged down in content creation, and to optimize the activities that are actually producing the best results. They caution against comparing yourself to other agents, and remind us to lean into the activities that we most enjoy doing. This will help you use your time more efficiently and avoid getting wrapped up in tasks that don't move your business forward.  If you're having fun with the creative side of your business but it's taking priority over your Ninja Nine, today's episode will help you recognize whether it's become an excuse, and how you can recalibrate. Join the Ninja Selling Podcast group on Facebook at www.facebook.com/groups/theninjasellingpodcast where you can ask questions, give advice, and connect with other Ninjas. You can also leave a voicemail with your direct feedback at 208 MY-NINJA. And visit NinjaSelling.com/events for more information about upcoming open installations. Or if you're interested in taking your goals a step further, visit NinjaCoaching.com to check out all of our amazing coaches.   Episode Highlights:  Content creation on social media can be a very helpful tool, but it shouldn't take priority over doing your Ninja Nine Reminder to send in your pre-listing packets to Garrett for a special research project It doesn't have to be the “best of the best” - just whatever you're currently using It's better to send out something than get held up trying to create the “perfect” packet Real estate reviews, pre-listing packets, marketing campaigns, and databases tend to fall prey to overthinking and overanalyzing to the point of inactivity If content creation takes up most of your time, it becomes an excuse for not doing your foundational activities Keep in mind what consumers are actually looking at Example of agents spending an inordinate amount of time creating their unique newsletter, then sticking it in an unmarked envelope, likely never to be opened at all If you enjoy spending that time creating the newsletter, it's not necessarily wasted time If the enjoyment factor is not there, you might be better off putting your time toward something else Avoid comparing yourself to others as this can get you stuck in the weeds Find companies and products that you like and trust and use those - you don't have to do everything yourself Set a time limit to make sure you don't get bogged down in content creation If your clients love the content you're creating, find out which parts they enjoy most and optimise those aspects - talk to people whose opinions you truly value and trust If you can produce the same results in half the time, why wouldn't you want to go that route and leave yourself more time for personal passions or family? Consistency with social media is more important than creating that one post that goes viral Be mindful of what you have the capacity for and do not overbook yourself Lean into the activities that you enjoy doing the most, be consistent with them, and use time blocks to stay on task   Quotes: “I will do it once I have that - That's an interesting place that we find people all the time.” “Don't let those become excuses for inactivity.” “So many people get stuck in, Well, I need to create the best content or I want this content to be unique...then it just consumes the entire day.”  “I would say content creation turns into the over-analyzation of, What features do I need? What do I want it to look like? Maybe I should go with this one? Maybe I should go with that one?” “The two most common questions I see are, What CRM do you use? That's probably the number one. And then the second is, What do you use for marketing?” “I love creating content. But you have to look at it from a systems perspective when it starts to consume all this time and becomes an excuse as to why we're not doing foundational business activities.” “Find companies, products, and sources that you trust, that you like, that bring value to your people, and use those products.” “The number one complaint of your owners and brokers out there is that they have services that you don't use.” “I'm a big believer in, Tighten the timeline down.” “Go talk to your people about what parts that they really like, and see where you can optimize some of your time there.” “If that 10 hours that you're spending, or more, on your newsletter is not producing the business results that you want to see, then your clients don't really love it that much.” “If you're going to spend this time away from your loved ones, not necessarily doing your other passions in life, let's be really efficient with it.” “This is the hard part, because you have to actually talk to your people about what you're sending, which sometimes can be uncomfortable.” “I think that's what you've got to look for is, What feels right to me? What's something that I enjoy doing? And running in those directions.”   Links: www.TheNinjaSellingPodcast.com Email us at    TSW@TheNinjaSellingPodcast.com Leave a voicemail at (208) MY-NINJA   Ninja Selling www.NinjaSelling.com @ninjasellingofficial Ninja Coaching: www.NinjaCoaching.com @ninja.coaching Ninja Events www.NinjaSelling.com/Events  Garrett garrett@ninjacoaching.com @ninjaredding Matt matt@ninjacoaching.com @matthewjbonelli   The Ninja Selling Podcast Facebook Group

The Golden Hours
A GDP Movie Update: Theater Push Week 3

The Golden Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 4:50


Excuse the heavy breathing. Online drop coming soon. Follow: @bigboachie

Alamodome Audible
Episode 161: Grit n Grind in Memphis

Alamodome Audible

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 86:50


Excuse the length this week but there's just so much to talk about. Between the Roadrunners amazing come from behind win, Jared's travel to Memphis, and the upcoming game against UNLV, we have a lot of ground to cover this week! 8:45 - What caused UTSA to have such a terrible start to the game against Memphis? 28:20 - Frank Harris showed why he's such a great leader of this offense after a gutsy and cerebral performance, ducking potential disaster after potential disaster. 34:53 - The injuries continue to stack up for the offensive line. We are well, well into the danger zone for this unit. 39:15 - Both coaching staffs made a lot of interesting coaching decisions which determined the outcome of the game. Where did Traylor and staff struggle and excel? 50:57 - Jared shares his experiences visiting Memphis for the game. 1:04:10 - UNLV is 0-4 but they're coming off their best performance in two years after taking a ranked Fresno State team to the fourth quarter. 1:10:20 - UTSA's 2015 season is a really good comparison for the start of UNLV's 2021 season. 1:22:23 - Expect UTSA to empty the bench on their offensive line, giving freshmen like Ronnie Garza, Frankie Martinez, Robert Rigsby, and River Gordon some looks.

Circulation on the Run
Circulation September 28, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 29:39


This week's episode features a panel discussion. Please join author Harmony Reynolds, editorialist David Newby, and Associate Editors Nicholas Mills and Sandeep Das as they discuss the articles "Natural History of Patients with Ischemia and No Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease: The CIAO-ISCHEMIA Study, "Outcomes in the ISCHEMIA Trial Based on Coronary Artery Disease and Ischemia Severity," and editorial "Forget ischemia, it's all about the plaque." Dr. Greg Hundley: Welcome listeners to this week's, September 28th, issue of Circulation on the Run. And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, Director of the Poly Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia, and associate editor at Circulation. And this week, listeners, we have an outstanding feature discussion. It's actually forum where we're going to discuss from Dr. Reynolds two papers pertaining to the ischemia trial. One looking really at the functional importance of stress testing, the other looking at the anatomical importance of cardiac CT scanning. We're going to have two of the associate editors along with Dr. Reynolds, each that handled the two papers and also a guest editorialist that will help put the entire paper together. Well, before we get to that, we're going to start and review some of the other papers in this issue. And let's grab a cup of coffee and get started. Dr. Greg Hundley: The first comes to us from Dr. Maliheh Nazari-Jahantigh from Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany, and it pertains to atherosclerotic plaque rupture. So the necrotic core of an atherosclerotic plaque is partly formed by ineffective efferocytosis, which increases the risk of an atherosclerotic plaque rupture. And in cell biology, efferocytosis comes from the Latin word effero, which means to take to the grave or to bury. And it's really the process by which apoptotic cells are removed by phagocytic cells. And so therefore, it can be regarded as the burying of "dead cells." Now MicroRNAs contribute to necrotic core formation by regulating efferocytosis as well as macrophage apoptosis. We also know that atherosclerotic plaque rupture occurs at an increased frequency in the early morning, indicating that diurnal changes occur in plaque vulnerability. Now all those circadian rhythms play a role in atherosclerosis, the molecular clock output pathways that control plaque composition and rupture susceptibility are unclear. Dr. Greg Hundley: And so these authors investigated this phenomenon. And what they found, interestingly, their results suggest that the molecular clock in atherosclerotic lesions induces a diurnal rhythm of apoptosis regulated by circadian Mer 21 expression in macrophages that is not matched by efferocytosis, and thereby increasing the size of the necrotic core of these plaques. So clinically, the implications are that a macrophage death clock controlled by mer 21 may enhance lesion growth and susceptibility to plaque rupture indicating that the molecular clock can have detrimental effects under pathologic conditions. And additionally, the molecular clock in lesional macrophages may contribute to the circadian pattern of myocardial infarction, which could be a target for preventive measures to limit the mismatch between apoptosis and efferocytosis and thus reduce plaque vulnerability in the early morning. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, our second paper comes to us also from the world of preclinical science, and it's from Professor Thomas Braun from the Max Planck Institute for heart and lung research. And this particular paper pertains to pulmonary hypertension. And as we know, pulmonary hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, originate from a complex interplay of environmental factors in genetic predispositions and little is known about developmental abnormalities or epigenetic dysregulation that might predisposed individuals to develop pulmonary hypertension or COPD in adults. So these authors screen a cohort of human pulmonary hypertension in COPD patients for changes of histone modifications by immunofluorescent staining. And also, they developed knockout mouse lines targeting cardiopulmonary progenitor cells and different heart and lung cell types. Dr. Greg Hundley: Now molecular, cellular and biochemical techniques were applied to analyze the function of SUV420H1-dependent epigenetic processes in cardiopulmonary progenitor cells and their derivatives. Well, what did they find? So the investigators found that loss of SUV420H1 in cardiopulmonary progenitor cells caused a COPD-like pulmonary hypertension phenotype in mice, including formation of perivascular tertiary lymphoid tissue, and goblet cell hyperplasia, hyperproliferation of smooth muscle cells and myofibroblast, impaired alveolarization and maturation of defects of the microvasculature leading to massive ripe ventricular dilation and premature death. Dr. Greg Hundley: Now mechanistically SUV420H1 bound directly to the five prime upstream in regulatory element of Superoxide Dismutase 3 gene to repress its expression and increased levels of the extracellular Superoxide Dismutase 3 enzyme in SUV420H1 mutants increased hydrogen peroxide concentration causing vascular defects and impairing alveolarization. So what can we take away, listeners, from this clinically? Well, the author's findings reveal a pivotal role of histone modifier SUV420H1 in cardiopulmonary co-development and uncover developmental origins of cardiopulmonary diseases. And now these results suggest that this study will facilitate the understanding of pathogenic events causing pulmonary hypertension in COPD and aid the development of epigenetic drugs for treatment of other cardiopulmonary diseases. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, listeners, what else is in, we call it, the mail bag, but some of the other articles in the issue? Well, doctors Varricchi and Wang exchanged letters regarding the prior article, the role of IgE FcεRI in pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. And our own Sara O'Brien highlights articles from our circulation family of journals. Professor Ross has a Research Letter regarding the effects of walnut consumption for two years on lipoprotein subclasses among healthy elders findings from the WAHA randomized controlled trial. And then finally, Dr. Maurer has a really nice On My Mind piece that raises concerns pertaining to the use of cardiac scintigraphy and screening for transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis. And now listeners, we're going to turn to that forum discussion where we have an author, our associate editors and an editorialist discussing two really important papers from the ischemia trial. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, listeners, we are very excited today to discuss in sort of the forum feature, two papers pertaining to the ischemia trial. And with us this day, we have Dr. Harmony Reynolds from New York University Grossman School of Medicine in New York city; two of our associate editors, Dr. Nick Mills from university of Edinburgh in Scotland; and Dr. Sandeep Das from UT Southwestern; and then also an editorialist, Dr. David Newby, who's also University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Welcome to everyone. Dr. Greg Hundley: Harmony, we're going to start with you. And in the first paper, the natural history of ischemia and no obstructive coronary artery disease, can you describe for us a little bit of the context of what shaped this question for you, what hypothesis did you want to test? And then describe for us a little bit your study population and your study design. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: Sure. Thanks so much for having me here to discuss these papers. I'm really appreciative of the attention from circulation, and I'm excited for this discussion today. So in this first natural history paper, we were looking at ischemia with non-obstructive corona arteries, INOCA, the kind of thing that used to be called cardiac syndrome X. And we know this is an extremely common problem. It's defined by having signs or symptoms of ischemia and no 50% or greater lesion on coronary imaging. And we also know from prior invasive studies that the mechanisms of this are overwhelmingly microvascular coronary disease and provokable coronary spasm. Some patients prove to be normal and invasive testing, but most will have some objective abnormality. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: We know this problem is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events and with high costs, but what we didn't know was whether the symptoms and ischemia on stress testing are tracking together in these patients. So if we're trying to treat these patients, should we be doing serial stress testing and targeting the medical therapy to ischemia abrogation or should we just be making their symptoms go away? And would this provide any long range insights for us into when we can figure out the symptom are truly ischemic in nature? Dr. Harmony Reynolds: So we decided to use the ischemia trial, and we had a fantastic platform for that in ischemia because, as you know, patients were screened in part for randomization using coronary CT angiography. And even though these patients had moderate or severe ischemia, some had no obstructive coronary disease on that CT coronary angiogram. And those are the patients that we enrolled in CIAO-ISCHEMIA. They had an assessment of angina at baseline, and they had to be symptomatic at some point. They didn't have to be symptomatic at the moment. They were enrolled in CIAO, but they had their stress test generally to evaluate ischemic symptoms. And they had their stress echocardiogram read by a core lab. Importantly, that core lab did not know the result of that CT scan. So they read them like all the other ischemia stress echoes. And then these patients had an angina and ischemia assessment with a repeat stress echo at one year. Dr. Greg Hundley: And what did you find? Dr. Harmony Reynolds: There were a number of interesting findings from this study. The first thing was that the severity of ischemia in the CIAO patients with INOCA was very similar to the ischemia patients who had obstructive coronary disease. So that tells us that the INOCA problem can happen with quite a lot of ischemia, and that had not been as well delineated before. Another finding expected, but we did find that is that there were many more women in the INOCA group, two thirds of our child population was female. And in ischemia, overall, it was closer to a quarter. We found that the symptoms and the ischemia were quite changeable. So at one year, the stress echocardiogram was normal in half of the child participant and only 23% still had moderate or severe ischemia. Angina had improved in 43%, and it worsened in 14%. There was an awful lot of change over one year, but the change in angina and the change in ischemia did not track together. And that was a bit of a surprise to me. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well, Nick, I know serving it as an associate editor, you see many papers come across your desk. What attracted you to pushing this paper forward for publication? Dr. Nicholas Mills: Thanks, Greg, and congratulations. Harmony, we love the papers you've been sending from ischemia trial, which genuinely is changing clinical practice all over the world. And it's been great to see the secondary analysis and follow-up papers. So this paper attracted me because it addresses an area where I still don't fully understand in clinical practice, what recommendations to make for my patients and what tests to arrange. As you say, INOCA is more common in women. I think these patients have largely been understudied over many decades, and there remains a lot of uncertainty. I liked it because you had a core lab, blinded core lab analysis with systematic follow up and it was a really well-done study. It reassured me in many ways because it told me that actually a lot of these patients, their symptoms get better, sort of irrespective of what we do. The treatments didn't seem to track within improvements of symptom, nor did the severity of ischemia, and that I think provides a lot of reassurance to our patients who are in this situation. Dr. Nicholas Mills: Of course, there is a group there who continue to have moderate to severe ischemia a year later. And I think this trial helps us understand maybe how we should study this group more, understand the heterogeneity that you've observed in this population in order to really try and resolve that and resolve their ongoing symptoms. But for the majority, four in five patients, they're going to do well and they're going to get better over time. And I think that's an important message from this study. Dr. Greg Hundley: Thank you so much, Nick. Well, Harmony, we're going to come back to you. You have a second paper, the outcomes in the ischemia trial really based on coronary artery disease and ischemia severity. Can you describe for us, again, working us back through, what were some of the constructs that you really wanted to address here? What was your hypothesis? And again, how did this study population maybe differ a little bit in this second paper? Dr. Harmony Reynolds: Thanks so much. So this paper tracked outcomes based on the severity of ischemia and the severity of coronary artery disease on the CT coronary angiogram now in randomized patients in the ischemia trial. So all of these had obstructive coronary disease and they were selected for randomization. And the premise of the ischemia trial was partly that we would be able to select patients who might benefit from revascularization and from an invasive strategy really based on how much ischemia they had on the stress test. Moderate or severe ischemia was required for randomization and for entry into the trial, but a core lab read those stress tests independently and independently assessed ischemia. And in some cases, when the site thought there was moderate or severe ischemia, the core lab did not agree. And the core lab independently decided whether it was moderate or severe. So we wanted to understand whether the ischemia severity at the time of trial entry influenced outcomes and influenced the outcomes by randomization treatment assignment. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: Similarly, about half of the patient had a CT that was interpretable for the number of vessels disease. And we wanted to understand in the context of all those prior stable ischemic heart disease trials, showing a lot of heterogeneity by the amount of coronary disease, whether in ischemia as well, there would be heterogeneity of the treatment effect based on how much coronary disease you started with. So the ischemia population, and this is almost the entire randomized cohort, but it's important to recognize for the CT analysis that only about three quarters of the patients had CT. They didn't get a CT, if your GFR was too low or if you had known coronary anatomy. And among those Cts, not every CT is perfectly interpretable for the number of vessels disease. These are sicker patients. These are not the super stable patients who have a low prevalence of disease. These were pretty sick, multi-vessel coronary disease patients, and they couldn't always hold their breast all that well. There was a lot of calcification in these. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: So for example, if there was motion artifact in the right coronary artery, we wouldn't be able to quantify the number of vessels disease. And that left us with a cohort of about half of our ischemia population, but that's still a giant cohort of several thousand patients. So that's how our study. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. And what did you find here? Dr. Harmony Reynolds: Here, we found that more severe ischemia was not associated with outcomes. Now that does go along with the COURAGE study in which after you adjust for clinical characteristics, ischemia was not associated with outcomes. But still it came as something of a surprise that even severe ischemia was not associated with a higher risk of outcomes than moderate or mild ischemia. We also found that in the coronary disease group, no matter how you measure the severity of coronary disease, the Duke prognostic index, the number of vessels disease, the segment involvement score, the segment stenosis score, all of these measures were very strongly associated with our outcomes, whether it was all cause mortality MI or our composite. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: When it came to treatment effect, we found that the ischemia severity were no relationship to treatment effect. There was no ischemia subgroup in which there appeared to be an advantage with an invasive strategy. But in the coronary disease group, and again taking into account the caveats of not everybody had a CT interpretable for the number of vessels disease, in those with the most severe coronary disease, that's the Duke 6 subgroup. And they had multi-vessel severe disease, either two vessel including the proximal LAD at 70% or three vessels with 70% stenosis. There was no benefit on mortality. But if we looked at the composite endpoint of cardiovascular death or MI, there appeared to be some advantage to the invasive strategy. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. Well, Sandeep, similar to Nick, working as an associate editor and meeting weekly, what attracted you to this particular paper? And why did you want to really see it come forward to be published? Dr. Sandeep Das: So first of all, I want to echo Nick's comments that these are great papers, and thanks very much for sending those our way and letting us have sort of first crack at them before they're released to the world. And I also want to comment on the side that Harmony and her team were just absolutely fantastic to work with in this process. From having been on the other side when you get 300 different comments from the editors and reviewers and you respond to them thoroughly and with grace, that's a feat in and of itself. So I want to shout out Harmony and her team for just being fantastic partners, because really we see ourselves as sort of the author's partners in kind of making the paper as good as it can be as the best it can be. Dr. Sandeep Das: So I'll admit upfront, I think it's kind of fashionable for people to say, well, I knew that this was going to show this, I knew this all from COURAGE, and this is not surprising to me. But I'll admit that I was surprised. And so this has been practice-changing for me, so this whole evolution post ischemia. And I really feel like a little bit of an existential crisis because I'm not sure I understand what ischemia means anymore. You ask me five years ago, I would've been very confident that I knew the answer to that. So you know what, really, as soon as this paper crossed our desk, I thought, wow, this is something we want to keep, this is something that's going to be really important to practice of cardiology. It's going to be really important to our readers. It's a great paper from a great group. This is something we want. So really it was never a question of, well, am I interested or am I not? I was interested from reading the abstract. Dr. Sandeep Das: So the question then became what are the real important questions that we need to sort of tease out and help elucidate for the clinician for the reader? And really for me, the question has always been, is there a subset of people where... So in my heart of hearts, I always kind of thought that burden of ischemia, if there was enough burden of ischemia, that it probably did help to revascularize that, right? I definitely practiced that way, right? There was some sort of number where I would start to say, that's a lot of ischemic myocardium and maybe we need to do something about that. Even though I know my intellectual brain says, no, there's no data that supports this, I really kind of thought it was true. And so Harmony and her team put another nail in that coffin here because it doesn't seem to be true, which to me was interesting and different and practice-changing. Dr. Sandeep Das: So the real questions here were sort of to tease out the interaction between anatomic severity, and we've all known that sort of anatomic burden of disease is proportional to adverse outcomes. That's not surprising. But the question then is, can we tease out a group where there may be benefit to revascularization? So there's a real interesting sort of interplay here between degree of ischemia and anatomic burden of disease. And is there a subset with enough of an anatomic burden of disease where you really may be interested in going after that to improve heart outcomes? So that's what I thought this was really fascinating paper. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. Well, David, we're going to turn to you next as the editorialist and asking you to sort of put the results of each of these two studies together. One, kind of highlighting for us how functional imaging might be useful to identify whether ischemia is present or not. And then the second study, really defining for us an association between anatomy and outcomes. So putting these all together, could you share your thoughts with us regarding these two papers? Dr. David Newby: Yes. Thank you. So I think that the CIAO-ISCHEMIA is very interesting, isn't it? And those clinicians were often challenged with symptoms versus our objective tests and trying to work out exactly what's going on, and it is. And such an important group as Harmony says, I can't agree more. We have a lot of morbidity here. As Nick said, I think the short term, a lot of the patients do seem to get better with just conservative management is good, but there's a core group that clearly are a problem. And as Harmony highlighted, you've got people with terrible regional wall-motion abnormalities on stress echo and yet no angina, others with no angina with no apparent difficulty on repeat testing. And then you've got a core group that has both, and it is fascinating to try and unpick that. And clearly, the symptoms are not correlating with our tests, and that's not the patient's fault. Dr. David Newby: And very often, no, no, you're wrong, can we say that to the patient? No, no, the patient is right and our tests are wrong, and we've got to work out how best to manage them. And I have a bit of analogy with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy as well, I think is at play here. I mean, here, you've got people with stable pain. We're not coming in as an acute emergency, but they're having regional wall motion abnormalities at times. They're getting a lot of symptoms. And we see similar things with Takotsubo, which is, I suppose, a much more flurry thing. I know that's something close to Harmony's his heart too. Excuse the pun. But this ischemia relationship, these regional wall motion abnormalities with chest pain, particularly in women, is something we really need to get our heads around and understand what's going on. It just reflects our ignorance, I think, of knowing exactly how to manage these patients. Dr. David Newby: And so for me, ischemia testing is about symptoms. It's about working out what's going on with the patient. It doesn't always give us the answer, but I certainly think that the role of ischemia testing is more about the symptoms. Dr. David Newby: And then when it comes to the second paper and outcomes with the ischemia trial, I absolutely was delighted to see those findings. I have to say place to what my prejudice is, I suppose, as someone that's been working with CT. And I suppose the slightly obvious thing is that the more disease you have, the more you will benefit from an intervention. And plaque and the burden of plaque is critical to that because how do you have a heart attack? Well, you have to have plaque, right? And it has to rupture. So the more plaque you have, the more likely you are. And I think that the analysis is again reinforcing what we've learned from some of the imaging trials with PROMIS and SCOT-HEART. Actually, the more plaque you have, the worse you are. Dr. David Newby: And yes, ischemia predicts risk, but ischemia predicts risk through its association with plaque burden, not through ischemia itself. And what I think we're seeing very nicely being played out in ischemia trial is the risk is definitely much stronger for CT than it is for imaging. And that's very clear, and that's exactly what PROMIS found exactly what SCOT-HEART found as well, and it's a rise robust finding. The interaction with the treatment effect that I find also fascinating and again plays to some of the bypass surgery trials that we've seen, bypass surgery tends to prevent spontaneous MIs and, even in some cases, mortality. And we're seeing trends in ischemia for mortality, can't over call them. I'd love to see what happens in 10 years. But I think in terms of the prevention of MIs, I'm putting all my money in one basket, which is the bypass surgery, 25% of course of patients revascularized that way. I don't believe that PCI is going to prevent the myocardial infarction. So I think all my money is in that box. Dr. David Newby: But it's absolutely fascinating data. It is all about the plaque if you're talking about prevention of clinical events downstream. And I think that's where the dichotomy is, scheme is about symptoms and understanding the patient's problems in terms of symptomatic improvement. If you want to improve their long term outcome, it's all about the plaque, understanding the burden of plaque and what you can do to hopefully prevent downstream event. Dr. Greg Hundley: Great. Thank you so much. And so listeners, we're going to ask each of our speakers today in really 20 or 30 seconds to go through and identify what do they think is the next study really to be performed in this space? So Harmony, we're going to start with you and then Nick, Sandeep and then finish up with David. Harmony? Dr. Harmony Reynolds: Thanks. Well, when it comes to INOCA, I would like to see more studies in the vein of CorMicA. So I'd like to see routine invasive testing to define the underlying pathophysiology problem and then targeted medical therapy interventions, and I'd like to see outcome trials. There's one outcome trial going on. It's a challenge because the event rate, though very important and higher than in the general population for sure, is low enough that these trials have to be quite large, and we look at ischemia with a relatively high event rate. And even so it's a stable population and that had to be large, this would have to be even larger. So we're going to need more mechanistic studies in order to lead to the treatment trials that will really influence practice. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: And in terms of the severity of coronary disease, this is a tough one. We felt like ischemia was a lift, and I'm not sure that there will be another huge stable ischemic heart disease trial. But sure, I'd love to see in people selected by CT for their advanced severity of coronary disease, whether an invasive management strategy makes a difference compared to medical therapy. I don't know that we'll see that one come to pass, but you never know. Dr. Greg Hundley: Nick? Dr. Nicholas Mills: Yeah. I agree. We need more mechanistic research, but I'd like to see more non-invasive methods to understand the mechanistic basis of this condition because CorMicA has caught an invasive protocol for a condition, which we know is benign and who most patients get better without any treatment. I would also like to see randomized blinded studies of treatment effects and because there are too many observational on blinded studies here. And I think the outcome has to be patient-focused and symptoms. Dr. Greg Hundley: Sandeep? Dr. Sandeep Das: Yeah. So everything that's been raised so far are fantastic comments and really on point. For me, I think if we can tease out the population that may benefit to get back to Dave's earlier comment that there's possibly not going to be a little humble here, there's possibly a population that has extensive, extensive CVD that could benefit from bypass surgery. And I think that that hasn't really been firmly demonstrated yet, although it's been suggested strongly. So that I think is an interesting study, and I hope that that gets done as a trial, but I can understand that it'd be a giant undertaking. And then the other thing I think is just algorithmic approaches that are driven by anatomical studies like SCOT-HEART and things like that, where we really try to make decisions based on the anatomical approach and pretend like the last 15 years never happened and that we kind are starting fresh with our best approach to how to treat these patients. Dr. Greg Hundley: And finally, David. Dr. David Newby: Yeah. I'm actually going to agree with everybody there, and I'm rooting for this trial actually because that's the one I want to do is look at advanced coronary disease on noninvasive imaging, irrespective of symptoms. And that's the big call actually if you've got no symptoms to put yourself through a bypass, because it's bypass, it's not standing. Bypass, we need. I'd also love to see some substudy coming out of ischemia. I think you're doing them. I hope you are looking at plaque burden and plaque characteristics because I think that's another level of complexity. We're so obsessed with stenosis, actually. And again, even anatomical and ischemia testing plays to that, it's not just about stenosis, stenotic arteries have big plaque burdens, et cetera. And it's not bypassing them, it's bypassing all the nonobstructive plaque and the obstructive plaque that has given you the benefit of revascularization with surgery. So I think you need to think about a really nice cool trial where we can do that trial even in the presence of nonobstructive disease, but big plaque burden, adverse plaque characteristics, and think about bypass. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well, listeners, we want to thank Dr. Harmony Reynolds for bringing us these two really informative studies from the ischemia trial, and also our associate editors, Dr. Nick Mills and Dr. Sandeep Das for providing their perspective and our editorialist, Dr. David Newby, who really helped us organize our thoughts and put both of these two studies into great perspective highlighting in the first that functional testing can really help us identify the presence or absence of ischemia. And then our second study highlighting the association between CT coronary angiography and the identification of the anatomic severity of disease with cardiac outcomes. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, on behalf of Carolyn and myself, we want to wish you a great week and we will catch you next week on the run. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association 2021. The opinions expressed by speaker in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit ahajournals.org.

Jon & Chantel
Excuse Me, But You're Beautiful

Jon & Chantel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 58:01


Chantel was at a red light when the person next to her had to tell her that she was beautiful! Jon tells a cringe-worthy dinner story involving his kids. Plus a brand new 2nd Date Update and Manifest Monday!

The Break Room
Mule Excuse Post Game Monday - WEEK 3 - Bills VS Washington

The Break Room

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 11:50


Tommy made his week 3 picks on Friday, now we recap how those predictions went. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A window to the spiritual world
First Haveli kīrtana - excuse the bumps in the effort

A window to the spiritual world

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 227:07


The Seven Streams Method
September 27

The Seven Streams Method

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 23:58


Download Ezekiel 8-11 We are in the Prophetic Stream reading from the Lexham English Bible. 7streamsmethod.com | @7StreamsMethod | @serenatravis | #7Streams | Donate Commentary by Dr. Drake Travis Lord, when you speak, good heavens and oh my word, we want to be listening.  Amen. 8 - It was the year 592 B.C. in the ninth month - what we today have come to call 'September' - and Ezekiel has been a captive in Babylon for five years.  It is six years until Jerusalem is going to need to be ransacked and burned flat for the abomination and idolatry that is going on there at a feverish pitch - and all with the priests' approval!  God is showing that He has had enough of the people in this city; this city that He called to be a Light for His purposes - a Light for the Gentiles.  They were wholly rebellious children of His and only a severest of severe punishments is going to work on them. They were worshiping the Canaanite fertility god Asherah, and the Babylonian fertility god Tammuz.  There were engaging in cultic Egyptian animal worship. They were doing sun worship, like what was going on in Japan after the Christian community was exterminated by the Shoguns centuries ago. The leadership of all this pagan revelry was being done by people who were once in alliance with the bible legends Josiah and Jeremiah ... but they had gone bad and were quite committed to staying this way.  This is what Ezekiel was being shown in his vision of Jerusalem-gone-wrong! 9 - The vision continues giving clear indication that an angel is going to go through this same city and cut down; wholly slaughter without mercy all who are immersed in this rancid idolatry.  Those who do not approve and are grieved by the idolatry v.s. participating in it are marked and not to be harmed.  This is a keen foreshadowing of what we see in Revelation 14:1 where the faithful are marked and therefore shielded from calamity. 10 - The angel and vision of wheels and all the etc. that appeared adorning in this vision arises again in ch. 10.  My husband and I work in film in Hollywood and it staggers the mind to discuss, "how on earth would this be filmed?! What graphics would be employed? There are eyes on wheels, there are hands right under wings filled with coals of fire that are being cued to burn a city turned apostate!" And y'wonder if the feathers would burn from the wings.  Oh well, back to the vision! [Excuse me please].  But as we know and have read earlier this year, Jerusalem was burned by these torching Babylonians in 586 B.C.  It was burned again to ashes in A.D. 70 by Romans.  Because of these events, there's an ordinance in Israel clear to today that houses must be built of non burnable material. But all this being said, Jerusalem is going to be burned. God is giving the vision about this.  It kind of sounds like the rebellious, murderous, idolaters, Satanic, and the fearful being thrown into the Lake of Fire in Rev. 20:14-15&Rev. 21:8. 11 - The final part of this vision is that the gavel is going to fall on the evil rulers in Jerusalem.  They know better but they think it's more exciting to go astray than to follow the God of Abraham in the area that God dedicated to the worship of Himself in His holy Temple. And those derelict leaders do not care how many are slain because of their instigating bad religion. So the leaders are going to fall, the city is going to be judged, the people will be exiled and humbled.  Then God is able to work with these people, to gather them to Himself and His purposes. They will have His Spirit, His heart ... Ezekiel is then taken back from his vision and begins to tell the exiles what he has seen.  Man-oh-man, this had to be an awe-inspiring story time around the campfire with "uncle Ezekiel"!

Men in Charge
Season 10, Episode 7: This Time We Have an Excuse!

Men in Charge

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 29:01


menincharge@kpbx.org (Men in Charge)

Faith Covenant Audio Podcast
Excuse Me: - Week 3: I'd serve but ________

Faith Covenant Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 38:03


Ever notice how we're quick to want things but quick to come up with excuses for why we can't get there? Whether it's sacrificing time, or something we enjoy, excuses abound. But what if we didn't let those excuses get in the way of our spiritual lives? Join us at Faith Covenant Church as we explore how to get beyond our excuses and on to God's best for us.

Kingdom Speak with Pastor Daniel McKillop

Excuse me…but the seat you're sitting in is mine. Yes, I know you want this spot, but you're not supposed to be there. Today on Kingdom Speak we talk position, power and promotion.   #KingdomSpeak #Podcast #Podcaster #NewEpisode #Humility #Pride

A.L.I.V.E. with Jessica Silverman
Ep 25: OWNING your Sh*t with Shelly Saunier

A.L.I.V.E. with Jessica Silverman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 90:44


In a world where cancel culture has made many feel the need to stay silent, Shelly owns her shit unapologetically. (Excuse my French, but no other could convey this energy!) In this episode, I had the divine joy of connecting with one of my yogi mentors Shelly Saunier, who I met years ago when I first moved to Florida in taking her Yin Yoga session at a yoga festival, which was one of the MOST beautiful practices I remember taking in my 13+ years of practicing yoga. Shelly has a way with words that exudes flair with fire, honoring her French and Cuban culture. If you've been feeling like you have to play safe as to not offend anyone, let Shelly be your guide today to live in your TRUTH + OWN your sh*t! For what does being ALIVE mean if you're not being you?Shelly Saunier is a self taught astrologer, modern mystic, Registered Yoga instructor and women's empowerment coach living in South Florida area. Her mission is to encourage and remind you of your power while sharing her experiences, tools, and lessons that have up leveled her life so that it may serve you in yours. "Someone always has something to say so do it your way!" - Shelly SaunierConnect with Shelly: https://linktr.ee/shellysaunierConnect with Me: Join the Digitally Savvy Sisterhood: Make massive impact (and income!) online, click here for more juicy deets on how to join and see if it's a good fit for you! Instagram: @mozen_wellnessWebsite: https://jessicasilverman.vipmembervault.comFacebook Group: A.L.I.V.E. with Jessica Silverman - bit.ly/mozenwellnessSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/alivepodcast)

The Messy Masterpiece with Tori & Chad
What's Your Excuse? - September 24

The Messy Masterpiece with Tori & Chad

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 10:58


Hi y'all! In this episode Tori and I talk about how we need to be pursing the Spirit and not just the fruit. Because the fruit will be a residual benefit of pursing the Spirit but it's about the Spirit and being connected with Jesus not just putting on a Christian display.Bible App Plan: https://www.bible.com/reading-plans/17021Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themastersfamOur Instagrams: Tori's- https://www.instagram.com/torimasters/Chad's- https://www.instagram.com/chadmasters/Podcast- https://www.instagram.com/themessymasterpiecepodcast

Fashion Crimes Podcast
2021 Met Gala Review

Fashion Crimes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 34:41


HOOOWDDYYY fashion insider friends!   So - if our #NYFW Episode last week was not enough fashion for you - get yourself ready for the Fashion Crimes Podcast 2021 #MetGala Review! This week, Holly and Nolan have QUITE a bit to say about “Fashion's Biggest Night Out.” Every year, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC hosts a themed fundraising gala. This year's theme was “In America: A Lexicon of Fashion” – whatever that means. Apparently, we aren't the only ones wondering WTH, as it seems like most whom arrived on the famous white Met staircase had no idea either - or at least - didn't bother to help us minions to understand their choice of outfit. RUDE! Excuse me....we need to know these things.  So, instead, Holly and Nolan pick their Favs and Flops, adding plenty of insightful details and sidebar commentary. Lots of sidebar commentary. Duh.  Holly loves J Lo in full her Ralph Lauren western, and Winnie Harlow and Gabrielle Union, both in Iris Van Herpen. Nolan drools over Shawn Mendez (with no shirt, again!). Would not kick him out of bed for eating crackers. I meaann. Let's be honest. But of course, Nolan does not mince words regarding Kristen Stewart in Chanel, Kendall Jenner in Givenchy (although he begrudgingly agrees that she did look the best she has ever looked at this Gala), and poor AOC with her “Tax the Rich” gown designed by Brother Vellies. Next time, AOC, ask Nolan first. I mean, right?!?! Oh! And Madonna's daughter Lourdes was dressed as a belly dancer – hairy arm pits and all! EW! I mean is that really necessary. And, we're sorry, but WTAF with Frank Ocean and his Prada x Homer green baby, Kim K. in her blackout bat suit and Justin Bieber in La Maison Drew? We are sure there are stories behind some of the weirder style choices, but frankly, we aren't sure we care. We do care, however, that this is basically the BEST TIME OF THE FASHION YEAR DOT COM, and love, love, love how much of a fashion feast we have had for the past 2 weeks. There were beauties, there were beasts, and then there was Nolan at a swanky, VVIP Met Gala after-party! He got all glammed up and enjoyed rubbing elbows with celebs, models and fashion editors - and partaking in lots and lots of sponsored spirits. All Holly cares about is the swag bag, and what she will be able to convince Nolan to part with. #truth It's been a long two weeks of fashion reporting, and frankly, our asses are fried. But hey, someone's gotta give their unwanted opinions. It might as well be us! OMG you're welcome. We are the two best fashion friends you never knew you needed. Reporting live from the 2021 Met Gala, I mean how lucky are you right now. #justsayin   LINKS DISCUSSED: Met Gala Red Carpet Looks: https://www.vogue.com/slideshow/met-gala-2021-red-carpet-live-celebrity-fashion #MetInAmerica #AmericanDesigners #hollykatzstyling #stylebynolan #personalstylist #fashionpodcast #fashioncrimes #whoworeitbest #whoworewhat #whoworeitworst #metmuseum #celebritystyle #celebrityfashion #celebritydress #eveningdress #eveninggowns #hautecouture #exclusivedesign #iheartradio #spotify #applepodcasts #podcastersofinstagram #podcast

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Three Martini Lunch: Hope for GOP in Virginia, Afghan Evacuation Disgrace, Psaki's Pathetic Excuse

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021


Join Jim and Greg as they welcome a new poll showing Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin leading Democrat Terry McAuliffe among likely voters.  They also vent as the Department of Homeland Security admits that only 16 percent of the Afghanistan evacuees brought to the U.S. were American citizens, green card holders, or Afghans with […]

Engineer of Finance
Pick an Excuse - Episode 190

Engineer of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 17:24


Can you confidently say that you are great at handling your life and finances? If you're not, you're not alone. There are many people who might be good at handling their lives, but not their money. There might also be those who are great at budgeting and investing, but their lives are suffering. In today's show, Ken shares the common excuses that he's hearing from people in terms of handling their finances and meeting financial advisors. Not only did he narrate the different life-changing stories about his life (and others), but also answer the question “Is money important to you?” Ken Greene transitioned from being a Professional Engineer (P.E.) to the “Engineer of Finance.” His goal is to help people become financially independent and help them earn better yields with less risk by investing Off Wall Street. Links and Resources from this Episode DISCLAIMER For resources and additional information of this episode go to http://engineeroffinance.com Connect with Ken Greene http://engineeroffinance.com Office 775-624-8839 https://www.linkedin.com/in/ken-greene https://business.facebook.com/GreeneFinance  Book a meeting with Ken If you liked what you've heard and would like a one-on-one meeting with the Engineer Of Finance click here Show Notes Ken's goal: To be the best Financial Advisor. - 1:32 Looking back: Why have I had a dramatic improvement? - 2:52 Stories about making dramatic improvements, even after facing different adversaries. - 3:54 No more excuses. Moving forward with what's important to you. - 9:06 “It's important to me to get that done so I'm around for my little guy. From that, I realized the importance of being around for everyone.” - 10:33 Common excuses that Ken's hearing from people in terms of handling finances and meeting financial advisors. - 11:25 Hearing someone say, “Money is not important to me.” - 12:15 It's not about the money, but what it allows you to do that's important to you. Once you find out what's important to you and act on it, the excuses don't show up. - 14:31 Review, Subscribe and Share If you like what you hear please leave a review by clicking here Make sure you're subscribed to the podcast so you get the latest episodes. Subscribe with Apple Podcasts Follow on Spotify Subscribe with Stitcher Subscribe with RSS 

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)
9-22-21 - Hour 2 - Is there any excuse for Cougar fans not to show up to the game Saturday?

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 40:15


Today's Co-Hosts: Ben Criddle (@criddlebenjamin) Subscribe to the Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle podcast:Apple Podcastshttps://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle/id996764363Google Podcastshttps://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuc3ByZWFrZXIuY29tL3Nob3cvMTM2OTkzOS9lcGlzb2Rlcy9mZWVkSpotifyhttps://open.spotify.com/show/7dZvrG1ZtKkfgqGenR3S2mPocket Castshttps://pca.st/SU8aOvercasthttps://overcast.fm/itunes996764363/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle-byuSpreakerhttps://www.spreaker.com/show/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddleStitcherhttps://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=66416iHeartRadiohttps://www.iheart.com/podcast/966-cougar-sports-with-29418022TuneInhttps://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports-Talk--News/Cougar-Sports-with-Ben-Criddle-p731529/

The Uncharted Veterinary Podcast
UVP 143 There is ALWAYS an Excuse (How to Teach Accountability)

The Uncharted Veterinary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 49:03


This week on the podcast, Dr. Roark and Stephanie tackle another topic from the mailbag. We received an email from a practice owner who is frustrated with a member of their team who always seems to have an excuse for their mistakes or breaking protocols. They asked Andy and Stephanie: “How do I help them self-reflect a little better and to take ownership of things rather than blame it on something or someone else?” Get ready for some serious discussion on how clear is kind. We will also cover the basics of how people are motivated when it comes to accountability. Ultimately, Andy and Stephanie agree that you can't fix anyone, they have to fix themselves. We talk about the key to understanding what might motivate them to fix themselves and how to leverage that to create an environment that supports accountability. Let's get into this... Links: Upcoming events: https://unchartedvet.com/upcoming-events/ Oct 9, 2021 from 3-5 pm Eastern time - Join founding UVC member, Dr. Tracy Sands for her powerful workshop called Empowering Your Team to Get Positive and Stay That Way! During this workshop, Dr. Sands will teach you some tools to help get your team to start thinking/acting on the bright side. In this workshop you will learn how to: ➡️ Use everyday tools and games that guide team members to focus on positive moments (without pretending everything is sunshine and rainbows). ➡️ Bounce back from negative situations in a constructive way. ➡️ Get your team to actively practice these skills. ➡️ Empower them to stay in that mindset! Registration is $99 to non-members and free to Uncharted Community members. SIGN UP HERE Registration is OPEN for our October Uncharted Veterinary Culture Conference! Come join us and work intentionally on your practice instead of in it: https://unchartedvet.com/uvc-culture/ All Links: https://linktr.ee/UnchartedVet Got a question for the mailbag? Submit it here: unchartedvet.com/mailbag

The Uncharted Veterinary Podcast
UVP 143 There is ALWAYS an Excuse (How to Teach Accountability)

The Uncharted Veterinary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 49:03


This week on the podcast, Dr. Roark and Stephanie tackle another topic from the mailbag. We received an email from a practice owner who is frustrated with a member of their team who always seems to have an excuse for their mistakes or breaking protocols. They asked Andy and Stephanie: “How do I help them self-reflect a little better and to take ownership of things rather than blame it on something or someone else?” Get ready for some serious discussion on how clear is kind. We will also cover the basics of how people are motivated when it comes to accountability. Ultimately, Andy and Stephanie agree that you can't fix anyone, they have to fix themselves. We talk about the key to understanding what might motivate them to fix themselves and how to leverage that to create an environment that supports accountability. Let's get into this... Links: Upcoming events: https://unchartedvet.com/upcoming-events/ Oct 9, 2021 from 3-5 pm Eastern time - Join founding UVC member, Dr. Tracy Sands for her powerful workshop called Empowering Your Team to Get Positive and Stay That Way! During this workshop, Dr. Sands will teach you some tools to help get your team to start thinking/acting on the bright side. In this workshop you will learn how to: ➡️ Use everyday tools and games that guide team members to focus on positive moments (without pretending everything is sunshine and rainbows). ➡️ Bounce back from negative situations in a constructive way. ➡️ Get your team to actively practice these skills. ➡️ Empower them to stay in that mindset! Registration is $99 to non-members and free to Uncharted Community members. SIGN UP HERE Registration is OPEN for our October Uncharted Veterinary Culture Conference! Come join us and work intentionally on your practice instead of in it: https://unchartedvet.com/uvc-culture/ All Links: https://linktr.ee/UnchartedVet Got a question for the mailbag? Submit it here: unchartedvet.com/mailbag

Trumpcast
A Word: Cancelling the “Black Friend” Excuse

Trumpcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 26:33


Your barista, your golf buddy, your ex-college roommate...just because you are friendly with a Black person doesn't mean you're friends. And even if you are, you can still be a racist. Scholar Khalil Gibran Muhammad explores the “Black buddy” myth of racial healing this through his podcast “Some of My Best Friends Are…”, which he co-hosts with his white best friend, Ben Austen. On today's episode of A Word, Muhammad joins Jason Johnson to talk about interracial friendships, and evolving views about how they reflect racial progress in America.  Guest: Khalil Gibran Muhammad is a historian, author, and the co-host of “Some of My Best Friends Are…,” a new podcast on the Pushkin network. Podcast production by Ahyiana Angel and Jasmine Ellis You can skip all the ads in A Word by joining Slate Plus. Sign up now at slate.com/awordplus for just $1 for your first month. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices