Podcast appearances and mentions of Mark Cuban

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American investor and entrepreneur

  • 2,281PODCASTS
  • 3,414EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 4, 2021LATEST
Mark Cuban

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Best podcasts about Mark Cuban

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Latest podcast episodes about Mark Cuban

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 3 | Sam Rubin and Buying a Town @ConwayShow @SamOnTv

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 30:56


Sam Rubin Review of Licorice Pizza and Funny story about Wendys & 7-11/ Poppin Buttons // Sean Murphy on Brian Kelly & Notre Dame / Storage space Podcast // Pastathon $760K / 67lbs pasta “family” / Mark Cuban buys a town

Startup Marketing
Videos and Social Media

Startup Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 40:34


Learn how to use videos on social media to grow your small business. Learn how videos can help you reach your target audience. Professional videographer tips. This week's guest is Matt Peet. Matt Peet is a Videographer turned Marketer. He got his start shooting weddings 10 years ago where he learned how to shoot and edit video fast. He then took that to the entrepreneur space and has been the videographer at large 4000 person events and small 30 person masterminds in places like Puerto Rico. Some of his clients include John Lee Dumas, Disney, Podcast Movement, Woodhouse Day Spa, and more. He has shot at events with speakers like Dan Kennedy from Magnetic Marketing, Pat Flynn, Tony Robbins, and Mark Cuban. Key Takeaways: How video helps boost your reach How video helps you engage with your target audience How to make adding video to your content easier How to find creative video content ideas What you need to film good videos Connect with Matt: https://mattpeet.com (Website) https://www.facebook.com/matthew.peet (Facebook) https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/matt-peet-marketing-podcast/id1553536313 (Podcast) Music: Tuesday by Sascha Ende, Music.io

Jones.Show: Thought-Full Conversation
129: Rob Shuter is equal parts naughty, nice & inspirational

Jones.Show: Thought-Full Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 30:06


Called “America's Number ONE Gossip Columnist” by The National Enquirer. Rob “Naughty But Nice” Shuter breaks celebrity news every day on his website NaughtyGossip.com where he delivers all the dish about the stars we love in his naughty but nice signature style. He also may make you rethink your definition of “gossip.” You can also catch him co-hosting and breaking celebrity news on Good Day New York, The Today Show, The Talk, Wendy Williams Show, CNN, Extra and Z100's ‘Elvis Duran.' Previously, Rob was the Huffington Post's only celebrity columnist and the former executive editor of OK! Magazine. Rob has also hosted his own Saturday night talk show on Mark Cuban's channel and his own daily morning show, ‘The Gossip Table,' on VH1! Before Rob was one of the world's most successful entertainment reporters, he was a publicist working for Jennifer Lopez, Alicia Keys, P. Diddy, Jessica Simpson and Jon Bon Jovi! Breaking some of the biggest entertainment stories, including Jamie Lynn Spears's pregnancy news, Britney's first post-meltdown interview, Eva Longoria's wedding, and baby exclusives for Jessica Alba, Tori Spelling and Mathew McConaughey's tots, Rob always knows where to find the best scoop. Now he is bringing all this experience to his new show, “Naughty But Nice,” on I HEART MEDIA in his unique cheeky way, which is always a pinch and never a punch! In his fifteen years as a celebrity publicist, Rob was privileged to have a front-row seat to the most successful people in the world. Being involved in the lives of the best and the brightest, Rob quickly discovered it wasn't talent all his super successful clients had in common. Rather, what all these extraordinary people share is they know exactly who they are—in just four words. His recent book, “The 4 Word Answer: Who Are You in 4 Words?” adds the words “self-help guru” to his already impressive list of accomplishments. JONES.SHOW is a weekly podcast featuring host Randall Kenneth Jones (author, speaker & creative communications consultant) and Susan C. Bennett (the original voice of Siri). JONES.SHOW is produced and edited by Kevin Randall Jones. Rob Shuter Online: Twitter: https://twitter.com/NaughtyNiceRob Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RobShuterOfficial Instagram: https://instagram.com/thenaughtygossip Web: NaughtyGossip.com Follow Rob on Clubhouse JONES.SHOW Online: Join us in the Jones.Show Lounge on Facebook. Twitter (Randy): https://twitter.com/randallkjones Instagram (Randy): https://www.instagram.com/randallkennethjones/ Facebook (Randy): https://www.facebook.com/mindzoo/ Web: RandallKennethJones.com Follow Randy on Clubhouse Twitter (Susan): https://twitter.com/SiriouslySusan Instagram (Susan): https://www.instagram.com/siriouslysusan/ Facebook (Susan): https://www.facebook.com/siriouslysusan/ Web: SusanCBennett.com Follow Susan on Clubhouse LinkedIn (Kevin): https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevin-randall-jones/ Web: KevinRandallJones.com www.Jones.Show

David C Barnett Small Business & Deal Making
5 Worst Pieces of Small Business Advice EVER!

David C Barnett Small Business & Deal Making

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 12:25


https://www.BusinessBuyerAdvantage.com https://www.HowToSellMyOwnBusiness.com Learn more at https://www.DavidCBarnett.com Related article... YouTube commentator JediBunny wants to know what I think are the 5 worst pieces of small business advice. I've ranked them in a Letterman Style list. Let's see if you agree… The first one I roast is ‘Sales Cures All' which is touted by business celebrity Mark Cuban. Why is Mark wrong? … and then 4 more for you to ponder in this week's video…: https://youtu.be/GcGgVV66oFA Learn how to buy an already-successful and profitable business even in the covid-recession of 2020 https://www.BusinessBuyerAdvantage.com Book a call with me at https://www.clarity.fm/davidbarnett Stop missing my new videos. Join my email list here: https://www.DavidCBarnettList.com Want to look dangerous like David? Jeff Alpaugh Customs has a special offer for you: https://www.JeffAlpaugh.com/DCB10 business broker mergers and acquisitions how to buy a small business smb buying an existing business

Gavin Dawson
4th Hour of The GBAG Nation

Gavin Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 43:51


Update on the Cowboys COVID list, Jared Sandler joins the show plus, how much are the Mavs issues caused by Mark Cuban. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lillian McDermott
Brian Cuban, Addiction Knows No Boundaries

Lillian McDermott

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 54:50


Brian Cuban is the younger brother of Dallas Mavericks' owner and entrepreneur Mark Cuban. He is also an attorney, author, and addiction recovery advocate. Brian has been in long term recovery from alcohol, cocaine, and bulimia since April of 2007. He has chronicled his experience of living with and recovering from twenty-seven years of eating […] The post Brian Cuban, Addiction Knows No Boundaries appeared first on LillianMcDermott.com.

Locked On Mavericks - Daily Podcast On The Dallas Mavs
27 Trade Targets the Dallas Mavericks Could Shop for on Black Friday

Locked On Mavericks - Daily Podcast On The Dallas Mavs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 36:52


The Dallas Mavericks are winning but they have some holes to fill and weaknesses to address. Which players around the league could be available for a trade? Nick Angstadt (@NickVanExit) and Isaac Harris (@IsaacLHarris) discuss 27-ish trade targets around the NBA that Mark Cuban, Nico Harrison, and the Mavs Front Office should target in trades. How can the Mavericks take advantage of teams like the Pelicans, Spurs, Kings, Rockets, and Magic that will become Sellers at the Trade Deadline? Who among the Kings group could help the Mavs: Harrison Barnes, Buddy Hield, Richaun Holmes, Marvin Bagley, or someone else? Subscribe to our Youtube Channel: Locked On Mavericks Follow/Subscribe Anywhere: linktr.ee/LockedOnMavs Follow Locked On NBA: linktr.ee/LockedOnNBA   Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! | Offers from our sponsors: lockedonpodcasts.com/offers SweatBlock - Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG - There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto - Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Winner Take All
Startup to Find Local American Made Products Online

Winner Take All

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 14:06


Check out Cultivate at the links below: Chrome: https://www.wecultivate.us/get/extension/chrome?campaignId=WTA Firefox: https://www.wecultivate.us/get/extension/firefox?campaignId=WTA Safari: https://www.wecultivate.us/get/extension/safari?campaignId=WTA Harsh Khurana, the CEO of Cultivate, a browser extension and shopping app with a mission to help businesses that are manufacturing goods locally, joins Alex on the show. The two discuss how Khurana launched Cultivate in 2020 during a time in which small American businesses were struggling. Harsh tells the story of how he secured funding from Shark Tank star and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban through a cold email and him and Alex explore some ideas on why large tech platforms seem hesitant to promote American products and manufacturers. Originally Aired: 11/23/21 #Cultivate #MadeInUSA #SmallBusiness 00:00 - Subscribe and Fight Big Tech 00:24 - What is Cultivate 01:21 - Cold Emailing Mark Cuban?! 02:06 - One Line Pitch That Got Cuban on as an Investor 02:33 - The Cultivate Browser Extension 04:15 - Identifying Amazon Brand and Seller Origin 05:44 - Data Says Over Half of Amazon Sellers from China?

NBA Front Office with Keith Smith
Wall Unhappy In Houston (Buyout?), Mavs Talk Porzingis Rumors, Aldridge Struggling To Adjust In Brooklyn, More

NBA Front Office with Keith Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 23:08


We break down John Wall's situation in Houston after some comments suggest he might not be happy with sitting out, Mark Cuban and the Mavs address Porzingis trade rumors, plus Tristan Thompson calls out the Kings and LaMarcus Aldridge admits to struggles with his role in Brooklyn...

Never Stand Still
Introducing Season Four of Never Stand Still

Never Stand Still

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 2:10


We're excited to announce a new season of Never Stand Still. PayPal's President and CEO Dan Schulman explores some of the guiding principles he's learned in martial arts and interviews world-class CEOs, creators, and change-makers about how those philosophies apply to their lives as they perform at the top of their game.  Season four guests include Mark Cuban, Maria Sharapova, Tory Burch, Matthew McConaughey, Howie Mandel, Dr. Ibram X. Kendi, and more. Check back on November 30th for the first episode.

Sports Business Radio Podcast
Sports Business Radio Vault with Mark Cuban, Arthur Blank & Marc Lasry

Sports Business Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 106:33


We look back at past Sports Business Radio conversations with Mark Cuban (Dallas Mavericks Governor and Shark Tank investor), Arthur Blank (Atlanta Falcons, Author of the book "Good Company" and Co-Founder of Home Depot) and Marc Lasry (Milwaukee Bucks Governor). Three successful pro sports team Governors and visionary business people.  LISTEN to Sports Business Radio on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon Music or at www.SportsBusinessRadio.com.  WATCH these interviews on the Sports Business Radio YouTube Channel at www.SportsBusinessRadio.com. Follow Sports Business Radio on Twitter @SBRadio and on Instagram and Tik Tok @SportsBusinessRadio. Sports Business Radio is powered by Malka Sports (@MalkaSports) and produced by Griggs Productions (@GriggsProductions). Happy Thanksgiving from Sports Business Radio! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

No Pump Fakes
Shawn Marion Makes His Case For the NBA's Top 75

No Pump Fakes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 55:21


How hard is it to win an NBA Championship? Shawn Marion shares what Mark Cuban told the locker-room – “Great teams make it to the Finals, but the hot team wins the Championship.” From playing with Jason Kidd and Steve Nash we hear about those special Suns and Mavs teams. Going under appreciated his whole career, he was one of the most versatile defenders of all time, guarding all 5 positions all game, not just in stints like many others. Whether it was matching up against Tim Duncan or KG he was always ready for the assignment. Shawn believes he should be top 75 all-time. Theus McBee: https://www.instagram.com/theuselijah/ Ahmad Smith: https://www.instagram.com/akisnba_/ Shawn Marion - https://www.instagram.com/matrix31/  

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0
PMS 2.0 541 - Thursday Night Football Preview, Ian Rapoport, Marcus Spears, Mark Madden, & AJ Hawk

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 115:13


On today's show, Pat, AJ Hawk, and the boys chat about tonight's Thursday Night Football game in Atlanta between the Patriots and Falcons, and that although the Same Game Parlay may be dead, the Canadian Sensation, Gumpy, makes a tasty boost for tonight's game, plus they cover everything else happening as we get ready for week 11 of the NFL season. Joining the program as he does every week to preview tonight's game and this weekend's slate, is NFL Network Insider, Ian Rapoport. They chat about who's in and out for tonight's game, which QB's might not play this weekend, if David Bakhtiari is going to play at all the Packers this season, and some of his other thoughts going into the weekend (37:07-57:36). Later, 8 year NFL veteran on the Defensive Line, ESPN NFL Analyst, 20th pick of the 2005 NFL Draft, The Big Swagu, Marcus Spears joins Pat and AJ Hawk to chat about his career at ESPN, what his ultimate goals in the industry are, his thoughts on the Cowboys and Chiefs this weekend, his new podcast with Big Perk, and what LSU needs to do to stay relevant (57:38-1:27:34). Lastly, The Super Genius, Pittsburgh Radio Legend, WCW Legend, Mark Madden joins the show to chat about the Penguins getting bought by the Fenway Sports Group, why he thinks it's a good thing, his thoughts on the Steelers thus far, what they're going to do at Quarterback, why he's upset with Mark Cuban, and much more (1:29:06-1:51:21). Make sure you subscribe to youtube.com/thepatmcafeeshow and listen every day on Mad Dog Radio, Sirius XM Channel 82. We appreciate you all for listening, come and laugh with us, cheers.

Podland News
Podcast listening is growing globally, Spotify advertising and subscriptions are expanding internationally but why is no one checking the content is factual, not breaking copyright and has a license to use it?

Podland News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 65:51


Listen to James Cridland and Sam Sethi   GUEST: Sean Li - Clever.FM NEWS: Spotify expands Podcast Subscriptions globally and now includes 20 price points from $0.50 to $150 and a way for creators to download subscribers' contact info  —  Just a few months after launching support for podcast subscriptions to U.S. creators, Spotify today is making the service available to creators in global markets.There are now more than 1,000 channels in Apple Podcasts. Podnews has discovered 293 paid subscription channels so far.Audiobooks are coming to Spotify - the company is to acquire Findaway, an audiobook distributor. Findaway will “enable Spotify to quickly scale its audiobook catalog”. It's experimented with audiobooks before: adding classic books, and a bespoke category for spoken word. (There are already more than 3,900 audiobooks on Spotify).Medium is getting into audio, acquiring audio-based learning platform Knowable. Warren Shaeffer, co-founder of Knowable, will join Medium as the Vice President of Audio. (Evan Williams, Medium's CEO, was co-founder of Odeo, an early podcast company.) Oprah Winfrey was on Clubhouse, but only 23,000 people listened. Meanwhile apps or logins are no longer required to listen on Spotify Greenroom. And - genuine question - has anyone heard from Mark Cuban's Fireside Chat recently? The New York Times says that 'misleading covid-19 talk goes unchallenged' on podcasts (and on radio). The article criticises iHeart, Spotify and Apple.Sounder has launched an “Audio Data Cloud”, which aims to analyse audio for advertisers to learn more about content of podcasts: including topic analysis, brand safety and automated summaries.

Millennial Momentum
263: How To Work The Job Market w/ Darin Alpert at RepVue

Millennial Momentum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 49:09


Darin Alpert is the VP Strategy at RepVue, which connects sales reps with data about what it's really like at sales orgs and jobs to apply to. Previously, he worked at Gong, G2 and TrustRadius and founded 2 companies (both sold), one with an investment from Mark Cuban. In this conversation, we discussed: What having a dad in sales meant to him Founding a company that Mark Cuban invested in What RepVue is doing in the hiring space What questions should reps be asking before they make their next career move? Much more... This podcast is brought to you by Postal.io, A Curated Experience Marketing Platform that Helps You Cut Through the Noise. If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to grow this show and find the best guests possible for you. Follow The Podcast: Apple/Spotify: Millennial Sales Twitter: @TommyTahoe Instagram: @TommyTahoe YouTube: TommyTahoe Website: Millennialmomentum.net

The Solar Panel: A Phoenix Suns Podcast
Nov 17: On Sarver, Cuban, Luka, Ayton, Booker with Tim Cato (The Athletic)

The Solar Panel: A Phoenix Suns Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 39:27


Dave talks with Tim Cato (The Athletic) about the latest news and rumors surrounding the Phoenix Suns and Mavericks, who the Suns play twice this week. We discuss the differences in the Robert Sarver and Mark Cuban sexism scandals, whether Deandre Ayton should have gotten a max extension, if Devin Booker should be a shoe-in All-Star and All-NBA, and more! Find the show: Twitter @DaveKingNBA @ZonaHoops_ @SunsSolarPanel Youtube: The Solar Panel: A Phoenix Suns Channel -- with weekly live shows Blog: www.BrightSideoftheSun.com and www.ZonaHoops.com Proudly Presented by Draftkings.com USE promo code TBPN at this link https://tinyurl.com/DKNOVEMBER for a BONUS! The Basketball Podcast Network

Leadership and Loyalty™
2/2 How Success Can Murder Your Company: Stephan Aarstol

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 38:25


We hear talk of the "Amazon Effect" that seems to be wiping out retail in the form we knew it.  As a leader, even outside of retail, what might be the writing on the wall that requires you to adapt, even if it's in a counter intuitive manner? Could the answer be something as crazy as a shorter work day where everyone goes home at 1:PM? Could the answer be walking away from your largest income generator? Crazy? Maybe. Let's find out. Our guest is Stephan Aarstol. Mark Cuban singled Stephan out as one of his best investments in the history of Shark Tank. In fact, Jeff Bezos name dropped Stephan Aarstol in his 2016 annual letter to stockholders. The UK's Daily Mail called him "America's Best Boss,” while Hamburg, Germany's Morgenpost, hails him "the World's Best Boss." Stephan Aarstol is a seasoned Internet Entrepreneur on the cutting edge of the direct-to-consumer revolution. He's also the author of The 5 Hour Work Day: Live Differently, Unlock Productivity, and Find Happiness. Websites: https://www.towerpaddleboards.com https://towerbeachclub.com https://www.towerelectricbikes.com Social Media: https://www.facebook.com/TowerSUP https://twitter.com/Towerpb https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephanaarstol https://www.instagram.com/towerpaddleboard Part 2)  Income, Profit, and Growth - How Success Can Murder Your Company Reinventing and Diversification Discovering Your Business isn't really under your control In a Commoditized World, it's Got Nothing to do with Price The Democratization that created Bigger Monopolies Why Business is 1+ (the right) 1 to = 11 The New Rules of Innovation . . . . Curious about how to tap into what drives meaning in your life and create meaningful transformation in the lives you touch? I invite you to: DovBaron.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

GlobalTQM Podcast | China Sourcing + Manufacturing for E-Commerce And Retail
Learn all about China NNN agreements… Should you protect your product? | Ep.38

GlobalTQM Podcast | China Sourcing + Manufacturing for E-Commerce And Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 38:29


Learn all about China NNN agreements… Should you protect your product? | Ep.38 In this episode, we will address the usefulness of an NNN agreement and cover in detail the good, bad, ugly, and realistic. We will discuss whether you are being responsible for your expectations and intentions behind the NNN agreement, down to the difference between an NNN agreement and an NDA agreement. In this episode we cover: How existing relationships can go bad The importance of speed of action Using WeChat effectively to nurture relationships with your suppliers How to get your customers on your side when things go south!

THE ED MYLETT SHOW
Ferocity Of A Female Shark

THE ED MYLETT SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 51:17


I hope you're ready to swim with one of the most famous SHARKS in America. You probably know BARBARA CORCORAN best from hanging out on SHARK TANK with the likes of Mark Cuban, Kevin O'Leary, Daymond John, and others for the past 11 seasons.  This week, you're going to learn about what it takes to run with those powerhouses as an  EQUAL on television and in the real world. Barbara's journey is packed full of lessons you need to hear and that you can use in your own life. She came from very modest beginnings and was a poor student who battled dyslexia and failed at 20 jobs before she was 23. But after borrowing $1,000 from a boyfriend, Barbara eventually formed the Corcoran Group, and in time, turned it into a $5 BILLION REAL ESTATE BUSINESS. You'll love the story of how Barbara tapped into her ENTREPRENEURIAL SUPERPOWERS to become one of the WEALTHIEST and most INFLUENTIAL businesswomen in the world today. Her rags-to-riches story is beyond INSPIRING.  More than that, it's a BLUEPRINT you can learn from when you tap into a FREEDOM MINDSET, GRIT, AND DETERMINATION to create your best life, even in the most difficult circumstances. As you'll hear, it's no surprise that many women look to Barbara as a ROLE MODEL to overcome challenges they face in the business world.  She offers specific advice to women, but there are also UNIVERSAL LESSONS anyone can take from her experiences and wisdom. Barbara shares the MUST-HAVE TRAITS any entrepreneur should have (starting with COMPETITIVENESS and RESILIENCE), how she EVALUATES Shark Tank opportunities, and why SELF-AWARENESS is critical when you work for yourself. Barbara wraps up our interview with an interesting and SURPRISING insight into how WEALTH DOES AND DOES NOT CHANGE YOUR LIFE.   She is an endless bundle of ENERGY and mixes that with HUMILITY and a NO-NONSENSE approach in her work, making Barbara Corcoran one of the most uniquely ENDEARING people I've had on my show.  

Screaming in the Cloud
Cutting Cloud Costs at Cloudflare with Matthew Prince

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 48:08


About MatthewMatthew Prince is co-founder and CEO of Cloudflare. Cloudflare's mission is to help build a better Internet. Today the company runs one of the world's largest networks, which spans more than 200 cities in over 100 countries. Matthew is a World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, winner of the 2011 Tech Fellow Award, and serves on the Board of Advisors for the Center for Information Technology and Privacy Law. Matthew holds an MBA from Harvard Business School where he was a George F. Baker Scholar and awarded the Dubilier Prize for Entrepreneurship. He is a member of the Illinois Bar, and earned his J.D. from the University of Chicago and B.A. in English Literature and Computer Science from Trinity College. He's also the co-creator of Project Honey Pot, the largest community of webmasters tracking online fraud and abuse.Links: Cloudflare: https://www.cloudflare.com Blog post: https://blog.cloudflare.com/aws-egregious-egress/ Bandwidth Alliance: https://www.cloudflare.com/bandwidth-alliance/ Announcement of R2: https://blog.cloudflare.com/introducing-r2-object-storage/ Blog.cloudflare.com: https://blog.cloudflare.com Duckbillgroup.com: https://duckbillgroup.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Writing ad copy to fit into a 30 second slot is hard, but if anyone can do it the folks at Quali can. Just like their Torque infrastructure automation platform can deliver complex application environments anytime, anywhere, in just seconds instead of hours, days or weeks. Visit Qtorque.io today and learn how you can spin up application environments in about the same amount of time it took you to listen to this ad.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. Today, my guest is someone I feel a certain kinship with, if for no other reason than I spend the bulk of my time antagonizing AWS incredibly publicly. And my guest periodically descends into the gutter with me to do the same sort of things. The difference is that I'm a loudmouth with a Twitter account and Matthew Prince is the co-founder and CEO of Cloudflare, which is, of course, publicly traded. Matthew, thank you for deigning to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Matthew: Corey, it's my pleasure, and appreciate you having me on.Corey: So, I'm mostly being facetious here, but not entirely, in that you have very publicly and repeatedly called out some of the same things I love calling out, which is AWS's frankly egregious egress pricing. In fact, that was a title of a blog post that you folks put out, and it was so well done I'm ashamed I didn't come up with it myself years ago. But it's something that is resonating with a large number of people in very specific circumstances as far as what their company does. Talk to me a little bit about that. Cloudflare is a CDN company and increasingly looking like something beyond that. Where do you stand on this? What got you on this path?Matthew: I was actually searching through really old emails to find something the other day, and I found a message from all the way back in 2009, so actually even before Michelle and I had come up with a name for Cloudflare. We were really just trying to understand the pricing on public clouds and breaking it all down. How much does the compute cost? How much does storage cost? How much does bandwidth cost?And we kept running the numbers over and over and over again, and the storage and compute costs actually seemed relatively reasonable and you could understand it, but the economics behind the bandwidth just made no sense. It was clear that as bandwidth usage grew and you got scale that your costs eventually effectively went to zero. And I think it was that insight that led to us starting Cloudflare. And the self-service plans at Cloudflare have always been unlimited bandwidth, and from the beginning, we didn't charge for bandwidth. People told us at the time we were crazy to not do that, but I think that that realization, that over time and at scale, bandwidth costs do go to zero is really core to who Cloudflare is.Cloudflare launched a little over 11 years ago now, and as we've watched the various public clouds and AWS in particular just really over that same 11 years not only not follow the natural price of bandwidth down, but really hold their costs steady. At some point, we've got a lot of mutual customers and it's a complaint that we hear from our mutual customers all the time, and we decided that we should do something about it. And so that started four years ago, when we launched the Bandwidth Alliance, and worked with almost all the major public clouds with the exception of Amazon, to say that if someone is sending traffic from a public cloud network to Cloudflare's network, we're not going to charge them for the bandwidth. It's going across a piece of fiber optic cable that yeah, there's some cost to put it in place and maybe there's some maintenance costs associated with it, but there's not—Corey: And the equipment at the end costs money, but it's not cloud cost; it just cost on a per second, every hour of your lifetime basis. It's a capital expense that is amortized across a number of years et cetera, et cetera.Matthew: And it's a fixed cost. It's not a variable cost. You put that fiber optic cable and you use a port on a router on each side. There's cost associated with that, but it's relatively de minimis. And so we said, “If it's not costing us anything and it's not costing a cloud provider anything, why are we charging customers for that?”And I think it's an argument that resonated with almost every other provider that was out there. And so Google discounts traffic when it's sent to us, Microsoft discounts traffic when it's sent to us, and we just announced that Oracle has joined this discounting their traffic, which was already some of the most cost-effective bandwidth from any cloud provider.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oracle's fantastic. As you were announced, I believe today, the fact that they're joining the Bandwidth Alliance is both fascinating and also, on some level, “Okay. It doesn't matter as much because their retail starting cost is 10% of Amazon's.” You have to start pushing an awful lot of traffic relative to what you would do AWS before it starts to show up. It's great to see.Matthew: And the fact that they're taking that down to effectively zero if you're using us is even better, right? And I think it again just illustrates how Amazon's really alone in this at being so egregious in how they do that. And it's, when we've done the math to calculate what their markups are, it's almost 80 times what reasonable assumptions on what their wholesale costs are. And so we really do believe in fighting for our customers and being customer-centric, and this seems like a place where—again, Amazon provides an incredible service and so many things, but the data transfer costs are just completely outrageous. And I'm glad that you're calling them out on it, and I'm glad we're calling them out on it and I think increasingly they look isolated and very anti-customer.Corey: What's interesting to me is that ingress to AWS at all the large public tier-one cloud providers is free. Which has led, I think, to the assumption—real or not—that bandwidth doesn't actually cost anything, whereas going outbound, all I can assume is that one day, some Amazon VP was watching a rerun of Meet the Parents and they got to the line where Ben Stiller says, “Oh, you can milk anything with nipples,” and said, “Holy crap. Our customers all have nipples; we can milk them with egress charges.” And here we are. As much as I think the cloud empowers some amazing stuff, the egress charges are very much an Achilles heel to a point where it starts to look like people won't even consider public cloud for certain workloads based upon that.People talk about how Netflix is a great representation of the ideal AWS customers. Yeah, but they don't stream a single byte to customers from AWS. They have their own CDN called Open Connect that they put all around the internet, specifically for that use case because it would bankrupt them otherwise.Matthew: If you're a small customer, bandwidth does cost something because you have to pay someone to do the work of interconnecting with all of the various networks that are out there. If you start to be, though, a large customer—like a Cloudflare, like an AWS, like an Azure—that is sending serious traffic to the internet, then it starts to actually be in the interest of ISPs to directly interconnect with you, and the costs of your bandwidth over time will approach zero. And that's the just economic reality of how bandwidth pricing works. I think that the confusion, to some extent, comes from all of us having bought our own home internet connection. And I think that the fact that you get more bandwidth up in most internet connections, and you get down, people think that there's some physics, which is associated with that.And there are; that turns out just to be the legacy of the cable system that was really designed to send pictures down to your—Corey: It wasn't really a listening post. Yeah.Matthew: Right. And so they have dedicated less capacity for up and again, in-home network connections, that makes a ton of sense, but that's not how internet connections work globally. In fact, you pay—you get a symmetric connection. And so if they can demonstrate that it's free to take the traffic in, we can't figure out any reason that's not simply about customer lock-in; why you would charge to take data out, but you wouldn't charge to put it in. Because actually cost more from writing data to a disk, it costs more than reading it from a disk.And so by all reasonable accounts, if they were actually charging based on what their costs were, they would charge for ingress but they want to charge for egress. But the approach that we've taken is to say, “For standard bandwidth, we just aren't going to charge for it.” And we do charge for if you use our premium routing services, which is something called Argo, but even then it's relatively cheap compared with what is just standard kind of internet connectivity that's out there. And as we see more of the clouds like Microsoft and Google and Oracle show that this is a place where they can be much more customer-centric and customer-friendly, over time I'm hopeful that will put pressure on Amazon and they will eliminate their egress fees.Corey: People also tend to assume that when I talk about this, that I'm somehow complaining about the level of discounting or whatnot, and they yell at me and say, “Oh, well, you should know by now, Corey, that no one at significant scale pays retail pricing.” “Thanks, professor. I appreciate that, but four years ago, or so I sat down with a startup founder who was sketching out the idea for a live video streaming service and said, ‘There's something wrong with my math because if I built this on AWS—which he knew very well, incidentally—it looks like it would cost me at our scale of where we're hoping to hit $65,000 a minute.'” And I checked and yep, sure enough, his math was not wrong, so he obviously did not build his proof of concept on top of AWS. And the last time I checked, they had raised several 100 million dollars in a bunch of different funding rounds.That is a company now that will not be on AWS because it was never an option. I want to talk as well about your announcement of R2, which is just spectacular. It is—please correct me if I get any of this wrong—it's an object store that lives in your existing distributed-points-of-presence-slash-data-centers-slash-colo-slash-a-bunch-of-computers-in-fancy-warehouse-rooms-with-the-lights-are-always-on-And-it's-always-cold-and-noisy. And people can store data there—Matthew: [crosstalk 00:10:23] aisles it's cold; in the other aisles, it's hot. But yes.Corey: Exactly. But it turns out when you lurk around to the hot aisle, that's not where all the buttons are and the things you're able to plug into, so it's freeze or sweat, and there's never a good answer. But it's an object store that costs a fair bit less than retail pricing for Amazon S3, or most other object stores out there. Which, okay, great. That's always good to see competition in the storage space, but specifically, you're not charging any data transfer costs whatsoever for doing this. First, where did this come from?Matthew: So, we needed it ourselves. I think all of the great products at Cloudflare start with an internal need. If you look at why do we build our zero-trust solutions? It's because we said we needed a security solution that was fast and reliable and secure to protect our employees as they were going out and using the internet.Why did we build Cloudflare Workers? Because we needed a very flexible compute platform where we could build systems ourselves. And that's not unique to us. I mean, why did Amazon build AWS? They built it because they needed those tools in order to continue to grow and expand as quickly as possible.And in fact, I think if you look at the products that Google makes that are really great, it ends up being the ones that Google's employees use themselves. Gmail started as Caribou once upon a time, which was their internal email system. And so we needed an object store and the sometimes belligerent CEO of Cloudflare insisted that our team couldn't use any of the public cloud object stores. And so we had to build it.That was the start of it and we've been using it internally for products over time. It powers, for example, Cloudflare Images, it powers a lot of our streaming video services, and it works great. And at some point, we said, “Can we take this and make it available to everyone?” The question that you've asked on Twitter, and I think a lot of people reasonably ask us, “What's the catch?”Corey: Well, in my defense, I think it's fair. There was an example that I gave of, “Okay, I'm going to go ahead and keep—because it's new, I don't trust new object stores. Great. I'm going to do the same experiment twice, keep one the pure AWS story and the other, I'm just going to add Cloudflare R2 to the mix so that I have to transfer out of AWS once.” For a one gigabyte file that gets shared out for a petabyte's worth of bandwidth, on AWS it costs roughly $52,000 to do that. If I go with the R2 solution, it cost me 13 cents, all of which except for a penny-and-a-half are AWS charges. And that just feels—when you're looking at that big of a gap, it's easy to look at that and think, “Okay, someone is trying to swindle me somewhere. And when you can't spot the sucker, it's probably me. What's the catch?”Matthew: I guess it's not really a catch; it's an explanation. We have been able to drive our bandwidth costs down low enough that in that particular use case, we have to store the file, and that, again, that—there's a hard disk in there and we replicate it to make sure that it's available so it's not just one hard disk, but it's multiple hard disks in various places, but that amortized over time, isn't that big a cost. And then bandwidth is effectively zero. And so if we can do that, then that's great.Maybe a different way of framing the question is like, “Why would we do that?” And I think what we see is that there is an opportunity for customers to be able to use the best of various cloud providers and hook the different parts together. So, people talk about multi-cloud all the time, and for a while, the way that I think people thought about that was you take the exact same workload and you run it in Azure and AWS. That turns out not to be—I mean, maybe some people do that, but it's super rare and it's incredibly hard.Corey: It has been a recurring theme of most things I say where, by default, that is one of the dumbest things I can imagine.Matthew: Yeah, that isn't good. But what people do want to do is they want to say, “Listen, there's some really great services that Amazon provides; we want to use those. And there's some really great services that Azure provides, and we want to use those. And Google's got some great machine learning, and so does IBM. And I want to sort of mix and match the various pieces together.”And the challenge in doing that is the egress fees. If everyone just had a detente and said there's going to be no egress fees for us to be able to hook these various [pits 00:14:48] together, then you would be able to take advantage of a lot of the different technologies and we would actually get stronger applications. And so the vision of what we're trying to build is how can we be the fabric that can stitch the various cloud providers together so that you can do that. And when we looked at that, and we said, “Okay, what's the path to getting there?” The big place where there's the just meatiest cost on egress fees is object stores.And so if you could have a centralized object store, and you can say then from that object go use whatever the best service is at Amazon, go use whatever the best service is at Google, go use whatever the best service is at Azure, that then allows, I think, actually people to take advantage of the cloud in a way which is what people really should mean when they talk about multi-cloud. Which is, there should be competition on the various features themselves, and you should be able to pick and choose the best of all of the different bits. And I think we as consumers then benefit from that. And so when we're looking at how we can strategically enable that future, building an object store was a real key part of that, and that's part of what we're doing. Now, how do we make money off of that? Well, there's a little bit off the storage, and again, even [laugh]—Corey: Well, that is the Amazonian answer there. It's like, “Your margin is my opportunity,” is a famous Bezos quote, and I figure you're sitting there saying, “Ah, it would cost $52,000 to do that in Amazon. Ah, we can make a penny-and-a-half.” That's very Amazonian, you could probably get hired over there with that philosophy.Matthew: Yeah. And this is a commodity service, just [laugh] storing data. If you look across the history of what Cloudflare has done, in 2014, we made encryption free because it's absurd to pay for math, right? I mean, it's just crazy right?Corey: Or to pay for security as a value-add. No, that should be baked into whatever you're doing, in an ideal world.Matthew: Domain registration. Like, it's writing something down in a ledger. It's a commodity; of course it should go to whatever the absolute cost is. On the other hand, there are things that we do that aren't commodities where we are able to better protect people because we see so much traffic, and we've built the machine learning models, and we've done those things, and so we charge for those things. So commodities, we think over time, go to effectively, whatever their cost is, and then the value is in the actual intelligent services that are on top of it.But an object store is a commodity and so we should be trying to drive that pricing down. And in the case of bandwidth, it's effectively free for us. And so if we can be that fabric that connects the different class together, I think that makes sense is a strategy for us and that's why R2 made a ton of sense for us to build and to launch.Corey: There seems to be a lack of ability for lots of folks, at least on the internet to imagine a use case other than theirs. I cheated by being a consultant, I get to borrow other people's use cases at a high degree of turnover. But the question I saw raised was, “Well, how many workloads really do that much egress from static objects that don't change? Doesn't sound like there'd be a whole lot of them.” And it's, “Oh, my sweet summer child. Sure, your app doesn't do a lot of that, but let me introduce it to my friends who are hosting videos on their website, for example, or large images that get accessed a whole bunch of times; things that are written once and then read forever by the internet.”Matthew: And we sit in a position where because of the role that Cloudflare plays where we sit in front of a number of these different cloud providers, we could actually look at the use cases and the data, and then build products in order to solve that. And that's why we started with Workers; that's why we then built the KV store that was on top of that; we built object-store next. And so you can see as we're sort of marching through these things, it is very much being informed by the data that we actually see from real customers. And one of the things that I really like about R2 is in exactly the example that you gave where you can keep everything in S3; you can set R2 in front of it and put it in slurp mode, and effectively it just—as those objects get pulled out, it starts storing them there. And so the migration path is super easy; you don't have to actually change anything about your application and will cut your bills substantially.And so I think that's the right thing to enable a multi-cloud world where, again, it's not you're running the exact same workload in different places, but you get to take advantage of the really great tack that all of these companies are building and use that. And then the companies will compete on building that tech well. So, it's not just about how do I get the data in and then kind of underinvest in all of the different services that I provide. It's how can we make sure that on a service-by-service basis, you actually are having real competition over time. And again, I think that's the right thing for customers, and absolutely R2 might not be the right thing for every use case that's out there, but I think that it wi—enabling more competition is going to make the cloud better for everyone.Corey: Oh, yeah. It's always fun hearing it from Amazonians. It's, “You have a service that talks to satellites in orbit. You really think that's a general-purpose thing that every company out there has to deal with?” No. Well, not yet, anyway.It also just feels to me like their transfer approach is antithetical to almost every other aspect of how they have built their cloud. Amazonians have told me repeatedly—I believe them—that their network is effectively magic. The fact that you can get near line rate between any two points without melting various [unintelligible 00:20:14], which shows that there was significant thought, work, effort, planning, technology, et cetera, put into the network. And I don't dispute that. But if I'm trying to build a workload and put it inside of AWS, I can control how it performs tied to budget; I can have a lot of RAM for things that are memory intensive, or I can have a little RAM; I can have great CPU performance or terrible CPU performance.The challenge with data transfer is it is uniformly great. “I want to get that data over there super quickly.” Yeah, awesome. I'm fine paying a premium for that. But I have this pile of data right here. I want to get it over there, ideally by Tuesday. There's no good way to do that, even with their Snowball—or Snow Family devices—when you fill them with data and send them into AWS, yeah, that's great. Then you just pay for the use of the device.Use them to send data out of AWS, they tack on an additional per-gigabyte fee for getting the data out. You're training as a lawyer, you went to the same law school that my wife did, the University of Chicago, which, oh, interesting stories down that path. But if we look at this, my argument is that the way to do an end-run around this is to sue Amazon for something, and then demand access to the data you have living in their environment during discovery. Make them give it to you for free, though, they'd probably find a way to charge it there, too. It's just a complete lack of vision and lack of awareness because it feels like they're milking a cash cow until it dies.Matthew: Yeah, they probably would charge for it and you'd also have to pay a lot of lawyers. So, I'm not sure that's the cost [crosstalk 00:21:44]—Corey: Its only works above certain volumes, I figure.Matthew: I do think that if your pricing strategy is designed to lock people in to prevent competition, then that does create other challenges. And there are certainly some University of Chicago law professors out there that have spent their careers arguing why antitrust laws don't make any sense, but I think that this is definitely one of those areas where you can see very clearly that customers are actually being harmed by the pricing strategy that's there. And the pricing strategy is not tied in any way to the underlying costs which are associated with that. And so I do think that, especially as you see other providers in the space—like Oracle—taking their bandwidth costs to effectively zero, that's the sort of thing that I think will have regulators start to scratch their heads. If tomorrow, AWS took egress costs to zero, and as a result, R2 was not as advantaged as it is today against them, you know, I think there are a lot of people who would say, “Oh, they showed Cloudflare.” I would do a happy dance because that's the best thing [thing they can do 00:22:52] for our customers.Corey: Our long-term goals, it sounds like, are relatively aligned. People think that I want to see AWS reign ascendant; people also say I want to see them burning and crashing into the sea, and neither one of those are true. What I want is, I want someone in a few years from now to be doing a startup and trying to figure out which cloud provider they should pick, and I want that to be a hard decision. Ideally, if you wind up reducing data transfer fees enough, it doesn't even have to be only one. There are stories that starts to turn into an actual realistic multi-cloud story that isn't, at its face, ridiculous. But right now, you have to pick a horse and ride it, for a variety of reasons. And I don't like that.Matthew: It's entirely egress-based. And again, I think that customers are better off if they are able to pick who is the best service at any time. And that is what encourages innovation. And over time, that's even what's good for the various cloud providers because it's what keeps them being valuable and keeps their customers thinking that they're building something which is magical and that they aren't trapped in the decision that they made, which is when we talk to a lot of the customers today, they feel that way. And it's I think part of why something like R2 and something like the Bandwidth Alliance has gotten so much attention because it really touches a nerve on what's frustrating customers today. And if tomorrow Amazon announced that they were eliminating egress fees and going head-to-head with R2, again, I think that's a wonderful outcome. And one that I think is unlikely, but I would celebrate it if it happened.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: My favorite is people who don't do research on this stuff. They wind up saying, “Oh, yeah. Cloudflare is saying that bandwidth is a fixed cost. Of course not. They must be losing their shirt on this.”You are a publicly-traded company. Your gross margins are 76% or 77%, depending upon whether we're talking about GAAP or non-GAAP. Point being, you are clearly not selling this at a loss and hoping to make it up in volume. That's what a VC-backed company does. Is something that is real and as accurate.I want to, on some level, I guess, low-key apologize because I keep viewing Cloudflare through a lens that is increasingly inaccurate, which is as a CDN. But you've had Cloudflare Workers for a while, effectively Functions as a Service that run at the edge, which has this magic aura around it, that do various things, which is fascinating to me. You're launching R2; it feels like you are in some ways aiming at becoming a cloud provider, but instead of taking the traditional approach of building it from the region's outward, you're building it from the outward in. Is that a fair characterization?Matthew: I think that's right. I think fundamentally what Cloudflare is, is a network. And I remember early on in the pandemic, we did a series of fireside chats with people we thought we could learn from. And so was everyone from Andre Iguodala, the basketball player, to Mark Cuban, the entrepreneur, to we had a [unintelligible 00:25:56] governor and all kinds of things. And we these were just internal on off the record.And I got to do one with Eric Schmidt, the former CEO of Google. And I said, “You know, Eric, one of the things that we struggle with is describing what is Cloudflare.” And without hesitation, he said, “Oh, that's easy. You're the network I plug into and don't have to worry about anything else.” And I think that's better than I could say it, myself, and I think that's what it is that we fundamentally are: we're the network that fits together.Now, it turns out that in the process of being that network and enabling that network, we are going to build things like R2, which start to be an object store and starts to sort of step into some of the cloud provider space. And Workers is really just a way of programming that network in order to do that, but it turns out that there are a bunch of workloads that if you move them into the network itself, make sense—not going to be every workload, but a lot of workloads that makes sense there. And again, I think that you can actually be very bullish on all of the big public cloud providers and bullish on Cloudflare at the same time because what we want to do is enable the ability for people to mix and match, and change, and be the fabric that connects all of those things together. And so over time, if Amazon says, “We're going to drop egress fees,” it may be that R2 isn't a product that exists—I don't think they're going to do that, so I think it's something that is going to be successful for us and get a lot of new users to us—but fundamentally, I think that where the traditional public clouds think of themselves as the place you put data and you process data, I think we think of ourselves as the place you move data. And that's somewhat different.That then translates into it as we're building out the different pieces, where it does feel like we're building from the outside in. And it may be that over time, that put versus move distinction becomes narrower and narrower as we build more and more services like R2, and durable objects, and KV, and we're working on a database, and all those things. And it could be that we converge in a similar place.Corey: One thing I really appreciate about your vision because it is so atypical these days, is that you aren't trying to build the multifunction printer of companies. You are not trying to be all things to all people in every scenario. Which is impossible to do, but companies are still trying their level best to do it. You are staking out the bounds of where you were willing to start and where you're willing to stop, in a variety of different ways. I would be—how do I put it?—surprised if you at some point in the next five years come out with, “And this is our own database that we have built out that directly competes with the following open-source project that we basically have implemented their API and gone down that particular path.” It does not sound like it is in your core wheelhouse at that point. You don't need—to my understanding—to write your own database engine in order to do what you do.Matthew: Maybe. I mean, we actually are kind of working on a database because—Corey: Oh, no, here we go again.Matthew: [laugh]—and yeah—in a couple of different ways. So, the first way is, we want to make sure that if you're using Workers, you can connect to whatever database you want to use anywhere in the world. And that's something that's coming and we'll be there. At the same time, the challenge of distributed computing turns out not to be the computing, it turns out to be the data and figuring out how to—CAP theorem is real, right? Consistency, Availability, and Partition tolerance; you can pick any two out of the three, but you can't get all three.And so you there's always going to be some trade-off that's there. And so we don't see a lot of good examples. There's some really cool companies that are working on things in the space, but we don't see a lot of really good examples of who has built a database that can be run on a distributed workload system, like Cloudflare to it do well. And so our team internally needs that, and so we're trying to figure out how to build it for ourselves, and I would imagine that after we build it for ourselves—if it works the way we expect it will—that that will then be something that we open up.Our motivation and the way we think about products is we need to build the tools for our own team. Our team itself is customer zero, and then some of those things are very specific to us, but every once in a while, when there are functions that makes sense for others, then we'll build them as well. And that does maybe risk being the multifunction printer, but again, I think that because the customer for that starts with ourselves, that's how we think about it. And if there's someone else's making a great tool, we'll use that. But in this case, we don't see anyone that's built a multi-tenant, globally-distributed, ACID-compliant relational database.Corey: I can't let it pass on challenge. Sure they have, and you're running it yourself. DNS: the finest database in the world. You stuff whatever you want to text records, and now you have taken a finely crafted wrench and turned it into a barely acceptable hammer, which is what I love about doing that terrible approach. Yeah, relational is not going to quite work that way. But—Matthew: Yes. That's a fancy key-value store, right? So—and we've had that for a long time. As we're trying to build those things up, the good news is that, again, we've run data at scale for quite some time and proven that we can do it efficiently and reliably.Corey: There's a lot that can be said about building the things you need to deliver your product to customers. And maybe a database is a poor example here, but I don't see that your motivation in this space is to step into something completely outside your areas of expertise solely because there's money to be made over there. Well, yeah, fortune passes everywhere. The question is, which are you best positioned to wind up delivering an actual transformative solution to that space, and what parts of it are just rent-seeking where it's okay, we're going to go and wherever the money is, we're chasing that down.Matthew: Yeah, we're still a for-profit business, and we've been able to grow revenue well, but I think it is that what motivates us and what drives us comes back to our mission, which is how do you help build a better internet? And you can look at every single thing that we've done, and we try to be very long-term-oriented. So, for instance, when we in 2014 made encryption free, the number one reason at the time, when people upgraded for the free version of our service, the paid version of our service is they got encryption for that. And so it was super scary to say, “Hey, we're going to take the biggest feature and give it away for free,” but it was clearly the direction of history and we wanted to be on the right side of history. And we considered it a bug that the internet wasn't built in an encrypted way from the beginning.So, of course, that was going to head that direction. And so I think that we and then subsequently Let's Encrypt, and a bunch of others have said, it's absurd that you're charging for math. And again, I think that's a good example of how we think about products. And we want to continue to disrupt ourselves and take the things that once upon a time were reserved for our customers that spend $10 million-plus with us, and we want to keep pushing those things down because, over time, the real opportunity is if you do right by customers, there will be plenty of ways that you can earn some of their budget. And again, we think that is the long-term winning strategy.Corey: I would agree with this. You're not out there making sneakers and selling them because you see people spend a lot of money on that; you're delivering value for customers. I say this as one of your paying customers. I have zero problem paying you every month like clockwork, and it is the least cloud-like experience because I know exactly what the bill is going to be in advance, which is apparently not how things should be done in this industry, yadda, yadda, yadda. It is a refreshingly delightful experience every time.The few times I've had challenges with the service, it has almost always been a—I'll call it a documentation gap, where the way it was explained in the formal documentation was not how I conceptualize things, which, again, explaining what these complex things are to folks who are not steeped in certain areas of them is always going to be a challenge. But I cannot think back to a single customer service failure I've had with you folks. I can't look back at any point where you have failed me as a customer, which is a strange thing to say, given how incredibly efficient I am at stumbling over weird bugs.Matthew: Terrific to have you as a customer. We are hardly perfect and we make mistakes, but one of the things I think that we try to do and one of the core values of Cloudflare is transparency. If I think about, like, the original sins of tech, a lot of it is this bizarre secrecy which pervades the entire industry. When we make mistakes, we talk about them, and we explain them. When there's an error, we don't throw up a white page; we put up a page that has our logo on it because we want to own it.And that sometimes gets blowback because you're in front of it, but again, I think it's the right thing to do for customers. And it's and I think it's incredibly important. One of the things that's interesting is you mentioned that you know what your bill is going to be. If you go back and look at the history of hosting on the internet, in the early days of internet hosting, it looks a lot like AWS.Corey: Oh, 95th percentile transit billing; go for one five minutes segment over and boom, your bill explodes. Oh, I remember those days. Unkindly.Matthew: And it was super complicated. And then what happened is the hosting world switched from this incredibly complicated billing to much more simplified, predictable, unlimited bandwidth with maybe some asterisks, but largely that was in place. And then it's strange that Amazon came along and then has brought us back to the more complicated world that's out there. I would have predicted that that's a sine wave—Corey: It has to be. I mean—Matthew: —and it's going to go back and forth over time. But I would have predicted that we would be more in the direction of coming back toward simplify, everything included. And again, I think that's how we've priced our things from the beginning. I'm surprised that it has held on as long as it has, but I do think that there's going to be an opportunity for—and I don't think Amazon will be the leader here, but I think there will be an opportunity for one of the big clouds.And again, I think Oracle is probably doing this the best of any of them right now—to say, “How can we go away from that complexity? How can we make bills predictable? How can we not nickel and dime everything, but allow you to actually forecast and budget?” And it just seems like that's the natural arc of history, and we will head back toward that. And, again, I think we've done our part to push that along. And I'm excited that other cloud providers seem to be thinking about that now as well.Corey: Oh, yeah. What I do with fixing AWS bills is the same thing folks were doing in the 70s and 80s with long-distance bills for companies. We're definitely hitting that sine wave. I know that if I were at AWS in a leadership role, I would be actively embarrassed that the company that is delivering a better customer experience around financial things is Oracle of all companies, given their history of audits and surprising people and the rest. It is ridiculous to me.One last topic that I want to cover with you before we call it an episode is, back in college, you had a thesis that you have done an excellent job of effectively eliminating from the internet. And the theme of this, to my understanding, was that the internet is a fad. And I am so aligned with that because I'm someone who has said for years that emerging technologies are fads. I've said it about cloud, about virtualization, about containers. And I just skipped Kubernetes. And now I'm all-in on serverless, which means, of course it's going to fail because I'm always wrong on these things. But tell me about that.Matthew: When I was seven years old in 1980, my grandmother gave me an Apple ][+ computer for Christmas. And I took to it like a just absolute duck to water and did things that made me very popular in junior high school, like going to computer camp. And my mom used to sign up for continuing education classes at the local university in computer science, and basically sneak me in, and I'd do all the homework and all that. And I remember when I got to college, there was a small group of students that would come around and help other students set their computer up, and I had it all set up and was involved. And so, got pretty deeply involved in the computer science program at college.And then I remember there was a group of three other students—so they were four of us—and they wanted to start an online digital magazine. And at the time, this was pre-web, or right in the early days of the web; it was sort of nineteen… ninety-three. And we built it originally on old Apple technology called HyperCard. And we used to email out the old HyperCard stacks. And the HyperCard stacks kept getting bigger and bigger and bigger, and we'd send them out to the school so [laugh] that we—so we kept crashing the mail servers.But the college loved this, so they kept buying bigger and bigger mail servers. But they were—at some point, they said, “This won't scale. You got to switch technologies.” And they introduced us to two different groups. One was a printer company based out in San Francisco that had this technology called PDF. And I was a really big fan of PDF. I thought PDF was the future, it was definitely going to be how everything got published.And then the other was this group of dorky graduate students at the University of Illinois that had this thing called a browser, which was super flaky, and crashed all the time, and didn't work. And so of the four of us, I was the one who voted for PDF and the other three were like, “Actually, I think this HTML thing is going to be a hit.” And we built this. We won an award from Wired—which was only a print magazine at the time—that called us the first online-only weekly publication. And it was such a struggle to get anyone to write for it because browsers sucked and, you know, trying to get students on campus, but no one on campus cared.We would get these emails from the other side of the world, where I remember really clearly is this—in broken English—email from Japan saying, “I love the magazine. Please keep writing more for the magazine.” And I remember thinking at the time, “Why do I care if someone in Japan is reading this if the girl down the hall who I have a crush on isn't?” Which is obviously what motivates dorky college students like myself. And at that same time, you saw all of this internet explosion.I remember the moment when Netscape went public and just blew through all the expectations. And it was right around the time I was getting ready to graduate for college, and I was kind of just burned out on the entire thing. And I thought, “If I can't even get anyone to write for this dopey magazine and yet we're winning awards, like, this stuff has to all just be complete garbage.” And so wrote a thesis on—ehh, it was not a very good [laugh] thesis. It's—but one of the things I said was that largely the internet was a fad, and that if it wasn't, that it had some real risks because if you enabled everyone to connect with whatever their weird interests and hobbies were, that you would very quickly fall to the lowest common denominator. And predicted some things that haven't come true. I thought for sure that you would have both a liberal and conservative search engine. And it's a miracle to this day, I think that doesn't exist.Corey: Now, that you said it, of course, it's going to.Matthew: Well, I don't know I've… [sigh] we'll see. But it is pretty amazing that Google has been able to, again, thread that line and stay largely apolitical. I'm surprised there aren't more national search engines; the fact that it only Russia and China have national search engines and France and Germany don't is just strange to me. It seems like if you're controlling the source of truth and how people find it, that seems like something that governments would try and take over. There are some things that in retrospect, look pretty wise, but there were a lot more things that looked really, really stupid. And so I think at some level, I had to build Cloudflare to atone for that stupidity all those years ago.Corey: There's something to be said for looking back and saying, “Yeah, I had an opinion, and with the light of new information, I am changing my opinion.” For some reason, in some circles, it feels like that gets interpreted as a sign of weakness, but I couldn't disagree more, it's, “Well, I had an opinion based upon what I saw at the time. Turns out, I was wrong, and here we are.” I really wish more people were capable of doing that.Matthew: It's one of the things we test for in hiring. And I think the characteristic that describes people who can do that well is really empathy. The understanding that the experiences that you have lead you to have a unique set of insights, but they also create a unique set of blind spots. And it's rare that you find people that are able to do that. And whenever you do—whenever we do we hire them.Corey: To that end, as far as hiring and similar topics go, if people want to learn more about how you view things, and how you see the world, and what you're releasing—maybe even potentially work with you—where can they find you?Matthew: [laugh]. So, the joke, sometimes, internal at Cloudflare is that Cloudflare is a blogging company that runs this global network just to have something to write about. So, I think we're unlike most corporate blogs, which are—if our corporate blog were typical, we'd have articles on, like, “Here are the top six reasons you need a fast website,” which would just be, you know, shoot me. But instead, I think we write about the things that are going on online and our unique view into them. And we have a core value of transparency, so we talk about that. So, if you're interested in Cloudflare, I'd encourage you to—especially if you're of the sort of geekier variety—to check out blog.cloudflare.com, and I think that's a good place to learn about us. And I still write for that occasionally.Corey: You're one of the only non-AWS corporate blogs that I pay attention to, for that exact reason. It is not, “Oh, yay. More content marketing by folks who just feel the need to hit a quota as opposed to talking about something valuable and interesting.” So, it's appreciated.Matthew: The secret to it was we realized at some point that the purpose of the blog wasn't to attract customers, it was to attract potential employees. And it turns out, if you sort of change that focus, then you talk to people like their peers, and it turns out then that the content that you create is much more authentic. And that turns out to be a great way to attract customers as well.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Matthew: Thanks for all you're doing. And we're very aligned, and keep fighting the good fight. And someday, again, we'll eliminate cloud egress fees, and we can share a beer when we do.Corey: I will absolutely be there for it. Matthew, Prince, CEO, and co-founder of Cloudflare. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a rambling comment explaining that while data packets into a cloud provider are cheap and crappy, the ones being sent to the internet are beautiful, bespoke, unicorn snowflakes, so of course they cost money.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The $100 MBA Show
MBA1918 Must Read: How to Win at the Sport of Business by Mark Cuban

The $100 MBA Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 16:03


Why do some entrepreneurs win, while others…just don't? If you ask reality TV star and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, the short answer is hustle — even though so many other factors are outside your control. Today, we review Cuban's book, How to Win at the Sport of Business. Packed with actionable, down-to-Earth advice, this […] The post MBA1918 Must Read: How to Win at the Sport of Business by Mark Cuban appeared first on The $100 MBA.

Leadership and Loyalty™
1/2 The Five Hour Workday: Stephan Aarstol

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 32:55


We hear talk of the "Amazon Effect" that seems to be wiping out retail in the form we knew it.  As a leader, even outside of retail, what might be the writing on the wall that requires you to adapt, even if it's in a counter intuitive manner? Could the answer be something as crazy as a shorter work day where everyone goes home at 1:PM? Could the answer be walking away from your largest income generator? Crazy? Maybe. Let's find out. Our guest is Stephan Aarstol. Mark Cuban singled Stephan out as one of his best investments in the history of Shark Tank. In fact, Jeff Bezos name dropped Stephan Aarstol in his 2016 annual letter to stockholders. The UK's Daily Mail called him "America's Best Boss,” while Hamburg, Germany's Morgenpost, hails him "the World's Best Boss." Stephan Aarstol is a seasoned Internet Entrepreneur on the cutting edge of the direct-to-consumer revolution. He's also the author of The 5 Hour Work Day: Live Differently, Unlock Productivity, and Find Happiness. Websites: https://www.towerpaddleboards.com https://towerbeachclub.com https://www.towerelectricbikes.com Social Media: https://www.facebook.com/TowerSUP https://twitter.com/Towerpb https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephanaarstol https://www.instagram.com/towerpaddleboard Part 1) Admitting You Are Wrong in Order to Win!  5 Hour Work Day, Give Employees Their Life Back Is it Socialism or German Efficiency?  Options for the Great Resignation The Innovative Power of Constraints The Love-Hate Relationship with Amazon Going from $2K to Walking away from $4Million Being Ahead of the Curve is Sometimes About Doing What's Counter-Intuitive . . . . Curious about how to tap into what drives meaning in your life and create meaningful transformation in the lives you touch? I invite you to: DovBaron.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dallas Morning News
11/12/21: Dallas police focus on next phase of crime plan...and more news

The Dallas Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 4:28


Dallas police focus on next phase of crime plan; Dallas approves deal for construction of I-35E Oak Cliff deck park; State suspends license of former Dallas Fire-Rescue paramedic seen kicking homeless man; Mark Cuban pours millions into practice facility upgrades

Uhh, Basketball?
71. Billionaires Behaving Badly

Uhh, Basketball?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 64:18


On today's episode Katie and Sean talk about the (70!!) allegations levelled against Phoenix Suns owner, Robert Sarver, and where this fits into the grander, more depressing scheme of instances like this in the NBA over time — Donald Sterling, Mark Cuban, Neil Olshey, a real parade of dudes with too much power and little to no accountability. They also talk about the trickle down effect this behaviour has on the league at large, in criminal allegations against players and coaches and their consequences. Sean then tries to invent a new unit of measurement — The Jokic— in TSWTOTW. We have joined Patreon folks! Come join the family and receive ad free episodes, discord access, a special shoutout and even more goodness: https://www.patreon.com/uhhbasketball Follow @UhhBasketball on Twitter! Also while you are it make sure you follow our hosts @woodleysean & @wtevs. If you enjoyed today's show, please rate Uhh, Basketball 5-Stars on Apple Podcasts. See you next week for an all new episode!

Pray
This week on PRAY: Eli Crane

Pray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 2:13


Eli Crane is a man of faith, a husband, a father, a veteran and an entrepreneur. Eli joined the Navy the week after 9/11. He Spent 8 years as a Navy SEAL. After 5 deployments in the Navy, three to Iraq, he decided to turn the page. You might have seen him and his wife Jen on ABCs hit show Shark Tank where they successfully landed a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary. Eli is also a brand ambassador for Sig Sauer firearms and was a member of the ACVBA (advisory committee veteran business affairs) in Washington, DC. He loves raising awareness about Veteran issues and regularly engages in conservative thought leadership through social media. Eli, his wife of 15 years, and their two daughters reside in Tucson, Arizona where together they run Bottle Breacher and raise their family. Most recently Eli has decided to run for US Congress in his home state, Arizona District 1. Eli is an America First candidate and has the courage and leadership skills necessary to keep America free and prosperous.

Pray
Eli Crane - Leadership - “A Motivating Environment”

Pray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 16:15


Eli Crane is a man of faith, a husband, a father, a veteran and an entrepreneur. Eli joined the Navy the week after 9/11. He Spent 8 years as a Navy SEAL. After 5 deployments in the Navy, three to Iraq, he decided to turn the page. You might have seen him and his wife Jen on ABCs hit show Shark Tank where they successfully landed a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary. Eli is also a brand ambassador for Sig Sauer firearms and was a member of the ACVBA (advisory committee veteran business affairs) in Washington, DC. He loves raising awareness about Veteran issues and regularly engages in conservative thought leadership through social media. Eli, his wife of 15 years, and their two daughters reside in Tucson, Arizona where together they run Bottle Breacher and raise their family. Most recently Eli has decided to run for US Congress in his home state, Arizona District 1. Eli is an America First candidate and has the courage and leadership skills necessary to keep America free and prosperous.“Calm breeds calm, fear breeds fear, and motivation breeds motivation.”

Pray
Overview of Eli Crane's Life, Leadership, and Legacy

Pray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 17:35


Eli Crane is a man of faith, a husband, a father, a veteran and an entrepreneur. Eli joined the Navy the week after 9/11. He Spent 8 years as a Navy SEAL. After 5 deployments in the Navy, three to Iraq, he decided to turn the page. You might have seen him and his wife Jen on ABCs hit show Shark Tank where they successfully landed a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary. Eli is also a brand ambassador for Sig Sauer firearms and was a member of the ACVBA (advisory committee veteran business affairs) in Washington, DC. He loves raising awareness about Veteran issues and regularly engages in conservative thought leadership through social media. Eli, his wife of 15 years, and their two daughters reside in Tucson, Arizona where together they run Bottle Breacher and raise their family. Most recently Eli has decided to run for US Congress in his home state, Arizona District 1. Eli is an America First candidate and has the courage and leadership skills necessary to keep America free and prosperous.

Pray
Eli Crane - Life - “Springs of Life”

Pray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 20:28


Eli Crane is a man of faith, a husband, a father, a veteran and an entrepreneur. Eli joined the Navy the week after 9/11. He Spent 8 years as a Navy SEAL. After 5 deployments in the Navy, three to Iraq, he decided to turn the page. You might have seen him and his wife Jen on ABCs hit show Shark Tank where they successfully landed a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary. Eli is also a brand ambassador for Sig Sauer firearms and was a member of the ACVBA (advisory committee veteran business affairs) in Washington, DC. He loves raising awareness about Veteran issues and regularly engages in conservative thought leadership through social media. Eli, his wife of 15 years, and their two daughters reside in Tucson, Arizona where together they run Bottle Breacher and raise their family. Most recently Eli has decided to run for US Congress in his home state, Arizona District 1. Eli is an America First candidate and has the courage and leadership skills necessary to keep America free and prosperous.“I no longer saw my life as my own, but I saw my life as bought and paid for.”

Pray
Eli Crane - Legacy - “Sinners in Need”

Pray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 11:48


Eli Crane is a man of faith, a husband, a father, a veteran and an entrepreneur. Eli joined the Navy the week after 9/11. He Spent 8 years as a Navy SEAL. After 5 deployments in the Navy, three to Iraq, he decided to turn the page. You might have seen him and his wife Jen on ABCs hit show Shark Tank where they successfully landed a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary. Eli is also a brand ambassador for Sig Sauer firearms and was a member of the ACVBA (advisory committee veteran business affairs) in Washington, DC. He loves raising awareness about Veteran issues and regularly engages in conservative thought leadership through social media. Eli, his wife of 15 years, and their two daughters reside in Tucson, Arizona where together they run Bottle Breacher and raise their family. Most recently Eli has decided to run for US Congress in his home state, Arizona District 1. Eli is an America First candidate and has the courage and leadership skills necessary to keep America free and prosperous.“All of us have a God sized hole in our hearts, and we're trying to fill it with everything under the sun but God.”

Freedom Slay Podcast
94 - Grit 101 with Shark Tank Champ & Everything Legendary Founder Duane Myko

Freedom Slay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 35:17


Duane Myko has grit by the pound and in this episode, you'll get a dose of what it really takes to succeed. From being broke and living in his car, to striking a deal with Mark Cuban on Shark Tank and getting his burgers in stores across the country, this entrepreneur knows a thing (or five!) about perseverance and shares his wisdom with listeners.Everything Legendary has plant based burgers (and other meat substitutes) that are changing the game. Not only are they dubbed the best plant-based burgers, but the best burgers, periodt. You can follow them on Instagram at @go_legendary or visit their site at GoLegendary.com--Your Host:You can find Gaynete on Instagram @gaynete or visit her site at Gaynete.comGayneté's high capacity Best Periodt menstrual cup is perfect for those with heavy flows and comfortable enough for those with light flows too. It's creating a serious buzz, honey.  You can take a menstrual cup quiz to find your perfect size best period cup and then grab the best menstrual cup in the game.

Get Attitude Podcast with Glenn Bill
S2 #35 - Cliff Freeman

Get Attitude Podcast with Glenn Bill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 80:45


7:15 - Momentum: A Strategic Guide to Success for Real Estate Agents and Brokers by Brent Gove 9:21 - What's your definition of attitude and who was your first attitude coach? Paper business. Zig Ziegler fan. How to win friends and influence people. Toby Robbins taps. Jim Rome. Playing at a competitive level. Harness the power that lives between your ears and focusing your energy. Your attitude is how you manage how life comes at you. Changing your attitude can change your life.  13:11 - Tony Robbins, release the giant within. Mastering influence. Take care of the vessel. Finding your why. Urban Cowboy movie. 22:17 - Controlling your destiny.  29:48 - Neurolinguistic something or other. Getting the other person to understand.  32:18 - What are the most important strategies that you would employ if you're starting a new business? A round to it. Find your niche. Start the business. Glenn Sanford. Mark Cuban. Find people who care about you and can help you make good decisions. ROI on your time.  38:56 - Knowledge through the decades. What is the attitude lesson at birth or new life? Sales. How to influence people.  40:52 - What is the attitude lesson at the age of 10? Having wonderful teachers that told me I could be whatever I wanted to be. Consciously incompetent.  42:37 - What is the attitude lesson at the age of 20? Rice University. Getting out on your own for the first time. Sheltered life. Challenge the status quo. Discovering limitations.  48:08 - What is the attitude lesson at the age of 30? Unemployable. Unconditional love. Every man should have a daughter. It will change the way you look at life. A time of growth. Be the dad that you didn't have. Help them learn how to make right decisions and give them good core values. Grooming children to take the business over. Understanding the magnitude of what we're building. Divorce.  1:01:28 - What is the attitude lesson at the age of 40? Getting closer to the end than the beginning. Value the time in every day.  1:04:16 - What is the attitude lesson at the age of 50? Caregiver for ailing mom. Losing a second parent. Broken family. Being humbled. You can't serve at a high level unless you are humble.  1:08:24 - What is the attitude lesson at the age of 60? Being resourceful. Realizing we don't know it all. If you're not open minded and receptive, opportunities will pass you by.  1:15:29 - Show close with message of hope. Zig and the redhead.  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  SUBSCRIBE / RATE / REVIEW

Uncut with Jay Cutler
Mark Cuban talks about business hustle, buying the Mavericks with gutsy investments, coaching NIL kids entering the NBA and Shark Tank on Uncut with Jay Cutler

Uncut with Jay Cutler

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 50:37


Jay is joined by the owner of the Dallas Mavericks and star of "Shark Tank", Mark Cuban! Mark talks to Jay about getting his start very early in life, how he got started with his first business, and when his business ventures turned the corner to success. Mark and Jay also joke about Mark's huge sale of Broadcast.com, and how investing that in a hedge fund not only protected his money but allowed him to buy the Dallas Mavericks and live a party life! Plus Mark and Jay talk about NIL rights, and how different it is today to draft and coach young players who are already getting paid hundreds of thousands of dollars before they even get into the league. And Mark also jokes about MLB not letting him into their league because he'd promote more fun in baseball. And of course Mark and Jay talk about the good and bad investments Mark has made during his time on Shark Tank.

Eternal Leadership
Keys to Entrepreneurial Success as a Christian | Bill Woolsey 392

Eternal Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 41:22


Bill is the President and Founder of FiveTwo, a network that equips faith-based entrepreneurs to launch a variety of sustainable startups and nonprofits. In 2015, the network launched a “Mother Teresa meets a friendly Mark Cuban” training process that helps entrepreneurial leaders to launch and grow ministries, nonprofits, and businesses that make an eternal difference in financially sustainable ways. Over the past decade, Bill has led countless entrepreneurs grow their businesses and better communities across the country. Find more on their website!

The Kevin Jackson Show
Ep. 21-433 - CNN Host Debunked

The Kevin Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 38:40


In this episode, Don Lemons actions in Florida speak louder than any word he's ever uttered. Mark Cuban uses the Maverick's double down on woke WuFlu. New wage ordinance in California could crush the restaurant industry.

HBO's Succession Podcast
“The Bigger the Party, the Bigger the Fraud” (with Mark Cuban)

HBO's Succession Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 22:56


Host Kara Swisher is joined by entrepreneur and NBA governor Mark Cuban for a conversation corresponding to season 3, episode 4, “Lion in the Meadow.” They dissect the business acumen of Logan Roy and his efforts to keep control of his company in the face of shareholder hostility.  Cuban gets into what it means to be a high stakes investor in a family company that's trying to stay in control. With Logan's back against the wall and his health at risk, can he afford not to have a succession plan? Mark doesn't seem to think so. And as usual,  Kara gives her take on this week's installment of power rankings. The official Succession podcast is produced by HBO in conjunction with Pineapple Street Studios. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cash Flow Guys Podcast
3008 - Monkey See Monkey Do

Cash Flow Guys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 33:05


When I see a dangerous trend that impacts lots of people who listen to this podcast, I feel it's my duty to create an episode to explain what I am seeing in hopes that you will take pause and dig a little deeper before you jump off that cliff.  I've done my best to keep you up to speed on trends I discover that end up trapping good people into difficult situations. When I first got started, I followed the herd-like most of us do.  I flipped houses first, then later wholesaled for a while.  While I made some serious cash doing these things, I also wound up paying far too much of my earnings to the IRS in the form of tax.  I also overpaid mailing houses, sign companies, call centers, software salesmen, and asset protection lawyers that said I needed a bunch of LLS's, trust, and other nonsense. Recently I've been learning about investing in / trading cryptocurrency.  I've read books, watched YouTube videos, read forums and chat groups, and dabbled in it myself.   I still have lots to learn (tech analysis), discovery and rationalization of trends, and so forth. I have discovered that public opinion or group thinking is often the driver of cryptocurrency performance and not so much the technology. There are groups of people who spend their days and nights offering unsolicited advice on crypto without any sort of credentials being presented or discussed.  For all I know I could be talking to some teenager in his mom's basement. When Elon Musk, Mark Cuban, Robert Kiyosaki, Logan Paul (YouTuber), Gene Simmons, and Snoop Dog speak, what they say influences the financial markets of cryptocurrency. I gotta say, such a phenomenon does not make me comfortable with cryptocurrency in any way shape, or form.  In fact, it keeps me from investing any large amount of money in this space. I'm not saying crypto is bad, evil, shady or anything like that I'm just saying before you leap in, might want to swim around in the shallow end and get a feel for your risk tolerance before proceeding past your comfort zone of loss. When you invest in anything be sure to never invest more than you are willing to lose.  I decided my magic number was $5,000 for crypto.  Although the investment has grown quite a bit, I also realize that if Snoop Dogg can't find weed because of the supply chain issues then it's likely he may tweet out some nonsense to wipe out my profits. As I dig into learning more about the chart analysis of crypto, the more I see and come to understand how market cap and trading volume impacts the price of crypto, unlike stocks, those are generally the two metrics available to track.  Please note both of those are directly impacted by emotion and the public consensus on the very second a crypto buyer executes a trade. The bottom line is that we all need to do our best to avoid playing monkey see monkey do when it comes to investing.  Take a time out to learn about what you plan to invest in, how profits are derived, know the risks and only invest that which you are willing to lose until you get to a place where you feel comfortable taking bigger steps.

Business RadioX ® Network
Men and Eating Disorders with Brian Cuban

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021


Brian Cuban/Author and Addiction Recovery Advocate Brian Cuban, the younger brother of Dallas Mavericks owner and entrepreneur Mark Cuban, is a Dallas based attorney, author, and addiction recovery advocate. He is graduate of Penn State University and The University of Pittsburgh School of Law. Brian has been in long term recovery from alcohol, cocaine and […]

Big Shot Bob Pod with Robert Horry
Robert Horry's favorite moments with Shaq, Steve Kerr, Mark Cuban, Gary Payton, Vernon Maxwell, Jeanie Buss and more from the Big Shot Bob Pod

Big Shot Bob Pod with Robert Horry

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 46:01


We flash back to some of the best stories from our biggest guests on the Big Shot Bob pod! Including Shaquille O'Neal talking about coming to the Lakers out of shape after winning a title, Rob's man crush on kindred spirit Steve Kerr, and his relationship with Clippers head coach Tyronn Lue. Plus Mark Cuban on the difference between Adam Silver and David Stern, Gary Payton on his love of trash talk in the NBA, and Mario Elie reliving the Kiss of Death and the era of flexing on players! And brilliant moments from Clemson Tigers head coach Dabo Swinney (and his divided loyalty between Clemson and Alabama), amazing memories from Vernon Maxwell, and Lakers owner Jeanie Buss on the relationships with players and coaches that meant the most to her!

Fescoe in the Morning
11/04 - 6 am - The Truth Is Hard

Fescoe in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 58:12


Was it really necessary to lie? Plus, we head to Green Bay to check on the Packers with Sparky Fifer of 1250 The Fan, one coach goes scorched Earth, good to have him in KC, Bob's guy is done for the year, what a novel concept, and Mark Cuban gets it.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

You Learn You Turn
Brian Cuban shares his struggles and triumphs in order to reduce stigma and help others

You Learn You Turn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 33:48


Brian Cuban candidly shares his story of addiction in hopes of reducing the stigma that will, in turn, get more people comfortable in asking for help. He has written three books-one to be released this December. See his impressive Bio Below:Brian Cuban, the younger brother of Dallas Mavericks owner and entrepreneur Mark Cuban, is a Dallas based attorney, author and addiction recovery advocate. He is graduate of Penn State University and The University of Pittsburgh School of Law. Brian has been in long term recovery from alcohol, cocaine and bulimia since April of 2007.His first book, Shattered Image: My Triumph Over Body Dysmorphic Disorder,” chronicles his first-hand experiences living with, and recovering from, twenty-seven years of eating disorders, and Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD).Brian's most recent, best-selling book, The Addicted Lawyer, Tales of The Bar, Booze, Blow, & Redemption is an un-flinching look back at how addiction and other mental health issues destroyed his career as a once successful lawyer and how he and others in the profession redefined their lives in recovery and found redemption.Brian has spoken at colleges, universities, conferences, non-profit and legal events across the United States and in Canada. Brian has appeared on prestigious talks shows such as the Katie Couric Show as well as numerous media outlets around the country. He also writes extensively on these subjects. His columns have appeared and he has been quoted on these topics on CNN.com, Foxnews.com, The Huffington Post, Above The Law, The New York Times, and in online and print newspapers around the world

Hablando de Tecnología con Orlando Mergal | Podcast En Español | Discusión inteligente sobre computadoras, Internet, telé

La Internet de hoy se basa en dos cosas: tráfico y atención. Y lo curioso es que siempre fue así. Lo que pasa es que en el comienzo pocos nos percatamos. Allá para el 1989, cuando Tim Berners Lee la inventó, la Internet era muy distinta. El tráfico sobraba y la atención también. La novedad de un lugar donde podíamos comunicarnos con cualquiera, libre de costo y sin restricciones tomo al mundo por asalto. Los dominios estaban todos disponibles, las páginas recibían tráfico abundante y —como en todas las bonanzas— hubo pioneros que hicieron grandes fortunas. Si no me crees, pregúntale a Mark Cuban, el billonario dueño de los Dallas Mavericks e inversionista del programa semanal Shark Tank, de la cadena ABC de los Estados Unidos. Hoy en día la cosa es muy distinta. El periodo de la conquista ya pasó y ahora hay grandes organizaciones que se han insertado como intermediarios para beneficiarse tanto de los que proveen algo como de quienes lo consumen. No hay un renglón de la Internet en el que no se haya insertado un parásito. Estos intermediarios controlan los dos elementos más importantes en la Internet: el tráfico y la atención. Tráfico y atención son conceptos inseparables en la Internet. Si tienes tráfico pero no logras atraer la atención tus resultados van a ser pobres. Y si tienes atención pero no tienes tráfico tus resultados también van a ser pobres. Piénsalo por un momento. ¿Qué tienen en común organizaciones como Google, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Intagram, Pinterest, los agregadores de blogs y los agregadores de podcast? Todos se han insertado entre los usuarios y su posible audiencia. ¿Y cómo lo logran? Pues controlando el acceso al tráfico y a la atención. Hoy en día, casi sin excepción, se hace imposible alcanzar una audiencia sin pasar a través de un intermediario. Y eso no es nuevo, porque a eso es que nos han tenido acostumbrados por décadas la radio, la televisión, la prensa y las revistas. Y en los países más primitivos todavía se le rinde pleitesía a estos medios tradicionales, dado su control férreo del acceso a las masas. La única diferencia es esta. Cuando los Beatles tocaron en el Show de Ed Sullivan, el 9 de febrero de 1964, los vieron 73 millones de personas. Hoy en día hay canales de YouTube que tienen ese nivel de audiencia. No son muchos, pero los hay. Por un lado la Internet vino a democratizar el acceso del hombre común a una audiencia mundial y por el otro surgieron organizaciones como: Google, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest y otros que llegaron a insertarse como intermediarios y a servirle de parásitos a quienes producen verdaderamente el contenido. A pesar de esa realidad, todavía quedan bolsillos de oportunidad. Y lo bonito del caso es que son bolsillos en los que estos parásitos no entran porque tendrían que ponerse ellos a producir el contenido. Y eso no es lo que hace un parásito. Te sugiero que escuches esta entrada detenidamente y hasta el final. Ya sea que escribas, produzcas audio, produzcas video o sencillamente desees hacer negocios —de los que sean— en la Internet. Lo que vamos a discutir hoy son las maneras de escaparte de las garras de los parásitos y llegar libremente a tu audiencia. Enlaces: • Contenido Fresco y Relevante, El 1% Que No Ha Cambiado • El Silencio También Es Música OTROS EPISODIOS QUE TE PUEDEN INTERESAR: ¿Cuán Fugaz Es Tu Data? La Propiedad Intelectual y los Nuevos Medios Desnudos Ante El Mundo Seguridad Industrial, Salud Ocupacional y Tecnología La Tecnología Al Servicio De La Historia ©2021, Orlando Mergal, MA _________________ El autor es Experto En Comunicación Corporativa (Lic. R-500), Autor de más de media docena de Publicaciones de Autoayuda y Productor de Contenido Digital Inf. 787-306-1590 • 787-750-0000 Divulgación de Relación Material: Algunos de los enlaces en esta entrada son “enlaces de afiliados”. Eso significa que si le das click al enlace, y compras algo,

The Miami Heat Beat Podcast
Hangover Time: MHB Postgame Show: F*** Mark Cuban // Heat-Mavericks

The Miami Heat Beat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 59:53


Welcome welcome welcome to our new post game show! Hangover Time hosted by Alf and joined by Tiffany Meeks, Siobhan Beslow, Kenny Spence, Joey Houshour, Christopher Mattox and Brassjazz. • 5 games in a row! Hottest team in the league! • Miami has the best point differential in the NBA • Luka is fat • The Miami Heat account recognizes “The Mechanic” ...and more!!! Visit TICKPICK.COM/HEATBEAT today and use the promo code HEATBEAT to save $10 on your first order of NBA tickets!  Join our discord to be able to ask guests questions CLICK FOR THE DISCORD CHAT INVITE https://discord.gg/miaheatbeat STREAMS ON Twitch.Tv/MiamiHeatBeat BUY OUR NEW MERCH! http://shop.miamiheatbeat.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Dan Barreiro
Lou Nanne Back In Studio! - Bumper to Bumper 11/2 Hour Three

Dan Barreiro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 54:51


Dan is joined by Lou Nanne, back from Maui and in-studio, for another great hour of Wild talk, Gopher talk and much more. Dan and Louie also review the Top 5 sports stories of the day which include the Wolves loss to the Magic and an enterprising idea Mark Cuban has to get more people to watch the Mavs.

GlobalTQM Podcast | China Sourcing + Manufacturing for E-Commerce And Retail
Even with my experience, my supplier duped me... | Ep.37

GlobalTQM Podcast | China Sourcing + Manufacturing for E-Commerce And Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 17:00


Even with my experience, my supplier duped me... [Podcast ep.037] This episode is packed with useful advice on getting to the bottom of production delays, using WeChat effectively to communicate with suppliers, and is a real story from the ground in China. We deal with problems, how they get resolved, and key takeaways. In this episode we cover; How existing relationships can go bad The importance of speed of action Using WeChat effectively to nurture relationships with your suppliers How to get your customers on your side when things go south!

Behar On The Block
Jenny Goldfarb - CEO Unreal Deli

Behar On The Block

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 45:41


Jenny Goldfarb, aka Mrs. Goldfarb, is the founder of Unreal Deli. She grew up on the Standard American Diet (SAD), and in her early 30s, learned about the plight of animals on factory farms, which led her to adopt a plant-based diet. After much trial and error she became a whiz in the plant-based kitchen and realized the thing she missed most after becoming vegan was premium NY-style deli meat. She sought to recreate a corned beef made from beets, chickpeas, tomatoes and high protein wheat. The recipe became such a hit that it encouraged her to produce her Corn'd Beef Reubens for Delis, Whole Foods, even Shark Tank, where she took on Mark Cuban as primary investor. The company then developed Unreal Roasted Turk'y followed by Unreal Steak Slices. With no experience in the food sector, let alone launching a company, she gave birth to this rapidly expanding business in her tiny kitchen while pregnant with her 3rd child. The Unreal Deli product line can now be found in thousands of restaurant and grocery locations nationwide with more to come.

The Ticket Top 10
Musers- Mark Cuban In Studio

The Ticket Top 10

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 17:10


10-25-2021 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Prof G Show with Scott Galloway
Cryptocurrencies, Smart Contracts, and the Streaming Industry — with Mark Cuban

The Prof G Show with Scott Galloway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 60:52


Mark Cuban, the serial entrepreneur and investor, joins Scott to discuss Bitcoin, Ethereum, use-cases for digital assets, and where SEC regulations might come in. Mark also shares why he's bullish on AI, offers his thoughts on stimulus spending, and explains why Robinhood may not be as bad as Scott thinks. Follow Mark on Twitter, @mcuban.  Scott opens with a prediction about the streaming wars.  Related Reading (No Mercy/No Malice): Stream On '22 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Earn Your Leisure
EYL #156: Shark Tank Winner Turned a Tennis Racket into a Comb

Earn Your Leisure

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 70:48


Last year we had the honor of having Mark Cuban as a guest. During his legendary episode, he referenced a company that he invested in on Shark Tank, called Twist It Up. Twist It Up is a hair grooming company that has a unique patent for a comb in the shape of a miniature tennis racket, which is designed to twist hair. He said the reason that he invested in the company was because of the passion of the founder and the upside potential of the product.  On episode 156, we had the opportunity of sitting down with the founder of Twist It Up, Noel Durity and his partner Ace. They walked us through the process of starting their company, getting a patent, the legal world of patents and trademarks, their experience on Shark Tank, business lessons learned from Mark Cuban and Daymond John, and more. #twistitup #sharktank #blackhair  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay and Buck Sound Off H2 - The Best From This Week - Oct 9 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 45:26


Clay and Buck Sound Off H2 - The Best From This Week - Oct 9 2021 New Zealand admits failure to achieve covid zero. Fauci dodges question on mounting number of breakthrough cases. Mark Cuban requires vaccine or negative test to attend Mavericks games. Leftist activists harass Kyrsten Sinema. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H1 – Oct 5 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 46:11


New Zealand admits failure to achieve covid zero. Fauci dodges question on mounting number of breakthrough cases. Mark Cuban requires vaccine or negative test to attend Mavericks games. Leftist activists harass Kyrsten Sinema. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com