Podcasts about University College London

Public research university in London, England

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Latest podcast episodes about University College London

In Our Time: History
The Great Stink

In Our Time: History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 50:12


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the stench from the River Thames in the hot summer of 1858 and how it appalled and terrified Londoners living and working beside it, including those in the new Houses of Parliament which were still under construction. There had been an outbreak of cholera a few years before in which tens of thousands had died, and a popular theory held that foul smells were linked to diseases. The source of the problem was that London's sewage, once carted off to fertilise fields had recently, thanks to the modern flushing systems, started to flow into the river and, thanks to the ebb and flow of the tides, was staying there and warming in the summer sun. The engineer Joseph Bazalgette was given the task to build huge new sewers to intercept the waste, a vast network, so changing the look of London and helping ensure there were no further cholera outbreaks from contaminated water. The image above is from Punch, July 10th 1858 and it has this caption: The 'Silent Highway'-Man. "Your Money or your Life!" With Rosemary Ashton Emeritus Quain Professor of English Language and Literature at University College London Stephen Halliday Author of ‘The Great Stink of London: Sir Joseph Bazalgette and the Cleansing of the Victorian Metropolis' And Paul Dobraszczyk Lecturer at the Bartlett School of Architecture at University College London

In Our Time
The Great Stink

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 50:12


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the stench from the River Thames in the hot summer of 1858 and how it appalled and terrified Londoners living and working beside it, including those in the new Houses of Parliament which were still under construction. There had been an outbreak of cholera a few years before in which tens of thousands had died, and a popular theory held that foul smells were linked to diseases. The source of the problem was that London's sewage, once carted off to fertilise fields had recently, thanks to the modern flushing systems, started to flow into the river and, thanks to the ebb and flow of the tides, was staying there and warming in the summer sun. The engineer Joseph Bazalgette was given the task to build huge new sewers to intercept the waste, a vast network, so changing the look of London and helping ensure there were no further cholera outbreaks from contaminated water. The image above is from Punch, July 10th 1858 and it has this caption: The 'Silent Highway'-Man. "Your Money or your Life!" With Rosemary Ashton Emeritus Quain Professor of English Language and Literature at University College London Stephen Halliday Author of ‘The Great Stink of London: Sir Joseph Bazalgette and the Cleansing of the Victorian Metropolis' And Paul Dobraszczyk Lecturer at the Bartlett School of Architecture at University College London

Faith Matters
150. How Are We Like the Ancient Christians? — A Conversation with Kristian Heal

Faith Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 53:38


For today's episode, we spoke with Kristian Heal.  BYU's Maxwell Institute has just released an amazing new volume of research called Ancient Christians, that offers remarkable insights into Christianity's earliest centuries. It's intended for Latter-day Saints, but based on the best scholarship available to give us a glimpse into what these ancient Christians believed,  how they worshiped, and the ways in which they saw and experienced the world.Kristian Heal was one of the editors of this volume, and wrote the chapter that we spoke with him about, called Preaching Christ. In his chapter, Kristian explores several fascinating topics that we got to ask him about, including the ritual of baptism, and what were referred to as “the deep mysteries of baptism,” what sabbath worship looked like early on, and how he deals with the concept of “apostasy” and “restoration,” including how we can view the evolution of Christianity without seeing it through an “us vs. them” paradigm.And for those of you just being introduced to Kristian and his work: he's a Research Fellow at the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. He received a BA in Jewish History and Hebrew from University College London, an MSt in Syriac studies from the University of Oxford, and a PhD in Theology from the University of Birmingham.As we study the New Testament this year, we actually hope to bring you more of the insights that the Maxwell Institute has shared through this book.

New Books in Sociology
Steffen Mau, "Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century" (Polity Press, 2022)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 42:36


It is commonly thought that, thanks to globalization, nation-state borders are becoming increasingly porous. In Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century (Polity, 2022) Steffen Mau shows that this view is misleading: borders are not getting more permeable in the era of globalization, but rather are being turned into powerful sorting machines. Today they fulfill their separation function better and more effectively than ever. While the cross-border movement of people has steadily increased in recent decades, a counter-development has taken place at the same time: in many places, new deterrent walls and militarized border crossings are being created. Borders have also become increasingly selective. Supported by digitalization, they have been upgraded to smart borders, and border control has expanded spatially on a massive scale, even becoming a global enterprise that is detached from territory.  Steffen Mau shows how the new sorting machines create mobility and immobility at the same time: for some travellers, borders open like department-store doors, but for others they remain closed more firmly than ever. While a small circle of privileged people are allowed to travel almost everywhere today, the vast majority of the world's population continues to be systematically excluded. Nowhere is the Janus face of globalization more evident than at the borders of the 21st century. Originally published in German in 2021, this new English edition was translated by Nicola Barfoot. Steffen Mau is Professor of Macrosociology at the Humboldt University of Berlin. His recent works include The Metric Society: On the Quantification of the Social (2019) and Inequality, Marketization and the Majority Class: Why Did the European Middle Classes Accept Neo-Liberalism? (2015). Catriona Gold is a PhD candidate in Geography at University College London. She is currently researching the US Passport Office's role in governing Cold War travel, and broadly interested in questions of security, surveillance and mobility. She can be reached by email, Mastodon or Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Political Science
Steffen Mau, "Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century" (Polity Press, 2022)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 42:36


It is commonly thought that, thanks to globalization, nation-state borders are becoming increasingly porous. In Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century (Polity, 2022) Steffen Mau shows that this view is misleading: borders are not getting more permeable in the era of globalization, but rather are being turned into powerful sorting machines. Today they fulfill their separation function better and more effectively than ever. While the cross-border movement of people has steadily increased in recent decades, a counter-development has taken place at the same time: in many places, new deterrent walls and militarized border crossings are being created. Borders have also become increasingly selective. Supported by digitalization, they have been upgraded to smart borders, and border control has expanded spatially on a massive scale, even becoming a global enterprise that is detached from territory.  Steffen Mau shows how the new sorting machines create mobility and immobility at the same time: for some travellers, borders open like department-store doors, but for others they remain closed more firmly than ever. While a small circle of privileged people are allowed to travel almost everywhere today, the vast majority of the world's population continues to be systematically excluded. Nowhere is the Janus face of globalization more evident than at the borders of the 21st century. Originally published in German in 2021, this new English edition was translated by Nicola Barfoot. Steffen Mau is Professor of Macrosociology at the Humboldt University of Berlin. His recent works include The Metric Society: On the Quantification of the Social (2019) and Inequality, Marketization and the Majority Class: Why Did the European Middle Classes Accept Neo-Liberalism? (2015). Catriona Gold is a PhD candidate in Geography at University College London. She is currently researching the US Passport Office's role in governing Cold War travel, and broadly interested in questions of security, surveillance and mobility. She can be reached by email, Mastodon or Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in National Security
Steffen Mau, "Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century" (Polity Press, 2022)

New Books in National Security

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 42:36


It is commonly thought that, thanks to globalization, nation-state borders are becoming increasingly porous. In Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century (Polity, 2022) Steffen Mau shows that this view is misleading: borders are not getting more permeable in the era of globalization, but rather are being turned into powerful sorting machines. Today they fulfill their separation function better and more effectively than ever. While the cross-border movement of people has steadily increased in recent decades, a counter-development has taken place at the same time: in many places, new deterrent walls and militarized border crossings are being created. Borders have also become increasingly selective. Supported by digitalization, they have been upgraded to smart borders, and border control has expanded spatially on a massive scale, even becoming a global enterprise that is detached from territory.  Steffen Mau shows how the new sorting machines create mobility and immobility at the same time: for some travellers, borders open like department-store doors, but for others they remain closed more firmly than ever. While a small circle of privileged people are allowed to travel almost everywhere today, the vast majority of the world's population continues to be systematically excluded. Nowhere is the Janus face of globalization more evident than at the borders of the 21st century. Originally published in German in 2021, this new English edition was translated by Nicola Barfoot. Steffen Mau is Professor of Macrosociology at the Humboldt University of Berlin. His recent works include The Metric Society: On the Quantification of the Social (2019) and Inequality, Marketization and the Majority Class: Why Did the European Middle Classes Accept Neo-Liberalism? (2015). Catriona Gold is a PhD candidate in Geography at University College London. She is currently researching the US Passport Office's role in governing Cold War travel, and broadly interested in questions of security, surveillance and mobility. She can be reached by email, Mastodon or Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/national-security

New Books in Critical Theory
Steffen Mau, "Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century" (Polity Press, 2022)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 42:36


It is commonly thought that, thanks to globalization, nation-state borders are becoming increasingly porous. In Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century (Polity, 2022) Steffen Mau shows that this view is misleading: borders are not getting more permeable in the era of globalization, but rather are being turned into powerful sorting machines. Today they fulfill their separation function better and more effectively than ever. While the cross-border movement of people has steadily increased in recent decades, a counter-development has taken place at the same time: in many places, new deterrent walls and militarized border crossings are being created. Borders have also become increasingly selective. Supported by digitalization, they have been upgraded to smart borders, and border control has expanded spatially on a massive scale, even becoming a global enterprise that is detached from territory.  Steffen Mau shows how the new sorting machines create mobility and immobility at the same time: for some travellers, borders open like department-store doors, but for others they remain closed more firmly than ever. While a small circle of privileged people are allowed to travel almost everywhere today, the vast majority of the world's population continues to be systematically excluded. Nowhere is the Janus face of globalization more evident than at the borders of the 21st century. Originally published in German in 2021, this new English edition was translated by Nicola Barfoot. Steffen Mau is Professor of Macrosociology at the Humboldt University of Berlin. His recent works include The Metric Society: On the Quantification of the Social (2019) and Inequality, Marketization and the Majority Class: Why Did the European Middle Classes Accept Neo-Liberalism? (2015). Catriona Gold is a PhD candidate in Geography at University College London. She is currently researching the US Passport Office's role in governing Cold War travel, and broadly interested in questions of security, surveillance and mobility. She can be reached by email, Mastodon or Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in World Affairs
Steffen Mau, "Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century" (Polity Press, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 42:36


It is commonly thought that, thanks to globalization, nation-state borders are becoming increasingly porous. In Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century (Polity, 2022) Steffen Mau shows that this view is misleading: borders are not getting more permeable in the era of globalization, but rather are being turned into powerful sorting machines. Today they fulfill their separation function better and more effectively than ever. While the cross-border movement of people has steadily increased in recent decades, a counter-development has taken place at the same time: in many places, new deterrent walls and militarized border crossings are being created. Borders have also become increasingly selective. Supported by digitalization, they have been upgraded to smart borders, and border control has expanded spatially on a massive scale, even becoming a global enterprise that is detached from territory.  Steffen Mau shows how the new sorting machines create mobility and immobility at the same time: for some travellers, borders open like department-store doors, but for others they remain closed more firmly than ever. While a small circle of privileged people are allowed to travel almost everywhere today, the vast majority of the world's population continues to be systematically excluded. Nowhere is the Janus face of globalization more evident than at the borders of the 21st century. Originally published in German in 2021, this new English edition was translated by Nicola Barfoot. Steffen Mau is Professor of Macrosociology at the Humboldt University of Berlin. His recent works include The Metric Society: On the Quantification of the Social (2019) and Inequality, Marketization and the Majority Class: Why Did the European Middle Classes Accept Neo-Liberalism? (2015). Catriona Gold is a PhD candidate in Geography at University College London. She is currently researching the US Passport Office's role in governing Cold War travel, and broadly interested in questions of security, surveillance and mobility. She can be reached by email, Mastodon or Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books Network
Steffen Mau, "Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century" (Polity Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 42:36


It is commonly thought that, thanks to globalization, nation-state borders are becoming increasingly porous. In Sorting Machines: The Reinvention of the Border in the 21st Century (Polity, 2022) Steffen Mau shows that this view is misleading: borders are not getting more permeable in the era of globalization, but rather are being turned into powerful sorting machines. Today they fulfill their separation function better and more effectively than ever. While the cross-border movement of people has steadily increased in recent decades, a counter-development has taken place at the same time: in many places, new deterrent walls and militarized border crossings are being created. Borders have also become increasingly selective. Supported by digitalization, they have been upgraded to smart borders, and border control has expanded spatially on a massive scale, even becoming a global enterprise that is detached from territory.  Steffen Mau shows how the new sorting machines create mobility and immobility at the same time: for some travellers, borders open like department-store doors, but for others they remain closed more firmly than ever. While a small circle of privileged people are allowed to travel almost everywhere today, the vast majority of the world's population continues to be systematically excluded. Nowhere is the Janus face of globalization more evident than at the borders of the 21st century. Originally published in German in 2021, this new English edition was translated by Nicola Barfoot. Steffen Mau is Professor of Macrosociology at the Humboldt University of Berlin. His recent works include The Metric Society: On the Quantification of the Social (2019) and Inequality, Marketization and the Majority Class: Why Did the European Middle Classes Accept Neo-Liberalism? (2015). Catriona Gold is a PhD candidate in Geography at University College London. She is currently researching the US Passport Office's role in governing Cold War travel, and broadly interested in questions of security, surveillance and mobility. She can be reached by email, Mastodon or Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Forum
Why do we have a seven-day week?

The Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 45:09


Why do we divide our lives into 7-day chunks? Unlike the day, month or year, there's no natural reason for this cycle, but nevertheless the week is now deeply ingrained in us and has proven very resistant to change. We explore the pagan, religious and early scientific roots of this man-made rhythm, the ideological battles fought over it, and the reason why the number seven came out on top. Our expert guests explain where the names of our days come from, why the weekend was born, and how the week has come to dominate our economic and social lives. There have, however, been several radical attempts to rip up the 7-day week – we hear about these alternatives and why they ultimately failed. Rajan Datar is joined by Eviatar Zerubavel, distinguished professor of sociology emeritus at Rutgers University, New Jersey, and author of ‘The Seven-Day Circle: The History and Meaning of the Week'; Ilaria Bultrighini, honorary research fellow in ancient history at University College London; and David Henkin, professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley, and author of ‘The Week: A History of the Unnatural Rhythms That Made Us Who We Are'. Producer: Simon Tulett (Picture: A signpost with the seven days of the week on the directional arrows against a bright blue cloudy sky. Credit: Getty Images)

Woman's Hour
Natasha Kaplinsky, Misogynist influencers, Professor Joanna Bourke, Dr Rebecca Gomperts

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 57:32


Natasha Kaplinsky has become the first female president of the British Board of Film Classification, which is responsible for setting age guidelines for films, videos and DVDs, as well as content on some streaming services. The journalist, presenter and former newsreader for the BBC, Sky and Channel 5 joins Anita for her first broadcast interview about the role since her appointment in November. She'll discuss what drew her to the job, which topics concern parents the most and how she'll judge today's cultural sensitivities around sex, violence and language. Andrew Tate appeared in court earlier this week and is continuing to be held on charges of rape and human trafficking in Romania – charges his lawyer claims have “no evidence.” One of the top ten most Googled individuals of 2022, a kickboxer turned life coach and former contestant of Big Brother, he gained popularity for his online videos which contained misogynistic content. But Andrew Tate is not the only person spreading those views on social media, there are a host of other men who have that space. So who are they preaching to and why are their messages so popular? Anita speaks to journalist Harriet Hall who interviewed Andrew Tate as part of an investigation into misogyny online for Cosmopolitan magazine and Dr Bettina Rottweiler from University College London who specialises in the relationship between misogyny and different types of violence. Professor Joanna Bourke has been looking into the history of breast cancer. How did the one-step radical mastectomy persist as the most common way to deal with the disease until relatively recently? How was breast cancer racialized, with many doctors in the US who believed that black women could not get it? And why are women encouraged to reconstruct their missing breast after surgery? Joanna is the Gresham Professor of Rhetoric, and is giving a lecture on the cultural history of breast cancer this evening, which will also be available to watch online. She joins Anita in studio. Dr Rebecca Gomperts has spent her career providing abortions in places where the procedure is restricted or illegal. Her first venture, Women on Waves, saw her using a converted fishing trawler to travel into international waters and perform the procedures on board. Then she started an online service shipping abortion pills to women, using her Austrian medical license to stay within the law. Most recently her attention has turned to the US in the wake of the overturning of Roe vs Wade. She joins Anita Rani to discuss how her work has changed.

OHBM Neurosalience
OHBM Neurosalience S3E9: The OHBM Podcast

OHBM Neurosalience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 70:06


The OHBM Communications Committee, otherwise called ComCom, was created in 2015 to address the growing need to enhance communication between the society members and leadership. It has rapidly grown, both in number of members and in its reach and impact, fostering a presence in social media, establishing a website and a blog, increasing connections to lay media, and recently, starting up and putting in the time to support the podcast OHBM Neurosalience. In general, communication is so absolutely fundamental in science and in any organization. The quality of how information is captured and disseminated directly determines the vibrancy of a field and community. ComCom has been doing a tremendous job. This conversation touches on all the aspects of what ComCom does and the impact of their efforts. In this episode, some of the challenges, the types of communication that ComCom fosters, its outreach to lay media, and how such committee receives feedback to guide and focus its efforts, were discussed. Guests*: Elizabeth DuPre, Ph.D. is a new post doc at Stanford University. She completed her PhD in Neuroscience at McGil University where she worked on improving inter-individual comparisons with functional alignment and naturalistic stimuli. She is the current chair of ComCom. Ilona Lipp, Ph.D. is a post doc in the Department of Neurophysics in the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences working on postmortem imaging and microstructure. She completed her Ph.D. at Cardiff University Brain Imaging Center (CUBRIC). She is the past chair of ComCom. Stephanie Forkel, Ph.D. is a group leader at the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Bahavior, in the Netherlands. Her team is studying anatomical variability and language recovery. She received her Ph.D. in NeuroImaging from the Department of NeuroImaging in Kings College London and carried out a post doc at University College London. Kevin Sitek, Ph.D. is a research scientist at the University of Pittsburgh. His research focus is subcortical systems as they relate to sound, communication, and language processing. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology, and carried out his post doc at Baylor College of Medicine. He is currently the Blog team lead. Nils Mulhert, Ph.D. is a Lecturer at the School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, UK. His research is focused on brain structure correlates of memory and impulsivity, and how these forms of cognition are affected in clinical disorders, such as epilepsy and multiple sclerosis. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Sheffield, and carried out two post docs at UCL and then Cardiff University. He is also a past chair of ComCom. This episode was produced by Alfie Wearn and Stephania Assimopoulos. Featured artwork "The Great Ape Within" by Zaki Alasmar. *Note: This episode was recorded a little while ago so some of the names and positions mentioned may be slightly out of date!

Going Viral: The Mother of all Pandemics
Covid Inequalities with Professor Sir Michael Marmot

Going Viral: The Mother of all Pandemics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 47:33


Professor Sir Michael Marmot has been researching health inequalities and their relationship to social injustice for more than 50 years. He has long been a vocal critic of how health inequalities undermine social cohesion and the ability of health systems to respond effectively to pandemics and other health emergencies. Despite being an outspoken critic of austerity and the policies of successive Coalition and Conservative British governments, he was named a Companion of Honour in the 2023 New Year Honour's List. Today Prof Sir Michael Marmot speaks to Mark about Covid-19 and health inequalities as well as his decades-long research into this field.  This interview is featured in our companion episode: ‘All In It Together: Were Unequal Outcomes Inevitable during Covid-19?' Presented by Mark Honigsbaum @honigsbaum With: Professor Sir Michael Marmot Professor of Epidemiology at University College London, Director of the UCL Institute of Health Equity, and Past President of the World Medical Association. https://www.instituteofhealthequity.org/  @MichaelMarmot @marmotihe Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald @Melissafitzg Co-producer: Kate Jopling  @katejopling Cover art by Patrick Blower. www.blowercartoons.com Follow us on Twitter: @GoingViral_pod     Follow us on Instagram: goingviral_thepodcast  This episode of Going Viral on trust in the pandemic, has been produced in collaboration with the UK Pandemic Ethics Accelerator. A partnership between the Universities of Oxford, Bristol and Edinburgh, University College London, and the Nuffield Council on Bioethics (the Principal Investigator was Professor Ilina Singh, University of Oxford). The Ethics Accelerator was funded by the UKRI Covid-19 research and innovation fund.  https://ukpandemicethics.org/   /  @PandemicEthics_ If you enjoy our podcast - please leave us a rating or review.  Thank you!

Arts & Ideas
Phillis Wheatley

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 44:13


In her short life, the 18th century African American woman, Phillis Wheatley was a slave, a prodigy, a poet and a celebrity. As a child, she was kidnapped from her home in West Africa and transported to Boston, where she was sold as a domestic slave to the Wheatleys, a prominent family of merchants. She was named Phillis, after the ship that brought her across the Atlantic. Unusually, the Wheatleys took an interest in her education and within a few years, she was producing exquisite poetry. Since no one in Boston would publish the work of an enslaved black woman, she was taken to London, and in 1773 her remarkable first book of poetry was published. She was praised and feted by the literati and became a celebrated poet. But her success was shortlived. After returning to Boston, she was freed, but died in poverty and obscurity at the age of 31. In this, the 250th anniversary of the publication of Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, the historian Christienna Fryar looks back on an extraordinary life and examines why, Phillis Wheatley is still largely unknown, on both sides of the Atlantic. She's joined by Xine Yao, lecturer in American Literature at University College London, who's also a BBC Radio 3 New Generation Thinker; the historian Montaz Marché, a PhD student researching the lives of black women in 18th century London; Brigitte Fielder, Associate Professor of Literature at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and Ade Solanke, a British-Nigerian writer, who wrote a play, Phillis in London, depicting Wheatley's time in London. Producer: Jonathan Hallewell There are more conversations like this on the Free Thinking programme website, which has a collection called Exploring Black History: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p08t2qbp There is more information on Adeola Solanke's play, Phillis in London, at https://www.sporastories.com/

The Courageously.u Podcast
134. Dr. Joanna Moncrieff: Debunking the Chemical Imbalance Theory

The Courageously.u Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 55:43


Today the fabulous Dr. Joanna Moncrieff is hanging out with us to help me create a conversation about all things psychiatric medications. If you're on meds or are considering getting on meds, this episode is a must-listen. Dr. Moncrieff is a psychiatrist, researcher, professor, and best-selling author. She is a professor of Critical and Social Psychiatry at University College London and works as a consultant psychiatrist in the NHS in London. Dr. Moncrieff researches the rational use and understanding of psychiatric drugs and the history, politics, and philosophy of psychiatry more generally. Her books include The Bitterest Pills, The Myth of the Chemical Cure, and A Straight Talking Introduction to Psychiatric Drugs. She is also co-founder of the Critical Psychiatry Network, which consists of a group of psychiatrists from around the world who are skeptical of the idea that mental disorders are simply brain diseases and of the dominance of the pharmaceutical industry. In today's episode, we talk about...  - What Dr. Moncrieff believes is the problem with drug treatment for mental health problems - How the chemical imbalance theory was turned into a marketing message - The downside to believing in the chemical imbalance theory - How antidepressants change your brain chemistry - The implications of using antidepressants longterm - How improvement after someone starts taking a psych med is due to a placebo effect - How antipsychotics help people who are acutely psychotic - How we should approach psychosis - What you need to know about stopping your mental health medications - Why stopping a benzodiazepine can leave you even more anxious than before you started the med ✨ If you found this episode helpful and you think someone else would find it valuable, spread a little bit of cyber love and share it on your Instagram stories. HANGOUT WITH ME ON INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/courageously.u/   TODAY'S SHOW NOTES: https://courageouslyu.com/dr-joanna-moncrieff/

Earth Wise
Assessing The Planet's Most Unique Birds | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 2:00


Birds come in a huge variety of shapes, sizes and plumages.  The physical attributes of birds are adaptations that have taken countless millennia to develop, and physical attributes are closely related to the roles birds play in their environment.    According to a new study led by researchers from the University College London in the U.K., […]

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. – Global Cancer Policy Leader Dr. Richard Sullivan (Part 1)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 25:18


Battling cancer takes place in many parts of the world and our next guest has led initiatives to do just that. In Part One of this Oncology, Etc. Podcast episode, Dr. Richard Sullivan, Professor of Cancer and Global Health at King's College London, shares with us his intriguing life trajectory, encompassing a childhood in various parts of the world, aspirations for a veterinary career that turned to basic science, medicine, health policy (4:27), and even a long-term stint with the British Army Intelligence (12:22). Dr. Sullivan, who served as Director of Cancer Research UK for nearly a decade also discusses traits he looks for in a cancer investigator (19:21), and how to be happy (21:16)! Guest Disclosures Dr. Richard Sullivan: Honoraria – Pfizer; Consulting or Advisory Role – Pfizer Dr. David Johnson: Consulting or Advisory Role – Merck, Pfizer, Aileron Therapeutics, Boston University Dr. Patrick Loehrer: Research Funding – Novartis, Lilly Foundation, Taiho Pharmaceutical If you liked this episode, please follow. To explore other episodes, as well as courses visit https://education.asco.org. Contact us at education@asco.org. TRANSCRIPT  Pat Loehrer: Hi, I'm Pat Loehrer. I'm director of the Center of Global Oncology and Health Equity at Indiana University Cancer Center.   Dave Johnson: And I'm Dave Johnson at UT Southwestern in Dallas, Texas.   Pat Loehrer: And this is Oncology, Etc. Dave, what book have you read this last month?   Dave Johnson: I have one I wanted to recommend to you. It's very interesting. It's by Steven Johnson, not of the syndrome fame. It's entitled Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer. You may have heard of this because PBS made a special documentary about this particular book. But in it, Johnson talks about the remarkable increase in human lifespan, especially over the 20th century, and the various factors that contributed to increased years of life from on average in the United States of about 48-49 in 1900 to just about 80 in the year 2000. So that beats anything in the history of mankind before.   And he has a chapter about each of the factors that contribute to this, and some of which I think we all recognize. Things like antibiotics playing a role, but some of the things that I hadn't thought about were improved drug regulation and the development of randomized controlled trials, which all of us have participated in. How important that is.   He also talked about, at least in the United States, the importance of automotive safety. And I'm sure some of us on this podcast are old enough to remember cars that did not have safety belts and certainly not other safety maneuvers that have really improved lifespan in that regard. So I found it a fascinating book. I think our listeners who are interested in medical history would also enjoy this text.   Pat Loehrer: Did he mention this podcast?   Dave Johnson: No, actually it wasn't mentioned, and I thought that was a tremendous oversight. So, I've sent him a letter and recommended that he add it.   Pat Loehrer: We may not live longer, but it just seems like we're living longer. When you listen to this podcast, time stands still.   Pat Loehrer: Well, it's my real great pleasure to introduce our interviewee today, Richard Sullivan. I met Richard several years ago through the late Professor Peter Boyle in Leon, and it's one of the greatest highlights of my life to be able to know Richard.   Professor Richard Sullivan's Research Group studies health systems and particularly chronic disease policy and the impact of conflict on health. He's a professor of cancer and Global Health at King's College in London and director of the Institute of Cancer Policy and Co-director of Conflict and Health Research Group. As well as holding a number of visiting chairs, Richard is an NCD advisor to the WHO, a civil military advisor to the Save the Children Foundation, and a member of the National Cancer Grid of India. His research focuses on global cancer policy and planning and health system strengthening, particularly in conflict ecosystems. He's principal investigative research programs ranging from automated radiotherapy planning for low resource settings to the use of augmented or virtual reality for cancer surgery through the political economy to build affordable equitable cancer control plans around the world.   Richard has led more Lancet Oncology commissions than anyone else. In fact, Lancet is talking about calling it the Sullivan Commissions. He's led five Lancet Oncology commissions and worked on four others. He's currently co-leading the Lancet Oncology Commission on the Future of Cancer Research in Europe and Cancer Care and Conflict in the conflict systems. His research teams have had major programs in capacity building in conflict regions across the Middle East and North Africa. He's done studies on the basic packages of health services in Afghanistan and worked in Pakistan, Syria, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. He's been a member of the British Army, intelligence and security, and in that capacity he's worked many years in biosecurity and counterterrorism issues. I think in some ways, this is the most interesting man in the world, and it's our pleasure today to have Richard join us. Richard, thank you for coming.   Richard Sullivan: Pat, Dave, you're really too kind. Marvelous to be with you. Thank you for the invitation.   Pat Loehrer: Can you tell us a little about your upbringing and early life before you became Dr. James Bond?   Richard Sullivan: I'm not sure that's anywhere close to the truth, sadly. But, yeah, I have had a very interesting, eclectic life. I was born in Aden just on the cusp of where the British Aden Protectorate met a country which actually no longer exists, the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. Because after the British left Aden, essentially the East Germans, and what was then the Soviet Union took over southern Yemen. So I was born in a very unusual part of the world, which sadly, since then has just deteriorated. I spent many years of my life with my parents, who were in the diplomatic service and doing other things, wandering around the globe, mainly in the Middle East and East Africa. We spent quite a lot of time, strangely enough, we washed up on the shores in the USA once as well. Dayton, Ohio, and eventually-   Pat Loehrer:  Not to interrupt you, Richard, there are no shores in Dayton, Ohio. So just correct you there.   Richard Sullivan: That is so true. My memory - cornfields everywhere. I had a wonderful dog then, that's how I remember it so well. And I didn't really come back to the UK until, oh, gosh, I was nearly 10-11 years old. So, coming back to the UK was actually a bit of a culture shock for me. And then relatively classical in terms of the UK, sort of minor public school and then into medical school. In the old days when it was in the 80's. I had a fabulous childhood, going all over the place, seeing lots of things, being exposed to lots of different cultures. I think it remained with me all my life. I never really feel a foreigner in a foreign land. That's nice. That's really unique and it's been marvelous being able to tie in the passion for global health with my upbringing as well. So, yeah, I had a wonderful childhood.   Dave Johnson: Would you mind expanding on your medical training, Richard? Tell us a little bit about that.   Richard Sullivan: Yeah, so when I, when I went to medical school in the UK, we were still running the old system. And by the old system, I mean, you know, these small medical schools with entries of, you know, 70, 80 individuals, particularly in London, you had that St. Mary's Hospital Medical School, which is where I went, Charing Cross, Guy's, St. Thomas', and they were all individual medical schools. Now, most of these now have merged together into these super medical schools. But certainly when I went to medical school, I'll be absolutely honest with you, I wanted to be a vet to begin with, but actually discovered I wasn't bright enough to be a vet. It was harder to become a vet than it was to become a doctor. In my day going into medicine, and people listening to this, or some people who understand the A level system in the UK will recognize if you're offered a BCD, that's quite low grades to get into medical school. So I went to Mary's, to be absolutely honest with you, because I heard that they took people that played rugby, and I came from a rugby-playing school. And sure enough, 90% of the interview was based on my rugby prowess, and that was St. Mary's Hospital Medical School. So it was wonderful.   And we'd already had people going there who were big rugby players. And again, it was, I remember thinking to myself, am I making the right decision here? But it was interesting, as soon as I went into medical school, I realized that was the life for me. I had done myself a favor by not going into veterinary science, which I would have been awful at. We had six years of very, very intensive pre-medicine, the classical medical rotations, and then that movement into the old schools of pre registration house officers, registrar jobs. We were quite an early stage. I kind of slightly went off-piste and started doing more academic work. Interestingly, most of my academic early days academic work was not in health policy and research. It was actually in very hard core cell signaling. So my doctorate was in biochemistry, and we worked on small GTPases, calcium-sensing proteins.   There were some really extraordinary heady days, and I'm talking here about the early nineties and the mid-nineties of tremendous discovery, real innovation. I was at UCL at the time, but mixing and matching that up with a sort of surgical training, and again, surgical training in those days was pretty classical. You went into your general surgery, then sort of specialized. It was really, really interesting but it was full on. I mean, you spent your entire life working. Morning to night so these were the days of 100 hours week rotations. You were doing one in twos, one in threes. That's every other night and every other weekend on call. It was incredibly intense, but there was a lot more diversity and plasticity in those days. You could dip in and out of medicine because of the way you were chosen and how you were recruited. So it suited my personality because I liked moving around and doing different things and that sort of took me through, really until the late 1990s.   Pat Loehrer: You became a urologist, right?   Richard Sullivan: That's right. Exactly. So I trained up until the late 1990s, it was all pretty standard, I would say. And then I decided I was bored and moved into the pharmaceutical industry and I went to work in for Merck Damstadt at the time, which was relatively small. I was going to say family owned, but it was quite family-owned pharmaceutical company that was just moving into oncology. And because I'd done the background in cell signaling and cell signaling was really the backbone of the new era of targeted therapies, this seemed like a great move. To be absolutely blunt with you, I didn't last very long, less than a couple of years, I think, mainly because I just found the whole environment way too constraining. But what it did provide me with was a springboard to meet the wonderful late Gordon McVie, who I met at a conference. And he said to me, ‘You're absolutely wasting your time and life by staying in the pharmaceutical industry. Why don't you come out, get an academic job at University College London and become my head of clinical programs?” - for what was then the Cancer Research Campaign. This Cancer Research Campaign and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund were the forerunners of Cancer Research UK. So, you know, this was an offer that was too good to be true.   So I jumped ship immediately, went back into academic life and joined CRC. And really the next ten years was this extraordinary blossoming of the merger of CRC with the Imperial College Research Fund, the creation of Cancer Research UK, and that was Paul Nurse, and obviously Gordon and me, bringing that all together. And it was the heady days of that resurgence of cancer, the importance of cancer care and research in the UK. And coupled with that, of course, it was the blossoming of my interest, really then into the global health aspects of cancer, which really, Gordon, people like you mentioned already, the late, wonderful Peter Boyle, all those individuals were already engaged in and they were the ones that really kind of catapulted me into a more international scene.   Dave Johnson: Did you know Dr. McVie before you met him at this conference, or was it just a chance encounter?   Richard Sullivan: No, he actually met me via John Mendelson, because John had picked up a paper I'd been writing on basically the very early versions of Rituximab that we were working on and we were looking for pharmacodynamic endpoints. And of course, one of the things I noticed with the patients is they were getting all these skin rashes on their faces, and I thought, that's terrific. Just seemed to be the skin rashes seemed to be together with those individuals that had better responses. And I remember writing this paper for Signal, which was a kind of relatively minor journal, and I think it was John Mendelson who picked it up and must have mentioned something to Gordon. Gordon hunted me out down at a particular conference, said, "How on earth do you know about this, that you're not anything more than a surgeon?" He was absolutely right about, goodness sake, what do you know about pharmacodynamic endpoints, and I kind of had to sort of confess that I've gone kind of slightly off-piste by doing biochemistry and cells signaling and working with these extraordinary people. And that's how I essentially met Gordon. He was very good for spotting slightly unusual, eclectic human beings.   Pat Loehrer: I'm very curious about the intersection of your work and how you got into the British Army and Intelligence with medicine and how that even may continue even today. So explain that story, that part of your life a little bit to us.   Richard Sullivan: Yeah, it was very early on, as I went into medical school, one of the key concerns was making money. I looked around for ways of doing something interesting to make money, and most of the jobs on offer were bar jobs, et cetera. Then I thought, what about the Territorial Army, which, in the early days of the 1980s, was, and still is, a very large component of the UK Armed Forces. So I actually joined the Royal Army Medical Corps, as you would expect for someone going into medicine. I thought, okay, I'll join the Royal Army Medical Corps, and I was a combat Medical Training Technician, et cetera. So I went along, signed up, and I think I was about three months into training when I was at a place called Kew Barracks and some chap came up to me and handed me a little bit of paper. It said "Intelligence Security Group" and gave a phone number. He said, "This is more your line of work. Why don't you give them a ring?"   It was interesting because, in those early days, they were looking for analysts who could work on lots of different areas. In those days, most of the work was domestic.. Of course, there was counterterrorism with Northern Ireland, but there was also the Soviet Union, and the fallout from the Warsaw Pact, so they were still actively recruiting into that area. There are lots of details I can't talk about, but it was relatively, to begin with, quite hard work and low level. It was a lot of learning foreign equipment recognition. It was what we consider to be standard combat intelligence. But the more time you spend in it, the more interesting it gets.   One of the areas they were looking to recruit into, which I didn't realize at the time but only later, was bioweapons and biosecurity. They needed people who understood biotechnology and the language of science, and who could be taught the language of infectious disease on top of that. That is quite a difficult combination to find. It's very easy to teach people trade craft and intelligence, it's very hard to teach them subject matter expertise. And they were really missing people who specialized in that area.   It was interesting because it was still a relatively open domain. There was still a lot of work going on in the counterterrorism front with biological weapons, and a lot around the Verification of the Biological Weapons and Toxin Convention. And it was an interesting, and I'd almost say parallel life. But your medical knowledge and the scientific knowledge I had already gained and was gaining was what was being looked for. So that was very early on and it has expanded over the years. More and more now we talk about health security and intelligence so that goes beyond what you would consider classic medical intelligence or Armed Forces - this is more about putting together the disciplines of intelligence with the securitized issues of, for example Ebola. That is a classic example. The big outbreaks in West Africa, the DRC, these are sort of the classic security intelligence issues - even COVID 19 for example - and mostly around the world, what we've seen is the intelligence apparatus taking front and center in that, whether you're looking at states like South Korea, et cetera. So I've moved more into that, and we do a lot of work and research into this as well. So we look at, particularly now, how to improve human intelligence in this area, the pros and cons of signal intelligence collection. And we go as far as to kind of ask sort of deep ethical and moral issues, for example, about how far should these sorts of apparatus of state be applied to public good issues like health. Because at the end of the day, when you're talking about the armed forces security sector, their primary job is for defense of the realm. So applying them in other areas obviously comes with a whole load of moral and ethical challenges. So, yes, it's been a fascinating journey, which, as I said, it extends all the way back to the late 1980s. It's been both complementary and different.   Dave Johnson: So, Richard, there's so many things in your resume that warrant exploration, but you served as Clinical Director of Cancer Research UK for nearly a decade. What was that experience like, and what accomplishment are you most proud of?   Richard Sullivan: It was an enormous privilege. In your life, you always look at some jobs and you think, “How lucky I was to be there at that time with those people.” I think, first of all, enormous respect for the people that ran both Cancer Research Campaign, Imperial Cancer Research Fund – I mean, Paul Nurse and Gordon McVeigh, Richard Treisman – I mean, some extraordinary people who were leading both of these charities. And so to be there at that moment when they both came together, but more importantly as well, they had this most amazing global network of literally the illuminati of cancer research, spanning from basic science all the way through to epidemiology, public health, health systems. And in those days, of course, those individuals would come on site visits to the UK to look at the different units and evaluate them. So you can imagine when you're bringing those sorts of individuals across, you get a chance to go out with them, go drinking, talk to them, learn about their research, and also learn about the extraordinary breadth of research that was there in the UK. So you're condensing almost a lifetime's worth of learning into a few years. It was an absolute privilege to have been able to serve the community like that.   What I'm most proud of? Gosh, I like to think I suspect that most proud of trying to help a lot of the fellows get through to where they were going to actually get the most out of their careers. When I look back, there are lots and lots of names of people who started at a very early stage with funding from Cancer Research Campaign or the Imperial College Research Fund, who are now very, very senior professors and global research leaders. And I like to think that we did a little bit to help them along that way and also help to support individual research programs actually reach their full potential. Because I think research management and planning is often overlooked. People think of this as very transactional – it's not transactional. It's an incredibly important, serious discipline. It requires very careful handling to get the very best out of your research ecosystem. You've really, really got to get under the skin and really have a clear view of how you're going to help people. So I think that's what I'm most proud of – is the individuals who made it all the way through and now these great leaders out there.   But it was also, let's be honest, it was halcyon days. Great innovations, great discoveries, new networks growing, incredible expansion of funding in the UK, in Europe, in the USA. They were very, very good days. And it was, as I said, it was a real privilege to be there almost at the center for nearly a decade.   Dave Johnson: Let me follow up on that, if I may, just for a moment. You have had such an incredible influence. What characteristics do you think are most desired in a cancer investigator? What sorts of things do you look for, especially when you're thinking about funding someone?   Richard Sullivan: Creativity. I think creativity is really important. We talk about the word innovation a lot, and it's an interesting engineering term, but creativity is that spark that you can see it in people, the way they talk about what they're doing. They have this really creative approach. And with that, I think you have to have the passion. Research careers are long and difficult, and I'd probably suggest there's probably more downs than there are ups, and you have to have that passion for it. And I think along with that passion is the belief in what you're doing – that first of all, you have that belief that actually drives you forward, that what you know you're doing is good work, and that you're really dedicated to it. But obviously, hand on heart, when you're looking at researchers, it's that passion and that creativity.   I think it's a brave person to judge how any person's career or program is going to go. I don't think any of us are prophets. Even in our own land. We might be able to see slightly into the future, but there are so many elements that make up  “success”. It's funny when I look back and I think those who've been successful, it's people who've also been generally happy in their lives. They've found their careers in whatever shape or form, fulfilling, and they've generally been happy human beings, and they've managed to create a life around research which has given them meaning.   Pat Loehrer: Richard, you have reinvented yourself a number of times – this transition of going from like a basic scientist, a surgeon, moving into public policy and global policy. Tell me a little bit about the journey that's been in terms of academics. How do you learn? What were the transition points in each of these things to get you now to be, as I mentioned before, kind of the key person for Lancet's commissions to somebody who was a rugby player?   Richard Sullivan: I suppose if you're being mean, you say, he clearly gets bored easily. But it's not that. Actually, I'm not very instrumental about life either. I mean, there are many people you will meet who have got their lives and strategies mapped out. They know they're going to do X next year, Y the following year. And for me, it's never been like that. For me, it's that excitement, that creativity of working on new and interesting things, but also knowing when you've run out of road in a particular area, where it no longer gets you out of bed in the morning, where you no longer feel happy, where you no longer feel you're contributing. All of us talking today have the great privilege of having choice about our lives, about what direction our lives should take. And it's not a privilege one should squander lightly because many people do not have choices about their lives. It's all about chance. And having that choice to be able to move into different areas is really important because I said you can stick in the same thing because you think you have to. And you can become an unhappy, miserable human being. And that makes you a miserable researcher to be around. It makes you a terrible doctor. Probably makes you a terrible person, actually, generally, if you're having a miserable life.   So finding new things, that really you're passionate about how you do it, there's no shortcut in this. It's hard work. Readily admit I went back to law school of economics, retaught myself lots of things. There are no shortcuts for. Deciding if you're going to a new area is learning, learning, practice, practice, practice, and just doing the hard work. I think that's an ethos that was probably drilled into us quite early anyway in medical school, because that's how you approach medicine. That's how you approach science when I was growing up. And it was that idea of humility that you can never have enough learning, you will always learn off other people. That's probably what drove me and how I've managed to change and as I say, who knows what the future is? I don't know. Maybe one day I'll think about doing a bit of poetry.   Dave Johnson: Your comments about happiness and work resonate with Pat and me. I think we both feel like humor is really important for happiness and career success. And, you know, Osler once said, “The master word of medicine is work.” You can't get around that. It is what it is. And I think you just reaffirmed that.   Well, this concludes part one of our interview with Richard Sullivan, professor of Cancer and Global Health at King's College, London and director of the King's Institute of Cancer Policy and co-director of the Conflict and Health Research Group. In the second part of this episode, Professor Sullivan will speak about the progress of global health, especially in conflict areas, and the need for young people to enter into the world of oncology and oncology research.   Thank you to all of our listeners for tuning into Oncology, Etc. This is an ASCO educational podcast where we will talk about just about anything and everything. So if you have an idea for a topic or a guest you would like us to interview, please email us at education@asco.org. Thank you again for listening.  Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the Comprehensive Education Center at education ASCO.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience and conclusions. Statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.  

The Beagle Has Landed Podcast
Adam Rutherford on His Latest Book about Eugenics

The Beagle Has Landed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023


Today's podcast features Adam Rutherford, a geneticist trained at University College London who has spent much of his career as a science communicator: as an editor at Nature, as a radio and television commentator for the BBC, and as the author of such books with delightful titles, including "Creation: the Origin of Life/The Future of Life and A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived" and "How to Argue With a Racist".

Going Viral: The Mother of all Pandemics
All In It Together: Were Unequal Outcomes Inevitable during Covid-19?

Going Viral: The Mother of all Pandemics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 58:16


When Covid-19 first struck the UK, the disease was described as “a great leveller”. But it soon became clear that Covid's impacts were not evenly distributed - we may have been in the same storm, but we were in different boats.  Today Mark and his guests Charlotte Augst, Halima Begum and Beth Kamunge-Kpodo discuss unequal outcomes during the Covid-19. With Professor Sir Michael Marmot and Pastor Mick Fleming. Produced in collaboration with the UK Pandemic Ethics Accelerator. Presented by Mark Honigsbaum @honigsbaum With: Dr. Charlotte Augst Former Chief Executive of National Voices, a coalition of charities working on health issues and which was extremely active highlighting issues of inequality during the pandemic. www.nationalvoices.org.uk  / @CharlotteAugst Dr. Halima Begum Chief Executive of the Runnymede Trust, the UK's leading race equality think tank. https://www.runnymedetrust.org  / @Halima_Begum Pastor Mick Fleming Founder of Church on the Street Ministries, Burnley. @PastorFleming Dr. Beth Kamunge-Kpodo Beth is a Lecturer in Law at the University of Reading. She has a longstanding interest in exploring and addressing various forms of inequality. www.reading.ac.uk/law/our-staff/beth-kamunge-kpodo Professor Sir Michael Marmot Professor of Epidemiology at University College London, Director of the UCL Institute of Health Equity, and Past President of the World Medical Association. Professor Marmot has led research groups on health inequalities for over 50 years. @MichaelMarmot https://www.instituteofhealthequity.org Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald @Melissafitzg Co-producer: Kate Jopling  @katejopling Cover art by Patrick Blower. www.blowercartoons.com Follow us on Twitter: @GoingViral_pod     Follow us on Instagram: goingviral_thepodcast  This episode of Going Viral on trust in the pandemic, has been produced in collaboration with the UK Pandemic Ethics Accelerator. It is a partnership between the Universities of Oxford, Bristol and Edinburgh, University College London, and the Nuffield Council on Bioethics (the Principal Investigator was Professor Ilina Singh, University of Oxford). The Ethics Accelerator was funded by the UKRI Covid-19 research and innovation fund.  https://ukpandemicethics.org/ @PandemicEthics_ If you enjoy our podcast - please leave us a rating or review.  Thank you!

Teachers Talk Radio
Should schools teach British values?: The Morning Break with John Gibbs

Teachers Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 65:16


My guest this week is Jan Germen Janmaat, Professor of Political Socialisation at University College London. We discuss his research on schools' role in creating a national identity and promoting civic values. We discuss attitudes to politics, political participation, and immigration. He finds a worrying social divide and an encouraging acceptance of liberal values among young people. Note: It was the statue of Edward Colston that was pulled down in Bristol.

Discovery
Tooth and Claw: Wasps

Discovery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 27:38 Very Popular


Why do wasps exist? While many see them as unfriendly bees who sting out of spite, their aggression could be interpreted as a fierce form of family protection. They are hugely understudied and even more underappreciated, with hundreds of thousands of different species carrying out jobs in our ecosystems. Some live together in nests whereas others hunt solo, paralysing prey with antibiotic-laden venom. In abundance, they can destroy environments - outcompeting most creatures and taking resource for themselves - but could we harness their predatory powers to take on pest control? Adam Hart and guests are a-buzz about this much-maligned insect and explore why we should be giving them more credit. Professor Seirian Sumner, behavioural ecologist at University College London, and Dr Jenny Jandt, ecologist at University of Otago, New Zealand.

New Books in Archaeology
Iraqi Bedouin and Intangible Cultural Heritage

New Books in Archaeology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 43:20


A conversation with Dr. Salah Hatem and Dr. Jaafar Jotheri, professors of archaeology at al-Qadisiyah University, about their research project documenting the intangible cultural heritage of the Bedouin in southern Iraq.  This episode covers topics ranging from the lifestyle of the Iraqi Bedouin to their indigenous knowledge (how to find water in the desert; plants that can be used as medicine) to how cultural heritage can be a tool for social change.  Their research project is funded by the Nahrein Network at University College London, which has as its mission to foster the sustainable development of antiquity, cultural heritage, and the humanities in Iraq. Learn more about the Nahrein network here. Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/archaeology

New Books in Art
Iraqi Bedouin and Intangible Cultural Heritage

New Books in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 43:20


A conversation with Dr. Salah Hatem and Dr. Jaafar Jotheri, professors of archaeology at al-Qadisiyah University, about their research project documenting the intangible cultural heritage of the Bedouin in southern Iraq.  This episode covers topics ranging from the lifestyle of the Iraqi Bedouin to their indigenous knowledge (how to find water in the desert; plants that can be used as medicine) to how cultural heritage can be a tool for social change.  Their research project is funded by the Nahrein Network at University College London, which has as its mission to foster the sustainable development of antiquity, cultural heritage, and the humanities in Iraq. Learn more about the Nahrein network here. Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/art

New Books Network
Iraqi Bedouin and Intangible Cultural Heritage

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 43:20


A conversation with Dr. Salah Hatem and Dr. Jaafar Jotheri, professors of archaeology at al-Qadisiyah University, about their research project documenting the intangible cultural heritage of the Bedouin in southern Iraq.  This episode covers topics ranging from the lifestyle of the Iraqi Bedouin to their indigenous knowledge (how to find water in the desert; plants that can be used as medicine) to how cultural heritage can be a tool for social change.  Their research project is funded by the Nahrein Network at University College London, which has as its mission to foster the sustainable development of antiquity, cultural heritage, and the humanities in Iraq. Learn more about the Nahrein network here. Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Iraqi Bedouin and Intangible Cultural Heritage

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 43:20


A conversation with Dr. Salah Hatem and Dr. Jaafar Jotheri, professors of archaeology at al-Qadisiyah University, about their research project documenting the intangible cultural heritage of the Bedouin in southern Iraq.  This episode covers topics ranging from the lifestyle of the Iraqi Bedouin to their indigenous knowledge (how to find water in the desert; plants that can be used as medicine) to how cultural heritage can be a tool for social change.  Their research project is funded by the Nahrein Network at University College London, which has as its mission to foster the sustainable development of antiquity, cultural heritage, and the humanities in Iraq. Learn more about the Nahrein network here. Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman
Rapid Response: Loneliness at work, w/Noreena Hertz, author of The Lonely Century

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 31:04


This is the loneliest century, says economist Noreena Hertz. Even before the pandemic forced us to stay home, loneliness was snaking its way through our lives, affecting everything from how we vote to how we work. Professor at University College London and author of the book, The Lonely Century, Noreena has some sage advice for businesses: about how less loneliness fuels more productivity, the bottom-line advantages of in-person connection over virtual interactions, and why values like kindness, community, and care are key to attracting and retaining talent. Technology is a double-edged sword, Noreena says, but we can use it to turn our isolation around, if we embrace the opportunity.Read a transcript of this episode: https://mastersofscale.com/danny-meyer-layoffs/Subscribe to the Masters of Scale weekly newsletter at http://eepurl.com/dlirtXSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Forum
The Cynics: Counter-culture from Ancient Greece

The Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 39:35


Today's counter-culture and alternative movements question mainstream norms, such as putting too much value on material possessions. The Cynics, practical philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome, also rejected conventional desires to seek wealth, power and fame. They were not your usual kind of philosophers: rather than lecturing or writing about their ideas, they acted out their beliefs by denying themselves worldly possessions and tried to live as simply as possible. Their leader, Diogenes of Sinope, allegedly slept in a ceramic jar on the streets of Athens and ate raw meat like a dog, flouting convention to draw attention to his ideas. So who were the Cynics? How influential was their movement? What made it last some 900 years? And why does the term 'cynicism' have a different meaning today? Bridget Kendall is joined by three eminent scholars of Greek philosophy: Dr. William Desmond, Senior Lecturer in Ancient Classics at Maynooth University in Ireland and author of several books on the Cynics; Dr. Elena Cagnoli Fiecconi, Lecturer in Ancient Philosophy at University College London; and Mark Usher, Professor of Classical Languages and Literature at the University of Vermont and author of new Cynic translations into English. (Image: The meeting of Alexander and Diogenes, detail from a tapestry, Scotland. Credit: DEA/S. Vannini/Getty Images)

The Prof G Show with Scott Galloway
The Blue Flame Thinkers of The Prof G Pod

The Prof G Show with Scott Galloway

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 41:29 Very Popular


Today, we're recapping some of the best insights from the Prof G Pod's Conversations in 2022.  Episodes in order of appearance: Super Fast Delivery – with Ralf Wenzel (CEO of JOKR). The Making of Silicon Valley – with Margaret O'Mara (Professor at Washington University). The Streaming Wars – with James Andrew Miller (Investigative Journalist). Economic Cycles, Investing in Education and Working through Grief with Ray Dalio (Investor). Startups vs. Big Corporations, Regulating Monolopies, and Tech Folly – with Noam Bardin (CEO of Post News). The Frothy Real Estate Market – with Abbey Wimemo and Samir Goel (Co-founders of Esusu). How Money Laundering Took Over London – with Oliver Bullough (Journalist and Author). Inside Davos + Understanding the Geopolitical Recession – with Ian Bremmer (Professor at NYU.) Your Mind on Psychedelics – with Michael Pollan (Professor at UC Berkeley School of Journalism.) China's Surveillance State – with Liza Lin and Josh Chin (Wall Street Journal Reporters.) Rewriting the Rules of Capitalism – with Mariana Mazzucato (Professor at University College London.) Future of Cities, Work, and Office Space with – Dror Proleg (Economic Historian). Failing Young Men – with Richard Reeves (Senior Fellow at Brookings Institute). Scott opens by thanking YOU for supporting Prof G Pod in 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Seriously…
6. Bad Blood - Newgenics

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 29:30


Are we entering a ‘newgenic' age - where cutting-edge technologies and the power of personal choice could achieve the kind of genetic perfection that 20th century eugenicists were after? In 2018, a Chinese scientist illegally attempted to precision edit the genome of two embryos. It didn't work as intended. Twin sisters - Lulu and Nana - were later born, but their identity, and the status of their health, is shrouded in secrecy. They were the first designer babies. Other technological developments are also coming together in ways that could change reproduction: IVF can produce multiple viable embryos, and polygenic screening could be used to select between them. Increased understanding and control of our genetics is seen as a threat by some - an inevitable force for division. But instead of allowing genetics to separate and rank people, perhaps there's a way it can be used - actively - to promote equality. Professor Paige Harden shares her suggestion of an anti-eugenic politics which makes use of genetic information. Contributors: Dr Helen O'Neill, lecturer in Reproductive and Molecular Genetics at University College London, Dr Jamie Metzl, author of Hacking Darwin, Professor Kathryn Paige Harden from the University of Texas and author of The Genetic Lottery: Why DNA Matters for Social Equality. Music and Sound design: Jon Nicholls Presenter: Adam Rutherford Producer: Ilan Goodman Clips: 28th Nov 2018 - BBC Newsday report, BBC Breakfast News / BBC Breakfast news report Chinese letter of condemnation / BBC Newsnight from 1988 on 10th anniversary of Louise Brown's birth

World Today
Panel: What repercussions will the European Union's CBAM cause globally?

World Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 55:00


Long in the making, a provisional agreement of the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism, or CBAM, was recently announced by the European Union. Under the CBAM, imports into the EU of products from specific emissions-intensive sectors will face an import levy. The EU said CBAM will begin to operate from October 2023, initially with reporting obligations only, and then come into force in 2026. The bloc said CBAM is part of its strategy to reduce its carbon emissions to net zero by 2050. Why are some of the EU's trading partners accusing the bloc of protectionism? Are concerns from developing economies of being mistreated under CBAM valid? Host Liu Kun is joined by Yao Shujie, Chueng Kong Professor of Economics, Chongqing University; Helga Zepp-LaRouche, Founder of The Schiller Institute; Michael Grubb, Professor of Energy and Climate Change at University College London; Mike Bastin, China observer, and Senior Lecturer at the University of Southampton.

The Pulse
Humans and Sound

The Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 49:40


The soundscape of our lives changes depending on where we are — the murmuring of voices, birdsong in trees, the beeps and dings of technology, and the cacophony of traffic. Our worlds are dense with sound. Often, it all blends together to the point that we barely notice it. But every sound has its own distinct profile — providing information, bringing joy or irritation, causing us to snap to attention or zone out. In this episode, we explore the world of sound, how we interact with it, and the people who compose the sounds that define our lives. We hear stories about the teams designing the hum of electric cars, how the sounds of a rainforest inspired the pings and dings coming from your computer, and a disorder that makes ordinary noises almost unbearable. Also heard on this week’s episode: We talk with physicist and oceanographer Helen Czerski about what sound is, how it travels, how our sense of hearing evolved, and her favorite topic — the sound of bubbles. Czerski is an associate professor of mechanical engineering at University College London. Her book is called “Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life.” Great cars make great sounds — the growl of a Porsche, the roar of a Mustang, the purr of a BMW. But what about electric cars? They're known for being quiet, but in recent years, electric car makers have been working to create their own signature sound. Reporter Alan Yu finds out what automobiles of the future will sound like. Who decides the sounds our electronics make: email notifications, event reminders, and error alerts? Pulse producer Nichole Currie talks with sound designer Matthew Bennet about the unlikely origin of the beeps and boops that define our daily lives. We listen back to a conversation with Fresh Air’s Terry Gross about how different she sounds on the radio than in her head — and talk with William Hartmann, who's part of the psychoacoustics group at Michigan State University, about why that is.

Poor Historians: Misadventures in Medical History Podcast
Book Biopsy: Spare Parts - The Story of Medicine Through the History of Transplant Surgery (with Author Paul Craddock)

Poor Historians: Misadventures in Medical History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 66:14


Our guest this week is author Paul Craddock, here to share his new book with us. Spare Parts is his first published work and is an excellent read into the history of one of the most complicated frontiers in medicine, transplant surgery.  Stretching back to the 16th century and arriving into the present day, we'll go over some of the discoveries that led to the ability to transplant organs in the modern age.  We know you'll enjoy this interview and highly recommend reading this book for yourselves.  Paul's exceptional storytelling is apparent in our interview and his wit is well suited to his subject material. Paul is an Honorary Senior Research Associate in the Division of Surgery and Interventional Sciences at University College London.  His PhD centered on the history of transplant medicine.Click HERE to get Paul's book and support our guest!Podcast Links:-Linktree (reviews/ratings/social media links): linktr.ee/poorhistorianspod-Merch Site: https://www.teepublic.com/user/poor-historians-podcast

Hear us Roar
Jen_Gilroy_Podcast_169_December_2022.mp3

Hear us Roar

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 34:24


This week's podcast is with Jen Gilroy (The Sweetheart Locket, Orion Dash/Orion Books, March 2022). Unlike most of our guests, Jen has been publishing since 2017 but in the romance category, so we discuss what's involved in switching to a new genre while still holding tight to your unique creative voice. As a writer who thinks strategically about her career, Jen shares insights into how British and American audiences differ, what she's learned from working simultaneously in two genres with two different agents, and the authors who she looked to for inspiration while composing this dual-time-line story.   Jen Gilroy writes women's fiction for Orion Dash and sweet western romance for Harlequin Heartwarming—uplifting stories about women finding home, family and new beginnings–and finding themselves too. She's a Romance Writers of America® Golden Heart® finalist and was shortlisted for the Romantic Novelists' Association Joan Hessayon award. A dual British-Canadian citizen, Jen lived in England for many years and earned a doctorate in geography, focusing on British cultural studies and social history, from University College London. She worked in higher education and marketing before becoming a full-time writer. She now lives in small-town Ontario, Canada with her husband, teenage daughter and floppy-eared rescue hound. When not writing, she enjoys reading, ballet and paddling her purple kayak. To learn more about Jen, click here.

Dementia Researcher
2022 End of Year Reflections from Dementia Researchers

Dementia Researcher

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 65:42


It's our last podcast of 2022. We're breaking from our usual tradition of bringing you old clips and instead we brought together eight of our brilliant researcher bloggers for a chat. In this show hosted by Adam Smith, they talk about their personal highlights from the year, share what they're most looking forward to in 2023 and give us a glimpse into what they like away from work. We're delighted to welcome Dr Yvonne Couch from University of Oxford, Dr Aida Suarez Gonzalez & Dr Anna Volkmer from University College London, Dr Kamar Ameen-Ali from Teesside University, Beth Eyre from University of Sheffield, Dr Gaia Brezzo from the UKDRI at The University of Sheffield, Dr Sam Moxon from The University of Manchester and new blogger Dr Connor Richardson from Newcastle University. -- Read or listen to all of our researchers blogs at: https://www.dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk/support-resources/blogs/ -- You can find out more about our bloggers and their work on our website. There you will also find a full transcript: https://www.dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk -- Like what you hear? Please review, like, and share our podcast - and don't forget to subscribe to ensure you never miss an episode + if you prefer to watch rather than listen, you'll find a video version of this podcast on our YouTube Channel at https://youtu.be/AJUw-mx-xCw -- This podcast is brought to you by University College London / UCLH NIHR Biomedical Research Centre in association with Alzheimer's Association, Alzheimer's Research UK, Alzheimer's Society and Race Against Dementia who we thank for their ongoing support.

The Conversation Weekly
Discovery: Reindeer's fascinating color-changing eyes

The Conversation Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 18:05


Reindeer's noses may not glow red, but these cold-loving creatures have evolved the ability to change the color of their eyes to help them thrive in northern winters. A neuroscientist explains how he discovered that a part of the reindeer eye called the tapetum lucidum is perfectly adapted to the dim, blue in the Arctic.Featuring Glen Jeffery, a professor of neuroscience at the Institute of Opthamology at University College London in the UK.This episode was produced by Katie Flood. The interim executive producer is Mend Mariwany. Eloise Stevens does our sound design and our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. Full credits for this episode are available here. A transcript will be available soon. Sign up here for a free daily newsletter from The Conversation.Further readingHow reindeer eyes transform in winter to give them twilight visionFive ways reindeer are perfectly evolved for pulling Santa's sleigh Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Demystifying Science
Universe Conspires to Create Life - Dr. Nick Lane, University College London

Demystifying Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 120:37


Is life inevitable? Or are we the unbelievable result of an against-all-odds game that has produced a pair of eyeballs capable of unravelling the mysteries of the universe? Nick Lane, Biochemist at the University College London, is torn. On the one hand, life seems like it has no choice but to occur. The biochemistry of metabolism is completely spontaneous, even in the absence of cells. But complexity? That's a whole different ballgame. We talk about why life on Earth is so strange, why a metabolic theory for life is so good, why Panspermia is so unsatisfying, and how some lab results imply our understanding of metabolism isn't as good as we think. Support the scientific revolution with a monthly donation: https://bit.ly/3lcAasB Or buy Nick Lane's books: Transformer - https://amzn.to/3W8mDTIThe Vital Question - https://amzn.to/3V71Oqr Power, Sex, Suicide - https://amzn.to/3WtBJ5U Life Ascending - https://amzn.to/3FAuW3G #evolution #origins #physics Check our short-films channel, @DemystifySci: https://www.youtube.com/c/DemystifyingScience AND our material science investigations of atomics, @MaterialAtomics THE MATERIAL WORLD https://www.youtube.com/@MaterialAtomics Join our mailing list https://bit.ly/3v3kz2S PODCAST INFO: Anastasia completed her PhD studying bioelectricity at Columbia University. When not talking to brilliant people or making movies, she spends her time painting, reading, and guiding backcountry excursions. Michael Shilo also did his PhD at Columbia studying the elastic properties of molecular water. When he's not in the film studio, he's exploring sound in music. They are both freelance professors at various universities. - Blog: http://DemystifySci.com/blog - RSS: https://anchor.fm/s/2be66934/podcast/rss - Donate: https://bit.ly/3wkPqaD- Swag: https://bit.ly/2PXdC2y SOCIAL: - Discord: https://discord.gg/MJzKT8CQub - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DemystifySci - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/DemystifySci/ - Twitter: https://twitter.com/DemystifySci MUSIC: -Shilo Delay: https://g.co/kgs/oty671

Global Governance Futures: Imperfect Utopias or Bust
31: Adrienne Buller – Illusions of Green Capitalism

Global Governance Futures: Imperfect Utopias or Bust

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 58:01


Adrienne Buller is the Director of Research at Common Wealth, an organization focused on promoting democratic ownership to transform how the economy operates and for whom. Adrienne has recently published ‘The Value of a Whale: On the Illusions of Green Capitalism' (2022), offering a deep dive into the fatal biases that have shaped the response of our governing institutions to climate and environmental breakdown. Tracing the intricate connections between financial power, economic injustice and ecological crisis, she exposes the myopic economism and market-centric thinking presently undermining a future where all life can flourish. Adrienne also has significant experience at the coalface of climate policy advocacy, having served as the Co-Director of the campaign group Labour for a Green New Deal through 2017 and 2018. Adrienne holds an MSc in Global Governance and Ethics from our very own University College London and a Bachelor of Science from McGill University. We discussed ‘The Value of a Whale,' the flaws in mainstream climate and environmental governance, corporate ‘green growth' mindsets, the commodification of nature. and much, much more. Adrienne tweets @adribuller: https://twitter.com/adribuller Publications: The Value of a Whale: On the Illusions of Green Capitalism (Manchester University Press, 2022): https://manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781526162632/ Owning the Future: Power and Property in an Age of Crisis (with Matthew Laurence) (Verso Books, 2022): https://www.versobooks.com/books/3981-owning-the-future

The Undraped Artist Podcast
Rosa Bonheur Undraped (VIDEO)

The Undraped Artist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 74:17


Our Guest   https://micahchristensen.com     Micah Christensen | MFDA, PhD Micah is a scholar of European, Asian, and American fine art, porcelain, and decorative objects. He earned his doctorate in the History of Art from University College London, where he travelled throughout Spain, Italy, France, and United Kingdom to study how artists were trained in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He received his Masters in Fine Art from Sotheby's Institute (London). There he worked with the founder of the Antiques Home Roadshow and other experts in the London auction world. Micah has lectured extensively, including at the British Library. He is currently a partner at Anthony's Fine Art & Antiques (Salt Lake City) and a Board Member of the Springville Museum of Art. He regularly lectures on continues to lecture, write, and consult with public institutions and private collectors. He is a co-author of the Dictionary of Utah Fine Artists. Micah currently sits on the Advisory Board of PleinAir Magazine.

The Undraped Artist Podcast
Rosa Bonheur Undraped (AUDIO)

The Undraped Artist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 74:35


Our Guest https://micahchristensen.com     Micah Christensen | MFDA, PhD Micah is a scholar of European, Asian, and American fine art, porcelain, and decorative objects. He earned his doctorate in the History of Art from University College London, where he travelled throughout Spain, Italy, France, and United Kingdom to study how artists were trained in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He received his Masters in Fine Art from Sotheby's Institute (London). There he worked with the founder of the Antiques Home Roadshow and other experts in the London auction world. Micah has lectured extensively, including at the British Library. He is currently a partner at Anthony's Fine Art & Antiques (Salt Lake City) and a Board Member of the Springville Museum of Art. He regularly lectures on continues to lecture, write, and consult with public institutions and private collectors. He is a co-author of the Dictionary of Utah Fine Artists. Micah currently sits on the Advisory Board of PleinAir Magazine.

Deconstructing Yourself
Meditation and the Bayesian Brain with Shamil Chandaria

Deconstructing Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 49:37


Host Michael Taft talks with philanthropist, serial entrepreneur, technologist, and meditator Dr. Shamil Chandaria about predictive processing as it relates to meditation, our phenomenal self model, recognizing our own fabrication hierarchy, replacing our top level priors as a way to understand nondual enlightenment, and much more.Dr Shamil Chandaria OBE is a philanthropist, serial entrepreneur, technologist, and academic with multi-disciplinary research interests spanning computational neuroscience, machine learning and artificial intelligence, and the philosophy and science of human well-being. His PhD, from the London School of Economics, was in mathematical modelling of economic systems using stochastic differential equations and optimal control theory. Later he completed an MA in Philosophy, with Distinction, from University College London where he developed an interest in philosophy of science and philosophical issues in biology, neuroscience, and ethics. In 2018 Dr. Chandaria helped to endow the Global Priorities Institute at Oxford University, an interdisciplinary research institute focusing on the most important issues facing humanity. In 2019 he was a founder of the Centre for Psychedelic Research, in the department of Brain Sciences at Imperial College London, a neuroscience research institute investigating psychedelic therapies for a number of conditions including treatment resistant depression. He is also funding research on the neuroscience of meditation at Harvard University and Berkeley, University of California.In 2022 Dr Chandaria was awarded a British OBE for services to Science and Technology, Finance and Philanthropy. He is also a long-term meditation practitioner. The Bayesian Brain and Meditation Lecture, by Shamil ChandariaYou can support the creation of future episodes of this podcast by contributing through Patreon.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

All About Art
Discussing 'Misogynageism' with Artist Fion Gunn

All About Art

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 27:53


EPISODE 43 of ‘All About Art': Discussing 'Misogynageism' with Artist Fion Gunn In this episode, I speak to artist Fion Gunn. She centers her practice around the desire to understand and analyze the extremity of human experience. She states that she is fascinated by the fundamental question: What does the experience of living mean for us both as individuals and as a global society? We chat about Fion's artistic practice and how she uses a variety of mediums including painting but also sculpture, augmented reality, and film. We then go on to discuss an incredibly prevalent issue within the arts: misogynageism. This term is one that was further explored in an interview with Fion in Artplugged written by art historian Verity Babbs. Tune in to hear us discuss it, and you can also read the full article here: https://artplugged.co.uk/young-gunn-fion-gunn-and-arts-misogynageism-problem/ Thank you Fion for coming on the podcast! You can support All About Art on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/allaboutart ABOUT THE HOST: I am an Austrian-American art historian, curator, and writer. I obtained my BA in History of Art at University College London and my MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy at Goldsmiths, University of London. My specializations include contemporary art, specifically feminism and artificial intelligence in artistic practice, as well as museum policies and arts engagement. Here are links to my social media, feel free to reach out: Instagram @alexandrasteinacker Twitter @alex_steinacker and LinkedIn at Alexandra Steinacker-Clark COVER ART: Lisa Schrofner a.k.a Liser www.liser-art.com

Lattice Training Podcast
Hormones and our human potential with Dr Nicky Keay

Lattice Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 76:21


In this podcast, Ella Russell talks to Dr Nicky Keay, an honorary clinical lecturer in the division of medicine at University College London.  She lectures and researches in areas of exercise endocrinology, with publications in this field. Nicky's clinical endocrine work is mainly with exercisers, dancers and athletes, with a focus on relative energy deficiency in sport (RED-S) and athletes navigating perimenopause/menopause. In addition to being the author of the British Association of Sports and Exercise Medicine (BASM) Health4performance.co.uk online resource. She is also a medical advisor to Scottish Ballet and a keen dancer herself.With her recent and first book, “Health Hormones and Human Potential: A guide to understanding your hormones to optimise your health and performance”, we couldn't wait to have her back on the podcast!Some of the topics covered in this podcast are;What hormones are and why they are so fundamental to our bodily functions.How hormones influence our adaptations to training (or not as the case may be).What can happen when we don't get the balance of training/climbing, recovery and nutrition right from a hormonal perspective.How do we spot if we're moving into a state of non-functional overreaching and when this might tip into overtraining syndrome;What can we do if we find ourselves in a state which points towards non-functional overreaching? How can AI help us to identify if we are getting the balance right hormonally.How do our gut microbes use hormones to influence our physical and mental health.What can we do to improve our gut microbiome diversity and when should we do this.For Nicky's website check got to:https://nickykeayfitness.com/new-book/And to buy her book go to the following sources:https://www.sequoia-books.com/catalog/keay/https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hormones-Health-Human-Potential-Understanding/dp/191411020X/?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_w=sPuam&content-id=amzn1.sym.9987c01f-79a1-401b-8cc0-4469362e1651&pf_rd_p=9987c01f-79a1-401b-8cc0-4469362e1651&pf_rd_r=EEXVF42265K8000CC4TZ&pd_rd_wg=90KJl&pd_rd_r=88d69466-d18b-452b-b2a4-12a55632c3a2&ref_=pd_gw_ci_mcx_mr_hp_atf_mThe Lattice jingle is brought to you by Devin Dabney, music producer of the outdoor industry who also hosts the American Climbing Project.Walter Beede - Baseball Lifer's Podcast"The Youth Baseball Guy" | Former NCAA Head Baseball Coach, Speaker, Author | Tweets...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Creating a Family: Talk about Infertility, Adoption & Foster Care
An Introduction to Female Fertility

Creating a Family: Talk about Infertility, Adoption & Foster Care

Play Episode Play 53 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 66:40 Transcription Available


How much do you really know about your fertility, menstrual cycles, and conception? Join us to learn more with Dr. Joyce Harper, a Professor of Reproductive Science at the Institute for Women's Health, University College London, and the head of the Reproductive Science and Society Group. She is the author of  Your Fertile Years.In this episode, we cover:Understanding the menstrual cycleUnderstanding the basic of conceptionPredicting ovulationBasics of InfertilityWhat percentage of infertility is caused by the female partner, the male partner, or both?What causes a woman to not ovulate?Initial workup for women who meet the definition of infertilityWorkup for Recurrent Pregnancy LossTreatment Options for Infertility How does the infertility workup differ for the LGBTQ+ community (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Non-binary, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, and Gender Nonconforming Individuals)? This podcast is produced  by www.CreatingaFamily.org. We are a national non-profit with the mission to strengthen and inspire adoptive, foster & kinship parents and the professionals who support them. Creating a Family brings you the following trauma-informed, expert-based content:Weekly podcastsWeekly articles/blog postsResource pages on all aspects of family buildingPlease leave us a rating or review RateThisPodcast.com/creatingafamilySupport the showDo you want more expert-based information? Check out our free resources at CreatingaFamily.org.

Going Viral: The Mother of all Pandemics
Who Do We Trust in a Pandemic?

Going Viral: The Mother of all Pandemics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 58:19


The coronavirus pandemic raised significant questions about public trust: trust in science, trust in politicians and trust in the public health messaging. Today Mark and his guests Anjana Ahuja; Sarah Cunningham-Burley; Charles Kwaku-Odoi and Christina Pagel discuss trust during the Covid-19 pandemic for this Going Viral special, produced in collaboration with the UK Pandemic Ethics Accelerator. Presented by Mark Honigsbaum @honigsbaum With: Anjana Ahuja Anjana Ahuja is a contributing writer on science for the Financial Times, offering weekly opinion on significant developments in global science, health and technology.  Last year she co-authored the bestselling ‘Spike: The Virus Vs The People' - the inside story of the Covid-19 pandemic with Sir Jeremy Farrar. Spike was shortlisted for the 2022 Orwell Prize for Political Writing and the 2022 Royal Society Science Book Prize. https://www.ft.com/anjana-ahuja  /  @anjahuja Professor Sarah Cunningham-Burley Sarah is Professor of Medical and Family Sociology and Dean of Molecular, Genetic and Population Health Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. Sarah led on work around engaging the public as part of the UK Pandemic Ethics Accelerator which finished its work in August 2022. She brought together members of the public to consider ethical issues arising during the Covid-19 pandemic. https://www.ed.ac.uk/profile/sarah-cunningham-burley / @Sarah_C_Burley  Rev Charles Kwaku-Odoi Charles is Chief Officer of the Caribbean and African Health Network (CAHN) and a Deputy Lieutenant (DL) of the county of Greater Manchester. Charles works to bring equity and fairness across a range of important health and wellbeing issues for people of the Caribbean and African Diaspora. He sits on a wide range of local and national governance boards including Macc (Manchester Community Central), Faith Network for Manchester, SAGE Ethnicity Subgroup, Greater Manchester Voluntary Community & Social Enterprise (VCSE) Leadership Group, Coalition of Race Equality (CORE) Organisations. www.cahn.org.uk  /  @charleskod Professor Christina Pagel Christina Pagel is a Mathematician and Professor of operational research at University College London within UCL's Clinical Operational Research Unit, which applies operational research, data analysis and mathematical modelling to topics in healthcare. https://iris.ucl.ac.uk/iris/browse/profile?upi=ACPAG88 / @chrischirp Series Producer: Melissa FitzGerald @Melissafitzg Co-producer: Kate Jopling  @katejopling Cover art by Patrick Blower. www.blowercartoons.com Follow us on Twitter: @GoingViral_pod     Follow us on Instagram: goingviral_thepodcast  This episode of Going Viral on trust during the pandemic, has been produced in collaboration with the UK Pandemic Ethics Accelerator, which was funded by the UKRI Covid-19 research and innovation fund. https://ukpandemicethics.org/ @PandemicEthics_ If you enjoy our podcast - please leave us a rating or review.  Thank you!