Podcasts about Edgar Allan Poe

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19th-century American author, poet, editor and literary critic

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Edgar Allan Poe

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Strong Women
81. The Woman Who Influenced a Nation with Melanie Kirkpatrick

Strong Women

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 49:44


The same woman who wrote “Mary Had a Little Lamb” also influenced popular American traditions like having a Christmas tree in your home and women wearing a white wedding gown for their marriage ceremony. She also is considered the godmother of our Thanksgiving because of her relentless petitions to Presidents and lawmakers to create the National holiday, which finally happened under President Lincoln. But do you even know her name?! In this week's episode, we talk with Melanie Kirkpatrick, author of the book "Lady Editor: Sarah Josepha Hale and the Making of the Modern American Woman." Melanie shares Hale's story of being a writer, an activist for education for women, and an editor of “Godey's Lady's Book”, the most popular women's magazine in the early years of our country. This story will fascinate and inspire you as we learn about the life and times of this remarkable woman.    Melanie Kirkpatrick Show Notes:  The Hudson Institute: https://www.hudson.org/  Lady Editor by Melanie Kirkpatrick: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/lady-editor-melanie-kirkpatrick/1137284560?ean=9781641771788  Thanksgiving by Melanie Kirkpatrick: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/thanksgiving-melanie-kirkpatrick/1123362923?ean=9781641772129  Escape from North Korea by Melanie Kirkpatrick: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/escape-from-north-korea-melanie-kirkpatrick/1110913342?ean=9781594036460  Books by Sarah Josepha Hale: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/%22Sarah%20Josepha%20Hale%22?Ntk=P_key_Contributor_List&Ns=P_Sales_Rank&Ntx=mode+matchall  Little Women by Louisa May Alcott: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/little-women-and-other-novels-louisa-may-alcott/1025050486?ean=9781435167179  Godey's Lady's Book: https://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/serial?id=godeylady  Books by Edgar Allan Poe: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/edgar%20allan%20poe  Books by Nathaniel Hawthorne: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/nathaniel%20hawthorne  Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/uncle-toms-cabin-harriet-beecher-stowe/1116705392?ean=9781593081218  Everlasting Song by Ha Jin: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-song-everlasting-ha-jin/1137975039?ean=9781524748791  Join Strong Women on Social Media: https://linktr.ee/strongwomencc  Erin and her husband, Brett, run Maven which “exists to help the next generation know truth, pursue goodness, and create beauty, all for the cause of Christ.” Check out more about Maven here: https://maventruth.com/   The Strong Women Podcast is a product of the Colson Center which equips Christians to live out their faith with clarity, confidence, and courage in this cultural moment. Through commentaries, podcasts, videos, and more, we help Christians better understand what's happening in the world, and champion what is true and good wherever God has called them.  Learn more about the Colson Center here: https://www.colsoncenter.org/   Visit our website and sign up for our email list so that you can stay up to date on what we are doing here and also receive our monthly book list: https://www.colsoncenter.org/strong-women 

History That Doesn't Suck
102: Epilogue to the Gilded Age

History That Doesn't Suck

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 62:44


Greg sits down with Zach and Kelsi for a chat. They make a rather … LIVE(ly) announcement … then proceed to talk about electricity, tycoons, and the New South. But the conversation can't end without Greg and Zach nerding out (as Kelsi, perhaps rightly, rolls her eyes) about their mutually favorite author: Edgar Allan Poe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast
Episode 177: The X Factor

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 103:44


Quizmasters Lee and Marc meet for a general knowledge quiz on Anatomy, 70's Movies, 80's Sitcoms, Literature, U.S. History, Retro Games, Vintage Toys and more! Round One JAM BANDS - What jam band is responsible for the song "Wilson," which became a popular chant amongst fans of Seattle Seahawks' quarterback Russell Wilson? 80's SITCOMS - Airing for four seasons on NBC, the Tanner family orbited the title character of which popular 80's sitcom? DOG BREEDS - What breed of dog was Boo, the pet of a Facebook executive and Virgin America's official pet liaison? 70's MOVIES - Chuck Wepner was the real-life inspiration for which movie series that began with a film released in 1976? RELIGION - What Christian denomination was begun by John Wesley in 1738? ANIMALS - Marsupials are classified into two superorders based on geographic origin, Ameridelphia (which accounts for roughly 25% of all marsupials) and what other super order? HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE - "Sheltered Harbor" is the translation of what Hawaiian word? Round Two URBAN LEGENDS - The DaVinci Code repeats the myth that the glass pyramid in front of the Louvre consists of how many panes of glass? RETRO GAMING - Peter Pepper was the protagonist who is pursued by dangerous food foes (such as Mr. Hot Dog, Mr. Pickle and Mr. Egg) in what 1980's ladder climbing game that was released in arcades as well as home video game consoles? BIRD ANATOMY - What bird bone is known as the "wishbone"? ANATOMY - The gnathion is the midpoint on the lowest part of which bone in the body? LITERATURE - What is the vocation of Ichabod Crane in The Legend of Sleepy Hollow? EUROPEAN FOODS - What dish whose origin dates to the 7th century Andalusia is traditionally made with ripe tomatoes, bell peppers, cucumbers, garlic, and bread moistened with water that is blended with olive oil and vinegar? Rate My Question FIRST LADIES - Of the 46 presidencies, which First Lady never moved into the White House due to her husband's untimely death? - Captain Nick THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA - In multiple iterations of the story Erik, the Phantom dresses as what character from a popular short story by Edgar Allan Poe? HUMAN ANATOMY - Of the over 60 sphincters in the human body, how many are in the digestive tract? Final Questions PUMPKINS - In the sport of pumpkin chucking, pumpkins that burst after leaving the barrel or sling before hitting the ground are disqualified and referred to as what prepared food? VINTAGE TOYS - “You run, you slide, you hit the bump and take a dive” were the words to the jingle for what toy from the 1980's to 1990's? Upcoming LIVE Know Nonsense Trivia Challenges November 24th, 2021 - Know Nonsense Challenge - Point Ybel Brewing Co. - 7:30 pm EDT December 1st, 2021 - Know Nonsense Trivia Challegnge - Ollies Pub Records and Beer - 7:30 pm EDT You can find out more information about that and all of our live events online at KnowNonsenseTrivia.com All of the Know Nonsense events are free to play and you can win prizes after every round. Thank you Thanks to our supporters on Patreon. Thank you, Quizdaddies – Brandon, Issa, Adam V., Tommy (The Electric Mud) and Tim (Pat's Garden Service) Thank you, Team Captains – Captain Nick, Grant, Mo, Jenny, Rick G., Skyler, Dylan, Shaun, Lydia, Gil, David, Aaron, Kristen & Fletcher Thank you, Proverbial Lightkeepers – Robb, Rachael, Rikki, Jon Lewis, Moo, Tim, Nabeel, Patrick, Jon, Adam B., Ryan, Mollie, Lisa, Alex, Spencer, Kaitlynn, Manu, Matthew, Luc, Hank, Justin, Cooper, Elyse, Sarah, Karly, Kristopher, Josh, Lucas Thank you, Rumplesnailtskins – Sarah, FoxenV, Laurel, A-A-Ron, Loren, Hbomb, Alex, Doug, Kevin and Sara, Tiffany, Allison, Paige, We Do Stuff, Kenya, Jeff, Eric, Steven, Efren, Mike J., Mike C., Mike. K If you'd like to support the podcast and gain access to bonus content, please visit http://theknowno.com and click "Support."

How To Love Lit Podcast
Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 41:53


Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This episode and next, we tackle one of the most intimidating poets in the American Canon- Walt Whitman.  He is the generally accepted and almost uncontested greatest contribution America has made to the great canon of World Literature- the ones comprised of those that really intimidate- William Shakespeare,  James Joyce, Gustave Flaubert, Vladimir Nabokov, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Pablo Neruda, Ovid, Goethe, Neitche-, Dante- people like that- there are not too many Americans that make that list.    And he does intimidate me- truly.  And honestly he baffles me.  The things he says seem easy to understand except I don't actually understand them.  They are beautiful and interesting but also uncomfortable.  People love his writing and always have, but he's also very offensive- and he offends all equally- the prude and the religious, but also the secular and intellectual- he offends the socialist as well as the capitalist.  Name an identity- he references it and somewhat dismantles it.  Primarily because he absolutely rejects group identities as we think of them today- even in terms of nations but in every sense.  To use his words, “I am large; I contains multitudes” that's a paraphrase from my favorite selection of his work which we'll read today.      For me he's such a curious person in part because of the time he emerged in what was called then the American experiment- and I honestly think his perspective has a lot to do from this unique time period, of course this is not different than how I feel about all of the writers we discuss.  But being born in 1819, the United States of America is only 36 years older than he is.  His parents were present during the Revolutionary War and have a real respect for what people were trying to do here, and how unusual and fragile democratic government actually was or really is.  We, at least we here in the United States, live with the feeling that this country just always has been- that democracy just happens.  That elections are just things that have always happened.  Most students today in this country don't even think about it. Democracy is the normal order in how things occur; equality and liberty are just virtues that everyone agrees are important- by one definition or another.  But None of this was reality and common understanding in 1819 in almost any part of the planet Earth.  And most of the world looked at the United States with contempt- a bunch of non-educated hillbillies living in some weird schemata that wouldn't stand the test of time.  There was no culture in this country, by international standards.  We had no great art, no history to speak of, we weren't writing great philosophies or composing great music.  We had not produced a Voltaire, or a Jean-Jacques Rousseau.  We had no Catherine the Great or Cosimo De Medici sponsoring great artistic ventures.        And so enters Walt Whitman- to which he would say, and did say- whoopdeedoo Europe- you are correct- we have none of that, and I celebrate that we don't.      I want to begin with this famous poem by Whitman.  Of course, it's from Leaves of Grass which we'll introduce in a second, but if you are reading the Death bed edition which is the one I have- again I'll explain all that later, it's in the beginning, that very first part called “Inscriptions”.  Let me read Whitman's famous words on America.     I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,  Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong,  The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam,  The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work,  The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck,  The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands,  The wood-cutter's song, the ploughboy's on his way in the morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown,  The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at work, or of the girl sewing or washing,  Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else,  The day what belongs to the day—at night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.      Garry, I want to hear your first thoughts when you read this poem.  Let me start by saying, notice how celebratory it is.  America is singing carols- not dirges- and the song of the American is the song of hard work- not the Vienna Philharmonic- which by the way was founded in 1842.  America was not building art, as commonly understood- we were building lives- free lives- lives where people lived with the choices they made, but they got to make their own choices.  This is very different than anywhere else- places more cultured, more sophisticated, more idealized.  We don't have serfs working for great lords or ladies.  We have no jet-setters so to speak- or people of privilege or high cultural standing- In America we work hard,  but we work for ourselves-and everyone does it- and that is something we're proud of.  There is no shame in labor.  There's a song to that.      Yes, it's very much about homestead.  It's about individualism and taking responsibility to create it- About creating your own little corner of the world.  This is exactly the idea that Alexis DeToqueville referenced in his important work Democracy in America.  As a Frenchman, he was totally surprised and impressed with this very thing that Whitman is talking about.  This poem is a complete refutation of the English feudal system and that's what Northerners loved about it.  In the South, and what was so offensive to Whitman when he spent time in New Orleans was that they were trying to recreate that hierarchal system where some people outrank others to the point of claiming they weren't even human- and that, to Whitman, was the complete opposite of what the entire American Experiment was about.      His parents were clearly on team America- he had one brother named George Washington Whitman, another named Thomas Jefferson Whitman and a third named Andrew Jackson Whitman.       Ha- I guess that IS a statement.  This unique time of history in which he lived allowed Whitman to see such great contrasts in America- he saw democracy and success found in personal effort.  He saw vast amounts of unpolluted natural beauty, but he also saw evil at its most deranged, and pain and loneliness at its most intense.  We have to remember that his parents lived through the glorious revolutionary war, but he lived during the treacherous Civil War- and his perspective and life experience is very different. He admired the expanse of the West. He loved the natural beauty of this continent, but he also was horrified and despised to its core – the. National plague that has defined and still defines so much of the American story- this legacy of slavery- his views on such, btw- got him fired by more than one employer, btw.  At this time, newspapers were owned and operated by political parties, and he was always slipping in views that the political operatives didn't like- so he got fired.       HA!  Well, I guess some things never change.    One thing that baffles and almost offends most academics is Whitman's absolute nothing of an academic background.  His parents were basically illiterate, his family was excessively large and chaotic; today we would say dysfunctional.  He had one sibling that actually had to be committed to an insane asylum.   His formal education was inadequate because his father sent him out to work.  It's so ironic that the greatest American poet had no formal tutelage to except what he scrounged up for himself in his own self-taught way by reading in libraries and attending operas.  He didn't have that option.  His father was also pretty much a financial failure.  He was a carpenter by trade, but had also had a little property.  His father speculated in real estate after moving to Brooklyn, NY, but wasn't all that great at business and ended up losing most of it.      And of course, that's the problem with the land of opportunity- you are kind of out there on your own to make it or break it.  And people were very aware of this.  There was no guarantee, at all, that America would even survive as a country.  It was still an experiment.  No one else was living like this.  Europeans had monarchies; the South American countries were colonies.  Our neighbors to the East were living in empires.  Only this little backward nation in a corner of North America was trying to do this weird thing.    And Whitman loved it.  He really did.  He loved the land.  He loved the cities.  He loved the people.  He spent the first 36 years of his life walking around and observing life, mostly in New York City and Long Island (which was NOT a suburb of New York at that time).    He loved the libraries and spent tons of time there reading.  He loved music, especially opera, which we'll notice has a strong influence on how he writes.  He loved learning, listening and observing, and this is what he wrote about.  I heard one lecturer say that he was the first non-blind poet- which I thought was weird and what made it stand out.  But what the professor meant was that most poets were writing about their inner life, things from their imagination- think Edgar Allan Poe and “The Raven”, but Whitman, in many cases, was transcribing things that he was seeing and hearing in urban life- and this was very different.  He would catalogue it- to use a word that is often used to describe this thing that we just saw him do in the poem we just read, make these long lists of details in these long sentences.         I also want to point out that it was this desire to self-educate that led him, like many of his day, to be influenced and challenged by the great Ralph Waldo Emerson. We'll do an entire episode or more than one of him, but Emerson's non-conventional ideas about nature and the soul and our inter-connectedness, although ideas that were commonly accepted in the far East, were new on this continent.      True- well, In 1855, something happened.  Whitman self-publishes the book Leaves of Grass.  This first version was only 95 pages long- that's compared to the death bed one which has 415 in my copy.   There was no author's name on the cover.  Instead, on the first page there was this image of a man in laborer's clothes.  Whitman only reveals that he's the author through one of the first unnamed poems calling himself, “Walt Whitman, an American, one of the roughs, a kosmos.”    If you look up the word Kosmos in the dictionary it will tell you that that word means- a complex orderly self-inclusive system- which is interesting to think about someone describing themselves as- but it's a Greek word.  It's also a Biblical word- which is how I believe Whitman would know it.  It is used in the New Testament to mean the universe or the creation as a whole- that's how Whitman defines himself in this poem “Song of Myself”  and the context of how he wants us to understand his work and who we are as individuals.  We too are kosmos.      Well, it didn't start out very cosmic- that's for sure.  It's a miracle Leaves of Grass came to be read by anyone.  He self-published it, literally type-setting it himself.  He printed 795 copies and sold almost none of them.     Don't you wish you had one of those originals?    I know right, well, people do.  In case you're in the market, there are 200 that are still around, and in 2014, one sold at Christie's for $305,000.  It's so ironic- Whitman struggled financially until the day he died and celebrated working people in everything he wrote.  What do you think he would think of that, Christy?    I have zero doubt, he would love it.  Totally.  Beyond being the book's publisher, he also was the book's publicist.  He sent copies to the leading poets of the day trying to drum up some good reviews.  Whittier was said to thrown his copy into the fire he was so offended and outraged- the homoerotic imagery was more than he could handle, but Ralph Waldo Emerson saw it for what it was and wrote Whitman back an amazing letter of encouragement.  Let me quote Emerson, “I am not blind to the worth of the wonderful gift of Leaves of Grass. I find it the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed.”  And of course, to this day, many world class literary scholars still think this about Whitman.       What I find humorous about Whitman is that he wrote glowing reviews of his book himself secretly and published them as if they were written by other people.       Yeah, he was working the influencer thing way back before that was a thing- He also, printed Emerson's actual glowing review when he reprinted the book in 1856, except he didn't get Emerson's permission to do so.  He put Emerson's words, “I greet you at the beginning of a great career” on the spine of the book and he published the entire letter with a long reply andress to Dear Master.”  It was NOT received well by Emerson.      I can see that as being slightly presumptuous.      Of course it was, but I would be tempted as well.  He really admired Emerson, in fact this is what he said about Emerson's influence on his writing.  “I was simmering, simmering, simmering; Emerson brought me to a boil.”    I want us to read the very first part of Song of Myself which was the first poem    I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  This is what I mean when I say, it seems like it's very simple to understand except I've read this poem hundreds of times and am still slightly confused as to what he means.  The term for this is ambiguous- he makes you, as a reader, put your own interpretation, put yourself into the lines to force the meaning out of it.      True, and if you take it at face value just superficially, it may seem that this is a narcissist celebrating egotism, but it clearly doesn't.  It also could be misunderstood to mean he celebrates idleness and laziness, but that doesn't seem to be right either.    Exactly- I love these first lines.  First of all, they are so iconic.  One thing Whitman is known for besides the cataloguing which I mentioned when we read I Hear America Singing, is this thing that today we call Free Verse. Whitman is often given credit for inventing the concept, although that is debatable.  But what is obvious is that there is no rhyme or meter of any kind at all and there isn't supposed to be.  He doesn't want anything to rhyme.  Instead, he wants to write in these really long sentences.  Every stanza is a single sentence, and he is going to do that through the entire poem.  Whitman felt you couldn't get your idea out in these little short phrases of iambic tetrameter like his Whittier, the guy who threw his book in the fire, was doing.  Whitman wanted, above all else, to create a sense of intimacy between himself and the person reading- and so he wanted to make sure you could follow his idea- from idea to idea.  He got this idea from two places- first he copied the idea from the one book he had been familiar with since his childhood- the King James Version of the Bible.  He copied the style like you see in the Psalms or even the Sermon on the Mount.  He also got the idea from the opera- if you think about opera- you also have these long phrases- that end with things like figaro figaro fiiiigaro-     Is that your impression of the opera?    Well, as you know, I enjoy the opera.  I haven't always, to be honest.  A few years ago, my good friend, I've mentioned her on the podcast before, Millington AP Literature/ Lang teacher Amy Nolette, coerced me to attend with her- and I did.  She is an accomplished musician so she really taught me how to admire what was going on- and we went every year for several years until Covid hit.  But, having said that, I'm fairly sure, that's my best attempt at singing opera.      But back to Whitman, so one of the first things that Whitman is famous for today is this concept of Free Verse- it was innovative then, but now, it doesn't seem that big of a deal.  That was a big deal, but a bigger deal to Whitman were the ideas he was putting out there.    I celebrate myself- not because I'm so important- not because I have all this amazing heritage or skill or anything- I celebrate myself because I have an essence that is 100% unique to me.  Let's read it again.     I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  It's not accidental that he throws in there that scientific language.  And this is where he will offend the capitalist or competitive side of us.  He makes this bold assertion- in this poetic way- to say- what, do you think you're that much better than me- you are made of the exact same material I am- we're both made of atoms- science teaches us that- and for every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.      In some sense it's the I'm okay- you're okay attitude, but taking it up a notch- I celebrate myself- you celebrate yourself.      For sure, and something we all give lip-service to today but no one actually really believes.  I have a creative writing assignment that I ask my students to do every year.  We take another Whitman poem called “There was a Child Went Forth” that talks about identity and the physical objects and places that influence who you are- it's a wonderful poem, anyway, I ask my students to write a poem using Whitman's style and technique about THEIR lives.  I tell them we're going to read them in small groups, and if they like what they wrote and feel comfortable,  we are going to print them and put them outside my door in the hallway for everything to read.  At first they are very very resistant to the idea.  They all hate it- first because it's writing, secondly because it's poetry- but mostly because they don't think they want their lives sprawled on the hallway of the school.  I had a sweet darling child, actually a quiet student, raise her hand in protest and literallty say, I don't want to do this.  I can't do this.  All I do is go to school and work- there is nothing interesting at all about my life.      Ha!  She seems to have missed the point.  She didn't want to celebrate herself and she's exactly the kind of person Whitman loved celebrating.    Exactly- and lots of my kids are like that- they work at Sonic, Chick-Fila- the mall- mowing lawns- but in her case, it turns out she is way more interesting and her poem is on the wall right now.  I may take a picture and post it on our website, so you can see them all.  I'm very proud of my kiddos- not just because they produced good poems but because lots of them are hardworking.       I will say, that next phrase leads us to think that Whitman is a lazy person.  He extols the virtue of loafing.  But of course, what I know about his biography which we'll get more into next week when we talk about his experiences in the Civil War and all of that, but Whitman was the very opposite of lazy.  He was an extremely physical hard worker.      True- Let's read the lines you're talking about..    I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  When he says I loaf and invite my soul- he's getting into the philosopher side of him that is so complex and we really don't even have time to go there today, but it's that old idea of contemplating- today what we call mindfulness.  And I have to admit, I'm not good at this.        He really believes in mindfulness although he didn't know we renamed his concept for him.  Loafe- meaning chill out- turn off the phone, turn off the tv, turn off the computer and invite your soul into yourself.  Chill out!!!  Stop and observe a spear of grass.  Just look at it- let your mind go there- let it focus on something small- it's the kind of thing the yoga instructors keep telling us to do, that we rarely heed but we all know we should.      Exactly- attention and silence- he things they are indispensable to a sane existence- and two things I'm not all that good at.  And then we get to these last two sentences in this opening little poem-    My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  There's a lot to say- but he's going to say- I'm proud to be from this place- my parents are from this place.  I'm 37- that is not young.  He is not a child prodigy- he's writing his first book late in life, relatively- he knows that- but he says I'm in good health and I begin- and I'm not going to stop until death- I'm going to live well all the way til the end- I'm not going to give up on myself.  Ever.      I can see why he's inspiring.  And I to get back to this idea of origins.  You know being an American today is something lots of people are proud of (although it is very American to trash our own country) but that's part of our national ethos- but even these same people proudly display their passport.  America is a powerful country and a rich country.  At that time it was a new country- and new countries don't have the safety of heritage and sometimes the people who come from them have trouble taking pride in their heritage.    I totally know what you're talking about.  There was a listener who connected with us through our Instagram page and showed us some beautiful pictures he had taken.  They were truly amazing- not only were the mountains breathtakingly gorgeous in their own right, but his eye for framing was genius.  I messaged him back and told him what I thought of his art.  We went back and forth and I finally asked him.  Where are you from? And he would never tell me.  He said he was from Central Asia and so fort which I eventually gathered he is from one of the new countries formally part of the USSR.   I'm not saying he was ashamed of where he was from, I didn't get that sense, but he seemed intimated that we were from America- a place that seems so far away and idealized from his point of view.  Whitman would tell this young man- you're from that wonderful air,  from wonderful heritage, from atoms just like ours- not just accept it celebrate it.    Because, as I read onward, he seems to imply, this is the attitude that breeds great things that breeds beautiful things but if it doesn't- that's okay as well- keep going all the way til death- compete not with others but with yourself- as he goes to self- publish the same book 8 more times until he does .    Ha!  I guess that's true.      I want to read the last sentence again of that opening because he sets up a lot of the rest of his writings with something of a warning-    Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  Again- that language seems simple but at the same time I have to really work at what he's going to say.  But I have an interpretation- he's going to say this- put away your school learning and your religious training when you read this.  Sit back because I'm going to say some really hard things- that's what he means with that word “hazard”- but they are not mean- they are natural- it's about the energy of being alive.  It's the beauty of being you, of being a physical body, of being an inter-connected spirit with connections to other people and part of this physical space.      And of course, it's that celebration of the physical body that kept getting him censored. Even Ralph Waldo Emerson later when he was reproducing his book begged him to self-censor what was thinly veiled homo-erotic passages, but he just wouldn't.  He didn't see them as erotic- he didn't even see sex like that.  For him sexuality and the physical body had a self-evidence important place in our lives and had to be brought out in the open- be it a hazard or not.  And again, it kind of was a hazard, he lost a really good job in Washington at one point because his boss found a copy of leaves of Grass in his desk and found it obscene.      Poor guy- well, that takes us to the title- Leaves of Grass- and what that even means.  I mentioned that Whitman was famous for his style or innovative literary technique, he has been increasingly praised for his innovative ideas about the body, the self, consciousness- he was one of the first America poets to even write about consciousness- the other one btw is Emily Dickinson.  But probably the thing I like the best about Whitman, and this is me, personally, is his ability to really capture a wonderful metaphor.  He could just say things in an understandable and pretty way- and this is what poetry really is all about- for my money.    This phrase that is the title – Leaves of Grass- it means something.  First let's read the first part of Song of Myself that talks about grass- I'd ask you to read all of it but I think we might get lost. Song of Myself number 6.      A child said What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands;  How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he.  I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful green stuff woven.    Or I guess it is the handkerchief of the Lord,  A scented gift and remembrancer designedly dropt,  Bearing the owner's name someway in the corners, that we may see and remark, and say Whose?    Or I guess the grass is itself a child, the produced babe of the vegetation.    Or I guess it is a uniform hieroglyphic,  And it means, Sprouting alike in broad zones and narrow zones,  Growing among black folks as among white,  Kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congressman, Cuff, I give them the same, I receive them the same.  And now it seems to me the beautiful uncut hair of graves.  When Whitman loafs around and stares at grass- he sees a picture of America- or a picture of any democracy any group of people that understand that they are one poeple- of which America was the example he knew, but he's not exclusionary by any means.  He says, look, every single blade of grass is totally different and yet in some sense the same.  He calls it a uniform hieroglyphic- what an interesting turn of phrase.  It's and I use his words here “black folks as among white, kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congreeman, Cuff, I give to me the same, I receive them the same.”    For Whitman, the picture of America was a field of grass.  If we look at it, we see hopeful green woven stuff. The handkerchief of the Lord- but if we look at it closely we're all so different- and both things are truly beautiful.  It's a paradox.   He goes on to say, it's from the land, it's made up of the dust that is made up of the people of the land- I know it gets philosophical- and you can take it as far deep as you want to plunge with him.   But you don't have to get all that deep or esoteric if you don't want to.  You can just lay on the grass, and smell it and enjoy it- loaf on it- to use his words.    You know what I like about that entire image and about Whitman's entire philosophy.  He absolutely spoke of diversity, but he did not celebrate diversity- not like we think of doing that today.  He celebrates unity- and that's why this metaphor is the title.  Whitman had a very refined understanding of how easy we can rip each other apart- there is not more divisive time in American history than the 1850s and of course the 1860s- which are the war years.   He lived through the most divided time in American history and he could see it coming even in 1855.  But during his life time, he would see 2.5% of America's population die killing each other that was 750,000 people- if we would compare it to the population of America today- that would be over 7 million people.  Next week we will see how much he admired Lincoln and what he stood for, but as he understood the American experiment,  he believed in admiring differences and loving them, but identifying as a single group- first and foremost.  The dominant image here is of a single landscape- beautiful and united across time and space respecting the past not judging or condemning it- allowing ourselves to spring from it renewed and refreshed.   And I think that's where the universal appeal comes from.  If Whitman was just about American patriotism, maybe we'd like him in this country, but it would feel propagandistic.  His ideals are universal and apply to any group of people- anywhere.  And he's not afraid to admit-some of thing may be self-contradictory.  The first time I ever read Whitman was in college.  I went to school studying political science, but in my junior year I decided I didn't want to do that anymore and I was going to get an English major, well this meant I had to take almost exclusively classes that demanded intense reading- and all at the same time.  I read so much that they all ran together and my grades were not as good as they could have been had I had a healthier pace.  And in all that reading, not a whole lot stood out- but this little poem by Whitman actually did- I underlined it, and I kept the trade book I purchased at the time.  I actually still have it after all these years and so many moves.  In this little section, Whitman is talking in that intimate way that he talks to his reader- it's personal- it's in the second person- and at that time of my life- it was a very chaotic time to be honest- I had no idea what I was doing in my life, my mother had recently died, I had very little idea what I should do in the future- I had changed directions at the last moment- and these famous words just stood out.  Will you read them?  51  The past and present wilt—I have fill'd them, emptied them.  And proceed to fill my next fold of the future.  Listener up there! what have you to confide to me?  Look in my face while I snuff the sidle of evening,  (Talk honestly, no one else hears you, and I stay only a minute longer.)  Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict myself,  (I am large, I contain multitudes.)  I concentrate toward them that are nigh, I wait on the door-slab.  Who has done his day's work? who will soonest be through with his supper?  Who wishes to walk with me?  Will you speak before I am gone? will you prove already too late?  Christy- what did that mean to you.      I really have no idea.  I think the line that I liked is the line everyone likes, “Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict. Myself.”   It just made me feel better.  I knew I was full of inconsistencies. And Whitman just seemed to be saying- of course you are- everyone is- to understand that is just being honest.  Let it go.  Just concentrate on what is near- what you're doing today, supper- that sort of thing.  If you're successful- that's great- if you're a failure- what difference does it make- we're all the same atoms, we're all just leaves of grass.   He just made me feel okay.    Which I guess that would probably have made him happy- the bard of democracy- known as the good gray poet- speaking across time and space about what it means to be a human- to be a leaf of grass.  Thanks for listeninging- next episode- we will delve a little more into his adult life, read some of his most famous poems – those tributes to Abraham Lincoln- and finish our discussion of this amazing American.  AS always, please share about us with a friend or colleague- push out an episode on your social media feed, text an episode to a friend.  Connect with us on our social media at howtolovelitpodcast on facebook, Instagram, twitter, or Linkedin.  If you are a teacher, visit our website for teaching materials that provide ideas scaffolding for using our podcasts as instructional pieces in your classroom.      Peace out.      

英式英語一分鐘 with 蕭叔叔
EP 575 - Quotes from Edgar Allan Poe (4)

英式英語一分鐘 with 蕭叔叔

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 2:31


英式英語一分鐘 with 蕭叔叔
EP 574 - Quotes from Edgar Allan Poe (3)

英式英語一分鐘 with 蕭叔叔

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 2:40


英式英語一分鐘 with 蕭叔叔
EP 573 - Quotes from Edgar Allan Poe (2)

英式英語一分鐘 with 蕭叔叔

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 2:44


Southern Haunts
Bedtime Haunting: The Oval Portrait

Southern Haunts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 12:02


Written in 1845, Edgar Allan Poe's The Oval Portrait is often compared to The Picture of Dorian Gray because that is the only other old timey story folks can think of. Honestly, I can't name another one. But the Oval Portrait clings to the creepy aesthetic that readers of the Victorian author have come to love and one that surrounds a pretty spooky quote from Poe himself. In his book  “Philosophy of Composition,” Poe talks about how “poetry as art is the rhythmical creation of beauty, and that the most poetical topic in the world is the death of a beautiful woman” So, cuddle up, dim the lights, and let me read to you. --Listen to my guest episode on The Silver Linings Playlist.--Want ad free episodes? Listen HEREShop Southern Haunts Merch HERE--IG: @SouthernhauntpodcastFB: Southern Haunts PodcastTwitter: @s_hauntspodcast--Subscribe to Oh! That's A Scary Movie--Music in this episode:https://uppbeat.io/t/kisnou/name-of-the-nighthttps://uppbeat.io/t/ak/midnight-stroll License code: WNT8HKI1FBYUZJMGhttps://uppbeat.io/t/danijel-zambo/friendly-ghost License code: HXQWQMBPM7FB232F"The Haunting Of Lake" originally composed and produced by "VivekSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/southernhauntspodcast)

英式英語一分鐘 with 蕭叔叔
EP 572 - Quotes from Edgar Allan Poe (1)

英式英語一分鐘 with 蕭叔叔

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 1:57


I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere
The Return of the Pharaoh

I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 67:33


“those sacred writings, drawn in Egyptian letters” [STUD]  If there is one author to whom we owe the rise in popularity of Sherlock Holmes in the mid-1970s, it is Nicholas Meyer, BSI ("A Fine Morocco Case"). It was his novel The Seven Per-Cent Solution (which spent 40 weeks on the New York Times Bestseller List) and his screenplay for the film version of the book that put Sherlock Holmes back in mainstream consciousness. Meyer and Holmes have returned with , another Holmes adventure tale that takes us to Egypt in 1910 amid the Egyptomania craze that was running high in Europe at the time.  As The Return takes Holmes and Watson on a journey to North Africa, our conversation with Nick takes us on a literary journey spanning 45 years as he looks at how his writing has (or hasn't) changed over that time. We also point out the timely nature of his topics, homages to Conan Doyle, and even get nods to Homer, Edgar Allan Poe, and Agatha Christie. It's an interview you won't want to miss with the master of latter-day Sherlock Holmes novels.   Please be sure to play our Canonical Couplet quiz: the winner will receive a copy of The Return of the Pharaoh. If you've already read it, play anyway and choose someone to give it to! Answers are due by November 29, 2021 at 11:59 a.m. EDT.     Sponsors  has a new edition in the McCabe-Cody series: , available on September 28.  is the premier publisher of books about Sherlock Holmes and Arthur Conan Doyle, including .  has plenty of books for the holidays. But if you want to ensure it arrives in time, consider their .     Would you care to advertise with us? You can find . Let's chat!   Links This episode:  (Amazon)  audiobook, read by David Robb  (Wikipedia)  (Twitter) "" by Edgar Allan Poe Previous episodes mentioned: Many more links, articles and images are available in our Flipboard magazine at  as well as through our accounts on , , , and .     And would you consider leaving us a rating and review? It would help other Sherlockians to find us.   Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email (comment AT ihearofsherlock DOT com), call us at (774) 221-READ (7323).   Transcript We are so grateful for your support , which makes our transcripts possible. Every amount helps. A transcript will be on soon.   --  

英式英語一分鐘 with 蕭叔叔
EP 571 - Edgar Allan Poe的短篇故事The Black Cat

英式英語一分鐘 with 蕭叔叔

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 2:26


Summer Reading List
Edgar Allan Poe: Season 2 Episode 1

Summer Reading List

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 94:22


Joins us and our special guest, Silvio La Frossia, on our podcast anniversary as we discuss the life and works of the brilliant but troubled Edgar Allan Poe! Instagram: @summerreadinglistpod Twitter: @summerlistpod Facebook: summerreadinglistpod Youtube: Summer Reading List Podcast Tik Tok: @summerreadinglistpod Additonal links: Vincent Price retellings: The Tell-Tale Heart (pt. 1): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LNjgv5p3Ek&ab_channel=mirkodamian The Tell-Tale Heart (pt.2): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TM-tAb-bM-s&ab_channel=mirkodamian The Cask of Amontillado (pt. 1): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XTmWag6wfw&ab_channel=mirkodamian The Cask of Amontillado (pt. 2): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yi4GRpOS7NU&t=5s&ab_channel=mirkodamian The Raven: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7zR3IDEHrM&t=1s&ab_channel=SunshineReading The Simpsons Treehouse of Horror- The Raven: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vbTt1URhwR4&ab_channel=ad0k Cask of Amontillado- Featuring John Heard and René Auberjonois: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TF_sMg5pKI&ab_channel=J2013

DIY MFA Radio
383: The Mashup as a Model: Lessons for Your Writing Career from Edgar Allan Poe - Interview with Catherine Baab-Muguira

DIY MFA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 52:12


Today, I have the pleasure of interviewing Catherine Baab-Muguira. Catherine is a writer and journalist who has contributed to many media outlets, including Slate, Quartz, CNBC and NBC News. She is a frequent podcast and radio guest, with appearances on NPR and Lifehacker's Upgrade. Catherine currently lives in Richmond, Virginia with her husband and baby son. Today we'll be discussing her first book, Poe for Your Problems: Uncommon Advice from History's Least Likely Self-Help Guru, which came out this past September.   In this episode Catherine Baab-Muguira and I discuss: How Edgar Allan Poe unexpectedly inspired her to write a book about mental health. Why she keeps her day job and how it helps her avoid literary snobbery. The value of learning to write good copy and the art of marketing your book. Plus, her #1 tip for writers. For more info and show notes: diymfa.com/383

Southern Haunts
Bedtime Haunting: The Cask of Amontillado

Southern Haunts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 19:34


Hey y'all!I had The second have of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow all ready to go...but it got deleted. So here is The Cast of the Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe. So, cuddle up, dim the lights, and let me read to you. --Want ad free episodes? Listen HEREShop Southern Haunts Merch HERE--IG: @SouthernhauntpodcastFB: Southern Haunts PodcastTwitter: @s_hauntspodcast--Subscribe to Oh! That's A Scary Movie--Music in this episode:https://uppbeat.io/t/kisnou/name-of-the-nighthttps://uppbeat.io/t/ak/midnight-stroll License code: WNT8HKI1FBYUZJMGhttps://uppbeat.io/t/danijel-zambo/friendly-ghost License code: HXQWQMBPM7FB232F"The Haunting Of Lake" originally composed and produced by "VivekSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/southernhauntspodcast)

Palaver: Unraveling Weird Lit
Episode 68: Poe Shit

Palaver: Unraveling Weird Lit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 49:05


We are taking it back to the 1840's with the one and only Edgar Allan Poe! Jess decided to break from his poems and instead tackle some dark and twisted short stories. We lovingly titled this episode “Poe Shit” because we are throwing down with a major horror baddie that has inspired many of our favorite authors! So with love, let's get weird.Be warned, there will be SPOILERS ahead in this episode. If you would like a spoiler free experience, check out some Poe Shit of your own….seriously any book store should have something of his. Don't forget to come back and join our weird book club podcast once you've finished the stories!Check out our social media and send us some feedback! We can't wait to hear from you constant listeners!Twitter: @palaverweirdlitInstagram: @palaverpodcastGmail: palaverweirdlit@gmail.comWe are looking for MORE listener suggestions to expand our bookshelves and use in upcoming episodes! If you are interested in sharing a book you love with us or our weird book club, share your listener suggestions through our gmail (palaverweirdlit@gmail.com). Share with us the title of your book, a spoiler free summary of the book/series, and why you love the book. If you would not like your name shared with your suggestion please let us know in the email. We look forward to hearing from you!Intro & Outro MusicWaltz Of The Skeleton Keys by WombatNoisesAudio | https://soundcloud.com/user-734462061Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.comCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_USI Saw A Ghost Last Night... by Leonell Cassio | https://soundcloud.com/leonellcassioMusic promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.comCreative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unportedhttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en_US

Story Time with Shining Nathan
Episode 2: The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe read by Shining Nathan

Story Time with Shining Nathan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 17:55


Your gay auntie reads to you the horror classic: The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe. Shining Nathan reads this to you in honor of spooky season. Kick back and enjoy this reading. Follow me on social media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shining_nathan Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@shiningnathan? Become a Patron: https://www.patreon.com/shiningnathan

Words by Winter
Poetry Snack, with Edgar Allan Poe

Words by Winter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 5:00


It's a post-Halloween poetry snack, with Edgar Allan Poe.Words by Winter: Conversations, reflections, and poems about the passages of life. Because it's rough out there, and we have to help each other through.Original theme music for our show is by Dylan Perese. Additional music by Kelly Krebs. Artwork by Mark Garry.  Today's poem, "Annabel Lee, by Edgar Allan Poe, is in the public domain.  Words by Winter can be reached at wordsbywinterpodcast@gmail.com. 

The Wilder Ride
The Tell-Tale Heart

The Wilder Ride

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 16:27


For many years, one of the traditions Alan brings to his radio show each Halloween, is a dramatic reading of Edgar Allan Poe's The Tell-Tale Heart. The story is very short and simple. It is only a few pages long. In it, an unnamed narrator is recounting his tale to some unknown audience. He opens asking why would anyone think he is mad? In the narrator's mind, because he can vividly remember the details of his activity and his crime, it should make him sane. He goes so far as to say his senses were all acute, especially his hearing.  As the tale unwinds, we learn about an old man with a blue film over one eye. It's that eye which makes the narrator eventually decide the old man must die. What follows is a painstaking telling of how long it would take to creep into the old man's room, night after night. Then, one night, the opportunity is right and the deed unfolds. However, after hiding the body and the evidence of the crime, police knock on the door.  All appears well since the man believes he has been too clever to be caught. But, at such a late hour and after all of the night's activity, he finds himself suddenly hearing the sound made by a watch, enveloped in cotton. He realizes the old man's heart is still beating and nothing he can do can make the sound stop. It grows louder and louder until finally the narrator, plagued by his own guilt, confesses the crime to the officers. Alan started the tradition of doing a simple live read. Then, after a few years, added some basic sound effects to supplement the tale. This rendition is the most complex to-date, combining ambient music, sound effects and a new reading of the story. The hope was to make it feel like a piece of radio theatre, where the listener can sit back, listening, as the story plays out to the imagination. make sure you have subscribed to The Wilder Ride on your pod-catcher of choice so you will not miss a single episode! If you have not already done so, please come join our Listener's Group on Facebook. Just visit our public page and click on the button to join the group. You can learn more about the regular podcast by visiting our About Us page. You can also find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Morbidly Intoxicated
Halloweenish Episode: Edgar Allan Poe

Morbidly Intoxicated

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 39:51


On our 1 year anniversary of Morbidly Intoxicated, we redo our "first" episode! That's right, we are bringing you the story of Edgar Allan Poe and Mary Rodgers! This was our original first episode, but Sierra didn't like the way it came out, so we changed it to Paul Modrowski. We hope you enjoy our episode! Sorry for the late post! 

All Roads Tavern
All Roads Tavern: All Hallow's Eve Story Night

All Roads Tavern

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 36:43


We have a few spooky stories for you, told by people from across the multiverse! First is Nesi with "The Squeeze" by Willian Shar, Second is Fizzle with "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe, Second with have Argathon with "The Masque of the Red Death" by Edgar Allan Poe, and lastly we have Kona with "Antigonish" by William Hughes Mearns.

Snyder’s Return
Happy Halloween - The Raven - Edgar Allan Poe

Snyder’s Return

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 8:12


Happy Halloween Everyone.A short reading of the iconic poem The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe.This take was inspired by the haunting James Earl Jones read of the poem.CAST & CREWReader: Adam PowellSound Design: Adam PowellMusic:Epidemic Sound - https://www.epidemicsound.com/referral/4u0qhi/Cover Art: Jess Lo - https://twitter.com/akinomii_art~~~~~~~~~~Website: http://snydersreturn.squarespace.comAre you on DISCORD? Come hang out in our server! https://discord.gg/QgU5UNf Join us in the Snyder's Return Facebook Group!~~~~~~~~~~~Social Media:Twitter - https://twitter.com/ReturnSnyderSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/SnydersReturn)

Beyond Texas with W.F. Strong
The Premature Burial - Halloween Edition

Beyond Texas with W.F. Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 16:41


Edgar Allan Poe's frightening tale about premature burials is a perfect Halloween treat.  My suggestion is that you listen to it in the dark, lying on your bed in silence, if possible.  as you know, the right ambiance is everything with horror fiction. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=46226306)

Snipe Hunt: Frightening Folklore
Reading - The Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe

Snipe Hunt: Frightening Folklore

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 18:31


Happy Halloween! Enjoy this dramatic reading (complete with sound effects and music) and get into the spooky mood. Presenting a horrifying short story: The Masque of the Red Death. Facebook: facebook.com/snipehuntpodcast Twitter: twitter.com/SnipeHuntPod Instagram: instagram.com/snipehuntpodcast/ Youtube: youtube.com/channel/UCM4sfl-CZQ4iKzpLL0MvfeQ Patreon: patreon.com/snipehunt --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/snipehunt/support

Lurk
2021 Halloween Bonus Edgar Allan Poe's The Telltale Heart

Lurk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 14:57


Listen to Jamie read Poe's chilling story The Telltale HeartHappy Halloween Lurkers!To see photos we discussed in this episode, please follow us on our Social Media platforms:Lurk on FacebookLurk on TwitterLurk on InstagramWe have a new Facebook Group join in the discussion! Lurk Podcast Facebook GroupWe are also now found on YouTube- Lurk on YouTubeWe've got Merch!Get Lurk MerchResourcesEdgar Allan Poe National Historic Site- PhiladelphiaEdgar Allan Poe House and Museum BaltimoreThe Poe Museum- RichmondWestminster Hall and Burying Ground Baltimore

For Reading Out Loud
Poe, Valdemar, Amontillado

For Reading Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 34:58


It's Halloween. The ideal time for Edgar Allan Poe. And so, two classic tales.

For Reading Out Loud
Poe, Valdemar, Amontillado

For Reading Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 34:58


It's Halloween. The perfect time for Edgar Allan Poe. Here are two classic tales.

Morbidly Intoxicated
Scary Stories: Part Two

Morbidly Intoxicated

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 47:14


"Today on Morbidly Intoxicated, we are continuing with our scary story presentations." This week on Morbidly Intoxicated, we continue our saga of scary stories, which will hopefully get you in the mood for Halloween, leading up to our one year anniversary! Get in the holiday spirit with an unsettling story that will make you think, and some classic Edgar Allan Poe.We hope you enjoy, and happy podcasting ;)

Saturday Night Freak Show
Two Evil Eyes (1990)

Saturday Night Freak Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 87:19


Colin thinks having Two Evil Eyes (1990) are better than one as two Masters of Horror, George Romero and Dario Argento, adapt a pair of Edgar Allan Poe stories. Adrienne Barbeau oozes sexuality in The Facts in the Case of M Valdemar, while Harvey Keitel gives a master class in drunk acting in The Black Cat. Listen as we talk freely about multiple cat murders, duplicitous lovers, shadow ghosts, pagan renaissance faires, thirsty bartenders and more on this week's exciting episode! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

St. Louis on the Air
Get in the Halloween spirit with this recitation of Poe's ‘The Masque of the Red Death'

St. Louis on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 17:22


Edgar Allan Poe's “The Masque of the Red Death” is a most appropriate tale for Halloween during the pandemic. This audio version is recited by historical interpreter Anne Williams with production and sound design by Aaron Doerr.

Jollyville Radio
Bonus Episode - The Raven

Jollyville Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 9:08


Happy Halloween! Michael Crosa reads The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe. This recording originally appeared in an episode of Poe works published October 10, 2021 by Lunatics Radio Hour podcast. Give them a follow!

Cinema Siblings
Siblings Chats: The best covid movie; plus some thoughts on the morass of ‘Midnight Mass'.

Cinema Siblings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 73:11


Cinema Siblings S3:E1: Siblings Chats: Welcome to Season 3 of Cinema Siblings! Today we're talking about a slew of movies and shows we've been watching and/or are excited about — and some we're not so excited about. We talk about the indie movie ‘Little Fish' on Hulu and why it might just be the best covid movie we're gonna get. Plus, we spend some time chatting about the morass of a show that is ‘Midnight Mass', and what makes it so frustrating. We end the show riffing on the new ‘The Batman' trailer and who should fill Daniel Craig's shoes as the new James Bond. Enjoy! Subscribe to the Cinema Siblings Society ‘Little Fish' trailer ‘Midnight Mass' trailer “Mike Flanagan Explores His Private Horrors in ‘Midnight Mass'”, via The New York Times Mike Flanagan's Edgar Allan Poe show in development, via Deadline ‘Squid Game' trailer ‘The Batman' trailer Follow the show: Spotify / Apple Podcasts / Google Podcasts / Anchor / Subscribe Send us your questions or suggestions! Email us! Connect with the siblings on Letterboxd: Brad – https://boxd.it/r3cf / Beth – https://boxd.it/r367 Intro/Outro music: “Jump” by Van Halen --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cinema-siblings/support

Dave Hill's Podcasting Incident
Episode 238: Author Catherine Baab-Muguira

Dave Hill's Podcasting Incident

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 58:27


Halloween is here, which Dave, Dez and Chris pretty much forgot but it's okay because Cat Baab-Muguira, author of the new book Poe For Your Problems: Uncommon Advice from History's Least Likely Self-Help Guru, is here to talk about exorcisms, holding up McDonald's, why Edgar Allan Poe is acceptable for small children but Metallica isn't, and other fun topics. Recorded live October 27, 2021.Buy Cat's book Poe For Your Problems today or Dave will stab you.Watch The Dave Hill Goodtime Hour  every Monday at 8pm ET, now exclusively on Twitch!WE HAVE T-SHIRTS NOW! Support Dave, Dez and Chris by purchasing one today!Support this show by becoming a Maximum Fun member!Buy Painted Doll's new record How To Draw Fire from Tee Pee Records today!Purchase Witch Taint's new album Sons of Midwestern Darkness  immediately.Dave's new stand up album The Pride of Cleveland  is out now on 800 Pound Gorilla Records! Buy it or Dave will stab you.Watch the music video for “Death To Death Metal” on YouTube or Dave's feelings will be hurt.Follow Dave on Instagram (@mrdavehill), Dez on Twitter (@shouthouseradio) and Chris on Twitter (@csgersbeck). Dave is banned from Twitter.Buy Dave's incredible new book Parking The MooseJoin our incredible weekly newsletter. This is basically the greatest newsletter you'll ever sign up for.Chat with listeners at Dave Hill's Facebooking Incident. Everyone is making out here and stuff. It rules.Please listen to our other podcast Dave Hill: History Fluffer. It's totally different from this one and it smells great.Also please listen to our other other podcast So… You're Canadian with Dave Hill on the Maximum Fun Network.

Colorado Matters
Oct. 28, 2021: Human composting in Colorado; The Raven’s Halloween haunt

Colorado Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 50:07


When you die, what do you want done with your body? A new law in Colorado allows a new option: human composting. Then, what happens when someone can afford the land, but not the house? Plus, Colorado Matters' 20th anniversary revisits a conversation with pastor Nadia Bolz-Weber. And a special Halloween treat, Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven."

Story Time with Shining Nathan
Episode 1: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe read by Shining Nathan

Story Time with Shining Nathan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 11:40


Your gay auntie reads to you the horror classic: The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe. Shining Nathan reads this to you in honor of spooky season. Kick back and enjoy this reading. Follow me on social media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shining_nathan Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@shiningnathan?

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

This week, Georgia and Karen cover the mysterious death of Edgar Allan Poe and the harrowing case of Cyntoia Brown. 

Totally Pawsome Pod
Quoth the Raven, "Baltimore!"

Totally Pawsome Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 13:28


Dr Sip's outside is coming inside, Melissa has company, so everyone is taking a break. Enjoy this  episode from BewilderBeasts - remastered for your listening pleasure. 

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep
Ligeia | Edgar Allan Poe

Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 45:15


Tonight, for the final episode of our third annual Classic Horror Sleep Story Series this October, we will read the Edgar Allan Poe tale “Ligeia”.The story follows an unnamed narrator and his wife Ligeia, a beautiful and intelligent raven-haired woman. She falls ill and dies- but not for long. ​​It may or may not have all been a hallucination of the narrator, and the story may or may not have been a satire by Poe of the Gothic genre itself. — read by 'N' — See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Well Told Tale
The Pit and the Pendulum

The Well Told Tale

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 42:39


We return, this Halloween week, to the twisted imagination of one of our favourite writers here at The Well Told Tale, Edgar Allan Poe.  Unlike many of his other gothic Tales, his focus in this short story is not on the fantastic, or the phantasmagorical, but the terrifying reality with which the protagonist is presented.  Published at the end of 1842, 'The Pit and the Pendulum' is a re-imagining of the horrors that faced those persecuted by the Spanish Inquisition.  What it lacks in historical fact, it makes up for in spine-tingling terror...If you'd like to support The Well Told Tale, please visit us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thewelltoldtaleBooks - (buying anything on Amazon through this link helps support the podcast):The Pit and the Pendulum - https://amzn.to/3jFwgIxEdgar Allan Poe: The Ultimate Collection - https://amzn.to/3baXKASThe Complete Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe - https://amzn.to/3jXvjvpFilmsThe Pit and the Pendulum (1961) - https://amzn.to/3nAWZaqThe Pit and the Pendulum (1991) - https://amzn.to/3bcQ15wI would like to thank my patrons: Toni A, Joshua Clark, Maura Lee, Jane, John Bowles, Glen Thrasher, Ruairi, Chris and Britt.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/thewelltoldtale)

Down These Mean Streets (Old Time Radio Detectives)
BONUS‌ ‌-‌ ‌Halloween‌ ‌Hoopla‌!

Down These Mean Streets (Old Time Radio Detectives)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 234:10


Turn down the lights and grab your candy - it's time for the Down These Mean Streets Halloween Special! Join me for a king-sized trick-or-treating trip through the golden age of radio for some comedies and chillers designed to get you in the Halloween spirit. Enjoy Bob Hope recreating his role in The Ghost Breakers as presented on The Screen Directors' Playhouse (originally aired on NBC on April 3, 1949). Then, it's a pair of terrifying tales from Edgar Allan Poe - "The Tell-Tale Heart" from NBC Presents Short Story (1951) and "The Black Cat" from Peter Lorre's Mystery in the Air (originally aired on NBC on September 18, 1947). We'll hear a trio of Halloween comedies from The Jack Benny Program (originally aired on CBS on October 31, 1948), My Favorite Husband (originally aired on CBS on October 28, 1949) and Our Miss Brooks (originally aired on CBS on October 30, 1949). Escape presents an adaptation of The Birds that aired a decade before Hitchcock brought the story to the big screen (originally aired on CBS on July 10, 1954). Finally, Ernest Chappell stars in a wry chiller from Wyllis Cooper in "Don't Tell Me About Halloween" from Quiet Please (originally aired on Mutual on October 27, 1947).

Geek Thyself
Geek Thyself - Edgar Allan Poe-Ms

Geek Thyself

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 33:20


Some fun All Hallows Eve play for you all!!

Nerd of Godcast
Spoopy Season Special- THE RAVEN

Nerd of Godcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 5:23


In honor of the season the crew does a reading of Edgar Allan Poe's The Raven (with the help of a bell ringer with a short attention span) Support this podcast

LitReading - Classic Short Stories
The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe

LitReading - Classic Short Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 17:14


While Halloween is the season for scary stories, their popularity is timeless. That is why this dark tale of revenge still send chills down listeners spines after almost two centuries.The Cask of Amontillado was first published in the November 1946 issue “Godey's Lady's Book” which demonstrates the universal fascination with scary stories. Poe understood humanity's greatest fears and exploited them masterfully, making him the all-time master of the horror genre.

The Christian Humanist Podcast
Episode 325: Descent into the Maelstrom (Halloween Crossover 2021)

The Christian Humanist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 1:10


Nathan Gilmour is joined by Dan Dawson and Victoria Reynolds Farmer in the network's annual Halloween crossover, discussing Edgar Allan Poe's short story "A Descent Into the Maelstrom."

The Literary Life Podcast
Episode 110: “The Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allan Poe

The Literary Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 97:14


On this special Halloween episode of The Literary Life, Angelina (Harriet Vane), Cindy (Professor MacGonagall), and Thomas (Lord Peter Wimsey), talk about Edgar Allan Poe's tale, “The Masque of the Red Death.” If you are a Patron, you can watch this episode and see our hosts in their costumes as they discuss the story! Angelina begins the chat with a little background on Edgar Allan Poe and his thoughts on the imagination and why he wrote the way he did, as well as connections with Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Thomas points out the connection between this story and Boccaccio's Decameron. Highlights of the discussion include Poe's use of medieval motifs, the imagery and symbolism in Poe's writing, the modern person's avoidance of considering death, and Poe's idea of life as a play within a play. Get in on the Western Films and Fiction webinar on November 22nd with Thomas and James Banks! Register here to join in! Next week we will continue our series on Mansfield Park. To view the schedule for the episodes in the series, see our Upcoming Events page. Also, if you want to join our members-only forum off Facebook, check out our Patreon page to learn more! Commonplace Quotes: I am more concerned by what “the Bomb” is doing already. One meets young people who make the threat of it a reason for poisoning every pleasure and evading every duty in the present. Didn't they know that, bomb or no bomb, all men die, many in horrible ways? There is no good moping and sulking about it. C. S. Lewis There are certain evil men who would be less dangerous if there were not some scrap of virtue in them. La Rochefoucauld This handmaiden (poesy) is not forbidden to moralize in her own fashion. She is not forbidden to depict but to reason and preach of virtue. Edgar Allan Poe, from his review of Longfellow's Ballads Sonnet – To Science by Edgar Allan Poe Science! true daughter of Old Time thou art!    Who alterest all things with thy peering eyes. Why preyest thou thus upon the poet's heart,    Vulture, whose wings are dull realities? How should he love thee? or how deem thee wise,    Who wouldst not leave him in his wandering To seek for treasure in the jewelled skies,    Albeit he soared with an undaunted wing? Hast thou not dragged Diana from her car,    And driven the Hamadryad from the wood To seek a shelter in some happier star?    Hast thou not torn the Naiad from her flood, The Elfin from the green grass, and from me The summer dream beneath the tamarind tree? Source: The Complete Poems and Stories of Edgar Allan Poe (1946) Book List: Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe God in the Dock by C. S. Lewis Maxims and Reflections by François de La Rochefoucauld “The Philosophy of Composition” by Edgar Allan Poe The Murders in the Rue Morge by Edgar Allan Poe The Decameron by Giovanni Boccacio Comus by John Milton The Tempest by William Shakespeare The Castle of Utronto by Horace Walpole Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen Oxford Book of English Verse ed. by Arthur Quiller-Couch Hamlet by William Shakespeare Support The Literary Life: Become a patron of The Literary Life podcast as part of the “Friends and Fellows Community” on Patreon, and get some amazing bonus content! Thanks for your support! Connect with Us: You can find Angelina and Thomas at HouseofHumaneLetters.com, on Instagram @angelinastanford, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ANGStanford/ Find Cindy at morningtimeformoms.com, on Instagram @cindyordoamoris and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cindyrollins.net/. Check out Cindy's own Patreon page also! Follow The Literary Life on Instagram, and jump into our private Facebook group, The Literary Life Discussion Group, and let's get the book talk going! http://bit.ly/literarylifeFB

Unpleasant Dreams
The Strange Death of Edgar Allan Poe - Unpleasant Dreams 9

Unpleasant Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 16:13


For our Halloween episode, we explore the strange death of the master of the macabre himself, Edgar Allan Poe. --- Cassandra Harold is your host. EM Hilker is our principal writer and researcher with additional writing by Cassandra Harold. Jim Harold is our Executive Producer. Unpleasant Dreams is a production of Jim Harold Media. You can find EM Hilker's original article HERE PODCAST TRANSCRIPT There is much that can be said about Edgar Allan Poe, but in terms of his literary habits, little that needs to be. Much more famous in death than he was in life, he was nevertheless a literary critic of some renown in his own time. His true love, however, was lurid, ghastly fiction. Poe unknowingly fathered the genre of detective fiction, through his tales of C. Auguste Dupin. The most well-known Dupin story was The Murders in the Rue Morgue, which served to set the stage for Sherlock Holmes and his ilk. He is best known now for his gothic fiction, morbid tales filled with crumbling stone castles and candle-lit catacombs, of demonic foes and bitter sweet revenge. He brought us The Raven, Hop-Frog, The Fall of the House of Usher. The creative mind of Poe was deep and dark and mysterious as a night ocean.  … but little is so mysterious as Poe's own death.... FIND THE REMAINDER OF THE TRANSCRIPT HERE SOURCES – FURTHER READING Anon. “Poe's Death Theories.” Poe's Death | Edgar Allan Poe Museum | Richmond, VA, www.poemuseum.org/poes-death. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Birch, Doug. “The Passing of Poe: What Really Happened to the Master of the Macabre in the Days Leading up to His Death Here 145 Years Ago?” Baltimoresun.com, 24 Oct. 2018, www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xpm-1994-10-02-1994275208-story.html. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Edgar Allan Poe: A Life from Beginning to End. Hourly History, 2018. Kindle ed. Eschner, Kat. “Who Was the Poe Toaster? We Still Have No Idea.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 19 Jan. 2017, www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/who-was-poe-toaster-we-still-have-no-idea-180961820/. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021  Geiling, Natasha. “The (Still) Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 7 Oct. 2014, www.smithsonianmag.com/history/still-mysterious-death-edgar-allan-poe-180952936. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Kay, Liz F. “Poe Toaster Tribute Is ‘Nevermore'.” Baltimoresun.com, 9 Dec. 2018, www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/bs-xpm-2010-01-19-bal-poe0119-story.html. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Lovejoy, Bess. Rest in Pieces. Simon and Schuster, 2013. Miller, John C. ‘The Exhumations and Reburials of Edgar and Virginia Poe and Mrs. Clemm,” Poe Studies, Dec. 1974, Vol. Vii, No. 27: 46-4, www.eapoe.org/pstudies/ps1970/p1974204.htm. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allen Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 2000. Pruitt, Sarah. “The Riddle of Edgar Allan Poe's Death.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 26 Oct. 2015, www.history.com/news/how-did-edgar-allan-poe-die. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Semtner, Christopher P. “13 Haunting Facts About Edgar Allan Poe's Death.” Biography.com, A&E Networks Television, 13 Jan. 2021, www.biography.com/news/edgar-allan-poe-death-facts. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Walsh, John Evangelist. Midnight Dreary: The Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe. St. Martin's Griffin, 2000. 

MattCast
Edgar Allan Poe

MattCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 46:50


The complicated and creative life of Edgar Allan Poe is explored, including two dramatic readings of his works and a twist at the end of his life you have probably never heard. The Raven: Dark Ambient Melodies (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LptTKfrHSi4), by Apocryphos, Kammarheit, Atrium Carceri - “A Lonely Strain” (https://cryochamber.bandcamp.com/album/onyx) and “Northumbria” by Sacred Ground (https://cryochamber.bandcamp.com/album/helluland). “Sound Effect - Knock on the Door - Sound” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deJDIfS0Psk) “Creeky Door Sound Effect” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKq51DHuLzU) “Old Window Open and Close HQ Sound Effect” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3y4mBNFEEM) The Tell-Tale Heart: “1 Hour of Royalty Free Horror Music” by Marc v/d Meulen (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JnPSMNuHtw) “Creeky Door Sound Effect” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKq51DHuLzU) “Heartbeat Sound Effect - Slow, Fast, Creepy, Irregular, Normal - Free Download I No Copyright” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLXLo3rEdrE) Other Music: “Chance,” by Edoy from the album, “Introspection,” 2021. Promoted by freemusicarchive.org. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/legalcode). “Cloister,” by Edoy from the album, “Introspection,” 2021. Promoted by freemusicarchive.org. Licensed under CC BY-ND 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/legalcode). “Waiting,” by Edoy from the album, “Instrospection,” 2021. Promoted by freemusicarchive.org. Licensed under CC BY 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode).https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcode “Far Out There,” by Sergey Cheremisinov, from the album, “The Healing,” 2019. Promoted by freemusicarchive.org. Licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcode).

The City of Man
Episode 149: Halloween Crossover Episode: "The Tell-Tale Heart"

The City of Man

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 1:26


In today's episode, Jordan talks to David Grubbs and Matthew Block about Edgar Allan Poe's short story "The Tell-Tale Heart."

History That Doesn't Suck
100: Halloween Special! Edgar Allan Poe: The Tell-tale Heart, The Cask of Amontillado, & The Raven

History That Doesn't Suck

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 57:27


‘How, then, am I mad? Hearken! and observe how healthily—how calmly I can tell you the whole story.” This is the story of a man driven to madness by a pale blue eye; the story of a man who's vowed revenge; of a young scholar heartbroken by death. This is also the story of the man who brought us these three tales–one of the most grim and ghastly Gothic authors in American history–Edgar Allan Poe. This episode is best enjoyed alone. In the dark. With headphones. Happy Halloween! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Exploring Series
The Black Cat by Edgar Allan Poe (Audiobook)

The Exploring Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 30:22


https://poestories.com/read/blackcat Support the Patreon to see Exploring videos early and vote on new ones!: http://bit.ly/1U9QkPh Join the Discord!: https://discord.gg/eBHHHe5 Support the Series with official Merch!: https://t.co/aH0HApXp7v Follow me on Twitter for updates!: https://twitter.com/TES_Mangg Listen on Podcasts: https://anchor.fm/theexploringseries Exploring SCP Foundation Playlist: https://bit.ly/2whu8NA Exploring Dungeons and Dragons Playlist: https://bit.ly/348IZZu Exploring Warhammer 40k Playlist: https://bit.ly/2DoFZgu Exploring Celtic Mythology Playlist: https://bit.ly/2rTuHLm Exploring Norse Mythology Playlist: http://bit.ly/2EAHTda Exploring Elder Scrolls Playlist: http://bit.ly/2fgqQoY Exploring Star Wars Playlist: http://bit.ly/2lNtlN0 Exploring Middle-Earth Playlist: http://bit.ly/2cGNcty Exploring the Cthulhu Mythos Playlist: http://bit.ly/25OI9jY Exploring History Playlist: https://bit.ly/2w7XMqM The Story of FFXIV Playlist: https://bit.ly/2XgU1Lk My Gaming Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ManggsLPs Music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dE3F6sybNJk --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theexploringseries/support

The Horror! (Old Time Radio)
Berenice by CBS Radio Mystery Theater

The Horror! (Old Time Radio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021


https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/archive.org/download/rr22021/TheHorror1041.mp3 On this week's episode of The Horror, the CBS Radio Mystery Theater presents its adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe's story, Berenice. This episode originally aired January 7, 1975. Download TheHorror1041