Podcasts about Jenner

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Latest podcast episodes about Jenner

It Sure Is A Beautiful Day
Why Kris Jenner is Kween with Celeb Hairstylist Chris Dylan

It Sure Is A Beautiful Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 49:07


This week we lighten things up a tad!    He's done everybody from Kathy and Nicky Hilton, to Brooke Burke, to Lisa Rinna's daughters Amelia and Delilah, to damn near every Kardashian and Jenner in the whole family. On this episode of It Sure is a Beautiful Day you'll meet celeb hairstylist Chris Dylan, one of Catt's good friends. During this conversation they pop the cherry on Catt's home studio and hear all about his professional journey in Hollywood which will totally knock your socks off. Two words: Kris Jenner.   Make sure to stick around for Chris' product picks. What to splurge on? What drugstore finds are the absolute best? Are hair growth serums and supplements actually worth it?    Please, leave your #ABD review on Apple Podcasts and don't forget to follow the show on IG at @abdwithcatt.   Big thanks to our sponsor this week:    Winona Street Design  - use code CATT for 10% off your purchase Everhem.com/catt for 10% off your first purchase   Produced by Dear Media.   Please note that this episode may contain paid endorsements and advertisements for products and services. Individuals on the show may have a direct or indirect financial interest in products or services referred to in this episode.

Beehive Household Podcast
GUY JENNER - CEO of HWM Aston Martin; History & Heritage of One of the Most Iconic British Brands

Beehive Household Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 45:53


Nataliya is talking with the CEO of HWM Aston Martin, Guy Jenner, about his personal journey and the history and heritage of HWM Aston Martin, the world's oldest Aston Martin dealership. Guy discusses his values and mindset and explains why consistency, working hard and determination are key to achieving success He also shares a fascinating insight into the origins of HWM Aston Martin and its long and successful relationship with Aston Martin cars.   KEY TAKEAWAYS I was interested in cars and able to speak the right language to people and understand what they needed Everything is a learning curve but the harder you work the better you do You have to create the opportunities and take them Collective learning and having access to a different way of thinking was transformational Aston Martin cars are very beautiful but for me, it's the engineering, how it drives, sounds and feels Performance is achieved in an understated way with smart design that delivers vigour and potential Success is having control in your life so that you can choose what you want to do The determination to be present and show up consistently is key As a small race team, we got on the podium and achieved, Stirling completed his first proper race for HWM   BEST MOMENTS ‘Being able to spot racing talent early on was an important factor in the success of the racing team' ‘It's important to appreciate everyone you work with in business and everyone you meet in life' ‘There is so much warmth and goodwill toward the brand'   VALUABLE RESOURCES Beehive Podcast https://www.hwmastonmartin.co.uk  HWM Aston Martin IG   ABOUT THE HOST NATALIYA LLOYD is a Design Entrepreneur & Celebrity Podcaster based in London and working globally.   CONTACT DETAILS You can connect with Nataliya on: LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/in/nataliyalloyd Instagram https://www.instagram.com/nataliyalloydinteriors/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/NataliyaLloydInteriors/ And her website www.nataliyalloydinteriors.com   PODCAST DESCRIPTION On this podcast, Nataliya features successful professionals, entrepreneurs and businesspeople to discover more about their lifestyle and personal aspects of their success formula. The bi-weekly podcast episodes shed new light on how extraordinary people sustain their success, their winning mindsets, daily routines, challenges they face and provide inspiration and tips for all listeners.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Peace Love and Bring a Bat
Move the Ball and Bring a Bat - Jennifer Garrett

Peace Love and Bring a Bat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 40:07


Suit up. Show up. Move the ball. That's the theme today as Uncle Dave sits down with Jennifer Garrett, branding architect, business consultant, executive coach, speaker and podcast host. Jennifer and Dave have a great, inspiring conversation and go into Jenner's books, "Dominate the Game" and "Move the Ball," in detail while making sure that they swing away to knock this one out of the park. There's an "R" in our hearts today and that "R" stands for Run like a champion because that's what you'll be doing after you listen. Enjoy! Check out Jennifer at: https://dominatethegame.square.site/ https://www.jenniferagarrett.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/movetheball/ I would really enjoy hearing from you. If you would like to connect, you can find me, your host Uncle Dave, David Chametzky here: https://www.davidchametzky.com  Find me on social media as David Chametzky, or on the Facebook page for Peace, Love and Bring a Bat, on Twitter @goofyjaam Peace Love and Bring a Bat is produced by Launchpad 516 Studios. For show ideas, guest inquiries or general feedback, drop an email: peacelovebringabat@gmail.com For sponsorships and media inquiries, drop an email: peacelovebringabat@lp516.com If you are enjoying hearing this and want to support either the podcast OR more importantly Goons for Good please feel free to click on the Patron link below to support and for a shout out and a half hour one on one session of Havening(R) https://patron.podbean.com/PeaceLoveandBringaBat Pink Cans for Cancer http://recycling4acure.org/pink-cans-4-cancer Subscribe to Peace Love and Bring a Bat on Apple Podcasts and get notified of new episodes, every Thursday! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/peace-love-and-bring-a-bat/id1552738547 (c) 2021 On the Path LLC. All Rights Reserved and Enthusiastically  

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 157: “See Emily Play” by The Pink Floyd

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “See Emily Play", the birth of the UK underground, and the career of Roger Barrett, known as Syd. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "First Girl I Loved" by the Incredible String Band. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this time, due to the number of Pink Floyd songs. I referred to two biographies of Barrett in this episode -- A Very Irregular Head by Rob Chapman is the one I would recommend, and the one whose narrative I have largely followed. Some of the information has been superseded by newer discoveries, but Chapman is almost unique in people writing about Barrett in that he actually seems to care about the facts and try to get things right rather than make up something more interesting. Crazy Diamond by Mike Watkinson and Pete Anderson is much less reliable, but does have quite a few interview quotes that aren't duplicated by Chapman. Information about Joe Boyd comes from Boyd's book White Bicycles. In this and future episodes on Pink Floyd I'm also relying on Nick Mason's Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd and Pink Floyd: All the Songs by Jean-Michel Guesdon and Philippe Margotin. The compilation Relics contains many of the most important tracks from Barrett's time with Pink Floyd, while Piper at the Gates of Dawn is his one full album with them. Those who want a fuller history of his time with the group will want to get Piper and also the box set Cambridge St/ation 1965-1967. Barrett only released two solo albums during his career. They're available as a bundle here. Completists will also want the rarities and outtakes collection Opel.  ERRATA: I talk about “Interstellar Overdrive” as if Barrett wrote it solo. The song is credited to all four members, but it was Barrett who came up with the riff I talk about. And annoyingly, given the lengths I went to to deal correctly with Barrett's name, I repeatedly refer to "Dave" Gilmour, when Gilmour prefers David. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A note before I begin -- this episode deals with drug use and mental illness, so anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to skip this one. But also, there's a rather unique problem in how I deal with the name of the main artist in the story today. The man everyone knows as Syd Barrett was born Roger Barrett, used that name with his family for his whole life, and in later years very strongly disliked being called "Syd", yet everyone other than his family called him that at all times until he left the music industry, and that's the name that appears on record labels, including his solo albums. I don't believe it's right to refer to people by names they choose not to go by themselves, but the name Barrett went by throughout his brief period in the public eye was different from the one he went by later, and by all accounts he was actually distressed by its use in later years. So what I'm going to do in this episode is refer to him as "Roger Barrett" when a full name is necessary for disambiguation or just "Barrett" otherwise, but I'll leave any quotes from other people referring to "Syd" as they were originally phrased. In future episodes on Pink Floyd, I'll refer to him just as Barrett, but in episodes where I discuss his influence on other artists, I will probably have to use "Syd Barrett" because otherwise people who haven't listened to this episode won't know what on Earth I'm talking about. Anyway, on with the show. “It's gone!” sighed the Rat, sinking back in his seat again. “So beautiful and strange and new. Since it was to end so soon, I almost wish I had never heard it. For it has roused a longing in me that is pain, and nothing seems worth while but just to hear that sound once more and go on listening to it for ever. No! There it is again!” he cried, alert once more. Entranced, he was silent for a long space, spellbound. “Now it passes on and I begin to lose it,” he said presently. “O Mole! the beauty of it! The merry bubble and joy, the thin, clear, happy call of the distant piping! Such music I never dreamed of, and the call in it is stronger even than the music is sweet! Row on, Mole, row! For the music and the call must be for us.” That's a quote from a chapter titled "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" from the classic children's book The Wind in the Willows -- a book which for most of its length is a fairly straightforward story about anthropomorphic animals having jovial adventures, but which in that one chapter has Rat and Mole suddenly encounter the Great God Pan and have a hallucinatory, transcendental experience caused by his music, one so extreme it's wiped from their minds, as they simply cannot process it. The book, and the chapter, was a favourite of Roger Barrett, a young child born in Cambridge in 1946. Barrett came from an intellectual but not especially bookish family. His father, Dr. Arthur Barrett, was a pathologist -- there's a room in Addenbrooke's Hospital named after him -- but he was also an avid watercolour painter, a world-leading authority on fungi, and a member of the Cambridge Philharmonic Society who was apparently an extraordinarily good singer; while his mother Winifred was a stay-at-home mother who was nonetheless very active in the community, organising a local Girl Guide troupe. They never particularly encouraged their family to read, but young Roger did particularly enjoy the more pastoral end of the children's literature of the time. As well as the Wind in the Willows he also loved Alice in Wonderland, and the Little Grey Men books -- a series of stories about tiny gnomes and their adventures in the countryside. But his two big passions were music and painting. He got his first ukulele at age eleven, and by the time his father died, just before Roger's sixteenth birthday, he had graduated to playing a full-sized guitar. At the time his musical tastes were largely the same as those of any other British teenager -- he liked Chubby Checker, for example -- though he did have a tendency to prefer the quirkier end of things, and some of the first songs he tried to play on the guitar were those of Joe Brown: [Excerpt: Joe Brown, "I'm Henry VIII I Am"] Barrett grew up in Cambridge, and for those who don't know it, Cambridge is an incubator of a very particular kind of eccentricity. The university tends to attract rather unworldly intellectual overachievers to the city -- people who might not be able to survive in many other situations but who can thrive in that one -- and every description of Barrett's father suggests he was such a person -- Barrett's sister Rosemary has said that she believes that most of the family were autistic, though whether this is a belief based on popular media portrayals or a deeper understanding I don't know. But certainly Cambridge is full of eccentric people with remarkable achievements, and such people tend to have children with a certain type of personality, who try simultaneously to live up to and rebel against expectations of greatness that come from having parents who are regarded as great, and to do so with rather less awareness of social norms than the typical rebel has. In the case of Roger Barrett, he, like so many others of his generation, was encouraged to go into the sciences -- as indeed his father had, both in his career as a pathologist and in his avocation as a mycologist. The fifties and sixties were a time, much like today, when what we now refer to as the STEM subjects were regarded as new and exciting and modern. But rather than following in his father's professional footsteps, Roger Barrett instead followed his hobbies. Dr. Barrett was a painter and musician in his spare time, and Roger was to turn to those things to earn his living. For much of his teens, it seemed that art would be the direction he would go in. He was, everyone agrees, a hugely talented painter, and he was particularly noted for his mastery of colours. But he was also becoming more and more interested in R&B music, especially the music of Bo Diddley, who became his new biggest influence: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "Who Do You Love?"] He would often spend hours with his friend Dave Gilmour, a much more advanced guitarist, trying to learn blues riffs. By this point Barrett had already received the nickname "Syd". Depending on which story you believe, he either got it when he started attending a jazz club where an elderly jazzer named Sid Barrett played, and the people were amused that their youngest attendee, like one of the oldest, was called Barrett; or, more plausibly, he turned up to a Scout meeting once wearing a flat cap rather than the normal scout beret, and he got nicknamed "Sid" because it made him look working-class and "Sid" was a working-class sort of name. In 1962, by the time he was sixteen, Barrett joined a short-lived group called Geoff Mott and the Mottoes, on rhythm guitar. The group's lead singer, Geoff Mottlow, would go on to join a band called the Boston Crabs who would have a minor hit in 1965 with a version of the Coasters song "Down in Mexico": [Excerpt: The Boston Crabs, "Down in Mexico"] The bass player from the Mottoes, Tony Sainty, and the drummer Clive Welham, would go on to form another band, The Jokers Wild, with Barrett's friend Dave Gilmour. Barrett also briefly joined another band, Those Without, but his time with them was similarly brief. Some sources -- though ones I consider generally less reliable -- say that the Mottoes' bass player wasn't Tony Sainty, but was Roger Waters, the son of one of Barrett's teachers, and that one of the reasons the band split up was that Waters had moved down to London to study architecture. I don't think that's the case, but it's definitely true that Barrett knew Waters, and when he moved to London himself the next year to go to Camberwell Art College, he moved into a house where Waters was already living. Two previous tenants at the same house, Nick Mason and Richard Wright, had formed a loose band with Waters and various other amateur musicians like Keith Noble, Shelagh Noble, and Clive Metcalfe. That band was sometimes known as the Screaming Abdabs, The Megadeaths, or The Tea Set -- the latter as a sly reference to slang terms for cannabis -- but was mostly known at first as Sigma 6, named after a manifesto by the novelist Alexander Trocchi for a kind of spontaneous university. They were also sometimes known as Leonard's Lodgers, after the landlord of the home that Barrett was moving into, Mike Leonard, who would occasionally sit in on organ and would later, as the band became more of a coherent unit, act as a roadie and put on light shows behind them -- Leonard was himself very interested in avant-garde and experimental art, and it was his idea to play around with the group's lighting. By the time Barrett moved in with Waters in 1964, the group had settled on the Tea Set name, and consisted of Waters on bass, Mason on drums, Wright on keyboards, singer Chris Dennis, and guitarist Rado Klose. Of the group, Klose was the only one who was a skilled musician -- he was a very good jazz guitarist, while the other members were barely adequate. By this time Barrett's musical interests were expanding to include folk music -- his girlfriend at the time talked later about him taking her to see Bob Dylan on his first UK tour and thinking "My first reaction was seeing all these people like Syd. It was almost as if every town had sent one Syd Barrett there. It was my first time seeing people like him." But the music he was most into was the blues. And as the Tea Set were turning into a blues band, he joined them. He even had a name for the new band that would make them more bluesy. He'd read the back of a record cover which had named two extremely obscure blues musicians -- musicians he may never even have heard. Pink Anderson: [Excerpt: Pink Anderson, "Boll Weevil"] And Floyd Council: [Excerpt: Floyd Council, "Runaway Man Blues"] Barrett suggested that they put together the names of the two bluesmen, and presumably because "Anderson Council" didn't have quite the right ring, they went for The Pink Floyd -- though for a while yet they would sometimes still perform as The Tea Set, and they were sometimes also called The Pink Floyd Sound. Dennis left soon after Barrett joined, and the new five-piece Pink Floyd Sound started trying to get more gigs. They auditioned for Ready Steady Go! and were turned down, but did get some decent support slots, including for a band called the Tridents: [Excerpt: The Tridents, "Tiger in Your Tank"] The members of the group were particularly impressed by the Tridents' guitarist and the way he altered his sound using feedback -- Barrett even sent a letter to his girlfriend with a drawing of the guitarist, one Jeff Beck, raving about how good he was. At this point, the group were mostly performing cover versions, but they did have a handful of originals, and it was these they recorded in their first demo sessions in late 1964 and early 1965. They included "Walk With Me Sydney", a song written by Roger Waters as a parody of "Work With Me Annie" and "Dance With Me Henry" -- and, given the lyrics, possibly also Hank Ballard's follow-up "Henry's Got Flat Feet (Can't Dance No More) and featuring Rick Wright's then-wife Juliette Gale as Etta James to Barrett's Richard Berry: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Walk With Me Sydney"] And four songs by Barrett, including one called "Double-O Bo" which was a Bo Diddley rip-off, and "Butterfly", the most interesting of these early recordings: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Butterfly"] At this point, Barrett was very unsure of his own vocal abilities, and wrote a letter to his girlfriend saying "Emo says why don't I give up 'cos it sounds horrible, and I would but I can't get Fred to join because he's got a group (p'raps you knew!) so I still have to sing." "Fred" was a nickname for his old friend Dave Gilmour, who was playing in his own band, Joker's Wild, at this point. Summer 1965 saw two important events in the life of the group. The first was that Barrett took LSD for the first time. The rest of the group weren't interested in trying it, and would indeed generally be one of the more sober bands in the rock business, despite the reputation their music got. The other members would for the most part try acid once or twice, around late 1966, but generally steer clear of it. Barrett, by contrast, took it on a very regular basis, and it would influence all the work he did from that point on. The other event was that Rado Klose left the group. Klose was the only really proficient musician in the group, but he had very different tastes to the other members, preferring to play jazz to R&B and pop, and he was also falling behind in his university studies, and decided to put that ahead of remaining in the band. This meant that the group members had to radically rethink the way they were making music. They couldn't rely on instrumental proficiency, so they had to rely on ideas. One of the things they started to do was use echo. They got primitive echo devices and put both Barrett's guitar and Wright's keyboard through them, allowing them to create new sounds that hadn't been heard on stage before. But they were still mostly doing the same Slim Harpo and Bo Diddley numbers everyone else was doing, and weren't able to be particularly interesting while playing them. But for a while they carried on doing the normal gigs, like a birthday party they played in late 1965, where on the same bill was a young American folk singer named Paul Simon, and Joker's Wild, the band Dave Gilmour was in, who backed Simon on a version of "Johnny B. Goode". A couple of weeks after that party, Joker's Wild went into the studio to record their only privately-pressed five-song record, of them performing recent hits: [Excerpt: Joker's Wild, "Walk Like a Man"] But The Pink Floyd Sound weren't as musically tight as Joker's Wild, and they couldn't make a living as a cover band even if they wanted to. They had to do something different. Inspiration then came from a very unexpected source. I mentioned earlier that one of the names the group had been performing under had been inspired by a manifesto for a spontaneous university by the writer Alexander Trocchi. Trocchi's ideas had actually been put into practice by an organisation calling itself the London Free School, based in Notting Hill. The London Free School was an interesting mixture of people from what was then known as the New Left, but who were already rapidly aging, the people who had been the cornerstone of radical campaigning in the late fifties and early sixties, who had run the Aldermaston marches against nuclear weapons and so on, and a new breed of countercultural people who in a year or two would be defined as hippies but at the time were not so easy to pigeonhole. These people were mostly politically radical but very privileged people -- one of the founder members of the London Free School was Peter Jenner, who was the son of a vicar and the grandson of a Labour MP -- and they were trying to put their radical ideas into practice. The London Free School was meant to be a collective of people who would help each other and themselves, and who would educate each other. You'd go to the collective wanting to learn how to do something, whether that's how to improve the housing in your area or navigate some particularly difficult piece of bureaucracy, or how to play a musical instrument, and someone who had that skill would teach you how to do it, while you hopefully taught them something else of value. The London Free School, like all such utopian schemes, ended up falling apart, but it had a wider cultural impact than most such schemes. Britain's first underground newspaper, the International Times, was put together by people involved in the Free School, and the annual Notting Hill Carnival, which is now one of the biggest outdoor events in Britain every year with a million attendees, came from the merger of outdoor events organised by the Free School with older community events. A group of musicians called AMM was associated with many of the people involved in the Free School. AMM performed totally improvised music, with no structure and no normal sense of melody and harmony: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] Keith Rowe, the guitarist in AMM, wanted to find his own technique uninfluenced by American jazz guitarists, and thought of that in terms that appealed very strongly to the painterly Barrett, saying "For the Americans to develop an American school of painting, they somehow had to ditch or lose European easel painting techniques. They had to make a break with the past. What did that possibly mean if you were a jazz guitar player? For me, symbolically, it was Pollock laying the canvas on the floor, which immediately abandons European easel technique. I could see that by laying the canvas down, it became inappropriate to apply easel techniques. I thought if I did that with a guitar, I would just lose all those techniques, because they would be physically impossible to do." Rowe's technique-free technique inspired Barrett to make similar noises with his guitar, and to think less in terms of melody and harmony than pure sound. AMM's first record came out in 1966. Four of the Free School people decided to put together their own record label, DNA, and they got an agreement with Elektra Records to distribute its first release -- Joe Boyd, the head of Elektra in the UK, was another London Free School member, and someone who had plenty of experience with disruptive art already, having been on the sound engineering team at the Newport Folk Festival when Dylan went electric. AMM went into the studio and recorded AMMMusic: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] After that came out, though, Peter Jenner, one of the people who'd started the label, came to a realisation. He said later "We'd made this one record with AMM. Great record, very seminal, seriously avant-garde, but I'd started adding up and I'd worked out that the deal we had, we got two percent of retail, out of which we, the label, had to pay for recording costs and pay ourselves. I came to the conclusion that we were going to have to sell a hell of a lot of records just to pay the recording costs, let alone pay ourselves any money and build a label, so I realised we had to have a pop band because pop bands sold a lot of records. It was as simple as that and I was as naive as that." Jenner abandoned DNA records for the moment, and he and his friend Andrew King decided they were going to become pop managers. and they found The Pink Floyd Sound playing at an event at the Marquee, one of a series of events that were variously known as Spontaneous Underground and The Trip. Other participants in those events included Soft Machine; Mose Allison; Donovan, performing improvised songs backed by sitar players; Graham Bond; a performer who played Bach pieces while backed by African drummers; and The Poison Bellows, a poetry duo consisting of Spike Hawkins and Johnny Byrne, who may of all of these performers be the one who other than Pink Floyd themselves has had the most cultural impact in the UK -- after writing the exploitation novel Groupie and co-writing a film adaptation of Spike Milligan's war memoirs, Byrne became a TV screenwriter, writing many episodes of Space: 1999 and Doctor Who before creating the long-running TV series Heartbeat. Jenner and King decided they wanted to sign The Pink Floyd Sound and make records with them, and the group agreed -- but only after their summer holidays. They were all still students, and so they dispersed during the summer. Waters and Wright went on holiday to Greece, where they tried acid for the first of only a small number of occasions and were unimpressed, while Mason went on a trip round America by Greyhound bus. Barrett, meanwhile, stayed behind, and started writing more songs, encouraged by Jenner, who insisted that the band needed to stop relying on blues covers and come up with their own material, and who saw Barrett as the focus of the group. Jenner later described them as "Four not terribly competent musicians who managed between them to create something that was extraordinary. Syd was the main creative drive behind the band - he was the singer and lead guitarist. Roger couldn't tune his bass because he was tone deaf, it had to be tuned by Rick. Rick could write a bit of a tune and Roger could knock out a couple of words if necessary. 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' was the first song Roger ever wrote, and he only did it because Syd encouraged everyone to write. Syd was very hesitant about his writing, but when he produced these great songs everyone else thought 'Well, it must be easy'" Of course, we know this isn't quite true -- Waters had written "Walk with me Sydney" -- but it is definitely the case that everyone involved thought of Barrett as the main creative force in the group, and that he was the one that Jenner was encouraging to write new material. After the summer holidays, the group reconvened, and one of their first actions was to play a benefit for the London Free School. Jenner said later "Andrew King and myself were both vicars' sons, and we knew that when you want to raise money for the parish you have to have a social. So in a very old-fashioned way we said 'let's put on a social'. Like in the Just William books, like a whist drive. We thought 'You can't have a whist drive. That's not cool. Let's have a band. That would be cool.' And the only band we knew was the band I was starting to get involved with." After a couple of these events went well, Joe Boyd suggested that they make those events a regular club night, and the UFO Club was born. Jenner and King started working on the light shows for the group, and then bringing in other people, and the light show became an integral part of the group's mystique -- rather than standing in a spotlight as other groups would, they worked in shadows, with distorted kaleidoscopic lights playing on them, distancing themselves from the audience. The highlight of their sets was a long piece called "Interstellar Overdrive", and this became one of the group's first professional recordings, when they went into the studio with Joe Boyd to record it for the soundtrack of a film titled Tonite Let's All Make Love in London. There are conflicting stories about the inspiration for the main riff for "Interstellar Overdrive". One apparent source is the riff from Love's version of the Bacharach and David song "My Little Red Book". Depending on who you ask, either Barrett was obsessed with Love's first album and copied the riff, or Peter Jenner tried to hum him the riff and Barrett copied what Jenner was humming: [Excerpt: Love, "My Little Red Book"] More prosaically, Roger Waters has always claimed that the main inspiration was from "Old Ned", Ron Grainer's theme tune for the sitcom Steptoe and Son (which for American listeners was remade over there as Sanford and Son): [Excerpt: Ron Grainer, "Old Ned"] Of course it's entirely possible, and even likely, that Barrett was inspired by both, and if so that would neatly sum up the whole range of Pink Floyd's influences at this point. "My Little Red Book" was a cover by an American garage-psych/folk-rock band of a hit by Manfred Mann, a group who were best known for pop singles but were also serious blues and jazz musicians, while Steptoe and Son was a whimsical but dark and very English sitcom about a way of life that was slowly disappearing. And you can definitely hear both influences in the main riff of the track they recorded with Boyd: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive"] "Interstellar Overdrive" was one of two types of song that The Pink Floyd were performing at this time -- a long, extended, instrumental psychedelic excuse for freaky sounds, inspired by things like the second disc of Freak Out! by the Mothers of Invention. When they went into the studio again with Boyd later in January 1967, to record what they hoped would be their first single, they recorded two of the other kind of songs -- whimsical story songs inspired equally by the incidents of everyday life and by children's literature. What became the B-side, "Candy and a Currant Bun", was based around the riff from "Smokestack Lightnin'" by Howlin' Wolf: [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Smokestack Lightnin'"] That song had become a favourite on the British blues scene, and was thus the inspiration for many songs of the type that get called "quintessentially English". Ray Davies, who was in many ways the major songwriter at this time who was closest to Barrett stylistically, would a year later use the riff for the Kinks song "Last of the Steam-Powered Trains", but in this case Barrett had originally written a song titled "Let's Roll Another One", about sexual longing and cannabis. The lyrics were hastily rewritten in the studio to remove the controversial drug references-- and supposedly this caused some conflict between Barrett and Waters, with Waters pushing for the change, while Barrett argued against it, though like many of the stories from this period this sounds like the kind of thing that gets said by people wanting to push particular images of both men. Either way, the lyric was changed to be about sweet treats rather than drugs, though the lascivious elements remained in. And some people even argue that there was another lyric change -- where Barrett sings "walk with me", there's a slight "f" sound in his vocal. As someone who does a lot of microphone work myself, it sounds to me like just one of those things that happens while recording, but a lot of people are very insistent that Barrett is deliberately singing a different word altogether: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Candy and a Currant Bun"] The A-side, meanwhile, was inspired by real life. Both Barrett and Waters had mothers who used  to take in female lodgers, and both had regularly had their lodgers' underwear stolen from washing lines. While they didn't know anything else about the thief, he became in Barrett's imagination a man who liked to dress up in the clothing after he stole it: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Arnold Layne"] After recording the two tracks with Joe Boyd, the natural assumption was that the record would be put out on Elektra, the label which Boyd worked for in the UK, but Jac Holzman, the head of Elektra records, wasn't interested, and so a bidding war began for the single, as by this point the group were the hottest thing in London. For a while it looked like they were going to sign to Track Records, the label owned by the Who's management, but in the end EMI won out. Right as they signed, the News of the World was doing a whole series of articles about pop stars and their drug use, and the last of the articles talked about The Pink Floyd and their association with LSD, even though they hadn't released a record yet. EMI had to put out a press release saying that the group were not psychedelic, insisting"The Pink Floyd are not trying to create hallucinatory effects in their audience." It was only after getting signed that the group became full-time professionals. Waters had by this point graduated from university and was working as a trainee architect, and quit his job to become a pop star. Wright dropped out of university, but Mason and Barrett took sabbaticals. Barrett in particular seems to have seen this very much as a temporary thing, talking about how he was making so much money it would be foolish not to take the opportunity while it lasted, but how he was going to resume his studies in a year. "Arnold Layne" made the top twenty, and it would have gone higher had the pirate radio station Radio London, at the time the single most popular radio station when it came to pop music, not banned the track because of its sexual content. However, it would be the only single Joe Boyd would work on with the group. EMI insisted on only using in-house producers, and so while Joe Boyd would go on to a great career as a producer, and we'll see him again, he was replaced with Norman Smith. Smith had been the chief engineer on the Beatles records up to Rubber Soul, after which he'd been promoted to being a producer in his own right, and Geoff Emerick had taken over. He also had aspirations to pop stardom himself, and a few years later would have a transatlantic hit with "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?" under the name Hurricane Smith: [Excerpt: Hurricane Smith, "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?"] Smith's production of the group would prove controversial among some of the group's longtime fans, who thought that he did too much to curtail their more experimental side, as he would try to get the group to record songs that were more structured and more commercial, and would cut down their improvisations into a more manageable form. Others, notably Peter Jenner, thought that Smith was the perfect producer for the group. They started work on their first album, which was mostly recorded in studio three of Abbey Road, while the Beatles were just finishing off work on Sgt Pepper in studio two. The album was titled The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, after the chapter from The Wind in the Willows, and other than a few extended instrumental showcases, most of the album was made up of short, whimsical, songs by Barrett that were strongly infused with imagery from late-Victorian and Edwardian children's books. This is one of the big differences between the British and American psychedelic scenes. Both the British and American undergrounds were made up of the same type of people -- a mixture of older radical activists, often Communists, who had come up in Britain in the Ban the Bomb campaigns and in America in the Civil Rights movement; and younger people, usually middle-class students with radical politics from a privileged background, who were into experimenting with drugs and alternative lifestyles. But the  social situations were different. In America, the younger members of the underground were angry and scared, as their principal interest was in stopping the war in Vietnam in which so many of them were being killed. And the music of the older generation of the underground, the Civil Rights activists, was shot through with influence from the blues, gospel, and American folk music, with a strong Black influence. So that's what the American psychedelic groups played, for the most part, very bluesy, very angry, music, By contrast, the British younger generation of hippies were not being drafted to go to war, and mostly had little to complain about, other than a feeling of being stifled by their parents' generation's expectations. And while most of them were influenced by the blues, that wasn't the music that had been popular among the older underground people, who had either been listening to experimental European art music or had been influenced by Ewan MacColl and his associates into listening instead to traditional old English ballads, things like the story of Tam Lin or Thomas the Rhymer, where someone is spirited away to the land of the fairies: [Excerpt: Ewan MacColl, "Thomas the Rhymer"] As a result, most British musicians, when exposed to the culture of the underground over here, created music that looked back to an idealised childhood of their grandparents' generation, songs that were nostalgic for a past just before the one they could remember (as opposed to their own childhoods, which had taken place in war or the immediate aftermath of it, dominated by poverty, rationing, and bomb sites (though of course Barrett's childhood in Cambridge had been far closer to this mythic idyll than those of his contemporaries from Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle, or London). So almost every British musician who was making music that might be called psychedelic was writing songs that were influenced both by experimental art music and by pre-War popular song, and which conjured up images from older children's books. Most notably of course at this point the Beatles were recording songs like "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" about places from their childhood, and taking lyrical inspiration from Victorian circus posters and the works of Lewis Carroll, but Barrett was similarly inspired. One of the books he loved most as a child was "The Little Grey Men" by BB, a penname for Denys Watkins-Pitchford. The book told the story of three gnomes,  Baldmoney, Sneezewort, and Dodder, and their adventures on a boat when the fourth member of their little group, Cloudberry, who's a bit of a rebellious loner and more adventurous than the other three, goes exploring on his own and they have to go off and find him. Barrett's song "The Gnome" doesn't use any precise details from the book, but its combination of whimsy about a gnome named Grimble-gromble and a reverence for nature is very much in the mould of BB's work: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "The Gnome"] Another huge influence on Barrett was Hillaire Belloc. Belloc is someone who is not read much any more, as sadly he is mostly known for the intense antisemitism in some of his writing, which stains it just as so much of early twentieth-century literature is stained, but he was one of the most influential writers of the early part of the twentieth century. Like his friend GK Chesterton he was simultaneously an author of Catholic apologia and a political campaigner -- he was a Liberal MP for a few years, and a strong advocate of an economic system known as Distributism, and had a peculiar mixture of very progressive and extremely reactionary ideas which resonated with a lot of the atmosphere in the British underground of the time, even though he would likely have profoundly disapproved of them. But Belloc wrote in a variety of styles, including poems for children, which are the works of his that have aged the best, and were a huge influence on later children's writers like Roald Dahl with their gleeful comic cruelty. Barrett's "Matilda Mother" had lyrics that were, other than the chorus where Barrett begs his mother to read him more of the story, taken verbatim from three poems from Belloc's Cautionary Tales for Children -- "Jim, Who Ran away from his Nurse, and was Eaten by a Lion", "Henry King (Who chewed bits of String, and was cut off in Dreadful Agonies)", and "Matilda (Who Told Lies and Was Burned to Death)" -- the titles of those give some idea of the kind of thing Belloc would write: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Matilda Mother (early version)"] Sadly for Barrett, Belloc's estate refused to allow permission for his poems to be used, and so he had to rework the lyrics, writing new fairy-tale lyrics for the finished version. Other sources of inspiration for lyrics came from books like the I Ching, which Barrett used for "Chapter 24", having bought a copy from the Indica Bookshop, the same place that John Lennon had bought The Psychedelic Experience, and there's been some suggestion that he was deliberately trying to copy Lennon in taking lyrical ideas from a book of ancient mystic wisdom. During the recording of Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the group continued playing live. As they'd now had a hit single, most of their performances were at Top Rank Ballrooms and other such venues around the country, on bills with other top chart groups, playing to audiences who seemed unimpressed or actively hostile. They also, though made two important appearances. The more well-known of these was at the 14-Hour Technicolor Dream, a benefit for International Times magazine with people including Yoko Ono, their future collaborator Ron Geesin, John's Children, Soft Machine, and The Move also performing. The 14-Hour Technicolor Dream is now largely regarded as *the* pivotal moment in the development of the UK counterculture, though even at the time some participants noted that there seemed to be a rift developing between the performers, who were often fairly straightforward beer-drinking ambitious young men who had latched on to kaftans and talk about enlightenment as the latest gimmick they could use to get ahead in the industry, and the audience who seemed to be true believers. Their other major performance was at an event called "Games for May -- Space Age Relaxation for the Climax of Spring", where they were able to do a full long set in a concert space with a quadrophonic sound system, rather than performing in the utterly sub-par environments most pop bands had to at this point. They came up with a new song written for the event, which became their second single, "See Emily Play". [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] Emily was apparently always a favourite name of Barrett's, and he even talked with one girlfriend about the possibility of naming their first child Emily, but the Emily of the song seems to have had a specific inspiration. One of the youngest attendees at the London Free School was an actual schoolgirl, Emily Young, who would go along to their events with her schoolfriend Anjelica Huston (who later became a well-known film star). Young is now a world-renowned artist, regarded as arguably Britain's greatest living stone sculptor, but at the time she was very like the other people at the London Free School -- she was from a very privileged background, her father was Wayland Young, 2nd Baron Kennet, a Labour Peer and minister who later joined the SDP. But being younger than the rest of the attendees, and still a little naive, she was still trying to find her own personality, and would take on attributes and attitudes of other people without fully understanding them,  hence the song's opening lines, "Emily tries, but misunderstands/She's often inclined to borrow somebody's dream til tomorrow". The song gets a little darker towards the end though, and the image in the last verse, where she puts on a gown and floats down a river forever *could* be a gentle, pastoral, image of someone going on a boat ride, but it also could be a reference to two rather darker sources. Barrett was known to pick up imagery both from classic literature and from Arthurian legend, and so the lines inevitably conjure up both the idea of Ophelia drowning herself and of the Lady of Shallot in Tennyson's Arthurian poem, who is trapped in a tower but finds a boat, and floats down the river to Camelot but dies before the boat reaches the castle: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] The song also evokes very specific memories of Barrett's childhood -- according to Roger Waters, the woods mentioned in the lyrics are meant to be woods in which they had played as children, on the road out of Cambridge towards the Gog and Magog Hills. The song was apparently seven minutes long in its earliest versions, and required a great deal of editing to get down to single length, but it was worth it, as the track made the top ten. And that was where the problems started. There are two different stories told about what happened to Roger Barrett over the next forty years, and both stories are told by people with particular agendas, who want particular versions of him to become the accepted truth. Both stories are, in the extreme versions that have been popularised, utterly incompatible with each other, but both are fairly compatible with the scanty evidence we have. Possibly the truth lies somewhere between them. In one version of the story, around this time Barrett had a total mental breakdown, brought on or exacerbated by his overuse of LSD and Mandrax (a prescription drug consisting of a mixture of the antihistamine diphenhydramine and the sedative methaqualone, which was marketed in the US under the brand-name Quaalude), and that from late summer 1967 on he was unable to lead a normal life, and spent the rest of his life as a burned-out shell. The other version of the story is that Barrett was a little fragile, and did have periods of mental illness, but for the most part was able to function fairly well. In this version of the story, he was neurodivergent, and found celebrity distressing, but more than that he found the whole process of working within commercial restrictions upsetting -- having to appear on TV pop shows and go on package tours was just not something he found himself able to do, but he was responsible for a whole apparatus of people who relied on him and his group for their living. In this telling, he was surrounded by parasites who looked on him as their combination meal-ticket-cum-guru, and was simply not suited for the role and wanted to sabotage it so he could have a private life instead. Either way, *something* seems to have changed in Barrett in a profound way in the early summer of 1967. Joe Boyd talks about meeting him after not having seen him for a few weeks, and all the light being gone from his eyes. The group appeared on Top of the Pops, Britain's top pop TV show, three times to promote "See Emily Play", but by the third time Barrett didn't even pretend to mime along with the single. Towards the end of July, they were meant to record a session for the BBC's Saturday Club radio show, but Barrett walked out of the studio before completing the first song. It's notable that Barrett's non-cooperation or inability to function was very much dependent on circumstance. He was not able to perform for Saturday Club, a mainstream pop show aimed at a mass audience, but gave perfectly good performances on several sessions for John Peel's radio show The Perfumed Garden, a show firmly aimed at Pink Floyd's own underground niche. On the thirty-first of July, three days after the Saturday Club walkout, all the group's performances for the next month were cancelled, due to "nervous exhaustion". But on the eighth of August, they went back into the studio, to record "Scream Thy Last Scream", a song Barrett wrote and which Nick Mason sang: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Scream Thy Last Scream"] That was scheduled as the group's next single, but the record company vetoed it, and it wouldn't see an official release for forty-nine years. Instead they recorded another single, "Apples and Oranges": [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Apples and Oranges"] That was the last thing the group released while Barrett was a member. In November 1967 they went on a tour of the US, making appearances on American Bandstand and the Pat Boone Show, as well as playing several gigs. According to legend, Barrett was almost catatonic on the Pat Boone show, though no footage of that appears to be available anywhere -- and the same things were said about their performance on Bandstand, and when that turned up, it turned out Barrett seemed no more uncomfortable miming to their new single than any of the rest of the band, and was no less polite when Dick Clark asked them questions about hamburgers. But on shows on the US tour, Barrett would do things like detune his guitar so it just made clanging sounds, or just play a single note throughout the show. These are, again, things that could be taken in two different ways, and I have no way to judge which is the more correct. On one level, they could be a sign of a chaotic, disordered, mind, someone dealing with severe mental health difficulties. On the other, they're the kind of thing that Barrett was applauded and praised for in the confines of the kind of avant-garde underground audience that would pay to hear AMM or Yoko Ono, the kind of people they'd been performing for less than a year earlier, but which were absolutely not appropriate for a pop group trying to promote their latest hit single. It could be that Barrett was severely unwell, or it could just be that he wanted to be an experimental artist and his bandmates wanted to be pop stars -- and one thing absolutely everyone agrees is that the rest of the group were more ambitious than Barrett was. Whichever was the case, though, something had to give. They cut the US tour short, but immediately started another British package tour, with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Move, Amen Corner and the Nice. After that tour they started work on their next album, A Saucerful of Secrets. Where Barrett was the lead singer and principal songwriter on Piper at the Gates of Dawn, he only sings and writes one song on A Saucerful of Secrets, which is otherwise written by Waters and Wright, and only appears at all on two more of the tracks -- by the time it was released he was out of the group. The last song he tried to get the group to record was called "Have You Got it Yet?" and it was only after spending some time rehearsing it that the rest of the band realised that the song was a practical joke on them -- every time they played it, he would change the song around so they would mess up, and pretend they just hadn't learned the song yet. They brought in Barrett's old friend Dave Gilmour, initially to be a fifth member on stage to give the band some stability in their performances, but after five shows with the five-man lineup they decided just not to bother picking Barrett up, but didn't mention he was out of the group, to avoid awkwardness. At the time, Barrett and Rick Wright were flatmates, and Wright would actually lie to Barrett and say he was just going out to buy a packet of cigarettes, and then go and play gigs without him. After a couple of months of this, it was officially announced that Barrett was leaving the group. Jenner and King went with him, convinced that he was the real talent in the group and would have a solo career, and the group carried on with new management. We'll be looking at them more in future episodes. Barrett made a start at recording a solo album in mid-1968, but didn't get very far. Jenner produced those sessions, and later said "It seemed a good idea to go into the studio because I knew he had the songs. And he would sometimes play bits and pieces and you would think 'Oh that's great.' It was a 'he's got a bit of a cold today and it might get better' approach. It wasn't a cold -- and you knew it wasn't a cold -- but I kept thinking if he did the right things he'd come back to join us. He'd gone out and maybe he'd come back. That was always the analogy in my head. I wanted to make it feel friendly for him, and that where we were was a comfortable place and that he could come back and find himself again. I obviously didn't succeed." A handful of tracks from those sessions have since been released, including a version of “Golden Hair”, a setting by Barrett of a poem by James Joyce that he would later revisit: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, “Golden Hair (first version)”] Eleven months later, he went back into the studio again, this time with producer Malcolm Jones, to record an album that later became The Madcap Laughs, his first solo album. The recording process for the album has been the source of some controversy, as initially Jones was producing the whole album, and they were working in a way that Barrett never worked before. Where previously he had cut backing tracks first and only later overdubbed his vocals, this time he started by recording acoustic guitar and vocals, and then overdubbed on top of that. But after several sessions, Jones was pulled off the album, and Gilmour and Waters were asked to produce the rest of the sessions. This may seem a bit of a callous decision, since Gilmour was the person who had replaced Barrett in his group, but apparently the two of them had remained friends, and indeed Gilmour thought that Barrett had only got better as a songwriter since leaving the band. Where Malcolm Jones had been trying, by his account, to put out something that sounded like a serious, professional, record, Gilmour and Waters seemed to regard what they were doing more as producing a piece of audio verite documentary, including false starts and studio chatter. Jones believed that this put Barrett in a bad light, saying the outtakes "show Syd, at best as out of tune, which he rarely was, and at worst as out of control (which, again, he never was)." Gilmour and Waters, on the other hand, thought that material was necessary to provide some context for why the album wasn't as slick and professional as some might have hoped. The eventual record was a hodge-podge of different styles from different sessions, with bits from the Jenner sessions, the Jones sessions, and the Waters and Gilmour sessions all mixed together, with some tracks just Barrett badly double-tracking himself with an acoustic guitar, while other tracks feature full backing by Soft Machine. However, despite Jones' accusations that the album was more-or-less sabotaged by Gilmour and Waters, the fact remains that the best tracks on the album are the ones Barrett's former bandmates produced, and there are some magnificent moments on there. But it's a disturbing album to listen to, in the same way other albums by people with clear talent but clear mental illness are, like Skip Spence's Oar, Roky Erickson's later work, or the Beach Boys Love You. In each case, the pleasure one gets is a real pleasure from real aesthetic appreciation of the work, but entangled with an awareness that the work would not exist in that form were the creator not suffering. The pleasure doesn't come from the suffering -- these are real artists creating real art, not the kind of outsider art that is really just a modern-day freak-show -- but it's still inextricable from it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Dark Globe"] The Madcap Laughs did well enough that Barrett got to record a follow-up, titled simply Barrett. This one was recorded over a period of only a handful of months, with Gilmour and Rick Wright producing, and a band consisting of Gilmour, Wright, and drummer Jerry Shirley. The album is generally considered both more consistent and less interesting than The Madcap Laughs, with less really interesting material, though there are some enjoyable moments on it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Effervescing Elephant"] But the album is a little aimless, and people who knew him at the time seem agreed that that was a reflection of his life. He had nothing he *needed* to be doing -- no  tour dates, no deadlines, no pressure at all, and he had a bit of money from record royalties -- so he just did nothing at all. The one solo gig he ever played, with the band who backed him on Barrett, lasted four songs, and he walked off half-way through the fourth. He moved back to Cambridge for a while in the early seventies, and he tried putting together a new band with Twink, the drummer of the Pink Fairies and Pretty Things, Fred Frith, and Jack Monck, but Frith left after one gig. The other three performed a handful of shows either as "Stars" or as "Barrett, Adler, and Monck", just in the Cambridge area, but soon Barrett got bored again. He moved back to London, and in 1974 he made one final attempt to make a record, going into the studio with Peter Jenner, where he recorded a handful of tracks that were never released. But given that the titles of those tracks were things like "Boogie #1", "Boogie #2", "Slow Boogie", "Fast Boogie", "Chooka-Chooka Chug Chug" and "John Lee Hooker", I suspect we're not missing out on a lost masterpiece. Around this time there was a general resurgence in interest in Barrett, prompted by David Bowie having recorded a version of "See Emily Play" on his covers album Pin-Ups, which came out in late 1973: [Excerpt: David Bowie, "See Emily Play"] At the same time, the journalist Nick Kent wrote a long profile of Barrett, The Cracked Ballad of Syd Barrett, which like Kent's piece on Brian Wilson a year later, managed to be a remarkable piece of writing with a sense of sympathy for its subject and understanding of his music, but also a less-than-accurate piece of journalism which led to a lot of myths and disinformation being propagated. Barrett briefly visited his old bandmates in the studio in 1975 while they were recording the album Wish You Were Here -- some say even during the recording of the song "Shine On, You Crazy Diamond", which was written specifically about Barrett, though Nick Mason claims otherwise -- and they didn't recognise him at first, because by this point he had a shaved head and had put on a great deal of weight. He seemed rather sad, and that was the last time any of them saw him, apart from Roger Waters, who saw him in Harrod's a few years later. That time, as soon as Barrett recognised Waters, he dropped his bag and ran out of the shop. For the next thirty-one years, Barrett made no public appearances. The last time he ever voluntarily spoke to a journalist, other than telling them to go away, was in 1982, just after he'd moved back to Cambridge, when someone doorstopped him and he answered a few questions and posed for a photo before saying "OK! That's enough, this is distressing for me, thank you." He had the reputation for the rest of his life of being a shut-in, a recluse, an acid casualty. His family, on the other hand, have always claimed that while he was never particularly mentally or physically healthy, he wasn't a shut-in, and would go to the pub, meet up with his mother a couple of times a week to go shopping, and chat to the women behind the counter at Sainsbury's and at the pharmacy. He was also apparently very good with children who lived in the neighbourhood. Whatever the truth of his final decades, though, however mentally well or unwell he actually was, one thing is very clear, which is that he was an extremely private man, who did not want attention, and who was greatly distressed by the constant stream of people coming and looking through his letterbox, trying to take photos of him, trying to interview him, and so on. Everyone on his street knew that when people came asking which was Syd Barrett's house, they were meant to say that no-one of that name lived there -- and they were telling the truth. By the time he moved back, he had stopped answering to "Syd" altogether, and according to his sister "He came to hate the name latterly, and what it meant." He did, in 2001, go round to his sister's house to watch a documentary about himself on the TV -- he didn't own a TV himself -- but he didn't enjoy it and his only comment was that the music was too noisy. By this point he never listened to rock music, just to jazz and classical music, usually on the radio. He was financially secure -- Dave Gilmour made sure that when compilations came out they always included some music from Barrett's period in the group so he would receive royalties, even though Gilmour had no contact with him after 1975 -- and he spent most of his time painting -- he would take photos of the paintings when they were completed, and then burn the originals. There are many stories about those last few decades, but given how much he valued his privacy, it wouldn't be right to share them. This is a history of rock music, and 1975 was the last time Roger Keith Barrett ever had anything to do with rock music voluntarily. He died of cancer in 2006, and at his funeral there was a reading from The Little Grey Men, which was also quoted in the Order of Service -- "The wonder of the world, the beauty and the power, the shapes of things, their colours lights and shades; these I saw. Look ye also while life lasts.” There was no rock music played at Barrett's funeral -- instead there were a selection of pieces by Handel, Haydn, and Bach, ending with Bach's Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major, one of his favourite pieces: [Excerpt: Glenn Gould, "Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major"]  As they stared blankly in dumb misery deepening as they slowly realised all they had seen and all they had lost, a capricious little breeze, dancing up from the surface of the water, tossed the aspens, shook the dewy roses and blew lightly and caressingly in their faces; and with its soft touch came instant oblivion. For this is the last best gift that the kindly demi-god is careful to bestow on those to whom he has revealed himself in their helping: the gift of forgetfulness. Lest the awful remembrance should remain and grow, and overshadow mirth and pleasure, and the great haunting memory should spoil all the after-lives of little animals helped out of difficulties, in order that they should be happy and lighthearted as before. Mole rubbed his eyes and stared at Rat, who was looking about him in a puzzled sort of way. “I beg your pardon; what did you say, Rat?” he asked. “I think I was only remarking,” said Rat slowly, “that this was the right sort of place, and that here, if anywhere, we should find him. And look! Why, there he is, the little fellow!” And with a cry of delight he ran towards the slumbering Portly. But Mole stood still a moment, held in thought. As one wakened suddenly from a beautiful dream, who struggles to recall it, and can re-capture nothing but a dim sense of the beauty of it, the beauty! Till that, too, fades away in its turn, and the dreamer bitterly accepts the hard, cold waking and all its penalties; so Mole, after struggling with his memory for a brief space, shook his head sadly and followed the Rat.

america tv love american death history black world children english uk space news americans games british young war walk spring secrets european wild heart inspiration stars dna songs african trip hospitals bbc wind sun vietnam joker wolf britain catholic mothers beatles lion tiger greece liverpool stem nurses cambridge wright birmingham iv kent david bowie eleven butterflies waters depending bomb bob dylan victorian newcastle civil rights john lennon invention bach lsd pink floyd apples communists rat boyd chapman bb boogie pops handel controls string heartbeat alice in wonderland kinks adler byrne ban mole greyhound emo sanford climax roald dahl tilt paul simon sigma yoko ono emi eaten camelot gnome james joyce syd pollock jenner abbey road gog rock music brian wilson elektra cautionary tales lewis carroll relics roger waters haydn notting hill arthurian groupies jeff beck sainsbury marquee willows etta james freak out i ching opel gilmour dick clark howlin edwardian coasters john lee hooker walk like gk chesterton bo diddley labour mp wish you were here tennyson sgt pepper richard wright penny lane twink pinups pat boone anjelica huston syd barrett new left john peel manfred mann nick mason free school allemande amm sdp klose jimi hendrix experience johnny b goode shine on pretty things rubber soul girl guides chubby checker oar liberal mps notting hill carnival american bandstand psychedelic experiences ray davies harrod newport folk festival bandstand elektra records bacharach frith steptoe roky erickson tam lin strawberry fields forever spike milligan soft machine andrew king joker's wild mose allison who do you love saucerful shallots joe boyd geoff emerick rhymer lodgers radio london entranced distributism ewan maccoll rick wright crazy diamond fred frith quaalude belloc pete anderson partita no incredible string band rob chapman track records slim harpo ron grainer addenbrooke what would you say mike leonard emily young interstellar overdrive dave gilmour cloudberry grimble norman smith nick kent ufo club skip spence chris dennis pink fairies first girl i loved jac holzman malcolm jones arnold layne smokestack lightnin dodder tilt araiza
Manny Talks Shooting
Chris Jenner @chrisfromthe740 Manny Talks Shooting #75

Manny Talks Shooting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 75:01


Check out Chris @ https://www.instagram.com/chrisfromthe740/?hl=en https://www.youtube.com/c/ChrisFromThe740 Check out the podcast "Manny Talks Shooting". Wherever you listen to podcasts. Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/manny-talks-shooting/id1552710518 Anchor: https://anchor.fm/alex-mansfield Manny Talks Shooting Merch: Follow us on: https://linktr.ee/mannytalksshooting Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mannytalksshooting/ Email: mannytalksshooting@gmail.com Music courtesy of Ben Sound at https://www.bensound.com

House Party
148. Truth Behind the Homes on 'Selling the OC' Episode 6, Plus, Is Kylie Jenner's Mansion Actually Worth $22M?

House Party

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 46:07


Over the years we've seen plenty of celebrities buy and sell second homes in the same city as their primary residence. Lebron James has simultaneously owned homes in the tony Los Angeles enclaves of Brentwood and Beverly Hills. Leonardo DiCaprio has a long history of doing real estate deals all over LA, from Malibu to Los Feliz. Now, Kylie Jenner is the latest A-lister to put her "spare" LA home up for sale. Jenner and her partner Travis Scott reportedly listed their Beverly Hills home for $22M. The curious part? They bought the home in 2018 for $13.4 million, far less than the current listing price. Does the 9,680-square-foot estate warrant such a high price tag? Will they get their price? We discuss it all on a new episode of "House Party" podcast. This week we also discuss Reese Witherspoon's latest real estate win: flipping (one of) her Nashville homes for $7.4 million. And we finish out the episode with a recap of "Selling the OC" episode six, titled "Co-listing Chaos." As the agents at The Oppenheim Group Newport Beach are dealing with the fallout of the "Kayla-Tyler drama," we are treated to an inside look at two gorgeous properties. The first is "Gio's house," a 3,817-square-foot home on Newport Bay, and the second is "Tyler's listing" in Dana Point, a mansion that was on the market for $10M. Want the inside scoop on these luxury homes? Listen to our latest episode in the player above! Be sure to subscribe to “House Party” on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts so you have access to new episodes right when they publish. And please: Throw us a five-star rating if you like what you hear. The more good ratings and reviews we have, the easier it is for people to find us. Want to chime in? Email us at podcast@realtor.com, follow us on Facebook and Instagram, or tweet us @housepartypod on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Laz and Powers: A show about the Chicago Blackhawks
Making sense of the Blackhawks hot start

Laz and Powers: A show about the Chicago Blackhawks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 38:38


Mark Lazerus and Scott Powers discuss the Blackhawks' hot start to the season and get into why they're winning, what the numbers say and what it means for their expected tank. They also talk about Jonathan Toews' season, answer listeners' questions and discuss their recent story on the anniversary of the Jenner & Block report. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cancel Me, Baby!
Baby EP 166: Brandon Jenner & His Last Name Heard 'Round the World

Cancel Me, Baby!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 8:43


Jenner. The name. You may have heard of it. In this short but sweet baby interview, I talked with Caitlyn Jenner's son (and David Foster's stepson) Brandon about his personal experience with nepotism, or lack thereof, in Hollywood and breaking out of his very famous name as an individual pursuing his love of music. He may not be a starving artist like the rest of us (seriously, Netflix, back the eff off our account sharing TY), but even resources don't solve his different, own relative struggle of proving himself worthy. Counting pennies or automatically being judged: Which would you rather deal with? Brandon was promoting his new and upcoming reality music series Project Supergroup from the Embassy Suites in Nashville. Rock on. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/taylor-ferber/support

#PopVultures
S1E71: Kylie Jenner's 'climate criminal' controversy: Celebs and climate change

#PopVultures

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 34:48


Synopsis: Each month, The Straits Times examines the ins and outs of pop culture in the Asian entertainment and Hollywood scene. In this very special crossover episode of #PopVultures and Green Pulse, hosts Jan Lee and Audrey Tan discuss celebrities and the climate. Hollywood personalities like Kylie Jenner recently found herself the subject of much criticism after she posted a picture of herself with her partner Travis Scott standing between two private jets with the caption: "You wanna take mine or yours?"  Amid an ongoing climate crisis that is already impacting vulnerable communities, her picture did not go down well, with many criticising Jenner and celebrities like her who use private jets - an extremely environmentally harmful mode of travel. Jan and Audrey discuss the impact celebs have - both good and bad - on the environment through their lifestyles, endorsements and public stances. Highlights (tap/click above): 01:43 Kylie Jenner and celebrities' use of private jets; why is air travel so harmful to the environment? 08:33 Is it fair to single celebrities out as 'climate criminals' when climate change is a far-reaching global problem? 12:15 Kourtney Kardashian's collaboration with Boohoo 13:50 What is greenwashing? Why is it difficult to detect? 26:15 Can celebrities ever be helpful in the fight against climate change? Produced by: Jan Lee (janlee@sph.com.sg), Penelope Lee & Eden Soh Edited by: Penelope Lee Follow #PopVultures Podcast episodes here every month:  Channel: https://str.sg/JWad Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaA Spotify: https://str.sg/JWaP  Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/Ju47  SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Follow Jan Lee on Instagram: https://str.sg/Jbxc Read Jan Lee's stories: https://str.sg/Jbxp --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wuJa The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia: https://str.sg/wuZ2 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wuZB Invisible Asia: https://str.sg/wuZn --- Discover more ST podcast series: Asian Insider: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check: https://str.sg/JWaN In Your Opinion: https://str.sg/w7Qt Your Money & Career: https://str.sg/wB2m SG Extra: https://str.sg/wukR ST Sports Talk: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This!: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover ST Podcasts: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! #PVSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald
Kanye Dropped by Everyone, Taylor Swift with Chris Franjola

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 93:29 Very Popular


I am on tour! Headed to Lax Vegas, Houston, Dallas, Boston, Philly, and DC! Get tickets at heathermcdonald.netChris and I went to Vegas, and Peter fell in love. First, I cover the RHOBH Lisa Rinna Twitter conspiracy. Why did the RHONY reunion never happen? RHSLC is talking BJ's while twerking in lingerie. Kanye West has been dropped by CAA and everyone else for his alarming anti-Semitic statements. Rumors about Kylie and Travis Scott's supposed girlfriend are sparked. Megan Markle is not a bimbo but plays one on TV. James Corden should have done it differently. And Just Like That is filming with Tony Danza. Taylor Swift former boyfriend, John Mayer, clapped back. The scary masked daycare workers got arrested, and some moms go too far, tricking their kids too. Get extra juice on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/juicyscoophttps://heathermcdonald.net/.Support our sponsors: https://www.betterhelp.com/HEATHERSo continue your credit journey with Chime. No Monthly Fees. No vibe-killing fees. Sign-up for a Chime Checking Account. Only takes two minutes and doesn't affect your credit score. Get started at chime.com/juicy

I RIDE A BIKE — THE PODCAST

SEASON 3 / EPISODE 6: Musician Jenner Fox is an amazing singer songwriter, but the fact that he does many of his tours by bike (thanks in large part to Xtracycle), this was one of my most anticipated conversations for the podcast. Thanks to a friend who alerted me to his northeast tour, I was able to catch him and his bandmate Jeremy at Blue in Portland, Maine before sitting down for the fun and meandering conversation. We chatted about the earlier years of learning to ride in a church parking lot, a hilarious story of a family mountain bike trip that quickly went awry, and how the contemplative aspect of riding a bike became a large part of his songwriting process. Of all the stories, I particularly liked the ones involving human kindness on his travels — with one that had happened just the day before when they met Bruces from Bruce's Burritos in Yarmouth, Maine during the heaviest rainstorm they had yet to encounter on their tour. And we finished the show with a performance of his bike inspired song “Tongue Canyon Road” before they jumped on their bikes and headed on to their next performance. -- Included in the "Best 40 Cycling Podcasts" on Feedspot: https://blog.feedspot.com/cycling_podcasts/ Follow on INSTAGRAM Follow on FACEBOOK Visit iRIDEaBIKE.com -- A Production of I RIDE, LLC Theme Song by Spencer Albee. Want to hear more? Visit @SpencerAlbee on social media and streaming platforms. PLEASE NOTE: Generally speaking, episodes of I RIDE A BIKE are NOT "explicit"... but due to the passionate nature of our guests, there may be language and stories that aren't appropriate for all listeners. Therefore, sometimes we are required to label as explicit. This episode of I RIDE A BIKE is supported in part by Allspeed, the Official Bike Shop of the Podcast. With convenient locations in Portland, Bethel and Carrabassett Valley Maine, Allspeed is THE local shop for everything bike. For more information, and to check out their latest hot deals, please visit Allspeed.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/irideabike/support

Real Estate Marketing Dude
Be a Solution with Lead Generation, Not a Sales Person

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 19:36 Very Popular


Today we are continuing the conversation on how you can use the recession to launch your brand in front of everyone else. While everyone else is cutting costs and attempting to just weather this thing through, you should be capitalizing on the marketing vacuum and making sure everyone knows your name.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeHow you can capitalize on lead generation without spending a fortune.How to develop a message that clients relate to.How to present the right solution to sellers and earn a bunch of new clients.ResourcesReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business? You constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike Cuevas a real estate marketing. This podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know, like trust, and most importantly, refer. But remember, it is not their job to remember what you do for a living. It's your job to remind them. Let's get started.What is up ladies and gentlemen, welcome another episode of the real estate marketing dude, podcast. Welcome, folks. It is October 20.Thursday, we're seeing interest rates at 7.7%. You got the Prime Minister of Britain just resigned in three weeks What the hell is going on? Guess what, who the hell cares? What you do is you focus on your business right now. And none of the noise because if you turn on the news, it's very depressing. So beyond that, what we're going to be chatting about on this video, or on this video on this podcast today, I don't have any guests. I've been enjoying doing these little teaching sessions. And I don't practice these you guys, I just sort of get up and just everything here comes from the hip. But if you watch or listen to last week's podcast, I talked about one thing to own during this market in this recession, and that is your database. I'm not going to talk about database during this podcast, because we're gonna switch towards if you're going to do lead generation, what kind of lead generation and that's the topic of today. You have to own your database. First, folks, I've been saying it for years, it's the only recession proof business model now seen it before there was a recession.The truth is, you have to own your database, because it'll support you in any single market you're in. Alright. So if you did not listen to that podcast, I highly recommend not only do you subscribe to the show, you leave a great review, go listen to that podcast. And let me tell you why owning your database is so important not just in the recession in any market, because you don't have a business without it. But I want to talk about where opportunity is going to be going forward into this market. AndI'm one of the first people that said, we're going to, we're going to have a big reset here, I saw this in oh seven, I saw this in a way I was in the mix, I saw the behind the scenes. And I've done this before. I'm so excited for this market. What I'm not, I'm sad for it, because a lot of people have the potential to get hurt. However, from a business perspective, I'm excited about it because I know how to make money in these markets. And what I'm going to share with you today is going to be where if you're going to start focusing on lead generation, where you start focusing, right. And I'm telling you this because we see a lot of data, folks, we have a company called the owner, advocate and owner, advocate agent. And if you want to visit owner advocate agent, it is all about giving sellers, multiple options, sharpening your listing presents presentation during this time, and using options as leverage to create and attract more listings. But beyond that, we generate a lot of leads, motivated seller leads and we have been sort of behind the scenes for the last 12 months, we anticipated a lot of the things with the market was going to happen. We didn't know what's going to happen this fast. Now that we're here, I can tell you exactly what's happening in the background, because we know what kind of leads we're creating. And you have to look at this from the macro perspective. What were sellers like at the beginning of this year, say prior to June or July? What were sellers like that they're arrogant, oh, my house is worth this Oh, everyone's because they've been spoiled for the last 12 years. The challenge we're all having right now and is Hey, your house isn't worth what it used to be sorry, the market change. And for many sellers, they can't understand that. And it's going to take some time it did last time. But the reality is starting to set in, because the truth of the matter is that people are worried about investing right now. And the ones who aren't don't have any money issues or any financial constraints. But for the majority of people out there, the housing has gotten more expensive with interest rates and all the above. So what you're going to see Mark my words as a prediction, if you're going to focus on anything you focus on listings now, you should always be focusing on listings, but what kind of listings is that motivated, motivated sellers. Okay, I still don't understand why real estate investors never have a problem in any type of real estate market. Real Estate Investors were still buying properties for pennies on the dollar in the last market when they're all selling over list price. And they're gonna be buying a lot of properties into this market. Andsellers are more likely to entertain a lot of these alternative solutions during a market shift like this, which is why you need them.What's going to happen is that you're going to have a lot of people unfortunately lose their jobs. You're gonna have people are getting squeezed. You have people that are just looking to get married, but they can't sell their house to move out of it because it's not worth what it was. Folks, I want you to think about everybody that bought a property from the time I would sayA 21 at basically almost anytime. And I would say in 2021, almost almost all of them are going to be underwater very soon. And I know that's not something a lot of people want to hear, but the cost of selling folks is 678 percent alone. And if someone bought a house at 5%, down, they're already underwater on it is what I'm seeing in most markets as we're seeing anywhere between a 10 and 20% correction, depending on where you're at. Midwest markets, lower priced markets a lot safer, but where I'm at on the coast Gergan crush, which means there's a lot of back demand for properties that may be underwater. And that's the that's the worrisome part. Now. In addition to this, though, there's going to be a lot of motivated sellers, when when there's a recession, people pull back on spending, they go into saving, one of the places that they go into saving is hey, my house is like my equity trap, I got 300,000 hours and equity, I'm gonna go ahead and tap into that for right now. Use this money for the time being to weather the storm. So how do you what I'm getting at is you want to focus your lead generation efforts on motivated sellers. This is one of the reasons why real estate investors are so great at creating a solution for him, which is just known as a cash offer. One you have to have a cash offer in this market, there's going to be a lot of people looking for him. And it's not a matter of whether or not they take you up on your cash offer, it's that you actually have one for a solution because people who said who have a who are distressed or who raise their hands immediately result to what's known as a fast solution, which is what a cash offer is, see the only thing real estate investors have been really, really good at. I mean, they're good at a lot of things. But I mean, from a marketing, the number one thing they're really really good at, is taking that cash offer and putting it in front of people that really need it or are facing the housing problem. And they do all that through buying the right data, having the right data, putting their offer in front of people that are distressed, and there's 1,000,001 ways to do that. What they're not doing is they're not farming an area, they're not farming Every Door Direct Mail, like most Realtors do, and do a blanket market approach, or a bus stop mentality or a billboard type of approach, throw a lot of shit at the wall and hope something sticks. That's not what you do for lead generation. That's what you do for branding. for lead generation, you need to be dialed into that message, you need to know exactly who the client is. And you need to provide a solution for them to exchange and get a lead. And one of the solutions that people are going to need more than ever are going to be exit strategies for their properties. Right. And the cash offer is always the one that generates the lead. My partner Dustin, at owner advocate agent.comgenerates a lot of these leads lots of these leads, Justin's got a portfolio of 100 homes in Phoenix. And he's Jenner he's bought all these properties because he's mastered the cash offer process. But what's really interesting is that he never what do you do with the rest of the 90% of people who don't take their cash offer? That's why you need a solution folks I'm getting at is creating your listing strategy, one focusing on sellers, 100%. But creating alternative solutions for sellers is where I believe you can win. It's the main reason why we created owner advocate agent. And it's because we know that sellers want options. The real estate market has never changed in like the last 3040 50 years. If you think about it the same way your parents bought or sold a house is the same way we're doing it today. Whereas the car industry has vending car machines and Carvana Carmax, there's been all these reiterations. But when it comes to the real estate industry, not so much. And you ask yourself, why is that?Like, it's still hey, here's a 5% 6% listing, and here's the way it's gonna go, this is my listing presentation. And it's going to be my way or the highway, you don't have any other options you see during the shift is time and it gives you immediate opportunity to introduce a solution. It's when there isn't a shift that people aren't looking for that solution. And there in fact, is the opportunity.So what kind of different offerings should you put together to sort of combat and regardless of where you're focusing your marketing efforts, it's how you do business that makes you stand out and build a bigger brand that people actually know. And what we know is going to happen is that there's going to be a lot of motivated sellers. And when every other agent is offering the exact same thing, there's your opportunity, because when a shift like this happens, sellers are looking for alternative solutions, which means some of them might pass up on that agent that has been referred to them or that even they used in the past because they're seeking a more important solution because things are getting tight. And I'm stressed. Hey, I don't know if that other agent can give me a cash offer and this option. So I'm gonna walk you through a couple different options just to get you sort of creatively thinking, and I'm gonna invite you to come check out owner advocate agent.com If you want to take it further, but the first option you need is a cash offer. I highly recommend you to get investor friendly in this market. Find investors investors buy 10 to 12 properties a year, at least the good ones, and I'd much rather if I'm the buyer's agent I'd much rather sell to one guy or galI know that buying multiple properties in this market because they don't care about the GFCI outlets, they don't even care if they're in place, whereas a residential buyer is going to get pissed off that GFCI outlet isn't in and they're gonna bitch about a $20 inspection issue. That's the truth of the matter is, so we have to look at how we're working, because investors right now are Silva tating on the sidelines, not only would I be working with investors to get cash offers, but I'd be working with investors on the buy side because there's going to be opportunities for them. And a lot of those will come right off the MLS, believe it or not, whereas that wasn't the case a year ago, Tony focuses what happened last time.Another thing I would do, I think every agent needs to adapt has a fix. In this program, what's going to happen is that a lot of people want last year's prices for their house. And even though their house is dilapidated, it has shag carpeting, formica countertops, brown, ugly appliances, with smoke stains on them, they're not going to get top dollar for their house unless it looks in tip top shape. So one of the options you can implement into your listing marketing plan is, hey, I can help you flip your own house with a fix and list program. That is very sexy. Because how many agents are offering that right now, you know, these are available in every single market. And if you don't know, go to owner advocate agent.com.Like you could implement a fix, fix and lists program immediately and how people flip their own houses. Because what's going to happen is that people are going to be like, hey, I want $500,000 For my house. Sorry, dude, your house isn't worth $500,000 anymore. There's been a market shift. I don't care. I want $500,000 For my house. Alright, sir. Well, I have one solution for you. If you want to do this, we need to fix it up, I need to put about 15 to $20,000 worth of work in here. And then I could think I could get you closer to $500,000 Do you want to do that? I don't have the money to do that we do and we have the contractors and you could pay them all at closing so that you could flip your house with no money out of pocket. That's a solution folks. Okay, so what I'm getting at is crafting your listing into solutions a cash offer is nothing more for a solution for someone that has to get the hell out of fixing this program is nothing more than a solution for someone that wants to sell it for more money. Okay, your typical listing presentation can't promise any of those. I'm not saying get rid of the listing I'm saying you keep it but add on multiple options.Number four bridge What if you have to sell your house right now but it can't sell what are you going to do? We're gonna get the buy and sell at the same time but because the market slow you can't time these transactions out anymore because you don't know when that listing is going to sell. And even if it does sell you have to adhere to the buyers terms and they might be demanding 30 Day clothes Well, the buy side puts you in a pickle because you can't find that property soon enough and that's what a bridge solution does. A bridge solution is like a modern day solution for people that are buying and selling a house at the same time.There's going to be a lot of those people that are stepping up stepping down and all of the above even with the recession life's going to happen folks. And because it's not as easy to sell your house or it won't be as easy to sell your house as before and there's gonna be higher market times a bridge solution comes into options. Right off the bat I just labeled out four different options. I one of the options I'm really excited about what's a sale leaseback sale lease backs are really really cool. It's for someone that wants to cash out but not leave that options available in certain markets right now throughout the United States. How interesting would it be to just market all of these different options? How interesting would it be to create a lead generation funnel for each option and put that option in front of people that have that problem?See, wouldn't we want to do lead generation it's very simple it's not a blanket like approach you need to identify a specific problem somebody has and create the solution being your service the problem that every agent has those everyone has the same service none of them are solutions but they're all self serving five or 6% It's my listing or the highway go home hit the bricks pal see what a Stephen Baldwinmove there this is what I'm getting at guys is like you have to have solutions in these markets. Short Saleif you don't think foreclosures are coming here and saying oh the markets never gonna go down folks how long have you been selling real estate three years? How the fuck are you going to tell me we're doing this for 20 years the market is going down this is what happens this is a shift all of these people remember so what you guys put on social media is timeless. Everyone was predicting the market wasn't gonna go down and brick inJanuary February March April May you got to egg on your face dude the market went down. So like don't just take some pundants talking head points do the research yourself and give people what they want to hear. When people see the market is not doing well come out and say it's not doing well don't sit there and say well it knows the booster Good boy. When you know it's not yourself. That's the reason why you're not buyinginstead offer solutions. Okay?Options, folks options and that's just on the sell side. Let's switch over to the buy side. What kind of options can you talk about on the buy side? Well, on the buy side right now I'm 100% focused on real estate investors.I'm 100% focused on aIn investment purchases, I'm changing my message from buy home versus buying investment. Because the reality is, is that people who do buy now, they should be patient, but go for the right deal. People don't buy a house unless it's the investment angle of it. So you know, and if you guys want to know more about changing the conversation, go look to a podcast I did a few weeks ago, where we go through a lot more of those different strategies. But you see, there's a lot of opportunity here, you guys, because what nobody does is changed their tune when the market shifts. And that's why so many people are going to be dropping out if not already from this business. But that alone is the opportunity, because the reality is, is that there's going to be 1/3 Less transactions this year in the next 1218 months, which is already showing through in the stats, and those numbers are correct. But at the same time, there's going to be more than the difference leaving the industry, which is a huge opportunity. When you combine that with offering and revamping and coming up with a solution based approach to your business, that can be very powerful for brand because it's what you do in times like these and adapt to that build a brand for the long term while everyone else goes out of business. This is exactly what happened in 2007. The only reason I know this is because we adapted to short sales at that time, and short sales are going to come back. There's going to be foreclosures, you need to be educated and all these different aspects of the market, because that's what people are going to start asking about. Buyers are going to start asking you about, hey, I'm just going to hold off for foreclosure those coming back. You need to know how to intelligently answer that question, which is different for every state because there's different foreclosure timelines.There's folks, there's a lot of opportunity out here. And you might not see it yet, but you have to start preparing for it now. Because it's going to be here faster than you know it. And I don't think we're I mean, we're not markets, the markets resetting it's correcting. This is actually pretty normal. But despite outside circumstances, it's getting low. Interest rates went up way too fast. And they should have just stuff that's out of our control. But what we can control is how we react to it. Okay, so what I'm telling you guys is react to it, I want you guys to look at your business today, look at it, where can you improve it? What levels of service? Can you add? What is your listing presentation look like? What kind of closing gifts can you get? Can you enhance those? How are you going to stay in front of your database during these times? You know, what am I what is my listing presentation going to look like? What am I going to do differently because if you're still going to be doing the same thing, that's when you stop growing, you have to take these times, see where the markets going and do things differently. There's two things I'm advising and I'm going to be screaming out for the next 20 weeks, at least maybe six to 18 months and one is going to be on your database. Like I said before, listen to that podcast from last week. But the second one is going to be adaptyour services to where the market is going. Right. The riches are in the niches in a recession. In an in a changing market like this and whether that means you become a rental or leasing agent I've seen many people do that in the past. Or you become a REO agent, a short sale agent, you become a divorce agent or you become a specialist of a neighborhood. It's time to niche down from a lead generation perspective and niche down on your lead generation offer a specific solution to a specific problem and own that don't be everything and everything to all people do one thing really good from lead generation before you move on to another lead generation activity. But always stay in front of your database, because they will always feed you during a recession. If you'd like to semesters folks where I want you to go ahead and visit owner advocate agent.com. Owner advocate agent.com. You've heard me mentioned a couple times on the show. And that's just because we just launched on their advocate agent we're really excited about it. I do believe that we're gonna be able to help so many different real estate agents throughout the country, adapt a new model and not onlyweather, the recession but dominate within it. And you could do that all at owner advocate agent.com Have a great week and we'll see you guys next Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing dude.com We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training and then scheduled time to speak with a dude and get you rolling into your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Rough Cut
Two Documentaries on the Same Subject?

Rough Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 25:34


It's a scenario most documentary filmmakers dread: someone else is covering the same story. Dueling documentaries are becoming more common, but is competition always bad for filmmakers?Director Jenner Furst came on the pod to talk about this phenomenon, which he's experienced several times throughout his career. Jenner and his filmmaking partner Julia Willoughby Nason and Michael Gasparro directed Hulu's Fyre Fraud, which came out days before Netflix's FYRE, as well as LulaRich, released just prior to another film on the same subject, The Rise and Fall of LuLaRoe.Jenner talks about how he approached these stories knowing there was a competing doc in progress, how he was able to gain access to some of the films' more controversial participants, and his advice for pitching to streamers.Rough Cut on InstagramVideo Consortium on InstagramHost Jennie Butler on InstagramExecutive Producer Sky Dylan-RobbinsProducer Amy DiGiacomo on Instagram and TwitterProducer Caley Fox ShannonProducer Abhishyant KidangoorEditor Audrey Horowitz on InstagramGot an idea for an episode? Email podcast@videoconsortium.orgClick here to support the Video Consortium

The Nonlinear Library: LessWrong
LW - Response to Katja Grace's AI x-risk counterarguments by Erik Jenner

The Nonlinear Library: LessWrong

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 23:20


Link to original articleWelcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Response to Katja Grace's AI x-risk counterarguments, published by Erik Jenner on October 19, 2022 on LessWrong. This is a response to the recent Counterarguments to the basic AI x-risk case ("Counterarguments post" from here on). Based on its reception, it seems that the Counterarguments post makes points that resonate with many, so we're glad that the post was written. But we also think that most of the gaps it describes in the AI x-risk case have already been addressed elsewhere or vanish when using a slightly different version of the AI x-risk argument. None of the points we make are novel, we just thought it would be useful to collect all of them in one reply. Before we begin, let us clarify what we are arguing for: we think that current alignment techniques are likely insufficient to prevent an existential catastrophe, i.e. if AI development proceeds without big advances in AI alignment, this would probably lead to an existential catastrophe eventually. In particular, for now, we are not discussing how hard open alignment problems are, whether these problems will be solved anyway without efforts from longtermists, whether an existential catastrophe would happen within a particular time frame, what a reasonable all-things-considered p(doom) is. These are all important questions, but the main thrust of the Counterarguments post seems to be "maybe this whole x-risk argument is wrong and things are actually just fine", so we are focusing on that aspect. Another caveat: we're attempting to present a minimal high-level case for AI x-risk, not to comprehensively list all arguments. This means there are some concepts we don't discuss even though they might become crucial on further reflection. (For example, we don't talk about the concept of coherence, but this could become important when trying to argue that AI systems trained for corrigibility will not necessarily remain corrigible). Anticipating all possible counterarguments and playing out the entire debate tree isn't feasible, so we focus on those that are explicitly made in the Counterarguments post. That said, we do think the arguments we outline are broadly correct and survive under more scrutiny. Summary Our most important points are as follows: The ambiguity around "goal-directedness" can be resolved if we consistently think about AI systems that are able to achieve certain difficult-to-achieve objectives. While certain small differences between AI and human values would be fine, there are good reasons to believe that the types of differences we'll get are not the type of small differences we can accept. It is not enough to align slightly superhuman AI systems if those systems don't let us reach a stable state where no one builds even more powerful unaligned AI. Those would roughly be our one-sentence responses to sections A, B, and C of the Counterarguments post respectively. Below, we first describe some modifications we would make to the basic case for AI x-risk and then go through the points in the Counterarguments post in more detail. Notes on the basic case for AI x-risk To recap, the Counterarguments post gives the following case for AI x-risk: I. If superhuman AI systems are built, any given system is likely to be ‘goal-directed'. II. If goal-directed superhuman AI systems are built, their desired outcomes will probably be about as bad as an empty universe by human lights. III. If most goal-directed superhuman AI systems have bad goals, the future will very likely be bad. This is roughly the case we would make as well, but there are a few modifications and clarifications we'd like to make. First, we will focus on a purely behavioral definition of "goal-directed" throughout this post: an AI system is goal-directed if it ensures fairly reliably that some objective will be achieved. For point I. in the a...

The Nonlinear Library
LW - Response to Katja Grace's AI x-risk counterarguments by Erik Jenner

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 23:20


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Response to Katja Grace's AI x-risk counterarguments, published by Erik Jenner on October 19, 2022 on LessWrong. This is a response to the recent Counterarguments to the basic AI x-risk case ("Counterarguments post" from here on). Based on its reception, it seems that the Counterarguments post makes points that resonate with many, so we're glad that the post was written. But we also think that most of the gaps it describes in the AI x-risk case have already been addressed elsewhere or vanish when using a slightly different version of the AI x-risk argument. None of the points we make are novel, we just thought it would be useful to collect all of them in one reply. Before we begin, let us clarify what we are arguing for: we think that current alignment techniques are likely insufficient to prevent an existential catastrophe, i.e. if AI development proceeds without big advances in AI alignment, this would probably lead to an existential catastrophe eventually. In particular, for now, we are not discussing how hard open alignment problems are, whether these problems will be solved anyway without efforts from longtermists, whether an existential catastrophe would happen within a particular time frame, what a reasonable all-things-considered p(doom) is. These are all important questions, but the main thrust of the Counterarguments post seems to be "maybe this whole x-risk argument is wrong and things are actually just fine", so we are focusing on that aspect. Another caveat: we're attempting to present a minimal high-level case for AI x-risk, not to comprehensively list all arguments. This means there are some concepts we don't discuss even though they might become crucial on further reflection. (For example, we don't talk about the concept of coherence, but this could become important when trying to argue that AI systems trained for corrigibility will not necessarily remain corrigible). Anticipating all possible counterarguments and playing out the entire debate tree isn't feasible, so we focus on those that are explicitly made in the Counterarguments post. That said, we do think the arguments we outline are broadly correct and survive under more scrutiny. Summary Our most important points are as follows: The ambiguity around "goal-directedness" can be resolved if we consistently think about AI systems that are able to achieve certain difficult-to-achieve objectives. While certain small differences between AI and human values would be fine, there are good reasons to believe that the types of differences we'll get are not the type of small differences we can accept. It is not enough to align slightly superhuman AI systems if those systems don't let us reach a stable state where no one builds even more powerful unaligned AI. Those would roughly be our one-sentence responses to sections A, B, and C of the Counterarguments post respectively. Below, we first describe some modifications we would make to the basic case for AI x-risk and then go through the points in the Counterarguments post in more detail. Notes on the basic case for AI x-risk To recap, the Counterarguments post gives the following case for AI x-risk: I. If superhuman AI systems are built, any given system is likely to be ‘goal-directed'. II. If goal-directed superhuman AI systems are built, their desired outcomes will probably be about as bad as an empty universe by human lights. III. If most goal-directed superhuman AI systems have bad goals, the future will very likely be bad. This is roughly the case we would make as well, but there are a few modifications and clarifications we'd like to make. First, we will focus on a purely behavioral definition of "goal-directed" throughout this post: an AI system is goal-directed if it ensures fairly reliably that some objective will be achieved. For point I. in the a...

Christadelphians Talk
Reasons To Believe The Bible - Brother Andrew Jenner

Christadelphians Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 55:24


You can follow us online at.. Some of our other services.. #1 Our Main site... https://cdvideo.org #2 Our podcast on android... https://cdvideo.org/podcast #3 Our podcast on Apple...https://cdvideo.org/podcast-apple #4 Our facebook...https://facebook.com/OpenBibles #5 Our Whats App... http://cdvideo.org/WhatsApp #6 Our Instagram... http://cdvideo.org/Instagram #7 Our twitter... http://cdvideo.org/twitter #8 Our YouTube Channel... http://cdvideo.org/youtube Watch / read / Listen to other thoughts for the day on our site here https://christadelphianvideo.org/tftd/ #Christadelphianvideo #christadelphianstalk #Christadelphians #openbible #cdvideo #bibleverse #thoughts #thoughtoftheday #meditate #think #christadelphian #God #truth #faith #hope #love #cdvideo #Gospeltruth #truebibleteaching #thegospelmessage #thegospeltruth #firstprinciples #bibletruth #bibleunderstanding #exploringthebible #thoughtfortheday --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/christadelphians-talk/message

EDG Intuitive
Episode 727: Conversation with Kristin N Spencer #3

EDG Intuitive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 50:55


This is another incredible conversation with Kristin, we are exploring the word failure. Often the word failure is associated with negative connotation. Kristin provides us with a new perspective on it. The Ghostwriting Copywriter ✍️ || Podcast Host || Personal Storytelling + Sales Psychology = Working With Your Dream Clientslinkedin.com/in/kristinspencerwriterliterarysymmetry.com ybspodcast.com/ Thank you Jenner from studio stargazer album Polaris/soundtrack Snowdrift available for purchase via https://www.studiostargazer.org/

The Nonlinear Library
AF - Disentangling inner alignment failures by Erik Jenner

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 7:23


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Disentangling inner alignment failures, published by Erik Jenner on October 10, 2022 on The AI Alignment Forum. TL;DR: This is an attempt to disentangle some concepts that I used to conflate too much as just "inner alignment". This will be old news to some, but might be helpful for people who feel confused about how deception, distributional shift, and "sharp left turns" are related. I first discuss them as entirely separate threat models, and then talk about how they're all aspects of "capabilities are more robust than alignment". Here are three different threat models for how an AI system could very suddenly do catastrophic things: Deception: The AI becomes deceptively aligned at some point during training, and then does what we want only for instrumental reasons (because it wants to be deployed). Once we deploy, it starts pursuing its actual objective, which is catastrophic for humans. Distributional shift: The AI behaves well during training, perhaps using some messy set of heuristics and proxy objectives. We deploy, and there's distributional shift in the AI's inputs, which leads to the model's proxies no longer being aligned with human values. But it's still behaving capably, so we again get catastrophic outcomes. Capability gains/sharp left turn: At some point (while training or in deployment), the AI becomes much more capable, including at a bunch of things we didn't explicitly train for. This could happen quite suddenly, e.g. because it learns some crucial general skill in relatively few gradient steps, or because it starts learning from something other than gradients that's way faster. The properties of the AI that previously ensured alignment are too brittle and break during this transition. Note that these can be formulated as entirely distinct scenarios. For example, deception doesn't require a distributional shift nor capability gains; instead, the sudden change in model behavior occurs because the AI was "let out of the box" during deployment. Conversely, in the distributional shift scenario, the model might not be deceptive during training, etc. (One way to think about this is that they rely on changes along different axes of the training/deployment dichotomy). Examples I don't think we have any empirical examples of deception in AI systems, though there are thought experiments. We do see kind of similar phenomena in interactions between humans, basically whenever someone pretends to have a different goal than they actually do in order to gain influence. To be clear, here's one thing that is not an example of deception in the sense in which I'm using the word: an AI does things during training that only look good to humans even though they actually aren't, and then continues to do those things in deployment. To me, this seems like a totally different failure mode, but I've also seen this called "deception" (e.g. "Goodhart deception" in this post), thus the clarification. We do have experimental evidence for goal misgeneralization under distributional shift (the second scenario above). A well-known one is the CoinRun agent from Goal misgeneralization in Deep RL, and more recently, DeepMind published many more examples. A classic example for sudden capability gains is the history of human evolution. Relatively small changes in the human brain compared to other primates made cultural evolution feasible, which allowed humans to improve from a source other than biological evolutionary pressure. The consequence were extremely quick capability gains for humanity (compared to evolutionary time scales). This example contains both the "threshold mechanism", where a small change to cognitive architectures has big effects, and the "learning from another source mechanism", with the former enabling the latter. In ML, grokking might be an example for the "threshold ...

The Brett Davern Show
Keeping Up With the Jenner’s

The Brett Davern Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 40:15


On Today’s Episode Airbnb used to be cool, Babyvomitcoin, and Brody Jenner is a real person …Enjoy! The Brett Davern Show is streamed LIVE daily at 12pm (eastern) 9am (pacific) on idobi Radio at http://idobi.com. Follow Brett on social media @BDavv, Katie : @KatieLeclerc, the show @BrettDavernShow

The Nonlinear Library
AF - How are you dealing with ontology identification? by Erik Jenner

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 5:46


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: How are you dealing with ontology identification?, published by Erik Jenner on October 4, 2022 on The AI Alignment Forum. Not really novel, but I've made this point quite often in recent conversations, so I decided to make a short write-up. I think a wide range of alignment proposals will somehow have to deal with ontology identification, i.e. mapping an AI's beliefs about the world to a representations humans can correctly understand. This could happen explicitly (e.g. via an ELK solution or strong interpretability), or be more hidden, or maybe the proposal avoids the problem in some clever way. But I think alignment proposals should have some answer to the question "How are you dealing with ontology identification?" A class of examples One high-level approach you could try to use to align AI goes as follows: Somehow get a model of human values. This could be a utility function, but might also look more like a preference ordering etc. Build an AI that optimizes according to this value model. (If the value model is just a preference ordering, you might have to deal with the fact that it can be inconsistent, but we're ignoring those issues here.) To be clear, this is not the only approach for building aligned AI (maybe not even the most promising one). It's a special case of separately solving outer alignment and inner alignment, which itself is a special case of solving alignment more broadly. But this still covers an important class of approaches. I think any approach along those lines has to deal with ontology identification, for a pretty simple reason. The model of human values we get from step 1. will be defined in terms of the human ontology. For example, if we're learning a utility function, it will have type signature Uhuman:{states in human ontology}R. But for step 2., we need something the AI can optimize over, so we need a utility function of type signature UAI:{states in AI ontology}R. This means that as a bridge between steps 1. and 2., we need a translation from the AI ontology to the human ontology, τ:{states in AI ontology}{states in human ontology}. Then we can use UAI:=Uhuman∘τ. Note that in practice, we will often collapse learning Uhuman and specifying τ into a single step. For example, when doing RLHF on videos of trajectories, we're learning a reward function defined directly in terms of videos, rather than a human representation of what's happening in those videos. These videos also map easily into the RL agent's ontology (the agent's initial layers perform that mapping). So we don't need to explicitly use an ontology translation τ anywhere. Implicitly, we're using the translation τ that satisfies UAI=Uhuman∘τ, where UAI is the reward model, defined as a function on videos. τ maps from videos to human's understanding of what's happening inside those videos, and Uhuman are the "true" human values (which aren't explicitly represented anywhere in this setup). This implicit translation τ corresponds to the human simulator from the ELK report: it maps videos to what humans think is happening when they see those videos. This leads to outcomes that look good to humans on video, rather than outcomes that are actually good. So when I say that alignment proposals have to "deal with ontology identification" somehow, I mean that they need a better map τ than this implicit one. So far, we've focused on RLHF as an example, in which case this perspective doesn't add much. But I think the same argument applies much more broadly. For example, one response to the issues with RLHF is "Ah, we need a better model of human irrationality". In other words, we should do a lot of cognitive science to figure out precisely in which ways humans give feedback that doesn't reflect their true preferences. Then we can back out true human preferences from irrational human feedba...

The Encrypted Economy
The CFTC and Ooki DAO: What It Means. Kayvan Sadeghi, Partner of Jenner & Block

The Encrypted Economy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 60:36


On this week's podcast, our guest is Kayvan Sadeghi,  Partner of Jenner & Block. We discuss the CFTC complaint against bZeroX, LLC and Ooki DAO and its implications for the DAO ecosystem.Resource LinksCFTC ComplaintCFTC Legally Served Ooki DAO via Website Help Bot, Court RulesKayvan SadeghiKayvan's LinkedInJenner & Block

Spiritual Dope
Spirituality with Shamanic Works Jenna Smith

Spiritual Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 48:26


Creator of the Re-Sourcing MethodTM  Jenna Smith provides a tangible framework for people to access their untapped resources in order to live a life of purpose, deep confidence, and self-trust. An in-demand speaker, professional singer, coach, and author. Jenna is known as the “real deal” to get you past trying and fixing,  to fully living as your ideal self — permanently.  How?  Because she aligns people back to their nature: As confident, worthy, creative, successful beings.  Cutting through half-baked Woo-Woo and Ra-Ra self-development, Jenna provides concrete easy-to-learn tools for tangible results that last a lifetime. Jenna Smith trained in Spiritual Psychotherapy, Ontological Coaching, Peak Performance, Oneness, as well as Shamanism and Intuitive healing from Peru, India, Africa, Ireland, and North America Contact Info and Links: Website:  www.jennasmithcoaching.com Follow on IG: @adventuresinjennaland   Intro Guy 0:00 Your journey has been an interesting one I'm to hear you've questioned so much more than those around you. You've even questioned yourself as to how you can have grown into these thoughts. Am I crazy? When did I begin to think differently? Why do people in general appear so limited in their thought process? Rest assured, you are not alone. The world is slowly waking up to what you already know inside yet can't quite verbalize. Welcome to the spiritual dough podcast, the show that answers the question you never even knew to ask, but knew the answers to questions about you this world the people in it? Most importantly, how do I proceed? Now moving forward? We don't have to have all the answers but we sure do love living in the question. Time for another head of spiritual dove with your host Brandon Handley. Let's get right into today's episode. Brandon Handley 0:43 One Hey, there's spiritual taupe. I'm on here today with Jenna Smith. She is the creator of the resourcing method, Jenna provides a tangible framework for people to tune into their untapped resources in order to live a life of purpose with deep confidence and self trust. An in demand speaker professional singer coach and author Jenner is known as the real deal to get you beyond trying and fixing to fully living as your ideal self permanently. Jenna has been trained as spiritual psychotherapy, Ontological Coaching, peak performance oneness, as well as shamanism and intuitive healing from Peru, India, Africa island in North America. Jenna what's going on? Jenna Smith 1:28 It's always interesting listening to that. I'm hanging out in southern Ontario, Canada, a little snowy right now. Brandon Handley 1:36 Well, I mean, you're lucky I love the snow, even a lot of snow. I've never really had to spend much time much further than Maine for winter, which, which was cool enough for me, I think that might be my limit. But who knows. I still like the snow and ice. Anyways, thanks for being here today. With us, we, we connected you and I connected over on pod match. I love it. It's like Tinder for podcasts are so different. And, and we get the opportunity to you know, see if there's a good fit beat. And before we hop on the call, and we did that actually, we still hopped on one just make sure was a good fit and really looking forward to the conversation to Jenna Smith 2:18 me too excited. Brandon Handley 2:20 So Jenna out, I always like to start these off with the whole idea that you know, you and I are conduits for your creative source source energy. I think you know, coming from shamanism, what you hear in shamanism is like being the hollow bone or something like that, right. And there's always something kind of flowing through us and whatever is flowing through us really ease isn't even for us, most likely it's for somebody else. And and there's a message that's coming through you today at this moment that somebody's gonna hear on the other end of this podcast. What is that message today? Jenna Smith 3:01 I feel like well, when you said sometimes it's not even for you, I feel like it's also always for you. But, um, I'm feeling like freedom is an inside job is is the two and I'm hearing right now. Like just dialing in our capacity to feel free from the inside. And then how that reflect in the outside world. And to dream like dream, our dream into being versus react from what's being already there, or other people are doing, you know, to be a creator. So that's, that's the vibe. Brandon Handley 3:43 I love it, right? The whole ideas that we're here creating our lives and, you know, one way or another, we're active participants. And hopefully we're willing, active, knowledgeable participants, creating something that we actually want in our lives versus being you know, being like, I think you said reactionary, right versus like, oh, shit, this is showing my life, I better tend to get out here freedom's an inside job, though, to your point. So I think that's a great message and a great way to start us off. So, you know, I know that we connected over the fact of you, you're, you're doing your coaching and you're in space of doing, you've done like many years of psychotherapy, you've done many years like peak performance. And you also ended up doing well call like just Aboriginal right? Healing, right. This is the the type of healing work that you'll find in native spaces. Yeah. Indigenous, there's no word. That's indigenous. So, you know, let's talk a little bit about your journey. You know, what do you think has been what has led you to this more spiritual space? Outside of the general? I'll just call it the general grind. Let's talk a bit about how you landed where you are today. And what are some things we could share with the audience? So it'll help them to step out of the grind and step into themselves, right? Jenna Smith 5:27 Yeah, yeah, and come with it. Sometimes the language I'll use is like 3d and five d, and maybe your audience would be familiar with that. But essentially, like a 3d existence, dimensional d dimensional, you have a job, and you have to do what's in front of you. And you follow these rules, and you kind of just don't have your own voice, and you don't have any freedom and power, really, you're just doing what's in front of you. And that's it. And that's true for many people. And whereas, like a five D reality is the acknowledgement that you're co creating, and you just slowly start to step out and out and out of systemic oppression and things that aren't there to, to empower humans. So just, I just thought I'd say that in case they say 3d and 5g, but how I got here was I think I came in at five D was like wtf is happening. So I mean, nothing extraordinary. My dad worked in the salt mine, my mom was a grade one teacher. But I was always an empath. I was always feeling other people's feelings and aware of things. And I could feel at home in nature. And eventually, when I got more and more to music, and eventually that was like, Oh, that makes sense. Because that's just creator, unencumbered, like nature, music, creation, anything in that creative realm where we're the intermediary of creation, right? So I was raised Roman Catholic, though. And that, that something felt off to me when I was, you know, kneeling and sitting and standing and mumbling the thing you're supposed to say at the time, you're supposed to say it without any connection to it. And I was like, hmm, this doesn't. This doesn't make sense to me. So that's, that's sort of like, the origin of knowing that there's something else at a really young age and then life presented new things. I was in a car accident when I was 15. And sustained, like soft tissue injuries, absolutely everywhere, nothing broke, but everything hurt. And that created a sleep disturbance. So I had like, no restorative sleep and chronic pain. And that created something called prevalent algea, or chronic pain syndrome. People might be aware of that. Basically, you're just always in pain, your brain doesn't work as well, all these kinds of things. And the doctors are like, yeah, so no, this is just how it is. You're just gonna have to deal with being in pain and there wasn't any options. And again, my voice in my head was like, really, like, you know, I didn't know the other option. But essentially, that led me to learning Reiki, Reiki got me connected to the energy world, like my Reiki teacher was like, hey, I can help you. And so my teachers, so over time to make a pretty long story short, teachers came to me the more that I was receptive to them. So what I would notice is I would create this opening of like, maybe there's another way or I think there's another way, and then a teacher would come. I didn't like, seek things. Often. My teachers found me. My teachers came to me so my Reiki teacher was a synchronistic event where I mentioned the word Reiki, and then someone's like, I'm taking Reiki I'm like, Okay, I'm gonna go to that thing. It was completely non forced. They always came to me. And then with shamanism, it just made sense to me. So energy made sense. To me. Reiki made sense to me. Oh, we're energy. And it's just, you know, when something sounds right, it that there's like, yeah, this makes sense that energy can come through. And this feels good. Oh, cool. Look at how I can sense things with my hands. And I kind of always knew were there. And then just kept getting more and more refined. And then in the real world, like, oh, I should have a job. So I love singing, and I was good at singing. And I went to university for singing, because apparently, that's gonna get you a singing career, which it won't. So that's not a thing. It'll get you in debt. And then you'll be like, Oh, what's, what's the plan for this? So that led me to being a personal trainer and doing these jobs and being in that 3d world, like, oh, had to pay my rent level up, but all the while I'm doing spiritual development. And I need my shaman mentor, random guy named Chris. You know, like, he doesn't have a special shaman name. Brandon Handley 9:51 I'm just assuming. Yeah, I mean, we all know Jenna Smith 9:56 Chris is actually his shot. I was like, No, that's wrong. His shaman He was left foot. But normal looking dude named Chris at a music festival looks at me strangely. And I was like, what's that about? Then we did an energy exchange and he helped me put my spirit back in my body. He's like, do you want to put your spirit back in your body? Yes. Brandon Handley 10:18 Do I know what that means? Yes, Chris. That'd be fantastic. I'm guessing you're the you're the person that does this. Jenna Smith 10:24 Yeah, like he had a t shirt and everything. So So I actually joke about him like strange, man. I think I was 22. Now he was maybe 3040s. And I was like, oh, yeah, come back to my mom's house. So we'll do an energy exchange of bodywork Brandon Handley 10:40 Did Did you tell your mom that that's what was happening? Oh, didn't Jenna Smith 10:44 tell her all I'm just like these, this free creature. Luckily, my spirit guides are like, we've got to just corral this chick until we get her tuned up. So. So either way, he put my spirit back on my body we did. It was at a traditional healer, heal me lie on a table, they heal you, right. That's what I was used to. I go and get Reiki, I go and get healed, I go see a healer. This was you know, weird to kind of like Tai Chi movements. And then you access something in the spirit world as a shaman and then you can blow it, it's another way to move into the physical through your breath, to blow that energy back into where it belongs. Or to blow out energy that is not in the highest. So there's no good or bad in shamanism, it's usable energy and usable energy. So when that happened, I felt a distinct shift because a bunch of we did a heart thing. And so a bunch of ex boyfriends popped up, like, called me something is like, out of nowhere, like one week in the one week period. I had a dream about you to learn. I'm like, okay, strange, but so so it's like evidence, right? Like, this isn't a coincidence. This would not have happened otherwise. And then my actual like, fiance type person living with me left, I went back home and there was a posted, I'm, I here's the key, like insects in the city. So I was that I quit. Yeah, like, I can't like something like I couldn't do as in person. Something something and I was so devastated. But this spirit in my body new vibrational muscle that I had was like, just curious, just wandering, and not freaking out. So both happening simultaneously. So I call Chris. Um, why did you do? What, by the way, he said, you know, she said, His Spirit stuff that I now say to my clients of like, you need to see each other with new eyes, blah, blah, blah. But it was just evidence to me, it was just intangible world that was just so powerfully boom, like, superhero landing, made tangible, like this energy shift. Did that recalibrating my life to match my spirit more? Brandon Handley 13:26 Right? Right, right, right. You energetically aligned right? Your spirit was like in your body and present and kind of an awareness of the Spirit in of itself, right? Just be like, Oh, shit, like Peter Pan, right? You So you found your shadow and you sewed it back on? Jenna Smith 13:44 Just just just that space was filled and and and now I could see through those eyes. So sort of like bambi legs, though. Oh, I don't know what I'm doing yet. Brandon Handley 13:57 We have to get like three or four more Disney references. And by the end of the podcast, Jenna Smith 14:02 we'll get sponsored. I love Disney movies. And I sang right and I like talk to animals. So I'm like, I wanted to present a Disney princess like obviously there should be a movie made about me. So anyway, that introduced me to shamanism that introduced me to the world of indigenous medicine which then more again, same thing, met mon Daza, from Zimbabwe who's a peacekeeper medicine man. So cool. He was taught how to be a medicine man from his ancestors through his dreams. So dragged about all the herbs and everything his feet were hanging over riverbank, seeing all the herbs without any instruction he went and got the herbs that he Oh this looks like this and didn't know what they were. Next stream was basically an encyclopedia of feeling like this is for this in this is for that. And then people started coming. So he tells this isn't like some guy on TV trying to make money like This is like he has nothing to prove. So like this Is this legitimate other good five d, where you're given instructions, you are being trained, you're being receptive, you're participating in your training, which is also very important. And then the people come, then you're then you're a magnet, right? Then you have that magnetic quality. So then the right people came, the people who needed him came and etc, etc. So learn from him a little bit and then just followed by spirit, just follow like, oh, go to Peru. Oh, go to these things. It wasn't like, Unknown Speaker 15:36 I should go to Peru so I can get a selfie on Machu Picchu, and then that'd be super cool. And it'd be super spiritual. Like, Jenna Smith 15:42 none of that voice guided my journey. And I think that's why like, Now this stuff is really cool. Like, when I was in high school, I'm 39. This was not cool. Like, this was like weird. And, you know, like, oh, like it wasn't Oh, neat. Tell me about chakras. Like, oh, my gosh, you're a shaman meet like before? Brandon Handley 16:08 It's definitely it's definitely interesting to see this kind of surge in the space. I mean, I think that Ayahuasca has a lot to do with it. I think that the Jenna Smith 16:22 entrepreneurs, tech startups, well, Brandon Handley 16:25 and a lot of, you know, I think, you know, plant medicine being legal now, like everywhere, right? Like, so with that coming to the forefront, there's like, it's become just a little bit more mainstream and acceptable, right. To your point to you've got tech entrepreneurs and people with high profiles, it'd be like, Yeah, I asked him for life, bro. And so, you know, it's bringing it to the forefront and making it this kind of cool thing. But what I think and you know, love to hear your part on this. And thoughts on this as well, is we got to be real careful, right? This is like a veneer, right? This is just the surface level of, you know, the spirituality, right, like just saying your spiritual wearing all the clothes and doing all this shit. Doesn't necessarily mean that you are, you know, connected to yourself. Right. I actually kind of had a question earlier. You know, where's the disconnect in general religion, right? Traditional religion, and want to make sure that we don't go down that same path again. Jenna Smith 17:38 Yeah, I believe in there's many rivers to the same ocean. Energy about spirit religion, as long as it's like, the not the human vs. Right. So the human vs of like control and power, and we both can't be right at the same time. That is when you need to call BS because Spirit is we're all right, all the time. So there's, there isn't that war energy, there isn't any separation, there literally isn't in that frequency. And we can't get there from the mind. We can't get there from a cognitive mind. Unknown Speaker 18:24 So yeah, Brandon Handley 18:25 well tell me more about that. Jenna Smith 18:28 Yeah, so the mind naturally will separate to the mind will naturally see good and bad, it's a good thing. It's like, that smells bad. Don't eat it. Like it's a good tool for life and for relationships and for unity and oneness and CO creating a world that doesn't suck. Not a great tool. Like it's limited. So the cognitive mind is bound to what has been, and what's been told to you. Brandon Handley 18:58 And the target in mind, again, cognitive mind, again, is what's bound and what Jenna Smith 19:04 it's bound to only what has been, and what's right in front of you. So it's what they are doing and what has been done. So it's not the place of innovation and creation and possibility. And unless someone has the courage to bring that in, but the cognitive mind is not the place where you create new things, or you create deep connection. It's a tool. It's just simply a tool, but it's not meant to be what we live from dominantly Brandon Handley 19:37 does so now of course, the follow up question is where are we supposed to live? dominantly. Jenna Smith 19:43 So, I believe we have the capacity to use our mind as a tool. And our body is a gateway to intelligent information through sensation and our heartspace which can also be used with emotions, it's a space. You know, when you there's no words, right? This is where music comes in, this is where poetry comes down. This is where art comes in, where it's trying to translate that thing that you can't bring words to what we try. And it's a beautiful trying, when we do it artistically. The dot space is the space of love and creation, where there is no noise of thoughts, because the thought is meant to be a tool. It's very reductionist, what I'm saying but it's, it's to help make sense of something make sense of where we could go with it. And we can increase our capacity of feeling with sensations in our body, we can increase our capacity, feeling the space of the heart and living from it more and more and, and going to fill up fill up in this space. Um, we just aren't, we're taught, we just weren't taught but the Ayahuasca is in the plant medicines are also those gateways, those access points that clean off our receivers. So but I like to make it really grounded and really easy, and like something preschool kids could do. So then that means adults could do it to feeling like they would be dumb if they dried, but your body and your heart. And so there's this place called your center, where all of it is there, like you can feel the body sensations, the mind has something to say, the heart is giving us data, it's all data. And then there's a space in between, there's a space in between all of that where we are. Hmm. And that's, that's where if we go from there, we're good. No matter the circumstances or conditions, this is what I've come to find. You know, my dad's committed suicide, I've been through a tornado killed chronic pain, blah, blah, blah. And it's, it's this, it's this place where I don't break where it is unbreakable, you know. So that center place where you have access to your body, your heart, and your mind, and then your spirit. All working at the same time. Brandon Handley 22:13 I want to use the word like resilience for this place where you don't break. But is that a good word? Is there a better word that you can think of that would describe that place? Jenna Smith 22:24 Hmm, I mean, I call it I call it this is the resourcing method. This is but it's not the best word either source like to resource to is the method of how to get there, but I would call this space like resilient is is a it's like a, you know, it's like an ad it's like your will get resiliency. Brandon Handley 22:44 Right. Right, exactly. But I think that there's I think that if what I'm understanding is that this is really a space where where you're connected, this is the place where you're connected, right, where you realize just in a moment that you're connected with source and in that space, right. Where you won't, you can't break. Right. I love you know, Bob Proctor. I haven't listened to him for a while. But one of the lies that he said, that really resonated with me back in the day was your spiritual DNA is perfect. Right. And so since then, I've always had to agree with him. So this is a place where you're spiritually connected, and you can't, it's impossible to break. So that would be I guess, where I would land that. Would you agree? Disagree? Jenna Smith 23:42 Yeah, there's no wrong or bad. There's no behind or forward. You know, you're not like, you know, people like, Oh, I'm dealing with this again, on like, two steps back with no Brandon Handley 23:54 users right here. Always here. Right? Jenna Smith 23:58 Yeah. And, and we heal in a spiral. Right. So sometimes the you that's a new new expression of yourself looks at an old date with new eyes with new capacity with new resourcing. In order to bring it fresh consciousness, bring it fresh, bring it Love, bring it attention, we don't have to add fancy words bring attention to something that was too hard to be with before. Okay, there's something wrong with that. So yeah, I like all that. Brandon Handley 24:28 And I like the idea to have it being in a spiral. It always makes me think I always think of the golden ratio, right? And just kind of like the growth is the growth is it gets bigger as you go out, but you still TierPoint like you can still see all of the rest of what's happening. So one of the things I want to hit on too, I mean, I'm definitely loving the you know, the indigenous conversation and talking about some of that but also want to just make sure that the people listening because You've also got two degrees in psychotherapy, right? So I mean, it's not like you didn't go to school and study and you just did a bunch of ayahuasca and hung out mud baths for a couple years and came out of it being like, Hey, I'm a healer. You're like, Hey, I also am classically trained, Western style. And then, you know, East meets West. Let's talk about the convergence of the two a little bit and how that's where do you see that convergence? Jenna Smith 25:30 Well, it's a great time, as you said, the hype Enos of plant medicine that can be misunderstood is like a transactional nature, I take this, I get that. No. And so if you don't have discernment, Trump being a trauma informed therapist is, luckily, it's trendy now. Like, it's also gaining trend, which is great mental health and the, there's some missing elements, but to be trained hours and hours and mentors, and it's, it's, it's so small thing, and I'm not like tooting my own horn, I'm just saying. It made sense to me to put that much time and effort into it. And the payoff is I am capable, when someone has something arise to deal with it. Like deep trauma, all of these things, you can't just Life Coach School them. Like there's some cool stuff with that have like habit management, all that kind of stuff. But when we talk about deep healing of human beings, fragmentation and PTSD and addictions and and you know, bringing up suicide, there's like, deep stuff that you don't want to eff with. Like, it is possible, Brandon Handley 26:48 right? And as a coach myself, I'm like, I tap out, I'm like, I'm out. You need somebody you need somebody else to deal with this shit. Jenna Smith 26:56 Okay, it's just like saying, Brandon Handley 26:59 Yeah, this is this, this is this is outside of my purview. But I love that, you know, you're able to, again, you're harnessing many different kinds of facets, right, many different pieces. And just curious again, to where you're seeing this convergence. Okay, right. Shamanism? Yeah. Jenna Smith 27:20 Yeah, I'm seeing in the world. Okay, so I started and then I went off, but there is what I love is the with the internet and the online world, that you're seeing more trauma informed with Gabor Ma Tei. And Thomas Hubel. You know, you never really hear their name out loud. That, that they're starting to have these conversations and those that are interested in seeking and wanting that wholeness are able to access this information, because it's out there. So there is a convergence, because, you know, in psychotherapy, you do inner child work, in shamanism you do. Soul Retrieval, right. So, um, and then there's just inner parts. In general, we have all of these inner parts that are dealt with in the psychotherapy, therapeutic model, that are also seen in the shamanic world, they're just different names. So it's really cool to be a part of both and then this Ontological Coaching and high performance and achievers and all that kind of stuff. And working with that type of personality type is really fascinating, but they all do converge, and how we relate to reality. So with the shamanism, being that creator, and not having it be wrong or bad. And then with psychotherapy, it is to bring Completion to things that haven't been processed before. So essentially, so you're not repeating the pattern, which is the same thing as being a co creator, right? Like, okay, so I tend to attract this kind of thing into my life, how can I be different in order to create an experience a different experience, so they, there is a lot of convergence. And the more you do it, the simpler it gets. That might have been like a lot of words, but what I find the essential truth of these converging is that we are already whole, what arises is what needs attention. And it's the right time if it arises, and you will attract the right people. I've always attract the right teachers, but not if I think I need them. Now, if I'm, you know, like up until 4am, looking for the solution to the problem. Right. Brandon Handley 29:37 Yeah. So, I love that you're hitting on that point. I jotted that down earlier to when you're talking about the you know, being magnetic and having the people drawn to you right, like, you know, and without, without seeking, right we talk about I think we hear a lot in this you know, spiritual just five d See this other space have a life of ease, right? And how things are supposed to be easier. And people are like, No, you got, you got to do all this work and you do all this other stuff. But you're also now you're not. And so this, this part that you're sharing, which I just want to highlight is like, you know, the people showed up when you needed them without like, ultimately seeking them without saying, I need this now in my life. But then when you do, you're like, Oh, my God, where I need, like shamon 101. And I need it like in zip code 19465. Like, oh, I can't find a shaman that fits my needs. Right? Where's How come a shaman won't just show up? Right? It's just energy that we put out thinking, I think that I heard you talk a little bit about this on another podcast, trying to do it from the egoic place. Jenna Smith 30:51 Trying to infer something's missing. So when when we're committed that something's missing, we're going to create, keep creating, something's missing. So we'll, we'll find somebody but they're maybe not great. Or like that you have a weird experience or Brandon Handley 31:03 your lesson? No, Chris, there. No, Chris. Jenna Smith 31:07 Chris, I mean, come on. That's the reality of it. I was gonna be like, what is Chris's Brandon Handley 31:13 name, I need to get ahold of Chris, is that like, Chris? versus shannon.com? Is that what I heard him say? Jenna Smith 31:20 He's gonna love this, it's so much fun. But you know, I do want to touch on that ease part. Because it's a both and you do work, you do do work on yourself, you do have a committed relationship to yourself and what comes your way. But there is ease on the other side of that, in order for you to be your fullest expression. So you can't just dink around, whatever, like, although sometimes I do because that's part of my full expression like, dawdling, it's like a way for me to kind of defragment or like hanging out on my hammock, like the things that make me more me, make me a better healer, make me more present, make me radiate more, so I can help more people, that that isn't the only reason why I'm doing it, I get to live a great life, and I should, as you do, and as should others. And that's sort of like the memo, people need to get like you give from your overflow. And that's what you deserve to have is what is that life that creates those conditions for you to be that, and sometimes that's working more hours for some people, but the ease is in the lack of struggle that you're not? Brandon Handley 32:38 Well, I mean, if you're working harder towards or in a life that you actually want, there's, there's a there's a purpose, there's a meaning there's alignment, right, then, you know, with all of that should come some type of ease in that. And it's not. Because it's your choice, right? Because this is this is like a meaningful, this is what I'm doing. I'm doing it on purpose, versus like, I'm getting up to pay the bills, I'm getting out because this I have to do this and all those things. Jenna Smith 33:09 Nature. So there are ants, right there ants are as a species, right? That that's their jam. Like there are people, and I know them and usually hire them. Like you come work for me. Like because you love doing this. And I thrive with lots of space, lots of space and time to go into cave time. And I need that in order to go out back into the world. And I've tried it different ways. But no, it just it's I would call it to be true to your nature to just assume the tree is going to have what it needs. And you know, the dog depending on where it lives, who's hosting it goes into should have what it needs, that in nature, you're going to have your needs back, just just just the way things are. But why not humans and to me, it's about returning to that that vibration of pay if I was created by a Creator and nature, this intersection of both which they are i There is a life where everything I'm supposed to be is supposed to be here for me. Not because I'm entitled. It's that everyone should essentially be able to come back to that existence because that just makes sense. That just makes sense to me. Brandon Handley 34:21 Right? Right. I think honestly, we're seeing that a lot more out there right now. So I guess the question I would have is, let's let's talk about doing some work with Jana. Right? Like who you know, who you working with? What's uh, you know, somebody who's listening to this podcast is like, Yeah, I'm down to do some spiritual shamanism and let's, let's get in out of the 3d indentified the, what are some of the first steps there? Jenna Smith 34:49 Yeah, so I mean, I mean, like pragmatically My website is Janice with coaching.com. And I work with The people that I have on my website that feel deeply and think big, so they're, you know, the achiever types that they know there's something that they're here for, but they're dealing dissatisfied and that kind of thing. So when I work with people like that, through conversation, it's like transformational conversations we meet as they speak, I can hear where they're out of alignment I can hear where they're battling themselves. In reality, I can hear programs that aren't theirs that third their mom or this and I don't villainize parents, and I don't villainize the programs, it's just like, that's not you. And it's very pragmatic, and that by having those conversations, okay, now, here are the things that you as an individual, individualized things that work for most humans anyway. So that's a bonus that will tune you to you more. And it's like in digestible increments, because that's, again, what makes my my job easy, is I'm tuning in to the intelligence of that person in front of me, knowing that it knows how to guide this person, with all of my gut with all my tools and all of my teaching all, but the biggest thing is to be present with the human in front of me, and listening deeply with presence and go from there. Maybe not the answer you're looking for. But that's what Brandon Handley 36:25 I mean. That's what it looks like. Right? That's what looks like for somebody to come to you and do work with you and to initiate what you know, what is something I guess what is something practical that maybe somebody doesn't have the time to pick up the phone to call Jenna today? Or this week? Do you have anything that they could take a look at themselves some tools that you might offer? Jenna Smith 36:52 Absolutely, yeah, so not sure if you have as a link notes. On my website, you'll see a link to programs and there are free meditations. So the heart breathing meditation is. So the three things I'm always going to recommend our heart breathing, which is meditation to center into the heart space journaling, and sensing the body sensations. So those are the steps to start to strengthen those vibrational muscles I talk about with your body and your heart, managing your mind and accessing your spirit. So they're all on that website. So there's, there's about five free meditations and the heart breathing it but if you were to pick one, I would say take on the heart breathing exercise for a month and start there because that's the muscle. It's like if you only ever did bicep curls, right? If you're into fitness, hi used to be a personal trainer. But you know, like, it's like, that's what we're always doing is our mind, our mind our mind. But you got to start working that muscle that doesn't get enough attention. Yeah, so it's like, definitely start there. I am writing a book right now. So that'll be coming out. So once you join teachable, you will get access to being on my list. So then you'll know when the book comes out as well. Brandon Handley 38:05 Awesome. You mentioned, like I said, check out another podcast and you'd mentioned something that I really liked about journaling, like journaling is what is not necessarily just writing down stuff, it is what Jenna Smith 38:18 it's a technology. So it's a it's an integration technology of merging your mind slowing it down, embodying it, it comes down through the heart space, your heart is connected to your hands energetically. And then as you're writing on paper, ideally, like computer typing isn't the same thing. As you're writing you're you're simultaneously being aware of and you're witnessing your experience. So you're getting all of these things all at once. And most people these days are like, Oh, I can't write as fast as my head. I can't you know, I can't write fast enough. I think it's hilarious. It's like, what do you think the problem? Like? What do you think the solution is? And they very rarely think to write slower. Just see what happens. Brandon Handley 39:08 Right? Right. I know, I've certainly gotten the feedback. Well, you know, if I write that much, my hand or arm is gonna hurt and like, well, I don't know, then maybe write less that day and work your way up to it or Jenna Smith 39:18 whatever, right? It's just the noise of the mind. And so as you start to write in a non hairy, crazy way, that is showing you how your mind is right. You're you're bringing awareness to thoughts and you're bringing awareness to your experience of thoughts through the page. And then as you begin as you journal more and more, it's this relationship with yourself that you're cultivating. You know, do you have the page? And so it's not a Dear Diary, it's uh, you know, you can do a brain dump, which is just blah, My shoulder hurts. It was hard to sleep. And then oh, maybe I'm grateful for this grateful for that. And then sometimes you could do a creation journal where Oh, you know, I'd love to feel inspired today and then just have floated out, like, you have no idea how it's gonna happen. And I've done this before, it's so neat, how creation will play with you, if you play with it. Like if you're I would love to experience I did one time, I'd like to be delighted. Whatever something and I, I hold out this book and then there was a bookmark that said, so are you ready to be delighted today? And it was a Pottery Barn ad. But it was the exact words, Brandon Handley 40:33 right? Well, it's, you know, to me, it's interesting. You know, I was going to ask you do you write down? Do you generally ask people or recommend that they write down some things that they might want? Oftentimes, right, we don't focus on what we want. We tend to just focus on the noise, right? Instead of cutting through it, and just saying, that's a bunch of noise. Here's actually what I, this is what I'd like this to look like. And then when you're writing it down, you're becoming part of that creative process. I think years ago, I called it like, physically, like the cosmic record player of the universe, right? Like the pen being like the needle on the paper being, you know, Jenna Smith 41:12 that's cool. That's a neat record, right? Brandon Handley 41:15 And so, but then it shows up, because now you've like, you've given yourself permission to just see it once. Now you're gonna see it, like, again, I think we talked about in the beginning here, you just talked about seeing the evidence of these things that are showing up in your life. So awesome. No, I love I love that. Is there anything else you wanted to hit on? Before I flip this over to just one more section here? Jenna Smith 41:40 Nope. Other than on my website, there are journal prompts, as well. Okay, so that's like, the brain dump start thing and then some prompts of like, creating and I actually can't remember them right now. But basically, holdings are very good, though. Helping Yeah, they're great. Like carry member one. But two prompts, because if you're new to journaling, you'll just be like, most people can't deal with this blank page to save their life. So confronting and you were so afraid of getting things wrong. But anyway, there's journal prompts, so but I love that record player. I just had a really cool visual when he said that. Brandon Handley 42:20 So I mean, look, when it came to me, like as I was doing it, just that's just how I felt right? I've got a tactile response of the paper to write. I've got a favorite paper to like, I mean, I'm just That's it gets to that point. You're like well, this is my favorite pet and I can't journal with it. Jenna Smith 42:35 is true. Like the these like gel pens that Unknown Speaker 42:40 that? Yeah, yeah. Brandon Handley 42:42 Yep, that and I've got this my papers down there. But I've got like this cotton press paper. That's all tactile and responsive. It's so great. Anyways. I'll share that with you after the fact. Okay. So I like to I like to I like to like in this podcast is kind of like a spiritual speed dating thing, right? Like, because people are gonna tune in and they're checking out like, hey, JENNA SMITH could be my next spiritual speed date. Like, I think, you know, studies also show out there that a lot of people just kind of go through like a 90 day cycle. Like, they're just like, hey, I'm gonna tune into all things Jenna for like, 90 days. So somebody's gonna tune in, you feel like nowadays, spiritual speed dating. There's a question. I'm gonna ask you a couple of questions you get for that. Jenna Smith 43:27 Never Never done this on a podcast before I like it. Brandon Handley 43:30 Alright, so spiritual Bachelorette number one. Describe God. Jenna Smith 43:40 To me, God is the source of everything and always here, but also like your cool uncle that wants all the best for you. And you can just call them and be like, so this is what happened today. And it really sucked, or can you get me a pony? Because I'd really like to have a pony. So I feel like it's not an ego thing. But it's this divine creator parent that intrinsically because you've been created wants you to be your fullest expression. Brandon Handley 44:15 Like, who wouldn't want that for their child? Right? Like if I'm if listen, if I'm taking a one in 400, Chilean shot, ascended jennasmith down to this dinky planet, or I'm not sending her that I have a shitty experience as a parent, right? Yeah. That's just my take as a parent, and you know, if you put it into the context that you're putting in, like, what are we also afraid of? Right? Like, you talked a little bit about like, even just getting to this prompt like getting to a journal and be like, I don't know what I was supposed to write. Right and like being afraid of writing the wrong thing. What are we what are we also afraid to Jenna Smith 44:53 do that we're not enough? We're so afraid that we'll get it wrong. We're not enough and were worthless, like the worthless Unknown Speaker 45:04 virus Jenna Smith 45:06 is just the worst. It's just the worst. It's like it's couldn't be further from the truth of who we really are. I had it too, I call it toxic shame. But feeling worthless is the antithesis of who you really are. And the it feels so terrible that you also don't share it with anybody. So it stays hidden and Off, off we go in this pain loop. But it's just not true. It's the feeling of worthlessness is so terrible, because it's not true. It is my belief. Brandon Handley 45:37 Get it? You know, just not even being worthy of something decent to write down that somebody would want to read type of thing? Jenna Smith 45:45 Well, you get it wrong. Like if you're wrong. You're wrong. Not you're not you're you don't have a journal yet, or this is new. Brandon Handley 45:52 Listen, I think that even sometimes my own gratitudes are wrong. I'm like, well, that doesn't I'm not sure if that was the right gratitude for today. Am I doing this right? I get it, I get it. And I also think that in conjunction with that, that's one of the things that people are afraid to make decisions, right. There's like the paralysis of what if I make the wrong choice? What do I make that what? Good? Well, no, Jenna Smith 46:17 I was, it made me think, you know, we also our children, we don't stop having an innocent, vulnerable self when we're 19 and then figure out what job we should have and who should we should marry and started like, it's so stupid. We're always vulnerable. And so this acceptance of our vulnerable self will also help with that too. And like, Unknown Speaker 46:38 Ooh, I'm scared of this, but it's okay. It's okay. Brandon Handley 46:43 To love that, to me, I'm definitely working through sounds sounds like you know, inner child work. What was the shamanism version of that? Jenna Smith 46:53 Oh, soul retrieval, Brandon Handley 46:55 soul retrieval and Shadow Work could all kind of be Jenna Smith 47:00 like, it's just basically saying like, Hey, it's okay to be like I call it being humaneness and beingness. The humaneness realm is the inner child and the shadow and the ego and the relationships and I would never be like Hitler. Brandon Handley 47:16 Speed balls, cocaine and heroin. You never know. Right? So yeah, Jenna Smith 47:21 the just the humaneness has its own thing. And then the Beingness has its own thing. And we're both Right, right. Brandon Handley 47:26 Which is super awesome. having you on here today. Love that. There's lots of free material that can help others along their journey. Where should we send people to to connect with you? Jenna Smith 47:38 Definitely. JENNA SMITH coaching.com. And I'm on Instagram, at Adventures in Jenna land. Brandon Handley 47:47 All right, awesome, awesome people that are Intro Guy 47:50 cool. I really hope you enjoyed this episode of the spiritual dove podcast. Stay connected with us directly through spiritual dove Dotco. You can also join the discussion on Facebook, spiritual and Instagram and spiritual underscore. If you would like to speak with us, send us an email to Brandon at spiritual dove.co. And as always, thank you for cultivating your mindset and creating a better reality. This includes the most thought provoking part of your day. Don't forget to like and subscribe to stay fully up to date. Until next time, be kind to yourself and trust your intuition. Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Life, Liberty, and Law
Samuel D. Green on Reason for Life and sharing the pro-life message through Christian communities

Life, Liberty, and Law

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 55:39


We speak today with Samuel D. Green, President & General Counsel of Reason for Life. Reason for Life encourages, equips, and educates Christian leaders who are hesitant to address abortion, helping them see that sharing the truth about this subject is both essential and loving. Before founding Reason for Life, Samuel spent five years at Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), where he engaged in litigation to defend the sanctity of life, freedom of speech, and religious liberty. Samuel has also worked as a litigation associate at a large law firm (Jenner & Block), as a member of a presidential campaign's legal team, and as a law clerk to the Honorable Raymond W. Gruender of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. Samuel finished first in his class at Pepperdine University School of Law, where he earned a Juris Doctor degree in 2011. He also studied political science at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where he graduated, summa cum laude, with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 2008. Samuel has provided legislative testimony, preached sermons about the sanctity of life, and given presentations across the country to various groups or their chapters (including Students for Life of America, 40 Days for Life, Summit Ministries, Teen Pact Leadership Schools, the Federalist Society, and the St. Thomas More Society). Samuel has also participated in media interviews and published articles with various outlets, including Newsweek, The Seattle Times, The Hill, Washington Examiner, The Federalist, and The Daily Signal. Additionally, Samuel authored a legal brief in the historic Supreme Court case that overturned Roe v. Wade. Reason for Life: Changing Hearts, Saving Lives https://reasonforlife.org

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
So is the vaccine mandate for federal contractors on or off?

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 22:09


A three-member panel of federal judges upheld an injunction that stopped the mandate that federal contractors have COVID vaccinations. It was not a unanimous decision. The same panel -- to which the Biden Administration had appealed the injunction -- agreed that the injunction should not be nationwide. Confusing? You bet. Federal Drive host Tom Temin tried to cut throught the confusion by talking with Jenner and Block partner Matthew Haws.

Nightly Pop
Jenner Juice, Leo & Gigi? & 80 Clooney Kisses - Nightly Pop 9/7/2022

Nightly Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 21:01 Very Popular


Kylie & Kris Jenner's martini tutorial and Leo DiCaprio might have his eyes for Gigi Hadid. Plus, how many kiss takes do George Clooney & Julia Roberts need?See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Government Contracts Legal Round-Up
The Government Contracts Legal Round-Up | Episode 27

The Government Contracts Legal Round-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 7:33


Episode 27 of the Government Contracts Legal Round-Up features an unusual FOIA request related to the Department of Labor's Office of Federal Contract Compliance Program and two notable bid protest and claims cases: G4S Secure Integration LLC, et al., v. United States and The Tolliver Group, Inc. v. United States. Partner David Robbins outlines the issues raised in these cases and key takeaways for contractors seeking to protect information in their EEO-1 Type 2 reports.

Opening Soon
Lessons From Their Frist Year With Esme

Opening Soon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 56:20


Traditionally we chat with restaurant entrepreneurs who are in the process of building, catching a glimpse into the process and challenges that unfold during opening. Today we're fortunate to be having a conversation from the other side as our guests are approaching their 1 year anniversary. Our guests today are a fellow husband and wife team, Chef Jenner Tomaska and Katrina Bravo of Esme Chicago. They met the old fashioned way like Alex and I, working at a restaurant together. Michelin Starred Esme is their first venture, prior to which Jenner was the Chef at Next in and Katrina was the marketing directorPhoto Courtesy of Jaclyn Rivas.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Opening Soon by becoming a member!Opening Soon is Powered by Simplecast.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
09-06-22 - Entertainment Drill - TUE - Caitlynn Jenner Facing Backlash From Trans Activist Over Upcoming Fight

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 11:56


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - The Entertainment Drill - Tuesday September 6, 2022

Heartwood Vermont
Cultivating Tree Diversity

Heartwood Vermont

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 31:31


Most of us are familiar with the idea that having a diversity of species can lend resiliency to an ecosystem, but how often do we stop to consider the pros and cons of having a diversity of tree species in urban settings? What does an “urban” forest even mean in largely rural Vermont? In this episode, we talk with city arborists and watershed conservationists about these questions and what they mean in terms of resilience to invasive forest pests in the forest where we live. Check out our full show notes for features guests, educational resources and transcript. Theme music was written and performed by Joanne Garton. Music featured in this episode: “Bells Picnic” by Daniel Birch is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 “Birds Eye View” by Daniel Birch is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 “Brushed Bells Leaving Home” by Daniel Birch is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 “Playful Nature” by Daniel Birch is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 “Moonglow” by Podington Bear is licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0 “Jenner” by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0 Full list of music and sound credit.

Corso - Deutschlandfunk
25 Jahre Netflix - Medienforscherin Mareike Jenner im Corsogespräch

Corso - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 16:36


Lechler, Berndwww.deutschlandfunk.de, CorsoDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

In Research Of
S03E21 - Ghostly Stakeout

In Research Of

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 116:12 Very Popular


Jeb and Blake drag Alex French back into the studio to endure a "ghostly stakeout" with the sultry voiced Sylvia Browne. Haunted Lives (Tobe Hooper, Nimoy, Sylvia Browne) The Dead Files - S01E09 Scandal in the South (episode set in Blake's hometown of Cartersville, GA) 1972 Akai Video Camera Sylvia Browne - self-proclaimed psychic - and she started a church!   Site of first "haunting" in renovated farmhouse (which burned in the 1980s) Near the village of Jenner   Antoinette May, freelance journalist, who worked the episode cases and co-wrote with Browne   Adventures of a Psychic: The Fascinating and Inspiring True Life Story of One of America's Most Successful Clairvoyants Nick Nocerino  

How's That Working For You?
COMING OUT OF THE CASTLE: A Recovering Five Exchanges Citadel for Community

How's That Working For You?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 72:06


Self-preservation dominant instinct Fives are often nicknamed “Ivory Tower” or “Castle”, representing metaphorically their tendency when un-conscious to wall themselves off from the world by way of over-using the mind. When healthy, our precious Fives can use the time inward and away from the rest of us to think and give back to the world in amazingly deep and wise ways, but when overdone this habit can shield them from the true abundance of life and relationship. Thus - just like in the insanity of addiction - what the Five comes to believe is the solution to their problem becomes the real problem. That dynamic describes much of the reality of our guest today on HOW'S THAT WORKING FOR YOU before she took a chance by lowering the drawbridge and giving herself bit-by-bit to a recovery community and eventually to God. Jenner K - molecular biologist, recovering alcoholic, researcher and author of the incredibly human and amazingly insightful book, The Enneagram for Recovery - shares her struggle with alcoholism that got its start shockingly at the age of eight. In a fascinating interview we get to hear how the fearful “hoarding” dynamic of unconscious type Fives figured not only into the deepening of her alcoholism, but also delayed the surrender to healing community. Stick around, though, because we also get to enjoy the ongoing fruits of Jenner's deep dive into the powerful synergy of 12 Step work and the enneagram, as she continues to “carry the message to others”, through her book, her workshops, and her life.

The Government Contracts Legal Round-Up
The Government Contracts Legal Round-Up | Episode 26

The Government Contracts Legal Round-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 8:23


In Episode 26 of the Government Contracts Legal Round-Up, Partner David B. Robbins leverages his experience as a former acting Suspending and Debarring Official for the US Air Force to provide insights into Senators Warren and Lujan's recent request regarding the Department of Justice's use of its debarment authority. He also explains the implications of the latest of a dense line of decisions interpreting FOIA Exemption 4, and significant bid protest and claims cases.

The West Live Podcast
Kendell Jenner's fitness fave arrives in Perth

The West Live Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 8:44


Kendal Jenner Does it. Selena Gomez does it. Even Dua Lipa does it. The IT that I'm referring to is RUMBLE Boxing… a new fitness craze that started in New York a few years back. And as of Thursday people who live near Innaloo can do it too.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Irresponsible Gentlemen Podcast

We gettin Right to it with a Lil Weezy f baby appreciation this week. Whole lot of topics to get to man but your boys are ready an here to be professional lls

It's All Been Done Radio Hour
Universe Journey: The Long Year Part 2

It's All Been Done Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 21:09


It's All Been Done Radio Hour #368  Universe Journey #85  "The Long Year Part 2"    Over the course of a year, Tokaladie is trapped on the station under the command of O.S.S. Admiral Jamie Jamieson. Luna, Anders, and Chase lead the resistance on Eastwood. Foley looks to keep busy when the fleet won't try to retake the station. Kahkay, M-, and Jamieson grow frustrated on Surrepttitia.    Visit our website http://iabdpresents.com Script books, clothing and more at https://amzn.to/3km2TLm Please support us at http://patreon.com/IABD   Find more from It's All Been Done Radio Hour here: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/iabdpresents/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@iabdpresents   A comedy radio show originally performed Saturday, July 31, 2021 streaming online.   STARRING Nick Arganbright as Captain Richard Kahkay  Katie Boissoneault as Com. Michelle Tokaladie  Shane Stefanchik as Com. M-  Sam Clements as Com. Colm Foley  Kristin Green as Lt. Neu, Her Most High, Echo Neu 99, and Lt. Tik  Ryan Yohe as Lt. Michael Anders and Adm. Jenner  Ashley Collins as Capt. Bobbi Luna  Keith Jackson as Adm. Jamieson Jamieson    GUEST-STARRING Megan Overholt as Lt. Connie Norton and Com. Logan  Chase McCants as Echo Jay Jamieson  Samantha Stark as Leetha, Ens. Sylvia Bernard, and Lt. Francine  Joe Morales as Lt. Yanna  Darren Esler as Ambassador Futan    Narrated by Darren Esler  Foley Artist Brendan Michna  Foley Technician Anna Stiles  Podcast edited by Chris Allen    Written by Jerome Wetzel Directed by Nick Arganbright  Music Director Kristin Green Theme Songs by Nathan Haley and Jerome Wetzel Technical Director Shane Stefanchik   When you post about us, hashtag #IABD   #youtuberadioplays #bestyoutubepodcastchannels

Christadelphians Talk
Promises to Noah... Are they Relevant Today? Brother Andrew Jenner

Christadelphians Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 27:56


A Christadelphian Video Production: CHRISTADELPHIANVIDEO.ORG, a worldwide collaboration by Christadelphians to help promote the understanding of God's Word to those who are seeking the Truth about the Human condition and God's plan and Purpose with the Earth and Mankind upon it. Christadelphianvideo.org is an online tool for establishing just how far removed today's mainstream Christianity is from the 'True Christian Teachings' of the 1st Century Apostles. You can follow us online at.. Some of our other services.. #1 Our Main site... https://cdvideo.org #2 Our podcast on android... https://cdvideo.org/podcast #3 Our podcast on Apple...https://cdvideo.org/podcast-apple #4 Our facebook...https://facebook.com/OpenBibles #5 Our Whats App... http://cdvideo.org/WhatsApp #6 Our Instagram... http://cdvideo.org/Instagram #7 Our twitter... http://cdvideo.org/twitter #8 Our YouTube Channel... http://cdvideo.org/youtube Watch / read / Listen to other thoughts for the day on our site here https://christadelphianvideo.org/tftd/ #Christadelphianvideo #christadelphianstalk #Christadelphians #openbible #cdvideo #bibleverse #thoughts #thoughtoftheday #meditate #think #christadelphian #God #truth #faith #hope #love #cdvideo #Gospeltruth #truebibleteaching #thegospelmessage #thegospeltruth #firstprinciples #bibletruth #bibleunderstanding #exploringthebible #thoughtfortheday --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/christadelphians-talk/message

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Time To TP The Box Office

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 103:59


We discuss why Nick's dryer might burn his house down in Dear Redacted, a very adult edition of Joke Court and a special appearance by one of our fun radio games!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.