Podcasts about Charles Dickens

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English writer and social critic

  • 2,134PODCASTS
  • 3,647EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 1, 2021LATEST
Charles Dickens

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Best podcasts about Charles Dickens

Show all podcasts related to charles dickens

Latest podcast episodes about Charles Dickens

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac for Wednesday, December 1, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 5:00


On this day in 1860 the first two chapters of Charles Dickens' novel “Great Expectations” were published.

The Pipes Magazine Radio Show Podcast
481: Brian's Zoom Pipe Club. Old Print Tobacco Ads.

The Pipes Magazine Radio Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 64:25


This week's Pipes Magazine Radio Show is a unique holiday themed show with Brian's Zoom Pipe Club looking at pipes and tobacco in a Charles Dickens' ‘A Christmas Carol' sort of way. The guys will talk about pipes and tobaccos of the past, present, and future. Joining the discussion with Brian will be Fred Hanna, Tad Gage, Barry Goldstein, Ronni B, Rich Esserman, Fred Janusek, Brad Pohlmann, Dave in LAX, Rob Cappuccio, Dino Argyropoulos, and several others. At the top of the show in Pipe Parts, Brian found some fun old tobacco ads that he will talk about.

The Drew Mariani Show
The Merry Beggars

The Drew Mariani Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 46:28


Hour 1 of The Drew Mariani Show on 11-30-21 Peter Atkinson of the Merry Beggars joins Drew to talk about Relevant Radio’s newest show series, an audio Advent calendar of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” Patrick Novecosky tells us a little about John Paul II's encyclical on Divine Mercy, the anniversary of it’s release being today

Michelle's Sanctuary
A Christmas Carol Part II | Holiday Bedtime Story for Grown Ups

Michelle's Sanctuary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 133:46


Welcome to Part II of "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens. Listen before bedtime so you may dream away to this classic holiday tale. Staves 3, 4. and 5 are included in this release. May you embrace your inner Scrooge with compassion, knowing that it is never to late to change or to grow into the person we wish to be and leave a legacy. It's time to dream away. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michelles-sanctuary/support

Michelle's Sanctuary
A Christmas Carol Part I | Holiday Bedtime Story

Michelle's Sanctuary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 107:28


Fall asleep to the classic tale by Charles Dickens. This journey begins with a guided meditation and visualization to help you relax before journeying into Stave 1 and Stave 2 of "A Christmas Carol." Embrace your inner Scrooge, and take this time to recognize that it is never too late to change. You are always capable of becoming a better version of yourself and a better version FOR yourself. It's time to dream away. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michelles-sanctuary/support

Out and About
A tradition returns with 'A Christmas Carol: The Musical'

Out and About

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 8:59


On this week's episode of Out and About, Chip Joyce joins Jenn Gordon to talk about “A Christmas Carol: The Musical” happening at The Scottish Rite Theatre on Dec. 2–5.A central Illinois tradition returns to the historic Scottish Rite Theatre with this presentation of the holiday classic, "A Christmas Carol. "This musical adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic will delight audiences of all ages and will get everyone in the Christmas spirit!For tickets and more information visit the Scottish Rite Theatre.

Focus on the Family Broadcast
Remembering the Gospel This Christmas

Focus on the Family Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 26:15


Allison Pittman inspires listeners to make Christmas more meaningful as she shares insightful parallels between the Bible and Charles Dickens' classic novel "A Christmas Carol." Get Allison Pittman's book "Keeping Christmas: 25 Advent Reflections on A Christmas Carol" for your donation of any amount! And when you give today, your support will be DOUBLED to Give Families Hope! https://donate.focusonthefamily.com/don-daily-broadcast-product-2021-11-26?refcd=1180803 Get more episode resources: https://www.focusonthefamily.com/episodes/broadcast/remembering-the-gospel-this-christmas/#featured-resource-cta If you've listened to any of our podcasts, please give us your feedback: https://focusonthefamily.com/podcastsurvey

A Cozy Christmas Podcast
A Christmas Carol: Stave 1

A Cozy Christmas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 47:21


A Cozy Christmas Podcast Presents: A Christmas Carol, Stave 1, by Charles Dickens. We are into the Christmas season now, and for this month's story I'll be bringing you weekly installments of A Christmas Carol! As you all know, this is by far my favorite story of all time. I am so excited to bring you this story that I love so dearly. I know some of you have seen multiple versions of the story on TV, but maybe you haven't actually read the original story yet. Maybe you read it every year and it's words are familiar to you. I invite you to join me in celebrating the season through these beautiful words of Charles Dickens. Throughout the month of December, I'll be releasing other episodes and interviews and Christmasy discussions too, so be sure to subscribe so you don't miss a single episode! Ways to support the show: Rate and review: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/a-cozy-christmas-podcast/id1523423375  Buy me a coffee? www.ko-fi.com/cozychristmas  Ornaments, Mugs, and Notebooks: https://www.etsy.com/shop/CozyChristmasPodcast  Logo shirt designs: http://tee.pub/lic/edygC_h4D1c    Contact Me: facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cozychristmaspodcast  instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cozychristmaspodcast/  twitter: https://twitter.com/CozyXmasPod  youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCikiozEbu0h9pKeI1Ei5TQ email: cozychristmaspodcast@gmail.com  

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Simply HIS Ladies - Misfits (Part 1)

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 29:00


The ladies of SIMPLY HIS sit down to celebrate the release of their new book MISFITS as they each talk about how important it is, not to reject your qwerks, but instead to EMBRACE your INNER MISFIT because it could very well be a GIFT from GOD! ALSO, don't miss out on  “THE MISFITS GRAND GIVEAWAY”!! In “Misfits” you will learn surprisingly simple, but life-changing biblical information that will empower you to discover your untapped potential, to find your God-ordained calling, and to embrace your destiny! Also included in this incredible Holiday Give-away is Donna Howell's thrilling sequel to the Charles Dickens classic, “A Christmas Carol” entitled “Ebenezer” where she answers what was left unaddressed at the end of the Dickens' novel such as whatever becomes of Tiny Tim?   You'll also receive, the never before released collection, “CHRISTMAS CLASSICS”! A beautiful volume of 9 full books with 14 stories total, all celebrating Christmas!    You'll also receive the NEW Best-Of Defender Publishing E-book collection on data disc! Now for the first time ever this must-have assortment features 110 of the most information packed best-selling books in Defender history! You'll also receive, Directly from the SkyWatchTV archive, the complete “Teens Rock” collection on DVD! Join Joe Horn and his talented group of young panelists as they discuss important issues facing today's modern youth culture!  And finally, included in the Misfits Grand Giveaway, Joe Horn's new CD, “This Time Around”! An anthology over 20 years in the making featuring the entire Horn family performing hit singles!   Available now at skywatchtvstore.com, order now or call 1-844-750-4985!

Stars on Suspense (Old Time Radio)
Episode 266 - Sarah Churchill

Stars on Suspense (Old Time Radio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 99:45


During a wartime break in her acting career, Sarah Churchill worked on the planning of the British invasion of North Africa, and she served as an unofficial advisor to her father Winston - who just happened to be prime minister. After the war, she returned to the stage and screen, but struggles with alcoholism cut short what should have been a long career on both sides of the pond. We'll hear her in her one and only visit to Suspense - an adaptation of Charles Dickens' "The Signalman" (originally aired on CBS on November 4, 1956). Then, she saddles up and heads west with Jack Benny in an episode of his comedy program (originally aired on CBS on March 5, 1950). Finally, she leads us an audio tour of her home in "Portrait of London" from The CBS Radio Workshop (originally aired on CBS on July 20, 1956).

New Books Network
Vlad Solomon, "State Surveillance, Political Policing and Counter-Terrorism in Britain, 1880-1914" (Boydell Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:04


In 1850 Charles Dickens wrote that Great Britain had “no political police,” adding that “the most rabid demagogue” could speak out “without the terror of an organised spy system.” In his book State Surveillance, Political Policing, and Counter-Terrorism in Britain: 1880-1914 (Boydell Press, 2021), Vlad Solomon describes how Britain gradually developed a system of “high policing” during the late Victorian and Edwardian eras that contradicted Britons' popular belief in their tolerant society. As Solomon demonstrates, contrary to Dickens's blithe assurance, Britain had irregularly employed political policing prior to the 1880s. The threat posed by Fenian terrorism, however, compelled the British home secretary, William Harcourt, to create a specialized section of the London Metropolitan Police in response. This evolved into Special Branch, which subsequently found its remit expanded to include monitoring political radicals, aliens, and even militant suffragists. Yet despite their increased range of duties, the number of detectives assigned to such tasks remained limited until espionage concerns and the prospect of war prompted the government to overhaul political policing with the creation of a new agency – the future MI5 – in order to provide more effective monitoring of the political threats facing the country. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Vlad Solomon, "State Surveillance, Political Policing and Counter-Terrorism in Britain, 1880-1914" (Boydell Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:04


In 1850 Charles Dickens wrote that Great Britain had “no political police,” adding that “the most rabid demagogue” could speak out “without the terror of an organised spy system.” In his book State Surveillance, Political Policing, and Counter-Terrorism in Britain: 1880-1914 (Boydell Press, 2021), Vlad Solomon describes how Britain gradually developed a system of “high policing” during the late Victorian and Edwardian eras that contradicted Britons' popular belief in their tolerant society. As Solomon demonstrates, contrary to Dickens's blithe assurance, Britain had irregularly employed political policing prior to the 1880s. The threat posed by Fenian terrorism, however, compelled the British home secretary, William Harcourt, to create a specialized section of the London Metropolitan Police in response. This evolved into Special Branch, which subsequently found its remit expanded to include monitoring political radicals, aliens, and even militant suffragists. Yet despite their increased range of duties, the number of detectives assigned to such tasks remained limited until espionage concerns and the prospect of war prompted the government to overhaul political policing with the creation of a new agency – the future MI5 – in order to provide more effective monitoring of the political threats facing the country. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Law
Vlad Solomon, "State Surveillance, Political Policing and Counter-Terrorism in Britain, 1880-1914" (Boydell Press, 2021)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:04


In 1850 Charles Dickens wrote that Great Britain had “no political police,” adding that “the most rabid demagogue” could speak out “without the terror of an organised spy system.” In his book State Surveillance, Political Policing, and Counter-Terrorism in Britain: 1880-1914 (Boydell Press, 2021), Vlad Solomon describes how Britain gradually developed a system of “high policing” during the late Victorian and Edwardian eras that contradicted Britons' popular belief in their tolerant society. As Solomon demonstrates, contrary to Dickens's blithe assurance, Britain had irregularly employed political policing prior to the 1880s. The threat posed by Fenian terrorism, however, compelled the British home secretary, William Harcourt, to create a specialized section of the London Metropolitan Police in response. This evolved into Special Branch, which subsequently found its remit expanded to include monitoring political radicals, aliens, and even militant suffragists. Yet despite their increased range of duties, the number of detectives assigned to such tasks remained limited until espionage concerns and the prospect of war prompted the government to overhaul political policing with the creation of a new agency – the future MI5 – in order to provide more effective monitoring of the political threats facing the country. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

Dorktales Storytime Podcast
The Little Redge Hen

Dorktales Storytime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 17:36


Who's on board to help Little Redge Hen sow some seeds, harvest the wheat, and grind it in to flour? “NOT I,” say the unbelievably unconcerned cow, the overly obstinate ostrich, and the sourly stubborn sheep, who are focused on their own selfish ways. Will the barnyard besties finally step up, or will Hen's freshly baked bread fill them with the smell of regret?PARENTS, TEACHERS AND HOMESCHOOLERS: This is a retelling of “The Little Red Hen” where you'll find fun examples of alliterative word pairings to describe the farm animals. This story is a conversation starter about collaboration and teamwork, getting to share in the rewards when you help do the work, and the feelings of regret.Find more information and resources:  https://jonincharacter.com/little-redge-hen/     Visit the Dorktales Storytime Podcast website: https://jonincharacter.com/dorktales-storytime-podcast/YOUR KIDS ON OUR SHOW: Contact our “Mr. Redge Hotline” for a chance for a shout out or featured in one of our episodes! Leave us a voicemail, email, video or use our color page - https://jonincharacter.com/contact-the-podcast/FOLLOW US: If our storytelling brings you some joy…and a few laughs, please follow us in your preferred podcast app so future episodes will automatically show up in your podcast library. We'd be so grateful if you helped us grow, by letting others know about our geeky tales too.Now, go be the hero of your own story and we'll see you next once-upon-a-time!KIDS LISTEN MEMBERS: advocates for quality podcasts for kids: https://www.kidslisten.org/WE LOVE FEEDBACK: https://ratethispodcast.com/dorktalesBE PART OF OUR DORK SQUAD, FREE PERKS:https://bit.ly/dorktales-signupCREDITS: This episode has been a Jonincharacter production. Today's story was written by Amy Thompson, and performed by Jonathan Cormur. Sound recording and production by Jermaine Hamilton at Hamilton Studio Recordings. Get our very merry version of Charles Dicken's “A Christmas Carol” about the BAH! HUMBUG! of a man called Ebenezer Scrooge! For a small fee you can support our podcast AND get access to this exclusive bonus episode, about cultivating joy and spreading holiday cheer all year long. Go to buymeacoffee.com/dorktales to purchase and download. Attention grown-ups! We want to hear from your kids! Have them ask Jonathan and Mr. Redge a question for a chance to hear a shout out and response on a future episode. Email us at dorktalesstorytime@gmail.com, call the Mr. Redge hotline at 650.503.9122 or go to our podcast contact page for more ways to get in touch!Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/dorktales)

Chiamate Roma Triuno Triuno
Puntata del 22/11/2021

Chiamate Roma Triuno Triuno

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 87:28


Il mistero della lettera di Charles Dickens: 300 sterline a chi lo risolve - "C'è qualcuno che ancora stenografa?" Polemiche Zerocalcare. Troppo romano - "Posso trasferirmi ovunque, ma non perdo le mie origini".

A Cozy Christmas Podcast
Have Yourself a Christmas Mystery with special guest Mark Shanahan

A Cozy Christmas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 56:47


We're going back to the theater today! And there's a mystery afoot... What happens when the worlds of Sherlock Holmes and Ebenezer Scrooge are thrown together? Find out in the new play that debuts today in NYC, A Sherlock Carol. My guest today is Mark Shanahan, he's the writer and director of the play. He comes from an extensive background in acting, writing and directing many plays both for the stage and radio. He stops by and we chat about his new play, the challenges of performing theater safely during a pandemic, and the power of stories - especially those by Arthur Conan Doyle and Charles Dickens. Then, I read a Christmas mystery story by Thomas Hardy called "The Thieves Who Couldn't Stop Sneezing." It is a funny short story about a young man named Hubert who stumbles across some thieves planning to rob a nearby mansion. Find out what happens in this charming holiday tale. Timestamps 00:00 My review of Gerald Dickens' A Christmas Carol performance 07:17 Interview with Mark Shanahan 33:08 Story: The Thieves Who Couldn't Stop Sneezing by Thomas Hardy 52:08 December Plans and a Special Thank You! Ways to support the show: Rate and review: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/a-cozy-christmas-podcast/id1523423375  Buy me a coffee? www.ko-fi.com/cozychristmas  Ornaments, Mugs, and Notebooks: https://www.etsy.com/shop/CozyChristmasPodcast  Logo shirt designs: http://tee.pub/lic/edygC_h4D1c    Contact Me: facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cozychristmaspodcast  instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cozychristmaspodcast/  twitter: https://twitter.com/CozyXmasPod  youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCikiozEbu0h9pKeI1Ei5TQ email: cozychristmaspodcast@gmail.com   Deck the Halls by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100307

The History of Literature
360 FMK Shakespeare! (with Laurie Frankel) | Tolstoy's Gospel (with Scott Carter)

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 72:30


It's a good day for cooking! First up: Scott Carter, author of the play Discord: The Gospel According to Thomas Jefferson, Charles Dickens, and Count Leo Tolstoy, joins Jacke for a look at the gospel as updated by Leo Tolstoy. Then novelist Laurie Frankel (author of One Two Three) stops by for a special Shakespeare game. Hope you enjoy! Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Breakaway Wealth Podcast
How to Create a Compelling Vision For 2022

Breakaway Wealth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 32:17


In This Episode: “No space of regret can make amends for one life's opportunity misused.” - Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol Three questions to ponder on: First, what will your future look like if you don't do anything at all? Second, what will your future look like if you continue moving in the same direction doing the same things you're doing now? Finally, what will your future look like if you make some conscious choices? With only a few weeks left before 2021 ends, have you taken time to plan for the new year? The last two years have delivered curveballs that none of us could have imagined. Yet, we continue to strive and thrive. Now, it's time to plan for 2022. But you can't have a plan if you don't know where you're going.  For Create Tailwind, they are launching their app soon. It's a community app where you can meet like-minded people to help you move towards your goals. It's part of the company's goal to continue to serve its community in a different way.   What about you? What is your compelling desire? Do you want to have regrets for all the things you didn't do? To help you plan, Jim and Nick talk about creating your vision and action plans for 2022 with the help of the 12 Week Year Field Guide. So why don't you give it a try? Get the 12 Week Year Field Guide: https://12weekyear.com/fieldguide/.   Book Mentioned in This Episode:   12 Week Year Book by Brian P. Moran & Michael Lennington   The Gap and The Gain: The High Achievers' Guide to Happiness, Confidence, and Success by Benjamin Hardy & Dan Sullivan    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens   Follow along with this episode on YouTube   Connect with Jim Oliver: Facebook: CreateTailwind & Jim Oliver Website: CreateTailwind.com YouTube: createtailwind.com LinkedIn: Jim Oliver

The Decision Reel
TDR-Ep.45-Scrooged

The Decision Reel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 111:43


This week we are in the Christmas Spirit with this modern take on Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," Frank Cross (Bill Murray) is a wildly successful television executive whose cold ambition and curmudgeonly nature has driven away the love of his life, Claire Phillips (Karen Allen). But after firing a staff member, Eliot Loudermilk (Bobcat Goldthwait), on Christmas Eve, Frank is visited by a series of ghosts who give him a chance to re-evaluate his actions and right the wrongs of his past. Check out Newsly and use our Promo code for 1 month free!! https://newsly.me and the promo code REEL

LensWork - Photography and the Creative Process
HT0986 - Looking at Images, Part 5 - Photograph as Teacher

LensWork - Photography and the Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 2:43


HT0986 - Looking at Images, Part 5 - Photograph as Teacher I remember the first time I read a Charles Dickens novel. I could only do so with a dictionary at my side and found I needed to look up a new word or two on every single page. I was not only reading the plot but learning a vocabulary about description and character development. The same can be said about looking at photographs. We need to learn a visual vocabulary and that learning never stops.

The History of Literature
358 The Profound Wisdom of Black Life and Literature (with Farah Jasmine Griffin) | Charles Dickens's Gospel (with Scott Carter)

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 64:57


In her new book Read Until You Understand, beloved professor Farah Jasmine Griffin entwines memoir, history, and art in exploring the culture of Black genius and the lessons and legacies of Black lives and literature. In this episode, Professor Griffin joins Jacke for a discussion of her father, the role literature played in her life after her father's untimely death, and the lifetime she's spent traveling through literature in search of a deeper understanding of concepts like mercy, love, justice, rage, beauty, and joy. PLUS Scott Carter, author of the play Discord: the Gospel According to Thomas Jefferson, Charles Dickens, and Count Leo Tolstoy joins Jacke for another look at three famous historical figures who each wrote their own version of the gospels. In this installment, Scott tells Jacke about the approach taken by Victorian supernova Charles Dickens. Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ralph Nader Radio Hour
Tom Morello: Still Raging

Ralph Nader Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 59:27


Tom Morello, activist, and lead guitarist of “Rage Against the Machine,” joins us to discuss the uses of music in protest, his latest album “The Atlas Underground Fire,” and his new gig writing op-eds for The New York Times. Also, child advocate, Robert Fellmeth, stops by to shed light on a situation right out of a Charles Dickens novel: the state stealing social security checks from foster children. Plus, Ralph answers your questions.

Bonnets At Dawn
S5.3, E1: Upstarts, Social Climbers, and Alicia LeFanu's Fashionable Connections w/Dr. Lydia Craig

Bonnets At Dawn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 67:17


We're kicking off our mini-season on Sex, Scandal, and Money with an episode about social climbers, upstarts, and Jamaican heirs in Regency England. We cover a lot in this one including Sanditon's Miss Lambe, Leigh Hunt's Black ancestry, Charles Dickens, the scandalous life of George Eliot, the Real Housewives, and Alicia LeFanu's novel Fashionable Connexions with our pal, Dr. Lydia Craig. Minor spoilers for Fashionable Connexions, which you can read online via Google Books.

The History of Literature
357 Little Women Remixed (with Bethany C. Morrow) | Thomas Jefferson's Gospel (with Scott Carter)

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 71:14


It's a literary feast! National bestselling author Bethany C. Morrow joins Jacke for a discussion of her novel So Many Beginnings: A Little Women Remix, in which four young Black sisters come of age during the American Civil War. PLUS playwright Scott Carter, author of Discord: The Gospel According to Thomas Jefferson, Charles Dickens, and Count Leo Tolstoy, returns to the podcast to tell Jacke about Jefferson's efforts to write a new version of the New Testament. Enjoy! Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Shakespeare and Company
Armando Iannucci on Pandemonium

Shakespeare and Company

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 36:56


This week Adam Biles is joined by comedy-legend Armando Iannucci to discuss Pandemonium, his riotously funny, but also deeply affecting mock-epic about the mistakes made and palms-greased during the British government's handling of the pandemic. Buy Pandemonium here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/I/9781408715086/pandemonium-some-verses-on-the-current-predicament Browse our online store here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/15/online-store/16/bookstore Become a Friend of S&Co here: https:/.friendsofshakespeareandcompany.com * Tell, Mighty Wit, how the highest in forethought and, That tremendous plus, The Science, Saw off our panic and Globed vexation Until a drape of calmness furled around the earth And beckoned a new and greater normal into each life For which we give plenty gratitude and pay Willingly for the vict'ry triumph Merited by these wisest gods. Pandemonium is an epic mock-heroic poem, written in response to the pandemic with all the anger and wit that Armando Iannucci brings to his vision of contemporary events. It tells the story of how Orbis Rex, Young Matt and his Circle of Friends, Queen Dido and the blind Dom'nic did battle with 'a wet and withered bat' from Wuhan. * Armando Iannucci is a writer and broadcaster who has written, directed and produced numerous critically acclaimed films, television and radio comedy shows. His screenplay for the film 'In The Loop' was nominated for an Oscar at the Academy Awards. His iconic series for the BBC – 'The Thick of It' – was nominated for 13 BAFTA Awards, winning 5 during its four series run. Among his own award-winning shows, he is also the co-creator and writer of the popular Steve Coogan character Alan Partridge. Armando's HBO comedy 'Veep' has picked up numerous awards, including four Emmys for Outstanding Comedy Series over the last four years. His film adaptation of Charles Dickens' 'The Personal History of David Copperfield' was released in January 2020, which that year won Best Screenplay at BIFA, was also nominated for a Golden Globe and won a 'Seal of Distinction' from the US Critics' Choice Association. In 2017 he published 'Hear Me Out', a new book on classical music, and released the feature film 'The Death of Stalin', which was nominated for 2 BAFTAs and won Best Comedy at the European Film Awards.
His latest HBO series, 'Avenue 5', which stars Hugh Laurie and Josh Gad, aired on SKY in January 2020, and is currently in production for the second series. Adam Biles is Literary Director at Shakespeare and Company. Buy a signed copy of his novel FEEDING TIME here: https://shakespeareandcompany.com/S/9781910296684/feeding-time Listen to Alex Freiman's Play It Gentle here: https://open.spotify.com/album/4gfkDcG32HYlXnBqI0xgQX?si=mf0Vw-kuRS-ai15aL9kLNA&dl_branch=1

The Calm Christmas Podcast with Beth Kempton
S2 Ep2: BREATHE (inhale the season, exhale the stress)

The Calm Christmas Podcast with Beth Kempton

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 27:32


From watching starling murmurations to cooking up a vat of hot soup, from long wintery walks and forest bathing to practicing calming breathing exercises, this episode is full of ideas for gentle ways to slow down, inhale the season and exhale the stress. And with a host of get ahead tips to make sure your holiday preparations all come together in good time, you'll feel more ready than ever for the approaching winter. With inspiration from Nick Acheson, Melissa Harrison, Charles Dickens, Jilly Shipway and Ali Roff Farrar.Join the Winter Writing Sanctuary (my free two week writing course starting November 22, 2021, mentioned in this episode) HERE. To be in with a chance of winning a copy of Winter by Melissa Harrison and a personalised, signed copy of my book Calm Christmas, head over to Instagram @bethkempton. The deadline for entries is 4pm UK time on Friday November 12, 2021. Have a lovely weekBeth XxFeatured in this episode:·      Essay by Nick Acheson in Winter: An anthology for the changing seasons edited by Melissa Harrison ·      Calm Christmas and a Happy New Year: A Little Book of Festive Joy by Beth Kempton·      Bleak House by Charles Dickens ·      Yoga Through the Year by Jilly Shipway·      The Wellfulness Project by Ali Roff Farrar 

Currently Reading
Season 4, Episode 15: Long-Term Buddy Reading + Picking a Book Club Book

Currently Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 51:29


1:27 Bookish Moment of the Week 1:46 - Unraveling Oliver by Liz Nugent  1:52 - Bookends bookshop in Pagosa Springs Colorado 2:46 - All the Lonely People by Mike Gayle 4:05 - The Afterlife of Holly Chase by Cynthia Hand 4:42 - My Plain Jane by Cynthia Hand, Jodi Meadows and Brodi Ashton 4:43 - My Lady Jane by Cynthia Hand, Jodi Meadows and Brodi Ashton 4:57 - A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens 5:19 - Marley by Jon Clinch 6:06 Current Reads: 6:12 - God Spare the Girls by Kelsey McKinney (Kaytee) 6:32 - Sarah's Bookshelves Live 9:43 - A Glimmer of Death by Valerie Wilson Wesley (Meredith) 9:52 - Book Drop subscription 13:32 - Let's Tell This Story Properly by Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi (Kaytee) Note: In the UK, this collection is published as Manchester Happened 14:23 - A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles 16:10 - Grown by Tiffany D. Jackson (Meredith) 16:23 - White Smoke by Tiffany D. Jackson 16:36 - Novel Neighbor bookshop 22:03 - Race to the Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse (Kaytee) 23:23 - Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse 24:22 - Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake (Meredith) 25:55 - The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins 25:56 - The Selection by Kiera Cass 25:58 - Furyborn by Claire Legrand 28:24 - A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas  30:32 Deep Dive - What Makes a Good Book Club Book? 33:58 - Leave the World Behind by Rumaan Alam 34:42 - Bookend Homeschoolers Season 2: Episode 13 36:20 - A Good Neighborhood by Therese Ann Fowler 36:50 - Good Neighbors by Sarah Langan 38:12 - How the Word is Passed by Clint Smith 39:02 - The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires by Grady Hendrix 40:49 - This Is How It Always Is by Laurie Frankel 41:45 - The Push by Ashley Audrain 41:48 - The Need by Helen Phillips 42:53 - Roar by Ceclia Ahern 43:15 - The Women of Brewster Place by Gloria Naylor 43:45 - You Think It, I'll Say It by Curtis Sittenfeld 44:43 - Books We Want to Press Into Your Hands: 45:05 - The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot (Kaytee) 47:26 - The Power by Naomi Alderman (Meredith) 49:20 - The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

Just Sleep - Bedtime Stories for Adults
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

Just Sleep - Bedtime Stories for Adults

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 30:49


Tonight's bedtime story is David Copperfield by Charles Dickens. Published in 1850, it is one of Dickens's most popular works and has been adapted numerous times. In this episode, David's mother receives a visit from Betsey Trotwood. And David Copperfield is born.If you'd like to support the podcast, you can buy me a coffee here ------> buymeacoffee.com/justsleeppodIf you like this episode, please remember to follow on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favourite podcast app. Also, share with any family or friends that might have trouble drifting off.

Emocionalmente Fuerte
79. Fracasé ¿Y qué?

Emocionalmente Fuerte

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 16:01


Charles Dickens,  autor de “Oliver Twist, The Christmas Carol” y muchas obras más, habló acerca del fracaso y dijo:  “Cada fracaso, le enseña al hombre, algo que necesitaba aprender.”  Te pregunto:  ➙¿Qué has aprendido con respecto al fracaso?  ➙¿Qué es el fracaso y cómo te hace sentir? ➙¿Cómo te relacionas con el fracaso? De esto hablo en el episodio 7️⃣9️⃣. Además, te comparto 3️⃣ cosas que NO debes hacer cuando te dices: “fracasé”

L'Abri Fellowship - Southborough
”Fellow Passengers to the Grave” : Learning Love of Neighbor with Charles Dickens - Esther Dalton

L'Abri Fellowship - Southborough

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 91:55


A lecture given at L'Abri Fellowship in Southborough, Massachusetts. For more information, visit https://southboroughlabri.org/ Oct 29 Esther Dalton "Fellow Passengers to the Grave" : Learning Love of Neighbor with Charles Dickens What does the Good Samaritan have to do with a prolific and sometimes preachy Victorian novelist? This lecture will explore this question by looking at how reading Dickens' stories can help us think in fresh, and perhaps deeper, ways about what loving our neighbors as ourselves looks like in real life. The Copyright for all material on the podcast is held by L'Abri Fellowship. We ask that you respect this by not publishing the material in full or in part in any format or post it on a website without seeking prior permission from L'Abri Fellowship. ©Southborough L'Abri 2021  

The Great Books
Episode 202: 'Bleak House' by Charles Dickens

The Great Books

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 33:43


John J. Miller is joined by Dwight Lindley of Hillsdale College to discuss Charles Dickens's Bleak House.

The Great Books
Episode 202: ‘Bleak House’ by Charles Dickens

The Great Books

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 33:43


John J. Miller is joined by Dwight Lindley of Hillsdale College to discuss Charles Dickens's 'Bleak House.'

Suncoast Culture Club
The SCF Musical Theatre Ensemble Presents Rupert Holmes's The Mystery of Edwin Drood

Suncoast Culture Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 56:48


The SCF Musical Theatre Program is proud to present the 2021 Fall Musical The Mystery of Edwin Drood, directed by Melodie Dickerson, in the SCF Neel Performing Arts Center on the following dates and times:Friday, November 5, 7:30 p.m.Saturday, November 6, 7:30 p.m.Sunday, November 7, 2:00 p.m.Tickets can be purchased through  the SCF Neel Performing Arts Center Website or at the door 45 minutes before each show.The Mystery of Edwin Drood is a musical by Rupert Holmes that is based on the unfinished Charles Dickens novel of the same name. The show was the first Broadway musical with multiple endings, leaving the audience to determine the outcome by vote! Listen to this Suncoast Culture Club podcast episode to meet four of the performers (Edgar Sanchez, Grace Gustafuson, Mia Freeman, and Lylyana Brych) along with director Melodie Dickerson, as they tell us all about the show, their characters, and the experience of producing this amazing and one-of-a-kind show. Then, get your tickets, come to the show, and be prepared to vote on the outcome!• SCF Music Program Facebook Page Link to watch the concert live• SCF Theatre Program Website & Facebook Page & Instagram• Manatee Performing Arts Center Website & Facebook & Twitter & YouTube• The Players Centre for the Performing Arts Website & Facebook & Instagram & YouTube• The Island Players Website• Asolo Repertory Theatre Website & Facebook & Instagram & YouTube• Sarasota Opera Website & Facebook & InstagramSupport the show (https://scf-foundation.org/suncoastcultureclub/)

A Breath of Fresh Earth
Halloween Bombs Trains coming to your town!

A Breath of Fresh Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 19:27


LNG travels through Florida, Cop26, dying Manatees, Halley's comet, a French villain to rival Chevron and much more. Bomb Trains 01:20-04:40 Cop 26- 04:40-06:55 Climate Hero #1 06:59-09:01 Earthshot winners Climate Villain #1 09:15-09:50 Total Energy Climate Hero #2 09:53-10:50 Hertz buys EVs Footsteps on the wind 11:00-11:30 Climate Villain #2 11:40-14:05 Chevron Manatees are dying 14:07-15:36 Carbon footprint apps 15:37-16:28 Edmund Halley 16:30-18:50 You can reach me at rf@richardfriedman.net You can find my books here with the links to find your favorite retailer. Climate Fiction novels: Escape to Canamith https://books2read.com/u/bWP9y1 The Two Worlds of Billy Callahan https://books2read.com/u/mvnvLX Cli/Fi short stories- A Climate Carol and Other Cli-Fi Short Stories. Available in print or audiobook. https://books2read.com/u/38roQL Danny Bloom created the phrase “cli-fi” and founder of cli-fi.net. Here's his review. Climate-themed anti-Trump short story 'A Climate Carol' will be read 100 years from now ''We must build arks,'' the Notre Dame University philosopher Roy Scranton urges, ''not just biological arks, to carry forward endangered genetic data, but also cultural arks, to carry forward endangered wisdom.'' One such cultural ark has already been built and it's a 14-page Christmas story from the pen of Richard Friedman in Cleveland, Ohio. In the title story, "A Climate Carol," based very closely on U.S. President Donald Trump's stubborn and selfish personality and his public denial of climate change, a narcissistic East Coast businessman and billionaire receives a visit on Christmas Eve from three Charles Dickens-like ghosts in a contemporary spin of that timeless classic from the 1840s "A Christmas Carol." Charles Dickens first published his now famous novella “A Christmas Carol” more than 170 years ago -- in 1843 — and that story has reverberated and resonated worldwide ever since. With the annual holiday season upon us all every November and December worldwide (Thanksgiving, Chanukah, Christmas), a new kind of holiday story titled “A Climate Carol” has been published in 2019 and stands to remain in print for the next 100 years, if not longer. It's that good, and that important. In fact, I would say that this short story is the best and most important climate-themed short story to appear so far in the 21st century and is likely to remain popular over the next 100 Christmases for sure. When I read it online a few days ago, I was blown away by both the author's storytelling skills and the environmental eco-theme of the 14-page piece. Let me tell you a few things about this modern Dickensian-style story and how it fits into the world we live in today, where runaway global warming threatens to push human civilization into a dark corner we may never get out from. However, before I go on, please know that “A Climate Carol” ends on an optimistic note, where ecumenical goodness triumphs over ''Trumpian greed'' and all ends well. In the story you will meet characters with names like Wilson Drummond (the proverbial '' Trumpian bad guy'' who later turns over a new leaf and becomes a champion of human kindness), his mother Gurtie Drummond, his limousine driver Sammie Johnson, and his employee Jericho Reese. And the star of the show, his grand-daughter Lily. You will also meet several important ghost-like characters, one who calls himself the Ghost of Climate Past, another who says they are the Ghost of the Current Climate in the world, and a third ghost who speaks in a chilling voice reminiscent of the horror movie actor Vincent Price and declares that he is the Ghost of Climate Future. In the end, we learn that the Scrooge-like Trump-like Drummond has mended his insensitive ways and become a better human being. He even later becomes President of the United States and turns out... Support this podcast

Life Logic
What are the Creeps and Chills and Why Do We Get Them | Happy Halloween

Life Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 10:29


It's the creeps. But what exactly is it? Why do we experience “the creeps”? And is being creepedout useful?Though the sensation has probably been around since humans began experiencing emotions, it wasn't until the middle of the 19th century that some of us called uncanny touch “the creeps”. Charles Dickens, is credited with the first use of the phrase, in his 1849 novel David Copperfield. It meant an unpleasant, tingly chill up the spine. In the years after the book, using “creepy” to describe something that causes unease took off. And as it turns out, “creepy” isn't actually all that complicated.

Audiobooks Daily, presented by Public Domain Media
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare - Act 5 (Part 5 of 5 Full Audiobook)

Audiobooks Daily, presented by Public Domain Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 28:52


Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare - Act 5 (Part 5 of 5 Full Audiobook) -- FINAL ACT --- Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers. --- Written by William Shakespeare --- William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's greatest dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon" (or simply "the Bard"). His extant works, including collaborations, consist of some 39 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright. --- Audiobooks Daily is a weekly podcast featuring the best of public domain short stories, novels, poetry, and plays. Every episode features a new chapter, full audiobook, or commentary of a great literary work. Authors included on our podcast: Edgar Allan Poe, Virginia Woolf, Jane Austen, Mark Twain, William Shakespeare, Oscar Wilde, Charles Dickens, Ernest Hemingway, Arthur Conan Doyle, and many more! Join our community of literary lovers as we listen to some of the greatest fictional novels, stories, poems, and plays ever created! Episodes are uploaded four times a week. --- This is a Librivox recording. Support or learn more by visiting librivox.org --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/public-domain-media-presents-audiobooks-daily/support

InObscuria Podcast
Ep. 99: Famous Ghost Stories From Rock n' Punk n' Metal

InObscuria Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 92:34


This week's show is the final frightful installment of our month-long celebration of the Halloween season. We also celebrate 2-years of existence!!! We hope you love this episode to death… There are some frightfully spooktacular songs on this episode that will raise the hairs on the back of your neck and nether regions! Happy Halloween everyone!What is it we do here at InObscuria? In the beginning, good always overpowered the evils of all man's sins... But in time the nations grew weak, and our cities fell to slums while evil stood strong. In the dusts of hell,lurked the blackest of hates. For he whom they feared awaited them... Now many many lifetimes later lay destroyed beaten down and only the corpses of rebels, ashes of dreams, and bloodstained streets remain... It has been written"Those who have the youth, have the future". So, come now children of the beast; be strong and shout at the devil!Songs this week include:Wednesday 13 – “Necrophaze (feat. Alice Cooper)” from Necrophaze (2019)Type O Negative – “Black Sabbath (From The Satanic Perspective)” from The Least Worst Of Type O Negative (2000) Electric Frankenstein – “Dead By Dawn” from The Buzz Of A Thousand Volts (2001)Voodoo Church – “The Undead” from Voodoo Church (1982)The Bronx Casket Co. – “Vampire War” from The Bronx Casket Co. (1999)Ink & Dagger – “The Lines Of Lies” from Ink & Dagger (1999)Helloween – “Halloween” from Keeper Of The Seven Keys Part I (1987)The Voluptuous Horror Of Karen Black – “I Believe In Halloween” from Black Date (1998)Please subscribe everywhere that you listen to podcasts!Visit us: https://inobscuria.com/https://www.facebook.com/InObscuriahttps://twitter.com/inobscuriahttps://www.instagram.com/inobscuria/Buy cool stuff with our logo on it!: https://www.redbubble.com/people/InObscuria?asc=u

Bonnets At Dawn
S5, Bonus: B@D Literary Ghost Tour

Bonnets At Dawn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 46:57


We're back with an expanded version of our 2020 B@D Live Literary Ghost Tour! This week, we're talking about spooky books, the ghost of Charles Dickens, and whether or not Anne Brontë is haunting a certain staircase in New York.

Tales To Terrify
Tales to Terrify 509 Charles Dickens Washington Irving

Tales To Terrify

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 128:09


Welcome to Episode 509. We've got a creepy collection of classic tales for you tonight. A signal-man foretells tragedy and a lover's rivalry turns treacherous.COMING UPGood Evening: OLD Promo, Thank-yous, Patreon Updates: 00:01:06Charles Dickens' The Signal-Man as read by Andrew Gibson: 00:06:43Washington Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow as read by Seth Williams: 00:44:12PERTINENT LINKSSupport us on Patreon! Spread the darkness.Shop Tales to Terrify MerchAndrew GibsonThe Narrator Nook DiscordThe Haven DiscordOriginal Score by Nebulus EntertainmentNebulus on FacebookNebulus on InstagramSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/talestoterrify. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Totally Pawsome Pod
Quoth the Raven, "Baltimore!"

Totally Pawsome Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 13:28


Dr Sip's outside is coming inside, Melissa has company, so everyone is taking a break. Enjoy this  episode from BewilderBeasts - remastered for your listening pleasure. 

Classical Stuff You Should Know
181: Great Expectations

Classical Stuff You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 59:00


In this episode, we discuss Charles Dickens's "Great Expectations." But you know, if you keep your expectations low, it's harder to be disappointed. I guess, in a way, that's the point of this book.

The Mutual Audio Network
2020 Christmas Story Series- Christmas at Fezziwig's Warehouse(102521)

The Mutual Audio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 5:31


Red Hawk continues with their early Christmas presents with Christmas at Fezziwig's Warehouse by Charles Dickens, read by Jonathan Reynolds. Edited by Clayton Hester. All content in the public domain. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Best Book Ever
072 Robin Whitten on "The Golden Compass" by Phillip Pullman

Best Book Ever

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 35:54


What a thrill it was to chat with Robin Whitten, founder and editor of AudioFile Magazine. I rely on their reviews for all of the audiobooks I check out at my library (yes! You can check out audiobooks at your library). Today, Robin and I chatted about how a narrator can bring you deeper into a story or drag you further out of it, how a good narrator can redeem an average book (and vice versa) and why the movie version of The Golden Compass didn't work. If you have never read The Golden Compass, I highly recommend you take Robin's advice and experience it on audio. It's a full cast production and it is truly something special. Support the Best Book Ever Podcast on Patreon   Follow the Best Book Ever Podcast on Instagram or on the Best Book Ever Website   Host: Julie Strauss Website/Instagram     Guest: Robin Whitten Website/Twitter/Behind the Mic with AudioFile Podcast/Audiobook Break Podcast   Discussed in this episode: The Golden Compass by Phillip Pullman His Dark Materials Series by Phillip Pullman Call for the Dead: A George Smiley Novel by John LeCarré   Kate Winslet narrated audiobooks: The Twits, The Minpins, and The Magic Finger by Roald Dahl Matilda by Roald Dahl You're a Bad Man, Mr. Gum by Andy Stanton Thérèse Raquin by Émile Zola Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen   The Golden Compass movie His Dark Materials television series Other audiobooks narrated by Sean Barrett (voice of lorick Byrnison) Neil Gaiman self-narrated audiobooks Always by Morris Gleitzman Always is the final book in the story of Felix, the hero of Morris Gleitzman's Once, Then, Now, After, Soon, and Maybe The Madness of Crowds by Louise Penny The Murder on the Links by Agatha Christie, read by Alfred Molina and a Full Cast The Iliad, narrated by Anton Lesser David Copperfield by Charles Dickens   Discussed in our Patreon Segment The AudioFile Magazine Golden Voices Simon Jones George Guidall Gerard Doyle Laura Lippman Linda Emond Robert Bathurst Jason Culp   (Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links, meaning I get a few bucks off your purchase at no extra expense to you. Anytime you shop for books, you can use my affiliate link on Bookshop, which also supports Indie Bookstores around the country. If you're shopping for everything else – clothes, office supplies, gluten-free pasta, couches – you can use my affiliate link for Amazon. Thank you for helping to keep the Best Book Ever Podcast in business!)

Industry Angel Business Podcast
222 Tony Robinson OBE | The Micro Business Champion

Industry Angel Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 64:50


Tony Robinson OBE has embarked on a tour of 70 talks in 70 towns to raise money for ExcludedUK and we brought the legend himself to sunny South Shields. Tony gave his 'Who wants to be a Happipreneur?' talk and we recorded this just for the podcast...   Tony's talk includes; - Of interest to all who want to be, or help someone else to be, more enterprising and happier in their work - Tony created the 'tongue in cheek' philosophy of Happipreneurship in the new 'Small is Beautiful' - the 5* rated 'The Happipreneur:Why MicroBizMatters? and it's now a thing. - Charles Dickens is Tony's role model Happipreneur but if he remembers he may mention some of the famous entrepreneurs he's met, and learns from. are too - including Kanya King CBE (his inspiration), Charlie Mullins OBE his #MicroBizMatters Tsar, Sir Jim Ratcliffe (his schoolmate) and Lord Sugar (once a client). - Tony explains how key decisions in his riches to rags journey allowed him to stumble into evermore happier and enterprising work life. - Guaranteed to be controversial and as Brad Burton, the UK's Number One Motivational Speaker says on the book cover "If you want the truth go to the 'Dickhead' in the red-feathered hat".   Industry Angel Twitter Industry Angel Website Podcast Sponsors;- Far North Sales & Marketing Carpeway MrFarrar.com

What’s Your Emergency
Author Douglas R Brown and A Firefighter's Christmas Carol

What’s Your Emergency

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:30


​Move over Charles Dickens, there's a new Christmas Carol on the block. No, not the Muppet Christmas Carol, even though it is a work of cinematic genius. We're talking about Douglas Brown's new collection of short tales A Firefighter Christmas Carol and other stories. Doug reached out to Justin to see if he'd be interested in reading the book a few months ago and Justin had to delay because of some mental health issues. You see, it isn't good to read about PTSD and suicide when you're possibly in the middle of treatment for mental health issues. Justin finally got through the Christmas Carol and immediately reached out to Doug to share this story as well as his own. When Doug made the pivot from his successful fantasy writing to this particular story What in his experiences came through as we watch his main character suffer Dickens' famous night of ghosts How the story can both help, and possibly hurt a person in recovery or experiencing PTSD Why werewolves came up in a discussion about firefighter PTSD, like, at all  

Somehow Related with Dave O'Neil & Glenn Robbins

Was Dickens a better writer than chips are a snack/accompaniment to any number of grateful mains? There's certainly been more hot chips by volume than Charles Dicken's books printed, we think. Who knows? Sam knows.   Link to the answer Lovefood.com   Thinking Music GIO insurance ad   Check out the Somehow Related Facebook Group.   Somehow Related is produced by Nearly Media. The robot's voice comes from Google Home. Original theme music by Kit Warhurst. Artwork created by Stacy Gougoulis.   Looking for another podcast? 10 Questions with Adam Zwar - The same 10 questions with answers that vary wildly. The Junkees with Dave O'Neil & Kitty Flanagan - The sweet and salty roundabout! Junk food abounds!

How To Love Lit Podcast
Elizabeth Barrett Browning - Sonnets Of The Portuguese - Plus A Great Love Story!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 50:03


Elizabeth Barrett Browning - Sonnets Of The Portuguese - Plus A Great Love Story!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver, and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver, and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This is our second week in a two part series discussing one of English Language literature's most romantic couples- the poets Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  Last week, we introduced Robert Browning and his notable dramatic monologue My Last Duchess which gives voice to a twisted psychopath.  We talked a little bit about Robert Browning's life, but not too much.  This week we'll return to his story as well as introduce his remarkable wife and her poetry, Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  Christy, am I correct when I say that during their lifetimes, she was famous and he was the Mr. Elizabeth Barrett Browning, so to speak?  Also, am I also correct that the man who wrote about the most twisted love relationship in British poetry also arguably had one of the most famous personal love stories!      You are correct on both accounts- although, in his defense, in regard to the second fiddle Robert played to Elizabeth during her life, history has elevated him over the years.      And been less kind to her, am I right about that?      For a while-you're right- the world turned on  Elizabeth, or EBB, as she signed her things.      Wait= stop there- EBB for Elizabeth Barrett Browning?  She went by that?      Well, she had a family nickname BA, but in her professional life-Yes- she signed everything EBB but there is a story.  When she was single she was Elizabeth Barrett Barrett- so, she started that before she got married.  When she got married, she kept up the EBB- it avoided all the normal name confusion women deal with when they marry later in life and have the hassle of changing identities.  In her case, sticking with thethe initials  just made it easy.    That worked out.      I agree- Anyway- back to your point that history was RUDE to her.  There was a period of about 100 years where people really criticized put her down.  Virginia Wolfe, specifically, wrote what to me is a cruel essay about EBB's most accomplished piece of poetry, a long epic novel in poem form called Aurora Leigh.  Wolfe is very condescending for many reasons, but from my perspective, Wolfe just didn't like poetry very much, and Aurora leigh is an epic poem.   So, EBB, for about a 100 years drifted along on the coat tails of her husband, ironically, whose reputation gained ground over that same period of time.  It was this giant reversal after death.      Huh- I guess it's a good thing they were both gone- that could have brought some marital complications!      So true, but maybe they would have laughed.  When they were alive, Robert Browning once said that the only way he could get a publisher to look at his work was if he promised he'd get Elizabeth to print something with them.   Today, though, over two hundred years later, we can all be relieved to know, history has decided to let them rest together in peace. They are both viewed in high regard in their own rights.  The Wolfe crowd has settled down, and we can see EBB with a more balanced perspective, especially her work Aurora Leigh- something notable but more than we can really handle in one episode-  I did want to mention because it was EBB's masterpiece- and something that is quite original- if you like her stuff or if you like epic poetry, you should check it out.  No one has really done an epic poem about a female hero like her either before or since, at least that I know anything about. When it came out It was extremely popular, as well as quite scandalous. It's a plot driven story, and Marian Erle, a heroine in the stories, gets raped, has a child, refuses to hide the fact that it was a product of rape and does not take a proposal in marriage that would redeem her reputation as a fallen woman, so to speak.  It has been said that women read it secretly under their sheets so as not to be discovered, and EBB loved that.      Let me just tell you, that might scandalize readers even todayOh my, I'd say that's a very different hero than Odysseus or Gilgamesh, and I can see why Aurora Leigh was so popular so quickly not just in Britain but in America- in fact,. I read it hadsomewhere that they printed over 20 editions before the end of the 19th century.  But, let's back up and get a little of the back story on this scandalous Victorian celebrity.      Okay- boring stuff first.  EBB was born on March 6, 1806, the eldest of TWELVE children to very prominent people.  Her father's family, the Barrett's owned thousands of acres of sugar plantation in Jamaica plus all the slaves that went with that.  The Barrett's had gobs of money.  Her early years were happy, and for a while she lived in a fairy land.  Her father built this incredibly lavish estate, and she had free reign to roam at will, and that's exactly what she did.  In one sense, her family was progressive.  They encouraged and even supported her studying, and she did and loved it.  She had an excellent private tutor and she worked hard- even though at the time for a woman there wasn't much point in it.  She received a very good classical education becoming proficient in both Greek and Latin.  She read all of the time and anything she could get her hands on- which was a lot.  She also got into poetry writing pretty early on. She wrote for everyone and all the time.  Her father called her the Poet Laureate of Hope End (that was the name of their estate).  He even sponsored the publication of her first epic poem she was only 13.      Can you imagine a proud father publishing his teenage daughter's epic poem- that's definitely a rich kid thing to do.    Well, it certainly was and an indication that her life was all just dreamy…until it wasn't.  First, The Barrett's, as in the extended family, had some sort of squabble about the sugar plantation money and somehow, I'm not sure how, Elizabeth's dad, lost a big chunk of it.  They lost the big fancy estate and had to move into some sort of temporary housing.     Then, and this is even worse although, it seems what I'm about to describe happened to a lot of women during this time period, at age 15, she started getting really sick with no commensurate explanation.  To this day, her illness is undiagnosed, but she had all kinds of symptoms that left her weak to the point of literally being physically disabled.      What did they say it was at the time?  And as historians have looked back through the record is there an idea today about what made her sick?    Two good questions.  Well, of course, her family tried everything, including moving to live by the seaside- which we've seen in a lot of British literature- that came up even in Emma.  But in her case her health never really improved. By the time she was 25, her family was living in London,but that place wasn't really known at the time for its fresh air- think the chimney sweeper or Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins.  What happened to poor Elizabeth is that she ended up spending all of her time confined in a bedroom in that famous address associated with her today- 50 Wimpole Street.       Well, I'm not sure about 50 Wimpole street, but isn't 57 Wimpole street the famous home of Paul McCartney- the place where he and John Lennon wrote “I want to Hold your Hand” and then later “Yesterday”.      Yes- that's a little bit after EBB's time there, though.  HA.  But actually, they did make a fairly famous movie called The Barretts at Wimpole Street about Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  So, there's that too.    Anyway, back to EBB's health-  Victorian London, in general,  was dirty and smoggy, and so Elizabeth ended up basically being locked up in her room theoretically for her own good.  There is a school of thought that suggests that Some of her problems were connected to an issue with her spine from an injury she got from falling off a horse.  We also know for a fact she  had a lot of trouble with her lungs.  I think the most trustworthy sources say she probably had spinal tuberculosis. Honestly, I really don't really know what was wrong with her except to say that by the time she was twenty-five, it seems she was pretty much disabled.  And, if that wasn't enough, she has another issue- again fairly common for the time period.   Her doctors- proscribed to her meds- and you can probably guess where I'm going with this- that were addictive- and like so many back then as well as today- she became an opium addict, of course, all under her doctor's care.  This seems a little horrifying to me, partly because we just finished watching the Netflix series The Pharmacist which was an expose on the opium problem in the United States connected to Oxycotin and the ensuing 400,000 overdoses directedly related to that drug.  But Garry, clearly, opium addiction is not a 21st century phenomenon, we talked about it a little bit with Frankenstein because it surfaced a little in that book, and even though this is a little tangential, it's interesting to me, so tell us about what opium addiction looked like in the 19th century and why would a little doted on homeschool girl wind up addicted to it?     Sure, wellFirst let's establish what it was she was taking.  It was a common drug called laudanum is what Elizabeth Barrett Browning was addicted to..  She wasn't popping pills or shooting up. anything.   Laudanum was an alcoholic herbal preparation thatand was 10% opium.  It was prescribed pretty much for everything: it was used as a pain reliever, a cough suppressant, it was used to control depression, heart palpitations.  It was given as a sleeping pill, menstrual cramps were treated with laudanum.  Just likeEven worse than oxycotin in the early days of the opioid epidemic today, itlaudanum was an entirely uncontrolled substance. Almost no one took the side effects of the drug seriously- and there were a lot of them- But another point to understand, and again this is just like opioids today- there was that associated euphoria people experienced from taking the drug that encouraged it's people to use it.  Why not, right?  It's not hurting anything, and it makes me feel good.       .  However, as we all know, thatdrug euphoria comes at a cost and the cost was depression, the slurred speech, the restlessness, poor concentration, and of course, theif you ever wanted to get off, terrible withdrawal symptoms.  Here's one crazy fun fact that might blow your mind- Itlaudanum was even spoon fed to infants, if you can believe that.      No way!    But before we judge too quickly with the arrogance of the present, we have to remember, that it wasn't until 1899 that aspirin was invented.  These were days when there were no antibiotics,  no mild tranquiliers;  not much of anything and people needed help- not just pain relief, but with all kinds of things, and this is what they had.      Do you think Barrett's prolonged disabilities could be connected with her drug use?    I'm sure it's possible, but I really don't know.  Laudanum has no curative properties. After they got married, Robert Browning did help her reduce her drug use significantly,  and in fact, she reduced her dosage to where she was finally able to get pregnant after two miscarriages related to laudanum.  After marrying him, her entire health condition improved actually.  She even got to where she could walk again, but I'm not sure what all the factors were that contributed to her general improved health.  She was definitely in a better climate and presumably happy.   I do want to be clear, there was no stigma at that time in using laudanum, so we don't need to see her as dark or even unconventional because she was a laudanum user.  Lots and lots of people used it for all kinds of things and lots were addicted- including names we recognize like Charles Dickens.      Okay-moving on to the love story- so Elizabeth was pretty much locked up in her room, disabled but otherwise living a fairly engaging intellectual life.  She was writing poetry, writing letters and basically building a literary career out of that bedroom, even in her disabled state.  In 1838, she published a book of poetry called The Seraphim and Other Poems and that one was met with a lot of critical success- oh and let me note- Elizabeth Barrett Browning published her work under her own name!!!  That wasn't what a lot of women writers were doing.  But, because her work was well received and NOT anonymous, this led to her corresponding via the mail and making friends with important literary figures of her day- some we've even heard of today- famous people like William Wordsworth and Edgar Allan Poe.  In 1844, she published another book of poetry, and it met even more success- and it was the publication of this book that changed her personal life completely.  In one of the poems in this collection,  the poem's name, btw, was  “Lady Geraldine's Courtship”, If you're interested, but in this poem she references the poetry of another  fairly obscure British poet,  a man by the name of Robert Browning.  Well, this obscure poet, Robert, was highly flattered to be noticed by someone who was now quite famous, and wrote her a letter thanking her for the shout out.  However, this was not your run of the mill thank you note.  In his thank you letter he very forwardly and now famously said this, “I love your verses with all my heart, Miss Barrett”…”, I do, as I say, love these books with all my heart- and I love you too.”      Ha!  That is forward.  Robert Browning was very much a very bold suitor- no doubt.  He pursued Elizabeth and all throughvia the mail. I was amazed to read there are over 573 letters between these two, and these letters pretty much document the story of two people falling in love.  Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan's email drama has nothing on these two!!  They wrote each other every day and seemingly pretty much about everything  in the world.  These were not check in texts.  These were not Joey Tribiani lines like “what's up!”- they were full on epistles.     So true, and these letters have been popular reading material ever since- for those of us who want to take stalking to the next level and stalk the love lives of the dead.  You really get an intimate look at two people falling in love.  Elizabeth said they were “talking upon paper”.   When you read the letters, you literally feel like you are injecting yourself into their private world.      Mostly because you are.      I guess that's true, but it is sweet.  Here's a clip for you to see what I mean.  “You've come to me as a dream comes, as the best of dreams comes.”  That's Elizabeth to Robert. And Robert Browning responds in the same sorts of ways, “I have loved you all my Life unawares- that is the idea of you.”         It's a very special back and forth that has been preserved, and they were clearly falling in love now before the eyes of the world and posterity- but we also see that Elizabeth was not totally sure marriage was the path for her.       No, she had a couple of serious hesitations.  Not the least of these was her father.  He absolutely did not believe in allowing his children to get married- especially Elizabeth, and by that I mean not ever.  They were a close family, and that put her in a terrible position.  To marry Robert would be to cut off her father.  Her relationship with her father otherwise was good- if you take out the tyrannical controlling thing- I know that kind of fails the say out loud test.       And of course we see in the letters that Robert, obviously was totally against this kind control over her.        That was one big problem, but she was also concerned about her disability and her age.  She was six years older.  Would this really work? By the time, they got married she was 40- today 40 is the new 20, but she didn't feel that way.   She felt past her prime.  These are some of the insecurities, we will see her write about in her love sonnets.  But, at the end of the day, Robert did love her.  He wanted the relationship to work.  And despite her father's objections, he visited her home 91 times unrelenting in wanting a relationship with Elizabeth.  Garry, do you have a theory as to what Mr. Barrett had against Robert or marriage in general?    Well, for one thing, he thought Robert might be trying to use Elizabeth's fame for his own career- and that would be understandable, I guess, although for a 40 year old, today that seems her problem not his.  But the bigger problem was sex in general.  From everything I've read he was a good father and loved his daughter.  Elizabeth, who they calledhis Ba- in many ways she his pride and joy.  He struggled with his daughter having her own sexual identity- he had idealized her.  It seems that as he got older, the sex piece was just more than he could handle.  This sort of thing happens even today.    Well, the locking the daughter up in the room plan failed.      I will say those plans usually do.    Robert and Elizabeth were in love, and on September 12 1846, with the help of her maid, Elizabeth sneaks out of the house and marries Robert.  One oddity is that after they get married, she had to sneak back into her father's house and live there secretly married for another week before they could work out their train tickets to Italy.  But they did ran away together and eventually settled in Florence and where they lived for the rest of Elizabeth's life.     One unfortunate fall out is that her father never got over the elopement.  He disowned her; cut her off financially and never spoke to her again.  He would die never to see his daughter again.  That's sad.     I suspect she knew that was a possibility, and the reason for her hesitation.  I'm also sure that really hurt, but she didn't seem to regret her decision.  Italy was her choice.  She'd loved it from her classical studies.  The doctors insisted it would significantly improve her health- which it did.   She also wanted Robert and a life with Robert, so Italy was the plan.  After three miscarriages, they had a son, she began walking again; she got involved with European politics, supported the the Unification of Italy, took stands on women's rights issues.  She was fully engaged in a life there.  In 1850, she would publish another collection of poetry- this one contained what she is most famous for- her “Sonnets from the Portuguese”.  Selections from this work is what we're going to read.  These were poems she had written to Robert during those days when she was living locked up in that room on Wimpole street.  She wrote 44 love sonnets to Robert,  but she didn't give them to Robert until after they were married.      What's the connection with the Portuguese?      Well, when they were dating, Elizabeth wrote a poem about a Portuguese girl named Catarina who was beloved.  Robert loved it and always connected Elizabeth to this fictional girl Catarina from the poem.  When Elizabeth published these love sonnets it was kind of an inside joke- the speaker is the Portuguese (her) and the poems are all love poems to her husband.  Sonnets from the Portuguese.    Also, you may remember from Robert's life- he had kind of a bad experience with writing personal confessional poems, so when it came to publishing truly personal poems, he wanted her to create some distance between the speaker of the poem.  So, they basically pretended she translated the sonnets. I like the idea- although, I will say, it's not super-well disguised.      So, why are these love sonnets so popular?    For one, there's just the idea that they are so so sweet.  And since their love life is so well documented with their letters, the personal story makes the sentiments in the sonnets charming.   Elizabeth was 39 years old.  She considers herself past her prime when they met.  She was disabled.  She expresses what to me seems like a disbelief someone she found to be as amazing as this man she admired really truly loved her.  On his part, it's kind of a female fantasy- it's sweet- against a lot of big obstacles,he made her believe he loved her because he did.  He really did.  He was equally enamoured with her.  He admired her.  He wondered how could a woman as brilliant as this woman love me?     And there we have something special- a mutual admiration- it is this mutual admiration that led to a real intellectual exchange.  In these letters we watch this intellectual exchange develop into a reciprocity of respect and from this respect we see trust and then intimacy. All of this, of course, is exactly the kind of thing Ibsen advocates for in A Doll's House.  The Browning's relationship is the exact opposite of the Helmer marriage.  The BrownsingsThe Brownings started  as intellectual equals but then emotionally connect.  After many months of back and forth, after many doubts, we finally land on those famous lines most of us recognize from grocery store valentine cards that young boys glue boxes of chocolates or put in the arms of teddy bears. “How do I love thee, let me count the ways?”      I really like Elizabeth; but I also like Robert.  He loved her for who she was.  He was bold; he took risks.  This is something young men aren't often encouraged to do. For whatever reason, Robert demonstrated leadership, and Elizabeth absolutely reciprocated this strength back to him.  Sonnets from the Portuguese take us on her journey. And because we know the true story of their real-life romance- the sonnets just seem sweet, romantic and precious.    You seem smitten, Christy, should I be concerned?  Or should I write sonnets?    Oh, you should definitely write sonnets, But let me say, there is more to appreciate about these love sonnets than just the love confession.  EBB was a rhetorician- and you know I love rhetoric- persuasion.  These poems don't just express emotion.  They are making an articulate argument- she's making a statement one I find interesting and relevant. Because Elizabeth was a product of the Victorian era, she had a very specific understanding of the view of the ideal woman of her day.  However, she was an intellectual, her father had done her the disservice of introducing her to Greek and Latin philosophy.  She was enamored with the female poet Sapphos- so as she sat in the confining room on Wimpole street, receiving letters from Robert- she found herself thinking- what does something like romantic love mean for someone like me?  I don't need a man for money?  I don't need a man for a career?  I don't even need a man for love- my father loves me.  What is romance?  What is love?  What is a relationship between a man and a roman?  She sat around her room a thought about those sort of things and she draws conclusions.     For one thing, she  defines female love in a different way- it doesn't have to be the same thing as masculine love- but it also doesn't have to be this frail Victorian helpless type she found typical of the age- she defines feminine love in a stronger way.  For EBB love comes from confidence and fills the lover with confidence. In the beginning we see a woman who was confident in her intelligence; confident in her work, confidenr in her family,  but not necessarily confident in any romantic sense.  And how many of us can relate to that?  This was exactly me as a high school and college student- if I'm being honest.       One thing that stands out to me is this idea the frail female.  This WAS the ideal female for a lot of men at this time period.  Of course, most men, even today, want to be strong for a significant lover or the love of women in general,  but this dramatic idea of the sickly and frail woman is very typical of the Victorian period.   I can see that a woman expressing powerful confidence was not something people expected from a female in a romantic relationship and certainly not in a female romantic figure.      Exactly, and EBB, who ironically was sickly, didn't want that to be the reason someone loved her.  She ran from that.  In fact, she even ran from being appreciated for being a woman in general.  When Wordsworth died, England needed a new poet Laureate, Elizabeth's name was recommended to succeed him.  The argument was that there should be a woman poet Laureate for the nation because there was a woman monarch.  Barrett took issue with this- she made the statement that she was not a poetess but a poet and she thought poetry should be judged by its merits not by the sex of its writers.    HA!!  19th century cross-sectional politics.    I know, right, but here's why I bring it up.  When it came to her poetry, she didn't want to be looked at as a woman-as in a hyphenated sub-group.  She saw this kind of thing as patronizing like how I heard boys talk about girl athletes when I was a kid- phrases like, “she's pretty fast- for a girl.” That was not Elizabeth's thing.  It's why didn't use a pseudonym like George Eliot or Emily Bronte who went by Ellis Bell.  Hiding your gender professionally  was totally acceptable.  But it seems to me that for EBB she wanted to say- I am a woman- know that-, I have the feelings and desires define me as a woman.   I will write about women and what women care about.  I will show how I as a woman see the world and I will stand confidently this.  This is an important thing to do.   Don't patronize me by qualifying me by gender; I define my femininity for myself.    But all of that only applies to outside relationships. n    So, how does it apply to personal relationships?     It seems crazy, and unljikely but somehow, she and Robert were on the same page in their understanding of how men and women should relate.  He was not intimated by her professional success at all, and he really should have been.  She was very well known; he was not.  Their personal relationship was all theirs.  She was a woman who wanted to be desired, to be cherished, to be loved and adored- and he wanted very much to do all those things for her.  That is a very traditional relationship, and maybe Victorian in nature- but I have to be honest, I love all those very same things.     As we read these poems, I see a powerful writer but also a dreamy love-struck woman.   “As the prisoners think of liberty, as the dying think of heaven so I think of you.”  That is another quote from one of her letters to Robert- but in this line we see a brave but smitten female voice.      So, you're saying, she's not writing as someone trying to be coy or silently waiting to be seduced.       Exactly, she does want to be seduced; she's just dropping the silent part.  Sonnets from the Portuguese are in sequence; they take us through her evolution of thinking and her emotions on this experience of falling in love.  In sonnets 1-2 we see the woman speaker as object of man- she is not the creator of her own poetic voice yet.  And this of course is what we think of when we think of traditional love poetry- man loves woman- man speaks- woman stays silent- just think about the convention of the sonnets in particular- especially Petrarchan sonnets.  That's what they were all about.    Now, we don't need to rehash our entire episode on Petrarch- although he's worth listening to if you haven't listened to that podcast- or at least not in a while- but, by way of reminder, Petrarch wrote sonnets to a woman named Laura who did not return his affection- the entire genre of the Petrarchan sonnet is about objectifying women.    In fact, I'm pretty sure Petrarch never really even refers to Laura as a whole human being- it's always her hair, or her breasts, her voice, her smile- even the name Laura- some people think just stands in for the word Laurel.      You're right.  Laura is distant- impersonal- an ideal.  The sonnets are mostly about Petrarch- the man- not the woman at all. Elizabeth is to not just going to reverse this- she's going to redefine the sonnet genre entirely.  She's going to say, I'm the object- yes- I want to be the object, but I'm also the speaker- I am not silent.  I am a recipient of a love that empowers, but I am also the giver of a love that emboldens.  The poetic relationship in these sonnets is reciprocal- His love calls for her poems- SHE writes them.  In a sense, he is a magic prince who kisses and restores her- she sees him like this- but she is not weak, she is not powerless- even in her physical fraility- even in her age- and she did see herself as kind of past her prime maybe physically but definitely not creatively or professionally.    SHE is the creator of the art here- she is creating this new idea that I can be a the muse for love and the creator of its art.      I also want to point out that their relationship, although it is intellectual,  it is not platonic.  It's very romantic and there is a lot that is physical here… and some of this is erotic to be honest… He was bold towards her, but now she reciprocates with boldness of her own….    Well, that could get interesting.      I think so, but we'll let you read those on your own, though.     Okay- so, we're going to read three of her sonnets?     Yes, I want to.   I think it's nice to try to see a little bit of the progression we've been talking about- how they kind of show her evolving into her own understanding of her relationship.  We won't overdo the analysis thing because there are three of them- and we'll just try to enjoy them more holistically.  We'll start with 14, move to 22 and then finish with the famous 43- the one most people know.        Sonnet 14    If thou must love me, let it be for nought  Except for love's sake only. Do not say,  "I love her for her smile—her look—her way  Of speaking gently,—for a trick of thought  That falls in well with mine, and certes brought  A sense of pleasant ease on such a day"—  For these things in themselves, Belovèd, may  Be changed, or change for thee—and love, so wrought,  May be unwrought so. Neither love me for  Thine own dear pity's wiping my cheeks dry:  A creature might forget to weep, who bore  Thy comfort long, and lose thy love thereby!  But love me for love's sake, that evermore  Thou mayst love on, through love's eternity.      It seems very straightforward and easy to understand for me.      It really is.  Just to give a little introduction to the form, notice that it is in iambic pentamenter, that means there are five strong beats in every line- just like in most every other sonnet in the world. Also, just like Petrarch, there is a rhyme scheme abba abba cdcdcd. But, that's as far as she will follow Petrarch's model.  In fact, she's almost responding to Petrarch- don't love me like Petrarch loved Laura.   He loved her for stuff- for her smile, her look, her way… all that garbage… don't even love me for any cute thing I say, or even what you do for me and how it makes you feel to do stuff for me, like wipe tears from my cheeks- nonsense like that…I'm just not interested.  If we're going to do this love thing, we need to get past all that and figure out something much deeper …the smile and tears stuff isn't enough.    “Love me for love's sake, that evermore though mayst love, on, through love's eternity.”      Well, it's a very ornate style- and it's understandable in light of what we know about her own personal underconfidences that she would talk like this, but like I said before, I really enjoy seeing a mature woman experience a deep and intimate love- she's allowing herself to enjoy all the emotions of love like most people associate with you, but it's not immature love, it establishs reciprocal terms.       Another point I want to make before we read the next one, and this may be one of the reasons her poetry was so ill-received in the 20th century, EBB has no trouble exploring her doubts and underconfidences in her romantic relationship.  And we see that a little here, although the earlier ones had more of it.  She seems slightly concerned that if the love relies too much on the physical, it might be a bust.  Feminist critics of the 20th century didn't like that.  They said things like, she's lowering herself in the relationship when she should be promoting herself.  And there is a real sense that that is true- she clearly submits to Robert in these sonnets- on purpose- but here is the difference that I think has since redeemed her- it's a reciprocated submission- it's not something that Robert himself was not doing.  Today, as we read her poems, we aren't really offended by her vulnerability.  In fact, the honesty has been reinterpreted as confidence.  It takes quite a bit of sincerity and confidence to be openly underconfident and dependent- as paradoxical as it sounds.      Well, of course, I agree with that.  And I have to think, from a psychological point of view, that being in love and writing about how it makes you feel at age 39 as opposed to 19 is probably why she can be vulnerable about her self-doubts without coming across as weak and pitiful.  She's already been through the adolescent stuff as a totally separate issue, so as she tries to understand what about love is overwhelming her and making her feel so differently- she can separate what is unique about this particular love relationship from regular developmental issues of underconfidence or even the loving relationships she's already experienced from her family- which we have to remember- she'd been adored her entire life.      Let's read 22- we can see the tone has shifted.  There's been a progression from love me for love's sake to now WHEN we stand erect…the posture is very different.  Let's read it.        When our two souls stand up erect and strong,    Face to face, silent, drawing nigh and nigher,    Until the lengthening wings break into fire    At either curvèd point,—what bitter wrong    Can the earth do to us, that we should not long   Be here contented? Think. In mounting higher,    The angels would press on us and aspire    To drop some golden orb of perfect song    Into our deep, dear silence. Let us stay    Rather on earth, Belovèd,—where the unfit   Contrarious moods of men recoil away    And isolate pure spirits, and permit    A place to stand and love in for a day,    With darkness and the death-hour rounding it.    Again, we have the same iambic pentameter- five strong beats in every line.  We have the rhyme scheme Abba Abba cdcdcd.  But what we notice more than the rhyme change is the tone change.  Traditionally in the Petrarchean sonnet the first eight lines set up a question and then the second six lines answer it.  There's a turn.  In this one, the first eight lines or the octave are going to define the status of their love as it is now.  The last six will argue- quite untraditionally that they need to stop time and just stay in the present moment.      HA!!  Wouldn't that be nice to be able to do.      Yeah- but I guess it's a nice sentiment even if a bit unrealistic.  I guess that's why she can enjoy it.  I want to point out how much religious imagery she throws in here.  It's not two bodies- it's two souls- they are not constrained by physical restraints anymore- something she was all too familiar with.   I also want to point at how equal the two people in this poem are.  They are two souls- erect and strong- face to face- with wings breaking into fire- that's pretty cool imagery.- kind of like some mythical phoenix full of power and energy.    And yet, as cool as they would be, I would prefer to just stay here in this moment with you.  It's sweet.  Okay, ready for the last one…the famous sonnet 43, the second to last poem in the series- in many ways the concluding one.  In this one, she is going to summarize some of the arguments she's made throughout the other sonnets.  She is going to catalogue the eight ways of loving that she's been making for the last 42.  Let's read it and then we'll see how this famous love story ends.      How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.  I love thee to the depth and breadth and height  My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight  For the ends of being and ideal grace.  I love thee to the level of every day's  Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.  I love thee freely, as men strive for right.  I love thee purely, as they turn from praise.  I love thee with the passion put to use  In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.  I love thee with a love I seemed to lose  With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath,  Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,  I shall but love thee better after death.    By the end of EBB's sonnet sequence she has reshaped her understanding of love.  She has allowed herself to express her initial insecurities, walked us through her doubts and developed before us a full and complete discovery of what her romantic relationship means.   Again, she is using the same iambic pentameter- and the same abba abba cdcdcd.  It's simple.  It's obvious.  It's confident. Where in the first one we read, there was a lot of insecurity, the second a very confident equality, here she is asserting her own leadership.  I think she's ready to elope!!!    HA!!  I guess she is.  Again there is a lot of religious and Christian imagery- it even alludes to the Bible.  The languages borrows from St. Paul in his letter to the Ephesians where he describes Christ's love for humanity.      Exactly, she's expressing a completeness here- in every line she's showing us this cycle.  There's spiritual love, every day love, free and society love, virtuous love, passionate love, permanent love and finally eternal love- after death.    Well, how does their story end.      It's nice.  First of all, I forgot to tell you, they nicknamed their son, Pen.  That's cute.  After the elopement and the move to Italy, they had 15 years before Elizabeth's health finally gave out.  The story goes that on the day Elizabeth died, Robert lifted her up towards him and she kissed him repeatedly, even kissing the air after he put her back on her bed.  Robert was heard saying, “Beautiful, beautiful.”  After she breathed her last breath, he looked at her and said, “How she looks now, how perfectly beautiful.”  This was on June 29, 1861.  That autumn, Robert and Pen left Florence never to return.  He prepared and published her last works that he titled, “Last Poems”.  He was unselfishly pleased that even after her death, sales of her work exceeded his.      Browning stayed in England, gradually establishing a place in London society.  He did propose again to a woman named Louisa, Lady Ashburton, a rich and attractive widow in 1869.  However, he blew the proposal so badly that she turned him down.     You know bad proposals are some of the things America's Funniest Home Videos really taught us all to enjoy.  But how was his so bad.  I mean, he was a poet.  You'd think he could turn a line.       Oh, he turned a line for sure, but this stands out- even in a long list of bad proposals.   He literally told her that his heart lay buried with his wife in Florence and he really just wanted to marry her for the advantages it would give Pen.      Well, at least he was honest.      Yes, he was that- just honest and single.  He continued to write and to publish all the way until his death.  And he died in the same country as his wife.  He and his sister were vacationing in Venice, Italy.  He had bought a house there for Pen.  While in Venice, he caught a cold and died on December 12, 1878 there.  Today, EBB is buried in Florence, but ironically they did not ship Robert Brownings down to Florence to be buried with her.  He actually got a very prestigious placement.  Today Robert Browning's body rests in Westminster Abbey.    Wow, that's impressive and an interesting ending to this very famous romance.    Unless  it doesn't end the romance…according to Elizabeth, she was going to love him better after death.    Ha!!!  Well, there you go, perhaps she's set those wings on fire!!    Oh my, we've read way too many sonnets this week.  Next week, we are changing gears entirely.  If you're listening to this in real time, it's October 2021, Halloween season and we are starting The Haunting of Hill House by the American Shirley Jackson.  It's not my favorite sub-genre, but here we go…into the scary stuff!!!    Thanks for listening, please know we appreciate you spending time with us each week.  We hope you are enjoying exploring the classics with us.  If so, please help us by tweeting an episode, posting a link on Facebook or LinkedIn or simply texting an episode to a friend.  And if you're a teacher, Visit our website for teaching support.    Peace Out.     

A Breath of Fresh Earth
The Earthshot Prize

A Breath of Fresh Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 25:18


15 finalists compete for a one-million pound prize. 5 winners grab the prestige and funding for their projects. Protect and restore nature 03:19-06:23 Clean our air 06:24-09:58 Revive our oceans 09:58-14:47 Build a waste-free world 14:48-18:48 Fix our climate 18:50-24:17 You can reach me at rf@richardfriedman.net You can find my books here with the links to find your favorite retailer. Climate Fiction novels: Escape to Canamith https://books2read.com/u/bWP9y1 The Two Worlds of Billy Callahan https://books2read.com/u/mvnvLX Cli/Fi short stories- A Climate Carol and Other Cli-Fi Short Stories. Available in print or audiobook. https://books2read.com/u/38roQL Danny Bloom created the phrase “cli-fi” and founder of cli-fi.net. Here's his review. Climate-themed anti-Trump short story 'A Climate Carol' will be read 100 years from now ''We must build arks,'' the Notre Dame University philosopher Roy Scranton urges, ''not just biological arks, to carry forward endangered genetic data, but also cultural arks, to carry forward endangered wisdom.'' One such cultural ark has already been built and it's a 14-page Christmas story from the pen of Richard Friedman in Cleveland, Ohio. In the title story, "A Climate Carol," based very closely on U.S. President Donald Trump's stubborn and selfish personality and his public denial of climate change, a narcissistic East Coast businessman and billionaire receives a visit on Christmas Eve from three Charles Dickens-like ghosts in a contemporary spin of that timeless classic from the 1840s "A Christmas Carol." Charles Dickens first published his now famous novella “A Christmas Carol” more than 170 years ago -- in 1843 — and that story has reverberated and resonated worldwide ever since. With the annual holiday season upon us all every November and December worldwide (Thanksgiving, Chanukah, Christmas), a new kind of holiday story titled “A Climate Carol” has been published in 2019 and stands to remain in print for the next 100 years, if not longer. It's that good, and that important. In fact, I would say that this short story is the best and most important climate-themed short story to appear so far in the 21st century and is likely to remain popular over the next 100 Christmases for sure. When I read it online a few days ago, I was blown away by both the author's storytelling skills and the environmental eco-theme of the 14-page piece. Let me tell you a few things about this modern Dickensian-style story and how it fits into the world we live in today, where runaway global warming threatens to push human civilization into a dark corner we may never get out from. However, before I go on, please know that “A Climate Carol” ends on an optimistic note, where ecumenical goodness triumphs over ''Trumpian greed'' and all ends well. In the story you will meet characters with names like Wilson Drummond (the proverbial '' Trumpian bad guy'' who later turns over a new leaf and becomes a champion of human kindness), his mother Gurtie Drummond, his limousine driver Sammie Johnson, and his employee Jericho Reese. And the star of the show, his grand-daughter Lily. You will also meet several important ghost-like characters, one who calls himself the Ghost of Climate Past, another who says they are the Ghost of the Current Climate in the world, and a third ghost who speaks in a chilling voice reminiscent of the horror movie actor Vincent Price and declares that he is the Ghost of Climate Future. In the end, we learn that the Scrooge-like Trump-like Drummond has mended his insensitive ways and become a better human being. He even later becomes President of the United States and turns out to represent all that is good about America. And grand-daughter Lily lives to the ripe old age of 93 and looks back with fondness at the strange but redemptive life of her grandfather for the things he later did to... Support this podcast

Bone and Sickle
Ghost Trains & Railway Terrors

Bone and Sickle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 52:34


Ghost trains and real-life railway terrors intermingle in this episode's exploration of old train-wreck ballads, nervous and funereally obsessed Victorians, urban legends involving train deaths, and more. Mrs. Karswell begins our show reading an imaginitive description of a phantom train written by George A. Sala for an 1855 edition of the magazine, Household Words, published by Charles Dickens … Read More Read More The post Ghost Trains & Railway Terrors appeared first on Bone and Sickle.