Podcasts about Maccabean Revolt

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  • 35PODCASTS
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  • Nov 29, 2021LATEST
Maccabean Revolt

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Best podcasts about Maccabean Revolt

Latest podcast episodes about Maccabean Revolt

The Hellenistic Age Podcast
Interview: Antiochus IV Epiphanes and the Jewish Tradition w/ Dr. Joseph Scales

The Hellenistic Age Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 54:54


Thanks to his role in the Maccabean Revolt, Antiochus IV Epiphanes of the Seleucid Empire played an important part in the history of Judaism. From the prophecies of Daniel to the histories of Josephus, Dr. Joseph Scales joins the show to talk about the perception of Antiochus IV in the Jewish literary tradition, viewed as both an incompetent ruler and great persecutor, and the prototype of the Antichrist. Episode Notes: (https://hellenisticagepodcast.wordpress.com/2021/11/29/interview-antiochus-iv-epiphanes-in-the-jewish-tradition-w-dr-joseph-scales/) Dr. Joseph Scales Links: Ancient Afterlives Podcast (https://anchor.fm/ancientafterlives) Twitter (https://twitter.com/josephdscales) Humanities Commons (https://hcommons.org/members/josephscales/) Social Media: Twitter (https://twitter.com/HellenisticPod) Facebook (www.facebook.com/hellenisticagepodcast/) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/hellenistic_age_podcast/) Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/hellenisticagepodcast) Show Merchandise: Etsy (https://www.etsy.com/shop/HellenisticAgePod) Redbubble (https://www.redbubble.com/people/HellenisticPod/shop?asc=u) Donations: Ko-Fi (https://ko-fi.com/hellenisticagepodcast) Amazon Book Wish List (https://tinyurl.com/vfw6ask)

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 311: God Fights for You

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 23:54


As we get closer to the end of the Old Testament, Fr. Mike highlights one of the lessons we've seen time and time again—that God continues to fight for each of us, despite the brokenness and messiness of our lives. He also points out how the reading from Wisdom foreshadows the coming of Jesus. The readings are 2 Maccabees 14, Wisdom 17-18, and Proverbs 25:18-20. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 298: The Gift of Life

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 23:38


Fr. Mike gives us context for the beginning of 2 Maccabees and recounts the story of Nehemiah's discovery of the sacred fire. He also offers a reflection for those struggling with grief and death, which serves as a reminder to all about the blessing of our lives and the lives of those we love. Today's readings are 2 Maccabees 1, Sirach 40-41, and Proverbs 24:1-7. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 297: Using Good Things for Evil

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 20:32


As we read from Proverbs and Sirach, Fr. Mike point out how everything God has made is good, but we can use those things for evil ends. We also get to the conclusion of 1 Maccabees. The readings are 1 Maccabees 16, Sirach 38-39, and Proverbs 23:29-35. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 296: Know Your Heart

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 19:39


As we begin to wrap up 1 Maccabees, Fr. Mike directs our attention to how 2 Maccabees will tell the same story in a different way. In Sirach, we are encouraged to know our own hearts, so that we can know our strengths, weaknesses, and where we might need healing. The readings are 1 Maccabees 15, Sirach 36-37, and Proverbs 23:26-28. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 288: Battling Against Gossip

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:42


Fr. Mike explains the importance of wisdom in our everyday lives when we face temptations to gossip, encouraging us in the battle for virtue, wisdom, and goodness. He emphasizes that we must ask the Lord for his wisdom to guide us as we interact with the people around us, just like the Jews prayed before battle. Today's readings are 1 Maccabees 7, Sirach 19-21, and Proverbs 22:22-25. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 287: Eleazar's Sacrifice

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 28:11


Fr. Mike illustrates the story of Eleazar and the abandonment of peace terms between the Jews and the Greeks. He also recognizes the pain that children and family members who don't follow the Lord can bring about, and uses wisdom from Sirach to address this prevalent struggle. Today's readings are 1 Maccabees 6, Sirach 16-18, and Proverbs 22:17-21. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 286: The Battle to Choose God

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 26:50


Fr. Mike walks us through the current battles of Judas Maccabeus and the Israelite people, emphasizing that while war is violent, freedom to belong to God and worship him is worth fighting for. He also discusses the importance of spending time with virtuous people to acquire their positive qualities and the need to seek good rather than evil to attain the riches of heaven. Today's readings are from 1 Maccabees 5, Sirach 13-15, and Proverbs 22:13-16. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 285: Story of Hanukkah

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 27:54


In today's reading from 1 Maccabees, we hear about the victory of Judas Maccabeus, which is also the story of Hanukkah. In Sirach, Fr. Mike points out that chasing fame and glory in this world are not worth our time, because they will all fade away after we are gone. The readings are 1 Maccabees 4, Sirach 10-12, and Proverbs 22:9-12. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 284: Near Occasion of Sin

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:36


Fr. Mike points out how advice from books like Proverbs and Sirach may not apply perfectly to every situation, but are meant to help guide us towards wisdom. He also highlights a piece from Sirach that encourages us to avoid "deserted places"—calling us not only to stay away from sin, but to stay away from what leads us to sin. The readings are 1 Maccabees 3, Sirach 7-9, and Proverbs 22:5-8. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 283: Mattathias Attacks

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 25:41


Fr. Mike clarifies the meaning behind Mattathias' zealous attack against the Greeks and his fellow Jews who were not obeying God's laws. From our reading of Sirach, Fr. Mike reminds us to remember the needs of the poor, and to be careful when forming friendships. Today's readings are 1 Maccabees 2, Sirach 4-6, and Proverbs 22:1-4. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Introduction to the Maccabean Revolt ( with Jeff Cavins)

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 32:03


Welcome to the Maccabean Revolt period! Jeff Cavins joins Fr. Mike to introduce the tenth biblical period in our journey, which begins with the Greek oppression of the Jews under Antiochus Epiphanes, and ends with Herodian rule of the Holy Land. Jeff and Fr. Mike walk us through the key events of this period, highlighting the zealous response of the Maccabean family, the celebration of Hanukkah, and the heroic martyrdom of Jews who would not betray their religious identity in the midst of persecution. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

BibleProject
Jonah's Literary Context – Jonah E2

BibleProject

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 53:49


The Hebrew Bible contains one story of human failure after another, leaving us with no doubt in our minds: humanity desperately needs a leader. In this episode, Tim walks us through the structure of the Hebrew Bible and how it shows us Jonah is an anti-leader, the opposite of what humanity needs, whose failure prepares us for the ultimate leader and Savior, Jesus. This is a sneak peek into our free graduate-level course on Jonah, which will be featured in the new Classroom resource available in 2022.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-19:40)Part two (19:40-27:30)Part three (27:30-42:30)Part four (42:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim's library here.Jonah class session notes, including the handout “How to Read a Text Like the Hebrew Bible” (page 5)Jonah: A Literal-Literary Translation, Tim MackieThe Wisdom of Ben Sira (which Tim mentions in part one) is a deuterocanonical work of biblical theology written shortly before the Maccabean Revolt.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Keep an Open Mind” by Olive MusiqueShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.

Anchored by Truth from Crystal Sea Books - a 30 minute show exploring the grand Biblical saga of creation, fall, and redempti

DESCRIPTION Episode 119 – Perfectly Quiet – The Intertestamental Period 5 Welcome to Anchored by Truth brought to you by Crystal Sea Books. In John 14:6, Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life.” The goal of Anchored by Truth is to encourage everyone to grow in the Christian faith by anchoring themselves to the secure truth found in the inspired, inerrant, and infallible word of God. Script: Then Jesus was approached by some Sadducees—religious leaders who say there is no resurrection from the dead. But now, as to whether the dead will be raised—haven’t you ever read about this in the writings of Moses, in the story of the burning bush? Long after Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob had died, God said to Moses, ‘I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.’ So he is the God of the living, not the dead. You have made a serious error. “ The Gospel of Mark, chapter 12, verses 18 and 26 and 27, New Living Translation ******** VK: Hello. I’m Victoria K. Welcome to another episode of Anchored by Truth. Today we are continuing our look at “The Intertestamental Period” - the 400-plus year period between the close of the Old Testament and the beginning of the New Testament. I’m in the studio today with RD Fierro, author and Founder Crystal Sea Books. RD, today we’re going into our 5th episode in this series. Last time we talked a bit about the conflict between the Ptolemies and the Seleucids for the control of Palestine during the intertestamental period. So, to set the stage for today’s discussion how about giving us a bit of a review of what we’ve been discussing. RD: Hello to all the Anchored by Truth listeners. We really appreciate you taking some time to be with us for this episode. The intertestamental period is probably the period of Biblical history that receives the least attention today. Most people are very familiar with the accounts of Jesus’ birth, life, and resurrection. Most are pretty familiar with some of the most popular episodes from the Old Testament such as Noah and the ark, Daniel in the lions’ den, or Elijah battling the prophets on Mt. Carmel. But even people who are regular Bible readers often pay little attention to the hundreds of years that elapsed between Malachi and Matthew. But we should because there were a great number of events that occurred during that period that are very important to us having a well-developed understanding of both the Old and New Testaments. And those events include the protracted conflict between the Ptolemies and the Seleucids that occurred between around 300 B.C. and 160 B. C. VK: And, as a refresher Ptolemy and Seleucus had both been generals in Alexander the Great’s army. After Alexander’s death his empire was carved into four territories. Ptolemy became the king of the Egyptian portion and Seleucus became the king of the Syrian portion. Israel, obviously, was between those two. So, when conflicts occurred between these two dynasties – which was pretty much all the time – Israel was always caught in the conflict. One of the most important prophetic chapters in the Old Testament has got to be chapter 11 of the book of Daniel. The entire chapter is devoted to the conflict between the Ptolemies and the Seleucids. It’s so detailed that it could almost read like a historical report of the conflict but it was written over 200 years before the first events of the struggle. RD: Right. And that’s a very good reason for looking at the intertestamental period. In the intertestamental period we see the fulfillment of a large number of prophecies contained in the Old Testament such as those in Daniel, chapter 11. See those prophecies fulfilled in such fine granularity cannot do anything but enhance our confidence in the Bible. Fulfilled prophecy is one of the strongest lines of evidence of the Bible’s supernatural inspiration. But beyond just seeing the prophetic fulfillment that occurred during the intertestamental period we also see the foundation for many of the events that we read about in the New Testament. For instance, there is no mention of the Sadducees or Pharisees at all in the Old Testament. But both groups were prominent in Israel in the first century A.D. VK: And since our contemporary calendar is dated according to Jesus’ life this is the period during which Jesus lived and performed his earthly ministry. Jesus frequently encountered both the Sadducees and the Pharisees during that ministry – though unfortunately most references to them are not positive ones. RD: Unfortunately, they are not. At any rate, both the Sadducees and Pharisees arose sometime during the intertestamental period though scholars are not exactly sure when. But it can be helpful to our understanding of Israel during the time of Jesus’ earthly ministry to try to understand some of the forces that gave rise to them. VK: So, what is some of the thinking behind what gave rise to these two groups and why they became so prominent? RD: Well, as we have already mentioned after Alexander the Great died his empire was divided among four of his generals. Initially Palestine came under the rule of Ptolemy who also ruled Egypt. Under Ptolemy the Jews seemed to have retained a large measure of self-rule and were able to have their own high priest. Traditionally, the high priest had just a religious function but in the absence of a Jewish king the high priest also became a major source of political influence. Under the Ptolemies the Jews also flourished in Egypt and as we’ve noted the Greek version of the Old Testament, the Septuagint was eventually produced by the Jewish colony in Alexandria. The Ptolemies controlled Palestine from about 300 B.C. to 198 B.C. VK: But in 198 B.C. the Seleucids were finally able to get control of Palestine. There had been frequent conflicts between the Ptolemies and the Seleucids but this was the first time the Seleucids actually were able to directly rule Palestine. The Seleucid rulers normally went by the title of Antiochus. In 175 B.C. Antiochus IV (the 4th) came to power. This turned out to be a very bad thing for the Jews. RD: Correct. Antiochus IV also was known as Antiochus Epiphanes (god manifest). Well, Antiochus Epiphanes began to feel pressure from the Romans who were already beginning their expansion to the east. Macedonia, which is the northern part of the Greek peninsula actually fell to Rome in 146 B.C. but even before that Rome’s expanding territorial ambitions were becoming obvious. Antiochus Epiphanes saw this so in an attempt to strengthen his control Antiochus stepped up the process of Hellenizing his empire. VK: Hellenization referred to the process of importing the Greek language and culture into the territories Alexander had conquered. It had always occurred at some pace within the territories the Greeks controlled but not at the same rate everywhere. Evidently, Antiochus felt that if his empire were thoroughly Hellenized the people would be more resistant to the Romans. So, part of what Epiphanes did was to try to get the Jews to change their culture and even give up their religion. This produced a terrible period of persecution for the Jews. Not unpredictably it spawned a revolt. RD: Right. In 167 B.C. Antiochus set up a statue of Zeus in the temple and slaughtered pigs as a sacrifice to it. Many of the Jews thought that this event was what the prophet Daniel had referred to when he spoke of the “abomination of desolation.” It’s hard to imagine doing anything that would inflame faithful Jews more. Right after this desecration the Maccabean Revolt broke out. The revolt was led by Judas Maccabeus or Judas the “Hammer.” VK: And the revolt was successful. In 164 B.C. the Jews were able to regain control of Jerusalem and they cleansed the temple. This event is still celebrated among the Jews as Hannukah. All this history was recorded and is part of the book known as 1 (first) Maccabees. RD: And the books of 1 and 2 Maccabees are part of the group of books known as the Apocrypha which we talked about in the first episode of this series. The Apocrypha are thought by Roman Catholics and the Orthodox branches of Christianity to be part of a second canon or “deuterocanonical.” VK: So, after the Ptolemies lost control of Palestine there was a lot going on during the next 4 decades. How did all this lead to the formation of the Sadducees and Pharisees? RD: Let’s remember that both the Ptolemies and the Seleucids were Greek. They may have been fighting for control of territory but they were both part of the original Greek empire. So, Hellenization was present under both. It’s just that Antiochus Epiphanes had taken it to a whole new level. Well, after the Jews regained their religious freedom they also wanted political freedom. It took another 2 decades but in 142 B.C. the Jews finally regained their independence. VK: And this is hard for us to grasp but when the Jews regained their independence it was the first time in over 400 years. The first Babylonian deportation of the Jews to Babylon had taken place around 600 B.C. Even after the Jews returned to Palestine around 70 years later they still weren’t independent. They were just a vassal state of the Persian Empire and then part of the Greek Empire. That must have been an amazing period for the Jews – to finally have their freedom after over 450 years of foreign rule. RD: Undoubtedly. But of course even at that point the Jews had been subject to Greek influence for over 150 years. So, the process of Hellenization had been going on a long time. And as with any large cultural movement some Jews had welcomed the changes the Greeks had brought with them. But many did not. Even after the Jews under the Maccabeans gained their political independence they did not return to their traditional priestly line of governance. Instead, the Maccabees founded the Hasmonean Dynasty – named for one of their ancestors, Hashmon – and continued their control of the country. This was fine with some Jews but not with others. The Hasmonean rulers dominated the priesthood, even though they weren’t from the priestly line of Aaron, and continued to adopt Greek ways of life. VK: And the Sadducees appear to have been a group that supported them in this plan. The Sadducees were an aristocratic group that seemed to have prized political stability above everything else. I suppose we could think of them as being the “establishment” of their day? RD: Yes. Religiously, the Sadducees only recognized the first five books of the Old Testament, the Pentateuch, as being canonical. They saw the rest of the books of the Old Testament as having lesser authority. This is one of the reasons they rejected the doctrine of the resurrection which Jesus confronted them about. VK: We heard that in our opening scripture today from Mark, chapter 12. There’s a parallel account of the same confrontation in Matthew, chapter 22, verses 22 through 33. So, it’s fair to say that the Sadducees had embraced the process of Hellenization far more than some other groups within Israel at the time. RD: Yes. VK: Then where do the Pharisees fit in? RD: The Pharisees seemed to have arisen as one of the groups that opposed the loss of the traditional Jewish culture and laws. They were not primarily a political group but they seemed to have begun to function as a cultural, religious, and political counterweight to the Sadducees and the Hellenizing intentions of the Hasmoneans. The Pharisees did accept the entire body of scripture we call the Old Testament so the Pharisees did accept the doctrine of resurrection and life after death. VK: And the Apostle Paul was a Pharisee. He famously invoked this religious difference when he was arrested in Jerusalem in Acts, chapter 23. This was a bit of clever lawyering on Paul’s part wasn’t it. RD: Yes. Paul’s trial before the Sanhedrin was around 60 A.D. So, it was about 200 years later than the events we’ve been describing. As we mentioned, we’re not sure exactly when the Sadducees and Pharisees formed as identifiable groups but they are first mentioned by the historian Josephus in connection with a Hasmonean ruler named John Hyrcanus I who ruled from 134 to 104 B.C. VK: So, sometime between the latter part of the 2nd century B.C. and the opening of the New Testament period the Sadducees and the Pharisees had become so well established and prominent that together they became the ruling group within Israel. Both groups had longevity. They persisted for well over 150 years. And we know that both groups had influence and power in Jesus’ day. RD: Yes. While we don’t know the exact origin of either group we do know that both groups have their roots in the intertestamental period and I think we can see how the Greek control of Palestine was a significant factor in shaping the Israel in which Jesus appeared. VK: What are you thinking about? RD: The Roman general Pompey occupied Jerusalem in 63 B.C. VK: Which put an end to the Jews’ independence. So, they were independent for less than 100 years? RD: Yes. So, let’s think about this. Between 300 B.C. and 142 B.C. the Jews were subject to Greek rule by either the Ptolemies or the Seleucids. And even after they became politically independent there were still factions within Israel that had supported the increasing Hellenization of their culture. The Greeks actively sought to transmit and spread their ideas. The Greeks were replaced by the Romans but the Romans did not make a corresponding effort to change the cultures, languages, or religious practices of the people they conquered. VK: The Romans were a very practical people. They were interested in stability within their far flung empire. They wanted control over economies, taxes, the military, and what we might term “infrastructure.” But the Romans didn’t have any particular interest in the religions or worship practices of their subject provinces provided those practices didn’t disrupt the Roman governance or the peace and stability of their empire. In fact the Romans afforded the Jews a fair amount of self-rule even during Jesus’ day didn’t they? The Jews had their own ruling council comprised of the Sadducees and Pharisees. The high council was permitted to make judgments about civil and criminal matters, although only the Romans could pronounce a death sentence. The Jews selected their own high priest. They were permitted to regulate the activities of the temples and synagogues. And even some of the high ranking Jews became friends with very senior Romans including members of Caesar’s family. RD: Right. As you mentioned, the Romans were very practical and this made them very capable builders and administrators. While it’s painting with a very broad brush you might say that Romans were builders while the Greeks had been thinkers. Alexander took an entire contingent of Greek scientists and philosophers along with his Army. The Greeks not only sought knowledge but they actively spread their knowledge and culture. During Jesus’ time, even after the Roman Empire had displaced the Greek Empire, Greek was the most common language used in international commerce and affairs. Even today the names of Greek philosophers are household names. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle are still well known in our day and time. VK: So, there are Greek philosophers that are well known in our day and time - but there are still Roman public facilities in use in our day and time. Aqueducts and roads built by the Romans have survived and some are still functioning after 2,000 years. The Romans were masters at construction including pouring and curing concrete under water to build very sophisticated ports and harbors. Naturally, the Roman military prowess is legendary because they were masters of metallurgy and military design. So, what you’re saying is that the differences in these two empires was significant in God’s preparation of the world for the arrival of Jesus. RD: Exactly. While we’ll talk more about this in a future episode the Romans made it safe for the first evangelists to travel throughout the Roman Empire and spread the gospel. But the Greeks had made it possible for the evangelists to speak with the people wherever they went. VK: But you are also saying that the impact of the Greek and Roman Empires on the preparation for Jesus’ arrival wasn’t just limited to the world outside Palestine. There were also impacts within Palestine. This was especially true of the Greeks whose had been present in Palestine in one form or another for 300 years. And part of that impact was reflected in the presence and differences between the Sadducees and Pharisees. RD: Yes. The Sadducees seem to have followed the Hasmonean practice of embracing the Hellenization that had been brought to Israel. The Pharisees did not. In fact, the Pharisees seem to have actively resisted attempts to change their culture. This meant that the Sanhedrin, the Jews’ ruling council at the time of Jesus was split religiously and philosophically. The one thing they did agree on, though, was on a desire to maintain their own power and influence. VK: Well just about anyone who has read the Gospels or listened to a sermon on Jesus’ life has heard about the Sadducees and Pharisees. But what are you thinking about when you talk about their presence being important insofar as the arrival of Jesus in the world is concerned. RD: As you said just anyone who has ever read Matthew, Mark, Luke, or John – or heard a sermon about them – has heard of the Sadducees and Pharisees. Part of the reason we’ve all heard about them is because it was often encounters between Jesus and a Sadducee or Pharisee that provided us with some of the clearest statements we have on major issues that pertain to salvation. VK: Such as? RD: Let’s look at the encounter we heard about in our opening scripture. This same encounter is described in Matthew and Mark. A group of the Sadducees were trying to trip Jesus up by asking, what was to them, a standard question they used in their debates with the Pharisees about whether there would be a physical resurrection. Remember the Sadducees did not believe in the resurrection but the Pharisees did. So the Sadducees posed the famous married-to-seven-different-brothers question. VK: Let’s listen to the question from Matthew, chapter 22, verses 25 through 28. The Sadducees said, “Well, suppose there were seven brothers. The oldest one married and then died without children, so his brother married the widow. But the second brother also died, and the third brother married her. This continued with all seven of them. Last of all, the woman also died. So tell us, whose wife will she be in the resurrection? For all seven were married to her.” RD: Right. The basis for the question was the Levirate requirement for a younger brother to marry the widow of an older brother. Then the first son of that union would be reckoned as the son of the older brother. At any rate, it was a trick question. VK: Like the philosophy professor who asks the Christian student “If God is all powerful can God make a rock so big God can’t lift it?” RD: Exactly like that. It was a trick question but of course it couldn’t trick Jesus. Jesus quickly pointed out that even the part of the Old Testament that the Sadducees did accept, the Pentateuch, stated clearly that there was life after death. Jesus quoted from Moses’ encounter with God at the burning bush. That encounter is described in Exodus, the 2nd book of the Bible. Jesus pointed out that God had used the present tense when he was speaking with Moses indicating clearly that Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were still alive with God even though all 3 had died physically decades before the encounter. So, we can see from this exchange with the Sadducees that Jesus often used his contact with either the Sadducees or Pharisees, or both, to clarify much of the confusion that existed at that time about major issues that pertained to faith and salvation. VK: So, you’re saying that the presence of the Sadducees and Pharisees in Israel during Jesus’ lifetime was actually helpful in Jesus getting out His message. The Sadducees and Pharisees were the leaders of society in their day. People listened to them just as they listen to various kinds of leaders and celebrities in our day. People would follow what the Sadducees and Pharisees said and did. And people would have been particularly interested if anyone confronted them. So, when Jesus had a debate or exchange with one the report would spread far more widely and quickly than it would otherwise. And, of course, we need to know something about the intertestamental period to know why that was true. If we don’t know anything about the intertestamental period the Sadducees and Pharisees appear in the Bible just like Dorothy dropping in from Kansas. RD: I like that visual. Next time we’ll take a little more about how some of Jesus’ exchanges with the Sadducees and Pharisees produced some of the clearest and most important teaching we have in the Bible. This is particularly important because so many of the things we learn pertain directly to our salvation and eternal life. Just as we heard in the scripture today Jesus Himself has affirmed that the resurrection is real. And since all things were made for Him and through Him when it comes to knowing how things work He is the most trustworthy voice possible. Now, I’m not saying that God or Jesus couldn’t have made these important revelations if the Sadducees and Pharisees didn’t exist. But I am saying that God chose to use the Sadducees and Pharisees as part of His plan of revelation. As such I think we need to take some time and understand how their arrival on the scene is part of the grand saga of redemption. VK: Amen. This sounds like a great time for a prayer. Jesus’ ministry while He was on this earth was all about saving those who are lost spiritually. The need for doing that continues today. So, today let’s listen to a prayer for the spiritually lost – knowing that God has promised that as we diligently and faithfully present our petitions He will respond with grace and mercy: ---- PRAYER FOR THE SPIRITUALLY LOST (JERRY). We hope you’ll be with us next time and we hope you’ll take some time to encourage some friends to tune in too, or listen to the podcast version of this show. If you’d like to hear more, try out crystalseabooks.com where “We’re not famous but our Boss is!” (Bible Quote from the New International Version) Daniel, chapter 8, verses 5 through 8 and 20 and 21, New International Version

Jewish Matters
Sunset Series # 11 Chanukah Special -The Challenge of Jewish Power: Lessons From the Maccabean Revolt For Today with Rabbi Yehuda HaCohen

Jewish Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2020 56:59


The Challenge of Jewish Power: Lessons From the Maccabean Revolt For Today with Rabbi Yehuda HaCohen, West Bank Jewish Peace Activist and EducatorFor 2,000 years the Jewish people were in a state of powerless. What can the story of the Maccabean Revolt teach us to help us become more comfortable with the power we’ve managed to obtain in the modern age, how Jewish values can inform our use of that power and what it really means ‘to live as a free people in our land’?We will be hearing a first hand description from Rabbi Yehuda HaKohen who lives on the very mountain where the Maccabees hid, trained their forces and launched their guerrilla campaign against foreign rule.

Stuff You Missed in History Class
SYMHC Classics: Maccabean Revolt

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2020 31:07


Were revisiting a 2016 episode about the uprising of the Maccabees against the Seleucid Empire during the Hellenistic period, which is an integral part of the Hanukkah story. After the restoration of Jewish religious freedom, the Maccabees started another revolt to obtain total independence. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers

Today in the Word Devotional

When Jesus sent out His disciples to proclaim the kingdom of Heaven, He advised them to be “shrewd as snakes and innocent as doves” (Matt. 10:16). Jesus was using a figure of speech. In the Garden of Eden, the serpent was more “crafty” than any other beast (Gen. 3:1). A dove was a worthy sacrifice (Lev. 5:11) and a symbol of peace (Luke 3:22). Christ’s followers would need wisdom as they navigated the troubles ahead while also leading pure and holy lives. Paul adopted this dual strategy while on trial before the Sanhedrin. When he was rebuked for speaking sharply to the high priest, even though he unjustly ordered that Paul be struck simply for testifying, the apostle apologized. Yet Paul also shrewdly exploited doctrinal disagreements between the Pharisees and Sadducees, the two parties that made up the Sanhedrin. These two groups had long-standing political differences that stretched back to the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid empire in the second century B.C. Paul appealed to the belief of the Pharisees in the resurrection of the body and this divided the assembly. Lysias, the Roman commander, learned that over forty men had conspired with the chief priests and elders to murder Paul, so he transferred him to Caesarea where Felix, the governor of Judea, resided. The letter that the Roman commander sent exonerated Paul of any charges that merited imprisonment (v. 29). Despite this, the apostle was held in protective custody in the palace that Herod the Great had built. The motives of Lysias and Felix were political. Yet it would be wrong to see Paul as only a pawn in all of this. God was setting the stage to fulfill His promise that the apostle would proclaim Christ “to the Gentiles and their kings and to the people of Israel” (Acts. 9:15). >> Do not be too quick to judge your circumstances. What appears to us to be an obstacle or a setback may be God’s way of strategically positioning you for the next stage in His plan.

Walkin In Yah's Way With Arden
Up to the Maccabean revolt, The Last Assault from The gentiles on the Jews, Judgment of fallen

Walkin In Yah's Way With Arden

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2020 18:22


From the maccabean revolt until new Jerusalem comes.

Heartland Alliance Church Podcast
The Religious Leaders: The Art of Missing the Point

Heartland Alliance Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2020 31:57


History (Return to Judah, Alexander the Great, Maccabean Revolt) and the Political World of Jesus' Time (Sadducees, Pharisees).

Not So Secret Bible
John 10: Sheep-less Nights

Not So Secret Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2020 39:40


Do you lock your door at night? Jesus would...except he was the door...and the one keeping watch. Seems a little confusing, right? However, Jesus uses these strange metaphors (at least to us) to point the Jews to his true identity and what he had in store for them. Would they recognize it? Also, we discuss the Maccabean Revolt and Jesus' reference to "gods" in Psalm 82. Dive into studying John 10 with Michael and Troy!Looking for more study material? Check out these books we've compiled for you!https://kit.co/notsosecretbibleSupport the show (https://bit.ly/3gvFQd3)

The Caldwell Commentaries Podcast
Daniel Lesson 37: Antiochus to Antichrist

The Caldwell Commentaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2020 90:31


Daniel 11:32-45  Learn about the vile Syrian king named Antiochus Epiphances, who committed an abomination of desolation in Israel, on her Temple and God's Holy of Holies in the Second Century B.C., and how that event led to the rise of the Maccabees and the Maccabean Revolt (and, subsequently, the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah). The reason Scripture presents so much about Antiochus Epiphanes is because he served as a prophetic type of the future Antichrist.  Because so much of the Book of Daniel either foreshadows or reveals the Antichrist of the last days, it has often been called "The Revelation of the Antichrist". Verses 36 to 39 contain prophecies about the final "fighting king," who is the most vicious king of any in history.  In this lesson, we discuss his character, his conquests, and his conclusion (meaning his "end" - how he will die).  Will the Antichrist be Jewish?  Gentile?  Islamic?  Roman?  Homosexual?  Listen and hear what Scripture says.

East Side Today
Between the Testaments - Part 3

East Side Today

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2020 46:43


We continue to look at how the Maccabean Revolt influenced the people's expectations and reactions to Jesus.

Thy Strong Word from KFUO Radio
Zechariah 11: Lived Parable, Christ & Bad Shepherds, 30 Silver Pieces

Thy Strong Word from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2020


Rev. Scott Adle, pastor of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Collinsville, Illinois, joins host Rev. AJ Espinosa to study Zechariah 11. God’s wrath against “the shepherds” continues in Zechariah 11. This time, God has Zechariah become a literal shepherd for a month as a living parable for the people. He symbolizes the reality that God is our true shepherd, who guided His people with the staffs of “Favor” and “Union.” In the end, the staffs are broken, and the people are given over to the “worthless shepherd who deserts the flock,” as Zechariah throws his 30 days’ wages into the Temple. The leadership of God’s people became corrupt, selling them out to the foreign powers that were slaughtering them. It was all upside down, both at the Maccabean Revolt but especially at our Lord’s birth, when Judas’s 30 pieces had to be thrown out of the Temple, not into it. Only Jesus is the Good Shepherd, the Priest and King who selflessly protects His people.

Thy Strong Word from KFUO Radio
Zechariah 10: Christ Shames Riders, Raises Ephraim in Body & Spirit

Thy Strong Word from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2020


Rev. Thomas Eckstein, pastor of Concordia Lutheran Church in Jamestown, North Dakota, joins host Rev. AJ Espinosa to study Zechariah 10. “The people wander like sheep; they are afflicted for lack of a shepherd.” The previous chapter flows seamlessly into Zechariah 10, but the emphasis on the rulers and “shepherds” of Israel becomes even more prominent. These words seem to anticipate the Maccabean Revolt, but their greater fulfillment is found in Christ. Christ had compassion on the people and made them lie down in green pastures to feed the five thousand. He is “the Good Shepherd” and “the Lamb” who defeats the horsemen of Zechariah and Revelation in spiritual warfare. Only Christ’s kingdom combines physical and spiritual restoration in the resurrection. Focused on Christ we will not be led astray to either extreme.

Thy Strong Word from KFUO Radio
Zechariah 9: Greek Palm Sunday, the Humble Christ Crushes Satan

Thy Strong Word from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2020


Rev. John Lukomski, Retired LCMS pastor in Southern Illinois, joins host Rev. AJ Espinosa to study Zechariah 9. “Behold, your king is coming to you; righteous and having salvation is he, humble and mounted on a donkey.” Quoted in both Matthew’s and John’s gospel accounts, Zechariah 9 is best known for the Lord’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday. Yet for all the humility, this chapter proclaims military glory. The king rides in on a donkey because he seems to have defeated all the enemies, including the relentless Phoenicians and Philistines. Historically this fits with Alexander the Great, whose successors were defeated by Zion’s “sons” in the Maccabean Revolt. Yet only Christ defeats Satan and His demons. Only the kingdom of heaven offers lasting peace.

Eyes of Reason
Hanukkah: Be The Wall

Eyes of Reason

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2020 15:00


Hanukkah is sui generis (one of a kind) as a Jewish Holiday. Hanukkah is a Jewish festival commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Greeks. It is also known as the Festival of Lights. There was a wall in the Temple. It was a special wall by which the Greeks made 13 breaches in it.

Greenwood Forest Sermons
Salt for the Land

Greenwood Forest Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2020 19:45


There was a boy named Sam who didn’t speak. His parents began to get very concerned as he passed all the developmental milestones and still wasn’t talking. They took to the pediatrician, to the speech therapist, to the neurologist—all the docs said the same thing: we can’t find any medical reason why he isn’t speaking. One night while the family was eating dinner, Sam looked up and said, “my soup is too salty.” His parents freaked out, and started yelling and crying with relief, and saying “we can’t believe it, Sam! You can talk! It’s a miracle. How did this happen?” Sam just calmly said, “Well up to now, everything has been fine.” Salt is used for so many things in our world. It is the most ubiquitous food seasoning on earth. From sea salt to kosher salt to pink Himalayan salt to Japanese moshio made from dried seaweed, every culture has its own unique forms of salt that people use to flavor cuisine. Salt is vital in the preservation process and was used to keep food safe to eat without refrigeration. Bacteria can’t survive without water so people figured out a long time ago that if they covered meats and other foods in salt, the salt would remove all the moisture, flavor the food, and keep the food from growing harmful bacteria. Salt has been used by many cultures for ritual purposes, often symbolizing purity or cleansing. Salt doesn’t just serve flavoring, preserving, and symbolic functions, however: it is actually essential to the functioning of the human body. It is necessary for nerve and muscle function, it helps regulate fluids, it plays a role in the body’s control of blood volume, and it provides electrolytes that regulate blood pH and pressure. We simply can’t live without it. The people of ancient Palestine couldn’t live without salt either. But in addition to the uses I’ve already mentioned, salt had another very important use for people in the ancient world. The Greek word translated as “earth” in the phrase “salt of the earth” from our passage gives us a clue. The word is “ges,” the root for English words such as geology. It means earth but most often in the sense of arable land, the ground we are standing on, the soil. Jesus is more accurately saying “you are salt for the land” or “salt for the soil.”[1] Salt was frequently used in ancient farming techniques as a fertilizer to be applied directly on arable land, and to keep manure from rotting until it could be transported to a field. The version of this teaching in the Gospel of Luke makes Jesus’s intended meaning clear. Luke 14:34-35 says “salt is good, but if it loses its savor, how can saltiness be restored? It is fit neither for the soil nor for the manure heap.” Jesus is employing an agricultural metaphor, not a metaphor about seasoning food. This has been blowing my mind all week and for me, adds a lot to the conversation about what Jesus expects from his followers. We are not simply to add flavor to the world around us, or to preserve it, but to scatter ourselves into the world’s arid places and make abundant life possible. We should be integrated into the soil around us, providing essential nutrients and stimulating growth. We should be a transformative presence in our community. If a fertilizer sits in the shed until the nutrients in it break down and it expires, it does nothing for the soil and has to be thrown out. Fertilizer is meant to be used for the life of the land around it. You are fertilizer for the ground also fits more neatly with Jesus’s other metaphor in this passage—you are the light of the world. In the same way, fertilizer does no good if it sits idle and isn’t scattered, light does no good if it is hidden under a basket. Fertilizer must give life to arid ground, and light must illuminate darkness. As Dietrich Bonhoeffer said “A community of Jesus which seeks to hide itself has ceased the follow him.”[2] The metaphors of salt, light, and the city on a hill were not just general images Jesus pulled out of thin air to describe how his followers should live. These metaphors were Jesus’s response to a very real conundrum facing the people of Israel in his day: how do we remain faithful to God under the boot of the Roman empire? For some in Jesus’s day, the best way to be faithful under oppressive Roman rule was a kind of “circle the wagons” approach—keep to ourselves, try to follow the law and the prophets as best we can, and interact with the gentile oppressors as little as possible. Pharisees often fell into this camp. The people in this camp placed a high value on maintaining a distinct identity from Rome, on being holy, and they thought the best way to accomplish this was to focus their energy internally, bolstering the Jewish community’s knowledge of their faith and exploring how to fulfill the law in daily life. I call this option revolutionary withdrawal. It remains an appealing option for religious people of many faiths, especially those who live under a government that is hostile to their religious practices. You can see this tendency throughout the history of the Christian church from some forms of the monastic movement to the radical reformers such as the Amish to a recent dustup over a book by conservative evangelical author Rod Dreyer called the “Benedict Option,” in which he argues that the only way for conservative evangelicals to escape the increasing decadence and immorality of American society is to “embrace exile from mainstream culture.” The second prominent option for remaining faithful during Jesus’s day was to take up arms and attempt to drive out the Romans so that a kingdom faithful to God might be established in Israel. I call this option revolutionary violence. Two memories animated the draw to revolutionary violence: the memory of God defeating Pharaoh and liberating the Hebrew people celebrated at Passover, and the memory of the Maccabean Revolt, which happened just 150 years before Jesus was born, where Judah Maccabee led a briefly successful guerilla war against the Greek/Seleucid empire, expelling them from Jerusalem and re-dedicating the temple to the worship of the one true God. In Jesus’s day, people such as the Zealots preferred this option, hoping to lead an armed rebellion against the Romans, kick them out of Israel, and freely live and worship as they chose. Several of Jesus’s disciples were likely affiliated with Zealot groups before becoming his followers and found this option appealing.[3] It was into this climate, and in answer to this specific question, that Jesus is offering the metaphors of salt and light. Jesus is rejecting the path of revolutionary withdrawal and the path of revolutionary violence, and offering an alternative path to faithfulness in the midst of Roman oppression: revolutionary discipleship. “God’s people are salt for barren ground,” he says. Salt is meant to be scattered across the land, catalyzing growth and life wherever it embeds itself. But salt that doesn’t do what it is meant to do, that doesn’t perform this life-giving and transformative role for the earth, is useless. “God’s people are light for a dark world,” he says. Why would you go to the trouble of lighting a lamp in the darkness and then hide it, confining its impact by covering it up? You wouldn’t! Light must shine to be what it was meant to be! And it only takes a little to illuminate the deepest dark. A city built on a hill is meant to be seen not hidden! Revolutionary withdrawal hides the light of God under a bushel basket and leaves the fertilizer in the shed. Revolutionary violence destroys the image of God in the one you are called to love, and puts your own light out. But revolutionary discipleship allows the light to be seen, the salt to be used for the good of the earth, and opens up the possibility that even one’s enemies might glorify God in heaven. As a saying I came across this week says, “There can be no such thing as secret discipleship, for either the secrecy destroys the discipleship, or the discipleship destroys the secrecy.” Following Jesus in revolutionary discipleship cannot help but be visible. It cannot help but generate reaction from the world around it. Sometimes those reactions are positive—some will see our good works and give glory to God. Some will be drawn to the city on a hill, they will want the meaning and purpose that comes with fertilizing an arid earth. But sometimes the reactions revolutionary discipleship brings are negative. Jesus was killed after all and promised us that if we truly wanted to follow him, we will have to be prepared to share in his suffering. It takes courage to be salt and light in a barren and dark world. When I think of courageous people who embraced their calling to be salt and light come what may, the first person that comes to my mind is Ida B. Wells. Our youth learned about Ida B. Wells last year in the lead-up to the Freedom Ride, but I’d venture a guess that very few of us learned about her until recently (if at all). She is one of the unjustly forgotten Black women whose uncommon boldness and prophetic fire should be at the forefront of our national memory, and certainly at the forefront of the U.S. church’s memory. Wells was born a slave in Mississippi a few months before the Emancipation Proclamation.[4] She learned her courage from her mother and father, who fled their former slaveowner after they were liberated and made a life for themselves, including boldly participating in political meetings among freed slaves, even as White backlash to Black enfranchisement was heating up. Tragically, both her parents and her baby brother died of yellow fever when Wells was only 16. She took responsibility for raising her other 6 siblings and took a job as a schoolteacher among freedpeople in rural Mississippi before she had even finished school herself. Once her brothers were old enough to care for themselves, she moved to Memphis, Tennessee with her sisters in tow and got a job as a journalist. It was in journalism that Wells found her calling. She began reporting on and protesting the establishment of Jim Crow laws around the South. In 1883, after Tennessee had adopted segregated train cars, Wells refused to move from the ladies car to the smoking car, which was where Black passengers were told to go if a train did not yet have a segregated car for them. The conductor returned with more White men to forcibly remove her, but she chose to get off the train rather than move to the smoking car. She sued the train company and won an initial suit, before the Tennessee Supreme Court eventually ruled against her, chastising her unladylike “persistence.” In 1892, she launched the crusade that would occupy the rest of her life. A White mob lynched the three owners of a Black grocery store in town, including one of Wells’s closest friends. Instead of retreating in self-preservation, or lashing out in soul-destroying violence, Wells devoted her life to investigating, documenting, and exposing the brutality of lynching. She travelled around the South, by herself, interviewing witnesses and documenting thousands of lynchings that were intended to terrorize Black Americans into not exercising the freedoms to which they were entitled. Wells is the reason we know as much as we do about how widespread lynching was as a practice. She was tireless and fearless in her devotion to what was right, deconstructing the harmful myths and lies that were used to justify these murders. She once said, “The way to right wrongs is to turn the light of truth upon them.” Wells’s courageous devotion to what was right and good inspired many other freedom-fighters, including Frederick Douglass, who remarked about Wells, “brave woman! You have done your people a service which can neither be weighed nor measured.” She chose revolutionary discipleship, and because she did, her witness was compounded immeasurably. She was light and salt in the midst of a dark and barren world. Our world is not so different from Jesus’s or Ida B. Wells’s. The particulars are different, but cruelty and oppression still run rampant. Those who wish to be faithful to God in the midst of darkness and barrenness still face a choice. We can try to insulate ourselves from danger, from hostility, from loss. We can choose to try and ride out the storm from inside the safety of these walls rather than engage boldly with the world around us. We can try to eliminate all the threats against us. Or we can pursue a revolutionary discipleship that rejects the violence of our world and refuses to shrink back in fear or self-preservation. Clarissa Pinkola Estés, an author and activist, wrote a moving letter to those engaged in the fight for goodness, and truth, and justice in our world today. She said: “Mis estimados queridos, My esteemed ones: do not lose heart. We were made for these times. I have heard from so many recently who are deeply and properly bewildered. Abject disregard of what the soul finds most precious and irreplaceable has become, in large societal arenas, the new normal. Ours is a time of almost daily jaw-dropping astonishment and often righteous rage over the latest degradations of what matters most to visionary people. The lustre and hubris some have aspired to while endorsing acts so heinous against children, elders, the poor, the unguarded, the helpless, is breathtaking. Yet…I urge you: do not lose hope. We were made for these times. I grew up on the Great Lakes and recognize a seaworthy vessel when I see one. Regarding awakened souls, there have never been more able crafts in the waters than there are right now across the world.  Look out over the prow; there are millions of righteous souls on the waters with you. One of the most important steps you can take to help calm the storm is not to allow yourself to be taken in a flurry of despair. Ours is not the task of fixing the entire world all at once, but of stretching out to mend the part of the world that is within our reach. One of the most calming and powerful actions you can do to intervene in a stormy world is to stand up and show your soul. Soul on deck shines like gold in dark times. To display the lantern of the soul in shadowy times like these, to be fierce and show mercy towards others, are acts of immense bravery and greatest necessity. Struggling souls catch light from other souls who are fully lit and willing to show it. In that spirit, I hope you will write this on your wall: when a great ship is in harbor and moored, it is safe, there can be no doubt. But…that is not what great ships are built for.”[5] Greenwood Forest, look up. Our beautiful ceiling resembles the underside of a ship, which has long been a symbol for the church universal’s journey in the world. Our challenge today is to see this place as the boat from which we leap like Peter to follow Jesus out on the water, rather than an ark in which we hide until the rain stops. We were made for times like this—to be salt for arid ground and light for a dark world. Let us stand up and let our souls shine for all those in our world who are waiting to see the light of other brave souls. If we can do that, then together, as the prophet Isaiah says our light will rise in the darkness, we will rebuild ruins, we will repair breaches, we will restore streets, and with the power of the God who made us salt and light, we will right the wrongs within our reach and be who we were built to be. Let us pray.   [1] See Anthony Bradley, “You Are the Manure of the Earth” Christianity Today October 2016; and Eugene Deatrick, “Salt, Soil, Savior” The Biblical Archeaologist 25 no. 2 (May 1962). [2] Bonhoeffer, The Cost of Discipleship [3] See Yoder, The Politics of Jesus [4] See Wells, The Light of Truth ed. Mia Bay [5] http://newstoryhub.com/2020/02/do-not-lose-heart-we-were-made-for-these-times-clarissa-pinkola-estes-ph-d-2/?fbclid=IwAR3cYRVVnTRluXE5tueMFj3inmS4dnYwguMOJqDN5akfM5S7oh8DOXa4-bw

Message to Kings - A Biblical History of Man
161BC: The Maccabean Revolt Part II and the Alliance with Rome

Message to Kings - A Biblical History of Man

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2020 13:46


Judas Maccabee counter-attacks and expands the Jewish borders, but the Seleucids keep coming. Year after year, war exhausts the nation and the people. Judas approves a treaty with Rome in order to prevent the invasions. Unfortunately, the treaty backfires and the Seleucids invade and Judas dies in battle and the Roman alliance remains. In this episode, we cover the start of the Hasmonean Kingdom and the Alliance with Rome. www.messagetokings.com

GotQuestions.org Audio Pages 2017-2019
What happened in the Maccabean Revolt?

GotQuestions.org Audio Pages 2017-2019

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2020


What happened in the Maccabean Revolt? Why did the Jewish people rebel against their Greek/Syrian rulers?

Message to Kings - A Biblical History of Man
164BC: The Maccabean Revolt and the History of Hanukkah

Message to Kings - A Biblical History of Man

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2019 13:41


Happy Hanukkah After a failed campaign against the Romans, Antiochus Epiphanes burns with anger and takes his anger out on the Jews. He defiles the temple and abuses the Jewish people which leads to an uprising. In this episode, we cover the revolt led by Judas Maccabee and his recapture of Jerusalem and the cleansing of the temple. Daniel 11:29-32 1 Book of Maccabees

Shaping Opinion
Hanukkah, The Festival of Lights

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2019 29:33


Rabbi Seth Adelson joins Tim to talk about the story of Hanukkah, its history, its traditions and its meaning. Rabbi Adelson serves the Congregation Beth Shalom in Pittsburgh. https://traffic.libsyn.com/shapingopinion/Hanukkah_Episode.mp3 It's often called the Festival of Lights, and it usually happens in November or December each year. It's the Jewish celebration of Hanukkah, and it takes place over eight days. Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem during the second century B.C. The story centers on the Maccabean Revolt, where the Jewish people had risen up against their Greek-Syrian oppressors. Hanukkah means “dedication” and it begins on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar. It is often called the Festival of Lights, and it's celebrated with the lighting of the menorah, traditional foods, games and gifts. History of Hanukkah This was during the reign of Alexander the Great. He had conquered Syria, Egypt and Palestine, but he allowed lands under his rule to continue observing their own religions. About 100 years later, a successor to Alexander was Antiochus II. He continued to allow the Jews who lived there to practice their faith. His son, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, didn't see it the same way. According to history, when he took control, he outlawed the Jewish religion and ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. In 168 (or 164) BC, his soldiers attacked Jewish people in Jerusalem, killing thousands and desecrating the city's holy Second Temple. He erected an altar to Zeus and sacrificed pigs as further insult to the Jewish people. Around that time, Jewish priest Mattathias and his five sons led a full-scale rebellion against Antiochus and the monarchy. Mattathias died in 166 (or 167) BC, two years late, and his son Judah, also known as Judah Maccabee, took the lead. In the next two years, the Jews were able to drive the Syrians out of Jerusalem, using what we would describe as guerilla warfare strategies. Judah then called on the Jewish people to cleanse the Second Temple, rebuild the altar and light its menorah. The Hanukkah Miracle According to the Talmud, Judah Maccabee and the other Jews who participated in the rededication of the Second Temple saw what they thought to be a miracle. The temple had a menorah, but only one cruse of olive oil was left pure. The others had been contaminated by the oppressors. Once they lit the menorah's only cruse they were amazed. There was only enough oil to keep the menorah's candles burning for a single day, yet the flames continued flickering for eight nights. This provided time for them to create a fresh supply of oil. The event served as the inspiration for Jewish sages to proclaim a yearly eight-day festival. Links Congregation Beth Shalom The Modern Rabbi Hanukkah, History.com Hanukkah, MyJewishLearning.com History of Hanukkah, National Geographic Elite Milk Chocolate Gold Coins, Amazon About this Episode's Guest Rabbi Seth Adelson Hailing from Williamstown, Massachusetts, in the Berkshire mountains, Rabbi Seth Adelson's rabbinic work has focused on making connections, on helping people find meaning in Jewish text and tradition, and on demonstrating the value and power of living Jewishly. Rabbi Adelson has been in Pittsburgh since 2015, and has led the charge in re-fashioning Congregation Beth Shalom as an open, inclusive community that focuses on connecting Jews with their tradition and helping them to find the kedushah/holiness in their lives. He spent the previous eight years in Great Neck, New York, serving as Assistant Rabbi and then as Associate Rabbi of Temple Israel of Great Neck. During his tenure on Long Island, he crafted a range of new initiatives that engaged more people, strengthened the community through teaching, pastoring, counseling, and re-framed Temple Israel as a welcoming place. Prior to that, Rabbi Adelson served for four years as Cantor at the ...

Shaping Opinion
Hanukkah, The Festival of Lights

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2019 29:33


Rabbi Seth Adelson joins Tim to talk about the story of Hanukkah, its history, its traditions and its meaning. Rabbi Adelson serves the Congregation Beth Shalom in Pittsburgh. https://traffic.libsyn.com/shapingopinion/Hanukkah_Episode.mp3 It’s often called the Festival of Lights, and it usually happens in November or December each year. It’s the Jewish celebration of Hanukkah, and it takes place over eight days. Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem during the second century B.C. The story centers on the Maccabean Revolt, where the Jewish people had risen up against their Greek-Syrian oppressors. Hanukkah means “dedication” and it begins on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar. It is often called the Festival of Lights, and it’s celebrated with the lighting of the menorah, traditional foods, games and gifts. History of Hanukkah This was during the reign of Alexander the Great. He had conquered Syria, Egypt and Palestine, but he allowed lands under his rule to continue observing their own religions. About 100 years later, a successor to Alexander was Antiochus II. He continued to allow the Jews who lived there to practice their faith. His son, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, didn’t see it the same way. According to history, when he took control, he outlawed the Jewish religion and ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. In 168 (or 164) BC, his soldiers attacked Jewish people in Jerusalem, killing thousands and desecrating the city’s holy Second Temple. He erected an altar to Zeus and sacrificed pigs as further insult to the Jewish people. Around that time, Jewish priest Mattathias and his five sons led a full-scale rebellion against Antiochus and the monarchy. Mattathias died in 166 (or 167) BC, two years late, and his son Judah, also known as Judah Maccabee, took the lead. In the next two years, the Jews were able to drive the Syrians out of Jerusalem, using what we would describe as guerilla warfare strategies. Judah then called on the Jewish people to cleanse the Second Temple, rebuild the altar and light its menorah. The Hanukkah Miracle According to the Talmud, Judah Maccabee and the other Jews who participated in the rededication of the Second Temple saw what they thought to be a miracle. The temple had a menorah, but only one cruse of olive oil was left pure. The others had been contaminated by the oppressors. Once they lit the menorah’s only cruse they were amazed. There was only enough oil to keep the menorah’s candles burning for a single day, yet the flames continued flickering for eight nights. This provided time for them to create a fresh supply of oil. The event served as the inspiration for Jewish sages to proclaim a yearly eight-day festival. Links Congregation Beth Shalom The Modern Rabbi Hanukkah, History.com Hanukkah, MyJewishLearning.com History of Hanukkah, National Geographic Elite Milk Chocolate Gold Coins, Amazon About this Episode's Guest Rabbi Seth Adelson Hailing from Williamstown, Massachusetts, in the Berkshire mountains, Rabbi Seth Adelson’s rabbinic work has focused on making connections, on helping people find meaning in Jewish text and tradition, and on demonstrating the value and power of living Jewishly. Rabbi Adelson has been in Pittsburgh since 2015, and has led the charge in re-fashioning Congregation Beth Shalom as an open, inclusive community that focuses on connecting Jews with their tradition and helping them to find the kedushah/holiness in their lives. He spent the previous eight years in Great Neck, New York, serving as Assistant Rabbi and then as Associate Rabbi of Temple Israel of Great Neck. During his tenure on Long Island, he crafted a range of new initiatives that engaged more people, strengthened the community through teaching, pastoring, counseling, and re-framed Temple Israel as a welcoming place. Prior to that, Rabbi Adelson served for four years as Cantor at the ...

Life Of Caesar
Caligula #6 – The Maccabees

Life Of Caesar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2019 70:38


One of the other first things Caligula did when he took power was to release Herod Agrippa from jail - King Herod from the New Testament. The grandson of Herod the Great. Which all gives me an excuse to talk about The Maccabean Revolt and a short history on Judaean politics from 169 BCE to Caligula.  The post Caligula #6 – The Maccabees appeared first on Life Of The Caesars.

First Presbyterian Church of Marietta
Sunday Seminary: Antiochus IV and the Maccabean Revolt

First Presbyterian Church of Marietta

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2019 57:02


Join this weekly lecture by scholar-in-residence Dr. Brennan Breed. Suggested readings: 1. 1 Maccabees 1-9; 2 Maccabees 2. Jospehus, Jewish Antiquities 12.242-13.225 3. Maccabees (Chris Seeman) 4. Hanukkah (Chris Seeman) 5. Why the Maccabees aren't in the Bible (Rachel Turkienicz)fpcmarietta.org

Emmanuel Enid Sermons (Enid, OK)
Mind the Gap: The Maccabean Revolt Against the Greeks (167 BC)

Emmanuel Enid Sermons (Enid, OK)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2019 59:37


Dr Taylor Marshall Catholic Show
275: Be the Maccabee!!!! The Maccabean Revolt for Catholics Today

Dr Taylor Marshall Catholic Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2019 10:54


This is a sample class from the New Saint Thomas Institute by Dr Taylor Marshall. He explains the paganization of the Israelites under the Greeks and how the Maccabean Revolt was organized to re-consecrate Israel and their temple and worship. Maccabees is crucial for Catholics today. To take more classes with Dr Taylor Marshall, please […] The post 275: Be the Maccabee!!!! The Maccabean Revolt for Catholics Today appeared first on Taylor Marshall.

Grace Church in Noblesville & Fishers, IN

When you juxtapose Jesus' triumphal entry with his brutal execution one week later, you end up with a pretty shocking contradiction to wrestle with, and I believe how you resolve this conflict in your mind can come to define what it means for you to follow Jesus. History God calls a man named Abraham and chooses his family to bring healing to the world. God tells Abraham, I will make of you a great nation, and I will bless you, and make your name great in you all the families of the earth shall be blessed. Genesis 12:2-3 Judah is told that his descendants would be the kings of Israel, and that one of them would ultimately be a global king. The scepter will not depart from Judah, nor the ruler's staff from his descendants, until the coming of the one to whom it belongs, the one whom all nations will honor. Genesis 49:10 David is a flawed man who makes some serious mistakes during his reign. God makes it clear to him that it isn’t him, but one of his descendants who will ultimately rule this global kingdom. For when you die and are buried with your ancestors, I will raise up one of your descendants, your own offspring, and I will make his kingdom strong.  He is the one who will build a house - temple - for my name. And I will secure his royal throne forever. I will be his father, and he will be my son. 2 Samuel 7:12-14 Then God sent prophets to speak to the people, and they made it very clear that this coming Messiah was still on the way. One day he would rule and bring healing to the nations just like God promised Abraham. In that day the heir to David's throne will be a banner of salvation to all the world. The nations will rally to him, and the land where he lives will be a glorious place. Isaiah 11:10 Rejoice, O people of Zion! Shout in triumph, O people of Jerusalem! Look, your king is coming to you. He is righteous and victorious, yet he is humble, riding on a donkey. Zechariah 9:9 These were the promises the Israelites held onto as they returned from exile and tried to rebuild. This was the future they hoped for. A king who would bring glory and righteousness and power and salvation to Israel once and for all. After the Maccabean Revolt, Israel finally gained independent rule again and the ability to worship freely. They were a sovereign nation once more. Which brings us to Jesus, coming to Jerusalem. Jesus: a descendant of David, a man who could heal people, a man who spoke with authority, and a man who had just raised Lazarus from the dead. Jesus, The Unlikely King The kingdom of Jesus was not the kingdom they were looking for. But that was not the kingdom Jesus offered. The kingdom of Jesus is one of peace. Not of destroying your enemies, but of loving them. It's a kingdom of praying for the wellbeing of those who persecute you. The kingdom of Jesus is one of surrender and trust, of quiet faith. Giving of yourself for the sake of others. Of turning the other cheek. The kingdom of Jesus is upside down. It's a kingdom where the first are last. Where the poor are rich. Where the lonely and lost and outcast are esteemed. It's a kingdom where wrongs are forgiven, not avenged. Where wealth and power are given away. It's upside down. Jesus became the king by giving up his power. Though he was God, he did not think of equality with God as something to cling to. Instead, he gave up his divine privileges; he took the humble position of a slave and was born as a human being. When he appeared in human form, he humbled himself in obedience to God and died a criminal's death on a cross. Therefore, God elevated him to the place of highest honor and gave him the name above all other names, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue declare that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. Philippians 2:6-11 By humbling himself and taking the sins of the world onto his shoulders - by dying for humanity - Jesus was revealing himself to be the king of this new kind of kingdom. This upside down kingdom. The kingdom God had always intended to bring about. A global kingdom where all are welcome. Where Jews and Gentiles can worship together. Where all the nations can be blessed. A kingdom whose king gave up everything for the sake of those who didn't even deserve it.

Working With The Voice
016: The Context of Jesus's Teachings

Working With The Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2018 36:24


This is a history lesson to help understand the intersection of the Pharisees, Sadducees, and Zealots with one another as well as with the Roman government. It helps us see why each group had the concerns that they did about Jesus.  We will discuss how the disputes between the written Torah and the oral Torah would ignite the world’s first religious war, the Maccabean Revolt.  The oppressive rule of the Greeks and Romans over the Jewish people led to the building of the magnificent Holy Temple and also its destruction less than 100 years later. I hope to show you more deeply why the peaceful message from Jesus was not what the people were looking for in a Messiah, and additionally, the signposts as to why listening to him at that time might have changed the world.  It still can.    

Living Disciples
Walking With God Part 10: The Maccabean Revolt

Living Disciples

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2018 93:49


The last look at the Old Testament, this week we focus our eyes on 1st and 2nd Maccabees and the story of Israel's three responses to Greek oppression: compliance, rebellion and martyrdom. These books provide a crucial transition in story and theology between Old and New Testaments. Fascinating stuff.

History of the Catholic Church Podcast
3: Salvation History, Part 2

History of the Catholic Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2018 46:46


In this episode, we discuss the return from the Babylonian Exile up through the Maccabean Revolt, with pit-stops in Greece, Rome, Persia, and India.

Perry Stone - Media
878 America's Parallels to the Maccabean Revolt - Audio

Perry Stone - Media

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2017 28:30


Perry Stone - Media
878 America's Parallels to the Maccabean Revolt

Perry Stone - Media

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2017 28:30


New City Baptist Church - Sermons
Sunday School: Pt.2- The Historical Background to Daniel

New City Baptist Church - Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2017


The Historical Background to Daniel- An outline of the Greek and Seleucid Empires, as well as the Maccabean Revolt, as prophesied in Daniel 11

Stuff You Missed in History Class

The uprising of the Maccabees against the Seleucid Empire during the Hellenistic period is an integral part of the Hanukkah story. After the restoration of Jewish religious freedom, the Maccabees started another revolt to obtain total independence. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers

Highland Church Podcast
20150726- Alien Ethics: Let Us Pray

Highland Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2015 22:35


During the Maccabean Revolt, Jews told the story of Daniel—who was faced with the exile of his people and chose only to pray in response. This seems like a passive response—that will make no significant difference. But his prayer motivates God to send an angel who wrestles with other powers to accomplish God’s will and free Israel. All Daniel had to do was ask. So, prayer is perhaps the most important task for those who want to “make a difference”

New Testament I
NT502 Lesson 28

New Testament I

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2015 24:59


Reflect on part two of the Gospel of Mark. Consider that the point of the secret in Mark is that it needs to be a secret until people know what the secret is. You cannot understand what it means to be the Messiah or the Son of God until he has hung on the Cross. There has to be a Messianic secret because there is a Messianic misunderstanding. What they thought Messiah should do was not what Jesus came to do. Expectations about the Messiah made it almost impossible for the people to imagine that what Jesus was up to was what the Messiah would be up to. Consider that dramatic irony is when the audience knows something that the characters do not. Mark makes clear what it means that Jesus is the Christ and the Son of God. Mark also makes clear their experience of suffering. The climatic statement in Mark 10:45 is book ended by two stories of a healing of a blind man. What is in between will be important and related to the events that frame it. Inclusio is the literary term. We will have a healing experience like the blind men when it comes to the question of who Jesus is. In Mark 8:31 – 10:45, Jesus tells us what it means that he is the Messiah. Even the disciples cannot understand what it means for Jesus to be the Messiah. The disciples were thinking in terms of temporal benefits, not forgiveness and thought in terms of political independence and the land, not a battle against sin and death. Explore that the Maccabean Revolt was the event that formed 1st century Jewish ideas about what a Messiah should do. Ptolemaic forces controlled Palestine and there was religious desecration and lack of freedom. Against all odds, the Maccabees drove out the Ptolemaic forces. The Maccabees set up the Hasmonean dynasty and had independence for almost 100 years. What a human being expects from their king is not like the actual Messiah Jesus. Jesus loves and has compassion for people. Jesus means to show the kingdom of God is at hand. Consider that it would have been easy for people to just interpret Jesus as a miracle worker.

New Testament I  (Video)
NT502 Lesson 28

New Testament I (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2015 24:14


Reflect on part two of the Gospel of Mark. Consider that the point of the secret in Mark is that it needs to be a secret until people know what the secret is. You cannot understand what it means to be the Messiah or the Son of God until he has hung on the Cross. There has to be a Messianic secret because there is a Messianic misunderstanding. What they thought Messiah should do was not what Jesus came to do. Expectations about the Messiah made it almost impossible for the people to imagine that what Jesus was up to was what the Messiah would be up to. Consider that dramatic irony is when the audience knows something that the characters do not. Mark makes clear what it means that Jesus is the Christ and the Son of God. Mark also makes clear their experience of suffering. The climatic statement in Mark 10:45 is book ended by two stories of a healing of a blind man. What is in between will be important and related to the events that frame it. Inclusio is the literary term. We will have a healing experience like the blind men when it comes to the question of who Jesus is. In Mark 8:31 – 10:45, Jesus tells us what it means that he is the Messiah. Even the disciples cannot understand what it means for Jesus to be the Messiah. The disciples were thinking in terms of temporal benefits, not forgiveness and thought in terms of political independence and the land, not a battle against sin and death. Explore that the Maccabean Revolt was the event that formed 1st century Jewish ideas about what a Messiah should do. Ptolemaic forces controlled Palestine and there was religious desecration and lack of freedom. Against all odds, the Maccabees drove out the Ptolemaic forces. The Maccabees set up the Hasmonean dynasty and had independence for almost 100 years. What a human being expects from their king is not like the actual Messiah Jesus. Jesus loves and has compassion for people. Jesus means to show the kingdom of God is at hand. Consider that it would have been easy for people to just interpret Jesus as a miracle worker.

St. Irenaeus Ministries
From Babylon to Bethlehem - The Hasmonean Dynasty

St. Irenaeus Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2009 49:42


The period between the Maccabean Revolt and Roman rule of Judea is not represented by any writings in the Scriptures, but like all things that touch the history of Israel and Christ, it is worth studying. The Hasmoneans, named after the house of Hasmon, are not related to David, but are a priestly family from the tribe of Levi. The Maccabean Revolt started when Mattathias, a Hasmonean, refused to offer sacrifice to pagan gods, with the eventual result that the Temple was purged and rededicated an event the Jews celebrate at Hanukkah for eight days. After the fighting had ended and Roman and Spartan rulers had expressed their support for Simon Maccabeus as high priest, and King Demetrius confirmed Simon as high priest and afforded him most of the traditional effects of a king, though Simon was not granted that title.The closing theme is Gerard Satamian's Chansons Sans Paroles Op. 2 Pastorale, from the album Dry Fig Trees. www.magnatune.com

St. Irenaeus Ministries
From Babylon to Bethlehem - Prelude to the Maccabean Revolt

St. Irenaeus Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2009 36:19


At the time of the Greeks, the Davidic line passes into obscurity, and the political power in Israel is held by the high priests. One such high priest, Onias II, refuses to pay taxes to the Ptolemaic empire. The Tobiad family steps in to cover the debt, and winds up becoming responsible for the tax collection in Israel. The Seleucid Empire takes over Israel, and gives the Jews certain concessions for their assistance. Onias III becomes high priest, and owing to a dispute with the governor of the Temple, receives a favorable preliminary ruling from the Seleucid Empire. Onias tries to confirm the ruling, but while he seeks out this confirmation, a new emperor takes power, Antiochus IV Epiphanes. In Jerusalem, a new group of rulers also takes over, and a man named Jason becomes high priest. Jason was not a particularly pious man, and allows certain Hellenistic influences into Israel, most notably a gymnasium. In this gymnasium, the men exercise naked, and in order to appear more like the Greeks whom they exercise with, some Jews begin to have cosmetic surgery to reverse their circumcisions. Meanwhile, a man named Menelaus convinces the Seleucids to assassinate Onias III and remove Jason to have himself named high priest. Menelaus starts selling off temple vessels, and the people riot. Menelaus seeks help from the Seleucids, who put down the riots bloodily. To keep the peace, the Seleucids conscript some Jews to build a garrison near the temple, and decide to begin construction on a Sabbath to prevent riots. This backfires and there are even more riots. The pro-Greek populace moved into the garrison and only left to enforce the edicts of the empire. People fled Jerusalem, since it was not safe for either orthodox or liberal. Antiochus wages a preemptive war on Egypt and wins, but the cost of the war causes him to despoil the Temple. As Antiochus attempts to completely conquer Egypt, Rome intervenes and turns Antiochus back, who now places the blame for this failure on the disunity in the empire caused by the nonconforming Jews. The closing theme is Gerard Satamian's Chansons Sans Paroles Op. 2 Pastorale, from the album Dry Fig Trees. www.magnatune.com

Daniel (2001)
52 - Ordination Comments, The Maccabean Revolt

Daniel (2001)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2002 58:16