Podcasts about Virtue

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Positive trait or quality deemed to be morally good

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Best podcasts about Virtue

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Latest podcast episodes about Virtue

And the Runner-Up Is
The Power of the Dog (feat. Sophia Ciminello)

And the Runner-Up Is

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 190:24


Kevin welcomes back Oscar Wild host Sophia Ciminello to talk about Jane Campion's 'The Power of the Dog,' the presumed runner-up in the 2021 Oscar race that lost to 'CODA.' 0:00 - 1:35 - Introduction 1:40 - 59:09 - 'The Power of the Dog' review 59:10 - 1:40:48 - Why 'The Power of the Dog' lost Best Picture 1:40:48 - 2:43:49 - Assessing the other eight Best Picture nominees 2:43:50 - 3:05:13 - Shoulda been a contender 3:05:14 - 3:10:24 - Did 'The Power of the Dog' deserve to win? Support And the Runner-Up Is on Patreon at patreon.com/andtherunnerupis! Follow Kevin Jacobsen on Twitter Follow Sophia Ciminello on Twitter Follow And the Runner-Up Is on Twitter and Instagram Theme/End Music is "The Virtue" by Jonathan Adamich Artwork: Brian O'Meara

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux
5005 HOW TO KILL RESENTMENT! FREEDOMAIN FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 56:01


Virtue for Women
Session 8: Words Matter | Tiffany Velasquez

Virtue for Women

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 26:14


Our words matter to others and to the Lord. As women, we have incredible power in our sphere of influence to build others up and glorify God in our speech. But there are pitfalls we must watch out for! In this episode, Tiffany takes a brief look at what the book of James has to say about the parallel between spiritual maturity and taming the tongue.   -- To join a Harvest women's small group, go to virtue.harvest.org/studies Learn more about Virtue women's ministry at Harvest Christian Fellowship by going to virtue.harvest.org/about/. Support the show: https://harvest.org/donate/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Indigo Podcast
Imagination Beyond the Struggle of Life

The Indigo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 62:15


What would you do if you had everything you wanted? What if you didn't have to work and your life was perfect? What then? In this episode, we unpack our thoughts regarding: What does it mean to have “made it” in life and society? Why there's more beyond the struggle of life and why that matters How all of us might start or continue that journey and make the world better Links and Other Information All episodes of The Indigo Podcast Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter

Morning Air
Fr. Bob Pagliari, Independence, Freedom & virtue of Consideration/ Dr. David Bissonnette, Obesity and Spirituality/ Bishop Daniel Mueggenborg, Sunday's Gospel Reflection

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 50:34


7/1/22 6am CT Hour John and Sarah chat about the 4th of July and the Pope's reflection on the elderly. Fr. Bob reminds us to be charitable to those who disagree with us and passes out Holy homework to reflect on the flag and ask others what you can do for them. Dr. Bissonnette talks about lack of belief in God and the breakdown of the family and how it can lead to obesity in parents and kids as well as despair in our country. Bishop Mueggenborg explains how we can use the buddy system to stay on track with following Jesus and be held accountable so as not to just do what makes us popular but what we are called to do.

Beyond Today
Beyond Today Television Program - The Ten Commandments: From Obedience to Virtue

Beyond Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022


Learn how keeping God's commandments develops your inner person to reflect God's righteous ways.

The Jeffersonian Tradition
Episode 121 Secession Day 2022: What Virtue, Freedom, & Independence Meant to Old Virginia

The Jeffersonian Tradition

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 49:58


Howdy everyone, and thanks again for tuning in to The Jeffersonian Tradition. In today's episode, we read a speech from Virginia's Nathaniel Beverly Tucker, addressed to the Young Men's Society of Lynchburg on August 26, 1838. In this speech, Tucker begs the young men of Virginia to recall their storied past, state pride and sovereignty, and the honor and duty of their heritage. If you want me to cover a topic or elaborate further on any given episode, then reach out to me through the show's private MeWe group, or by contacting me at the show email address, which is mrjeffersonian@outlook.com. If you find value in the podcast, please consider becoming a supporting listener. One-time contributions can be sent to the show's cash app, http://cash.app/$MrJeffersonian . Recurring contributions can be made through the Anchor supporting listener link. Thanks again for tuning in to The Jeffersonian Tradition! Sign up for MeWe today: https://mewe.com. Fuel the Jeffersonian Revolution today and buy your goldbacks here: Defy the Grid. Help us out with Little Miss Jeffersonian HERE --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mr-jeffersonian/support

Sermons For Everyday Living
Sermons 07/01/22 - The Precious Blood & St Junipero Serra

Sermons For Everyday Living

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 55:19


The Precious Blood and the Virtue of Modesty *Missionary Inspirations *Shedding Every Last Drop of His Precious Blood *The Shedding of Blood and Eternal Redemption *St Junipero Serra's Holy Legacy

The Daily Nugget
Tolerance is not a Christian Virtue

The Daily Nugget

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022


Today on the Daily Nugget, Mike talks about the core value of tolerance. What the culture means by tolerance is not the same as what we are called to live into as Christians. We are to follow the example of Jesus. Jesus never compromised truth to be tolerant and neither should we.

Owls at Dawn
"Nuance: Virtue or Vice?" - OaD Ep. 171

Owls at Dawn

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 95:51


"Nuance: Virtue or Vice?" - OaD Ep. 171Shitty Minute: People who hate on Draymond Green's podcast, but also, Draymond Green's podcast | Main Segment: Fuck Nuance | Sticky Leaves: The Empty Space by Peter BrookMusic by Blue Ducks - "Four Inches of Water"___________For OaD merch, visit our site here.To gain access to bonus episodes, the community Discord, and more, visit our Patreon account. All funds will go toward producing further content, increasing our ability to engage with you, and improving our technical production.@owls_at_dawn | owlsatdawnpodcast@gmail.com | patreon.com/owlsatdawn

End Abortion Podcast
Fr. Frank Pavone's Homily for June 30, 2022: Why Patriotism is a Virtue

End Abortion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 14:35


Fr. Frank Pavone's Homily for June 30, 2022: Why Patriotism is a Virtue by Priests for Life

GOSPILLED
Virtue Overcomes Defamation #181

GOSPILLED

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 59:21


Jeremiah 20:10 KJV For I heard the defaming of many, fear on every side. Report, say they, and we will report it. All my familiars watched for my halting, saying, Peradventure he will be enticed, and we shall prevail against him, and we shall take our revenge on him. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/andrewhorval/support

Constituting America
Essay 51: Upon a Need of Virtue to Self-govern: Penning a United States Constitution for a Free and Independent Nation

Constituting America

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 7:30


Essay 51: Upon a Need of Virtue to Self-govern: Penning a United States Constitution for a Free and Independent Nation by Andrea Criswell. Click here to explore our 2022 90-Day Study: American Exceptionalism Revealed: The Historic Rise and Fall of Worldwide Regimes and How United States Founding Wisdom Prevails. America's Founders understood the failings of totalitarian regimes, and thus attempted an experiment in liberty they hoped future Americans would find invaluable and maintain. Constituting America's 2022 90-Day Study looks at the rise and fall of worldwide regimes throughout history, juxtaposed to founding principles of the United States Constitution and federalists' and anti-federalists' views of their day regarding what history taught them about human nature and what is required to preserve our freedom!

Fortune's Path Podcast
Ann Howard on Leadership and Feeling Good About the Future

Fortune's Path Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 67:06


Ann Howard, product and technology leader, talks about how leaders need to share information widely and make decisions publicly. Ann says leaders are charged with predicting the future. She lays out her method for making decisions, knowing that there are very few decisions that are irreversible. Ann describes how to scale decisions down, test them, and get information about risks, describes the differences between leadership and management, and how she builds teams that are accountable to each other. Tom and Ann spend some time talking about what makes for bad leaders. Ann talks about when people are drawn to leadership for the wrong reasons, and why you can't be a leader alone. Ann tells why she admires Ray Dalio's idea of hyper realism and the difference between kindness and niceness. Tom asks Ann who is the best leader she ever worked for and why. Tom and Ann talk about raising kids as a test of letting people fail and dig their way out. Tom asks Ann why she doesn't think of herself much when she's leading. Ann talks about how her personal story informs her desire to lead. After Ann tells a story about her daughter on the playground, Tom asks how things have changed for women since Ann was a kid.

Constituting America
Essay 50: Keeping a Republic: America's Founders on the Role of Public and Private Virtue

Constituting America

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 13:27


Essay 50: Keeping a Republic: America's Founders on the Role of Public and Private Virtue by Gary Porter. Click here to explore our 2022 90-Day Study: American Exceptionalism Revealed: The Historic Rise and Fall of Worldwide Regimes and How United States Founding Wisdom Prevails. America's Founders understood the failings of totalitarian regimes, and thus attempted an experiment in liberty they hoped future Americans would find invaluable and maintain. Constituting America's 2022 90-Day Study looks at the rise and fall of worldwide regimes throughout history, juxtaposed to founding principles of the United States Constitution and federalists' and anti-federalists' views of their day regarding what history taught them about human nature and what is required to preserve our freedom!

Genius Garden with Jessi Huntenburg
The Virtue of Patience: How Waiting Gets You What You Want

Genius Garden with Jessi Huntenburg

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 25:51


In this episode, Jessi tells a story that reveals that patience is a virtue that she continually needs to nurture. She also shares why she believes that the cultivation of patience helps us to follow the path of our Genius with more success and consistency, and how a lack of patience can ultimately lead to self-sabotage. Finally, she shares how certain childhood experiences contribute to impatience, and how mindfulness can bring us the pause we need to think before we act. Learn about the How to Grow A Genius Garden Journey

Midnight Train Podcast
The Antikythera Mechanism (Nerd Overload)

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 114:36


Sign up for bonus episodes at www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com    Well since last week's episode left Logan up at night with nightmares and I still can't get the stains out of my shorts; we have decided to make this week's episode a little more on the lighter side. So we are diving deep into the wonderful world of politics! You got it, today we are going to discuss The Biden Administrations wonderful and brilliant plans and maybe even get an interview with Brandon himself! HA like that would ever happen. Fuck those guys. We are actually talking about the Antikythera Mechanism, and the mysteries surrounding it.   The Antikythera mechanism is a hand-powered orrery( a mechanical model of our solar system) from Ancient Greece that has been dubbed the world's first analog computer since it was used to forecast celestial locations and eclipses decades in advance. The ancient Olympic Games' four-year cycle, which was akin to an Olympiad, could also be followed using this method.   In 1901, wreckage from a shipwreck off the shore of the Greek island of Antikythera included this artifact. Archaeologist Valerios Stais recognized it as bearing a gear on May 17, 1902. The gadget, which was found as a single lump and then fragmented into three primary components that are now divided into 82 individual shards following conservation efforts, was contained in the remnants of a wooden box that measured 34 cm 18 cm 9 cm (13.4 in 7.1 in 3.5 in). While several of these shards have inscriptions, four of them have gears. The biggest gear has 223 teeth and is around 13 centimeters (5.1 in) in diameter.   Using contemporary computer x-ray tomography and high resolution surface scanning, a team at Cardiff University led by Mike Edmunds and Tony Freeth was able to image inside fragments of the crust-encased mechanism in 2008 and decipher the faintest writing that had once been inscribed on the machine's outer casing. This shows that it contained 37 bronze meshing gears that allowed it to mimic the Moon's erratic orbit, where the Moon's velocity is higher in its perigee than in its apogee, follow the motions of the Moon and Sun across the zodiac, and anticipate eclipses. Astronomer Hipparchus of Rhodes researched this motion in the second century BC, and it is possible that he was consulted when building the device. It is believed that a piece of the system, which also determined the locations of the five classical planets, is missing.   The device has been variously dated to between 150 and 100 BC, or to 205 BC, and it is thought to have been devised and built by Greek scientists. In any event, it had to have been built prior to the shipwreck, which has been dated to around 70–60 BC by many lines of evidence. Researchers suggested in 2022 that the machine's initial calibration date, rather than the actual date of manufacture, would have been December 23, 178 BC. Some academics disagree, arguing that the calibration date should be 204 BC. Up to the astronomical clocks of Richard of Wallingford and Giovanni de' Dondi in the fourteenth century, comparable complicated machines had not been seen.   The National Archaeological Museum in Athens currently has all of the Antikythera mechanism's fragments as well as a variety of reproductions and artistic reconstructions that show how it would have appeared and operated.   During the first voyage with the Hellenic Royal Navy, in 1900–1901, Captain Dimitrios Kontos and a crew of sponge divers from Symi island found the Antikythera shipwreck. Off Point Glyphadia on the Greek island of Antikythera, at a depth of 45 meters (148 feet), a Roman cargo ship wreck was discovered. The crew found various huge items, including the mechanism, ceramics, special glassware, jewelry, bronze and marble statues, and more. In 1901, most likely that July, the mechanism was pulled from the rubble. The mechanism's origin remains unknown, however it has been speculated that it was transported from Rhodes to Rome along with other seized goods to assist a triumphant procession that Julius Caesar was staging.   The National Museum of Archaeology in Athens received all the salvaged debris pieces for storage and examination. The museum personnel spent two years assembling more visible artifacts, like the sculptures, but the mechanism, which looked like a mass of tarnished brass and wood, remained unseen. The mechanism underwent deformational modifications as a result of not treating it after removal from saltwater.   Archaeologist Valerios Stais discovered a gear wheel lodged in one of the rocks on May 17, 1902. Although most experts judged the object to be prochronistic and too complicated to have been created during the same era as the other components that had been unearthed, he originally thought it was an astronomical clock. Before British science historian and Yale University professor Derek J. de Solla Price developed an interest in the object in 1951, investigations into the object were abandoned. The 82 pieces were photographed using X-ray and gamma-ray technology in 1971 by Price and Greek nuclear researcher Charalampos Karakalos. In 1974, Price issued a 70-page report summarizing their findings.   In 2012 and 2015, two more searches at the Antikythera wreck site turned up artifacts and another ship that may or may not be related to the treasure ship on which the mechanism was discovered. A bronze disc decorated with a bull's head was also discovered. Some speculated that the disc, which has four "ears" with holes in them, may have served as a "cog wheel" in the Antikythera mechanism. There doesn't seem to be any proof that it was a component of the mechanism; it's more probable that the disc was a bronze ornament on some furniture.   The earliest analog computer is typically referred to as the Antikythera mechanism. The production of the device must have had undiscovered ancestors throughout the Hellenistic era based on its quality and intricacy. It is believed to have been erected either in the late second century BC or the early first century BC, and its construction was based on mathematical and astronomical ideas created by Greek scientists during the second century BC.   Since they recognized the calendar on the Metonic Spiral as originating from Corinth or one of its colonies in northwest Greece or Sicily, further investigation by the Antikythera Mechanism Research Project in 2008 showed that the idea for the mechanism may have originated in the colonies of Corinth. The Antikythera Mechanism Research Initiative contended in 2008 that Syracuse could suggest a relationship with the school of Archimedes because it was a Corinthian colony and the home of Archimedes. In 2017, it was shown that the Metonic Spiral's calendar is of the Corinthian type and cannot be a Syracuse calendar. Another idea postulates that the device's origin may have come from the ancient Greek city of Pergamon, site of the Library of Pergamum, and claims that coins discovered by Jacques Cousteau at the wreck site in the 1970s correspond to the time of the device's creation. It was second in significance to the Library of Alexandria during the Hellenistic era due to its extensive collection of art and scientific scrolls.   A theory that the gadget was built in an academy established by Stoic philosopher Posidonius on that Greek island is supported by the discovery of Rhodian-style vases aboard the ship that carried the object. Hipparchus, an astronomer active from around 140 BC to 120 BC, lived at Rhodes, which was a bustling commercial port and a center for astronomy and mechanical engineering. Hipparchus' hypothesis of the motion of the Moon is used by the mechanism, raising the likelihood that he may have developed it or at the very least worked on it. The island of Rhodes is situated between the latitudes of 35.85 and 36.50 degrees north; it has lately been proposed that the astronomical events on the Parapegma of the Antikythera mechanism operate best for latitudes in the range of 33.3-37.0 degrees north.   According to a research published in 2014 by Carman and Evans, the Saros Dial's start-up date corresponds to the astronomical lunar month that started soon after the new moon on April 28, 205 BC. This suggests a revised dating of about 200 BC. Carman and Evans claim that the Babylonian arithmetic style of prediction suits the device's predictive models considerably better than the conventional Greek trigonometric approach does. According to a 2017 study by Paul Iversen, the device's prototype originated in Rhodes, but this particular model was modified for a customer from Epirus in northwest Greece. Iversen contends that the device was likely built no earlier than a generation before the shipwreck, a date that is also supported by Jones.   In an effort to learn more about the mechanism, further dives were made in 2014 and 2015. A five-year investigative program that started in 2014 and finished in October 2019 was followed by a second five-year session that began in May 2020.   The original mechanism probably came in one encrusted piece from the Mediterranean. It broke into three main parts shortly after that. In the meanwhile, more little fragments have come loose from handling and cleaning, and the Cousteau expedition discovered other fragments on the ocean floor. Fragment F was found in this fashion in 2005, suggesting that other fragments may still remain in storage, undetected since their first retrieval. The majority of the mechanism and inscriptions are found on seven of the 82 known fragments, which are also mechanically noteworthy. Additionally, 16 smaller components include inscriptions that are illegible and fragmentary.    The twelve zodiacal signs are divided into equal 30-degree sectors on a fixed ring dial that represents the ecliptic on the mechanism's front face. Even though the borders of the constellations were arbitrary, this was consistent with the Babylonian practice of allocating an equal portion of the ecliptic to each zodiac sign. The Sothic Egyptian calendar, which has twelve months of 30 days plus five intercalary days, is marked off with a rotating ring that is located outside that dial. The Greek alphabetized versions of the Egyptian names for the months are used to identify them. To align the Egyptian calendar ring with the current zodiac points, the first procedure is to spin it. Due to the Egyptian calendar's disregard for leap days, a whole zodiac sign would cycle through every 120 years.   Now we cannot show you pictures because well you couldn't see them. So we will try to describe them as best we can and we can also post them online.    The mechanism was turned by a now-lost little hand crank that was connected to the biggest gear, the four-spoked gear shown on the front of fragment A, gear b1, via a crown gear. As a result, the date indicator on the front dial was shifted to the appropriate day of the Egyptian calendar. Since the year cannot be changed, it is necessary to know the year that is currently in use. Alternatively, since most calendar cycles are not synchronized with the year, the cycles indicated by the various calendar cycle indicators on the back can be found in the Babylonian ephemeris tables for the day of the year that is currently in use. If the mechanism were in good operating order, the crank would easily be able to strike a certain day on the dial because it moves the date marker around 78 days each full rotation. The mechanism's interlocking gears would all revolve as the hand crank was turned, allowing for the simultaneous determination of the Sun's and Moon's positions, the moon's phase, the timing of an eclipse, the calendar cycle, and maybe the positions of planets.   The position of the spiral dial pointers on the two huge dials on the rear had to be observed by the operator as well. As the dials included four and five complete rotations of the pointers, the pointer had a "follower" that followed the spiral incisions in the metal. Before continuing, a pointer's follower had to be manually shifted to the opposite end of the spiral after reaching the terminal month place at either end of the spiral.   Two circular concentric scales may be seen on the front dial. The Greek zodiac signs are denoted on the inner scale, which is divided into degrees. A series of similar holes underneath the movable ring that rests flush with the surface and runs in a channel that makes up the outer scale are marked off with what appear to be days.   This outer ring has been thought to symbolize the 365-day Egyptian calendar ever since the mechanism was discovered, but new study contradicts this assumption and suggests it is really divided into 354 intervals. The Sothic and Callippic cycles had previously pointed to a 365 14-day solar year, as evidenced in Ptolemy III's proposed calendar reform of 238 BC. If one accepts the 365-day presupposition, it is acknowledged that the mechanism predates the Julian calendar reform. The dials aren't thought to represent his intended leap day, but by rotating the scale back one day every four years, the outer calendar dial may be adjusted against the inner dial to account for the effect of the extra quarter-day in the solar year.   The ring is most likely seen as a manifestation of a 354-day lunar calendar if one accepts the 354-day evidence. It is perhaps the first instance of the Egyptian civil-based lunar calendar postulated by Richard Anthony Parker in 1950, given the age of the mechanism's putative manufacture and the existence of Egyptian month names. The lunar calendar was intended to act as a daily indicator of succeeding lunations and to aid in the understanding of the Metonic(The moon phases return at the same time of year every almost precisely 19 years during the Metonic cycle. Although the recurrence is imperfect, careful examination shows that the Metonic cycle, which is defined as 235 synodic months, is only 2 hours, 4 minutes, and 58 seconds longer than 19 tropical years. In the fifth century BC, Meton of Athens determined that the cycle was exactly 6,940 days long. The creation of a lunisolar calendar is made easier by using these full integers.) and Saros(The saros, which may be used to forecast solar and lunar eclipses, is a period of exactly 223 synodic months, or around 6585.3211 days, or 18 years, 10, 11, or 12 days (depending on how many leap years there are). In what is known as an eclipse cycle, the Sun, Earth, and Moon return to about the same relative geometry, a nearly straight line, one saros time after an eclipse, and a nearly similar eclipse will take place. A sar is a saros's lower half.) dials as well as the Lunar phase pointer. Unknown gearing is assumed to move a pointer across this scale in synchrony with the rest of the mechanism's Metonic gearing. A one-in-76-year Callippic cycle correction and practical lunisolar intercalation were made possible by the movement and registration of the ring with respect to the underlying holes.   The dial also shows the Sun's location on the ecliptic in relation to the current year's date. The ecliptic serves as a useful reference for determining the locations of the Moon, the five planets known to the Greeks, and other celestial bodies whose orbits are similarly near to it.   The locations of bodies on the ecliptic were marked by at least two points. The position of the Moon was displayed by a lunar pointer, while the location of the mean Sun and the current date were also provided. The Moon position was the oldest known application of epicyclic gearing(Two gears positioned so that one gear's center spins around the other's center make up an epicyclic gear train, sometimes referred to as a planetary gearset.), and it mimicked the acceleration and deceleration of the Moon's elliptical orbit rather than being a simple mean Moon indicator that would signal movement uniformly across a circular orbit.   The system followed the Metonic calendar, anticipated solar eclipses, and computed the time of various panhellenic athletic competitions, including the Ancient Olympic Games, according to recent research published in the journal Nature in July 2008. The names of the months on the instrument closely resemble those found on calendars from Epirus in northwest Greece and with Corfu, which was formerly known as Corcyra.   Five dials are located on the rear of the mechanism: the Metonic, Saros, and two smaller ones, the so-called Olympiad Dial (recently renamed the Games dial since it did not track Olympiad years; the four-year cycle it closely matches is the Halieiad), the Callippic(a certain approximate common multiple of the synodic month and the tropical year that was put out by Callippus around 330 BC. It is a 76-year span that is an improvement over the Metonic cycle's 19 years.), and the Exeligmos(a time frame of 54 years, 33 days over which further eclipses with the same characteristics and position may be predicted.)   Both the front and rear doors of the wooden casing that houses the mechanism have inscriptions on them. The "instruction manual" looks to be behind the rear door. "76 years, 19 years" is inscribed on one of its parts, denoting the Callippic and Metonic cycles. "223" for the Saros cycle is also written. Another piece of it has the phrase "on the spiral subdivisions 235," which alludes to the Metonic dial.   The mechanism is exceptional due to the degree of miniaturization and the intricacy of its components, which is equivalent to that of astronomical clocks from the fourteenth century. Although mechanism specialist Michael Wright has argued that the Greeks of this era were capable of designing a system with many more gears, it includes at least 30 gears. Whether the device contained signs for each of the five planets known to the ancient Greeks is a subject of significant controversy. With the exception of one 63-toothed gear that is otherwise unaccounted for, no gearing for such a planetary display is still in existence.   It is quite likely that the mechanism featured additional gearing that was either removed before being placed onboard the ship or lost in or after the shipwreck due to the enormous gap between the mean Sun gear and the front of the box as well as the size and mechanical characteristics on the mean Sun gear. Numerous attempts to mimic what the Greeks of the time would have done have been made as a result of the absence of evidence and the nature of the front section of the mechanism, and of course various solutions have been proposed as a result of the lack of evidence.   Michael Wright was the first to create a model that included a simulation of a future planetarium system in addition to the existing mechanism. He said that corrections for the deeper, more fundamental solar anomaly would have been undertaken in addition to the lunar anomaly (known as the "first anomaly"). Along with the well-known "mean sun" (present time) and lunar pointers, he also provided pointers for this "real sun," Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn.   A solution that differs significantly from Wright's was published by Evans, Carman, and Thorndike. Their suggestion focused on the uneven spacing of the letters on the front clock face, which seemed to them to imply an off-center sun indication arrangement. By eliminating the requirement to imitate the solar anomaly, this would simplify the mechanism. Additionally, they proposed that simple dials for each individual planet would display data such as significant planetary cycle events, initial and final appearances in the night sky, and apparent direction changes rather than accurate planetary indication, which is rendered impossible by the offset inscriptions. Compared to Wright's concept, this system would result in a far more straightforward gear system with significantly lower forces and complexity.   After much investigation and labor, Freeth and Jones released their idea in 2012. They developed a concise and workable answer to the planetary indicator puzzle. They also suggest that the date pointer, which displays the mean position of the Sun and the date on the month dial, be separated to display the solar anomaly (i.e., the sun's apparent location in the zodiac dial). If the two dials are properly synced, Wright's front panel display may be shown on the other dials as well. However, unlike Wright's model, this one is simply a 3-D computer simulation and has not been physically constructed.   Similar devices A first-century BC philosophical debate by Cicero, De re publica (54-51 BC), discusses two devices that some contemporary authors believe to be some sort of planetarium or orrery, forecasting the motions of the Sun, Moon, and the five planets known at the time. After Archimedes' demise at the siege of Syracuse in 212 BC, the Roman commander Marcus Claudius Marcellus took both of them to Rome. One of these devices was the sole thing Marcellus preserved during the siege because of his admiration for Archimedes (the second was placed in the Temple of Virtue). The instrument was kept as a family heirloom, and according to Philus, who was present during a conversation Cicero imagined had taken place in Scipio Aemilianus's villa in the year 129 BC, Gaius Sulpicius Gallus, who served as consul with Marcellus's nephew in 166 BC and is credited by Pliny the Elder with being the first Roman to have written a book explaining solar and lunar eclipses, gave both a "learned explanation" and working demonstrations of the device.   According to Pappus of Alexandria (290–c. 350 AD), Archimedes had penned a now-lost treatise titled On Sphere-Making that described how to build these contraptions. Many of his innovations are described in the ancient documents that have survived, some of which even have crude illustrations. His odometer is one such instrument; the Romans later used a similar device to set their mile marks (described by Vitruvius, Heron of Alexandria and in the time of Emperor Commodus). Although the pictures in the literature looked to be practical, attempts to build them as shown had been unsuccessful. The system worked properly when the square-toothed gears in the illustration were swapped out for the angled gears found in the Antikythera mechanism.   This technique existed as early as the third century BC, if Cicero's story is accurate. Later Roman authors including Lactantius (Divinarum Institutionum Libri VII), Claudian (In sphaeram Archimedes), and Proclus (Commentary on the First Book of Euclid's Elements of Geometry) in the fourth and fifth century also make reference to Archimedes' invention.   Cicero also said that another such device was built "recently" by his friend Posidonius, "... each one of the revolutions of which brings about the same movement in the Sun and Moon and five wandering stars [planets] as is brought about each day and night in the heavens"   Given that the third device was almost certainly in Posidonius's possession by that time and that both the Archimedes-made and Cicero-mentioned machines were found in Rome at least 30 years after the shipwreck's estimated date, it is unlikely that any one of these machines was the Antikythera mechanism discovered in the wreck. The researchers who rebuilt the Antikythera mechanism concur that it was too complex to have been a singular invention.   This proof that the Antikythera mechanism was not unique strengthens the argument that there was a tradition of complex mechanical technology in ancient Greece that was later, at least in part, transmitted to the Byzantine and Islamic worlds. During the Middle Ages, complex mechanical devices that were still simpler than the Antikythera mechanism were built in these cultures.A fifth- or sixth-century Byzantine Empire geared calendar fragment that was mounted to a sundial and maybe used to help tell time has been discovered. The Caliph of Baghdad commissioned Bani Ms's Kitab al-Hiyal, also known as the Book of Ingenious Devices, in the early ninth century AD. Over a hundred mechanical devices were detailed in this document, some of which may have been found in monastic manuscripts from antiquity. Around 1000, the scholar al-Biruni described a geared calendar that was comparable to the Byzantine mechanism, and a 13th-century astrolabe also had a clockwork system that is similar to it. It's probable that this medieval technology was brought to Europe and had a part in the region's development of mechanical clocks.   Su Song, a Chinese polymath, built a mechanical clock tower in the 11th century that, among other things, measured the positions of several stars and planets that were shown on an armillary sphere that spun mechanically.   Conspiracy Corner The Antikythera Mechanism was thought to have been created between 150 and 100 BCE at first, but recent research dates its development to approximately 205 BCE. It's interesting that this technology seems to have just vanished because comparable items didn't start turning up until the 14th century. But why did the ancient Greeks permit such a significant development to be forgotten over time? Posidonius carried on the work of the Greek astronomer Hipparchus by instructing students at an astronomy academy. Posidonius invented a contraption that "in each rotation reproduces the identical motions of the Sun, the Moon and the five planets that take place in the skies every day and night," according to Cicero, one of Posidonius' students. Which remarkably resembles the Antikythera Mechanism. However, when the Mechanism was created in the second century BCE, Posidonius was not yet alive. Hipparchus was, though. Posidonius could have built an instrument based on Hipparchus' Antikythera Mechanism, which he made many years before. What about Posidonius' instrument, though? A time traveler from the future may have developed the Mechanism, or it may genuinely be a futuristic gadget that was taken back to ancient Greece and put there on purpose if it dates to the second century BCE and equivalent technology didn't start emerging until decades later. Some people think the entire thing is a hoax despite overwhelming scientific proof to the contrary. After all, it is challenging to reconcile the Antikythera mechanism's antiquity with its growth in technology. The Turk, a fictional chess-playing robot constructed in the 18th century, has been likened to the mechanism by some. But scientists easily acknowledge that The Turk is a fraud. Why would they fabricate evidence of the mechanism's reliability? What would they be attempting to conceal? Even though it is quite old, the Antikythera mechanism represented an enormous advance in technology. So how did the Greeks of antiquity come up with the concept, much alone construct it? They didn't, according to The Ancient Aliens: “Beings with advanced knowledge of astronomical bodies, mathematics and precision engineering tools created the device or gave the knowledge for its creation to someone during the first century BC. But the knowledge was not recorded or wasn't passed down to anyone else.” Therefore, aliens either provided humanity the ability to make this gadget or the knowledge to do so, but they didn't do anything to assure that we built on it or learnt from it. It seems like the aliens weren't planning ahead very well. This theory, like the extraterrestrial one, is based simply on the observation that the Antikythera mechanism seems to be too technologically sophisticated for its period. The mythical Atlantis was a highly developed metropolis that vanished into the ocean. Many people think the city genuinely exists, despite the fact that Plato only described it in a sequence of allegories. And some of those individuals believe the Antikythera mechanism proves Atlantis existed since it was too sophisticated for any known culture at the time; they believe Atlantis, not Greece, is where the mechanism originated. According to the notion of intelligent design, a higher power purposefully created many things on Earth because they are too sophisticated to have arisen by simple evolution. Because the Antikythera mechanism is so much more sophisticated than any other artifact from that age, some people think it is proof of intelligent design. If this is the case, you have to question what divine, omnipotent creature would spend time creating such a minute object for such a trivial goal. Greece's coast is home to the island of Rhodes. Greek artifacts were placed into the ship transporting the Mechanism, which was sailing for Rome. One explanation for this might be that the Antikythera mechanism was taken together with the spoils from the island of Rhodes. How come Rhodes was pillaged? following a victorious war against the Greeks, as part of Julius Caesar's triumphal procession. Could the loss of one of history's most significant and cutting-edge technical advancements be accidentally attributed to Julius Caesar? The Antikythera mechanism may have predicted the color of eclipses, which is thought to be impossible by scientists, according to new translations of texts on the device. Therefore, were the forecasts the mechanism provided only educated guesses, or did the ancient Greeks have knowledge that we do not? According to legend, an extraterrestrial species called the Annunaki (possible episode?) invaded and inhabited Earth (they were revered as gods in ancient Mesopotamia), leaving behind evidence of their presence. The Antikythera mechanism could be one of these hints. The Mechanism uses what appears to be distinct technology that was, as far as we are aware, extremely different from anything else that was built about 200 BCE. It estimates when lunar eclipses would occur, which advanced space invaders would undoubtedly know something about. An intriguing view on the process is held by Mike Edmunds from Cardiff University. The uniqueness and technological innovation of the item are frequently highlighted in reports about it. However, Edmunds speculates that the mechanism may have been in transit to a client when the ship carrying it went down. If one device was being delivered, might there possibly be others — if not on this ship, then potentially on others from Rhodes? — he asks in his essay. There may have been more of these amazing machines that have been lost to the passage of time or are still out there waiting to be found. MOVIES - films from the future - https://filmsfromthefuture.com/movies/

Original Soundchat
OSC 179 - AI: The Somnium Files & Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward

Original Soundchat

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 111:19


THIS WEEK: Joe investigates a serial killer case where the victims are missing their left eyes by going into dreams in AI: The Somnium Files and Peter decides whether to ally with or betray teammates in the Nonary Game after solving escape rooms with Ryoma Nakamura's work in Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward.

Parousia Podcast
Parousia Podcast - Virtue: The Antidote to Vice - Dr Paul Morrissey with Matthew-Hermann Tague

Parousia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 55:52


Those who have heard the conversion story of Matthew-Hermann Tague will know he often talks about virtue being the antidote to vice. In this Parousia Podcast, Matthew-Hermann Tague sits down with Dr Paul Morrissey, President of Campion College Australia to discuss the theological and cardinal virtues in more detail. For details about the Campion Early Offer Scheme mentioned in this episode, go to www.campion.edu.au.

Constituting America
Essay 49: America's Founders on Virtue as Fundamental to Republican Government

Constituting America

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 27:10


Essay 49: America's Founders on Virtue as Fundamental to Republican Government by Joerg Knipprath. Click here to explore our 2022 90-Day Study: American Exceptionalism Revealed: The Historic Rise and Fall of Worldwide Regimes and How United States Founding Wisdom Prevails. America's Founders understood the failings of totalitarian regimes, and thus attempted an experiment in liberty they hoped future Americans would find invaluable and maintain. Constituting America's 2022 90-Day Study looks at the rise and fall of worldwide regimes throughout history, juxtaposed to founding principles of the United States Constitution and federalists' and anti-federalists' views of their day regarding what history taught them about human nature and what is required to preserve our freedom!

The Product Podcast
The Most Underrated PM Virtue by Disney SVP of Product

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 23:56


In this episode we are joined by Disney SVP of Product, Ajay Arora, to talk about his very successful career in Product Management and how he got there by staying humble. He will be giving you an exclusive look at all the great products he has built and what it took to build them so that you can get inspired to achieve greatness just like him.Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources hereThis episode is brought to you by Amplitude.Amplitude is the pioneer in digital optimization software, helping product leaders answer the strategic question: "How do our digital products drive our business?" More than 1,400 customers, including Atlassian, Instacart, NBCUniversal, Shopify, and Under Armour rely on Amplitude. The Amplitude Digital Optimization System makes critical data accessible and actionable so teams can unlock insights, build winning products faster, and turn products into revenue. Amplitude is the best-in-class product analytics solution, ranked #1 in G2's 2022 Winter Report.Get started today at amplitude.com

FatMan Chronicles
FMC Runs Chicago: Chapter 20

FatMan Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 60:31


Episode 149 – FMC Runs Chicago: Chapter 20 After Pete's review of dining at Virtue and getting to meet Top Chef fan favorite Damarr Brown, and another 15 minutes of food talk, the guys dive into what's been going on in their lives. Pete is on the mend just in time to give a good push to the Chicago Marathon with 15 weeks to go. Dave is finding his mental mojo while understanding there is a long road ahead. In general, a good week for your FMC co-hosts. All of this leads Pete to suggest a way to get some focus and invite all of you along. The July Habit Kickoff is live on Facebook. More details are coming soon. In the meantime, join us here, and let's get those habits hoppin'! Now, get out there and #bebettertoday! This episode is sponsored by The No Fear Project podcast, the Be Better Today podcast, and That Wine Pod. Subscribe now in your favorite podcast app! Join The No Fear Project on Facebook or shoot Pete a note for more information.   Listen, subscribe, share, rate & review! Please subscribe to the podcast and leave us a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, Podbean, Stitcher, or in your favorite podcast app! Find FatMan Chronicles at: Fatmanchronicles.com Facebook.com/fatmanstories Twitter & Instagram - @fatmanstories Email – fatmanchronicles@outlook.com Music – “You Got Me Wrong” by Sifar Copyright 2022 Paragon Media – All Rights Reserved

Ali Albarghouthi
And Muhammad is His Messenger The Virtue of Prophet Muhammad & Evidence of his prophethood

Ali Albarghouthi

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 72:04


Science Salon
284. Yoram Hazony on Traditional Conservatism vs. Enlightenment Liberalism

Science Salon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 110:01


In this conversation based on his new book, political theorist Yoram Hazony argues that the best hope for Western democracy is a return to the empiricist, religious, and nationalist traditions of America and Britain, a distinctive alternative to divine-right monarchy, Puritan theocracy, and liberal revolution. After tracing the tradition from the Wars of the Roses to Burke and across the Atlantic to the American Federalists and Lincoln, Hazony describes the rise and fall of Enlightenment liberalism after World War II and the present-day debates between neoconservatives and national conservatives over how to respond to liberalism and the woke left. In response, Shermer makes the case for Enlightenment liberalism, with its focus on science and reason, as the primary driver of moral progress over the centuries. Hazony criticizes the modern left with its focus on identity politics, while Shermer counters that while the illiberalism of the left can be problematic, a far greater threat to individual liberty and personal autonomy—the bedrock of Enlightenment liberalism—comes from religious and nationalist conservatism on the right. Yoram Hazony, an award-winning political theorist, is the chairman of the Edmund Burke Foundation in Washington and the president of the Herzl Institute in Jerusalem. His previous book, The Virtue of Nationalism (Basic Books, 2018), was named Conservative Book of the Year for 2019 by the Intercollegiate Studies Institute and has been translated into half a dozen languages. He appears frequently in the U.S. media, including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Fox News, CNN, NPR, Time, The New Republic, The Ben Shapiro Show, and the Rubin Report. A graduate of Princeton University (B.A.) and Rutgers (Ph.D.), Hazony lives in Jerusalem with his wife and children.

Device & Virtue
S7E5 - The Digital Prophet: Marshall McLuhan—with Nick Ripatrazone

Device & Virtue

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 57:23


When Wired magazine started, they did the weirdest thing a tech magazine could do—they picked a patron saint. Was Marshall McLuhan a digital prophet? Chris interviews Nick Ripatrazone, author of Digital Communion: Marshall McLuhan's Spiritual Vision for a Virtual Age (2022). Nick is the Culture Editor for Image and a Contributing Editor for the Catholic Herald. Find out why McLuhan, in his mid-20s, left his nominal Baptist upbringing for a robust Catholic faith. Plus, are smartphones the new stained glass window?  In the book, Ripatrazone writes, "For McLuhan, mass media was a form of Mass. When we communicate electronically, not only do we send information; we send ourselves." He unpacks this idea more fully in this episode. Afterward, Adam and Chris discuss how digital media provides a kind of "secular" communion, and whether McLuhan's uniquely Christian metaphor ultimately breaks down. Finally, find out whether Nick thinks the digital age requires us to reimagine the sacraments in a virtual world. LINKS Nick's book is Digital Communion: Marshall McLuhan's Spiritual Vision for a Virtual Age. Marshall McLuhan's books include Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, The Medium is the Massage, and The Gutenberg Galaxy. Chris mentions the posthumously published, The Medium and the Light, as well as Douglas Coupland's biography, Marshall McLuhan: You Know Nothing of My Work! TALK BACK Follow Device & Virtue on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Follow Chris and Adam on Twitter. Support Device & Virtue. Learn how. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Dare Great Things
DGT Episode 191 - Why Does Virtue Matter - The Virtuous Leader Part 2

Dare Great Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 27:30


There is a lot of talk today in Catholic circles about virtuous leadership.  This is a good thing but do we know why virtue is important?  Why does Catholic teaching emphasize virtue so much and why should it be important to business leadership?  In this second of a six part series I lead our participants through an examination of the importance of identity for leadership and the importance of virtue for identity.  If we are going to admit that leadership comes from who we are and virtues help define who we are, then we see the importance of virtues for leadership.

Walk with Jesus
Wickedness Begets Wickedness

Walk with Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 32:29


A mind apart from God only grows in wickedness. Romans 1:28 says, “And even as they did not like to retain God in their knowledge, God gave them over to a reprobate mind, to do those things which are not convenient..” You cannot make light out of darkness, you have to shine a light in the darkness.  Here is the book I mentioned: Church History: A Biblical Perspective by Greg Axe   Check out these past episodes for further study: Episode 17 Faith, Virtue, Liberty Episode 46 Modern Day Tower of Babel Episode 63 Absolutely Crazy Episode 65 Kant Can't Episode 94 Psychedelics and Reconstruction   Here is the Spotify playlist I mentioned.   If you have any questions or prayer requests or need a physical Bible feel free to DM me on Instagram at #walkwithjesuspodcast or email me at WalkWithJesusPodcast@gmail.com

Abhayagiri Dhamma Talks
Sustaining Wholesome States

Abhayagiri Dhamma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022


Stony Point Podcast with Jim England
Adding To My Faith - 2 Peter 1:5-9

Stony Point Podcast with Jim England

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 29:30


1. Person of Faith A. Divine nature B. Divine calling C. Divine promises 2. Growing as a person of faith A. Virtue or moral excellence B. Practical knowledge C. Self control D. Perseverance or steadfastness E. Godliness F. Brotherly kindness G. Love 3. What I want missing from my faith A. Barren and unfruitful B. Shortsighted or spiritually blind C. Loss of peace and assurance --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/frank-england/support

21st Century Wire's Podcast
SUNDAY WIRE: Episode #424 ‘Summer of Virtue' with special guests

21st Century Wire's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 124:11


NOTE: Our main Twitter account for Patrick Henningsen @21WIRE has been permanently deplatformed by Twitter's censorship department – so please follow and promote our official media account instead, @21stCenturyWire. This week the SUNDAY WIRE broadcasts LIVE on ACR, with host Patrick Henningsen covering all the top stories in US, UK and internationally. This week we're joined by the Sunday Wire's roving correspondent for culture & sport, Basil Valentine, and ACR's Hesher, to discuss the selling-out of the UK's once legendary Glastonbury Festival, which has been hijacked by politics, with globalist icons Zelensky and Greta taking centre stage this year, as festival goers get a megadose of virtue-signaling. All this and much more. Featured Music by Walk-On Army & Utility GET YOUR COPY OF NEW DAWN MAGAZINE'S MAY-JUNE ISSUE: https://21w.co/nd192 SHOP CLIVE DE CARLE'S NATURAL HEALTH STORE HERE: https://21w.co/shop-clive JOIN OUR TELEGRAM CHANNEL HERE: https://t.me/My21wire   SUPPORT OUR MEDIA PLATFORM HERE: https://21w.co/support  SUBSCRIBE & BECOME A MEMBER @21WIRE.TV: https://21wire.tv The Sunday Wire with Patrick Henningsen broadcasts LIVE on Alternate Current Radio SUNDAY 5pm-8pm UK Time, 12pm-3pm EST (US), 9am-12pm PST (US) at: http://alternatecurrentradio.com  http://thesundaywire.com

The Garrett Ashley Mullet Show
A Free People's Suicide by Os Guinness

The Garrett Ashley Mullet Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 45:23


Freedom, to be sustainable, requires not just Liberty in the abstract. What Os Guinness calls "the golden triangle" includes also Virtue and "Faith in something." Without these, Freedom cannot be maintained. In his 2014 book, 'A Free People's Suicide: Sustainable Freedom and the American Future,' Guinness delves deep into quotes from the Founding Fathers of the United States of America, plus also great thinkers from Western history - all to underscore the point that free peoples typically do not remain free forever. Yet the audacious hope of the men who won the War of Independence against Great Britain in the late 18th century, then went on to turn 13 colonies into what is now the world's declining yet still pre-eminent superpower, was that this free people would remain free forever. Their ambition was not based on nothing, however. Students of Polybius, Cicero, Augustine, and others - the great men of renown who constituted the United States in the first place did so after careful study of what had caused other great empires and peoples to both rise and fail in maintaining their civilizations and societies. As Guinness points out, in our day we have almost entirely divorced our ideas of liberty from their requisite partners - faith and virtue. Those are now thoroughly private matters, and liberty has been accordingly redefined to the point that any reminder of an objective standard of good character is shouted down because we are infringing on someone else's freedom in the abstract. Yet freedom cannot only exist in a negative sense, as freedom from unreasonable searches and seizure, or freedom from infringements on our 1st and 2nd Amendment rights exemplify. There is also a positive kind of freedom which is to and for something - freedom to do what one ought and must as a fulfillment of duty to God and our fellow man. In our obsession with negative liberty, Guinness argues, we have lost sight of the sense in which our freedom is to do more than just whatever we want, but also to do what we must. In so doing, anyone telling us we must do something is said to be infringing on our freedom to do what we want because in our abandonment of faith and virtue we do not want to do what we ought. Yet here again, to the extent that faith and virtue have become private matters, the American Republic has been deprived of public faith and virtue. And the results are nothing short of catastrophic. Thus we waiver somewhere between Thomas Cole's third and fourth paintings in his 1833-1836 series The Course of Empire - transitioning now from The Culmination to Destruction as many previous great empires throughout history have. As the recent Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade, plus the subsequent response from angry Leftists and ambivalent establishment conservatives demonstrates, we are now in a full-blown crisis in the U.S. due to a rejection of duty. Men no longer have the duty to be men. Women no longer have the duty to be women. In fact, we have flown so far and fast from our duties that we want to be liberated from even the claim that there is any such thing as men and women. Yet it is tragic how we suddenly believe again that there is such a thing as women. And the ball is in the court of the Pro Life movement to argue whether mothers who seek to get an abortion in states where that will be illegal should be prosecuted. And it would be funny if it were not so sad that the Left finishes Pride Month in the U.S. screeching at the sky again about women's rights after having just denied emphatically that they even know what a woman is. This is all to say that Guinness is right. If we want to endure in Culmination and not end in Destruction we must repent, rekindle, and revive Christian faith and virtue in this country. Otherwise we are doomed, plain and simple. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/garrett-ashley-mullet/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/garrett-ashley-mullet/support

Abhayagiri Dhamma Talks
The Purpose of Practice

Abhayagiri Dhamma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


Ajahn Pasanno cautions against focusing on the method in meditation and instead turn to the experience and the result of practice.

John Piper Sermons
The Uncommon Virtue of Humility

John Piper Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 41:06


Humility flourishes in hearts that focus not on being humble, but on gladly exalting Jesus, who is superior to us in every possible way.

Virtue for Women
Session 7: Rooted in Christ: Invincible and Secure | Amber Neben

Virtue for Women

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 20:11


Is it possible to have inner strength that is more powerful than the pressures, voices or challenges we face in life? Yes! But it is sourced from the Lord and not ourselves. In this podcast, professional athlete Amber Neben covers practical steps to help cultivate heart, mind and soul strength. “I hope to help you see the treasure we have in Scripture, and how—as we do what God says and believe what He says about us—we are equipped to develop and maintain inner invincibility and emotional security.” -- To join a Harvest women's small group, go to virtue.harvest.org/studies Learn more about Virtue women's ministry at Harvest Christian Fellowship by going to virtue.harvest.org/about/. Support the show: https://harvest.org/donate/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lakeshore Church
True Virtue // Honor In A Cancel Culture

Lakeshore Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 26:35


True Virtue // Honor In A Cancel Culture - Craig Groeschel

Christ Church InTown
A Fellowship Of Virtue - Dave Abney - 06/26/2022

Christ Church InTown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 40:34


Rev Dave Abney. A Fellowship Of Virtue. 1 Timothy 2:8-15. 06/26/2022.

Aruna Ratanagiri Dhamma Talks
Luang Por Munindo (full catalogue) - Are We Suffering From a Virtue Deficiency?

Aruna Ratanagiri Dhamma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 33:00


(keywords) (slightly edited version) Teaching styles, translating, Rahula, wise reflection, relevant, rate of change, technology, political parties, blaming, wisdom, insight, supportive conditions, Awakening, illness, medicine, diet, exercise, instilling virtues, pejorative, virtue signalling, vitamin deficiency, gratitude, patience, forgiveness, generosity, kindness, integrity, sense of ‘I', identity, strong, stable, supple, Christian family, Prodigal Son, betrayal, forgiveness, Jesus on the cross, bickering, vicissitudes, reservoir, Kisa Gotami, mustard seeds, compassion, self-obsession, Devadatta, praise and gain, lick-spittle, intimidation, philosophical arguments, feeling enquiry, equanimity, generosity, counter-force for self-obsession, forgiveness, adding ill-will, contentment, Bhikkhuni Mahapajapati, modesty, contentment, frugality, effort, solitude, GP clinic, backlog, threatening, volatility, Mt Everest, past-life accumulations.

Catholic Studies Academy Podcast
Episode 125: June 24, 2022 - Victory For Virtue

Catholic Studies Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 63:03


Episode 125: June 24, 2022 - Victory For Virtue by Jason Gale

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew
On the Necessity of Holiness with Sharon Lebell

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 43:32


The Walled Garden is a podcast and community of independent philosophers and seekers who are dedicated to the pursuit of truth, wisdom, virtue, and the divine. Led by Australian poet, philosopher, and musician Simon Drew, American philosopher, author, and speaker Sharon Lebell, and British philosopher and researcher Kai Whiting, The Walled Garden hosts regular live events and meetups with fascinating philosophers, theologians, artists, leaders, and seekers who can teach us all about how to live a flourishing existence. Visit The Walled Garden: thewalledgarden.com Join our free Discord Chat: https://discord.gg/5TAUzfdCe8 Get one-on-one mentoring with our philosophers: https://thewalledgarden.com/mentors Register for Upcoming Events: https://thewalledgarden.com/events Shop at The Walled Garden: https://thewalledgarden.store/ About Sharon Sebell: Sharon is one of the pioneers of the contemporary Stoicism movement, and the author behind the best-selling interpretation of Epictetus' writings, “The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness.” As a musician and prominent writer, Sharon seeks to liberate the wisdom of the past in order to facilitate deeper meaning-making and personal flourishing. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sadhguru's Podcast
The Greatest Virtue - Inclusiveness #DailyWisdom

Sadhguru's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 0:59


Conscious Planet: https://www.consciousplanet.orgSadhguru App (Download): https://onelink.to/sadhguru__appOfficial Sadhguru Website: https://isha.sadhguru.orgSadhguru Exclusive: https://isha.sadhguru.org/in/en/sadhguru-exclusiveYogi, mystic and visionary, Sadhguru is a spiritual master with a difference. An arresting blend of profundity and pragmatism, his life and work serves as a reminder that yoga is a contemporary science, vitally relevant to our times.

Collegevue church of Christ Sermon Podcast
Silence is a Virtue (June 19, 2022)

Collegevue church of Christ Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022


In this sermon we look at areas where silence is important.

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux
5000 FREEDOMAIN SHOW 5,000! THE UPB PROJECT!

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 6:38


Thank you for making this massive wave of warm philosophy possible!www.freedomain.com/donate

Uncommon Knowledge
Yoram Hazony Rediscovers Conservatism

Uncommon Knowledge

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 71:28


Yoram Hazony is the chairman of the Edmund Burke Foundation and president of the Herzl Institute. His 2018 book, The Virtue of Nationalism, established Hazony as one of the leading proponents of a new kind of “national conservatism.” His new book, Conservatism: A Rediscovery, has set off a passionate debate among intellectuals on the Right to determine what “national conservatism” actually means and why conservatism needs to be rediscovered. We put those questions and many more to Hazony in this interview. Recorded on May 17, 2022

The Daily Stoic
Journalist James Pogue on Political Principles and Cultivating Virtue | We All Must Go Into The Wilderness

The Daily Stoic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 100:06


Ryan reads today's daily meditation and talks to journalist James Pogue about his recent piece on the new right in Vanity Fair, how the modern political climate is void of solid principles, why cultivating virtue is so important, and more.I came across his recent piece in Vanity Fair on the New Right, where he dives inside the new strain of reactionary, retro-patriarchal conservative politics embodied by those like Tucker Carlson and J.D. Vance. It touched on a lot of things I have been thinking about lately, so I wanted to have him on to discuss this particular topic because it feels timely and important.James Pogue is a journalist and essayist who has written for Harper's, The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Granta, the New Republic, and Vice, among many others. He is a recipient of support from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and was once called a “brilliant young Southern writer” by the Oxford American. He lives in LA, where I help run a native plant nursery. My first book is called Chosen Country: A Rebellion in the West, a first-person account of conflict over public lands in the American west. NED Products will help you perform better, sharpen your mind and get consistent, quality sleep. Go to helloned.com/STOIC or enter code STOIC at checkout to get 15% off.LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Every week, nearly 40 million job seekers visit LinkedIn? Post your job for free at LinkedIn.com/STOIC. Terms and conditions apply.Go to shopify.com/stoic, all lowercase, for a FREE fourteen-day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features. Grow your business with Shopify today - go to shopify.com/stoic right now.Framebridge makes it easier and more affordable than ever to frame your favorite things - without ever leaving the house. Get started today - frame your photos or send someone the perfect gift. Go to Framebridge.com and use promo code STOIC to save an additional 15% off your first order.KiwiCo is a subscription service that delivers everything your kids will need to make, create and play. Get 50% off your first month plus FREE shipping on ANY crate line with code STOIC at kiwico.com.Sign up for the Daily Stoic email: https://dailystoic.com/dailyemailCheck out the Daily Stoic Store for Stoic inspired products, signed books, and more.Follow us: Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, TikTok, Facebook

Hard Men Podcast
The Good Man: Masculine Virtue from The Aeneid

Hard Men Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 37:03


In The Aeneid, Virgil paints a picture of the good man through the story of Aeneas. Having fled after Troy fell to the Greeks, our hero embarks on a journey to plant a city for his son and future generations. In the process, we learn that Aeneas is a good man because he has developed pietas, gravitas, and auctoritas. In this episode, we'll talk about what those virtues are and why they're central to understanding masculinity. Special thanks to this episode's sponsors, Reformation Heritage Books, and Christendom Bible College. Be sure to sign up to get email updates from Christendom Bible College and you will get a three-chapter excerpt of Frank J. Smith's book, Race, Church, & Society. Notes:   The Aeneid, Virgil. Household and the War for the Cosmos, CR Wiley. Get your free three-chapter excerpt of Race, Church, & Society 

Live Authentically Podcast with Pamela Savino
Episode 124: Be in the Moment with Sharon Lebell

Live Authentically Podcast with Pamela Savino

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 36:01


The Live Authentically podcast is back with Sharon Lebell, a bestselling author, composer, speaker and performing musician. Sharon joins Pam to talk about Stoicism, how to live your best possible life and her internationally bestselling book, “The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness.”As per usual, Pam asks Sharon a pertinent question: “How do you live authentically?” To which Sharon responds, “I seek to live authentically every day by asking myself one question, and it's simply this: What can you do with the moment? What can I do with this moment? Because when you think about it, well, it's all we have.”It's true that the present moment is all that we have. And in this present moment, Sharon says we can make a choice that can resonate with us for years to come. It's hard for any of us to know exactly how, but we have the control to change the course of our lives by the decisions we make at any given moment.Getting out of the process of constantly unconsciously doing and shifting toward creating conscious choices isn't easy. It's not a problem that Sharon can conclusively solve. “But what I do believe we can do is set deliberate reminders to take a pause, to draw yourself back into yourself again, or to remember to remember,” Sharon shares.One of the ways Sharon says she does that for herself is by remembering that she's a musician. Sharon put a sticky note on one of her instruments so that when she passes by, she has to read it. The note reads, “Pay the toll,” prompting Sharon to play a tune on her instrument any time she reads the note.“I would urge other people to just find ways of reminding themselves… For lack of a better way of saying it, remind yourself to be who you decided you were going to be. I mean, you know, one of those aspects of that question for me is I'm a musician. Well, if you're a musician, pay the toll,” Sharon chuckled.Learn more about Sharon and what she has to offer by watching the full podcast episode here. Or you can visit her website, or follow her on Facebook.

Buddhist Society of Western Australia
Virtue, Peace and Compassion | Ajahn Brahm | 17 June 2022

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 79:32


Ajahn Brahm explains that when he bows to the Buddha statue three times, he is paying respect to virtue, peace and compassion. Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page: https://bswa.org/teachings/, choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean.

Yaron Brook Show
YBS: Yaron's Rules For Life Part 16 -- Cultivating the Virtue of Justice

Yaron Brook Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 118:35


Show is Sponsored by: https://www.expressvpn.com/yaron and https://www.fountainheadcasts.comLike what you hear? Like, share, and subscribe to stay updated on new videos and help promote the Yaron Brook Show: https://bit.ly/3ztPxTxBecome a sponsor to get exclusive access and help create more videos like this: https://bit.ly/2TCEqHcOr make a one-time donation: https://bit.ly/2RZOyJJContinue the discussion by following Yaron on Twitter (https://bit.ly/3iMGl6z) and Facebook (https://bit.ly/3vvWDDC )Want to learn more about Ayn Rand and Objectivism? Visit the Ayn Rand Institute: https://bit.ly/35qoEC3 #SelfEsteem #Morality #Interpersonal #Selfishness #Objectivism #Ethics #Politics

Passion Struck with John R. Miles
6 Ways Patience Is an Important Virtue and How You Build It w/John R. Miles EP 151

Passion Struck with John R. Miles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 24:45


John R. Miles - Six Ways Patience Is an Important Virtue and How to Build It. | Brought to you by Masterworks. Go to https://www.masterworks.io/ and use code passion to start. Today, we live in a fast-paced world where we desire results at the speed of thought. We consume our fast foods, get our groceries and meals delivered to our house, drive our fast cars, and respond to the constant instant messaging, all of which can make us prone to impatience. Now, it is okay for some things to be done faster. But not for everything. And that is why it is so vital to understand the importance of patience. --► Full show notes: https://passionstruck.com/six-ways-patience-is-an-important-virtue/  --► Subscribe to My YouTube Channel Here: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnRMiles --► Subscribe to the podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/passion-struck-with-john-r-miles/id1553279283. *Our Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/passionstruck. Thank You Masterworks for Sponsoring. This episode of Passion Struck with John R. Miles is brought to you by Masterworks.  66% of Billionaires Collect Art, so Why Aren't You? Low Minimums, Simple and Exciting. You Can Use Art as an Alternative Investment to Diversify Your Portfolio. Blue-Chip Artwork. Go to https://www.masterworks.io/ and use code passion to start. Thank you for listening to this podcast. I hope you keep up with the weekly videos I post on the YouTube channel, subscribe to, and share your learnings with those who need to hear them. Your comments are my oxygen, so please take a second and say 'Hey' ;). What I discuss about the six ways patience is a virtue and how to build it: Speed has its benefits. But, many people misinterpret that real art comes in the form of understanding when to apply both: speed at a micro-level and patience at a macro one to ultimately accomplish our end goals. I will use the story of the Chinese Bamboo tree to illustrate the benefits of patience and six ways to practice it. 0:00 Introduction and announcements 1:53 What makes us prone to impatience? 4:33 The definition of patience 5:27 The parable of the Chinese Bamboo Tree 13:02 Why do we often lose our patience? 15:16 What are the six benefits of practicing patience? 18:19 What are six steps you can take to discover and practice patience? 21:00 Why patience is a critical component of success 22:30 Analysis and wrap-up Show Links Show discussion questions: Why do we put so much focus on the quick wins? Why can patience feel counterintuitive to the big goals we set for ourselves? What did you find most inspiring about the story of the Chinese Bamboo Tree? What can you learn from the farmer's dedication? Are you experiencing any hindrances to being patient? What three things can you do to alter how you approach impatience? What steps will you take after hearing today's episode to change your approach to how you combine speed and patience? Interested in reading the transcript for the episode: https://johnrmiles.com/six-ways-to-benefit-from-the-importance-of-patience/  My episode on why you should Why the Journey Is More Important Than the Destination: https://passionstruck.com/life-is-about-the-journey-not-the-destination/  My interview with Cathy Heller on How Do You Find Your Life's Passion: https://passionstruck.com/cathy-heller-how-do-you-find-your-lifes-passion/  My interview with Jesse Gould on Saving Veterans One Heroic Heart at a Time: https://passionstruck.com/jesse-gould-heroic-hearts-project/  My interview with Jordan Harbinger on Why Legacy is Greater Than Currency:  https://passionstruck.com/jordan-harbinger-on-why-building-your-legacy-is-greater-than-currency/ Are you having trouble prioritizing yourself   John discusses the importance of self-love in Episode 104 Follow John on the Socials: * Twitter: https://twitter.com/Milesjohnr * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnrmiles.c0m * Medium: https://medium.com/@JohnRMiles ​* Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/john_r_miles * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/milesjohn/ * Blog: https://johnrmiles.com * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/passion_struck_podcast/ * Gear: https://www.zazzle.com/store/passion_struck/ -- John R Miles is a serial entrepreneur and the CEO and founder of Passion Struck. His full-service media company helps people live intentionally by creating best-in-class educational and entertainment content. John is also a prolific public speaker, venture capitalist, and author named to the ComputerWorld Top 100 IT Leaders.