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The mountainous southern part of the region of Palestine

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Sermon Audio – Cross of Grace
A Call in the Wilderness

Sermon Audio – Cross of Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022


Matthew 3:1-12In those days, John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness of Judea, proclaiming, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.” This is the one about whom the prophet Isaiah spoke when he said, “The voice of one crying out in the wilderness, ‘Prepare the way of the Lord, and make his paths straight.' Now, John wore clothing of camel's hair with a leather belt around his waist and he ate locusts and wild honey. Then the people of Jerusalem and all the people of Judea were going out to him, and all the along the region of the Jordan, to be baptized by John in the river Jordan, confessing their sins.But when John saw the Pharisees and Sadducees coming for baptism, he said to them, “You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee the wrath that is to come? Bear fruit worthy of repentance. Do not presume to say to yourselves, ‘We have Abraham as our ancestor;' for I tell you, God is able from these stones to raise up children to Abraham. Even now the axe is lying at the root of the trees and every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire.“I baptize you with water for repentance, but one who is more powerful than I is coming after me. I am not worthy to carry his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire. His winnowing-fork is in his hand, and he will clear his threshing-floor and will gather his wheat into the granary; but the chaff he will burn with unquenchable fire.” John the Baptist was a strange bird … an oddball … out there in the wilderness, dressing weirdly, eating differently, baptizing some people, barking at and berating others. A lot can be said about his words, his warnings, and what he wore, of course – all of that camel hair and leather. And the reason we get all of those details, I believe, is that they point to how all of it made him stand out as unique… as special… as chosen, perhaps… as someone different and worth listening to… as someone worth heeding, and following, and someone – however surprising – that we should pay attention to.John the Baptist is one of those people most of us might have looked at sideways – maybe even kept our distance from, in the moment – but who, in hindsight, new what he was talking about.Because, above all else, John the Baptist – Jesus' crazy cousin – was a Truth-Teller. And the Truth can be hard to hear sometimes. He was the voice of one crying out in the wilderness, as the prophet Isaiah predicted. He knew a thing or two about the reign of God and his ministry was about preparing for the coming of that kingdom, by way of Jesus. John knew that, in the coming of Jesus, God's reign of love and justice and mercy and grace was about to break into the world in a way that it never had before. And John was on a mission to preach and teach and warn and welcome whoever he could to what that could mean for them.John the Baptist is impassioned and he's frustrated and he's angry, even, about what he sees in the world around him, and all of that talk about axes and trees, threshing floors, chaff, and unquenchable fire is evidence of that. And it can be scary to some. It doesn't sound very gracious or forgiving or hopeful on the surface. And maybe that's not what John was going for.But, the truth is, each of us has something like the “chaff” of sin in our lives that's worth repenting, worth changing, worth letting God burn away, if you will, by the refining fires of grace, love, mercy and forgiveness. And I like to think that's the kind of stuff John – and Jesus, for that matter – wants to be cut down and done away with in our lives.So, while it may be tempting to write him off as some kind of crazy, carnival barker out there in the wilderness, John the Baptist is a model… a poster child… an example… for anyone with a Truth to tell; for anyone who prepares a path; for anyone who makes a way; for anyone crying out in the wilderness of injustice and sin and ugliness and despair – with better news of love and mercy, grace, forgiveness and hope. And someone, maybe, not everyone wants to hear from.So I thought about John the Baptist when I read a story by Elizabeth Felicetti, this week, in The Christian Century. It's a story about a guy named Luke. Luke wants to be a pastor – to be ordained as a priest, actually, in the Episcopal church. And this guy, Luke, and John the Baptist have a lot in common.Luke doesn't wear camel hair and leather, but he's covered in cheap tattoos and he wears the state-issued blue garb of a maximum security prison, somewhere in Virginia. The food in the prison cafeteria might be worse and weirder than locusts and wild honey, so Luke has created a food ministry where inmates can get soup and ramen noodles to fill them up when they can't enough to eat, otherwise. Luke's wilderness isn't the wilds of the Judean countryside. His wilderness is the prison hospital and its mental health units where he spends time caring for other inmates. And his wilderness is the library and the prison chapel, too – wherever he leads Bible studies and worship inside the facility, for and with prisoners like himself.Now, we don't know much about John the Baptist's past, but Luke is locked up – going on 20 years or so, now, with another 8 to go if he keeps up his good behavior. And Luke is in prison, not for setting fire to some metaphorical “chaff,” like John preaches about, but for actually trying to burn his family home down so he could use the insurance money to pay his college tuition. And for killing his brother, Andrew, too, before setting that fire. Luke did all of this when he was just 18 years old.And Luke is also like John the Baptist, apparently, in that he knows a thing or two about repentance - that is, if you believe his story and see his call to ministry as legitimate and faithful, as many people do, including his parents, whose son he killed and whose home he tried to destroy.There is some evidence of Luke's repentance … of his turning … of his changed ways. He has established a food ministry in prison where hungry inmates can get food when they need it. He also organizes large meals for holidays like Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas. (It might surprise you to know that three square meals a day aren't guaranteed to every inmate in every corrections facility, just because they should be.)Luke has helped with a ministry that trains dogs to become therapy dogs, too. And he's a confidant and a counselor to other inmates – filling in unofficially when the prison chaplain hasn't been able to be around due to COVID protocols. He listens well, pays attention to what others are going through. He prays for and with them when they need it. And, apparently, Luke gives a good hug, too. Something, I imagine, that's hard to come by in prison.His desire to fulfill the role of “priest” as defined by the Episcopal Church's Book of Common Prayer means he longs to “represent Christ and his Church, particularly as pastor to the people; to share with the bishop in the overseeing of the Church; to proclaim the Gospel; to administer the sacraments; and to bless and declare pardon in the name of God.”It may not surprise you that the Church has declined Luke's candidacy for ordination. Of course, they did what churches do best - they sent a committee to meet with him before making their decision. Now, I've only read one article about all of this so my presumptions may be unfair and unfaithful, but I couldn't help but think of this “committee” as something like the Pharisees and Sadducees that John railed against down by the river – this “diocesan commission on ministry” – that visited Luke in the wilderness of his prison, only to decide to stop his discernment process, at least until he's out of prison. Maybe it's not fair to call them a brood of vipers, like John the Baptist might have. Maybe it is. I don't know.But Luke is still willing to jump through all of their hoops, do all of the work, endure all of the rejection, suspicion and skepticism that comes his way, knowing it won't change his situation in prison one bit, but because, he says, of the Spiritual power and authority God's call to ordained ministry would afford him in his dealings with others – even, and especially, in the wilderness behind bars where he lives.Luke even acknowledges that “weighed in the balance,” as he puts it, “the totality of [his] life will always be negative” because of his crimes. He's not trying to earn God's favor or forgiveness or work his way out of the moral mess of his life by seeking to serve the Church. He says, he knows, that he only gets into heaven “by God's grace and the skin of his fingernails” and so he longs to live the best way he can, to give back all that he can, and to follow God in every way that he can. His quest for ordination is about growing into who he thinks he was always created to be when he was marked – in a baptism like John the Baptist's very own, down by the river – just like most of the rest of us, with the cross of Christ, forever.Luke says that things like the food ministry he started “grow wonderfully,” even in the wilderness of a prison like his. “They just need a seed to get started.” And that's his calling as he sees it. “Not to carry the burden for everyone, just to be the seed that evokes our best selves.”Like the voice of one, crying out in the wilderness, you might say. Preparing a way. Making a straight path. Calling others – in the darkest, most despairing time of their lives – to repentance and forgiveness and peace of mind. I think Luke sounds a lot like John – whether the powers that be are able to see it, or recognize it, or encourage him or not.And I like to believe that, if someone like Luke can do what someone like John the Baptist can do – repent, receive forgiveness, and make room for others in the wilderness of their lives to experience some measure of grace, mercy, love, and hope – than someone like you and I can do the same, more often, by way of the love made known to us and through us in Jesus Christ, our Lord.Amen

Commuter Bible OT
Daniel 1-2, Proverbs 26:13-28

Commuter Bible OT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 18:59


Daniel 1 - 1:05 . 1:11Daniel 2 - 4:30 . 4:36Proverbs 26:13-28 - 16:05 . God's people are now in exile in the land of Babylon, which brings us to the book of Daniel, an extraordinary account of a young Judean exile who receives interpretation and prophecy from the Lord while serving foreign kings. Of particular significance in today's passage is the statue that Nebuchadnezzar sees in a dream. The statue's head of gold represented Babylon; its silver chest and arms: the Medo-Persian empire; the bronze stomach and thighs: the Greek empire; the legs of iron: the kingdom of Rome; and the mixed clay and iron feet: a continuation of Rome in later times. Finally, the rock represents the kingdom of God in Christ, as it easily destroys the manmade statue, enduring forever and spreading throughout the earth.:::Christian Standard Bible translation.All music written and produced by John Burgess Ross.Co-produced by the Christian Standard Bible.facebook.com/commuterbibleinstagram.com/commuter_bibletwitter.com/CommuterPodpatreon.com/commuterbibleadmin@commuterbible.org

LARKCAST
The Wrong Resurrection

LARKCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 45:12


As the final decisive turn towards the culmination of Jesus' mission to die, he straight up tells Martha that resurrection isn't like a software you apply to a device. HE IS THE RESURRECTION. Upon casually raising Lazarus from 4 days of death to foreshadow what he means, the Judean leaders collude to finally dispose of this Fanatic. Join Russ and Jameson as they explore the most unique gospel—the gospel of John—through the lens of the finished work of Jesus. This episode features a conversation about John 11._____________________________________________________Helping You Learn To Live Loved...Become a Lark Supporter: https://larksite.com/donateWeb: https://larksite.comLarkcast: https://larksite.com/larkcastBook: Reclaim (Available on Amazon) https://larksite.com/reclaimInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/lark_social/

Commuter Bible
Daniel 1-3, Isaiah 43:1-13

Commuter Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 27:34


Daniel 1 - 1:11 . Daniel 2 - 4:36 . Daniel 3 - 16:31 . Isaiah 43 - 23:55 . The book of Daniel is an extraordinary account of a young Judean exile who receives interpretation and prophecy from the Lord while serving foreign kings. Of particular significance in today's passage is the statue that Nebuchadnezzar sees in a dream. The statue's head of gold represented Babylon; its silver chest and arms: the Medo-Persian empire; the bronze stomach and thighs: the Greek empire; the legs of iron: the kingdom of Rome; and the mixed clay and iron feet: a continuation of Rome in later times. Finally, the rock represents the kingdom of God in Christ, as it easily destroys the manmade statue, enduring forever and spreading throughout the earth.:::Christian Standard Bible translation.All music written and produced by John Burgess Ross.Co-produced by Bobby Brown, Katelyn Rahn, Eric Williamson & the Christian Standard Biblefacebook.com/commuterbibleinstagram.com/commuter_bibletwitter.com/CommuterPodpatreon.com/commuterbibleadmin@commuterbible.org

Pastor Mike Impact Ministries
Psalm 19:1-6 - The God of Creation

Pastor Mike Impact Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 4:58


The well-known Christian writer C. S. Lewis said this about Psalm 19: "I take this Psalm to be the greatest poem in The Psalms and one of the greatest lyrics in the world." The church lectionary assigns this psalm to be read on Christmas Day, when the "Sun of Righteousness" came into the world (Mal. 4:2) and the "Living Word" was laid in the manger (John 1:14). The emphasis in the psalm is on God's revelations of Himself in creation, Scripture, and the human heart. From the title we learn that Psalm 19 is a “Psalm of David”, and he wrote it to be sung as a song because he addressed it to the “Chief Musician”, the Master of the Choir. Spurgeon in his “Treasure of David” wrote: “This song very distinctly divides itself into three parts, very well described by the translators in the ordinary heading of our version. The creatures show God's glory, Psalms 19:1-6. The word shows his grace, Psalms 19:7-11. David prayed for grace, Psalms 19:12-14. Thus praise and prayer are mingled, and he who here sings the work of God in the world without, pleads for a work of grace in himself within.” We are not sure when David wrote this psalm. He could have written it as a shepherd boy on the Judean hills, lying on his back on a dark night and staring up into the star-spangled splendor of the sky. He might have written it as a fugitive when Saul's men were pursuing him one night. Or maybe it was when he fled from Absalom to seek refuge in the wild wastes of the mountains. Or it is possible that he wrote it at some quieter moment when, pacing the roof of his palace, he once again lifted his eyes from the darkened streets of the slumbering city of Jerusalem to see the beautiful night sky in the early hours of the morning as he waited for the sun to rise over the Mt of Olives. In the first six verses, David wrote about the worlds around us and acknowledge God as the Creator. David focused on the heavens above him, and especially the circuit of the sun. Of course, there are many worlds in God's creation. They include the earth beneath our feet, the plant and animal worlds on earth, in the skies and in the waters, the human world, the world of rocks and crystals, worlds visible to the human eye, and worlds so small we need special equipment to see them. David knew none of modern scientific data, and yet when he pondered the heavens, he was overwhelmed by the glory of the Lord. The existence of creation implied the existence of a Creator, and the nature of the creation implied that He was wise enough to plan it and powerful enough to execute His plan and maintain what He had made. So complex a universe demands a Creator who can do anything, who knows everything, and who is present everywhere. But even more, David knew that God was speaking to the inhabitants of the earth by means of His creation. Creation is a "wordless book" that everybody can read because it needs no translation. God speaks through creation day after day and night after night; His speech "pours out" silently, abundantly, universally. David was an outdoorsman and often watched the sunrise and sunset, and what he saw day after day reminded him of a bridegroom leaving the marriage pavilion to claim his bride, and a vigorous athlete running a race. The first image speaks of glory (the groom was richly attired), love and anticipation, while the second speaks of power and determination. But in spite of this universal message that pours out day and night to the entire world, most people ignore it and reject God because they want to live as they please (Rom. 1:18-2:23). The repeated question, "Are people lost who have never heard about Jesus?" has two answers: (1) Yes, they are lost, because God speaks to them all day long, and they refuse to listen; (2) What are we doing about getting the message to these people? God bless!

Tomahawk Missionary Baptist Church's Podcast

Amos was a Judean prophet called to deliver a message primarily to the northern tribes of Israel. Politically, it was a time of prosperity under the long and secure reign of Jeroboam II who, following the example of his father Joash and significantly “restored the border of Israel”. It was also a time of peace with both Judah, and her more distant neighbors. The ever-present menace of Assyria was subdued, possibly because of Nineveh's repentance at the preaching of Jonah. Spiritually however, it was a time of rampant corruption and moral decay.

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible
November 7: Psalm 98; 2 Kings 6:24–7:20; Zechariah 11; John 3:22–36

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 11:19


Psalms and Wisdom: Psalm 98 Psalm 98 (Listen) Make a Joyful Noise to the Lord A Psalm. 98   Oh sing to the LORD a new song,    for he has done marvelous things!  His right hand and his holy arm    have worked salvation for him.2   The LORD has made known his salvation;    he has revealed his righteousness in the sight of the nations.3   He has remembered his steadfast love and faithfulness    to the house of Israel.  All the ends of the earth have seen    the salvation of our God. 4   Make a joyful noise to the LORD, all the earth;    break forth into joyous song and sing praises!5   Sing praises to the LORD with the lyre,    with the lyre and the sound of melody!6   With trumpets and the sound of the horn    make a joyful noise before the King, the LORD! 7   Let the sea roar, and all that fills it;    the world and those who dwell in it!8   Let the rivers clap their hands;    let the hills sing for joy together9   before the LORD, for he comes    to judge the earth.  He will judge the world with righteousness,    and the peoples with equity. (ESV) Pentateuch and History: 2 Kings 6:24–7:20 2 Kings 6:24–7:20 (Listen) Ben-hadad's Siege of Samaria 24 Afterward Ben-hadad king of Syria mustered his entire army and went up and besieged Samaria. 25 And there was a great famine in Samaria, as they besieged it, until a donkey's head was sold for eighty shekels of silver, and the fourth part of a kab1 of dove's dung for five shekels of silver. 26 Now as the king of Israel was passing by on the wall, a woman cried out to him, saying, “Help, my lord, O king!” 27 And he said, “If the LORD will not help you, how shall I help you? From the threshing floor, or from the winepress?” 28 And the king asked her, “What is your trouble?” She answered, “This woman said to me, ‘Give your son, that we may eat him today, and we will eat my son tomorrow.' 29 So we boiled my son and ate him. And on the next day I said to her, ‘Give your son, that we may eat him.' But she has hidden her son.” 30 When the king heard the words of the woman, he tore his clothes—now he was passing by on the wall—and the people looked, and behold, he had sackcloth beneath on his body—31 and he said, “May God do so to me and more also, if the head of Elisha the son of Shaphat remains on his shoulders today.” 32 Elisha was sitting in his house, and the elders were sitting with him. Now the king had dispatched a man from his presence, but before the messenger arrived Elisha said to the elders, “Do you see how this murderer has sent to take off my head? Look, when the messenger comes, shut the door and hold the door fast against him. Is not the sound of his master's feet behind him?” 33 And while he was still speaking with them, the messenger came down to him and said, “This trouble is from the LORD! Why should I wait for the LORD any longer?” Elisha Promises Food 7 But Elisha said, “Hear the word of the LORD: thus says the LORD, Tomorrow about this time a seah2 of fine flour shall be sold for a shekel,3 and two seahs of barley for a shekel, at the gate of Samaria.” 2 Then the captain on whose hand the king leaned said to the man of God, “If the LORD himself should make windows in heaven, could this thing be?” But he said, “You shall see it with your own eyes, but you shall not eat of it.” The Syrians Flee 3 Now there were four men who were lepers4 at the entrance to the gate. And they said to one another, “Why are we sitting here until we die? 4 If we say, ‘Let us enter the city,' the famine is in the city, and we shall die there. And if we sit here, we die also. So now come, let us go over to the camp of the Syrians. If they spare our lives we shall live, and if they kill us we shall but die.” 5 So they arose at twilight to go to the camp of the Syrians. But when they came to the edge of the camp of the Syrians, behold, there was no one there. 6 For the Lord had made the army of the Syrians hear the sound of chariots and of horses, the sound of a great army, so that they said to one another, “Behold, the king of Israel has hired against us the kings of the Hittites and the kings of Egypt to come against us.” 7 So they fled away in the twilight and abandoned their tents, their horses, and their donkeys, leaving the camp as it was, and fled for their lives. 8 And when these lepers came to the edge of the camp, they went into a tent and ate and drank, and they carried off silver and gold and clothing and went and hid them. Then they came back and entered another tent and carried off things from it and went and hid them. 9 Then they said to one another, “We are not doing right. This day is a day of good news. If we are silent and wait until the morning light, punishment will overtake us. Now therefore come; let us go and tell the king's household.” 10 So they came and called to the gatekeepers of the city and told them, “We came to the camp of the Syrians, and behold, there was no one to be seen or heard there, nothing but the horses tied and the donkeys tied and the tents as they were.” 11 Then the gatekeepers called out, and it was told within the king's household. 12 And the king rose in the night and said to his servants, “I will tell you what the Syrians have done to us. They know that we are hungry. Therefore they have gone out of the camp to hide themselves in the open country, thinking, ‘When they come out of the city, we shall take them alive and get into the city.'” 13 And one of his servants said, “Let some men take five of the remaining horses, seeing that those who are left here will fare like the whole multitude of Israel who have already perished. Let us send and see.” 14 So they took two horsemen, and the king sent them after the army of the Syrians, saying, “Go and see.” 15 So they went after them as far as the Jordan, and behold, all the way was littered with garments and equipment that the Syrians had thrown away in their haste. And the messengers returned and told the king. 16 Then the people went out and plundered the camp of the Syrians. So a seah of fine flour was sold for a shekel, and two seahs of barley for a shekel, according to the word of the LORD. 17 Now the king had appointed the captain on whose hand he leaned to have charge of the gate. And the people trampled him in the gate, so that he died, as the man of God had said when the king came down to him. 18 For when the man of God had said to the king, “Two seahs of barley shall be sold for a shekel, and a seah of fine flour for a shekel, about this time tomorrow in the gate of Samaria,” 19 the captain had answered the man of God, “If the LORD himself should make windows in heaven, could such a thing be?” And he had said, “You shall see it with your own eyes, but you shall not eat of it.” 20 And so it happened to him, for the people trampled him in the gate and he died. Footnotes [1] 6:25 A shekel was about 2/5 ounce or 11 grams; a kab was about 1 quart or 1 liter [2] 7:1 A seah was about 7 quarts or 7.3 liters [3] 7:1 A shekel was about 2/5 ounce or 11 grams [4] 7:3 Leprosy was a term for several skin diseases; see Leviticus 13 (ESV) Chronicles and Prophets: Zechariah 11 Zechariah 11 (Listen) The Flock Doomed to Slaughter 11   Open your doors, O Lebanon,    that the fire may devour your cedars!2   Wail, O cypress, for the cedar has fallen,    for the glorious trees are ruined!  Wail, oaks of Bashan,    for the thick forest has been felled!3   The sound of the wail of the shepherds,    for their glory is ruined!  The sound of the roar of the lions,    for the thicket of the Jordan is ruined! 4 Thus said the LORD my God: “Become shepherd of the flock doomed to slaughter. 5 Those who buy them slaughter them and go unpunished, and those who sell them say, ‘Blessed be the LORD, I have become rich,' and their own shepherds have no pity on them. 6 For I will no longer have pity on the inhabitants of this land, declares the LORD. Behold, I will cause each of them to fall into the hand of his neighbor, and each into the hand of his king, and they shall crush the land, and I will deliver none from their hand.” 7 So I became the shepherd of the flock doomed to be slaughtered by the sheep traders. And I took two staffs, one I named Favor, the other I named Union. And I tended the sheep. 8 In one month I destroyed the three shepherds. But I became impatient with them, and they also detested me. 9 So I said, “I will not be your shepherd. What is to die, let it die. What is to be destroyed, let it be destroyed. And let those who are left devour the flesh of one another.” 10 And I took my staff Favor, and I broke it, annulling the covenant that I had made with all the peoples. 11 So it was annulled on that day, and the sheep traders, who were watching me, knew that it was the word of the LORD. 12 Then I said to them, “If it seems good to you, give me my wages; but if not, keep them.” And they weighed out as my wages thirty pieces of silver. 13 Then the LORD said to me, “Throw it to the potter”—the lordly price at which I was priced by them. So I took the thirty pieces of silver and threw them into the house of the LORD, to the potter. 14 Then I broke my second staff Union, annulling the brotherhood between Judah and Israel. 15 Then the LORD said to me, “Take once more the equipment of a foolish shepherd. 16 For behold, I am raising up in the land a shepherd who does not care for those being destroyed, or seek the young or heal the maimed or nourish the healthy, but devours the flesh of the fat ones, tearing off even their hoofs. 17   “Woe to my worthless shepherd,    who deserts the flock!  May the sword strike his arm    and his right eye!  Let his arm be wholly withered,    his right eye utterly blinded!” (ESV) Gospels and Epistles: John 3:22–36 John 3:22–36 (Listen) John the Baptist Exalts Christ 22 After this Jesus and his disciples went into the Judean countryside, and he remained there with them and was baptizing. 23 John also was baptizing at Aenon near Salim, because water was plentiful there, and people were coming and being baptized 24 (for John had not yet been put in prison). 25 Now a discussion arose between some of John's disciples and a Jew over purification. 26 And they came to John and said to him, “Rabbi, he who was with you across the Jordan, to whom you bore witness—look, he is baptizing, and all are going to him.” 27 John answered, “A person cannot receive even one thing unless it is given him from heaven. 28 You yourselves bear me witness, that I said, ‘I am not the Christ, but I have been sent before him.' 29 The one who has the bride is the bridegroom. The friend of the bridegroom, who stands and hears him, rejoices greatly at the bridegroom's voice. Therefore this joy of mine is now complete. 30 He must increase, but I must decrease.”1 31 He who comes from above is above all. He who is of the earth belongs to the earth and speaks in an earthly way. He who comes from heaven is above all. 32 He bears witness to what he has seen and heard, yet no one receives his testimony. 33 Whoever receives his testimony sets his seal to this, that God is true. 34 For he whom God has sent utters the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure. 35 The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand. 36 Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God remains on him. Footnotes [1] 3:30 Some interpreters hold that the quotation continues through verse 36 (ESV)

Emmanuel Presbyterian Church

Audio Recording Sermon OutlineSpeaker: Rev. Scott StrickmanSermon Series: John 1-12: Come, See, Live!John 3:22-36 (ESV) 22 After this Jesus and his disciples went into the Judean countryside, and he remained there with them and was baptizing. 23 John also was baptizing at Aenon near Salim, because water was plentiful there, and people were coming and being baptized 24 (for John had not yet been put in prison). 25 Now a discussion arose between some of John's disciples and a Jew over purification. 26 And they came to John and said to him, “Rabbi, he who was with you across the Jordan, to whom you bore witness—look, he is baptizing, and all are going to him.” 27 John answered, “A person cannot receive even one thing unless it is given him from heaven. 28 You yourselves bear me witness, that I said, ‘I am not the Christ, but I have been sent before him.' 29 The one who has the bride is the bridegroom. The friend of the bridegroom, who stands and hears him, rejoices greatly at the bridegroom's voice. Therefore this joy of mine is now complete. 30 He must increase, but I must decrease.” 31 He who comes from above is above all. He who is of the earth belongs to the earth and speaks in an earthly way. He who comes from heaven is above all.32 He bears witness to what he has seen and heard, yet no one receives his testimony.33 Whoever receives his testimony sets his seal to this, that God is true.34 For he whom God has sent utters the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure.35 The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand.36 Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God remains on him.Sermon OutlineWe will consider what we must receive from God:1. All thingsv27 John answered, “A person cannot receive even one thing unless it is given him from heaven”v28 I said ‘I am not the Christ but I have been sent before him'2. God's Wordvv31-33 He who comes from heaven… bears witness to what he has seen and heard… Whoever receives his testimony... v34 For he whom God has sent utters the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure3. The Son of Godv29 The friend of the bridegroom… rejoices greatly… Therefore this joy of mine is now complete. v30 He must increase, but I must decrease.vv35-36The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand. Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life…Prayer of ConfessionOur God and Father, all that we have comes from your generous hand. We confess we take much for granted. We fail to give thanks to you. Our pride is exposed in our boasting. Forgive us for how we have selfishly sought our own increase. Forgive us for the various ways we have minimized you. We thank you for your word of grace, the good news about the Son of God who has come to give us life. Cleanse us of our sins, and grant us new life in Christ. Amen.Questions for ReflectionDo you pray before you eat? If so, why?How are we to understand that “a person cannot receive even one thing unless it is given him from heaven”? What are implications for our choices and actions? What benefits are there to having this mindset?What are practical ways we walk with God in daily life? What do you do that inadvertently minimizes dependance on God?Why do we need God's word? What problems would we have if we didn't have the Bible?What does it mean to receive God's word? What are implications for attitudes or practices of reading the Bible?How do we receive Jesus? What does it mean to believe in him?If eternal life can't be earned but only received, what do we do once we receive it?How should we live differently?

Emmanuel Presbyterian Church

Audio Recording Sermon OutlineSpeaker: Rev. Scott StrickmanSermon Series: John 1-12: Come, See, Live!John 3:22-36 (ESV) 22 After this Jesus and his disciples went into the Judean countryside, and he remained there with them and was baptizing. 23 John also was baptizing at Aenon near Salim, because water was plentiful there, and people were coming and being baptized 24 (for John had not yet been put in prison). 25 Now a discussion arose between some of John's disciples and a Jew over purification. 26 And they came to John and said to him, “Rabbi, he who was with you across the Jordan, to whom you bore witness—look, he is baptizing, and all are going to him.” 27 John answered, “A person cannot receive even one thing unless it is given him from heaven. 28 You yourselves bear me witness, that I said, ‘I am not the Christ, but I have been sent before him.' 29 The one who has the bride is the bridegroom. The friend of the bridegroom, who stands and hears him, rejoices greatly at the bridegroom's voice. Therefore this joy of mine is now complete. 30 He must increase, but I must decrease.” 31 He who comes from above is above all. He who is of the earth belongs to the earth and speaks in an earthly way. He who comes from heaven is above all.32 He bears witness to what he has seen and heard, yet no one receives his testimony.33 Whoever receives his testimony sets his seal to this, that God is true.34 For he whom God has sent utters the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure.35 The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand.36 Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God remains on him.Sermon OutlineWe will consider what we must receive from God:1. All thingsv27 John answered, “A person cannot receive even one thing unless it is given him from heaven”v28 I said ‘I am not the Christ but I have been sent before him'2. God's Wordvv31-33 He who comes from heaven… bears witness to what he has seen and heard… Whoever receives his testimony... v34 For he whom God has sent utters the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure3. The Son of Godv29 The friend of the bridegroom… rejoices greatly… Therefore this joy of mine is now complete. v30 He must increase, but I must decrease.vv35-36The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand. Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life…Prayer of ConfessionOur God and Father, all that we have comes from your generous hand. We confess we take much for granted. We fail to give thanks to you. Our pride is exposed in our boasting. Forgive us for how we have selfishly sought our own increase. Forgive us for the various ways we have minimized you. We thank you for your word of grace, the good news about the Son of God who has come to give us life. Cleanse us of our sins, and grant us new life in Christ. Amen.Questions for ReflectionDo you pray before you eat? If so, why?How are we to understand that “a person cannot receive even one thing unless it is given him from heaven”? What are implications for our choices and actions? What benefits are there to having this mindset?What are practical ways we walk with God in daily life? What do you do that inadvertently minimizes dependance on God?Why do we need God's word? What problems would we have if we didn't have the Bible?What does it mean to receive God's word? What are implications for attitudes or practices of reading the Bible?How do we receive Jesus? What does it mean to believe in him?If eternal life can't be earned but only received, what do we do once we receive it?How should we live differently?

ESV: Straight through the Bible
November 5: John 3–4

ESV: Straight through the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 10:33


John 3–4 John 3–4 (Listen) You Must Be Born Again 3 Now there was a man of the Pharisees named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews. 2 This man came to Jesus1 by night and said to him, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him.” 3 Jesus answered him, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again2 he cannot see the kingdom of God.” 4 Nicodemus said to him, “How can a man be born when he is old? Can he enter a second time into his mother's womb and be born?” 5 Jesus answered, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. 6 That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.3 7 Do not marvel that I said to you, ‘You4 must be born again.' 8 The wind5 blows where it wishes, and you hear its sound, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.” 9 Nicodemus said to him, “How can these things be?” 10 Jesus answered him, “Are you the teacher of Israel and yet you do not understand these things? 11 Truly, truly, I say to you, we speak of what we know, and bear witness to what we have seen, but you6 do not receive our testimony. 12 If I have told you earthly things and you do not believe, how can you believe if I tell you heavenly things? 13 No one has ascended into heaven except he who descended from heaven, the Son of Man.7 14 And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, 15 that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.8 For God So Loved the World 16 “For God so loved the world,9 that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. 17 For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. 18 Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God. 19 And this is the judgment: the light has come into the world, and people loved the darkness rather than the light because their works were evil. 20 For everyone who does wicked things hates the light and does not come to the light, lest his works should be exposed. 21 But whoever does what is true comes to the light, so that it may be clearly seen that his works have been carried out in God.” John the Baptist Exalts Christ 22 After this Jesus and his disciples went into the Judean countryside, and he remained there with them and was baptizing. 23 John also was baptizing at Aenon near Salim, because water was plentiful there, and people were coming and being baptized 24 (for John had not yet been put in prison). 25 Now a discussion arose between some of John's disciples and a Jew over purification. 26 And they came to John and said to him, “Rabbi, he who was with you across the Jordan, to whom you bore witness—look, he is baptizing, and all are going to him.” 27 John answered, “A person cannot receive even one thing unless it is given him from heaven. 28 You yourselves bear me witness, that I said, ‘I am not the Christ, but I have been sent before him.' 29 The one who has the bride is the bridegroom. The friend of the bridegroom, who stands and hears him, rejoices greatly at the bridegroom's voice. Therefore this joy of mine is now complete. 30 He must increase, but I must decrease.”10 31 He who comes from above is above all. He who is of the earth belongs to the earth and speaks in an earthly way. He who comes from heaven is above all. 32 He bears witness to what he has seen and heard, yet no one receives his testimony. 33 Whoever receives his testimony sets his seal to this, that God is true. 34 For he whom God has sent utters the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure. 35 The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand. 36 Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God remains on him. Jesus and the Woman of Samaria 4 Now when Jesus learned that the Pharisees had heard that Jesus was making and baptizing more disciples than John 2 (although Jesus himself did not baptize, but only his disciples), 3 he left Judea and departed again for Galilee. 4 And he had to pass through Samaria. 5 So he came to a town of Samaria called Sychar, near the field that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. 6 Jacob's well was there; so Jesus, wearied as he was from his journey, was sitting beside the well. It was about the sixth hour.11 7 A woman from Samaria came to draw water. Jesus said to her, “Give me a drink.” 8 (For his disciples had gone away into the city to buy food.) 9 The Samaritan woman said to him, “How is it that you, a Jew, ask for a drink from me, a woman of Samaria?” (For Jews have no dealings with Samaritans.) 10 Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,' you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.” 11 The woman said to him, “Sir, you have nothing to draw water with, and the well is deep. Where do you get that living water? 12 Are you greater than our father Jacob? He gave us the well and drank from it himself, as did his sons and his livestock.” 13 Jesus said to her, “Everyone who drinks of this water will be thirsty again, 14 but whoever drinks of the water that I will give him will never be thirsty again.12 The water that I will give him will become in him a spring of water welling up to eternal life.” 15 The woman said to him, “Sir, give me this water, so that I will not be thirsty or have to come here to draw water.” 16 Jesus said to her, “Go, call your husband, and come here.” 17 The woman answered him, “I have no husband.” Jesus said to her, “You are right in saying, ‘I have no husband'; 18 for you have had five husbands, and the one you now have is not your husband. What you have said is true.” 19 The woman said to him, “Sir, I perceive that you are a prophet. 20 Our fathers worshiped on this mountain, but you say that in Jerusalem is the place where people ought to worship.” 21 Jesus said to her, “Woman, believe me, the hour is coming when neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem will you worship the Father. 22 You worship what you do not know; we worship what we know, for salvation is from the Jews. 23 But the hour is coming, and is now here, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father is seeking such people to worship him. 24 God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth.” 25 The woman said to him, “I know that Messiah is coming (he who is called Christ). When he comes, he will tell us all things.” 26 Jesus said to her, “I who speak to you am he.” 27 Just then his disciples came back. They marveled that he was talking with a woman, but no one said, “What do you seek?” or, “Why are you talking with her?” 28 So the woman left her water jar and went away into town and said to the people, 29 “Come, see a man who told me all that I ever did. Can this be the Christ?” 30 They went out of the town and were coming to him. 31 Meanwhile the disciples were urging him, saying, “Rabbi, eat.” 32 But he said to them, “I have food to eat that you do not know about.” 33 So the disciples said to one another, “Has anyone brought him something to eat?” 34 Jesus said to them, “My food is to do the will of him who sent me and to accomplish his work. 35 Do you not say, ‘There are yet four months, then comes the harvest'? Look, I tell you, lift up your eyes, and see that the fields are white for harvest. 36 Already the one who reaps is receiving wages and gathering fruit for eternal life, so that sower and reaper may rejoice together. 37 For here the saying holds true, ‘One sows and another reaps.' 38 I sent you to reap that for which you did not labor. Others have labored, and you have entered into their labor.” 39 Many Samaritans from that town believed in him because of the woman's testimony, “He told me all that I ever did.” 40 So when the Samaritans came to him, they asked him to stay with them, and he stayed there two days. 41 And many more believed because of his word. 42 They said to the woman, “It is no longer because of what you said that we believe, for we have heard for ourselves, and we know that this is indeed the Savior of the world.” 43 After the two days he departed for Galilee. 44 (For Jesus himself had testified that a prophet has no honor in his own hometown.) 45 So when he came to Galilee, the Galileans welcomed him, having seen all that he had done in Jerusalem at the feast. For they too had gone to the feast. Jesus Heals an Official's Son 46 So he came again to Cana in Galilee, where he had made the water wine. And at Capernaum there was an official whose son was ill. 47 When this man heard that Jesus had come from Judea to Galilee, he went to him and asked him to come down and heal his son, for he was at the point of death. 48 So Jesus said to him, “Unless you13 see signs and wonders you will not believe.” 49 The official said to him, “Sir, come down before my child dies.” 50 Jesus said to him, “Go; your son will live.” The man believed the word that Jesus spoke to him and went on his way. 51 As he was going down, his servants14 met him and told him that his son was recovering. 52 So he asked them the hour when he began to get better, and they said to him, “Yesterday at the seventh hour15 the fever left him.” 53 The father knew that was the hour when Jesus had said to him, “Your son will live.” And he himself believed, and all his household. 54 This was now the second sign that Jesus did when he had come from Judea to Galilee. Footnotes [1] 3:2 Greek him [2] 3:3 Or from above; the Greek is purposely ambiguous and can mean both again and from above; also verse 7 [3] 3:6 The same Greek word means both wind and spirit [4] 3:7 The Greek for you is plural here [5] 3:8 The same Greek word means both wind and spirit [6] 3:11 The Greek for you is plural here; also four times in verse 12 [7] 3:13 Some manuscripts add who is in heaven [8] 3:15 Some interpreters hold that the quotation ends at verse 15 [9] 3:16 Or For this is how God loved the world [10] 3:30 Some interpreters hold that the quotation continues through verse 36 [11] 4:6 That is, about noon [12] 4:14 Greek forever [13] 4:48 The Greek for you is plural; twice in this verse [14] 4:51 Or bondservants [15] 4:52 That is, at 1 p.m. (ESV)

ESV: Chronological
October 24: John 3–4

ESV: Chronological

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 10:33


John 3–4 John 3–4 (Listen) You Must Be Born Again 3 Now there was a man of the Pharisees named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews. 2 This man came to Jesus1 by night and said to him, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him.” 3 Jesus answered him, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again2 he cannot see the kingdom of God.” 4 Nicodemus said to him, “How can a man be born when he is old? Can he enter a second time into his mother's womb and be born?” 5 Jesus answered, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. 6 That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.3 7 Do not marvel that I said to you, ‘You4 must be born again.' 8 The wind5 blows where it wishes, and you hear its sound, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.” 9 Nicodemus said to him, “How can these things be?” 10 Jesus answered him, “Are you the teacher of Israel and yet you do not understand these things? 11 Truly, truly, I say to you, we speak of what we know, and bear witness to what we have seen, but you6 do not receive our testimony. 12 If I have told you earthly things and you do not believe, how can you believe if I tell you heavenly things? 13 No one has ascended into heaven except he who descended from heaven, the Son of Man.7 14 And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, 15 that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.8 For God So Loved the World 16 “For God so loved the world,9 that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. 17 For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. 18 Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God. 19 And this is the judgment: the light has come into the world, and people loved the darkness rather than the light because their works were evil. 20 For everyone who does wicked things hates the light and does not come to the light, lest his works should be exposed. 21 But whoever does what is true comes to the light, so that it may be clearly seen that his works have been carried out in God.” John the Baptist Exalts Christ 22 After this Jesus and his disciples went into the Judean countryside, and he remained there with them and was baptizing. 23 John also was baptizing at Aenon near Salim, because water was plentiful there, and people were coming and being baptized 24 (for John had not yet been put in prison). 25 Now a discussion arose between some of John's disciples and a Jew over purification. 26 And they came to John and said to him, “Rabbi, he who was with you across the Jordan, to whom you bore witness—look, he is baptizing, and all are going to him.” 27 John answered, “A person cannot receive even one thing unless it is given him from heaven. 28 You yourselves bear me witness, that I said, ‘I am not the Christ, but I have been sent before him.' 29 The one who has the bride is the bridegroom. The friend of the bridegroom, who stands and hears him, rejoices greatly at the bridegroom's voice. Therefore this joy of mine is now complete. 30 He must increase, but I must decrease.”10 31 He who comes from above is above all. He who is of the earth belongs to the earth and speaks in an earthly way. He who comes from heaven is above all. 32 He bears witness to what he has seen and heard, yet no one receives his testimony. 33 Whoever receives his testimony sets his seal to this, that God is true. 34 For he whom God has sent utters the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure. 35 The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand. 36 Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God remains on him. Jesus and the Woman of Samaria 4 Now when Jesus learned that the Pharisees had heard that Jesus was making and baptizing more disciples than John 2 (although Jesus himself did not baptize, but only his disciples), 3 he left Judea and departed again for Galilee. 4 And he had to pass through Samaria. 5 So he came to a town of Samaria called Sychar, near the field that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. 6 Jacob's well was there; so Jesus, wearied as he was from his journey, was sitting beside the well. It was about the sixth hour.11 7 A woman from Samaria came to draw water. Jesus said to her, “Give me a drink.” 8 (For his disciples had gone away into the city to buy food.) 9 The Samaritan woman said to him, “How is it that you, a Jew, ask for a drink from me, a woman of Samaria?” (For Jews have no dealings with Samaritans.) 10 Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,' you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.” 11 The woman said to him, “Sir, you have nothing to draw water with, and the well is deep. Where do you get that living water? 12 Are you greater than our father Jacob? He gave us the well and drank from it himself, as did his sons and his livestock.” 13 Jesus said to her, “Everyone who drinks of this water will be thirsty again, 14 but whoever drinks of the water that I will give him will never be thirsty again.12 The water that I will give him will become in him a spring of water welling up to eternal life.” 15 The woman said to him, “Sir, give me this water, so that I will not be thirsty or have to come here to draw water.” 16 Jesus said to her, “Go, call your husband, and come here.” 17 The woman answered him, “I have no husband.” Jesus said to her, “You are right in saying, ‘I have no husband'; 18 for you have had five husbands, and the one you now have is not your husband. What you have said is true.” 19 The woman said to him, “Sir, I perceive that you are a prophet. 20 Our fathers worshiped on this mountain, but you say that in Jerusalem is the place where people ought to worship.” 21 Jesus said to her, “Woman, believe me, the hour is coming when neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem will you worship the Father. 22 You worship what you do not know; we worship what we know, for salvation is from the Jews. 23 But the hour is coming, and is now here, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father is seeking such people to worship him. 24 God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth.” 25 The woman said to him, “I know that Messiah is coming (he who is called Christ). When he comes, he will tell us all things.” 26 Jesus said to her, “I who speak to you am he.” 27 Just then his disciples came back. They marveled that he was talking with a woman, but no one said, “What do you seek?” or, “Why are you talking with her?” 28 So the woman left her water jar and went away into town and said to the people, 29 “Come, see a man who told me all that I ever did. Can this be the Christ?” 30 They went out of the town and were coming to him. 31 Meanwhile the disciples were urging him, saying, “Rabbi, eat.” 32 But he said to them, “I have food to eat that you do not know about.” 33 So the disciples said to one another, “Has anyone brought him something to eat?” 34 Jesus said to them, “My food is to do the will of him who sent me and to accomplish his work. 35 Do you not say, ‘There are yet four months, then comes the harvest'? Look, I tell you, lift up your eyes, and see that the fields are white for harvest. 36 Already the one who reaps is receiving wages and gathering fruit for eternal life, so that sower and reaper may rejoice together. 37 For here the saying holds true, ‘One sows and another reaps.' 38 I sent you to reap that for which you did not labor. Others have labored, and you have entered into their labor.” 39 Many Samaritans from that town believed in him because of the woman's testimony, “He told me all that I ever did.” 40 So when the Samaritans came to him, they asked him to stay with them, and he stayed there two days. 41 And many more believed because of his word. 42 They said to the woman, “It is no longer because of what you said that we believe, for we have heard for ourselves, and we know that this is indeed the Savior of the world.” 43 After the two days he departed for Galilee. 44 (For Jesus himself had testified that a prophet has no honor in his own hometown.) 45 So when he came to Galilee, the Galileans welcomed him, having seen all that he had done in Jerusalem at the feast. For they too had gone to the feast. Jesus Heals an Official's Son 46 So he came again to Cana in Galilee, where he had made the water wine. And at Capernaum there was an official whose son was ill. 47 When this man heard that Jesus had come from Judea to Galilee, he went to him and asked him to come down and heal his son, for he was at the point of death. 48 So Jesus said to him, “Unless you13 see signs and wonders you will not believe.” 49 The official said to him, “Sir, come down before my child dies.” 50 Jesus said to him, “Go; your son will live.” The man believed the word that Jesus spoke to him and went on his way. 51 As he was going down, his servants14 met him and told him that his son was recovering. 52 So he asked them the hour when he began to get better, and they said to him, “Yesterday at the seventh hour15 the fever left him.” 53 The father knew that was the hour when Jesus had said to him, “Your son will live.” And he himself believed, and all his household. 54 This was now the second sign that Jesus did when he had come from Judea to Galilee. Footnotes [1] 3:2 Greek him [2] 3:3 Or from above; the Greek is purposely ambiguous and can mean both again and from above; also verse 7 [3] 3:6 The same Greek word means both wind and spirit [4] 3:7 The Greek for you is plural here [5] 3:8 The same Greek word means both wind and spirit [6] 3:11 The Greek for you is plural here; also four times in verse 12 [7] 3:13 Some manuscripts add who is in heaven [8] 3:15 Some interpreters hold that the quotation ends at verse 15 [9] 3:16 Or For this is how God loved the world [10] 3:30 Some interpreters hold that the quotation continues through verse 36 [11] 4:6 That is, about noon [12] 4:14 Greek forever [13] 4:48 The Greek for you is plural; twice in this verse [14] 4:51 Or bondservants [15] 4:52 That is, at 1 p.m. (ESV)

Shoulder to Shoulder
(57) Halloween, Ecclesiastes, and a Judean Settler

Shoulder to Shoulder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 54:16


In this episode, Doug expresses his disdain for the Halloween season, Pesach shares a fascinating rabbinic source about Ecclesiastes, and then they're joined by Gidon Ariel of Root-Source.com, an educational initiative aimed at teaching Jewish wisdom to Christians.

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast
Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Biblical Treasure in the Judean Desert 10/18/2022

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 28:30


Excavations in the Judean desert unearth the biggest archaeological finds since the Dead Sea scrolls; plus, visit the hometown of Mary Magdalene; and a child's discovery opens a window into ancient Jerusalem.

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast
Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Biblical Treasure in the Judean Desert 10/18/2022

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 28:30


Excavations in the Judean desert unearth the biggest archaeological finds since the Dead Sea scrolls; plus, visit the hometown of Mary Magdalene; and a child's discovery opens a window into ancient Jerusalem.

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast
Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Biblical Treasure in the Judean Desert 10/18/2022

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 28:30


Excavations in the Judean desert unearth the biggest archaeological finds since the Dead Sea scrolls; plus, visit the hometown of Mary Magdalene; and a child's discovery opens a window into ancient Jerusalem.

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast
Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Biblical Treasure in the Judean Desert 10/18/2022

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 28:30


Excavations in the Judean desert unearth the biggest archaeological finds since the Dead Sea scrolls; plus, visit the hometown of Mary Magdalene; and a child's discovery opens a window into ancient Jerusalem.

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast
Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Biblical Treasure in the Judean Desert 10/18/2022

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 28:30


Excavations in the Judean desert unearth the biggest archaeological finds since the Dead Sea scrolls; plus, visit the hometown of Mary Magdalene; and a child's discovery opens a window into ancient Jerusalem.

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast
Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Biblical Treasure in the Judean Desert 10/18/2022

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 28:30


Excavations in the Judean desert unearth the biggest archaeological finds since the Dead Sea scrolls; plus, visit the hometown of Mary Magdalene; and a child's discovery opens a window into ancient Jerusalem.

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast
Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Biblical Treasure in the Judean Desert 10/18/2022

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 28:30


Excavations in the Judean desert unearth the biggest archaeological finds since the Dead Sea scrolls; plus, visit the hometown of Mary Magdalene; and a child's discovery opens a window into ancient Jerusalem.

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast
Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Biblical Treasure in the Judean Desert 10/18/2022

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 28:30


Excavations in the Judean desert unearth the biggest archaeological finds since the Dead Sea scrolls; plus, visit the hometown of Mary Magdalene; and a child's discovery opens a window into ancient Jerusalem.

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast
Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Biblical Treasure in the Judean Desert 10/18/2022

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 28:30


Excavations in the Judean desert unearth the biggest archaeological finds since the Dead Sea scrolls; plus, visit the hometown of Mary Magdalene; and a child's discovery opens a window into ancient Jerusalem.

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast
Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Biblical Treasure in the Judean Desert 10/18/2022

CBN.com - Jerusalem Dateline - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 28:30


Excavations in the Judean desert unearth the biggest archaeological finds since the Dead Sea scrolls; plus, visit the hometown of Mary Magdalene; and a child's discovery opens a window into ancient Jerusalem.

Into The Word with Thomas J. Short
ITW Season 5 Ep# 711: John 3:14-4:3 - Jesus' Judean Ministry Begins To Eclipse The Jordan Valley Ministry Of John The Immerser

Into The Word with Thomas J. Short

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 27:16


Central Christian Podcast
Acts - Week 56

Central Christian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 44:08


Acts 19:1-7 ESV And it happened that while Apollos was at Corinth, Paul passed through the inland country and came to Ephesus. There he found some disciples. 2 And he said to them, “Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?” And they said, “No, we have not even heard that there is a Holy Spirit.” 3 And he said, “Into what then were you baptized?” They said, “Into John's baptism.” 4 And Paul said, “John baptized with the baptism of repentance, telling the people to believe in the one who was to come after him, that is, Jesus.” 5 On hearing this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. 6 And when Paul had laid his hands on them, the Holy Spirit came on them, and they began speaking in tongues and prophesying. 7 There were about twelve men in all.   Luke 3:15-16 NIV 15 The people were waiting expectantly and were all wondering in their hearts if John might possibly be the Messiah. 16 John answered them all, “I baptize you with water. But one who is more powerful than I will come, the straps of whose sandals I am not worthy to untie. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire. Luke 3:17 NIV 17 His winnowing fork is in his hand to clear his threshing floor and to gather the wheat into his barn, but he will burn up the chaff with unquenchable fire.” John 3:22-26 NIV 22 After this, Jesus and his disciples went out into the Judean countryside, where he spent some time with them, and baptized. 23 Now John also was baptizing at Aenon near Salim, because there was plenty of water, and people were coming and being baptized. 24 (This was before John was put in prison.) 25 An argument developed between some of John's disciples and a certain Jew over the matter of ceremonial washing. 26 They came to John and said to him, “Rabbi, that man who was with you on the other side of the Jordan—the one you testified about—look, he is baptizing, and everyone is going to him.” John 3:27-30 NIV 27 To this John replied, “A person can receive only what is given them from heaven. 28 You yourselves can testify that I said, ‘I am not the Messiah but am sent ahead of him.' 29 The bride belongs to the bridegroom. The friend who attends the bridegroom waits and listens for him, and is full of joy when he hears the bridegroom's voice. That joy is mine, and it is now complete. 30 He must become greater; I must become less.” Luke 7:29 NIV 29 (All the people, even the tax collectors, when they heard Jesus' words, acknowledged that God's way was right, because they had been baptized by John. Acts 19:2 ESV 2 And he said to them, “Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?” And they said, “No, we have not even heard that there is a Holy Spirit.” Ephesians 1:13 NIV 13 And you also were included in Christ when you heard the message of truth, the gospel of your salvation. When you believed, you were marked in him with a seal, the promised Holy Spirit, Romans 8:9 NIV 9 You, however, are not in the realm of the flesh but are in the realm of the Spirit, if indeed the Spirit of God lives in you. And if anyone does not have the Spirit of Christ, they do not belong to Christ. 2 Peter 1:2 NASB 2 Grace and peace be multiplied to you in the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord; 2 Peter 1:3 NASB 3 seeing that His divine power has granted to us everything pertaining to life and godliness, through the true knowledge of Him who called us by His own glory and excellence. Galatians 3:1-6 NIV You foolish Galatians! Who has bewitched you? Before your very eyes Jesus Christ was clearly portrayed as crucified. 2 I would like to learn just one thing from you: Did you receive the Spirit by the works of the law, or by believing what you heard? 3 Are you so foolish? After beginning by means of the Spirit, are you now trying to finish by means of the flesh? 4 Have you experienced so much in vain—if it really was in vain? 5 So again I ask, does God give you his Spirit and work miracles among you by the works of the law, or by your believing what you heard? 6 So also Abraham “believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness.” Hebrews 10:14 NASB 14 For by one offering He has perfected for all time those who are sanctified. Ephesians 5:18-20 NIV 18 Do not get drunk on wine, which leads to debauchery. Instead, be filled with the Spirit,19 speaking to one another with psalms, hymns, and songs from the Spirit. Sing and make music from your heart to the Lord, 20 always giving thanks to God the Father for everything, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.

CrossPointe Coast | Sermons

Micah from CrossPointe Coast on Vimeo. Preacher: Jeremiah Fyffe Scripture: Micah CYCLE 1 | WITNESS INJUSTICE CYCLE 2 | KNOW JUSTICE CYCLE 3 | DO JUSTICE Kenneth Barker The Book of Micah is arranged in three cycles of judgement and salvation. Cycles one and three are more lengthy in judgement. The middle cycle, cycle two, is more lengthy in salvation. Sennacherib - King of Assyria - 701 As for Hezekiah, the Judean, who did not submit to my yoke, forty-six of his strongly fortified cities as well as the villages of their environs … I surrounded and conquered; 200,150 people … I brought here and counted as booty. As for him, like a bird in a cage I shut him up in Jerusalem, his royal city. 2 Kings 19:35–36 (ESV) And that night the angel of the Lord went out and struck down 185,000 in the camp of the Assyrians. And when people arose early in the morning, behold, these were all dead bodies. Then Sennacherib king of Assyria departed and went home and lived at Nineveh. Leviticus 25:23–24 (ESV) The land shall not be sold in perpetuity, for the land is mine. For you are strangers and sojourners with me. And in all the country you possess, you shall allow a redemption of the land. 2 Timothy 4:3–4 (ESV) For the time is coming when people will not endure sound teaching, but having itching ears they will accumulate for themselves teachers to suit their own passions, and will turn away from listening to the truth and wander off into myths. Isaiah 2:2–3 (ESV) It shall come to pass in the latter days that the mountain of the house of the Lord shall be established as the highest of the mountains, and shall be lifted up above the hills; and all the nations shall flow to it, and many peoples shall come, and say: “Come, let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob, that he may teach us his ways and that we may walk in his paths.” For out of Zion shall go forth the law, and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem. Hebrews 13:14 (ESV) For here we have no lasting city, but we seek the city that is to come. 1 Corinthians 1:27–29 (ESV) But God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise; God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong; God chose what is low and despised in the world, even things that are not, to bring to nothing things that are, so that no human being might boast in the presence of God. Matthew 23:23 (ESV) Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you tithe mint and dill and cumin, and have neglected the weightier matters of the law: justice and mercy and faithfulness. These you ought to have done, without neglecting the others. C. L. Feinberg The piety that God approves consists of three elements: a strict adherence to that which is equitable in all dealings with our fellowmen; a heart determined to do them good; and diligent care to live in close and intimate fellowship with God.

Keys of the Kingdom
10/15/22: Branches of Government

Keys of the Kingdom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 115:00


Natural Law pre-exists all other law; Believing in God; Pentateuch; Private interpretations; Essenes; Temples and Religion; No king but Caesar; Jesus the king of the Jews (citizens of Judea); Appointing gods; Jesus v Pilate; Not of this world; Why Rome was in Judea; Law of nations; Nationalism; Asylum; Are you seeking the kingdom of God and His righteousness?; Why persecute Christians?; 4th branch of government; Supreme court; Theos/Elohim; Threskia - not what you think; Born again?; Constitutionalists; Constitution - bylaws; SCOTUS - constitutional interpretation; Signers of the constitution; Quick outline of law; Life on Earth; Examining nature and science; Reason and resonance (inspiration); Tree of Knowledge; Your salvation; Making America great; Municipalities; Legal systems; 3 branches of government; Judiciary act; Equity; Remedies? The covenants we make; Fourth branch of government = you; Procreation; Brothers in bondage; Have you enslaved your neighbor?; Funding schools; Government of, for and by the people; Faith, hope and charity; The snare of covetous practices; Early American freedom; Votive offerings; Individual freedom?; Respecting neighbor's property rights; Private education; Force via government = tyranny; Joseph; Christ's other way; Taking back your responsibilities; Baptism into which kingdom?; High priests; Judean government; Faith? Or Allegiance?; Misinterpreting torah; Right to choose = free nation; Doing with Christ said; Loving neighbor; Biblical constitutions; Legalizing the constitution; Democracy; Republic; Common purse; No coveting!; Being accustom to taking from others; Sharing in love; Jury nullification; Judging fact and law; Being judged as you have judged; Alienable privileges; Forfeiting your rights; Administrative courts; Breaking your chains; Christian school assignment story; Respecting right to choose; Modern pastors' fallacy; Constantinian church; Bishops; Who's your savior?; Repentance; Love your neighbor.

Simon reads the Bible

Joshua 12 NLT read aloud by Simon MacFarlane. 1 These are the kings east of the Jordan River who had been killed by the Israelites and whose land was taken. Their territory extended from the Arnon Gorge to Mount Hermon and included all the land east of the Jordan Valley. 2 King Sihon of the Amorites, who lived in Heshbon, was defeated. His kingdom included Aroer, on the edge of the Arnon Gorge, and extended from the middle of the Arnon Gorge to the Jabbok River, which serves as a border for the Ammonites. This territory included the southern half of the territory of Gilead. 3 Sihon also controlled the Jordan Valley and regions to the east—from as far north as the Sea of Galilee to as far south as the Dead Sea, including the road to Beth-jeshimoth and southward to the slopes of Pisgah. 4 King Og of Bashan, the last of the Rephaites, lived at Ashtaroth and Edrei. 5 He ruled a territory stretching from Mount Hermon to Salecah in the north and to all of Bashan in the east, and westward to the borders of the kingdoms of Geshur and Maacah. This territory included the northern half of Gilead, as far as the boundary of King Sihon of Heshbon. 6 Moses, the servant of the Lord, and the Israelites had destroyed the people of King Sihon and King Og. And Moses gave their land as a possession to the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and the half-tribe of Manasseh. 7 The following is a list of the kings that Joshua and the Israelite armies defeated on the west side of the Jordan, from Baal-gad in the valley of Lebanon to Mount Halak, which leads up to Seir. (Joshua gave this land to the tribes of Israel as their possession, 8 including the hill country, the western foothills, the Jordan Valley, the mountain slopes, the Judean wilderness, and the Negev. The people who lived in this region were the Hittites, the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Perizzites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites.) These are the kings Israel defeated: The king of Jericho The king of Ai, near Bethel 10 The king of Jerusalem The king of Hebron 11 The king of Jarmuth The king of Lachish 12 The king of Eglon The king of Gezer 13 The king of Debir The king of Geder 14 The king of Hormah The king of Arad 15 The king of Libnah The king of Adullam 16 The king of Makkedah The king of Bethel 17 The king of Tappuah The king of Hepher 18 The king of Aphek The king of Lasharon 19 The king of Madon The king of Hazor 20 The king of Shimron-meron The king of Acshaph 21 The king of Taanach The king of Megiddo 22 The king of Kedesh The king of Jokneam in Carmel 23 The king of Dor in the town of Naphoth-dor The king of Goyim in Gilgal 24 The king of Tirzah. In all, thirty-one kings were defeated.

Into The Word with Thomas J. Short
ITW Season 5 Ep# 706: MT 4:1-9//MK 1:12-13//LK 4:1-13 - Jesus Tempted In The Judean Wilderness

Into The Word with Thomas J. Short

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 27:16


Today's program: ITW Season 5 Ep# 706: MT 4:1-9//MK 1:12-13//LK 4:1-13 - Jesus Tempted In The Judean Wilderness. Join us today at www.IntoTheWord2020.com or via your favorite podcast platform. Distributed by ReSermon.com.

Most Certainly True Podcast
The Life of Jesus - Nazareth and Early Judean Ministry

Most Certainly True Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 58:09


Nazareth and Early Judean Ministry----------------------------------It's the story of salvation.  God sent his Son to live his life and to give his life to save sinners.  Join us at Most Certainly True Podcast to spend some time looking at Jesus and the life that he lived to win heaven for us.  We'll take a unique look at the timelines and the geography of the Gospels and piece together the accounts that the Holy Spirit has recorded for us.  We'll seek to grow in our understanding and appreciation of the ministry and the love that Jesus showed to us and to the world.   Join us for the 5 episode series to thank God for The Life of Jesus. Make sure to find the other titles in this series or check out a different series or one of our sermons from Grace on our Most Certainly True podcast channel.  We'd love to have you grow with us.  Check out more about our ministry or connect with a pastor at www.gracedowntown.org.   Thanks for listening!

Oro Valley Catholic
Magic, Faith, and Sacraments

Oro Valley Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 28:41


The Bible is full of examples of magical thinking. Eve eats and apple thinking it will make her divine. Gen. 3 The Babylonians build a ziggurat thinking it takes them to heaven. Gen. 11 Judean soldiers where amulets into battle for protection, but are slain. 2 Macc. 12. We think war, material goods and getting what we want will bring divine rewards - eternal life and happiness. Magical thinking is the belief that you can use a material cause to cause and divine effect. Sacraments are just the opposite. Magic, faith and the sacraments, this week on OVC. Readings: https://bible.usccb.org/bible/readings/100222.cfm Music: Adoro te devote, St. Mark Choir pursuant to OneLicense Annual License w/Podcasting, A-726294

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Bad Weather Scrubs a Third Launch Attempt for the World's Most Powerful Rocket

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 30:49


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 25 Episode 101*Bad weather scrubs a third launch attempt for the world's most powerful rocketIn a case of déjà vu all over again as NASA has been forced to scrub a third launch attempt of its massive Artemis 1 Moon rocket – this time because of Tropical storm Ian near Jamaica which was forecast to rapidly intensify and move towards the Florida coast.*NASA's Lunar IceCube missionHitching a ride on NASA's Artemis Moon rocket is a tiny shoe box sized six unit cubesat spacecraft that will be searching for water hidden in the dark shadows of deep craters on the lunar surface.*Virgin Orbit to launch from QueenslandThe rural Queensland city of Toowoomba could become a future space port for Virgin Orbit. The company has just signed a memorandum of understanding with Australian infrastructure development company Wagner Corporation to use their Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport as a local base of operations.*32 new variable stars discoveredAstronomers have discovered 32 new variable stars in the Palomar 2 globular cluster a hundred thousand light years away in the constellation Auriga the charioteer.*The Science ReportScientists have created what they claim are living synthetic cells by harvesting bacteria for body parts.Rare 2000-year-old Judean coin returned to the Israel Antiquities AuthorityA new study shows medieval Brits weren't as British as they thought.Skeptics guide to cults.Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/listen For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen to. Thank you…To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.For more podcasts visit our HQ at https://biteszhq.com Your support is needed...SpaceTime is an independently produced podcast (we are not funded by any government grants, big organisations or companies), and we're working towards becoming a completely listener supported show...meaning we can do away with the commercials and sponsors. We figure the time can be much better spent on researching and producing stories for you, rather than having to chase sponsors to help us pay the bills.That's where you come in....help us reach our first 1,000 subscribers...at that level the show becomes financially viable and bills can be paid without us breaking into a sweat every month. Every little bit helps...even if you could contribute just $1 per month. It all adds up.By signing up and becoming a supporter at the $5 or more level, you get immediate access to over 280 commercial-free, double, and triple episode editions of SpaceTime plus extended interview bonus content. You also receive all new episodes on a Monday rather than having to wait the week out. Subscribe via Supercast (you get a month's free trial to see if it's really for you or not) ... and share in the rewards. Details at Supercast - https://bitesznetwork.supercast.tech/ Details at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com or www.bitesz.com

Endtime Ministries | End of the Age | Irvin Baxter
End of the Age - Israel Edition

Endtime Ministries | End of the Age | Irvin Baxter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 58:30


Bible prophecy foretells the establishment of a Palestinian State in the West Bank and that Europe, the origin of the Antichrist, will be involved. An Israeli news source has reported a de facto Palestinian State is in process, funded by three billion euros for the European Union. This is the Judean area Jesus prophesied about in Matthew 24. We will analyze these events on this edition of End of the Age.

Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart

It is always painful to see a good man fall. And in the affair of David and Bathsheba, that is pretty much what happened. It happened to a good woman at the same time. Who knows, maybe this was somewhere in the back of King Solomon’s mind when he wrote:Dead flies cause the ointment of the perfumer to send forth a foul odor: so does a little folly to him that is respected for wisdom and honor.Ecclesiastes 10:1 KJ2000And he had a classic example in his own mother and father. This affair is loaded with lessons to be learned and questions to be answered. Someone said, Power corrupts. At the time this happened, David was at the peak of his power, his influence, and his popularity. There seems to be a sense of invincibility that comes over powerful men at times. They come to think they are above the law—that they can get away with things ordinary men can’t. After all, they are not ordinary.But in David’s case, this is singularly stupid. He had a covey of wives. And if they had not been enough, there was the entire flower of Judean womanhood before him. He didn’t have to take another man’s woman. Girls would have lined up to be David’s concubines, and he could have taken his pick. So why did he take another man’s wife? What on earth was he thinking? The answer is easy: He wasn’t thinking. He saw, he wanted, he took. And if it hadn’t been for one small problem, he might have gotten away with it.

ESV: Through the Bible in a Year
September 6: Proverbs 1–2; Psalm 63; John 3

ESV: Through the Bible in a Year

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 10:22


Old Testament: Proverbs 1–2 Proverbs 1–2 (Listen) The Beginning of Knowledge 1 The proverbs of Solomon, son of David, king of Israel: 2   To know wisdom and instruction,    to understand words of insight,3   to receive instruction in wise dealing,    in righteousness, justice, and equity;4   to give prudence to the simple,    knowledge and discretion to the youth—5   Let the wise hear and increase in learning,    and the one who understands obtain guidance,6   to understand a proverb and a saying,    the words of the wise and their riddles. 7   The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge;    fools despise wisdom and instruction. The Enticement of Sinners 8   Hear, my son, your father's instruction,    and forsake not your mother's teaching,9   for they are a graceful garland for your head    and pendants for your neck.10   My son, if sinners entice you,    do not consent.11   If they say, “Come with us, let us lie in wait for blood;    let us ambush the innocent without reason;12   like Sheol let us swallow them alive,    and whole, like those who go down to the pit;13   we shall find all precious goods,    we shall fill our houses with plunder;14   throw in your lot among us;    we will all have one purse”—15   my son, do not walk in the way with them;    hold back your foot from their paths,16   for their feet run to evil,    and they make haste to shed blood.17   For in vain is a net spread    in the sight of any bird,18   but these men lie in wait for their own blood;    they set an ambush for their own lives.19   Such are the ways of everyone who is greedy for unjust gain;    it takes away the life of its possessors. The Call of Wisdom 20   Wisdom cries aloud in the street,    in the markets she raises her voice;21   at the head of the noisy streets she cries out;    at the entrance of the city gates she speaks:22   “How long, O simple ones, will you love being simple?  How long will scoffers delight in their scoffing    and fools hate knowledge?23   If you turn at my reproof,1  behold, I will pour out my spirit to you;    I will make my words known to you.24   Because I have called and you refused to listen,    have stretched out my hand and no one has heeded,25   because you have ignored all my counsel    and would have none of my reproof,26   I also will laugh at your calamity;    I will mock when terror strikes you,27   when terror strikes you like a storm    and your calamity comes like a whirlwind,    when distress and anguish come upon you.28   Then they will call upon me, but I will not answer;    they will seek me diligently but will not find me.29   Because they hated knowledge    and did not choose the fear of the LORD,30   would have none of my counsel    and despised all my reproof,31   therefore they shall eat the fruit of their way,    and have their fill of their own devices.32   For the simple are killed by their turning away,    and the complacency of fools destroys them;33   but whoever listens to me will dwell secure    and will be at ease, without dread of disaster.” The Value of Wisdom 2   My son, if you receive my words    and treasure up my commandments with you,2   making your ear attentive to wisdom    and inclining your heart to understanding;3   yes, if you call out for insight    and raise your voice for understanding,4   if you seek it like silver    and search for it as for hidden treasures,5   then you will understand the fear of the LORD    and find the knowledge of God.6   For the LORD gives wisdom;    from his mouth come knowledge and understanding;7   he stores up sound wisdom for the upright;    he is a shield to those who walk in integrity,8   guarding the paths of justice    and watching over the way of his saints.9   Then you will understand righteousness and justice    and equity, every good path;10   for wisdom will come into your heart,    and knowledge will be pleasant to your soul;11   discretion will watch over you,    understanding will guard you,12   delivering you from the way of evil,    from men of perverted speech,13   who forsake the paths of uprightness    to walk in the ways of darkness,14   who rejoice in doing evil    and delight in the perverseness of evil,15   men whose paths are crooked,    and who are devious in their ways. 16   So you will be delivered from the forbidden2 woman,    from the adulteress3 with her smooth words,17   who forsakes the companion of her youth    and forgets the covenant of her God;18   for her house sinks down to death,    and her paths to the departed;419   none who go to her come back,    nor do they regain the paths of life. 20   So you will walk in the way of the good    and keep to the paths of the righteous.21   For the upright will inhabit the land,    and those with integrity will remain in it,22   but the wicked will be cut off from the land,    and the treacherous will be rooted out of it. Footnotes [1] 1:23 Or Will you turn away at my reproof? [2] 2:16 Hebrew strange [3] 2:16 Hebrew foreign woman [4] 2:18 Hebrew to the Rephaim (ESV) Psalm: Psalm 63 Psalm 63 (Listen) My Soul Thirsts for You A Psalm of David, when he was in the wilderness of Judah. 63   O God, you are my God; earnestly I seek you;    my soul thirsts for you;  my flesh faints for you,    as in a dry and weary land where there is no water.2   So I have looked upon you in the sanctuary,    beholding your power and glory.3   Because your steadfast love is better than life,    my lips will praise you.4   So I will bless you as long as I live;    in your name I will lift up my hands. 5   My soul will be satisfied as with fat and rich food,    and my mouth will praise you with joyful lips,6   when I remember you upon my bed,    and meditate on you in the watches of the night;7   for you have been my help,    and in the shadow of your wings I will sing for joy.8   My soul clings to you;    your right hand upholds me. 9   But those who seek to destroy my life    shall go down into the depths of the earth;10   they shall be given over to the power of the sword;    they shall be a portion for jackals.11   But the king shall rejoice in God;    all who swear by him shall exult,    for the mouths of liars will be stopped. (ESV) New Testament: John 3 John 3 (Listen) You Must Be Born Again 3 Now there was a man of the Pharisees named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews. 2 This man came to Jesus1 by night and said to him, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him.” 3 Jesus answered him, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again2 he cannot see the kingdom of God.” 4 Nicodemus said to him, “How can a man be born when he is old? Can he enter a second time into his mother's womb and be born?” 5 Jesus answered, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. 6 That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.3 7 Do not marvel that I said to you, ‘You4 must be born again.' 8 The wind5 blows where it wishes, and you hear its sound, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.” 9 Nicodemus said to him, “How can these things be?” 10 Jesus answered him, “Are you the teacher of Israel and yet you do not understand these things? 11 Truly, truly, I say to you, we speak of what we know, and bear witness to what we have seen, but you6 do not receive our testimony. 12 If I have told you earthly things and you do not believe, how can you believe if I tell you heavenly things? 13 No one has ascended into heaven except he who descended from heaven, the Son of Man.7 14 And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, 15 that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.8 For God So Loved the World 16 “For God so loved the world,9 that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. 17 For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. 18 Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God. 19 And this is the judgment: the light has come into the world, and people loved the darkness rather than the light because their works were evil. 20 For everyone who does wicked things hates the light and does not come to the light, lest his works should be exposed. 21 But whoever does what is true comes to the light, so that it may be clearly seen that his works have been carried out in God.” John the Baptist Exalts Christ 22 After this Jesus and his disciples went into the Judean countryside, and he remained there with them and was baptizing. 23 John also was baptizing at Aenon near Salim, because water was plentiful there, and people were coming and being baptized 24 (for John had not yet been put in prison). 25 Now a discussion arose between some of John's disciples and a Jew over purification. 26 And they came to John and said to him, “Rabbi, he who was with you across the Jordan, to whom you bore witness—look, he is baptizing, and all are going to him.” 27 John answered, “A person cannot receive even one thing unless it is given him from heaven. 28 You yourselves bear me witness, that I said, ‘I am not the Christ, but I have been sent before him.' 29 The one who has the bride is the bridegroom. The friend of the bridegroom, who stands and hears him, rejoices greatly at the bridegroom's voice. Therefore this joy of mine is now complete. 30 He must increase, but I must decrease.”10 31 He who comes from above is above all. He who is of the earth belongs to the earth and speaks in an earthly way. He who comes from heaven is above all. 32 He bears witness to what he has seen and heard, yet no one receives his testimony. 33 Whoever receives his testimony sets his seal to this, that God is true. 34 For he whom God has sent utters the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure. 35 The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand. 36 Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God remains on him. Footnotes [1] 3:2 Greek him [2] 3:3 Or from above; the Greek is purposely ambiguous and can mean both again and from above; also verse 7 [3] 3:6 The same Greek word means both wind and spirit [4] 3:7 The Greek for you is plural here [5] 3:8 The same Greek word means both wind and spirit [6] 3:11 The Greek for you is plural here; also four times in verse 12 [7] 3:13 Some manuscripts add who is in heaven [8] 3:15 Some interpreters hold that the quotation ends at verse 15 [9] 3:16 Or For this is how God loved the world [10] 3:30 Some interpreters hold that the quotation continues through verse 36 (ESV)

Living By Faith, Hope and Love
Prince of Prophets - Isaiah

Living By Faith, Hope and Love

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 45:33


Micheal Angelo among artist Micheal Jordan among basketball Beethoven among composers Lincoln among presidents Krzyzewski among coaches Isaiah is among prophets Most educated, most articulate, most influential Greatness often accompanies being misunderstood 5 areas we want to look at tonight Who wrote the book? As is the case with nearly all the books of “the prophets,” the book of Isaiah takes its name from its writer. Isaiah was married to a prophetess who bore him at least two sons (Isaiah 7:3; 8:3). He prophesied under the reign of four Judean kings—Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah (1:1)—and he likely met his death under a fifth, the evil King Manasseh. K Christian tradition as early as the second century identifies Isaiah as one of the prophets whose death is described in Hebrews 11:37, specifically the prophet who was “sawn in two.” Isaiah likely lived in Jerusalem, given the book's concern with the city (Isaiah 1:1) and his close proximity to at least two significant kings during the period of his prophecy (7:3; 38:1). Much of scholarship for the past two centuries has assigned multiple writers to Isaiah, dividing the book into three sections: 1–39, 40–55, and 56–66 However, these divisions come out of a scholarly denial of predictive prophecy. This position not only limits the power of God to communicate with His people but also ignores the wide variety of specific, predictive claims about Jesus Christ scattered throughout the book. Where are we? Isaiah prophesied from 739–681 BC to a nation that had turned a deaf ear to the Lord. Instead of serving Him with humility and offering love to their neighbors, the nation of Judah offered meaningless sacrifices in God's temple at Jerusalem and committed injustices throughout the nation. The people of Judah turned their backs on God and alienated themselves from Him, which created the need for Isaiah's pronouncements of judgment —declarations made in the hope that God's chosen people would return to Him. Why is Isaiah so important? The book of Isaiah provides us with the most comprehensive prophetic picture of Jesus Christ in the entire Old Testament. It includes the full scope of His life: the announcement of His coming (Isaiah 40:3–5), His virgin birth (7:14), His proclamation of the good news (61:1), His sacrificial death (52:13–53:12) His return to claim His own (60:2–3) Because of these and numerous other christological texts in Isaiah, the book stands as a testament of hope in the Lord, the One who saves His people from themselves. What's the big idea? Isaiah's overall theme receives its clearest statement in chapter 12: “Behold, God is my salvation, / I will trust and not be afraid” (Isaiah 12:2). This echoes the meaning of Isaiah's name, which means the “salvation of Yahweh.” Having read the book, you might wonder about the strong presence of judgment that runs through the first thirty-nine chapters when the theme is salvation. How can the two coexist? The presence of judgment indicates its necessity for salvation to occur. Before we can have salvation, we must have a need for it! So the bulk of those early chapters in Isaiah detail judgments against the people who have turned their backs on the Lord, showing us that those who persist in their rebellion will receive judgment. On the other hand, we also see God's faithfulness to His promise. He will preserve a small remnant of faithful believers, those who will continue on into the glorious renewed world He has prepared for His children in the end times (65:17–66:24). How do I apply this? Because of its scope, Isaiah contains one of the clearest expressions of the gospel in all the Old Testament. Even from the first chapter, it is clear that the people have turned away from God and failed in their responsibilities as His children (Isaiah 1:2–17). Yet God miraculously holds out hope to this unrepentant people, offering cleansing of sins and the blessing that comes with faith and obedience in Him (1:18–20). Salvation lies only in God—the only question is whether or not we will accept His offer. In addition to its gospel message, the book of Isaiah clearly articulates the sins of God's people—dealing with others unjustly which resulted in their offering hypocritical sacrifices to God. Do you see anything in your own life that might fall under Isaiah's critique of injustice—treating family, colleagues, or even strangers with unkindness or even prejudice? Isaiah's message is also a call for believers to come back to purity in our love for God and for our neighbors (Luke 10:26–28).

Douglas Jacoby Podcast
A Tour Through John, Lesson 18

Douglas Jacoby Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 23:08


For additional notes and resources check out Douglas' website.12 Again Jesus spoke to them, saying, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness but will have the light of life.” "Again Jesus spoke" ties in to 7:38. Remember that 7:53-8:11 is not in the original; it interrupts the flow.Thus the statement is spoken in the context of the Feast of Tabernacles.In the second "I am statement," Christ claims to be the light of the world (v.12).Just as the pillar of fire led the Israelites through the desert after the Exodus, so Jesus will lead his people.Hence the emphasis on following the light. (The Israelites followed the pillar.)For more on the background to the "I am" statements, in addition to previous comments on John 6:35, see Isaiah 41:4 and 43:10-11, where the OT Greek LXX reads ego eimi ("I am").Jesus does not say, "Look -- there's the light," or "I've found the light!" Rather, he boldly claims, "I am the light."The Bible teaches that because God is our light (Psalm 27:1), Jesus is the light (John 8:12). Further, the Word is a light (Psalm 119:105), and as we live out the truth, we ourselves are to be the light of the world (Matthew 5:14).The truth that Jesus is the light of the world (v.12) will be vividly illustrated in chapter 9 when Jesus heals the man born blind (9:5).13 Then the Pharisees said to him, “You are testifying on your own behalf; your testimony is not valid.” 14 Jesus answered, “Even if I testify on my own behalf, my testimony is valid because I know where I have come from and where I am going, but you do not know where I come from or where I am going. 15 You judge by human standards; I judge no one. 16 Yet even if I do judge, my judgment is valid; for it is not I alone who judge, but I and the Father who sent me. 17 In your law it is written that the testimony of two witnesses is valid. 18 I testify on my own behalf, and the Father who sent me testifies on my behalf.” 19 Then they said to him, “Where is your Father?” Jesus answered, “You know neither me nor my Father. If you knew me, you would know my Father also.” 20 He spoke these words while he was teaching in the treasury of the temple, but no one arrested him, because his hour had not yet come.The Pharisees challenge his statement as unsubstantiated (v.13).They will not accept testimony without witnesses. Deuteronomy 19:15 requires witnesses for testimony to be valid.Jesus responds that his testimony corresponds with the judgment of his Father (vv.14-18), and thus is not at all invalid. God himself is Jesus' witness!They judge by human standards (v.15). See 7:24. Jesus claims to "judge no one": not a repudiation of judgment or the judgment day, but a denial of judging by human standards.Misunderstanding his reference to his Father (they are on "channel 2"), they then inquire about his earthly father (v.19).This interaction takes place in the treasury of the temple (v.20).The treasury was located in the Court of the Women, between the Court of the Israelites and the Court of Gentiles.The gadzophulakion (also Mark 12:41,43; Luke 21:1) is either the Temple Treasury or the offering box itself.The leaders wanted to arrest him, but it was not his time.21 Again he said to them, “I am going away, and you will search for me, but you will die in your sin. Where I am going, you cannot come.” 22 Then the Jews said, “Is he going to kill himself? Is that what he means by saying, ‘Where I am going, you cannot come'?”Jesus said that he would go away, where they could not follow (v.21).Many Jews believed that suicides would be consigned to the deepest part of Hades, the underworld.23 He said to them, “You are from below, I am from above; you are of this world, I am not of this world. 24 I told you that you would die in your sins, for you will die in your sins unless you believe that I am he.” 25 They said to him, “Who are you?” Jesus said to them, “Why do I speak to you at all? 26 I have much to say about you and much to condemn; but the one who sent me is true, and I declare to the world what I have heard from him.” 27 They did not understand that he was speaking to them about the Father.Jesus replies that he is from above -- it is they who are from below (v.23).Unless they believe what he has said ("I am," v.24), they will die in their unbelief.Again they question his authority, and identity (v.25).His response can be taken two ways, as in the NIV "Just what I have been claiming all along," or as above in the NRSV. The Amplified Bible has: "Jesus replied, [Why do I even speak to you!] I am exactly what I have been telling you from the first."28 So Jesus said, “When you have lifted up the Son of Man, then you will realize that I am he, and that I do nothing on my own, but I speak these things as the Father instructed me. 29 And the one who sent me is with me; he has not left me alone, for I always do what is pleasing to him.” 30 As he was saying these things, many believed in him.Jesus predicts that once he has been lifted up (crucified), men will better understand his divine origin and the truth of his words (v.28).Jesus claims to always obey the Father, for which reason he is not alone. God is with him in his life and words (v.29).Even at this point it seems that many believed Jesus was speaking the truth (v.30), although the antagonism continues into the final section of John 8.The negative reaction well illustrates 3:19-20. Darkness always resists the light.Verse 30 may be taken as the final verse in this section, or the first verse in the section that follows.31 Then Jesus said to the Jews who had believed in him, “If you continue in my word, you are truly my disciples; 32 and you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.” 33 They answered him, “We are descendants of Abraham and have never been slaves to anyone. What do you mean by saying, ‘You will be made free'?”Jesus now calls the Jews who believed his message (v.30) to an obedient faith (v.31). This is the only way the truth will set them free (v.32).They react poorly to the challenge, rejecting the freedom Jesus offers, which comes only from obedience (v.34ff).The irony of their retort is pathetic. What about the Egyptians? Midianites? Assyrians? Babylonians? Greeks? And what about the present Roman occupation (63 BC+)?They take their stand on nationalistic and religious pride (v.33).Ezra 9:9 is also à propos.34 Jesus answered them, “Very truly, I tell you, everyone who commits sin is a slave to sin. 35 The slave does not have a permanent place in the household; the son has a place there forever. 36 So if the Son makes you free, you will be free indeed.Just as a train is "free" only when it stays on the rails, so humans experience true freedom when they walk in the path of God's commands.For more passages about spiritual freedom, see Psalm 119:45; Romans 8:21; 2 Corinthians 3:17; Galatians 5:1; Ephesians 3:12; James 1:25, 2:12; 2 Peter 2:19.There are three passages in John where Jesus spells out what it means to be a disciple. (This also makes an excellent "discipleship study.")John 8 -- We must remain in his word.John 13 -- We must love one another as he loved us.John 15 -- We must live a productive (fruitful) life.37 I know that you are descendants of Abraham; yet you look for an opportunity to kill me, because there is no place in you for my word. 38 I declare what I have seen in the Father's presence; as for you, you should do what you have heard from the Father."They have no room for his message (vv.37,43), and are ready to do away with Jesus.Jesus claims to have come from the very presence of God (v.38). In a number of places in this gospel he says that he has come down from heaven.39 They answered him, “Abraham is our father.” Jesus said to them, “If you were Abraham's children, you would be doing what Abraham did, 40 but now you are trying to kill me, a man who has told you the truth that I heard from God. This is not what Abraham did. 41 You are indeed doing what your father does.” They said to him, “We are not illegitimate children; we have one father, God himself.” 42 Jesus said to them, “If God were your Father, you would love me, for I came from God and now I am here. I did not come on my own, but he sent me. 43 Why do you not understand what I say? It is because you cannot accept my word. 44 You are from your father the devil, and you choose to do your father's desires. He was a murderer from the beginning and does not stand in the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks according to his own nature, for he is a liar and the father of lies. 45 But because I tell the truth, you do not believe me. 46 Which of you convicts me of sin? If I tell the truth, why do you not believe me? 47 Whoever is from God hears the words of God. The reason you do not hear them is that you are not from God.”When the Jews retort, "We are not children of fornication" (v.41), they are claiming, in effect, "We are not guilty of spiritual harlotry."The prophet Hosea, and Jesus, accused Israel of spiritual unfaithfulness. They are defending themselves.It is possible that their words are a slur on Jesus' paternity, but this interpretation evolved in the early third century, and is probably not in view in this passage.Jesus reminds them that their antagonistic response is nothing like the attitude of Abraham, their alleged father. "Like father, like son." Their father is the devil (v.44), and they resemble him in several ways.Here Jesus also tells us several things about the devil (vv.44-45):His desires are contrary to God's.He is a murderer.He is not truthful, and lies.Putting it all together, we see a power bent on his own way, and willing to do whatever it takes to persuade others to follow him."Which of you convicts me of sin?" (v.46).What a claim! On the lips of no other human would these words have been received with anything other than astonishment or offense. But the truth is, none of the charges against Jesus we find on the lips of his enemies is true. Nor is there any hint of sin in Jesus' personal life.Jesus is saying, in effect, that his life backs up his message and divine origin. "What action of mine warrants this response on your part?" There is no excuse for anyone to reject his teaching, let alone with such vitriol.Compare John 8:46 to 1 Kings 8:46.Those who do not accept the truth show that they are not of God (v.47).48 The Jews answered him, “Are we not right in saying that you are a Samaritan and have a demon?” 49 Jesus answered, “I do not have a demon; but I honor my Father, and you dishonor me. 50 Yet I do not seek my own glory; there is one who seeks it and he is the judge. 51 Very truly, I tell you, whoever keeps my word will never see death.”Unable to specify a particular sin, the Jews resort to name-calling (v.48). To this Jesus responds coolly and objectively (v.49ff).Why do they call him a Samaritan (v.48)?He was not a Judean -- at least by upbringing. Though born in Bethlehem in Judah, he probably had a Galilean accent, as nearly all his life he had lived in the north (Nazareth and Capernaum).Samaritans were viewed as heretics, as they had a slightly different Bible, even altering the Ten Commandments.They rejected the Temple and the Jewish priesthood.At least two Samaritan prophets made outrageous claims.Simon Magus (Acts 8) worked wonders and claimed to be "the Great Power."Dositheus claimed to be the Son of God.As for the claim of demon-possession, the second century Justin Martyr viewed both these Samaritans as possessed (Apol. 26:1,4-5).And yet Jesus was warm in his outreach to the Samaritans. For more on this, click here.Again Jesus returns to the theme of freedom.Whoever obeys his teaching, he promises, will not see death (v.51).He refers of course to spiritual death, not physical.52 The Jews said to him, “Now we know that you have a demon. Abraham died, and so did the prophets; yet you say, ‘Whoever keeps my word will never taste death.' 53 Are you greater than our father Abraham, who died? The prophets also died. Who do you claim to be?” 54 Jesus answered, “If I glorify myself, my glory is nothing. It is my Father who glorifies me, he of whom you say, ‘He is our God,' 55 though you do not know him. But I know him; if I would say that I do not know him, I would be a liar like you. But I do know him and I keep his word. 56 Your ancestor Abraham rejoiced that he would see my day; he saw it and was glad.” 57 Then the Jews said to him, “You are not yet fifty years old, and have you seen Abraham? 58 Jesus said to them, “Very truly, I tell you, before Abraham was, I am.” 59 So they picked up stones to throw at him, but Jesus hid himself and went out of the temple.The Jews are greatly offended at this claim, realizing that Jesus is implicitly elevating himself above Abraham and the prophets. Even Abraham, spiritual father of the nation, had died, and here is Jesus, claiming it is possible not to die at all!Jesus knows God (v.55). Nowhere in John does he claim to believe in God, but to know him. This knowledge is not academic, but intimate. Christ knows the Father as he knows himself. (Another implication of divinity.)In regard to verse 56, Abraham saw into the future. See, e.g., Genesis 15:5-6,17-21; 12:1-3. It was common among Jews in the first century to ascribe to Abraham knowledge of the end of days and the Messiah.Verse 57 does not suggest that Jesus was nearing 50.In fact, he would only have been about 35 at the time of his death.The age of 50 simply denotes an elder, a man at the end of his working life (Numbers 4:2-3,39; 8:24-25). Jesus is not even 50 years old (v.57); it is ludicrous that he would have special information about a man who had died nearly two millennia earlier."Before Abraham was born, I am" (v.58) has a parallel in the Greek O.T., which was the Bible of most early Christians. There we read: "Before the mountains were born / or you brought forth the earth and the world / from everlasting to everlasting you are (Psalm 90:2 [LXX Ps 89:2]).Jesus goes further:Abraham, to whom God had made promises about Messianic times, rejoiced in the things being fulfilled through Jesus' ministry.Pushing the crowd to the very limit, Jesus then implies his divinity: "Before Abraham was born, I am" (v.58).The response: the crowd wants to execute him for blasphemy.Jesus eludes them. (His time had still not come!)

Living Words
Its Lamp is the Lamb

Living Words

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022


Its Lamp is the Lamb Revelation 21:22-22:7 by William Klock In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.  The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters.   And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light.  And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness.  God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day. (Genesis 1:1-5) So begins the great story.  And it goes on.  The Lord speaks and the land appears and brings forth every kind of plant.  The Lord speaks and creates the heavens, then fills them with the sun, the moon, the stars.  He fills the sea with fish and brings forth animals to roam the earth.  And finally he creates human beings, male and female, to bear his image—to be the priests of his temple and to have dominion, to steward, this good cosmos that he made.  They were to be fruitful, to multiply, to fill the earth, and by implication to expand the Lord's temple until it encompassed all of Creation.  And it was good. The Lord planted a garden and in it he placed the man, and later his wife, to share in his fellowship.  In the middle of the garden was the tree of life and from that garden-temple we're told flowed streams of water to nourish the earth.  How long it lasted, we're not told.  If we're meant to take it literally—which we really don't know—it wasn't very long, seeing as Eve's first child was born outside the garden.  The two bought the lie of the serpent and rebelled against the Lord.  They broke the one rule they'd been given and, in doing so, grasped for divinity themselves.  In that state, having access to the tree of life and the immortality it gave, would have been cruel and disastrous, so they were cast out and as the story unfolds in the chapters that follow, things went from bad to worse. But the Lord did not abandon that which he created out of love and grace.  Creation itself and the human beings that corrupted it were created good and the Lord would not only make them good once again—he would forgive and restore and renew these rebellious creatures and bring them back into his presence, to live at the headwaters of the river and under the leaves of the tree of life.  Abraham.  Isaac.  Jacob.  Joseph.  Moses.  Joshua.  David.  Israel.  All signposts in the great story, reminding us that not even the worst of human sin and rebellion can ultimately derail the Lord's plan for his cosmos.  In the midst of this broken world the Lord created a people for himself.  He claimed a land for himself, he delivered them from Egypt and placed them in that land, and he dwelt in their midst in the tabernacle and later the temple—the greatest of the Old Testament signposts, pointing to a future in which he will set everything to rights and restore humanity to his presence.  Creation cries out to be delivered from corruption and to have its stewards set right and restored to their rightful place. The Old Testament prophets, living in the midst of Israel's troubles, looked forward to that day.  The very existence of Israel as the people of God was a reminder that he's working to set things to rights, but Israel herself became emblematic of humanity's problem.  Sin.  Idolatry.  Compromise.  Worldliness.  Unfaithfulness.  The very people whom the Lord had redeemed and claimed as his own needed, themselves, to be set right.  And so the prophets rebuked Israel, but they did so in hope.  We'll get to our text from John's Revelation in a bit, but first those prophets.  We've seen how John draws constantly on their imagery and here, at the end, in Revelation 21 and 22 John riffs on Isaiah 60 and Ezekiel 47 and uses their imagery to show us the faithfulness of God revealed in the end as the great project begun in Genesis 1 and 2 is finally fulfilled. Isaiah saw a day in which the glory of God would outshine the sun in a renewed Zion: The sun shall be no more          your light by day, nor for brightness shall the moon          give you light; but the Lord will be your everlasting light,          and your God will be your glory. (Isaiah 60:19) Isaiah also writes of the Lord's city: And nations shall come to your light,          and kings to the brightness of your rising… Your gates shall be open continually;          day and night they shall not be shut, that people may bring to you the wealth of the nations,          with their kings led in procession. (Isaiah 60:3, 11) It would be worth reading the whole of Isaiah 60, but that would take longer than we have this morning.  Needless to say, it's a vision of both creation and God's own people set to rights and in that renewal God's glory is powerfully manifest.  It was a vision that inspired hope in Israel.  It was a vision that shaped the ministry of Jesus.  And in Revelation 21 John reinterprets that vision in light of the risen Jesus.  Look at Revelation 21:22-27. And I saw no temple in the city, for its temple is the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb.  And the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God gives it light, and its lamp is the Lamb.  By its light will the nations walk, and the kings of the earth will bring their glory into it, and its gates will never be shut by day—and there will be no night there.  They will bring into it the glory and the honor of the nations.  But nothing unclean will ever enter it, nor anyone who does what is detestable or false, but only those who are written in the Lamb's book of life.   At this point we shouldn't be surprised that the whole city is the Lord's temple.  We saw last week saw that it's filled with his glory.  And John described the city symbolically as an enormous cube—it's so large that it fills the earth, or at least sort of the known world of John's day—and it's a cube, a giant holy of holies.  That was the part of the tabernacle and later the temple that held the ark of the covenant and the Lord's presence, the glory cloud, rested on the ark.  All along, this is where the temple and the ark and the cloud of glory were pointing: to a future day when, even despite human sin, the project into which the Lord had called Adam and Eve is completed and his glory fills the earth as the waters cover the sea, as Habakkuk put it.  It should have happened through the faithfulness of Adam and the faithfulness of his children and grandchildren and great-grandchildren, but instead it has come through the faithfulness of a second Adam, through Jesus, and through the proclamation of the gospel by his Spirit-empowered new Israel. And it's not just the temple that is no longer needed, but even the sun and the moon become redundant.  Does that mean there will literally be no sun and moon in God's new creation?  I think, like John's statement that there was no sea, this is symbolic language.  That's the nature of his revelation.  I could be wrong.  Maybe in this new creation the laws of physics and biology and the very structure of the cosmos itself will be transformed.  I don't think so, but it's possible.  But the point is that this new creation, this restored temple, is full of the glory of the Lord and his brightness outshines the sun.  As John recorded these words he would have had the end of Exodus in mind—that awe-inspiring scene of the Lord's glory descending to fill the newly-completed tabernacle, his brightness in the midst of Israel's wilderness camp.  It's the conclusion of a story of human blood and tears, but there at the end the love and the grace and the mercy of God triumph as his people gather around to worship.  And yet, if we're paying attention to the bigger story, Exodus can't be the end.  As glorious as it is, Israel's camp and even the tabernacle were a little thing, a tiny spot of brightness, in the midst of a vast world of darkness.  Israel's camp still included sinners and uncleanness, despite the law.  And the nations hardly took notice of any of it.  Something more, something bigger had to happen.  Exodus, like Moses and Israel and the tabernacle were signs pointing to something greater.  And now John sees it.  Finally, here's the fulfilment of the story.  The great thing so amazing that John can only describe it by piling up symbols and metaphors.  It's like this and it's like this and it's like that, too—oh, and also like that and that and that! The city is full of the glory of God and the lamp—the centre and the source of that glory is the lamb—the one who was slain, whose blood and tears bought humanity's redemption from our own blood and tears.  Isaiah had seen something similar, and yet I have to think that Isaiah was left in wonder as to how it all would ever happen.  All he could say was that the Lord would do something so amazing that the nations would finally take notice and recognise him, coming to him in submission and to give him glory.  And John sees it now.  The amazing thing the Lord has done is Jesus himself, the Lamb.  It is his light that outshines the sun.  St. Paul, in Romans, writes of grace abounding because of sin and here we see that as nowhere else.  Adam new the light of God in perfection, and yet he didn't know it like this.  The amazing thing, the Lamb who humbled himself to become incarnate and to die for the sake of his sinful people, reveals the glory of the Lord in a way Adam could never have dreamed of. Are you familiar with the Japanese art of kitsugi?  Broken pottery and ceramics are glued back together with lacquer and then the lacquer repairs are covered with gold.  A bowl or a teapot can be a thing of beauty, they don't usually attract much attention.  But break it and repair it with gold, and it becomes a thing of even greater beauty that everyone suddenly notices.  That's the best thing I can think of to illustrate what John's getting at.  Creation was glorious, but God's repairing of his Creation through the sacrifice of the Lamb is infinitely more glorious, just as Jesus is more beautiful for the nail scars in his hands and feet.  He reveals the love and the mercy and the grace of God like costly gold highlighting the repairs of a piece of broken pottery.  And, key here, no one can help but be caught by this vision of glory, of what God and the Lamb have done.  They're captured by it.  The only response anyone can give—you, me, all the nations of the earth—is to bow down and to offer ourselves in return, giving him the glory he is so clearly due.  By the incarnation and by the death and resurrection of Jesus, that scene of glory, of the Lord descending to be present with Israel in the wilderness as the people gather around to worship and to live in his presence, that scene is multiplied a hundred thousand times over.  Because of Jesus, the entire world now takes notice and gathers to worship in the light of his glory and to live and work in his presence. So the darkness of human sin and rebellion, prompted a response from the Lord that is indescribably glorious.  It shines so brightly that there is no night.  And its light has gone out to the nations through the proclamation of the gospel and Isaiah's vision is fulfilled.  This is a vision to inspire those little beleaguered and persecuted churches—and the church today—to stand firm and to continue to proclaim the good news about Jesus even in the face of martyrdom.  By the light of the Lamb and his gospel the nations walk and come to the city to bring their glory and honour.  This is what Israel was meant to be—a light to the nations—only more so and greater than any king or prophets could ever have imagined.  Solomon's glory is but a shadow of King Jesus.  The tribute of the Queen of Sheba is but a shadow of what the nations will bring to the Lamb.  And, finally, the people of God is set fully to rights.  Sin, evil, rebellion have been wiped from creation.  Nothing unclean or false is present.  There are no lying, stealing, greedy Achans to bring judgement on the people of God. John sees Genesis 1 fulfilled through Isaiah's imagery and then he sees Genesis 2 fulfilled in the imagery of Ezekiel's prophecy.  Ezekiel was writing during the Exile.  The temple had been destroyed, but in his vision he saw it restored, and more importantly, he saw the glory of the Lord return to it.  When Israel returned from her exile, she did rebuild the temple, but Ezekiel's vision of the return of the Lord's glory was never fulfilled—not until Jesus created a new Israel, a new temple, and filled it—us—with his Spirit.  And yet even that is a shadow of what is to come.  But what John draws on here is Ezekiel's vision of the temple as a new Eden.  In Ezekiel 47 the prophet sees a river flowing from the temple—from the garden—and the further it flows the deeper it gets until it's so enormous it couldn't be crossed and at that point it flows down into the Judean wilderness and down into the Dead Sea.  The Dead Sea is dead.  It so full of salt and minerals nothing can live in it.  Its water is useless for irrigation.  But Ezekiel saw the life-giving water of the temple make even the Dead Sea come to life.  In his vision it swarms with fish and trees grow on the banks, bearing fresh fruit.  Ezekiel writes: Their leaves will not wither, nor their fruit fail, but they will bear fresh fruit every month, because the water for them flows from the sanctuary. Their fruit will be for food, and their leaves for healing. (Ezekiel 47:12) John now sees the fulfilment of Ezekiel's vision.  Look at Revelation 22:1-5. Then the angel showed me the river of the water of life, bright as crystal, flowing from the throne of God and of the Lamb through the middle of the street of the city; also, on either side of the river, the tree of life with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations.  No longer will there be anything accursed, but the throne of God and of the Lamb will be in it, and his servants will worship him.  They will see his face, and his name will be on their foreheads.  And night will be no more. They will need no light of lamp or sun, for the Lord God will be their light, and they will reign forever and ever.   Ezekiel saw a restoration or a rebirth of Creation's state as we see it in Genesis 2, but John sees that renewal even more explicitly.  Ezekiel saw a river bringing life to the dead.  John sees that river irrigating the tree of life—the very tree that stood in the middle of the garden, the very tree that imparted the life of God to Adam and Eve, the very tree from which they were barred because of their sin.  John sees it restored.  He sees twelve kinds of fruit, deliberately calling back to what Ezekiel saw, but also showing us a multiplication of the tree.  As the river flows down the main street of the city, so the tree grows and flourish all down both banks of the river—not just a single tree of life, but tree after tree after tree.  And it's not just to give life to Adam and Eve.  The tree is there for the healing of—to give life to—the nations.  What does that look like?  I think the specifics are beyond the scope of John's vision.  His point is just that the nations whose armies we've seen warring with each other throughout the book, the nations who were once enticed by the beast, his prophet, and the great prostitute, the nations that had once given themselves over to idolatry and every kind of wickedness, John now sees those nations transformed by the power of the gospel and faith in Jesus the Messiah.  They've been brought into this new world, and the abundant fruit of the tree of life—this tree symbolic of the life of God—heals them.  Like divine kintsugi, God's life heals the hurts, the griefs, the hatred, the tears. From the holy of holies the river flows—the water of life—bringing healing and life to the nations.  But John also sees that in response, the nations bring their worship to the city.  What other response can we have to the love and mercy and grace so freely poured out to forgive, to redeem, to restore, to make new?  But there's a difference between this temple and the temple of the Old Testament.  In the old temple no one saw the face of God.  In Exodus and again when Solomon built his temple, the people saw the cloud of glory descending into the holy of holies, but apart from that, the vision of divine glory was off-limits.  The unholy cannot enter the presence of the holy to look upon it.  Everyone in the Bible who ever had a glimpse fell on his face in fear.  But here the redeemed nations of God's new creation worship in his presence.  John says they see his face.  Why?  Because the name of the Lamb is written on their—on our—foreheads.  Because Jesus has marked us out as his own.  Brother and Sisters, when we come to him in faith, submitting to him, and giving him our allegiance in baptism, by that water he marks us as his own.  The minister may mark you with a cross on your forehead, but what Jesus does in that act is far more profound: he fills you with his Spirit and in doing that he's given each of us an earnest, a down payment on the life of God's new world—a life in which we, his people, become his very temple, a life where he lives in our midst, and we see him face to face, finally able to give him the fullness of worship of which our worship today is only a dim shadow. But John doesn't stop there.  We're not just set right; we're set right to fulfil the purpose for which we were created.  John really does see Genesis fulfilled.  “They will reign for ever and ever,” he writes.  The Lord said to Adam and Eve, “Be fruitful, multiply, fill the earth, subdue it, have dominion over it.”  We see every day what a mess we've made of that vocation.  St. Paul writes in Romans about Creation groaning in eager longing as it awaits our renewal and restoration and here, finally, John sees it.  What exactly that will look like, he doesn't say.  In this new world things have evolved beyond their original state in Eden.  The Lord doesn't simply reboot the programme.  Somehow he redeems what is good in human history and human development.  The garden has become a great city, but the garden is still there.  And, I think, our vocation will have grown and evolved in the same way.  But at its core it remains the same: serving the Lord as the priests of his temple and working as stewards of his Creation. Brothers and Sisters, it's not just pie in the sky when we die.  John brings everything back to the present.  Again, he was writing to those little churches full of persecuted and often fearful Christians bracing for a tidal wave of opposition.  He writes to them of perseverance in the midst of tribulation and reminds them that Jesus and his kingdom are real.  Real today and giving hope for the future.  He writes in verses 6 and 7:   And [the angel] said to me, “These words are trustworthy and true. And the Lord, the God of the spirits of the prophets, has sent his angel to show his servants what must soon take place.”   “And behold, I am coming soon. Blessed is the one who keeps the words of the prophecy of this book.”   Stand firm.  This is not all there is.  Jesus would vindicate his faithful people.  Judgement would fall, first on Jerusalem and then on Rome.  And John saw that glorious vision of Jesus riding out on a white horse to conquer by the power of the gospel—and his church riding with him.  It's a battle, but the outcome is already certain.  And here at the end we see the fruit.  We see the victory celebration that await.  And the angel says, “Blessed is the one who keeps the words of the prophecy of this book.”  Blessed is the one who stands firm in faith.  Blessed is the one who gives his allegiance to Jesus.  Blessed is the one proclaims to the world the death and resurrection and ascension of the Lord Jesus.  And blessed is the one who, filled the Spirit of God, lives out his or her priestly stewardship today—living today in light of the new creation to come.  For Christ has died, Christ is risen, and Christ will come again. Let's pray: Lord God, you declare your almighty power most chiefly in showing mercy and pity: mercifully grant to us such a measure of your grace, that we, running the way of your commandments, may receive your gracious promises, and be made partakers of your heavenly treasure; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

First Presbyterian Church of Baton Rouge

Mark was the first gospel written and recorded. Mark wrote to the persecuted Gentile Christians living in Rome. Because of this, Mark (more than any of the other gospel writers) narrows in on Jesus as our Suffering Servant, the Son of God. He writes with conciseness and urgency, documenting some of the most significant "support-beam" details of Jesus' life and ministry. In this passage, we learn how John the Baptist prepares the way for Jesus, getting our hearts ready for his ministry through a baptism of repentance (vs. 1-8). Then, Jesus prepares his heart for the work he came to do, through baptism and temptation, which sets the stage for his ministry. Then, we go. "The time is fulfilled." Jesus begins building God's Kingdom, and invites us along in that kingdom work. Ready... Set... Go! John shows such humility and reverence for the Lord, not only in his appearance, but in his actions taking the attention off him and onto Jesus, the one. He. says, "is mightier than I . . . who will baptize you with the Holy Spirit." It seems as though Mark is eager to let us know that all of these initial events took place in the "wilderness." Why is that significant? "The moment Jesus was baptized was like having the “commander-in-chief” of our lives come forward to the front lines and jump into the trenches to fight for us" (John Piper). “It's no more odd for Jesus to be baptized in the Jordan River than it is for him to hang on the cross at Calvary” (Mark Dever). The phrase “torn open” occurs twice in Mark's gospel, here at Jesus' baptism and again at the crucifixion, at the inaugurating moment of his ministry and at the moment he completed his mission. What do you think it would've been like to experience "the heavens being torn open, and the Spirit descend on him like a dove" and hear the voice of God speak words to his beloved Son, where all three persons of the Godhead were visibly united?! The last words, according to Mark, that Jesus heard before this time of testing, were from His Father: “You are my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased.” "The Spirit drove Jesus out to be tempted by Satan." This meeting with Satan was no accidental encounter, it was a divine appointment scheduled by the Father and implemented by the Spirit. Jesus came to reverse, to rectify, what humanity failed to do. This is what his temptation proves to us, he had to face, fight, and win all the battles we could ever face, he had to be tempted in every way. "The beginning of Jesus' public ministry didn't start in a thriving metropolis, but in the rugged wasteland of the Judean wilderness near the Dead Sea; not with a press conference but a baptism; not with a parade and feast, but with 40 days of solitude and fasting even further in the wilderness, being tempted by Satan himself” (NT Wright). Jesus came to proclaim the kingdom of God both as a present reality and as a future hope. In what ways is the kingdom of God already here? In what way is it yet to come? Jesus gives us four commands in our response to the gospel: Repent, believe, follow him, and fish for men. Reflection question: What have you given up in order to follow Jesus? What have you gained?

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck
Israel's LAST STAND Against Rome: Inside ANCIENT Fortress of Masada | Watchman Newscast

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 15:04


On today's Watchman Newscast, host Erick Stakelbeck takes you inside one of the most legendary fortresses in the world, Masada. In the middle of the remote Judean wilderness, the Jewish rebels made their famous last stand against Rome in AD 73, eventually committing mass suicide rather than be slaughtered or taken into slavery by Rome. Why does this tragic story of resistance to tyranny matter to Jews today? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Live to Love Scripture Encouragement
Live to Love Scripture Encouragement John 13.38

Live to Love Scripture Encouragement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 1:30


John 13:38 Jesus answered, "Will you lay down your life for Me? Truly, truly, I say to you, a rooster will not crow until you deny Me three times. Again, Jesus told what was going to happen before it happened so that Peter would ultimately come to believe in, trust in, rely upon, and follow Him unto death. Jesus responded to Peter's boast that he would lay down his life for Him. Indeed, Peter would have to die to his own self-appraised grandeur before he could follow Jesus anywhere. Upon the rooster's crow, Peter's pride in his own self-significance and importance would lie dead in the Judean dust. He would be perhaps the greatest alright—the greatest failure of the disciples. However, as we know. God used Peter's failure and subsequent restoration as testimony of His love and an incredible source of encouragement. Will we lay down our lives for Jesus' namesake? I hope so. Let's be on the alert for any lurking pride, self-significance, and self-importance that would hinder the flow of the love of Jesus Christ into the world we live in. Acknowledgment: Music from “Carried by the Father” by Eric Terlizzi. www.ericterlizzi.com

The Village Church
Books of the Bible: Mark

The Village Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 50:22


Mark 11 The beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah,[a] the Son of God,[b] 2 as it is written in Isaiah the prophet:“I will send my messenger ahead of you,    who will prepare your way”—3 “a voice of one calling in the wilderness,‘Prepare the way for the Lord,    make straight paths for him.'”4 And so John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. 5 The whole Judean countryside and all the people of Jerusalem went out to him. Confessing their sins, they were baptized by him in the Jordan River. 6 John wore clothing made of camel's hair, with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey. 7 And this was his message: “After me comes the one more powerful than I, the straps of whose sandals I am not worthy to stoop down and untie. 8 I baptize you with[e] water, but he will baptize you with[f] the Holy Spirit.”Support the show

Everything Everywhere Daily History Podcast

Around the year 36 BC, the King of Judea, Herod the Great, built a fortress in the Judean desert overlooking the Dead Sea. Almost 100 years later, that fortress became the scene for what was one of the most dramatic moments in the history of the Jewish people.  It was the final act in a rebellion against the Roman Empire, the ramifications of which are still felt in the world today.  Learn more about the Last Stand at Masada and the end of the Judean Revolt on this episode of Everything Everywhere Daily. Subscribe to the podcast!  https://link.chtbl.com/EverythingEverywhere?sid=ShowNotes -------------------------------- Executive Producer: Darcy Adams Associate Producers: Peter Bennett & Thor Thomsen   Become a supporter on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/everythingeverywhere Update your podcast app at newpodcastapps.com Search Past Episodes at fathom.fm Discord Server: https://discord.gg/UkRUJFh Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/everythingeverywhere/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EverythingEverywhere Twitter: https://twitter.com/everywheretrip Website: https://everything-everywhere.com/everything-everywhere-daily-podcast/ Everything Everywhere is an Airwave Media podcast." or "Everything Everywhere is part of the Airwave Media podcast network Please contact sales@advertisecast.com to advertise on Everything Everywhere. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ESV: Daily Office Lectionary
August 9: Psalm 97; Psalms 99–100; Psalms 94–95; Judges 13:1–15; Acts 5:27–42; John 3:22–36

ESV: Daily Office Lectionary

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 12:48


Proper 14 First Psalm: Psalm 97; Psalms 99–100 Psalm 97 (Listen) The Lord Reigns 97   The LORD reigns, let the earth rejoice;    let the many coastlands be glad!2   Clouds and thick darkness are all around him;    righteousness and justice are the foundation of his throne.3   Fire goes before him    and burns up his adversaries all around.4   His lightnings light up the world;    the earth sees and trembles.5   The mountains melt like wax before the LORD,    before the Lord of all the earth. 6   The heavens proclaim his righteousness,    and all the peoples see his glory.7   All worshipers of images are put to shame,    who make their boast in worthless idols;    worship him, all you gods! 8   Zion hears and is glad,    and the daughters of Judah rejoice,    because of your judgments, O LORD.9   For you, O LORD, are most high over all the earth;    you are exalted far above all gods. 10   O you who love the LORD, hate evil!    He preserves the lives of his saints;    he delivers them from the hand of the wicked.11   Light is sown1 for the righteous,    and joy for the upright in heart.12   Rejoice in the LORD, O you righteous,    and give thanks to his holy name! Footnotes [1] 97:11 Most Hebrew manuscripts; one Hebrew manuscript, Septuagint, Syriac, Jerome Light dawns (ESV) Psalms 99–100 (Listen) The Lord Our God Is Holy 99   The LORD reigns; let the peoples tremble!    He sits enthroned upon the cherubim; let the earth quake!2   The LORD is great in Zion;    he is exalted over all the peoples.3   Let them praise your great and awesome name!    Holy is he!4   The King in his might loves justice.1    You have established equity;  you have executed justice    and righteousness in Jacob.5   Exalt the LORD our God;    worship at his footstool!    Holy is he! 6   Moses and Aaron were among his priests,    Samuel also was among those who called upon his name.    They called to the LORD, and he answered them.7   In the pillar of the cloud he spoke to them;    they kept his testimonies    and the statute that he gave them. 8   O LORD our God, you answered them;    you were a forgiving God to them,    but an avenger of their wrongdoings.9   Exalt the LORD our God,    and worship at his holy mountain;    for the LORD our God is holy! His Steadfast Love Endures Forever A Psalm for giving thanks. 100   Make a joyful noise to the LORD, all the earth!2     Serve the LORD with gladness!    Come into his presence with singing! 3   Know that the LORD, he is God!    It is he who made us, and we are his;2    we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture. 4   Enter his gates with thanksgiving,    and his courts with praise!    Give thanks to him; bless his name! 5   For the LORD is good;    his steadfast love endures forever,    and his faithfulness to all generations. Footnotes [1] 99:4 Or The might of the King loves justice [2] 100:3 Or and not we ourselves (ESV) Second Psalm: Psalms 94–95 Psalms 94–95 (Listen) The Lord Will Not Forsake His People 94   O LORD, God of vengeance,    O God of vengeance, shine forth!2   Rise up, O judge of the earth;    repay to the proud what they deserve!3   O LORD, how long shall the wicked,    how long shall the wicked exult?4   They pour out their arrogant words;    all the evildoers boast.5   They crush your people, O LORD,    and afflict your heritage.6   They kill the widow and the sojourner,    and murder the fatherless;7   and they say, “The LORD does not see;    the God of Jacob does not perceive.” 8   Understand, O dullest of the people!    Fools, when will you be wise?9   He who planted the ear, does he not hear?  He who formed the eye, does he not see?10   He who disciplines the nations, does he not rebuke?  He who teaches man knowledge—11     the LORD—knows the thoughts of man,    that they are but a breath.1 12   Blessed is the man whom you discipline, O LORD,    and whom you teach out of your law,13   to give him rest from days of trouble,    until a pit is dug for the wicked.14   For the LORD will not forsake his people;    he will not abandon his heritage;15   for justice will return to the righteous,    and all the upright in heart will follow it. 16   Who rises up for me against the wicked?    Who stands up for me against evildoers?17   If the LORD had not been my help,    my soul would soon have lived in the land of silence.18   When I thought, “My foot slips,”    your steadfast love, O LORD, held me up.19   When the cares of my heart are many,    your consolations cheer my soul.20   Can wicked rulers be allied with you,    those who frame2 injustice by statute?21   They band together against the life of the righteous    and condemn the innocent to death.322   But the LORD has become my stronghold,    and my God the rock of my refuge.23   He will bring back on them their iniquity    and wipe them out for their wickedness;    the LORD our God will wipe them out. Let Us Sing Songs of Praise 95   Oh come, let us sing to the LORD;    let us make a joyful noise to the rock of our salvation!2   Let us come into his presence with thanksgiving;    let us make a joyful noise to him with songs of praise!3   For the LORD is a great God,    and a great King above all gods.4   In his hand are the depths of the earth;    the heights of the mountains are his also.5   The sea is his, for he made it,    and his hands formed the dry land. 6   Oh come, let us worship and bow down;    let us kneel before the LORD, our Maker!7   For he is our God,    and we are the people of his pasture,    and the sheep of his hand.  Today, if you hear his voice,8     do not harden your hearts, as at Meribah,    as on the day at Massah in the wilderness,9   when your fathers put me to the test    and put me to the proof, though they had seen my work.10   For forty years I loathed that generation    and said, “They are a people who go astray in their heart,    and they have not known my ways.”11   Therefore I swore in my wrath,    “They shall not enter my rest.” Footnotes [1] 94:11 Septuagint they are futile [2] 94:20 Or fashion [3] 94:21 Hebrew condemn innocent blood (ESV) Old Testament: Judges 13:1–15 Judges 13:1–15 (Listen) The Birth of Samson 13 And the people of Israel again did what was evil in the sight of the LORD, so the LORD gave them into the hand of the Philistines for forty years. 2 There was a certain man of Zorah, of the tribe of the Danites, whose name was Manoah. And his wife was barren and had no children. 3 And the angel of the LORD appeared to the woman and said to her, “Behold, you are barren and have not borne children, but you shall conceive and bear a son. 4 Therefore be careful and drink no wine or strong drink, and eat nothing unclean, 5 for behold, you shall conceive and bear a son. No razor shall come upon his head, for the child shall be a Nazirite to God from the womb, and he shall begin to save Israel from the hand of the Philistines.” 6 Then the woman came and told her husband, “A man of God came to me, and his appearance was like the appearance of the angel of God, very awesome. I did not ask him where he was from, and he did not tell me his name, 7 but he said to me, ‘Behold, you shall conceive and bear a son. So then drink no wine or strong drink, and eat nothing unclean, for the child shall be a Nazirite to God from the womb to the day of his death.'” 8 Then Manoah prayed to the LORD and said, “O Lord, please let the man of God whom you sent come again to us and teach us what we are to do with the child who will be born.” 9 And God listened to the voice of Manoah, and the angel of God came again to the woman as she sat in the field. But Manoah her husband was not with her. 10 So the woman ran quickly and told her husband, “Behold, the man who came to me the other day has appeared to me.” 11 And Manoah arose and went after his wife and came to the man and said to him, “Are you the man who spoke to this woman?” And he said, “I am.” 12 And Manoah said, “Now when your words come true, what is to be the child's manner of life, and what is his mission?” 13 And the angel of the LORD said to Manoah, “Of all that I said to the woman let her be careful. 14 She may not eat of anything that comes from the vine, neither let her drink wine or strong drink, or eat any unclean thing. All that I commanded her let her observe.” 15 Manoah said to the angel of the LORD, “Please let us detain you and prepare a young goat for you.” (ESV) New Testament: Acts 5:27–42 Acts 5:27–42 (Listen) 27 And when they had brought them, they set them before the council. And the high priest questioned them, 28 saying, “We strictly charged you not to teach in this name, yet here you have filled Jerusalem with your teaching, and you intend to bring this man's blood upon us.” 29 But Peter and the apostles answered, “We must obey God rather than men. 30 The God of our fathers raised Jesus, whom you killed by hanging him on a tree. 31 God exalted him at his right hand as Leader and Savior, to give repentance to Israel and forgiveness of sins. 32 And we are witnesses to these things, and so is the Holy Spirit, whom God has given to those who obey him.” 33 When they heard this, they were enraged and wanted to kill them. 34 But a Pharisee in the council named Gamaliel, a teacher of the law held in honor by all the people, stood up and gave orders to put the men outside for a little while. 35 And he said to them, “Men of Israel, take care what you are about to do with these men. 36 For before these days Theudas rose up, claiming to be somebody, and a number of men, about four hundred, joined him. He was killed, and all who followed him were dispersed and came to nothing. 37 After him Judas the Galilean rose up in the days of the census and drew away some of the people after him. He too perished, and all who followed him were scattered. 38 So in the present case I tell you, keep away from these men and let them alone, for if this plan or this undertaking is of man, it will fail; 39 but if it is of God, you will not be able to overthrow them. You might even be found opposing God!” So they took his advice, 40 and when they had called in the apostles, they beat them and charged them not to speak in the name of Jesus, and let them go. 41 Then they left the presence of the council, rejoicing that they were counted worthy to suffer dishonor for the name. 42 And every day, in the temple and from house to house, they did not cease teaching and preaching that the Christ is Jesus. (ESV) Gospel: John 3:22–36 John 3:22–36 (Listen) John the Baptist Exalts Christ 22 After this Jesus and his disciples went into the Judean countryside, and he remained there with them and was baptizing. 23 John also was baptizing at Aenon near Salim, because water was plentiful there, and people were coming and being baptized 24 (for John had not yet been put in prison). 25 Now a discussion arose between some of John's disciples and a Jew over purification. 26 And they came to John and said to him, “Rabbi, he who was with you across the Jordan, to whom you bore witness—look, he is baptizing, and all are going to him.” 27 John answered, “A person cannot receive even one thing unless it is given him from heaven. 28 You yourselves bear me witness, that I said, ‘I am not the Christ, but I have been sent before him.' 29 The one who has the bride is the bridegroom. The friend of the bridegroom, who stands and hears him, rejoices greatly at the bridegroom's voice. Therefore this joy of mine is now complete. 30 He must increase, but I must decrease.”1 31 He who comes from above is above all. He who is of the earth belongs to the earth and speaks in an earthly way. He who comes from heaven is above all. 32 He bears witness to what he has seen and heard, yet no one receives his testimony. 33 Whoever receives his testimony sets his seal to this, that God is true. 34 For he whom God has sent utters the words of God, for he gives the Spirit without measure. 35 The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand. 36 Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God remains on him. Footnotes [1] 3:30 Some interpreters hold that the quotation continues through verse 36 (ESV)