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Tim O'Brien from O'Brien Communications helps you immerse yourself in a story, a time, a place or just an idea that has shaped the way we think. Each episode will make you see things a little differently about subjects and ideas you thought you knew. Shaping Opinion resides at the intersection of hi…

Tim O'Brien


    • Oct 25, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 43m AVG DURATION
    • 283 EPISODES

    Listeners of Shaping Opinion that love the show mention: chris no context podcast, tim is a great, show is really, shaping, rogers, insightful podcast, i'm looking forward, listen to this show, give it a listen, interesting topics, one day, interviewing, great host, thought provoking, dive, engaging, history, well done, politics, professional.



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    Dr. James Fallon on The Psychopath Next Door

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 60:47

    Author and neuroscientist Dr. James Fallon joins Tim to talk about the dark side of the human brain and how common psychopathy may really be throughout society. And his story has a twist. Dr. Fallon is a neuroscientist, a professor of psychiatry and human behavior, and an author of the book, “The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain.” https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/The_Psychopath_Next_Door_auphonic.mp3 I'm going to say a word, and I want you to focus on the first thing that comes to mind. Are you ready? OK, here's the word. Psychopath. What came to mind. Did you think about a killer? Perhaps a serial killer? It makes sense. Many, if not most of the most notorious serial killers in history were psychopaths. Ted Bundy. Jeffrey Dahmer. David Berkowitz, also known as the Son of Sam. Edmund Kemper, who we discussed on last week's episode with Justin from the Generation Why Podcast. These were all famous serial killers. And they were all psychopaths. So, what exactly is a psychopathic personality? That's one of the first questions I had to ask Dr. James Fallon.  He's a neuroscientist at the University of California at Irvine. He's done extensive research in this area, and he's the author of a book called, “The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain.” Links The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain, by James Fallon (Barnes & Noble) Killed Strangely: The Death of Rebecca Cornell, by Elaine Forman Crane (Barnes & Noble) James Fallon, Ph.D., (University of California, Irvine) The Neuroscientist Who Discovered He was a Psychopath, Smithsonian Lizzie Borden, The Crime Museum The 1673 Murder of Rebecca Cornell and the 'Good Fire,' New England Historical Society About this Episode's Guest Dr. James Fallon James Fallon, Ph.D., is a neuroscientist and Professor Emeritus of Anatomy and Neurobiology at the University of California, Irving. He has several areas of expertise, including adult stem cells, psychiatry, and the relationships between brain imaging, genetics and a range of psychiatric conditions. These include schizophrenia, depression, addictions and psychopathy.

    Generation Why: Solving America’s True Crime Obsession

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 70:36

    Justin from the popular true crime podcast called Generation Why joins Tim to talk about America's obsession with true crime and his podcast's role in shaping the growing genre. Justin and his best friend and co-host Aaron launched their podcast in 2012, helping to pioneer the true crime podcasting. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Justin_Evans_-_True_Crime_Obsession_auponic.mp3 For a lot of people when they think of podcasts, they think of true crime. And for a lot of people, when they think of true crime, they think of podcasts. Aaron (left) and Justin (right) from Generation Why But it's not just podcasts. True crime magazines were a thing for well over 50 years. TV programs like Dateline have made true crime their focus for decades. Streamers have produced a steady stream of documentaries like “Making a Murderer,” and then there are the motion pictures and the streaming dramas, like “Mindhunter.” In the podcasting world, true crime continues to be one of the fastest-growing genres. And as we've already mentioned, the Generation Why podcast has pioneered the form. Generation Why released its first episode in 2012. It's co-hosted by best-friends Aaron Habel and Justin Evans. Each week, they select a specific case, almost always involving a murder or a missing person, to study and analyze, and perhaps most importantly, help the listener come to their own conclusions. About four years into their own podcasting journey, Justin and Aaron saw a boost in listener interest when a podcast called “Serial” hit the scene. Serial is largely credited for helping to blast off podcasting to a new level of popularity and awareness. The Generation Why podcast remains one of the top true crime podcasts today. Links Generation Why Podcast (website) This American Life Podcast (website) Joe Rogan Experience Podcast (website) WTF  with Marc Maron (Marc Maron podcast) Podcast Audiences: Why are Women Such Big Fans of True Crime Podcasts, BrandWatch (this is the article Tim mentioned in the episode Music Credits for this Episode The following tracks are featured in this episode under the terms of Creative Commons via the Free Music Archive: Deep by Bio Unit Death Note by Audiobinger PointsOfView by Ketsa Agency by Metre Apogee by Metre Sidewinder by Frequency Decree Insomnia by VibesByDRVN

    Heroes: The Guide Dog Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 50:41

    President and CEO of Guide Dogs for the Blind, Christine Benninger joins Tim to we'll talk about everything that has to happen long before that working guide dog meets his or her new partner.  Guide Dogs for the Blind works to give people with blindness freedom and mobility by helping them obtain guide dogs. That's where their work culminates. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Guide_Dogs_auphonic.mp3 Close your eyes. Imagine not being able to see. Then imagine trying to go about your daily routine this way. Even if you have trouble imagining it, you already get a sense of just how tough life can be if you're blind. There are many ways people with blindness work to overcome daily challenges to live normal, productive and successful lives. Today, we're going to talk about one of the more fascinating programs that exists in this way. It's called Guide Dogs for the Blind.  It's based on the belief that everyone deserves to move through the world safely and confidently—to live the life they want to live. While the work of Guide Dogs for the Blind is comprehensive, it all comes down to someone with a need, and the work involved to meet that need. That process starts with finding those special dogs, and then training them, which is a miracle in itself, and then of course, training the dog's partner so that the two are a perfect match. Guide Dogs for the Blind is the largest guide dog school in North America. More than 16,000 guide dog teams have graduated from the school since the organization's founding in 1942. Believe it or not, the organization does not charge its clients. The personalized training and support is provided thanks to the organization's donors and volunteers. Chris Benninger has been the organization's president and CEO since 2014. Links Guide Dogs for the Blind (website) Pick of the Litter Documentary About this Episode's Guest Christine Benninger Christine Benninger Christine (Chris) joined Guide Dogs for the Blind in April of 2014. Chris brings a wealth of non-profit and for-profit experience to her role. Prior to joining GDB, she spent 17 years leading the Humane Society Silicon Valley. During her tenure there, she and her team's progressive approach helped save the lives of tens of thousands of animals and greatly reduce pet overpopulation problems in Santa Clara County. Under her leadership, the organization was also able to raise $25.5 million to build The Animal Community Center -- the first facility of its kind in the country. Under Chris' leadership, Guide Dogs for the Blind has expanded its program offerings to include Orientation and Mobility training for individuals with insufficient skills to qualify for guide dog training, a companion dog program for visually-impaired children and advocacy in support of GDB's visually-impaired communities. In addition, annual fundraising has tripled since 2014 and a new state-of-the-art Puppy Center has been built. Current organization-wide initiatives include Diversity, Equity and Inclusion as well as full accessibility throughout GDB and its communication channels. Chris was elected to the IGDF board at the 2021 IGDF Annual General Meeting. Chris honed her business skills as an auditor with Arthur Andersen & Co. as well as in her 15 years with Hewlett Packard Corporation. At HP, Chris held managerial positions in the U.S. as well as in Europe. She holds an M.B.A. from Stanford University. Chris loves to ride her bike, hike, and travel. Chris loves dogs and has three of her own: Theia, a career change Golden Retriever, who now serves as an ambassador for GDB as well as Hank, a Basset Hound, and Petey, a Chihuahua. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDT6MUtTkKo

    What’s Next in Afghanistan

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 45:05

    Journalist Hollie McKay joins Tim from Afghanistan where she lives and from where she files her reports as the Taliban strengthens its control over the country in the wake of the U.S. pullout. Hollie is a war crimes investigator, an author and a reporter who gives a view on what life is like for the people of Afghanistan now that the Taliban is in control. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Afghanistan_auphonic.mp3 Photo Source: Hollie McKay America just marked the 20th anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and four hijacked aircraft. The attacks were waged by Islamic terrorists with the backing of Osama Bin Laden and the terrorist group Al Qaeda.  At the time, Al Qaeda and the Taliban operated terrorist training camps in Afghanistan, where the 9/11 hijackers trained. On October 7, 2001, the United States and Great Britain responded to the 9/11 attacks by targeting terrorist training camps in Afghanistan with bombs and cruise missiles. That led to a war against the terrorists in that country and a 20-year war-time occupation. By August of this year, that conflict started to come to its end as the United States pulled out of the country. Over the 20 years of the Afghan war, more than 3,500 allied troops died in combat. That includes 2,448 American service members. More than 20,000 Americans suffered combat-related wounds. Many more came home with scars you can't see. According to Brown University, roughly 69,000 Afghan security forces were killed during that period, as well as 51,000 Afghan civilians and 51,000 terrorists and militants. The United States had spent $2 trillion on the conflict.  In the end, the U.S. left billions of dollars in military equipment and arms, including armored vehicles, drones and military helicopters. In 10 days in August, from August 6th through the 15th, the Taliban took control of Kandahar, Mazar-e-Sharif and then the capital city, Kabul. The incumbent Afghan government quickly fell apart with the country's president fleeing to the UAE. The U.S. evacuated its embassy, and thousands of American citizens went to the Kabul airport to flee the country. During the evacuation, two suicide bombers attacked the Kabul airport, killing more than 103 people, including 12 American Marines and one U.S. Navy medic. By the time the Taliban took control, there were still an undetermined number of Americans and Afghan allies still in the country. Hollie McKay is a war crimes investigator and has worked on the frontlines of several war zones that have included Iraq, Pakistan, Syria, Iran, and many other places, including Afghanistan. Links Afghans Dying at Border as Tensions Intensify Between Taliban, Pakistan, New York Post Driving Across What Was Once Afghanistan's Terror-Filled Highway, Knewz The Transformation of Kabul, One Month After the Taliban Takeover, New York Post Taliban Official: Strict Punishment, Executions Will Return, Associated Press Hollie McKay (website) About this Episode's Guest Hollie McKay Hollie McKay Hollie S. McKay is a foreign policy expert and war crimes investigator. She was an investigative and international affairs/war journalist for Fox News Digital for over fourteen years where she focused on warfare, terrorism, and crimes against humanity. Hollie has worked on the frontlines of several major war zones and covered humanitarian and diplomatic crises in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Syria, Iran, Turkey, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Burma, Russia, Africa, Latin America, and other areas. Her globally-spanned coverage, in the form of thousands of print articles and essays, has included exclusive and detailed interviews with numerous captured terrorists, as well as high-ranking government, military, and intelligence officials and leaders from all sides. She has spent considerable time embedded with US and foreign troops,

    Revealing the Secrets of Mars

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 49:33


    NASA's Chief Scientist Dr. Jim Green joins Tim to talk about big plans for the red planet, Mars. Jim has had a long and distinguished career on some of the agency's major research projects and missions that have explored the rest of our solar system, from Mars to Pluto. In this episode, Jim gets into detail on what we have learned, can learn and will learn from Earth's nextdoor neighbor. He uncovers some of the secrets of Mars. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Revealing_the_Secrets_of_Mars_auphonic.mp3 Next to the Moon and the Sun, the most captivating celestial bodies in our night sky for mankind over thousands and thousands of years has been Mars. The red planet. The fourth rock from the sun. So, it made sense when we started to make plans for space travel, Mars would figure prominently into those plans. As far back as the inception of both the Soviet and American space programs in the late 1950s and early 1960s, space scientist started making plans to explore Mars. By July 4, 1997, NASA was able to land a spacecraft on Mars.  The Mars Pathfinder was launched on December 4th 1996. Six months later, it landed on Mars. The unit featured the first-ever robotic rover that sent an unprecedented amount of data on the planet back to scientists at NASA. After that, there were other missions, which included Mars orbiters, landers, and excavators.  And the United States hasn't been the only country working to explore the planet. The Soviet Union, then Russia, then China, then India, and even the United Arab Emirates have launched missions to Mars. Each time, we learn something new and something significant about Mars. But in the end, there is one question that continues to drive mankind's quest to visit Mars. Is there life on that planet, and if so, what does it look like? Jim Green has worked to find the answers to this and many other questions throughout his career as a scientist at NASA. Links NASA's Mars Exploration Program James L. Green, NASA Why We Explore Mars, National Geographic Nicolaus Copernicus, History.com Jezero Crater - Mars, NASA About this Episode's Guest Dr. Jim Green Dr. Jim GreenPhoto courtesy of NASA NASA's Chief Scientist, Dr. Jim Green received his Ph.D. in Space Physics from the University of Iowa in 1979 and began working in the Magnetospheric Physics Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1980. At Marshall, Dr. Green developed and managed the Space Physics Analysis Network, which provided many scientists, all over the world, with rapid access to data, other scientists, and specific NASA computer and information resources. In addition, Dr. Green was a safety diver in the Neutral Buoyancy tank making over 150 dives until he left MSFC in 1985. From 1985 to 1992 he was the Head of the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The NSSDC is NASA's largest space science data archive. In 1992 he became the Chief of the Space Science Data Operations Office until 2005 when he became the Chief of the Science Proposal Support Office. While at GSFC, Dr. Green was also co-investigator and the Deputy Project Scientist on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission. From 1992 to 2000 he was also the Deputy Project Scientist for Mission Operations and Data Analysis for the Global Geospace Science Missions WIND and POLAR. He has written over 110 scientific articles in referred journals involving various aspects of the Earth's and Jupiter's magnetospheres and over 50 technical articles on various aspects of data systems and computer networks. From August 2006 to April 2018 Dr. Green was the Director of the Planetary Science Division at NASA Headquarters. Under his leadership several missions have been successfully executed, including the New Horizons spacecraft flyby of Pluto, the MESSENGER spacecraft to Mercury, the Juno spacecraft to Jupiter,


    Encore: Nashville’s Magical Bluebird Cafe

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 37:27

    The COO and General Manager of Nashville's famous Bluebird Café Erika Wollam Nichols joins Tim to talk about the Bluebird, its storied history and how this little place in a strip mall has impacted country music, songwriting and our culture. This encore episode was first released as Episode 81 on August 19, 2019. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Encore_Bluebird_Cafe.mp3 If you were to drive down Hillsboro Pike just outside of Downtown, Nashville, you could easily miss it. The Bluebird Café is tucked into a small strip mall, and is as unassuming as it might have been the day it opened in 1982. It's known as a songwriter's performance space. It has only 90 seats but it still plays host to new and upcoming singer-songwriters, and accomplished artists on any given night. The music is acoustic. The genres can range from country and bluegrass, to pop, rock and contemporary Christian music. In addition to Garth Brooks and Taylor Swift, Bluebird audiences have had the chance to listen to Keith Urban, Kathy Mattea, Trisha Yearwood, Faith Hill, Vince Gill, LeAnn Rimes, John Prine, Phil Vassar, and many, many writers who've created songs for the biggest names in music. Amy Kurland founded the Bluebird Café in 1982, and in 2008, she sold it to the Nashville Songwriters Association International. It was more of a donation, than a sale. The Nashville Songwriters Association is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the craft of songwriting. The Bluebird Café gained even broader attention in 2012 when the hit ABC television drama Nashville featured the Bluebird in its ongoing plotline. Links The Bluebird Cafe Nashville Songwriters Association International (NSAI) ‘Nashville' Made the Bluebird Famous, But Few People Know the Venue's Real Story, Washington Post Taylor Swift Proved She Can Actually Work a Room at Nashville Landmark Bluebird Café, People Magazine Garth Brooks Brings Stories, Friendships to Bluebird Café, The Tennesseean Bluebird Documentary, Review, Variety About this Episode's Guest Erika Wollam Nichols Erika Wollam Nichols is the General Manager and Chief Operating Officer of Nashville's Bluebird Café. A native of Acton, Massachusetts, Erika came to Nashville in 1984 when she went to Belmont University and began working at The Bluebird Café. Since then, she was the Program Director for the Summer Lights Festival, a city-wide event that was 4 days of music, art, dance and theater in downtown Nashville. She handled all the entertainment from folks like Wynonna to the local theater company. The event boasted an attendance of over 150,000 people with talent on up to 8 outdoor stages. She left there in 1996 to run Tin Pan South for the Nashville Songwriters Association International (NSAI) from 1996 to 2000. She then went to the Country Music Hall of Fame as Director of Public Programs, and then VP of Marketing & Community Outreach. She returned to NSAI in 2004 and attended grad school for her MFA. Erika agreed to take the helm of The Bluebird when NSAI purchased it 2008.

    Encore: In Search of Kindness

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 44:36

    Mary Latham is on a mission to collect stories of kindness from all 50 states in the country for a once-in-a-lifetime journey. She joins Tim to talk about what and who inspired her mission and tells many stories she's learned 41 states into her trip. This Encore Episode (#75) was first released on July 8, 2019. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Encore_-_In_Search_of_Kindness.mp3 Mary Latham is in the middle of the kind of trip that many may dream of, but only a few take, which is to travel across all 50 states in America by car. What makes Mary's story even more unique is why she's doing it and what she hopes to find. Mary is looking for as many stories of human kindness as she can find and document for a book she plans to write that will be donated to hospital waiting rooms across the country. Mary's physical journey started in October 2016, but the idea came much sooner, in 2012. In the process, she has created a movement she calls, “More Good.” You may wonder what this has to do with “shaping opinion.” The answer is simple. When someone travels to all 50 states, collecting stories of kindness, you get to know something about America and why and how Americans think the way they do. Mary's journey will help you see the very large good in the country. Links More Good A Woman's Journey to Find Human Kindness One State at a Time, Westword Inspired by Her Mother, She Roadtrips Across the Country to Gather Stories of Kindness, WBUR A Quest to Collect Stories of Kindness Has Driven Her to 39 States (and counting), Star Tribune Searching for More Good, Stonehill College Woman Travels Entire Country Seeking Random Acts of Kindness in Honor of Late Mother, The Western Journal About this Episode's Guest Mary Latham Mary Latham was working in a law firm, as a nanny in the evenings and she ran a photography business on the weekends when she lost her mother from cancer. That traumatic event inspired Mary to look for the positive, or in the words of her mother Pat, there's “more good” in the world if you just look for it. So, that's what Mary decided to do. Since then, Mary's mission has taken her to 41 U.S. states so far.

    9/11: Never Forget

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 40:57

    Ed Root joins Tim to talk about the people and the groups who have dedicated their lives to remembering the people and the lessons of 9/11.  Ed is a cousin of flight attendant Lorraine Bay, who was aboard United Flight 93 when it crashed into a field on September 11, 2001. Since then, Ed has been an active member of a group called, “Families of Flight 93.” Ed has dedicated much of his life to since that day. From September 12th until today, that story and the work involved can be summed up in two words, “Never forget.” This episode is part of our special series, "9/11: A Generation Removed." https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Never_Forget_at_20.mp3 The stories of September 11th 2001 number in the thousands. There were the victims, the heroes, the first responders, the people from Air Traffic Control towers, to emergency dispatchers and people in Washington. There were leaders, decision-makers, and family members. The ripple effect of the 9/11 terrorist attacks was huge, and if you're paying attention, it's still happening to this day, 20 years later. But for as powerful and broad as those attacks had on America on that day, it was the next day that a whole new set of stories would begin. The little-known stories of people who've decided we are not going to forget what happened. We are not going to forget those who died. We are not going to pretend this never happened. We will never forget. This is one of those stories. Ed Root is one of those people. About 9/11: A Generation Removed On September 11, 2021, America will mark the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the country that happened on September 11, 2001. In remembrance of the event, the Shaping Opinion podcast will release a series of nine distinct episodes centered on the 9/11 attacks, starting on Friday, September 3rd and culminating on the 20th Anniversary, September 11, 2021.  The series, entitled, “9/11: A Generation Removed,” will feature six new and original episodes for 2021, and three encore episodes, all based on the personal experiences of guests and stories of people who were there in New York, in Washington, D.C., and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Links Families of Flight 93, Facebook Friends of Flight 93, website Flight 93 Memorial, National Park Service Site 9/11 National Memorial and Museum, website Police Benevolent Association of New York City, WTC Resources FDNY Memorial Page, unofficial A 9/11 Reflection: The Pentagon in Photos, Pentagon About this Episode's Guest Ed Root Edwin Root retired as a business analysis after 34 years from Phillips Van-Heusen Corporation. An advocate for many years of American Civil War historic preservation, Ed served on the Boards of the Civil War Library and Museum in Philadelphia and the Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association. He is also a co-author of “Isn't This Glorious – The 15th, 19th and 20th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiments at Gettysburg's Copse of Trees.”  The book garnered the “Bachelder-Coddington Award for Civil War in 2006. His cousin, Lorraine Grace Bay, was a senior flight attendant on United Airlines Flight 93 on September 11th, 2001.He served on the Stage II jury which selected the winning design of the Flight 93 National Memorial in Somerset County, Pennsylvania in 2005. Ed has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Families of Flight 93, Inc. since 2006. He has served on numerous committees within either the Families of Flight 93 organization or the larger Flight 93 Memorial partnership. Ed lives in Allentown, PA with his wife Nancy.

    9/11: A Flag Raising

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 54:55

    Award-winning photographer Thomas E. Franklin joins Tim to tell his story of Ground Zero on September 11, 2001, and the story behind that now iconic photo he took that day, one that gave a nation in shock and mourning, something new. A sense of hope. And something to rally around. Our collective sense of patriotism. He captured that image of those three firefighters raising the American flag amidst the ruins of the World Trade Center.  This episode is part of our special series, "9/11: A Generation Removed." https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/A_Flag_Raising_at_20.mp3 Tom Franklin had just gotten back from an assignment in the Dominican Republic. It was 8 a.m. on September 11, 2001, and he was in the newsroom at The Bergen Record in Hackensack, New Jersey. He was ready to get back into a normal routine, coving the New York and New Jersey region. It was a beautiful, sunny day. That all changed at 8:46 a.m., when the first of two jets would plow into the World Trade Center towers as part of a coordinated terroristic attack on America. Tom had to gram his camera and equipment and go. About 9/11: A Generation Removed On September 11, 2021, America will mark the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the country that happened on September 11, 2001. In remembrance of the event, the Shaping Opinion podcast will release a series of nine distinct episodes centered on the 9/11 attacks, starting on Friday, September 3rd and culminating on the 20th Anniversary, September 11, 2021.  The series, entitled, “9/11: A Generation Removed,” will feature six new and original episodes for 2021, and three encore episodes, all based on the personal experiences of guests and stories of people who were there in New York, in Washington, D.C., and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Links Thomas E. Franklin, Website 9/11 Photographers: Thomas E. Franklin Remembers, Lohud.com About the Photo, About the Flag, Ground Zero Spirit Behind the Lenz on September 11, Politico About this Episode's Guest Tom Franklin Thomas E. Franklin is an award-winning photographer, multimedia journalist, documentary filmmaker, and educator, based in northern New Jersey. Since 2016, his multimedia work has explored issues related to immigration and forced migration, shedding light on the highly complex circumstances surrounding global migration and reporting on the personal experiences of many who have been forcibly displaced or seeking asylum. Currently, his project, Seeking Refuge, is display at the Paterson Museum in a virtual exhibit. Originally planned to debut at the Museum in May 2020, the physical exhibition was postponed due to the museum's COVID-19 closure. While working on Seeking Refuge, Tom traveled on assignment to Central Mexico, and the Southern U.S. border with Mexico, where his dramatic footage of migrants who breached the U.S. border fence by the Pacific Ocean in Tijuana was published by the Los Angeles Times syndicate. He also traveled to Lesvos, Greece, where he produced, The World Arrived at Our Doorstep, a 10-minute documentary film about a British couple living there who worked tirelessly to assist Syrian refugees, but have been vilified by locals for helping the unwanted arrivals. The documentary and story with photos was published on the i24 News website and appeared on TV segment, broadcast in English, French, and Arabic to countries around the globe, and streamed live on its website. Tom is perhaps best known for photographs taken at Ground Zero on September 11, 2001. His iconic image of three New York City firefighters raising the U.S. flag above the rubble of the World Trade Center following the attacks is one of the most widely recognized images in history, and was featured on the United States Postal Service's Heroes stamp, generating over $10 million for those affected by 9/11. In 2002, he was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for his 9/11 photo.

    9/11: Inside the White House Bunker

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 71:29

    Retired Marine Lt. Colonel Robert Darling joins Tim to tell his story of what it was like in the White House bunker on 9/11, where the vice president and other administration officials gathered intel and made decisions minute by minute. Some of those decisions were not only life and death, but historically, never had to be made before. Robert gives an insider's story on how the nation's leadership responded to the most severe attack on America's homeland since the Civil War.  This episode is part of our special series, "9/11: A Generation Removed." https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Inside_the_White_House_Bunker_at_20.mp3 As much as has been reported over the years about what happened on September 11th, 2001, outside of some of the leaders involved, you rarely get the chance to hear the story from an insider – someone who was both a participant and a witness to history, in that context. That's what you get when you hear the story of now retired Marine Lieutenant Colonel Robert J. Darling. Bob was a military liaison officer to the President. He was primarily responsible for planning air travel logistics for the President, the Vice President and the First Family. He was a pilot of Marine One, the helicopter that carries the President. He was a combat-hardened former Marine Cobra helicopter pilot. On September 11th, he found himself in direct support to Vice President Dick Cheney, the National Security Advisor, Dr. Condoleezza Rice, and others in the administration and in the nation's leadership apparatus. He was a critical communications link between those in the White House bunker and the chain of command outside of the bunker in national security, at the Pentagon, transportation, the Federal Aviation Administration, world leaders and others. When the terrorist attacks happened, the President was in Florida. The vice president was on site in the White House, along with other senior members of the administration. In the years before September 11th, much prepared him for what he'd see, what he'd hear and what he would have to do on that day. But as we find out, everyone who was with him in the White House bunker that day brought with them their own special histories and experiences that uniquely prepared them for the roles each would play, to make decisions that would affect the safety of millions and influence the future of the country they served. Links Robert J. Darling (website) 24 Hours Inside the White House Bunker, by Robert J. Darling (Barnes & Noble) Inside the White House Bunker on 9/11, West Point Center for Oral History About 9/11: A Generation Removed On September 11, 2021, America will mark the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the country that happened on September 11, 2001. In remembrance of the event, the Shaping Opinion podcast will release a series of nine distinct episodes centered on the 9/11 attacks, starting on Friday, September 3rd and culminating on the 20th Anniversary, September 11, 2021.  The series, entitled, “9/11: A Generation Removed,” will feature six new and original episodes for 2021, and three encore episodes, all based on the personal experiences of guests and stories of people who were there in New York, in Washington, D.C., and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. About this Episode's Guest Robert J. Darling Lieutenant Colonel Robert J. Darling retired from the United States Marine Corps with just over twenty years of active duty service in October 2007. He flew Cobra attack helicopters in Desert Shield and Desert Storm during the first Gulf War and in Somalia, Africa in support of Operation Restore Hope. In June 1998, he was selected to fly as a presidential pilot with Marine Helicopter Squadron One and in October 2000, he was selected to work for The White House Military Office, Airlift Operations Department. It was in that capacity that, then Major Darling supported the President,

    9/11: Running with the President

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 57:41


    Former Bloomberg News White House correspondent Dick Keil joins Tim to talk about his story of 9/11 that started at 6:30 a.m. when he went on a morning run with President Bush in Sarasota, Florida, where the president was scheduled to make an appearance at a local elementary school.  Dick provides details and background on what the chain of events was with the president that morning, and what it was like to cover the President of the United States from Air Force One as history was unfolding.  This episode is part of our special series, "9/11: A Generation Removed." https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Running_with_the_President_at_20.mp3 On the morning of September 11, 2001, President George W. Bush woke up a little before 6 a.m.  He was staying at the Colony Beach and Tennis Resort on Longboat Key, Florida, not far from Sarasota, where he was to make a visit at a local elementary school later that morning. At 6:30 a.m., he took his daily run. He ran about for and a half miles on the grounds of the Longboat Key Golf Club. It took him just over 32 minutes to complete the run. He was joined by several Secret Services agents, and by Bloomberg White House correspondent Richard Keil. It was a beautiful day in Florida and all the way up the East Coast. The president was scheduled to visit the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota at 9 a.m.  That was a 20-minute drive from the hotel to the school. The purpose of the trip was to promote education. This was part of the president's campaign to combat illiteracy rates in the country. The name of the campaign was, “Putting Reading First.” Shortly after 8:30 a.m., the presidential motorcade left the hotel for the school. Meanwhile, 1,200 miles away, at 8:46 a.m., American Airlines Flight 11 crashes into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. Quickly, Press Secretary Ari Fleischer gets word that a plane has crashed into one of the towers at the World Trade Center. Word starts to spread throughout the motorcade, but the president is not immediately notified. About two minutes after the plane has hit the building, at 8:48 a.m., the president arrives at the elementary school, where he is told what's happened by his Chief of Staff Andrew Card. As far as anyone knows at that point, the size of the plane and what had happened were unclear. For now, the president assumes it was a tragic accident. The president is escorted to a room in the school where there are 18 second-graders in two rows before him. They start to take turns reading a story from a children's book called, “The Pet Goat.” The traveling White House Press Corps lines the back of the room, capturing video of what is to be a routine photo op. At the same time, some in that group are already getting texts, pages and calls about what is unfolding in New York. At 9:03 a.m., a second aircraft, United Flight 175 has crashed into the South Tower of the World Trade Center. Before long, Andrew Card would do something that's almost never done in the midst of a presidential event. He walks to the head of the classroom, and leans down to communicate directly to the president. He whispers into the president's right ear, “A second plane has just hit the World Trade Center. America is under attack.” Immediately, he steps back so as not to engage in a discussion of the matter in front of the children and the news media. The president's demeanor immediately and visibly changes. Clearly, he is preoccupied. He avoids any abrupt actions or movements so as not to send the wrong message. He works to keep his cool until the appropriate time where he can gracefully excuse himself from the room. Not long after, he exits the classroom for a nearby holding room that the White House is using. It becomes a de facto war room where the president and his team can find out what's happening and to make the first decisions that have to be made in response to the terrorist attacks o...


    9/11: A Network Anchor Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 49:47

    Former CNN lead news anchor Aaron Brown joins Tim to tell his story from September 11, 2001, where he brought the event to 1.4 billion viewers around the world, live as it happened. It was Aaron Brown on that day, standing on a rooftop in New York City, bringing us one of the most historic and tragic moments of our generation in real time. This episode is part of our special series, "9/11: A Generation Removed." https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/A_Network_Anchor_Story_at_20.mp3 If you remember September 11, 2001, you remember how you learned of the terrorist attacks of that day. If you weren't in New York City, or at the Pentagon, or in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, chances are you remember getting the news from a friend, or a coworker, or a family member, and then you turned on the TV. I'll tell you what I did. I was in a meeting in a building just next to the Pittsburgh airport. We could hear and feel the roar of jet engines nonstop as they came in, one after the other to land. This was not normal. I remember telling the person I was with that it reminded me of jets landing on an aircraft carrier. Minutes later, someone came into the room and told us that all flights were grounded, so if anyone had a plane to catch, they were out of luck. That a plane had hit the World Trade Center, and that was all they knew. My meeting was over, so I went out to my car, and that was my first chance to get the news. I heard it on the radio. Then I went home and spent the rest of that day glued to the television, flipping channels, just like most Americans and people around the world. While the Internet was extremely influential, television was the thing. Most everyone in America still got most of their breaking news from one of the three broadcast networks or CNN, or the radio. Newspapers would follow the next day with in-depth reporting. News websites sort of filled in where broadcast and print couldn't. It all worked together to give you the best picture of events as possible. On September 11th, most watched on television. Tragic, scary, puzzling, angering, confusing, and live. Live coverage removed the filter, it removed the buffer. Journalists were seeing events unfold with us. And so were decision-makers, from the White House to the Pentagon to air traffic controllers and first responders. If you weren't on site, you were watching a TV monitor. Yet still, it was the job of a few reporters to try to make sense of it all with us and for us. Aaron Brown was the face and the voice of CNN on that day. He was the cable network's lead anchor, newly minted, having just arrived from ABC. He was one of a handful of people, that the world relied on to try to understand what we were all seeing. To verify what we were all hearing. To know what was actually happening. Links Aaron Brown Joining Walter Cronkite School, Adweek On the 15th Anniversary, what it was like to anchor 9/11, CNN The Face of 9/11, HuffPost About 9/11: A Generation Removed On September 11, 2021, America will mark the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the country that happened on September 11, 2001. In remembrance of the event, the Shaping Opinion podcast will release a series of nine distinct episodes centered on the 9/11 attacks, starting on Friday, September 3rd and culminating on the 20th Anniversary, September 11, 2021.  The series, entitled, “9/11: A Generation Removed,” will feature six new and original episodes for 2021, and three encore episodes, all based on the personal experiences of guests and stories of people who were there in New York, in Washington, D.C., and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. About this Episode's Guest Aaron Brown Aaron Brown circa 2001 Aaron Brown is an American journalist most recognized for his coverage of the September 11 attacks on CNN. He was a longtime reporter for ABC, the founding host of ABC's World News Now,

    9/11: As It Happened

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 102:17


    This is a 100-minute, moment-by-moment telling of the story of September 11th 2001 “As It Happened” and the days that followed. Over the past three years, we've interviewed people who were there in New York, at the Pentagon and on site at that farm field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. This year, we've talked to more people with their own personal stories of 9/11. Each provides a new perspective on the events that changed America, and their reflections now after 20 years.  This episode is part of our special series, "9/11: A Generation Removed." https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/As_It_Happend_at_20.mp3 Release Date: 9/6/21 It is September 11th, 2001. All along the East Coast, the weather couldn't be nicer. Skies pristinely blue. Temperatures are perfect for an early September day. Millions are back from vacations and summer breaks. America is going back to work. Back to school. Back to a normal routine. President George W. Bush starts his day at 6:30 a.m. with his daily run. He's in Sarasota for an appearance he's scheduled to make at a nearby elementary school at 9 a.m. Dick Keil is a former college runner and now the White House Correspondent for Bloomberg News. He has the chance to join the president on his run this morning. They talk about anything but politics. What no one knew but would quickly learn is that this would be no normal day. Everything would change in the coming hours. 19 terrorists from the extremist group al-Qaida were already in the midst of executing a plan to hijack four commercial aircraft and crash those planes into strategic targets. Those targets were the Pentagon, another site in Washington that no one would fully confirm - but most experts tend to presume it was the U.S. Capitol Building - and the World Trade Center's Twin Towers in New York City. By 7:30 a.m., all 19 militants are in transit. The airports they will depart from are Logan Airport in Boston, Dulles Airport just outside of Washington, D.C., and Newark Airport. All four flights they will hijack are scheduled to go to California and are packed with enough jet fuel to take them cross-country. This episode will take you minute by minute through the story of 9/11 through the eyes of eight people who were there, each at a different important location in this moment of history. Along with our eight guests, we include actual recordings of air traffic controllers, dispatchers and the President of the United States from this day. This is a comprehensive narrative of 911: As it Happened. About 9/11: A Generation Removed On September 11, 2021, America will mark the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the country that happened on September 11, 2001. In remembrance of the event, the Shaping Opinion podcast will release a series of nine distinct episodes centered on the 9/11 attacks, starting on Friday, September 3rd and culminating on the 20th Anniversary, September 11, 2021.  The series, entitled, “9/11: A Generation Removed,” will feature six new and original episodes for 2021, and three encore episodes, all based on the personal experiences of guests and stories of people who were there in New York, in Washington, D.C., and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Links 9/11 Interactive Timeline, 9/11 National Memorial website September 11 Chronology, U.S. Department of Homeland Security September 11 Timeline, Flight 93 Memorial website


    9/11: An NYPD Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 51:25

    Retired NYPD detective Chris O'Connor joins Tim to tell his story of September 11, 2001 at the World Trade Center in New York.  Chris was within walking distance from the World Trade Center when the first plane hit. We talk with Chris about his story and the story of many first responders who continue to live with the after-effects of 9/11.  This episode is an encore presentation as part of our special series, "9/11: A Generation Removed." https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/An_NYPD_Story_at_20.mp3 It's September 11th, 2001 in one of the busiest cities in the world on a beautiful early fall day. As New Yorkers go about the business of starting another work day, little did they know that 19 terrorists from the extremist group al-Qaida were in the midst of executing a plan to hijack four commercial aircraft and crash those planes into predetermined targets. Among those targets were the Pentagon, another site in Washington that no one would ever confirm, and the World Trade Center Twin Towers in New York City. At 8:45 a.m. on that day, American Airlines Flight 11 crashed into the north tower of the World Trade Center in New York. Just less than 20 minutes later, a second aircraft – United Airlines Flight 175 – flew into the South Tower of the World Trade Center. Later, American Airlines Flight 77 would crash into the Pentagon. And finally, just after 10 a.m. that day, United Airlines Flight 93 would crash into an empty field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.  The passengers on that jet were able to mount an attack of their own on the terrorists to foil their attack on Washington, D.C. That day marked the worst terrorist attack on the United States in the country's history. Almost 3,000 people were killed then.  But as you'll learn today, the real death toll was higher and it continues to grow to this day. The toll that September 11th took on the health of first responders is one that continues to this day. Chris O'Connor was a plain clothes detective member of the NYPD. What started as a day to appear in court for one of his cases, would change his life. About 9/11: A Generation Removed On September 11, 2021, America will mark the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the country that happened on September 11, 2001. In remembrance of the event, the Shaping Opinion podcast will release a series of nine distinct episodes centered on the 9/11 attacks, starting on Friday, September 3rd and culminating on the 20th Anniversary, September 11, 2021.  The series, entitled, “9/11: A Generation Removed,” will feature six new and original episodes for 2021, and three encore episodes, all based on the personal experiences of guests and stories of people who were there in New York, in Washington, D.C., and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Links Feal Good Foundation, No Responders Left Behind Legislation Allows Unlimited Sick Leave for 9/11 First Responders, Long Island Herald Rockville Centre Detective Feels 9/11's Lasting Effects, Long Island Herald 9/11 Memorial and Museum, New York City Flight 93 Memorial, National Park Service National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial About this Episode's Guest Chris O'Connor Chris served in the NYPD as a Police Officer from June of 1995 till November of 2002.   He joined the Rockville Centre, New York, Police Department and served as an officer and Detective from November 2002 until November 2018. Since September 11, 2001, he has experienced a range of health issues, including having his gallbladder removed, six sinus surgeries, a tumor removed from his foot and other foot surgeries. He donated bone marrow to a young boy suffering from Leukemia in 2004. That patient is now a 29-year-old, healthy young man. Chris is now 48 years old and is the married Father of three with one on the way. Presently, he is awaiting biopsy results for tumor in his left foot.  He is also awaiting a decision for coverage from the World Trade Centre Health...

    9/11: A Shanksville Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 39:40

    Former FBI special agent Bill Crowley joins Tim to discuss his role as the FBI's lead spokesperson on the scene in Shanksville, Pennsylvania in the days following the Flight 93 hijacking and crash on September 11, 2001. Bill talks about his own role, the crisis communications challenges and takes us back to that time and that place. This episode is an encore presentation as part of our special series, "9/11: A Generation Removed." https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/A_Shanksville_Story_at_20.mp3 It's been 17 years since America experienced the deadliest terrorist attack in its history. Four commercial jetliners were hijacked by members of al-Qaeda. The first two jets flew into the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City. These were American Airlines Flight 11, and United Airlines Flight 175. Another jet slammed into the western side of the U.S. Pentagon. This was American Airlines Flight 77. A fourth plane never made it to its intended target. United Airlines Flight 93 crashed into a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. It has been widely reported that the terrorist attack failed because the crew and passengers on Flight 93 fought back. We now know much about what happened on the plane, thanks to cell phone conversations and other data, including the plane's flight recorder. We also know what happened that morning in other places. At 8:46 a.m., American Airlines Flight 11 was the first of the planes to hit their target, crashing into the north tower of the World Trade Center in New York City. 18 minutes later, United Airlines Flight 175 crashed into the South tower of the World Trade Center. TV coverage went live and millions were watching. This was before the collapse of the towers. About 9/11: A Generation Removed On September 11, 2021, America will mark the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the country that happened on September 11, 2001. In remembrance of the event, the Shaping Opinion podcast will release a series of nine distinct episodes centered on the 9/11 attacks, starting on Friday, September 3rd and culminating on the 20th Anniversary, September 11, 2021.  The series, entitled, “9/11: A Generation Removed,” will feature six new and original episodes for 2021, and three encore episodes, all based on the personal experiences of guests and stories of people who were there in New York, in Washington, D.C., and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Links Flight 93 National Memorial, National Parks Service Flight 93 and Shanksville, Pennsylvania, the forgotten part of 9/11, Time In Shanksville, Thousands Gather to Honor Flight 93 Victims, New York Times Remembering 9/11 in Pictures – National Geographic Bush at War, Amazon, Bob Woodward About this Episode's Guest Bill Crowley A retired special agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Bill Crowley is an Assistant Professor in La Roche College's Department of Justice, Law and Security. He is a subject matter expert and consultant to the media in the fields of national security, white collar crime, confidential human sources and police tactics. He is also an attorney-at-law with a specialized interest in the areas of national security and constitutional law.  

    9/11: A Pentagon Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 62:45

    Captain Bill Toti, a retired Naval officer, joins Tim to discuss his firsthand experiences from the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. Bill remembers the attack on the Pentagon moment for moment, and what he did in the immediate aftermath and throughout the recovery. One thing we talk about is how the Pentagon's story may be the least known in the conversation on 9/11.  This episode is an encore presentation as part of our special series, "9/11: A Generation Removed." https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/A_Pentagon_Story_at_20.mp3 On September 11th, 2001, 19 terrorists from the extremist group al-Qaida hijacked four commercial aircraft and used those planes to carry out suicide attacks against the World Trade Center in New York, the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., and what appears to be a failed attempt to target another Washington, D.C. target. At 8:45 a.m. on that a clear day, American Airlines Flight 11 crashed into the north tower of the World Trade Center in New York. Eighteen minutes later, a second passenger jet – United Airlines Flight 175 – flew into the South Tower of the World Trade Center. At 9:45 a.m., American Flight 77 would circle over Washington, D.C. before crashing into the west side of the Pentagon, ripping through the outer three of the Pentagon's four, heavily reinforced and massive rings. At 10 minutes after 10 that morning, United Airlines Flight 93 crashed into an empty field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, after it appears the passengers on that jet foiled a terrorist attack on Washington. At the end of the day, it was the worst terrorist attack on the United States in the country's history. Almost 3,000 people were killed. Millions watched events unfold on television, though most of the country's attention was on New York, where the World Trade Center's twin towers would collapse on live TV, and where the greatest human losses occurred. At the Pentagon, 189 military personnel and civilians were killed, including the 64 people aboard American Flight 77. To this day, less is known about what happened that day at the Pentagon than the stories from New York and Pennsylvania. About 9/11: A Generation Removed On September 11, 2021, America will mark the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the country that happened on September 11, 2001. In remembrance of the event, the Shaping Opinion podcast will release a series of nine distinct episodes centered on the 9/11 attacks, starting on Friday, September 3rd and culminating on the 20th Anniversary, September 11, 2021.  The series, entitled, “9/11: A Generation Removed,” will feature six new and original episodes for 2021, and three encore episodes, all based on the personal experiences of guests and stories of people who were there in New York, in Washington, D.C., and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Links 9/11 ‘Inside the Pentagon' Documentary, PBS The Pentagon: Local Naval Officer Details Chaos After Attack, Youngstown Vindicator 9/11 Pentagon, Naval History and Heritage Command ‘The Forgotten 9/11:' Returning to the Pentagon 15 Years Later, NBC News About this Episode's Guest Bill Toti William Toti served for more than 26 years in the U.S. Navy, including tours as commander of Fleet Antisubmarine Warfare Command Norfolk, as commodore of Submarine Squadron 3, and as commanding officer of the nuclear fast attack submarine USS Indianapolis (SSN 697). He also served for more than nine years in the Pentagon, including tours as special assistant to the Vice Chief of Naval Operations, as Navy representative to the Joint Requirements Oversight Council, and as deputy director of the Navy War Plans Cell, Deep Blue. He was on duty in the Pentagon on September 11, 2001, when American Airlines flight 77 slammed into the building. His experiences that day were captured in the 2006 Simon & Schuster book Operation Homecoming, as well as the 2016 PBS documentary “9/11: Inside the Pentagon.”

    9/11: They Just Couldn’t Stop The Journal

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 49:02

    Author Dean Rotbart joins Tim to talk about how the September 11th terrorist attacks destroyed the main newsroom of the Wall Street Journal, yet the team persevered and found a way to put out a newspaper the next day in defiance of the terrorists. Dean is an author and a former reporter at the Wall Street Journal.  His new book, “September Twelfth: An American Comeback Story,” tells the lesser known tale of what happens when one of the nation's leading news organizations becomes part of the story. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/They_Couldnt_Stop_the_Journal_auphonic.mp3 On September 11th, 2001, the Wall Street Journal's main newsroom was located just across the street from the World Trade Center. When those two planes hit the north and south towers of the World Trade Center, every building in the immediate vicinity was impacted. The building where the Wall Street Journal was located was destroyed by falling debris, fire and smoke. Editors, reporters, photo journalists were not only an eye-witness to the biggest story of their lifetimes, but they became a part of it. Lines were blurred. In the end, the Journal and its Dow Jones news teams rose to the occasion. Keep in mind, many of these people knew others who died in the attacks. They knew families who lost loved ones. This was personal. There's no way around it. In the end, the newspaper put its heart and its best work on its front page, publishing a Pulitzer Prize-winning edition the very next day on September 12th. Dean Rotbart worked in that newsroom years before, and he knew many of the people who worked there that day. Links News Luminaries Project, Dean Rotbart September Twelfth: An American Comeback Story (book), by Dean Rotbart Book excerpt: As 9/11 turns 20, ‘September Twelfth' looks at The Wall Street Journal's Pulitzer-winning coverage – Poynter About this Episode's Guest Dean Rotbart Dean Rotbart, chair and editor-in-chief, NewsLuminaries.com (Photo: Avital Rotbart, TimeinaBottlePhotography.com) Dean Rotbart is an award-winning journalist, broadcaster, entrepreneur, and reputation coach. He advises Fortune 500 CEOs, senior communications executives, business owners, professionals, authors, and a wide array of small businesses and charities on strategies to raise their local, national, and global visibility. Dean is the originator of a series of training workshops, including Newsroom Confidential, Buzz Snatching, and Reputation Tool Chest. He has served on the faculty of the Wizard Academy for more than a decade and was previously a member of the Academy's board. Dean and his wife Talya are the founders of NewsBios.com, a popular service that provides in-depth dossiers on the world's most influential journalists and bloggers. Dean and Talya live in Denver with their two young-adult children, Maxwell and Avital.      

    Colonel Robert Adams, MD: The Making of a Navy SEAL

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 57:40


    Dr. Bob Adams, a former Navy SEAL joins Tim to talk about how a Navy SEAL is made, from what he needs going in, to Hell Week, to the SEALS' intensive training, and life as a SEAL. Bob also became a medical doctor after his SEAL career, and then joined the US. Army's elite Delta Force as a medical doctor . In this episode, Bob about the a very specific part of his military history, and that is the storied orientation would-be SEALs have to go through before they can become Navy SEALs. Today we're going to talk about Hell Week. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Hell_Week_Navy_Seals_auphonic.mp3 President John F. Kennedy, a former Navy man himself, was the one who established the U.S. Navy SEALs in 1962. The idea was to create an elite maritime military force to conduct unconventional warfare. Their job was and is to carry out the types of clandestine, small-unit, high-impact missions that large forces cannot do. SEALs also conduct on-the-ground reconnaissance of strategic targets that may then be attacked by larger forces. Usually, what helps distinguish Navy SEAL operations is that they start and end in or near a body of water, like a river, the ocean, a swamp or a coastline. Navy SEALs train to operate in all environments, on land and in the sea. They often work in climate extremes. From the desert to the arctic, to the jungle. Not everyone who wants to be a Navy SEAL gets to be one. You have to earn it, and to do that, you start by going through one of the toughest weeks in your life. The Navy SEALs call it, “Hell Week.” Hell Week is held the third week of the first phase of SEAL training. It consists of 5 and ½ days of cold, wet, brutally difficult operational training on less than four hours of sleep. If you go through Hell Week, you are tested for your physical endurance, your mental toughness, your ability to endure pain and cold, your teamwork, your attitude and your ability to perform work under high physical and mental stress. You're sleep-deprived. But ultimately, it's your determination, your will and your desire that are tested. Only one-fourth of those who start Hell week make it to the end of those five and ½ days. One out of every four trainees survive Hell week and go on in their training to become SEALs. Bob Adams was a Navy SEAL. When he thinks of Hell Week, there are some things he never forgets. Links Six Days of Impossible, SEALHellWeek.com How I Narrowly Survived Navy SEAL Hell Week, SOFREP.com Colonel Robert Adams, MD, Swords and Seals Six Days of Impossible: SEAL Hell Week - A Doctor Looks Back, by Robert Adams, Barnes & Noble Navy SEALS Official Site, NavySEALS.com About this Episode's Guest Bob Adams Colonel Robert Adams, MD is a US Naval Academy graduate who served thirty-six years in the Navy and Army as a Navy SEAL, the DELTA Force Command Surgeon, and an Army family medicine physician (with obstetrics). Wake Forest Medical School, then an Army residency at Madigan Army Medical center in Tacoma, Washington was followed by service with the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, NC. After the military he built a thriving private practice in North Carolina where he won numerous awards for clinical excellence and practiced for 13 more years, retiring in 2020.


    The Baby Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 40:40

    Dr. Lori Buzzetti joins Tim to talk about one of the most magical stories of all time, one we all think we know, but it's amazing what we don't. Lori is a board-certified physician in Obstetrics and Gynecology. She has served in private practice, and at a large medical center, where she was on the teaching faculty. Today, she is the founder and president of a nonprofit organization that serves expectant mothers called So Big. In this episode we're going to talk about one of the most basic questions you can think of. What actually happens in those nine months before we meet our babies? https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/The_Baby_Story_Full.mp3 We all have our own understandings of how babies are made based on what we may have read, or been told, or been taught in health class. And of course, based on our own experience as mothers … and as fathers. Or as family members. Today, we're going to assume none of that. We're going to start with a clean slate, and walk through the most amazing journey on the planet with someone who knows. We're going to learn about the baby. Just the baby. Not the mom, not the dad, and not so much the pregnancy per se. Just the baby. Links So Big, (Lori's nonprofit organization website) LynLeee Hope, Meet the Baby Who Was Born Twice, 'For Every Mom' Blog Extreme Preemie Born at 21 Weeks Young at Emory Decatur Hospital, Fox 5 Atlanta Pregnancy Week by Week, Mayo Clinic About this Episode's Guest Dr. Lori Buzzetti Dr. Lori Buzzetti is the founder and President of a nonprofit organization called So Big, which serves expectant mothers. So Big has established one Mountain House maternity home in Indiana with plans to expand in the near future. These homes would help expectant mothers meet their basic needs and connect with other programs that also serve pregnant women in need. Joining forces with others that have similar passion and goals will help us reach the women and children we want to serve and to do it more effectively. In the end it's about giving hope. It's about sharing God's love. She is married to Dr. Tony Buzzetti, with a daughter, Tessa and a son, Jake. They attend Traders Point Christian Church. She has a B.S. in Biochemistry from Iowa State University and M.D. from the University of Iowa. She completed her training in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Indiana University Medical Center. She is Board-certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and a former private practitioner on the south-side of Indianapolis. She is formerly employed by St. Vincent Hospital where she was a member of the teaching faculty and administration for the OBGYN residency program.

    Encore: A Hershey Story

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 55:57

    Pamela Whitenack, Director Emeritus of the Hershey Community Archives, joins Tim to talk about the story behind Hershey, the iconic candy brand, the company and the small town in Pennsylvania, all the vision of one man, Milton S. Hershey. This episode is an Encore Presentation of another one of our listeners' favorite episodes. It was originally released on April 22, 2019. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Encore_A_Hershey_Story.mp3 If I were to say the word “Hershey,” to you, most likely the first thing you would picture is that iconic American chocolate bar. But there's a story behind that candy bar that all starts with one man who never allowed his failures to have the last word. In the end, he would succeed at the highest levels of business, live a long life and leave a community legacy that continues to this day. In this episode, we talk about Milton Hershey and the Hershey story. Milton Hershey – Pre-Chocolate Bar He was born on September 13th, 1857. Lived in Central Pennsylvania in the village of Derry Church. It wouldn't be long before he was earning a living, quitting his formal education around the age of 13 to serve an apprenticeship. When he was 18 years-old, Milton opened his own candy shop in Philadelphia, but that lasted 6 years and he had to close it after making some poor business decisions. He then moved to Denver where he worked with a caramel manufacturer and learned how to make caramel with a unique recipe that included fresh milk. After less than a year he went to New York City to start wholesale business, and makes another poor business decision on leases that causes that business to fail. At that point, he decides to return to Pennsylvania and launch the Lancaster Caramel Company. He builds that business into the leading national Caramel company and by 1900 was able to sell that business for $1 million. The modern-day equivalent to roughly $1 billion. Milton Discovers Chocolate In 1893, Milton attends the Chicago International Exposition and sees a demonstration of German chocolate-making machinery He bought the equipment and began making chocolate-coated caramels. . Chocolate became a secondary business to caramels throughout the 1890s. In 1903, Milton Hershey builds a mammoth and modern candy-making factory in Derry Church. It opened in 1905. At the same time, he designs a model community to serve as the town for his employees, which would become, Hershey, Pennsylvania. The town featured brick and wood-frame homes, treelined streets with sidewalks, churches, retail and recreational facilities and parks. Milton Hershey School and Philanthropy Milton and Catherine Hershey, who did not have children of their own, decide to create the Hershey Industrial School for orphaned boys, which opened in 1909. Today, that school is known as the Milton S. Hershey School. Boys and girls attend. In 1918, three years after Catherine died unexpectedly, Milton Hershey transferred much of his wealth – the company to the Hershey Trust, which funds the Hershey School. Chronology & Legacy 114 products in 1896. 1900 – the Hershey Bar 1907 – Hershey Kisses 1908 – Included almonds in Hershey Bar 1925 – Included peanuts in Hershey Bar for product called Mr. Goodbar 1938 – Krackel Bar Milton Hershey died at 88 in 1945.  The Hershey Company is one of the leading candy makers in the world with a portfolio of iconic brands.  A partial list of other Hershey brands includes: Reese's York Peppermint Patty Twizzlers Good and Plenty Cadbury and Rolo in North America Milton Hershey School serves 1,9090 students per year.  The M.S. Hershey Foundation, established in 1935, funds educational and cultural activities for local residents. Links Hershey Community Archives Milton Hershey School Hershey Trust M.S. Hershey Foundation The Hershey Company Milton Hershey – Biography.com The Hershey Story 

    China: Should We Be Worried?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 56:32


    Charles Lipson joins Tim to talk about the current place China has on the world stage and what this means to America. He's Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago, where he has taught international relations and studied international cooperation and conflict with an emphasis on political aspects of the global economy. He's also authored books and has been a regular contributor to major academic journals and news publications. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/China_-_Should_we_be_worried_auphonic.mp3 In the long history of the world, China is recognized as one of the first civilizations on the planet.  Long before there were terms like “super power,” China was a leading economic power for thousands of years. Politically, for most of that time, monarchies ruled the country. In the 20th Century, that all changed when the country officially became the People's Republic of China under a communist political structure. To give you an idea of its size, the China we know today holds a population of 1.4 billion people, who are ruled by the Communist Party of China. The country spans give geographical time zones and it borders 14 other countries. To provide context, the China we know today became known as the People's Republic of China after a civil war in 1949. The Communist Party of China took control and still remains in power. Communist party chairman Mao Zedon became China's new leader at that time. Two months later, two million soldiers followed the former Chinese leader Chiang Kai-shek to Taiwan. That's where he created a provisional government which he said was the legitimate ruling body of China. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, China had been a largely agricultural economy. To industrialize China, Mao imposed a commune system and prohibited farming. This was called “the great leap forward.” The plan was a disaster. There was famine that led to 56 million dead. Three million of those were so desperate they committed suicide. In 1966, Mao created what he called the Cultural Revolution to get rid of capitalism and traditional Chinese influences on the country. He created the philosophy called Mao-ism to replace long-standing ideologies. He closed schools, and Chinese youths were charged with leading change. There were youth gangs called the Red Guards who attacked citizens they deemed unacceptable. After a period of terrible unrest, the country instituted martial law and a purge of 1.5 million citizens. Throughout this timeline, America was in the midst of a Cold War with Communist China and the Soviet Union. The countries were building up their nuclear arms stockpiles and the threat of total global devastation was very real and ever-present. In 1972, President Richard Nixon eased some of those tensions by visiting China for the first time. This was the first diplomatic meeting between leaders of China and the United States since 1949.  Nixon met with Mao, and discussed trade between the two countries, along with U.S. troop withdrawal from Taiwan. In 1976, Mao died, putting an effective end the Cultural Revolution. It's estimated that during his reign, his Communist China killed 40 million people. His successor was Deng Xiaoping who led the country for the next 20 years. Fast forward to July of 1997 when Britain returned Hong Kong to China after British colonialization of that country for 156 years. China agreed that it would keep Hong Kong's economic capitalism as part of the deal. Eleven years ago, China and Taiwan started to engage in discussions for the first time. Five years ago, in 2016, China rescinded its commitment to that relationship. Today, the futures of both Hong Kong and Taiwan are in question. China is now a world super power and rival to the United States and Russia. It's been one of the fastest-growing and largest economies on the globe. Economically, China is the second-largest economy behind the United States.


    Abe Unger: Rethinking the Liberal Arts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 49:09

    Abe Unger joins Tim to talk about the current state of liberal arts schools, how he says many are failing and how to turn things around. He's got some concrete ideas and some real-life, proven examples of how it can work pretty quickly. Abe is the Director of Urban Programs and Associate Professor of Government and Politics at Wagner College and the Executive Director of the Gender Equity Network. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Rethinking_the_Liberal_Arts_auphonic.mp3 It wasn't that long ago that I remember taking both of my kids on tours of the Northeast looking at colleges. Having two kids with different interests allowed me to see a cross-section of schools, from Ivy League institutions to small private, state and public colleges. In the course of the many tours, some of the recruiting language was pretty standard. But every now and then, you'd really start to see the difference between one college and the next. I'm a Liberal Arts grad myself. My majors were journalism and rhetoric. I attended a university that was more than a liberal arts college, though its own liberal arts school was on a par with any stand-alone liberal arts college. But as a parent, I found myself wondering about something I don't remember thinking about as a high school senior. Return on investment. Will my kids have careers after college that justify the expense of those four years in school? Each of my kids chose different paths, but both were able to land in careers that they never would have anticipated that freshman year. This was on my mind recently, when I read an article from professor Abe Unger on this very issue. He wrote a piece for The James Martin Center for Academic Renewal called, “Why Liberal Arts Colleges Are Failing and How to Revive Them.” Links Dr. Abraham Unger, Wagner College Why Liberal Arts Colleges Are Failing and How to Revive Them, James Martin Center Manhattan School of Music About this Episode's Guest Abe Unger Abe Unger spent over a decade as Director of Urban Programs and as a professor, with tenure, in the Department of Government and Politics at Wagner College in Staten Island, New York City. He is now Executive Director of the Gender Equity Network. Dr. Unger received his Bachelor's of Music from the Manhattan School of Music in classical guitar, and his MA and Ph.D. from Fordham University in political science. He is the author of numerous articles, many of which are on Higher Ed reform, and 3 books on urban economic development and public policy.  

    Entering a New Era: Paying College Athletes

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 36:16

    David Ridpath joins Tim to talk about some recent court rulings, rule changes and other decisions that have cleared the way for college athletes to get paid. Dave is a Sport Management professor at Ohio University, and he's an expert on NCAA governance, academic issues and athlete rights. The focus of this conversation is how paying athletes will change the NCAA  landscape for athletes, fans, universities and marketers. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/NCAA_NIL_Branding_auphonic.mp3 In June of this year, the U.S. Supreme Court came down with a decision against the NCAA that now paves the way for college athletes to be paid. But it's not that simple. The court decided only on education-related benefits, and not broader compensation matters. Not long after that, the NCAA Board of Directors approved changes that will now clear the way for college athletes to start earning money based on the fame and celebrity they achieve. But they can earn that money without the risk of losing their eligibility or putting their own schools or sports programs at risk of violating amateurism rules. Here's what happened. The Supreme Court ruled against the National Collegiate Athletic Association in an antitrust case. The ruling now limits the NCAA's rights to bar college athletes from getting paid. The Court allowed non-cash compensation for college athletes.  In its ruling, the court said the NCAA violated antitrust rules. It said athletes should be paid for education-related benefits. The court did not rule on the larger compensation issues. The NCAA had built its case around the idea that limits on athlete pay do not violate antitrust laws because they encourage consumer choice. They said that their restrictions are what distinguish college athletics, or amateur status, from professional athletics. At the end of June, the NCAA decided to suspend its restrictions on payments to athletes for things like sponsorship deals, online endorsements, personal appearances. In other words, athletes can no make money on their name, image and likeness for marketing purposes. Keep that in mind as we talk to our guest today. The NCAA decision applies to all athletes across all of its divisions – Division One, Division Two and Division three athletes. That's' roughly 460,000 college athletes in the United States. In fact, most of those athletes won't see a big difference in their finances, but a few of the most elite athletes will. Dave Ridpath has followed this issue for many years and says this is one of the biggest changes to college athletics in decades. Links David Ridpath Bio, Ohio University The Drake Group NCAA Clears Way for Athlete Compensation as State Laws Loom, Associated Press Supreme Court NCAA Ruling and the New Future of Paying College Athletes, CNBC College Athletes' Payment Rights: A Question of When and How, Not If, by David Ridpath and Chris Knoester for the James Martin Center The Shame of College Sports, The Atlantic About this Episode's Guest Dr. B. David Ridpath Dr. B. David Ridpath, Ed.D, is beginning his second decade as a tenured faculty member with Ohio University and its prestigious Sports Administration Program as an Associate Professor of Sports Business. Prior to Ohio, he was an Assistant Professor of Sport Administration at Mississippi State University and has over 15 years of practical experience in intercollegiate athletics in administrative and coaching capacities at Marshall University, Weber State University and Ohio University. Dr. Ridpath is often cited by major worldwide media outlets such as the New York Times, Time Magazine, CNN and ESPN as an expert on NCAA and intercollegiate athletic matters due to his research and practical experience in the industry. Dr. Ridpath has appeared before Congressional committees and has served as an expert witness in numerous cases involving intercollegiate athletics and college athlete rights.

    Eugene Volokh: Is Big Tech a Common Carrier?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 58:09

    UCLA law professor Eugene Volokh joins Tim to talk about a unique way to approach Big Tech and its increasing exercise of power and control over the national dialogue. It's the “common carrier” approach. In this episode, Eugene gives his thoughts on the First Amendment and Big Tech. This episode is part of our increased focus this year on your right to freedom of speech. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Common_Carrier_auphonic.mp3 Over the past several months, Washington has been grappling with what to do about Big Tech and its role in the national discussion. More to the point, as more digital companies exert power and control over what is permitted and not permitted to be discussed on their platforms, many questions arise. How should Section 230 of the U.S. Communications Decency Act apply? Or more to the point, should Big Tech firms continue to be immune from certain legal actions for content that is allowed? Should digital platforms that decide what content is allowed or not allowed be treated as publishers, like newspapers or news websites? Should antitrust law come to play to break up some of these firms that are so large, it is nearly impossible for a viable competitor to emerge? Or, is there another way? Links Eugene Volokh, UCLA Bio The Volokh Conspiracy, Reason.com The Volokh Conspiracy, Facebook Volokh Conspiracy, Twitter U.S. Statute - 47 USC Section 230 - Telecommunications Protection for Private Blocking and Screening of Offensive Material, FindLaw About this Episode's Guest Eugene Volokh Eugene Volokh teaches First Amendment law and a First Amendment amicus brief clinic at UCLA School of Law, where he has also often taught criminal law, copyright law, tort law, and a seminar on firearms regulation policy. Before coming to UCLA, he clerked for Justice Sandra Day O'Connor on the U.S. Supreme Court and for Judge Alex Kozinski on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Volokh is the author of the textbooks The First Amendment and Related Statutes (7th ed. 2020) and Academic Legal Writing (5th ed. 2016), as well as over 90 law review articles. He is a member of The American Law Institute; a member of the American Heritage Dictionary Usage Panel; and the founder and coauthor of The Volokh Conspiracy, a Weblog that was hosted by the Washington Post and is now at Reason Magazine. In addition to his academic work, he has also filed briefs in more than 125 appellate cases throughout the country since 2013, and has argued in over 30 federal and state appellate cases.

    Encore: Ralph Cindrich, Going Head to Head with the NFL

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 50:19

    Former college All-American, NFL linebacker, and one of the NFL's most prominent player agents Ralph Cindrich joins Tim to give his unique perspective of the NFL. Ralph spent 40 years in locker rooms, on fields and in negotiations with the owners during the league's meteoric rise.  This episode is an Encore Presentation of another one of our listeners' favorite episodes. It was originally released on October 1, 2018. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Encore_-_Ralph_Cindrich.mp3 Ralph Cindrich was ranked among the most powerful people in sports. He is the author of the book, “NFL Brawler: a player turned agent's 40 years in the bloody trenches of the National Football League.” In this episode, Ralph talks about his career, cut shot by injury, and the role injuries play in an NFL career. He talks about how injuries can affect the value placed on a given professional football player. From Player, to Lawyer, to Agent In this expansive conversation, Ralph talks about how he decided to become a lawyer as his pro football career started to come to an end. He talks about how he made the transition to become a pro football agent. And he tells many interesting, funny and compelling stories about life in and around the NFL.” Some of these stories range from the time when shady agents tried to dominate the football agent business, to some of his negotiating brawls with general managers and owners. Among them, how he was there when his teammate, Billy White Shoes Johnson, lit up score boards and created the NFL endzone dance tradition. He tells, blow by blow, what it was like to negotiate against some of the toughest negotiators in the business, from Jerry Jones of the Dallas Cowboys, to Bill Polian of the Buffalo Bills, and Robert Irsay of the Indianapolis Colts. Links NFL Brawler: A Player-Turned-Agent's Forty Years in the Bloody Trenches of the National Football League, by Ralph Cindrich, Amazon NFLBrawler.com Hard Hitter, Pittsburgh Quarterly Cindrich Renounces NFL Agent Business, Sports Business Journal Robinson: Ex-Super Agent Sounds Off, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review ‘NFL Brawler': How Local Football Star Ralph Cindrich Became a Big-time Agent, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette About this Episode's Guest Ralph Cindrich Ralph Cindrich was an All-American linebacker at the University of Pittsburgh. He then went on to play in the NFL for the New England Patriots, the Houston Oilers, and the Denver Broncos.  When his career was cut short due to injuries, he went on to become an attorney, and one of the most revered player agents in the league.

    Would You Pass the U.S. Citizenship Test?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 46:59


    Professor Greg Jackson joins Tim to talk about what it takes to pass the American citizenship test, what's on it, and what all means. Do you think you could pass the test? You may be surprised. You may know Greg from previous episodes where we discussed George Washington, the history of the American Flag, or the history of the U.S. Capitol building. Greg is a historian and history professor at Utah Valley University. And he's the host of the very popular podcast called, “History that Doesn't Suck.” In this episode, we explore the test to become an American citizen. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Citizenship_Test_auphonic.mp3 Less than two years ago, The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation decided to conduct a test to find out just how much Americans actually know about their country, its history and what it means to be a citizen. The country failed. But let's be more specific. The survey found that two out of three Americans would not pass the test that's required to become a U.S. Citizen. First, a little background on that test. Before an immigrant to the United States can take the Oath of U.S. Citizenship, he or she must pass a naturalization test that's administered by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). It's a two-part test. There is a civics test. And there is an English language test. While some accommodations may be made for age and physical limitation, applicants for citizenship are expected to demonstrate they can read, write and speak words in ordinary and daily usage in the English language. And they have to demonstrate that they have a basic knowledge and understanding of American history, government and tradition. So, when the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, conducted its survey, here are some highlights – or lowlights – of what it found. Only 13 percent, or almost 1 out of 10 Americans knew that the Constitution was ratified in June 1788. Most thought it was 1776 when the Declaration of Independence was signed. 60 percent, that's 6 out of 10 Americans, did not know the countries the U.S. fought against in World War Two. More than half of those surveyed did not know how many justices are on the U.S. Supreme Court. There are nine. People who were 65 years old and older scored best with 74 percent answering at least 6 out of 10 questions correctly. Those 45 years old and younger did the worst. Only 19 percent were able to pass the exam. I know what you're wondering right now. You're wondering if you could pass the exam yourself.  Well, before you try to answer that, we decided this may be a good time to take the mystery out of the test. Links History that Doesn't Suck Podcast Greg Jackson, Utah Valley University Sample Civics Test, U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services 12 Years a Slave, by Solomon Northup (Barnes & Noble) Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass, by Frederick Douglass (Barnes & Noble) Ken Burns' Documentaries, Barnes & Noble About this Episode's Guest Prof. Greg Jackson Dr. Greg Jackson is best known for being the Creator, Head Writer, and Host of History That Doesn't Suck and contributing as a historical consultant to the podcast American Elections: Wicked Game. Greg is Associate Professor of Integrated Studies and Assistant Director of National Security Studies at Utah Valley University, where he teaches courses spanning US, European, and Middle Eastern history. Greg earned his Ph.D. in history from the University of Utah. When Greg isn't researching, teaching, or podcasting, he's usually hanging with his family, cycling, rock climbing, or indulging his love of languages. Greg speaks fluent French, rusty-but-conversational Spanish, and has some working ability in Arabic and Classical Latin.  


    Encore: Unanswered Questions about the JFK Assassination

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 43:53


    Dr. Cyril Wecht, a world-renowned forensic pathologist joins Tim to talk about his long experience with his study of the John F. Kennedy assassination. Dr. Wecht was among the first to raise concerns over the investigation of the assassination. In this episode, we talk with Dr. Wecht about the events of November 22, 1963, the story that was told to the world, and the story that has started to emerge in the 55 years since.  This episode is an Encore Presentation of one of our listeners' favorite episodes. It was originally released on February 18, 2019. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Encore_-_JFK_Assassination.mp3 Dr. Cyril Wecht has been involved in many high-profile cases, including the assassinations of Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King. But the most high-profile case that he has studied and written a book about is the JFK Assassination and the possibility that it was the result of a conspiracy. On a sunny day on November 22nd 1963, President John F. Kennedy was shot and killed as his motorcade traveled through the streets of Dallas. That's one thing that everyone can agree on. After that, the official explanation for what happened is only one of the stories that have resonated with people over the years. As history would tell it, as the president rode with the first lady and Texas Governor John Connally through Dealey Plaza in Downtown Dallas, he was horrifically shot in the head, setting off a chain of events that are controversial to this day. Very quickly, the world would learn that the shooter was an employee of the Texas Schoolbook Repository. His name was Lee Harvey Oswald, and he was said to have perched himself at a window on the 6th floor overlooking Dealey Plaza when the president drove by. In six seconds, he fired three shots into the president's car. In a matter of hours, the police caught up with Oswald and it was widely believed that for all intents and purposes, the case was solved. With President Kennedy deceased, President Johnson convened the Warren Commission to conduct a formal investigation into the assassination. By September and October of 1964, just short of a year after the assassination, the Warren Commission issued their report. It was 26 volumes of details and justification of their findings, which was that there was a single shooter, and that shooter was Lee Harvey Oswald. The Commission concluded that he was operating on his own and that there was no larger conspiracy either within or outside of the United States. Dr. Cyril Wecht was the first civilian forensic pathologist to see the Warren Commission's forensic evidence, which would come in 1972. Before that, in 1964, he was among the first to study the 26-volume Warren Commission Report from a forensic pathology perspective. Links Who Killed Kennedy?, Amazon Books (Cyril Wecht author) Dr. Cyril Wecht Author Page, Amazon Books 50 Years Later, Wecht Continues to Poke Holes in Report on JFK Assassination, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review The Cyril H. Wecht Institute at Duquesne University, About Dr. Wecht About this Episode's Guest Dr. Cycil Wecht Cyril H. Wecht, M.D., J.D., is a forensic pathologist, attorney and medical-legal consultant. Being an expert in Forensic Medicine, Dr. Wecht has frequently appeared on several nationally syndicated programs discussing various medicolegal and forensic scientific issues, including medical malpractice, drug abuse, the assassinations of both President John F. Kennedy and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, the death of Elvis Presley, the O.J. Simpson case, and the JonBenet Ramsey cases. His expertise has also been utilized in high profile cases involving Mary Jo Kopechne, Sunny von Bulow, Jean Harris, Dr. Jeffrey McDonald, the Waco Branch Davidian fire, and Vincent Foster. A comprehensive study of these cases are discussed from the perspective of Dr. Wecht's own professional involvement in his books, Cause of Death,


    A Century of Respect: The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 41:49

    Gavin McIlvenna joins Tim on the Centennial of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Gavin is president of the Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. He had a long and distinguished career in the U.S. Army, but one of the more unique experiences he's had is the time he spent guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington Cemetery. In this episode, Gavin tells the story behind the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and the symbolic and real significance of one of the most hallowed places on American soil. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Tomb_of_the_Unknown_Soldier_auphonic.mp3 There are places throughout the United States where those who've died for their country are remembered with honor and where they remain. Churchyard cemeteries in places like Boston and Philadelphia to honor the Revolutionary War dead. Or battlefield cemeteries like the one in Gettysburg to honor the fallen during the American Civil War. But in America's history, there hadn't been a single place. A dedicated place to pay tribute to those who gave their lives for our freedoms and for the nation. That changed after World War One. After the Great War, France and Great Britain decided to select one of their fallen soldiers to represent all of the dead from World War One. They laid an unknown soldier to rest in an honored place on November 11, 1920, just over 100 years ago. Other nations followed in similar fashion. Portugal, Italy, Belgium. All selected an unknown soldier to receive full military honors and burial at an honored place in those countries. The commanding general of American forces in France at the time was Brigadier General William Connor. He first heard about the French plans to honor their Unknown Solider during the planning phases. He liked the idea and ran it up the chain, only to be rejected by the U.S. Army Chief of Staff, General Payton March. That was in 1919. General March felt the Americans would be able to identify all of their own dead, so there wouldn't be any “unknown soldiers,” and he felt the U.S. had no comparable burial place for a fallen hero that was similar to Westminster Abbey in Great Britain. But on December 20, 1921, U.S. Congressman Hamilton Fish of New York introduced a resolution that called for the return to the country of an unknown American who was killed during World War One. He wanted to bury a soldier who was killed in France, and then make plans for his burial with full military honors in a tomb that would be constructed at Arlington National Cemetery. The tomb was built and is now located at the Memorial Amphitheater in Arlington Cemetery. On November 11, 1921, the body of an unidentified soldier who was killed in France, was laid to rest. He represents all of the unidentified and missing from World War One. Since that time, an unidentified American service member has been laid to rest at that tomb, with the highest honors, representing World War Two, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. One crypt sits empty to represent all those who remain missing. This year marks the Centennial of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Links Arlington National Cemetery Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier National Commemoration of the Centennial, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier The 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, The Old Guard About this Episode's Guest Gavin McIlvenna Sergeant Major (Retired) Gavin L. McIlvenna is the 11th President of the Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (SHGTUS) SGM (Ret) McIlvenna retired from the US Army after nearly 23years of service, with various peace and contingency operations in Northern Iraq, Bosnia, Baghdad, and Africa. Throughout his career, he has held every key leadership from sniper team leader to operations sergeant major. His military education includes the all levels of the Non[1]Commissioned Officers Education System culminating with the United States Army Sergeant...

    A Century of Respect: The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 41:49

    Gavin McIlvenna joins Tim on the Centennial of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Gavin is president of the Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. He had a long and distinguished career in the U.S. Army, but one of the more unique experiences he's had is the time he spent guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington Cemetery. In this episode, Gavin tells the story behind the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and the symbolic and real significance of one of the most hallowed places on American soil. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Tomb_of_the_Unknown_Soldier_auphonic.mp3 There are places throughout the United States where those who've died for their country are remembered with honor and where they remain. Churchyard cemeteries in places like Boston and Philadelphia to honor the Revolutionary War dead. Or battlefield cemeteries like the one in Gettysburg to honor the fallen during the American Civil War. But in America's history, there hadn't been a single place. A dedicated place to pay tribute to those who gave their lives for our freedoms and for the nation. That changed after World War One. After the Great War, France and Great Britain decided to select one of their fallen soldiers to represent all of the dead from World War One. They laid an unknown soldier to rest in an honored place on November 11, 1920, just over 100 years ago. Other nations followed in similar fashion. Portugal, Italy, Belgium. All selected an unknown soldier to receive full military honors and burial at an honored place in those countries. The commanding general of American forces in France at the time was Brigadier General William Connor. He first heard about the French plans to honor their Unknown Solider during the planning phases. He liked the idea and ran it up the chain, only to be rejected by the U.S. Army Chief of Staff, General Payton March. That was in 1919. General March felt the Americans would be able to identify all of their own dead, so there wouldn't be any “unknown soldiers,” and he felt the U.S. had no comparable burial place for a fallen hero that was similar to Westminster Abbey in Great Britain. But on December 20, 1921, U.S. Congressman Hamilton Fish of New York introduced a resolution that called for the return to the country of an unknown American who was killed during World War One. He wanted to bury a soldier who was killed in France, and then make plans for his burial with full military honors in a tomb that would be constructed at Arlington National Cemetery. The tomb was built and is now located at the Memorial Amphitheater in Arlington Cemetery. On November 11, 1921, the body of an unidentified soldier who was killed in France, was laid to rest. He represents all of the unidentified and missing from World War One. Since that time, an unidentified American service member has been laid to rest at that tomb, with the highest honors, representing World War Two, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. One crypt sits empty to represent all those who remain missing. This year marks the Centennial of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Links Arlington National Cemetery Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier National Commemoration of the Centennial, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier The 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, The Old Guard About this Episode's Guest Gavin McIlvenna Sergeant Major (Retired) Gavin L. McIlvenna is the 11th President of the Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (SHGTUS) SGM (Ret) McIlvenna retired from the US Army after nearly 23years of service, with various peace and contingency operations in Northern Iraq, Bosnia, Baghdad, and Africa. Throughout his career, he has held every key leadership from sniper team leader to operations sergeant major. His military education includes the all levels of the Non[1]Commissioned Officers Education System culminating with the United States Army Sergeant...

    Encore: The Battle of Little Bighorn Changed Everything

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 54:24

    Historian Andy Masich joins Tim to discuss the battle of Little Bighorn, one of the most well known and possibly misunderstood battles in the history of the American West.  An author, speaker and college educator, Andy also serves as CEO of the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh. In this episode he puts the story of Little Bighorn into perspective for today and how America changed afterward. This episode is an Encore Presentation of one of our listeners' favorite episodes. It was originally released on July 9, 2018. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Little_Bighorn_Encore.mp3 June 25, 1876 , American Indians defeat George Custer at and the U.S. Army  at Little Bighorn, which is in southern Montana. The U.S. Army had been forcing American Indians onto reservations, but there were resistors led by chiefs Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. As Americans moved West, Indian nations had repeatedly entered into treaties with the U.S. government but the terms changed as more and more people moved West.  Then gold was discovered in South Dakota's Black Hills in South Dakota, which had been considered sacred ground to plains Indians. In 1875 the U.S. Army was said to have ignored treaty provisions and invaded the Black Hills. That prompted many plains Indians to leave their reservations and join Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse in Montana. Battle lines were drawn. In late 1875, the U.S. Army ordered “hostile Indians” in Montana to return to their reservations or be subject to attack.  Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse ignored the order, then urged other warriors to join with them to fight the army. By late Spring 1876, thousands of American Indian men, women and children had gathered at a massive camp along a river in Southern Montana called Little Bighorn. On June 17th, General George Crook of U.S. Army was stunned by size and ferocity of the Indian attack nearby and pulled back.  Two other Army columns remained, one commanded by General Alfred Terry and one by General John Gibbon. General Terry ordered the 7th Cavalry under Lt. Colonel George Custer to scout ahead.  Instead of proceeding cautiously, he dismissed his scouts when they told him of a gigantic Indian village nearby in the valley of Little Bighorn. Believing that there was a village but discounting its size, his main fear was that when word got to the village, the people would scatter before he could emerge victorious. He divided roughly 600 men into three battalions, keeping about 215 under his direct command. He did this to keep the Indians from scattering to escaping his invasion. The people did not scatter, they mobilized. Sitting Bull was too old for battle, but younger Crazy Horse sped into battle with a large force to meet the U.S. Army. With Custer's troops divided and advancing, they found it was they who were under attack by a rapidly growing number of warriors.  Custer and the others had tried to regroup his regiment but it was too late. Everyone was under attack. Custer himself, and his 215 men were cut off and under attack by as many as 3,000 armed braves. In less than a 2 hours, they were all killed to the last man. Eyewitness Lakota Chief Red Horse said this in 1881 – “The Sioux did not take a single soldier prisoner, but killed all of them. None were left alive for even a few minutes.” Other regiments survived with heavy casualties but were able to hold for a day until the Indians withdrew. There were 50 known deaths among Sitting Bull's followers. While the Battle of Little Bighorn was the greatest victory for the plains Indians, and the army's worst defeat in what was called the Plains Indian War, the Indians were not able to revel in victory.  The story of “Custer's Last Stand” outraged many Americans and created national perceptions of merciless Indians. The federal government became that much more determined to crush the “hostile Indians.” In less than 5 years,

    Encore: The Battle of Little Bighorn Changed Everything

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 54:24

    Historian Andy Masich joins Tim to discuss the battle of Little Bighorn, one of the most well known and possibly misunderstood battles in the history of the American West.  An author, speaker and college educator, Andy also serves as CEO of the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh. In this episode he puts the story of Little Bighorn into perspective for today and how America changed afterward. This episode is an Encore Presentation of one of our listeners' favorite episodes. It was originally released on July 9, 2018. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Little_Bighorn_Encore.mp3 June 25, 1876 , American Indians defeat George Custer at and the U.S. Army  at Little Bighorn, which is in southern Montana. The U.S. Army had been forcing American Indians onto reservations, but there were resistors led by chiefs Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. As Americans moved West, Indian nations had repeatedly entered into treaties with the U.S. government but the terms changed as more and more people moved West.  Then gold was discovered in South Dakota's Black Hills in South Dakota, which had been considered sacred ground to plains Indians. In 1875 the U.S. Army was said to have ignored treaty provisions and invaded the Black Hills. That prompted many plains Indians to leave their reservations and join Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse in Montana. Battle lines were drawn. In late 1875, the U.S. Army ordered “hostile Indians” in Montana to return to their reservations or be subject to attack.  Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse ignored the order, then urged other warriors to join with them to fight the army. By late Spring 1876, thousands of American Indian men, women and children had gathered at a massive camp along a river in Southern Montana called Little Bighorn. On June 17th, General George Crook of U.S. Army was stunned by size and ferocity of the Indian attack nearby and pulled back.  Two other Army columns remained, one commanded by General Alfred Terry and one by General John Gibbon. General Terry ordered the 7th Cavalry under Lt. Colonel George Custer to scout ahead.  Instead of proceeding cautiously, he dismissed his scouts when they told him of a gigantic Indian village nearby in the valley of Little Bighorn. Believing that there was a village but discounting its size, his main fear was that when word got to the village, the people would scatter before he could emerge victorious. He divided roughly 600 men into three battalions, keeping about 215 under his direct command. He did this to keep the Indians from scattering to escaping his invasion. The people did not scatter, they mobilized. Sitting Bull was too old for battle, but younger Crazy Horse sped into battle with a large force to meet the U.S. Army. With Custer's troops divided and advancing, they found it was they who were under attack by a rapidly growing number of warriors.  Custer and the others had tried to regroup his regiment but it was too late. Everyone was under attack. Custer himself, and his 215 men were cut off and under attack by as many as 3,000 armed braves. In less than a 2 hours, they were all killed to the last man. Eyewitness Lakota Chief Red Horse said this in 1881 – “The Sioux did not take a single soldier prisoner, but killed all of them. None were left alive for even a few minutes.” Other regiments survived with heavy casualties but were able to hold for a day until the Indians withdrew. There were 50 known deaths among Sitting Bull's followers. While the Battle of Little Bighorn was the greatest victory for the plains Indians, and the army's worst defeat in what was called the Plains Indian War, the Indians were not able to revel in victory.  The story of “Custer's Last Stand” outraged many Americans and created national perceptions of merciless Indians. The federal government became that much more determined to crush the “hostile Indians.” In less than 5 years,

    Memorial Day: A Gold Star Mother’s Story

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 38:06


    Marlyn Shipley joins Tim for a special Memorial Day episode where she tells her own story. Marlyn is a Gold Star Mother, which means she lost one of her children in service to the U.S. military. Marlyn’s son Michael was a specialist in the U.S. Army’s 101st Airborne. He died on December 12, 1985 when the plane that he and 247 other fellow troops were aboard, crashed in Gander, Newfoundland. Marlyn talks about what Memorial Day means to her, about the life of a Gold Star mother, about her son Michael. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Gold_Star_Mother_auphonic.mp3 One of the most touching and gripping traditions when it comes to the American military started in Cleveland, Ohio during the First World War. Robert Queisser was the father of two sons who were serving the military in Europe at that time. To help him cope with the worry a parent has when his son is at war, and to help his wife in the same way, he came up with an idea. He created a banner called the Blue Star Flag. He even patented it. The design featured a blue star, which he said represented hope and pride, on a field of white that was surrounded by a red border. It was 1917, and mothers and fathers across the country liked the idea and demand for the banners exploded. The first flags were handmade and hung in the front windows of homes by mothers, to signify that they had sons serving the war effort. If you had more than one son fighting in the war at that time, you had a star for each child. As you might expect, not all of those children survived the war. Time would pass and casualty numbers started to climb. The Women’s Committee of the Council of National Defenses had an idea of its own. It suggested that mothers of soldiers killed in the war avoid wearing black mourning clothes. Instead, they said to wear a black band that featured a gold star on their left arms. President Woodrow Wilson began to call these mothers, “Gold Star Mothers.” Before long, some of those Gold Star Mothers started to stitch a gold star over the blue star on those flags in their front windows. If you walked down a street and saw that distinctive flag in the window with a gold star, you knew there was a mother in that house who lost a son in the war. By the time the Second World War happened, those blue and gold star flags became more omnipresent. To give you an idea of just how powerful those flags were, picture this. Alletta Sullivan lived in Waterloo, Iowa. She had five sons, all aboard one ship, the U.S.S. Juneau. All five of those boys died when the ship was sunk on November 13, 1942. Alletta had to replace five blue stars on her flag with five gold stars. For over 100 years now, service flags have been displayed as American troops deployed all around the world in both war and peace time. Marlyn Shipley lives in a small town near Pittsburgh and is a Gold Star mother. Links Gold Star Mothers: A History of Service and Sacrifice, OurMilitary.com The Deadliest Plane Crash in Canada Killed 248 Soldiers in 1985, HistoryCollection.com 35 Years Ago: Unsolved Gander Aircrash Kills 248 101st Airborne Soldiers, 8 Crew, The Michigan Star Gold Star Flag Ceremony Gives Closure to Dead North Huntingdon Vet's Mother, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review Skepticism Remains on Crash Anniversary, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review Band of Brothers Series (official website), HBO ABC's 20/20 Coverage of the Gander Crash: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv8KoLHbEgc


    Memorial Day: A Gold Star Mother’s Story

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 38:06


    Marlyn Shipley joins Tim for a special Memorial Day episode where she tells her own story. Marlyn is a Gold Star Mother, which means she lost one of her children in service to the U.S. military. Marlyn's son Michael was a specialist in the U.S. Army's 101st Airborne. He died on December 12, 1985 when the plane that he and 247 other fellow troops were aboard, crashed in Gander, Newfoundland. Marlyn talks about what Memorial Day means to her, about the life of a Gold Star mother, about her son Michael. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Gold_Star_Mother_auphonic.mp3 One of the most touching and gripping traditions when it comes to the American military started in Cleveland, Ohio during the First World War. Robert Queisser was the father of two sons who were serving the military in Europe at that time. To help him cope with the worry a parent has when his son is at war, and to help his wife in the same way, he came up with an idea. He created a banner called the Blue Star Flag. He even patented it. The design featured a blue star, which he said represented hope and pride, on a field of white that was surrounded by a red border. It was 1917, and mothers and fathers across the country liked the idea and demand for the banners exploded. The first flags were handmade and hung in the front windows of homes by mothers, to signify that they had sons serving the war effort. If you had more than one son fighting in the war at that time, you had a star for each child. As you might expect, not all of those children survived the war. Time would pass and casualty numbers started to climb. The Women's Committee of the Council of National Defenses had an idea of its own. It suggested that mothers of soldiers killed in the war avoid wearing black mourning clothes. Instead, they said to wear a black band that featured a gold star on their left arms. President Woodrow Wilson began to call these mothers, “Gold Star Mothers.” Before long, some of those Gold Star Mothers started to stitch a gold star over the blue star on those flags in their front windows. If you walked down a street and saw that distinctive flag in the window with a gold star, you knew there was a mother in that house who lost a son in the war. By the time the Second World War happened, those blue and gold star flags became more omnipresent. To give you an idea of just how powerful those flags were, picture this. Alletta Sullivan lived in Waterloo, Iowa. She had five sons, all aboard one ship, the U.S.S. Juneau. All five of those boys died when the ship was sunk on November 13, 1942. Alletta had to replace five blue stars on her flag with five gold stars. For over 100 years now, service flags have been displayed as American troops deployed all around the world in both war and peace time. Marlyn Shipley lives in a small town near Pittsburgh and is a Gold Star mother. Links Gold Star Mothers: A History of Service and Sacrifice, OurMilitary.com The Deadliest Plane Crash in Canada Killed 248 Soldiers in 1985, HistoryCollection.com 35 Years Ago: Unsolved Gander Aircrash Kills 248 101st Airborne Soldiers, 8 Crew, The Michigan Star Gold Star Flag Ceremony Gives Closure to Dead North Huntingdon Vet's Mother, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review Skepticism Remains on Crash Anniversary, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review Band of Brothers Series (official website), HBO ABC's 20/20 Coverage of the Gander Crash: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv8KoLHbEgc


    The Story Behind the American Front Porch

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 47:40

    Author and journalist Michael Dolan joins Tim to tell the story of the American front porch. He’s the editor of American History magazine and the author of a book entitled, “The American Porch: An informal history of an informal place.” In this episode, he talks about how the front porch shaped life in America for well over 200 years. You could say that when it comes to our homes, the front porch was the original social media. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Front_Porch_auphonic.mp3 It’s probably something you may not think about much, even if you have one on your home and you walk across it a few times every day. The front porch. But did you ever wonder what your life would be like if you didn’t have one? Or, on the other hand, if you are one of millions of Americans who don’t have a front porch, did you ever wonder what your life would be like if you did have one? It’s not an understatement to say that in neighborhoods with front porches, the social dynamics between and among neighbors are different than they are in neighborhoods without them. And most certainly those same social dynamics are different today, than they were many years ago, when it was just assumed your home would have a front porch, and that would be the place you would spend your time between your private world and the public world. Michael Dolan is the editor of American History Magazine and the author of the book, “The American Porch.” Links The American Porch, by Michael Dolan (Amazon) American History Magazine, Historynet.com The Front Porch Campaign, American Heritage Magazine About this Episode’s Guest Michael Dolan Michael Dolan is a writer, editor, and musician. He lives in Washington, DC, his hometown. Besides editing American History  magazine, he consults on book manuscripts and documentary television programs, most recently one about wildlife along the Canadian/American border. His articles have run in Smithsonian, The New Republic, The New Yorker, Outside, and The New York Times Magazine, among others. His 1987 Washington City Paper story about Judge Robert Bork’s video rentals caused a furor leading Congress to enact the federal Video Privacy Protection Act of 1988. Between 1983 and 1995, he and his wife renovated a 1920s-era bungalow in a DC neighborhood near the Potomac River. The final step of that process replaced a careworn front porch with one that he designed. The results of that project inspired his 2002 book, The American Porch: An Informal History of an Informal Place. Dolan’s porch occasionally is the scene of rehearsals by his band, The Powerful House Ways & Means Committee.

    The Story Behind the American Front Porch

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 47:40

    Author and journalist Michael Dolan joins Tim to tell the story of the American front porch. He's the editor of American History magazine and the author of a book entitled, “The American Porch: An informal history of an informal place.” In this episode, he talks about how the front porch shaped life in America for well over 200 years. You could say that when it comes to our homes, the front porch was the original social media. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Front_Porch_auphonic.mp3 It's probably something you may not think about much, even if you have one on your home and you walk across it a few times every day. The front porch. But did you ever wonder what your life would be like if you didn't have one? Or, on the other hand, if you are one of millions of Americans who don't have a front porch, did you ever wonder what your life would be like if you did have one? It's not an understatement to say that in neighborhoods with front porches, the social dynamics between and among neighbors are different than they are in neighborhoods without them. And most certainly those same social dynamics are different today, than they were many years ago, when it was just assumed your home would have a front porch, and that would be the place you would spend your time between your private world and the public world. Michael Dolan is the editor of American History Magazine and the author of the book, “The American Porch.” Links The American Porch, by Michael Dolan (Amazon) American History Magazine, Historynet.com The Front Porch Campaign, American Heritage Magazine About this Episode's Guest Michael Dolan Michael Dolan is a writer, editor, and musician. He lives in Washington, DC, his hometown. Besides editing American History  magazine, he consults on book manuscripts and documentary television programs, most recently one about wildlife along the Canadian/American border. His articles have run in Smithsonian, The New Republic, The New Yorker, Outside, and The New York Times Magazine, among others. His 1987 Washington City Paper story about Judge Robert Bork's video rentals caused a furor leading Congress to enact the federal Video Privacy Protection Act of 1988. Between 1983 and 1995, he and his wife renovated a 1920s-era bungalow in a DC neighborhood near the Potomac River. The final step of that process replaced a careworn front porch with one that he designed. The results of that project inspired his 2002 book, The American Porch: An Informal History of an Informal Place. Dolan's porch occasionally is the scene of rehearsals by his band, The Powerful House Ways & Means Committee.

    Should We Ban Political Talk from the Workplace?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 36:24

    Steve Paskoff joins Tim to talk about whether it’s a good idea for employers to ban discussion of politics in the workplace. Steve is CEO of an Atlanta-based firm called ELI, Inc. That’s a company that provides workplace culture training for employers. In this episode, Steve explains how to handle the touchy issue of employees talking about politics and other sensitive topics at work. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Should_We_Ban_Politics_at_Work_auphonic.mp3 Basecamp is a company that makes workplace collaboration software. It enables teams to work together across geography and time zones on robust platforms. I’ve used it and like it. As successful as the company has been, it only had about 60 employees last month when the CEO and co-founder of the company made a decision that would change things. On April 26th, Basecamp CEO Jason Fried and his cofounder David Hansson published a blog post for employees entitled: “Changes at Basecamp.” In the post, the company’s leaders told employees, among other things, that they were going to ban political discussions. I’m paraphrasing here in the name of brevity, but the CEO said that discussions, “related to politics, advocacy, or society at large…are not healthy, and they haven’t served us well. And we’re done with it at Basecamp.” The post told employees that if the new policy was unacceptable, the company would offer a fair severance package and help them find another job. This led to a backlash within the company that spilled over into the social media universe and earned the company more media coverage than its software ever did. According to reports, management just didn’t like what was happening on their own platform and decided to lay down some strict guidelines. The fallout came relatively swiftly.  Within weeks, one-third of the company decided to quit. That’s roughly 18 employees who had tweeted on social media that they intend to leave the firm. Links ELI, Inc., website How Should HR Handle Political Discussions at Work?, SHRM Basecamp's Controversial Move to Ban Politics at Work is a Reminder that the Workplace is Not a Democracy?, Business Insider Basecamp Implodes as Employees Flee Company, Including Senior Staff, The Verge About this Episode’s Guest Steve Paskoff Stephen M. Paskoff is the founder, president and CEO of ELI®, a learning and consulting company that provides advisory and learning services to help clients align their values with behaviors which increase employee contribution, build respectful and inclusive cultures, maximize results and reduce legal and ethical risk. Mr. Paskoff is a nationally recognized speaker and author on how to align behaviors with organizational mission and values. He has been named the highest-ranking speaker at SHRM’s national conference and spoken at other major conferences throughout the United States. His work was referenced and quoted in the EEOC’s 2016 Harassment Study. Before founding ELI® in 1986, Mr. Paskoff was an EEOC trial attorney and partner in a management law firm. He graduated from Hamilton College and the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and is a member of the Georgia Bar. More information is available at www.eliinc.com .  

    Should We Ban Political Talk from the Workplace?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 36:24

    Steve Paskoff joins Tim to talk about whether it's a good idea for employers to ban discussion of politics in the workplace. Steve is CEO of an Atlanta-based firm called ELI, Inc. That's a company that provides workplace culture training for employers. In this episode, Steve explains how to handle the touchy issue of employees talking about politics and other sensitive topics at work. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Should_We_Ban_Politics_at_Work_auphonic.mp3 Basecamp is a company that makes workplace collaboration software. It enables teams to work together across geography and time zones on robust platforms. I've used it and like it. As successful as the company has been, it only had about 60 employees last month when the CEO and co-founder of the company made a decision that would change things. On April 26th, Basecamp CEO Jason Fried and his cofounder David Hansson published a blog post for employees entitled: “Changes at Basecamp.” In the post, the company's leaders told employees, among other things, that they were going to ban political discussions. I'm paraphrasing here in the name of brevity, but the CEO said that discussions, “related to politics, advocacy, or society at large…are not healthy, and they haven't served us well. And we're done with it at Basecamp.” The post told employees that if the new policy was unacceptable, the company would offer a fair severance package and help them find another job. This led to a backlash within the company that spilled over into the social media universe and earned the company more media coverage than its software ever did. According to reports, management just didn't like what was happening on their own platform and decided to lay down some strict guidelines. The fallout came relatively swiftly.  Within weeks, one-third of the company decided to quit. That's roughly 18 employees who had tweeted on social media that they intend to leave the firm. Links ELI, Inc., website How Should HR Handle Political Discussions at Work?, SHRM Basecamp's Controversial Move to Ban Politics at Work is a Reminder that the Workplace is Not a Democracy?, Business Insider Basecamp Implodes as Employees Flee Company, Including Senior Staff, The Verge About this Episode's Guest Steve Paskoff Stephen M. Paskoff is the founder, president and CEO of ELI®, a learning and consulting company that provides advisory and learning services to help clients align their values with behaviors which increase employee contribution, build respectful and inclusive cultures, maximize results and reduce legal and ethical risk. Mr. Paskoff is a nationally recognized speaker and author on how to align behaviors with organizational mission and values. He has been named the highest-ranking speaker at SHRM's national conference and spoken at other major conferences throughout the United States. His work was referenced and quoted in the EEOC's 2016 Harassment Study. Before founding ELI® in 1986, Mr. Paskoff was an EEOC trial attorney and partner in a management law firm. He graduated from Hamilton College and the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and is a member of the Georgia Bar. More information is available at www.eliinc.com .  

    SCOTUS: Is 9 a Good Number?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 35:01


    Mike Davis joins Tim to talk about the current debate over whether or not to expand the size of the U.S. Supreme Court, otherwise known as “court packing.” Mike is president of the Article 3 Project. That’s an organization that focuses on the U.S. Constitution and the judicial branch of government. Mike explains how important it is to preserve the apolitical nature of the judicial branch of government, and the U.S. Supreme Court, in particular. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/SCOTUS_9_auphonic.mp3 The U.S. Supreme Court is as old as the country itself. The Court was established by the United States Constitution with the passage of the Judiciary Act of 1789. It first assembled in 1790. The U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the court system, representing the judiciary branch of the nation. The judiciary is one of three branches of government. The other two are the executive branch, headed by the president, and the legislative branch, which represents both the House of Representatives and the Senate. When the Supreme Court was established back in 1789, it had six Justices. Since then, the number of justices on the court has changed a few times.  John Adams, when he was president, passed the Judiciary Act of 1801, which reduced the Court to five justices. This was an attempt to limit how many appointments the next president – Thomas Jefferson – could appoint to the bench. Once Jefferson got into office, he and his party repealed the act and went back to having six justices on the high court. Then, in 1807, Jefferson and Congress decided to add a seventh justice when it added a seventh federal circuit. Andrew Jackson was the next president to change the number of justices on the Supreme Court. In 1837, he added two more justices to the high court after Congress expanded the number of federal circuit court districts. The next time there was a change to that number was for a short time during the Civil War. In 1863, Congress created a 10th federal circuit, and so the country had a 10th Supreme Court Justice. Once the war was over, Congress passed legislation in 1866 to reduce the Court to seven justices. That lasted for two years. In 1869, a new Judiciary Act established the number of nine justices on the U.S. Supreme Court. That was the last time there was a change to the number of justices on the Supreme Court. 1869. The last time there was any serious consideration to changing the number was a failed attempt by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1937. His motives were political. He wanted a majority of Democrat-leaning justices to help advance his agenda. So, his idea was to add as many as six new members to the Supreme Court. The effort failed when two respected members of the Court at that time, decided to oppose the effort – Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes and Justice Louis Brandeis. Mike Davis has spent much of his career focused on the justice system, and the U.S. Constitution. He’s had a special focus on the judiciary and the Supreme Court. Links The Article 3 Project, website Internet Accountability Project, website Court-packing Isn't Just a Bad Idea, It's Downright Unconstitutional, New York Post Mike Davis: Packing the Court is a Radical Assault on Judicial Independence, The Epoch Times Democrats Introducing Legislation to Pack Supreme Court with 4 New Justices, Report Says, DailyWire About this Episode’s Guest Mike Davis Mike Davis leads the Article III Project (A3P), established to fight for and defend judicial nominees, appointed judges, the process, and judicial independence. He is also the founder and president of the Internet Accountability Project, a new advocacy organization that opposes Big Tech and seeks to hold them accountable for their bad acts. Davis previously served as Chief Counsel for Nominations to Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) on the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary during the 115...


    SCOTUS: Is 9 a Good Number?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2021 35:01


    Mike Davis joins Tim to talk about the current debate over whether or not to expand the size of the U.S. Supreme Court, otherwise known as “court packing.” Mike is president of the Article 3 Project. That's an organization that focuses on the U.S. Constitution and the judicial branch of government. Mike explains how important it is to preserve the apolitical nature of the judicial branch of government, and the U.S. Supreme Court, in particular. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/SCOTUS_9_auphonic.mp3 The U.S. Supreme Court is as old as the country itself. The Court was established by the United States Constitution with the passage of the Judiciary Act of 1789. It first assembled in 1790. The U.S. Supreme Court is the highest court in the court system, representing the judiciary branch of the nation. The judiciary is one of three branches of government. The other two are the executive branch, headed by the president, and the legislative branch, which represents both the House of Representatives and the Senate. When the Supreme Court was established back in 1789, it had six Justices. Since then, the number of justices on the court has changed a few times.  John Adams, when he was president, passed the Judiciary Act of 1801, which reduced the Court to five justices. This was an attempt to limit how many appointments the next president – Thomas Jefferson – could appoint to the bench. Once Jefferson got into office, he and his party repealed the act and went back to having six justices on the high court. Then, in 1807, Jefferson and Congress decided to add a seventh justice when it added a seventh federal circuit. Andrew Jackson was the next president to change the number of justices on the Supreme Court. In 1837, he added two more justices to the high court after Congress expanded the number of federal circuit court districts. The next time there was a change to that number was for a short time during the Civil War. In 1863, Congress created a 10th federal circuit, and so the country had a 10th Supreme Court Justice. Once the war was over, Congress passed legislation in 1866 to reduce the Court to seven justices. That lasted for two years. In 1869, a new Judiciary Act established the number of nine justices on the U.S. Supreme Court. That was the last time there was a change to the number of justices on the Supreme Court. 1869. The last time there was any serious consideration to changing the number was a failed attempt by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1937. His motives were political. He wanted a majority of Democrat-leaning justices to help advance his agenda. So, his idea was to add as many as six new members to the Supreme Court. The effort failed when two respected members of the Court at that time, decided to oppose the effort – Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes and Justice Louis Brandeis. Mike Davis has spent much of his career focused on the justice system, and the U.S. Constitution. He's had a special focus on the judiciary and the Supreme Court. Links The Article 3 Project, website Internet Accountability Project, website Court-packing Isn't Just a Bad Idea, It's Downright Unconstitutional, New York Post Mike Davis: Packing the Court is a Radical Assault on Judicial Independence, The Epoch Times Democrats Introducing Legislation to Pack Supreme Court with 4 New Justices, Report Says, DailyWire About this Episode's Guest Mike Davis Mike Davis leads the Article III Project (A3P), established to fight for and defend judicial nominees, appointed judges, the process, and judicial independence. He is also the founder and president of the Internet Accountability Project, a new advocacy organization that opposes Big Tech and seeks to hold them accountable for their bad acts. Davis previously served as Chief Counsel for Nominations to Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) on the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary during the 115...


    Surveillance: You’re Being Ranked

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 46:28


    Kelley Vlahos joins Tim to talk about how big tech companies are starting to use your data to grade you in ways that may surprise and shock you. The focus of our discussion is your Social Credit Score and how China may be illustrating just how alarming its applications can be. Kelley is a senior advisor at the Quincy Institute and editorial director at Responsible Statecraft. She’s written about this population monitoring tool that before now was unthinkable in America. That’s the focus of this episode. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Social_Credit_Score_auphonic.mp3 Anyone who buys a car or a house or wants a new credit card is familiar with the financial credit process. You have to build up a track record of paying off your debts in order to obtain good financial credit. Financial credit enables you to borrow money. A bad financial credit rating can be used by banks and lenders to deny you a loan, which means you can’t buy that house, that car, or get that credit card. Until now, that was the only credit rating you needed to worry about. But in subtle ways, another credit rating may be creeping into your daily life you may not be so aware of. It’s called a Social Credit Score. It’s essentially a profile that rates people for better or worse based on everything they do. Every place they go, every rideshare they take, every destination they travel to, every book they buy, every membership, every donation, everything they post online, and, of course, their Internet search history. Here are a couple simple examples. Every time you take an Uber rideshare, your driver rates you according to a star system. If the driver likes you, you get more stars. If the driver doesn’t like you, you get fewer stars. What you have to do to be liked is up to the driver, not you. On social media, you learn what information you’re allowed to share and that information – even if it’s legal and non-offensive - that will get you suspended or banned. Links Kelley Beaucar Vlahos (website) George Orwell's Dystopian Nightmare in China, by Kelley Vlahos, American Conservative The Invisible Shackles of America's Social Credit System, Human Events Social Credit Scores are Already Here, The Last American (blog) China has Started Ranking Citizens with a Creepy 'Social Credit' System, Business Insider About this Episode’s Guest Kelley Vlahos Kelley Beaucar Vlahos comes to QI from The American Conservative, where for the last three years she served as the magazine’s executive editor and co-host of the Empire Has No Clothes podcast. Before joining TAC in 2017,  Vlahos served as a contributing editor to the magazine, reporting and publishing regular articles on U.S. war policy, civil liberties, foreign policy, veterans, and Washington politics since 2007. She also organized the magazine’s major annual foreign policy conference for the last three years. Prior to that, Vlahos was director of social media and a digital editor at WTOP News in Washington, D.C. from 2013 to 2017. She spent 15 years as an online political reporter for FOX News at the channel’s Washington D.C. bureau, as well as Washington correspondent for Homeland Security Today magazine. She is on the board of PublicSquare.net, a non-profit media project promoting informed Left-Right debate. Her recent media appearances include C-SPAN’s Washington Journal, Tucker Carlson Tonight, NPR’s 1A, POTUS on Sirius XM, and Al Jazeera.  Before moving to the nation’s capital, Vlahos earned her degree in Journalism-Mass Media at Central Connecticut State University and worked her way through local and regional newspapers in her home state of Connecticut, including The New Britain Herald and The Torrington Register Citizen.


    Surveillance: You’re Being Ranked

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 46:28


    Kelley Vlahos joins Tim to talk about how big tech companies are starting to use your data to grade you in ways that may surprise and shock you. The focus of our discussion is your Social Credit Score and how China may be illustrating just how alarming its applications can be. Kelley is a senior advisor at the Quincy Institute and editorial director at Responsible Statecraft. She's written about this population monitoring tool that before now was unthinkable in America. That's the focus of this episode. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Social_Credit_Score_auphonic.mp3 Anyone who buys a car or a house or wants a new credit card is familiar with the financial credit process. You have to build up a track record of paying off your debts in order to obtain good financial credit. Financial credit enables you to borrow money. A bad financial credit rating can be used by banks and lenders to deny you a loan, which means you can't buy that house, that car, or get that credit card. Until now, that was the only credit rating you needed to worry about. But in subtle ways, another credit rating may be creeping into your daily life you may not be so aware of. It's called a Social Credit Score. It's essentially a profile that rates people for better or worse based on everything they do. Every place they go, every rideshare they take, every destination they travel to, every book they buy, every membership, every donation, everything they post online, and, of course, their Internet search history. Here are a couple simple examples. Every time you take an Uber rideshare, your driver rates you according to a star system. If the driver likes you, you get more stars. If the driver doesn't like you, you get fewer stars. What you have to do to be liked is up to the driver, not you. On social media, you learn what information you're allowed to share and that information – even if it's legal and non-offensive - that will get you suspended or banned. Links Kelley Beaucar Vlahos (website) George Orwell's Dystopian Nightmare in China, by Kelley Vlahos, American Conservative The Invisible Shackles of America's Social Credit System, Human Events Social Credit Scores are Already Here, The Last American (blog) China has Started Ranking Citizens with a Creepy 'Social Credit' System, Business Insider About this Episode's Guest Kelley Vlahos Kelley Beaucar Vlahos comes to QI from The American Conservative, where for the last three years she served as the magazine's executive editor and co-host of the Empire Has No Clothes podcast. Before joining TAC in 2017,  Vlahos served as a contributing editor to the magazine, reporting and publishing regular articles on U.S. war policy, civil liberties, foreign policy, veterans, and Washington politics since 2007. She also organized the magazine's major annual foreign policy conference for the last three years. Prior to that, Vlahos was director of social media and a digital editor at WTOP News in Washington, D.C. from 2013 to 2017. She spent 15 years as an online political reporter for FOX News at the channel's Washington D.C. bureau, as well as Washington correspondent for Homeland Security Today magazine. She is on the board of PublicSquare.net, a non-profit media project promoting informed Left-Right debate. Her recent media appearances include C-SPAN's Washington Journal, Tucker Carlson Tonight, NPR's 1A, POTUS on Sirius XM, and Al Jazeera.  Before moving to the nation's capital, Vlahos earned her degree in Journalism-Mass Media at Central Connecticut State University and worked her way through local and regional newspapers in her home state of Connecticut, including The New Britain Herald and The Torrington Register Citizen.


    Internet Privacy and the Law

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 39:31

    Fred Cate joins Tim to talk about how big tech companies could use your personal data without your knowledge or explicit consent and some of the legal issues involved. Fred is vice president for research, a distinguished professor of law and a senior fellow at Indiana University’s Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Internet_Privacy_and_the_Law_auphonic.mp3 Earlier this month, Alaska was the latest state to take up the issue of consumer data privacy when the state’s governor introduced bills in both legislative chambers. The two bills – Senate Bill 116 and House Bill 159 – are both called the Consumer Data Privacy Act. They are designed to give individuals the right to know what personal information is being collected about them and request its deletion. If the bills become law, consumers would be able to opt out of the sale of their personal information. They would be able to learn whether their information has been sold or shared with third parties. Why is this important? You know when you log onto your computer or use your smart phone someone is watching. So what? Right? We all know our data is out there, but just where is there? And who is there? But, did you ever wonder what is actually happening with your data? And by data, I don’t just mean your financial transactions, your texts, your tweets, your pictures and your posts. I mean everything. Not only is your smart phone and your computer tracking you, but it’s making decisions about you, it’s inferring things about you. It’s judging you. And it could be sharing its conclusions about you with someone else who wants to sell to you. Or sell access to you to yet someone else. And that’s where it starts to get really interesting. Someone may want you to buy something, or go somewhere, or donate to something, or protest against something, or boycott something, and they may try to maneuver you into doing just that. All without your even realizing it. Professor Fred Cate of Indiana University is one of the foremost experts on cybersecurity and he specializes in information privacy and the law. Links Professor Fred Cate, Indiana University Webpage Fred Cate, Information Policy Center Privacy and Freedom, Dr. Alan Westin (Barnes & Noble) Alaska Governor Introduces Consumer Data Privacy Bill, Law Street California Consumer Privacy Act, State of California About this Episode’s Guest Fred Cate Professor Fred Cate specializes in information privacy and security law issues. He has testified before numerous congressional committees and speaks frequently before professional, industry, and government groups. In addition to his appointment in the Law School and as Vice President for Research, he is an Adjunct Professor of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University. From 2003 to 2014, he served as the founding director of IU’s Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research, a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Research and Information Assurance Education, where he is now a senior fellow. Professor Cate currently chairs the National Academies’ study on Law Enforcement and Intelligence Access to Encrypted Content, and he is a member of the National Academies’ Forum on Cyber Resilience as well as many other government, industry, and not-for-profit advisory panels. He serves as a senior policy advisor to the Centre for Information Policy Leadership at Hunton & Williams LLP. Previously, Professor Cate served as a member of the National Academies’ Committee on Technical and Privacy Dimensions of Information for Terrorism Prevention, counsel to the Department of Defense Technology and Privacy Advisory Committee, and a member of the National Security Agency’s Privacy and Civil Liberties Panel, the Federal Trade Commission's Advisory Committee on Online Access and Security, and Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board,...

    Internet Privacy and the Law

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 39:31

    Fred Cate joins Tim to talk about how big tech companies could use your personal data without your knowledge or explicit consent and some of the legal issues involved. Fred is vice president for research, a distinguished professor of law and a senior fellow at Indiana University's Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Internet_Privacy_and_the_Law_auphonic.mp3 Earlier this month, Alaska was the latest state to take up the issue of consumer data privacy when the state's governor introduced bills in both legislative chambers. The two bills – Senate Bill 116 and House Bill 159 – are both called the Consumer Data Privacy Act. They are designed to give individuals the right to know what personal information is being collected about them and request its deletion. If the bills become law, consumers would be able to opt out of the sale of their personal information. They would be able to learn whether their information has been sold or shared with third parties. Why is this important? You know when you log onto your computer or use your smart phone someone is watching. So what? Right? We all know our data is out there, but just where is there? And who is there? But, did you ever wonder what is actually happening with your data? And by data, I don't just mean your financial transactions, your texts, your tweets, your pictures and your posts. I mean everything. Not only is your smart phone and your computer tracking you, but it's making decisions about you, it's inferring things about you. It's judging you. And it could be sharing its conclusions about you with someone else who wants to sell to you. Or sell access to you to yet someone else. And that's where it starts to get really interesting. Someone may want you to buy something, or go somewhere, or donate to something, or protest against something, or boycott something, and they may try to maneuver you into doing just that. All without your even realizing it. Professor Fred Cate of Indiana University is one of the foremost experts on cybersecurity and he specializes in information privacy and the law. Links Professor Fred Cate, Indiana University Webpage Fred Cate, Information Policy Center Privacy and Freedom, Dr. Alan Westin (Barnes & Noble) Alaska Governor Introduces Consumer Data Privacy Bill, Law Street California Consumer Privacy Act, State of California About this Episode's Guest Fred Cate Professor Fred Cate specializes in information privacy and security law issues. He has testified before numerous congressional committees and speaks frequently before professional, industry, and government groups. In addition to his appointment in the Law School and as Vice President for Research, he is an Adjunct Professor of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University. From 2003 to 2014, he served as the founding director of IU's Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research, a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Research and Information Assurance Education, where he is now a senior fellow. Professor Cate currently chairs the National Academies' study on Law Enforcement and Intelligence Access to Encrypted Content, and he is a member of the National Academies' Forum on Cyber Resilience as well as many other government, industry, and not-for-profit advisory panels. He serves as a senior policy advisor to the Centre for Information Policy Leadership at Hunton & Williams LLP. Previously, Professor Cate served as a member of the National Academies' Committee on Technical and Privacy Dimensions of Information for Terrorism Prevention, counsel to the Department of Defense Technology and Privacy Advisory Committee, and a member of the National Security Agency's Privacy and Civil Liberties Panel, the Federal Trade Commission's Advisory Committee on Online Access and Security, and Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board,...

    What to Do About Big Tech and Section 230

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 44:12


    Josh Hammer joins Tim to talk about one of the hottest debates over the future of the Internet, the fate of Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act, which is credited with creating the Internet as we know it today and giving Big Tech almost unbridled power. Has that little provision outlived its purpose? We explore. Josh is opinion editor of Newsweek magazine. He’s a research fellow with the Edmund Burke Foundation. He’s counsel and policy advisor for the Internet Accountability Project, and he’s a syndicated columnist. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Section_230_auphonic.mp3 It’s 1996. Bill Clinton is president. The Oscar winning movie for the year is Braveheart. Nintendo introduces its Nintendo 64 gaming system. And there’s this thing that computer geeks are getting all excited about. It’s called the World Wide Web, the Internet. But even more than that, the Internet is starting to spread across the country to regular computer users. Think about it. Until now, that computer on your desk was exactly that. Just a machine on your desk. It was connected to nothing. You had to insert a floppy disk into a drive, download some data onto it, remove it and physically take it to another place to transfer or deliver the data. The only places where you had access to computer networks were those big computer systems at your office or in government, universities or news rooms. But now there was this thing called the Internet. Google was just being started. No one even knew about the company or why it would even be needed. Certainly, there was no Twitter, no Facebook, no Instagram, no YouTube. Social media as we know it would come much later. For now, the novelty of the Internet was to learn how to get used to the very notion of connectedness. Being connected with someone else virtually. Chat boards. This was a totally new thing. On the media front, if you wanted information, you’d have to get that from TV, mostly one of the three major networks or CNN on cable. Or your daily newspaper, or the radio. That was it. The editors and producers in those newsrooms held all the cards. They decided what you would know … or not know… about what was happening in the world on any given day. They would get to decide what opinions, theories, conspiracy or not, you’d get to hear about. No one else. They were the gatekeepers, and they liked it. But it’s 1996, and all of that is about to change. Two congressional representatives would get together to write something called Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996. California Republican Chris Cox joined with Oregon Democrat Ron Wyden to author Section 230. It states: “No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provide by another information content provider.” 26 words. As they say, “the 26 words that created the Internet” as we know it today. Little did anyone know in 1996 what was in store for the world thanks to that Internet. And thanks to those 26 words. Thanks to those words, the Internet would become the wild west of communications. No more gatekeepers. No one to tell us what we can know or what we can’t know. We can talk to each other without anyone interfering. Those who helped usher in the Internet age called it the “democratization of communication.” Thanks to those words and a generation of innovators, companies, technologies and platforms, the world would become a smaller place. The legacy media would lose its stranglehold over mass communication, and the world would be forever changed, for better, and for worse. The Internet is now the world’s new town square. Links Josh Hammer, Newsweek Bio Josh Hammer, Creator's Syndicate Bio Internet Accountability Project When Harry Became Sally, by Ryan Anderson (Barnes & Noble) What is Section 230? The social media law is in the crosshairs of Congress, CNET


    What to Do About Big Tech and Section 230

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 44:12


    Josh Hammer joins Tim to talk about one of the hottest debates over the future of the Internet, the fate of Section 230 of the 1996 Communications Decency Act, which is credited with creating the Internet as we know it today and giving Big Tech almost unbridled power. Has that little provision outlived its purpose? We explore. Josh is opinion editor of Newsweek magazine. He's a research fellow with the Edmund Burke Foundation. He's counsel and policy advisor for the Internet Accountability Project, and he's a syndicated columnist. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Section_230_auphonic.mp3 It's 1996. Bill Clinton is president. The Oscar winning movie for the year is Braveheart. Nintendo introduces its Nintendo 64 gaming system. And there's this thing that computer geeks are getting all excited about. It's called the World Wide Web, the Internet. But even more than that, the Internet is starting to spread across the country to regular computer users. Think about it. Until now, that computer on your desk was exactly that. Just a machine on your desk. It was connected to nothing. You had to insert a floppy disk into a drive, download some data onto it, remove it and physically take it to another place to transfer or deliver the data. The only places where you had access to computer networks were those big computer systems at your office or in government, universities or news rooms. But now there was this thing called the Internet. Google was just being started. No one even knew about the company or why it would even be needed. Certainly, there was no Twitter, no Facebook, no Instagram, no YouTube. Social media as we know it would come much later. For now, the novelty of the Internet was to learn how to get used to the very notion of connectedness. Being connected with someone else virtually. Chat boards. This was a totally new thing. On the media front, if you wanted information, you'd have to get that from TV, mostly one of the three major networks or CNN on cable. Or your daily newspaper, or the radio. That was it. The editors and producers in those newsrooms held all the cards. They decided what you would know … or not know… about what was happening in the world on any given day. They would get to decide what opinions, theories, conspiracy or not, you'd get to hear about. No one else. They were the gatekeepers, and they liked it. But it's 1996, and all of that is about to change. Two congressional representatives would get together to write something called Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996. California Republican Chris Cox joined with Oregon Democrat Ron Wyden to author Section 230. It states: “No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provide by another information content provider.” 26 words. As they say, “the 26 words that created the Internet” as we know it today. Little did anyone know in 1996 what was in store for the world thanks to that Internet. And thanks to those 26 words. Thanks to those words, the Internet would become the wild west of communications. No more gatekeepers. No one to tell us what we can know or what we can't know. We can talk to each other without anyone interfering. Those who helped usher in the Internet age called it the “democratization of communication.” Thanks to those words and a generation of innovators, companies, technologies and platforms, the world would become a smaller place. The legacy media would lose its stranglehold over mass communication, and the world would be forever changed, for better, and for worse. The Internet is now the world's new town square. Links Josh Hammer, Newsweek Bio Josh Hammer, Creator's Syndicate Bio Internet Accountability Project When Harry Became Sally, by Ryan Anderson (Barnes & Noble) What is Section 230? The social media law is in the crosshairs of Congress, CNET


    Nadine Strossen: Fight Hate with Speech, Not Censorship

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 58:14


    Nadine Strossen joins Tim to talk about how to fight “hate speech” or harmful speech without censorship. She’s a best-selling author and a Professor of Constitutional Law at New York Law School. She’s also the first woman national President of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).  In this episode, she talks about private company censorship, the challenges, some solutions and all of it as addressed in her book “Hate: Why we should resist it with free speech, not censorship. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Fight_Hate_with_Free_Speech_auphonic.mp3 Free speech isn’t just an American issue, and it’s not just a First Amendment issue. Though it is important to note that the right of freedom of expression is the cornerstone to the First Amendment for a reason. The founders believed that certain rights come from God. Even if you don’t believe in God, and that is your right as protected by the First Amendment, the founders would tell you that your rights are natural rights, not man-made rights. They are innate desires and drives for every human being on earth and that it’s not for man to deny them to others. The right to express yourself without punishment is one of the most important rights they cited. The right to gather in groups peacefully together without penalty. The right to worship your God without coercion or punishment. The right of a free press to report news and information without government control. History is ripe with examples of cases where these rights were used to spread hateful thoughts and ideas. At the same time, our country’s short history is also full of cases where courts decided that the price for our First Amendment freedoms is tolerance for the spread of ideas that some may see as harmful, hateful or irresponsible. The principle is this. We must be willing to tolerate speech we don’t like in exchange for the right to deliver speech that others may not like. In recent years, there has been a movement to try to control, prevent or stop the spread of speech and information some may feel are harmful. Their solution is to stifle the speech, de-platform the messenger. Or even de-platform the platform. Remove any opportunity for others to communicate if that communication does not meet accepted narratives. In other words, censorship. This has been the focus of Nadine Strossen’s professional life. And with a resume that includes serving as the first woman national President of the ACLU, she has solid credentials on the issue of free speech and the battle against censorship, she has found allies from conservatives to progressives as well, making this an increasingly nonpartisan issue. Links Nadine Strossen Bio, New York Law School Hate: Why we should resist it with free speech, not censorship, by Nadine Strossen (Barnes & Noble) The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, by Soshana Zuboff (Barnes & Noble) Communications Decency Act of 1996 (in full, including Section 230), Columbia University PDF About this Episode’s Guest Nadine Strossen Nadine Strossen has written, taught, and advocated extensively in the areas of constitutional law and civil liberties, including through frequent media interviews. From 1991 to 2008, she served as President of the American Civil Liberties Union, the first woman to head the nation’s largest and oldest civil liberties organization. Professor Strossen is currently a member of the ACLU’s National Advisory Council, as well as the Advisory Boards of Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), Heterodox Academy, and the National Coalition Against Censorship. When she stepped down as ACLU President in 2008, three Supreme Court Justices participated in her farewell and tribute luncheon: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Antonin Scalia, and David Souter. Her 2018 book, HATE: Why We Should Resist It With Free Speech, Not Censorship, has been widely praised by ideologically diverse...


    Nadine Strossen: Fight Hate with Speech, Not Censorship

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 58:14


    Nadine Strossen joins Tim to talk about how to fight “hate speech” or harmful speech without censorship. She's a best-selling author and a Professor of Constitutional Law at New York Law School. She's also the first woman national President of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).  In this episode, she talks about private company censorship, the challenges, some solutions and all of it as addressed in her book “Hate: Why we should resist it with free speech, not censorship. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Fight_Hate_with_Free_Speech_auphonic.mp3 Free speech isn't just an American issue, and it's not just a First Amendment issue. Though it is important to note that the right of freedom of expression is the cornerstone to the First Amendment for a reason. The founders believed that certain rights come from God. Even if you don't believe in God, and that is your right as protected by the First Amendment, the founders would tell you that your rights are natural rights, not man-made rights. They are innate desires and drives for every human being on earth and that it's not for man to deny them to others. The right to express yourself without punishment is one of the most important rights they cited. The right to gather in groups peacefully together without penalty. The right to worship your God without coercion or punishment. The right of a free press to report news and information without government control. History is ripe with examples of cases where these rights were used to spread hateful thoughts and ideas. At the same time, our country's short history is also full of cases where courts decided that the price for our First Amendment freedoms is tolerance for the spread of ideas that some may see as harmful, hateful or irresponsible. The principle is this. We must be willing to tolerate speech we don't like in exchange for the right to deliver speech that others may not like. In recent years, there has been a movement to try to control, prevent or stop the spread of speech and information some may feel are harmful. Their solution is to stifle the speech, de-platform the messenger. Or even de-platform the platform. Remove any opportunity for others to communicate if that communication does not meet accepted narratives. In other words, censorship. This has been the focus of Nadine Strossen's professional life. And with a resume that includes serving as the first woman national President of the ACLU, she has solid credentials on the issue of free speech and the battle against censorship, she has found allies from conservatives to progressives as well, making this an increasingly nonpartisan issue. Links Nadine Strossen Bio, New York Law School Hate: Why we should resist it with free speech, not censorship, by Nadine Strossen (Barnes & Noble) The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, by Soshana Zuboff (Barnes & Noble) Communications Decency Act of 1996 (in full, including Section 230), Columbia University PDF About this Episode's Guest Nadine Strossen Nadine Strossen has written, taught, and advocated extensively in the areas of constitutional law and civil liberties, including through frequent media interviews. From 1991 to 2008, she served as President of the American Civil Liberties Union, the first woman to head the nation's largest and oldest civil liberties organization. Professor Strossen is currently a member of the ACLU's National Advisory Council, as well as the Advisory Boards of Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), Heterodox Academy, and the National Coalition Against Censorship. When she stepped down as ACLU President in 2008, three Supreme Court Justices participated in her farewell and tribute luncheon: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Antonin Scalia, and David Souter. Her 2018 book, HATE: Why We Should Resist It With Free Speech, Not Censorship, has been widely praised by ideologically diverse...


    Walter Iooss Jr.: The Sports Photography Master

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 43:18


    Legendary sports photographer Walter Iooss joins Tim to talk about his life and career that has spanned decades. His work has appeared in Sports Illustrated and in many major media outlets and in unforgettable marketing campaigns. If you were to think of an iconic photo from any major American sport from over the past 50 years, there’s a decent chance Walter is the one who captured that image. Walter talks about his life behind the lens, a lens that has captured household names, helped make a few athletes become household names, and even at times when people in his photos were not famous, the image was still…iconic. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Walter_Iooss_Photo_Legend_auphonic.mp3 There is a photo from 1988 of Michael Jorden in his red Chicago Bulls uniform that makes it look like he’s defying gravity. Like he’s flying, basketball in hand, somewhere between the foul line and the hoop, ready to slam that ball through the net. If a picture tells 1,000 stories, this one tells 1,001. Did he really take off at the foul line and make it to the hoop in one jump? What does it take to do that? The image is iconic. There’s another photo from years earlier when New York Jets celebrity quarterback Joe Namath was preparing for the Super Bowl. And by preparing, I mean lounging next to a swimming pool, getting some sun, surrounded by a fans and reporters. Broadway Joe, in swimming trunks, flashing his million-dollar smile. Iconic. Then there’s that one from the NFC Championship game in January 1982. That’s where Joe Montana tossed the winning pass to Dwight Clark to send the San Francisco 49ers to the Super Bowl. The photo features the exact moment where Clark is at the high point of his jump, catching the football barely in his fingertips, to bring it down with a championship. The photo and the moment have been dubbed, “The Catch.” Iconic. Those are three iconic images of many that have one thing in common. Walter Iooss. He’s the photographer who sometimes captures iconic moments, and other times, through this artistic eye, he creates them. Walter has shot photos for Time, Newsweek, New York and People magazines.  He’s done advertising work for brands like Adidas, Pepsi, Gatorade, Fuji and Eastman Kodak. He’s published many books of his work, but the major constant in his career has been his work for Sports Illustrated. A magazine he started working for in the 1960s, and one he still works for today. Over the years, he’s shot images for more than 300 of the magazine’s covers. Links Walter Iooss, Jr., Website Christie's Puts Sports Photography GOAT Walter Iooss Jr. On the Auction Block, Forbes Walter Iooss: Sports Photography Legend, Shutterbug.com G.O.A.T.S.: Greatest of All Time, with  Photographer Walter Iooss, ESPN Documentary Walter Iooss Jr.'s Best Super Bowl Photos, Sports Illustrated About this Episode’s Guest Walter Iooss Jr. Widely viewed as one of the greatest sports photographers of our time and called “the poet laureate of sports,” Walter Iooss, Jr.’s photographs have graced the pages of Sports Illustrated, including more than 300 covers, for 58 years. Since the age of 17, Walter has photographed some of the most recognized athletes in sports history, including Muhammad Ali, Michael Jordan, Lebron James, Tiger Woods, and hundreds more. His ability to create beautiful backdrops for his subjects, both action and portraits, changed the definition of what a “good sports photograph” should be. Walter placed the same care and consciousness from his sports photographs to create Sports Illustrated’s now-legendary swimsuit issues. As in his action shots, his portraits for SI’s legendary swimsuit issues revealed his uncanny sense of graphics and Rembrandt-like reverence for light and shadow. His ability to truly connect with his subjects, athletes, or models, is what helped make Walter the best in the game. Flexibility and reinvention are two attributes t...


    Walter Iooss Jr.: The Sports Photography Master

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 43:18


    Legendary sports photographer Walter Iooss joins Tim to talk about his life and career that has spanned decades. His work has appeared in Sports Illustrated and in many major media outlets and in unforgettable marketing campaigns. If you were to think of an iconic photo from any major American sport from over the past 50 years, there's a decent chance Walter is the one who captured that image. Walter talks about his life behind the lens, a lens that has captured household names, helped make a few athletes become household names, and even at times when people in his photos were not famous, the image was still…iconic. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Walter_Iooss_Photo_Legend_auphonic.mp3 There is a photo from 1988 of Michael Jorden in his red Chicago Bulls uniform that makes it look like he's defying gravity. Like he's flying, basketball in hand, somewhere between the foul line and the hoop, ready to slam that ball through the net. If a picture tells 1,000 stories, this one tells 1,001. Did he really take off at the foul line and make it to the hoop in one jump? What does it take to do that? The image is iconic. There's another photo from years earlier when New York Jets celebrity quarterback Joe Namath was preparing for the Super Bowl. And by preparing, I mean lounging next to a swimming pool, getting some sun, surrounded by a fans and reporters. Broadway Joe, in swimming trunks, flashing his million-dollar smile. Iconic. Then there's that one from the NFC Championship game in January 1982. That's where Joe Montana tossed the winning pass to Dwight Clark to send the San Francisco 49ers to the Super Bowl. The photo features the exact moment where Clark is at the high point of his jump, catching the football barely in his fingertips, to bring it down with a championship. The photo and the moment have been dubbed, “The Catch.” Iconic. Those are three iconic images of many that have one thing in common. Walter Iooss. He's the photographer who sometimes captures iconic moments, and other times, through this artistic eye, he creates them. Walter has shot photos for Time, Newsweek, New York and People magazines.  He's done advertising work for brands like Adidas, Pepsi, Gatorade, Fuji and Eastman Kodak. He's published many books of his work, but the major constant in his career has been his work for Sports Illustrated. A magazine he started working for in the 1960s, and one he still works for today. Over the years, he's shot images for more than 300 of the magazine's covers. Links Walter Iooss, Jr., Website Christie's Puts Sports Photography GOAT Walter Iooss Jr. On the Auction Block, Forbes Walter Iooss: Sports Photography Legend, Shutterbug.com G.O.A.T.S.: Greatest of All Time, with  Photographer Walter Iooss, ESPN Documentary Walter Iooss Jr.'s Best Super Bowl Photos, Sports Illustrated About this Episode's Guest Walter Iooss Jr. Widely viewed as one of the greatest sports photographers of our time and called “the poet laureate of sports,” Walter Iooss, Jr.'s photographs have graced the pages of Sports Illustrated, including more than 300 covers, for 58 years. Since the age of 17, Walter has photographed some of the most recognized athletes in sports history, including Muhammad Ali, Michael Jordan, Lebron James, Tiger Woods, and hundreds more. His ability to create beautiful backdrops for his subjects, both action and portraits, changed the definition of what a “good sports photograph” should be. Walter placed the same care and consciousness from his sports photographs to create Sports Illustrated's now-legendary swimsuit issues. As in his action shots, his portraits for SI's legendary swimsuit issues revealed his uncanny sense of graphics and Rembrandt-like reverence for light and shadow. His ability to truly connect with his subjects, athletes, or models, is what helped make Walter the best in the game. Flexibility and reinvention are two attributes t...


    Power Struggle: Big Tech and Antitrust Reform

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 38:24


    Antitrust expert Bill Baer joins Tim to talk about the growing interest in antitrust and efforts to rein in Big Tech. Bill is a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution, and has a unique view of all of this. He was Assistant Attorney General in charge of the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, and before that he had served as Director of the Bureau of Competition at the Federal Trade Commission. In this episode, Bill explains how antitrust reform, particularly for Big Tech, has already begun to take shape. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Big_Tech_and_Antitrust_auphonic.mp3 In a normal year, words like “antitrust” don’t come up much, unless you’re in a courtroom or legal office. But this is not a normal year. Big Tech has never been more powerful. Companies like Google, Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Twitter, have unprecedent influence on the way Americans work, spend, invest, socialize, stay informed and above all, communicate. The amount of power wielded by such a small group of companies and powerful people hasn’t been seen since the turn of the last century. While Big Tech has made news for its bold efforts to influence the national dialogue in recent months, many have said that because they are private companies, technology platforms are not subject to First Amendment law. What many of those same people may not realize is that the issues at play may have as much to do with antitrust and competition as they do with communication. In Washington, D.C. there are bipartisan efforts to take a serious look at antitrust reform. The people behind the movement say that antitrust law hasn’t kept up with the pace of change in technology and its impact on society. Senator Amy Klobuchar, the Democrat senator from Minnesota, is the new chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Antitrust Subcommittee. That committee introduced sweeping legislation to update the U.S. antitrust law. Republican Congressman Ken Buck from Colorado, has taken up the issue in the House. He’s on the House Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law, and helping to lead the charge, with Democrats, to revisit the laws that govern monopolies. This is a nonpartisan issue. Both the Senate and the House are looking closely at how those laws may need to be changed to ensure that big technology firms do not get the kind of power that could cripple some segments of society if misused. Links Bill Baer Bio, The Brookings Institution How Senator Klobuchar's Proposals will Move the Antitrust Debate Forward, Brookings Blog Testimony of Bill Baer before U.S. House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law, October 1, 2020 Colorado's Congressional Odd Couple, Buck and Neguse, is Taking on Big Tech, The Denver Post Acting FTC Chair Calls for 'Bold Action' to Rein in Tech, Other Monopolies, MarketWatch About this Episode’s Guest Bill Baer Antitrust has been the principal focus of Bill’s career. On three different occasions, he served in the U.S. antitrust enforcement agencies: from 1975 to 1980 in various positions at the Federal Trade Commission; from 1995 to 1999 as Director of the Bureau of Competition at the FTC; and from 2013 to 2017 at the Justice Department where he was Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust for three-plus years and then Acting Associate Attorney General from April 2016 until January 2017. When not in public service, he was a partner at Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. Since January of 2021, he has been a Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution.


    Power Struggle: Big Tech and Antitrust Reform

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 38:24


    Antitrust expert Bill Baer joins Tim to talk about the growing interest in antitrust and efforts to rein in Big Tech. Bill is a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution, and has a unique view of all of this. He was Assistant Attorney General in charge of the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, and before that he had served as Director of the Bureau of Competition at the Federal Trade Commission. In this episode, Bill explains how antitrust reform, particularly for Big Tech, has already begun to take shape. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Big_Tech_and_Antitrust_auphonic.mp3 In a normal year, words like “antitrust” don't come up much, unless you're in a courtroom or legal office. But this is not a normal year. Big Tech has never been more powerful. Companies like Google, Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Twitter, have unprecedent influence on the way Americans work, spend, invest, socialize, stay informed and above all, communicate. The amount of power wielded by such a small group of companies and powerful people hasn't been seen since the turn of the last century. While Big Tech has made news for its bold efforts to influence the national dialogue in recent months, many have said that because they are private companies, technology platforms are not subject to First Amendment law. What many of those same people may not realize is that the issues at play may have as much to do with antitrust and competition as they do with communication. In Washington, D.C. there are bipartisan efforts to take a serious look at antitrust reform. The people behind the movement say that antitrust law hasn't kept up with the pace of change in technology and its impact on society. Senator Amy Klobuchar, the Democrat senator from Minnesota, is the new chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee's Antitrust Subcommittee. That committee introduced sweeping legislation to update the U.S. antitrust law. Republican Congressman Ken Buck from Colorado, has taken up the issue in the House. He's on the House Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law, and helping to lead the charge, with Democrats, to revisit the laws that govern monopolies. This is a nonpartisan issue. Both the Senate and the House are looking closely at how those laws may need to be changed to ensure that big technology firms do not get the kind of power that could cripple some segments of society if misused. Links Bill Baer Bio, The Brookings Institution How Senator Klobuchar's Proposals will Move the Antitrust Debate Forward, Brookings Blog Testimony of Bill Baer before U.S. House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law, October 1, 2020 Colorado's Congressional Odd Couple, Buck and Neguse, is Taking on Big Tech, The Denver Post Acting FTC Chair Calls for 'Bold Action' to Rein in Tech, Other Monopolies, MarketWatch About this Episode's Guest Bill Baer Antitrust has been the principal focus of Bill's career. On three different occasions, he served in the U.S. antitrust enforcement agencies: from 1975 to 1980 in various positions at the Federal Trade Commission; from 1995 to 1999 as Director of the Bureau of Competition at the FTC; and from 2013 to 2017 at the Justice Department where he was Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust for three-plus years and then Acting Associate Attorney General from April 2016 until January 2017. When not in public service, he was a partner at Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. Since January of 2021, he has been a Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution.


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