Podcasts about mission hospital

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Best podcasts about mission hospital

Latest podcast episodes about mission hospital

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - 'Medical News' with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 16:36


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel and brings on Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of Medical News! He and Wayne talk about Brad Pitt's skin care routine, a thermal camera on the iPhone and coffee's link to a longer one of these.

Bill Handel on Demand
BHS - 9A - 'Medical News' with Dr. Jim Keany and Wayne & The House Whisperer

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 31:21


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel. Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, joins the show for a fresh edition of 'Medical News'. Wayne hosts Dean Sharp for this week's edition of Wayne & The House Whisperer. He and Dean talk about Earthquake Prep!

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 14:35


Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, joins Bill Handel for this week's edition of Medical News. He and Handel talk about scientists studying pig-organ transplants in brain-dead people for longer periods.

Bill Handel on Demand
BHS - 8A - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany and HOTN [LE]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 31:53


Bill Handel speaks with Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of Medical News. Jennifer Jones Lee accompanies Bill for the Late Edition of Handel on the News.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 9a - 'Medical News' with Dr. Jim Keany and Sylvester Stallone's Mad!

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 33:04


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel. He speaks with Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, regarding Vitamin D and brain health. And actor Sylvester Stallone is upset because there's a new Rocky spin-off in the works, and he thinks the producers are 'parasites'!

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show
'Medical News' with Dr. Jim Keany, L.A. County's 'High' COVID Community Level and the DEA with Steve Gregory

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 42:30


Bill Handel is joined by Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of 'Medical News'. KFI News Reporter Steve Gregory comes on the show to talk about the Los Angeles County moving into 'high' COVID community levels, prompting the potential return of indoor mask mandates. Additionally, the DEA seized a whole lot of fentanyl in Inglewood.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - 'Medical News' with Dr. Jim Keany and Sketchy Secret Service Activity

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 28:19


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of 'Medical News'. According to an official, the Secret Service deleted text messages from the Insurrection on January 6th, 2021. And in an alternate reality, you could be catching flights from Palmdale instead of LAX.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - 'Medical News' with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 14:33


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of 'Medical News'. He and Dr. Jim talk about the Omicron offshoot BA.5 and why it's a big deal, Monkeypox vaccine shipments and genetically modified pig hearts being transplanted into deceased recipients for science.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - 'Medical News' with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 15:25


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel and hosts Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, Dr. Jim Keany. The two talk about the positive effects of 2-3 cups of coffee on a daily basis. Also, the benefits of exercise in a pill. And there's a new eye exam that can show if you're at risk for a heart attack.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 8a - 'Medical News' with Dr. Jim Keany and WOTN [LE]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 37:22


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel. Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, joins the show for this week's edition of 'Medical News'. Jennifer Jones Lee accompanies Wayne for the Late Edition of Wayne on the News.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 11:38


Bill Handel is joined by Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo. He and Dr. Keany talk about heat exposure, Pfizer vs. Moderna when it comes to the COVID vaccine, and a 10-second balance test that might predict your lifespan.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 8a - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany and HOTN [LE]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 25:59


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo for this week's edition of Medical News. Wayne Resnick and Jennifer Jones Lee join Bill for the Late Edition of Handel on the News. The three of them discuss news topics that include: The Supreme Court has ruled against New York's gun permit law, the FDA has banned Juul e-cigarettes from the U.S. market, and the World Health Organization is considering declaring monkeypox a global health emergency.

Friends of Kijabe
Dayalan Clark

Friends of Kijabe

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 23:13


Dayalan: I'm Dayalan Clark. I'm a breast surgeon from the UK. I came out to Kijabe mainly to help because Beryl [Akinyi] has been on maternity leave. Beryl is the surgeon who does most of the breast work here, and Peter Bird, who we have known for many, many years, asked if we could if I could come and help. Peter grew up in India as a missionary child with his father being a surgeon and a missionary hospital, at a mission hospital in India in a place called Mysore. And it so happened that my wife's father was also a surgeon in the same hospital, and they grew up together across a wall as neighbors growing up in India. And that was my connection with Peter Bird. I think my wife and Peter lost connection, though our respective parents kept in touch. And then when we were visiting Nairobi for a safari in 2006, we heard that Peter was here. So we were going for a safari with my wife's parents. It was their 50th wedding anniversary and they loved wildlife. So that was our treat for them for their 50th wedding anniversary. And they said, “Oh, Peter is in Kijabe, let's try and meet up with Peter.” So we came and visited Kijabe had lunch with Peter.  In 2006 I took an early retirement from my work in the NHS in the UK with the express purpose to go and help mission hospitals in need. And then in 2019 I came out to Nairobi with a group of breast surgeons from the UK to train to do a training course and a teaching course in Nairobi, and who was on the local faculty to spread the word. So we met up again and I was telling Peter how I had taken an early retirement with the express view of going in and helping mission hospitals in need. And then he turned around said, Oh, would you be able to help in Kijabe if we needed us at all? I'd love to come to catch up if he needed me. And then of course, Peter was leaving last year and Beryl was going on maternity leave. So he contacted me and said, Can you come and help us while on maternity leave? And so I'm here. That's how I'm here.  David: That's amazing. Did you and your wife meet? How did you meet? Dayalan: I went to medical school in India, which is a Christian medical school called CMC Christian Medical College Vellore. And we were classmates in Vellore and we met there and got married after we finished our house jobs and then did some mission service, which is part of our obligation in India, then did our respective postgraduate training and in Vellore again, myself in general surgery and my wife in pediatrics. And then it worked again in mission hospitals in India and then went out to the UK in 1991, never intending to settle in the UK. But God, God's wills are strange and we never thought that's going to be the plan. But that's what happened. And I was very conscious that because we've trained in Vellore, I've always grown with the feeling that I consider myself very fortunate, coming from a very average background in India. My father was a minister in the church and retired as the Bishop of Madras. So very ordinary background, but consider ourselves very fortunate to have been able to have gone to the UK and to made a career there, to become consultants there and always felt as soon as my children were on their own feet, I'm going to stop working, retire and try to give back to people who been less fortunate than myself. Wow. David: Wow. That brings up so many interesting questions. I'm not super familiar with India, but one of my dreams is - this is why I was so excited to meet you is I heard from from Dr. Nthumba when we were starting Friends of Kijabe - he said, "you need to learn about Vellore, you need to learn about this place." And so, I'd love to hear about that. But then also I'm curious just what. . .you said your father is a minister and then became a bishop. Most people in America associate India with Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism.  Is Christianity regional? Dayalan: Christianity is much more common in South India than in North India.  Where I come from, which is South India, but the population of India is huge. As you know, 1.3 billion people and 2% are Christians. So, 80% Hindus, about 10% are Muslims. And then, like you said, the other communities like Sikhs, Jains and such like from the rest of it with Christianity being 2%. So even Clark, which is my surname, is a very Indian name, but the background to that is one of my forefathers must have been converted. And when you convert it from Hinduism to Christianity, the way you denounced your previous religion was either you took on a biblical name or you took on a very western sounding name, often a missionary who converted you. I presume one of my forefathers was probably converted by someone called Clark or decided to take on a Western sounding name. And that's how Clark has come down the generations. David: Wow. So, there's a tradition that the Apostle Thomas went to India, right? Dayalan: It's historic. Legend is that he came down to this west coast of India, which is Kerala, and then traveled down and then actually came through Tamil Nadu where I'm from, near Chennai. It's called Saint Thomas Mount. And they say that that's where he probably last either left India or died there. We don't know. But I don't think there's enough factual evidence but that's what they think happened. Yeah. David: Interesting. It's not until really spending time in this part of the world that realize Christianity developed very differently than I perceived. Southeast Asia, Africa, a lot of the early church fathers were in those places. It was not a European thing until much later on, which I think is fascinating. Dayalan: Yes.  Considering Christianity arose, Christ lived in Jerusalem in the Middle East, I think proximity-wise you can see why it happened that way. Egypt is not far from where it was and you have flight to Egypt when Christ was born. But it doesn't surprise me. Definitely there was quite a lot of Christianity around this region and moving both east to us [in India]. David: Wow. I think my understanding of our previous conversation - tell me if this is accurate - that Vellore is probably a picture of what Kijabe could be like in, I don't know, what you would say, maybe 20 or 30 years? Dayalan: Quite possibly so. I mean, the first thing that struck me when I came to Kijabe, I saw the community spirit, the closeness, and how well people got on together. And the first thing that struck me, especially with a lot of missionaries here, the first thing that struck me was this is below in the fifties or sixties because Vellore was very similar. There's a Christ-centered Mission Hospital, which was largely supported by Americans and some British missionaries, both in terms of the day-to-day running of the hospital and in personnel, which I see exactly what is happening here. And Vellore has then gone on to become one of the leading institutions in India, both in teaching and in terms of health delivery. And my only prayer is that hopefully 30, 40 years Kijabe is going to get there. One of the things that Vellore has, which probably is an advantage for them, having developed so quickly and so well, is a medical school, which I think we don't have yet in Kijabe. But I think if we have Christ at the center, everything else will follow. And I can see great things happening in Kijabe, just in the services that I've seen, in breast cancer care itself, I can see there's huge scope because we've just had a mammogram machine installed. Oh, yes, which is fantastic. And then I've helped in helping the radiographers from here, going to Aga Khan and MP Shah to get some training and of course, we're going to have a breast radiologist coming from America, starting in August. So, with this mammogram machine, we have a state-of-the-art absolutely fantastic machine, and then if we have a breast radiologist to actually drive that forward. I can see Kijabe being a fantastic breast unit going forward.  David: That's amazing. So you went from Vellore, you went from a very faith-based medical system to the NHS, which I assume was not the same. No, no. What was that like? Dayalan: The NHS as a health provider is absolutely fantastic.  You have, which I think most developed countries should aspire for, a health delivery system that is free at the point of delivery irrespective of your social status, your economic status, or who you are. Absolutely fantastic health delivery system. But one of the issues with that is that it's very secular, even though the British consider themselves a Christian country. I think that's far from what's practically happening there. So, it wasn't an issue for me. I am still involved in my church. I sing in the church choir. I'm actively involved in church activities. They've been very supportive of me coming here and by their prayers. So that balanced it out. And yes, it was different. But I think the professional satisfaction that I got from treating my patients, knowing that irrespective of whatever treatment they needed, they got it, irrespective of their economic status. And I think that is something most countries should aspire for. Any developed country that doesn't do that I think is really failing their people. And so I think Britain and the NHS is a fantastic health delivery system. It's huge and any huge system like that will have flaws, will have deficiencies. But as a principle where they can deliver good quality care which is completely free at the point of delivery, I think the NHS is fantastic. David: What does India's delivery system look like? Because you're doing a lot of fundraising for the people who are not able to pay, correct? Dayalan: Yes. So now in the UK, we have a group very much like Friends of Kijabe called the Friends of Vellore UK. And because Vellore has been training medical students for about 80 years, they have people in various countries. We have friends of Vellore in the US and the UK and Australia and in different parts. And the original role of these organizations, are charities that were set up by mission. Those who went from the UK to the Vellore worked there, came back, and raised funds from their local churches. Equipment that was not being used by discarded by the NHS was being shipped back to Vellore. So, Vellore depended a lot on these Friends of Vellore in the different countries. But the law has now got grown so big and it's completely self-sufficient for their day-to-day running for their equipment. So they don't need the Friends of the Vellore UK anymore for that. So, we've turned our focus towards paying poor patients' bills. And one of the things that often used to worry me is that, yes, the law is a fantastic institution. They give brilliant care, tertiary care for people. But what about the poor man living on the street outside or just two miles away from the law? Where does he go? I mean, he doesn't have a chance of paying those bills. Vellore has now moved on in that 15% of their income, which is a large amount, is completely for charity. Dayalan: And they're moving towards no patient will ever be turned away from the law because of lack of funds. So that's where we come in and we have said no more capital investment from us. We are going to concentrate on paying for poor patients' bills and they have a very good system which was set up in the seventies called person to person. So, a person in the UK donates money for a person in the Vellore. So that money is then raised and sent to Vellore. Vellore administers that. Every penny that that person in the UK donates goes directly to paying that poor patient's bill. And the person who in Vellore UK who donates that money gets a report of the patient that they treated and whose bill they helped to pay. That was set up in the seventies and is a very popular way of helping poor patients because the donors love it. They know exactly what's happened, the social standard, how much the bill cost, and what either the patient or their parents earn. So that was that's a very popular program and Friends of Vellore the UK that is our main contribution. David: I just had to pause. In 1970. So that meant you had to send a letter for every single patient that was helped. Dayalan: That's right. It was snail mail in those days. I remember as interns and as house officers actually filling in the form for a PCP form. Whenever the consultant knew that this patient is is not going to affect, they'll turn round to the junior, which was us. Can you please fill in a PDP form? We would then go into the patient's history, the economic background, where they live, what they earn, how many meals they have, how big their house is, and then all that details are then put together. Then the money is sent from PCP and then a sort of report is compiled by the administrator and by Vellore, and then sent by mail to the people in the UK. David: I'm just absolutely floored because I associate this with organizations like Compassion International. This is normal now. This was not normal in 1970 by any stretch of the imagination. For somebody working in the charity space, it's just mind-bogglingly cutting edge. That's so cool. Dayalan: I think Vellore has been just miles ahead of everybody else in India and even abroad. One of the other things, just to give you an example was the medical admissions when we got into medical college. So, you did an entrance exam where you qualified and then you were called for an interview and the interview took three days and the interview was hardly anything on the subject material. But it's basically to understand what is the aptitude of this individual person. Does the CMC think that this person is someone who has the aptitude to go back and serve? That was the main crux of the interview. We had personal interviews, we had group tasks, we had individual tasks, we had psychometric tasks. This is going back 50 years when it wasn't even envisaged. In the UK we now started bringing this in for our medical admission. And I was saying, “Guys, we've been doing this for 50 years at Vellore.” I think Vellore was really miles ahead of everybody else in lots of their programs and lots of their thinking and a lot of their projects. David: Yeah, that's just amazing. Wow. Is there anything you see at KJB that reminds you of what that's like? Like what are common threads? Dayalan: Well, I think the common thread is the Christ-centered attitude of what you're doing for your patients. Nobody is interested in personal gain or personal glory.  All you are interested in is that God's name be praised and that patient getting well. And I think that's probably the first thing that struck me when I came here. That's it, I think the most important thing in health delivery system within a Christian ethos. So that was the first thing that struck me. The second thing that struck me is the training system is so similar. Vellore was started by an American missionary, Ida Scudder. The training system where residents do what they were doing here, like the PAACS (Pan African Academy of Christian Surgeons) training system, the residents take personal responsibility for the patient they're looking after. They present in rounds. They know everything about that patient. And the training system was very similar. And I think what I appreciate with PAACS, even more than what we had in Vellore is ours was mainly service-oriented. Here you've introduced some teaching into it. Also, you have, at least in surgery, regular teaching sessions which we didn't have in the Vellore. The onus was on the individual to go read up. And whereas here [in Kijabe] you have a structured training program with structured teaching from starting from the basic sciences, going right up to the operating skills, which is fantastic. David: How do how does the skill level of our [Kijabe] trainees match up to other places you've been? Dayalan: I think the training here, the skill level is fantastic, and I think it's what I like about the system is it's actually geared towards the African setting in that they have a general training which we don't have in the UK. We've moved away completely, but the UK can afford to do it because it's a developed country and they have the NHS which will look after everyone, whatever they need is, whereas here it's not the case. And so, I think the training is very broad here, very good here. And having seen the final-year residents, I know they're going to be doing the exams shortly and they will go out and I'm confident they would be able to manage most surgical conditions. And when I say surgical, not in the narrow sense of the UK, but in the broad sense of what Africa needs. So I think the skill levels are absolutely fantastic for this residency.  David: For some of the non-medical people listening. What are the biggest surgical needs for Africa? Dayalan: I think the surgical need for Africa is to be a generalist where you can actually have a basic understanding of surgical diseases, know what the pathology is, and be able to quite rightly identify the problem and treat it adequately. One of the things I've noticed here is I've seen lots of patients being referred from elsewhere who actually have no knowledge of how that disease should have been treated but are willing to have a go because of either bravado or there's a financial incentive because if they did something surgical, they're going to get paid for it. And I think that's where PAACS really stands out in that they've grown them quite well and by the end of their training they know exactly what to do. David: Do we know why breast cancer is so common? I know we're a referral center, so I have a skewed sense because that's so much of what we see in Kijabe. Why is it so prevalent? Why is it affecting young people? Do we have answers to those questions? Dayalan: Interestingly, the statistics we have shown that breast cancer is a disease of the developing country. When I was in India, working in rural India and Assam in the last few years, I didn't see very much breast cancer, rural India, villages, not so much. You go to the urban cities in India, it's more common. And similarly, Kijabe seems to get a track because of the reputation we have of having treated breast cancer for a long time. With Peters reputation, we are a referral center for lots of people around the area and so I think Kijabe and Kenya are also going in the direction of the other developing countries where breast cancer is getting more common. And I have a simplistic view to this and I've discussed this with you before in that the things that increase your risk for breast cancer, even though each of them is small, are much more common in the developed countries. Things like the oral contraceptive pill, and hormone replacement treatment, all of these are extraneous estrogens which your body is not used to and taking them increases your risk. Things related to childbirth. Not having children increases your risk.  Having children and the number of children you have is protective. If you have more children, you are more protected against breast cancer. The same way breastfeeding. In the West, there was a huge fad against breastfeeding and using artificial milk.  Breastfeeding is protective in developing countries like India and Kenya. It's a necessity. If you don't breastfeed, it's economically not possible to actually buy powdered milk. And so, it's because of necessity, you have to do it. Everyone breastfed. Each of these is a small risk, but if you add them cumulatively, they become a higher risk. And I think as more countries, the developing countries are getting more developed and getting more Westernized, all of them are following the same trend that we have in the West, and this is increasing the risk. And so, breast cancer is getting more common in developing countries, unlike it was 20 or 30 years ago. David: Wow. This just sounds both sad and scary. Dayalan: It is. Because statistics in the cities in India show that they're almost catching up with the West in terms of prevalence of breast cancer. And it's probably this whole modernization shaping the West and doing all the things that they think the West is doing, which is good. David: I was having a conversation with Rich Davis today about research. The thing that comes to mind is autism. How rare it is for for it to be seen here? Yet in Nairobi, it's much more common each year that goes by. I don't know if your wife has had this experience in anywhere else you travel. Each year that goes by, Arianna sees a few more children [with autism]. And it's I wonder if there are similar factors. I wonder what the correlations are and where it comes from? Dayalan: I think definitely you can. My wife's in the same field, she's a pediatrician also. And there's no doubt that that incidence is increasing. But also, I think we're more aware of conditions that we didn't know 20 years ago. So 20 years ago, autism was just about coming, making it very similar to screening for breast cancer, pre-invasive breast cancer like DCIS, we didn't know these conditions before, but slowly we're getting more. Research helps with that. We've got good screening programs both in the US and in the UK, fantastic breast screening programs, and so we're learning much more as we go along with each intervention that comes about like screening. So I think we're going to see more of it. And the more you see of it, the more you get to know of it and the more you get to know of it, the better it gets for patients and health benefits. David: What would have happened in Kijabe, if you did have breast cancer 20 years ago? There were probably very few chemotherapy options? I guess you could have done a mastectomy, but there was no reconstruction. I mean, was it a death sentence? Dayalan: Almost.  One of the problems we have in Kijabe and in Kenya and the whole I think is patients present much later, as a result of which the prognosis is not going to be as good as countries like yours and mine, where we have good screening programs, we pick it up early. If you take breast cancer in the UK now, two-thirds of the patients are going to be alive and well in 20 years' time. In Kijabe it's going to be a complete opposite statistic, roughly just off the top of my head, where two-thirds would be dead after 20 years. But that's because they present so late. So, yes. We've got much better in the treatment everywhere. And the problem we have is a lot of the new treatments in breast cancer, i.e., chemotherapy.  Monoclonal antibodies unfortunately are very expensive. So while in the UK where you have the NHS, where [cost] doesn't matter, in Kijabe and in Kenya, it's much more difficult to access all of these. But saying that, in the three months that I've been here, patients are being given the same chemotherapy regime that we use in the UK. Thanks to NHIF, thanks to patients' awareness, they're able to access monoclonal antibodies, not to the extent we would in the UK, but definitely, it's available and now we give our patients that treatment, and of course reconstructive surgery has moved on miles. Dayalan: In terms of the treatment options we have, it's increased phenomenally. When I started in the UK 30 years ago, we had one chemotherapy regime for breast cancer. Now we have 20, maybe 30 regimes that we can use - different chemotherapeutic agents and if one fails, you go on to the next and so on and so forth, which we didn't have 20 years ago. I think treatment for breast cancer is really looking up. And with the new mammogram machine, I think one of the big things that we should be looking at is setting up a screening program for the local people because the mammogram machine is not going to be busy with the amount of breast cancer work that we do. So really what we need to be doing is developing a screening program, going out into the community and telling them, come, let's have a look, get some mammograms. Let's pick this up early. If you have a cancer, we'll sort it out for you. 

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 14:00


Bill Handel hosts the Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo Dr. Jim Keany for this week's edition of Medical News. He and Dr. Keany talk about COVID vaccines, extreme heat and the CDC issuing new guidance for Monkeypox symptoms.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 9a - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany and the 2028 Olympics Bring Hope for LA Transit

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 27:19


Bill Handel brings on Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, to talk about the COVID vaccine for kids under 5, the strength of COVID immunity and the CDC issuing new guidance on monkeypox symptoms. 2028 could fuel a transit boom for Los Angeles with the Olympics coming into town. And 'Disney adults' are online punching bags; What makes them so happy?

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 12:33


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of Medical News. The two talk about monkeypox in L.A. County and the inevitable return of mask mandates with COVID cases on the rise again.

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show
The Plea for Gun Control, Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany and KFI News Reporter and 'Unsolved' Host Steve Gregory

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 46:27


Bill Handel talks about President Biden urging Congress to act on guns in a rare primetime address. Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the Emergency Room at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, joins the show to talk about rising covid cases and monkeypox arriving in LA County. And Steve Gregory shares his experience being at last night's LASD Homicide Bureau's 100th Anniversary Gala, while also teasing what's coming up tomorrow night on his episode of 'Unsolved'.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - Biden Urges Congress to Act on Guns and Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 27:03


Bill Handel talks about how President Biden made a rare primetime address to urge Congress on gun control. Also, why is there still a baby formula shortage? Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo joins the show for this week's edition of Medical News. Monkeypox is officially in L.A. County and mandatory mask mandates could return shortly.

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show
The Strictest Abortion Bill Yet, Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany and KFI News Reporter and 'Unsolved' Host Steve Gregory

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 45:55


Bill Handel touches on Oklahoma lawmakers having passed one of the nation's strictest abortion bills yet. Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo joins the show to talk Monkeypox and the CDC approving Pfizer's COVID booster shot for children ages 5-11 years old. And KFI News Reporter Steve Gregory comes on to talk about some stories he's been covering and to provide listeners with a preview of what they can look forward to hearing on an all-new episode of the hit show 'Unsolved', airing tomorrow night at 8PM PST right here on KFI.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - Oklahoma Law Makers Pass Strictest Abortion Bill Yet and Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 25:48


Bill Handel unpacks the bill passed in Oklahoma that bans abortions at the point of fertilization. As gas prices continue to climb, Americans can't stay off the roads. And Dr. Jim Keany joins the show for this week's edition of Medical News. Dr. Keany is the Co-Director at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, and he talks about the recent spread of Monkeypox and the CDC having approved Pfizer's COVID booster vaccine for children ages 5-11 years old.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 11:37


Bill Handel hosts the Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo Dr. Jim Keany for this week's edition of Medical News. The two discuss Monkeypox and the CDC having approved the COVID booster vaccine shot for kids ages 5-11 years old.

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show
Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany, McCarthy's Damage Control Post-Insurrection and Disney Employees Caught in the Crossfire

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 50:48


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of Medical News. Handel also talks about how Kevin McCarthy sought to contain the damage after audio leaked from the Capitol Insurrection on January 6th, 2021. And Disney employees find themselves caught in between political crossfire as Florida pushes back against the company's refusal to accept their anti-gay agenda.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 14:42


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of Medical News. He and Dr. Keany talk about the recent increase in adolescent suicide in several states and a warning against daily aspirin.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany and Evaluating the Threat of Nuclear War

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 29:23


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of Medical News. ABC News Crime and Terrorism Analyst Brad Garrett joins the show to evaluate whether or not the threat of nuclear warfare is real. And in a new Cold War, choosing sides seems unnecessary.

The Matt Mittan Show
Topics: HCA Mission Hospital Nurses Protest / Local Crimes Increasing

The Matt Mittan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 13:29


Matt goes over some key happenings around town the next few days, as well as taking a quick look at the top local stories in the news and reacting to them - from his nearly 30 years of local media experience. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/Mittan)

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 5:38


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of Medical News. He and Dr. Keany talk about airlines lifting their mask policies - but will it end up causing major health issues?

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany and The Battle for Donbas

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 26:23


Bill Handel hosts the Co-Director of Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, Dr. Jim Keany, for this week's edition of Medical News. The two talk about the recent lifting of mask mandates for those traveling on certain airlines and on trains. And speaking of masks, COVID cases are on the rise while few precautions have returned - why is that? And the battle for Donbas rages on; Handel talks about why Russia is shifting its war machine to East Ukraine.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 14:47


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo for this week's edition of Medical News, where he and Bill talk about the FDA authorizing a new COVID-19 breath test and why eating disorders have risen during the pandemic.

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show
New York Considering Weapon-Detecting Technology, 'Medical News' with Dr. Jim Keany and KFI News Reporter and 'Unsolved' Host Steve Gregory

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 47:12


Bill Handel talks about New York exploring weapon-detecting technology for their subways after the shooting that took place in Brooklyn. Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, joins the show for this week's edition of Medical News. And KFI News Reporter and the Host of the hit new show 'Unsolved' Steve Gregory joins the show to talk about Sheriff Villanueva's battle with the MTA and also to tease what listeners can look forward to hearing on tomorrow night's episode, airing at 8PM PST right here on KFI.

Let's Finish Cancer
Nutrition for Cancer Prevention + Treatment

Let's Finish Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 31:22


Host Niki Strealy, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Specializing in Gut Health, speaks with Kailey Proctor, Board Certified Oncology Dietitian at Leonard Cancer Institute with Mission Hospital about valuable and useful information when it comes to nutrition for cancer prevention and treatment. For more resources, visit: providence.org, https://www.providence.org/locations/mission-hospital-mission-viejo/cancer-center and https://www.aicr.org/

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - 'Medical News' with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 6:58


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the E.R. at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo. He and Dr. Keany talk about aphasia - what it is and how it impacts those affected.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 8a - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany and HOTN [LE]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 30:04


Bill Handel speaks with Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission viejo, as Dr. Keany works with a Ukrainian church to create and send over trauma packs designed to treat battle wounds. Wayne Resnick and Jennifer Jones Lee join Bill for the Late Edition of Handel on the News. The three discuss news topics that include: Russia is warning of a direct clash with NATO if peacekeepers are sent to Ukraine, one of Putin's aids has reportedly quit in opposition of the war in Ukraine, and Russia will now exclusively accept Rubles as forms of payment for gas exports to 'unfriendly countries.'

KFI Featured Segments
KFI News Steve Gregory - OC Ukraine Trauma Kits W

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 0:33


A trauma nurse from Mission Hospital in Orange County is helping send medical supplies to Ukraine, KFI News' Steve Gregory explains.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 6:22


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the E.R. at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo. Dr. Keany is working with a Ukrainian church to create and send over trauma packages designed to treat battle wounds.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - The Latest on the Invasion of Ukraine and Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 30:25


Bill Handel provides some updates on the latest that's happening regarding the invasion of Ukraine. Wayne Resnick sits in to talk about the approval of new limits on 'pretextual stops' by LAPD officers that's riling the police union. And Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo joins the show to talk about the CDC shifting its masking guidance and TikTok's impact on the mental health of young users.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 14:38


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo to talk about the CDC shifting its masking guidance and TikTok's impact on the mental health of young users.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - 'Medical News' with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 14:28


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo. The two talk about a possible cure to HIV by scientists and the cost of an increase in reckless driving.

America's Work Force Union Podcast
MaryBe McMillan (North Carolina AFL-CIO) / Tim Carter (SMART Northwest Regional Council)

America's Work Force Union Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2022 54:40


North Carolina AFL-CIO President MaryBe McMillan spoke to the AWF Union Podcast today about a major union victory by nurses at Mission Hospital in Asheville, N.C., and a failed attempt by politicians to weaken labor rights in the state.   SMART Northwest Regional Council President Tim Carter was also featured on today's edition of the podcast. He discussed a union-made beer called Local 66 Lager, the region's hot construction market and the need to recruit more apprentices.

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show
Deomcrats and the Supreme Court, Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany and KFI News Reporter and 'Unsolved' Host Steve Gregory

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 49:26


Bill Handel on the Democrats having precedent for a speedy Supreme Court confirmation. Dr. Jim Keany of Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo joins the show for this week's edition of Medical News. And KFI News Reporter and 'Unsolved' host Steve Gregory comes on to talk about what listeners can look forward to hearing on his show this weekend.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 14:08


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany of Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo for this week's edition of Medical News. He and Bill talk about the CDC, COVID-19 and the FDA.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - Democrats and the Supreme Court & Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 29:09


Bill Handel talks about the vacant seat on the Supreme Court now that Justice Breyer has retired and how the Democrats have ground to act quickly. What happens to the millions of electric car batteries when they get old? And Dr. Jim Keany of Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo joins the show for this week's edition of Medical News.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 13:26


Bill Handel hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of Medical News. The two talk about the first case of COVID-19 being reported in the U.S. two years ago today, and what listeners should know about these 'free' at-home COVID tests.

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show
Governor Newsom on the State of Freight Train Thefts, Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany and the 'Ticking Swine Bomb'

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 49:01


Bill Handel talks about Governor Gavin Newsom visiting the site where trash from stolen packages off of freight trains has the area looking 'like a third world country'. Dr. Jim Keany, co-director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, joins the show for some Medical News. And what's being referred to as a 'ticking swine bomb', the population of feral pigs in California has exploded as a new bill seeks to control it.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Non-COVID Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 14:30


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel and hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, for this week's edition of Medical News, where the focus this week is discussing things that are not COVID-related.

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show
California's New Laws Coming 2022, Non-COVID Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany and "Was It 2020 or 2021?"

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 44:44


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel. California has some new laws coming in 2022 and Wayne has a list of them all. And speaking of new laws, 5 things to watch out for in California come 2022 in regards to marijuana. Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo comes on the show for this week's edition of Medical News where he and Wayne talk about things other than COVID. And KFI News Director Chris Little and Technical Director Tyler Whitman square off in a new game show: "Was it 2020 or 2021?"

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - California's New Laws for 2022 and Non-COVID Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 32:11


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel. There's a list of new laws for California in 2022 that's topped with bacon, and 5 things to watch for in California in 2022 when it comes to marijuana. Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo joins Wayne for Non-COVID related Medical News.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany & What The Heck is Tech Tuesday with Steve Greenberg

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 32:28


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel. Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, joins the show to talk about the CDC, COVID and the Omicron variant. And Steve Greenberg, contributor on NBC's Today Show and the host of the YouTube gadget game show "What The Heck Is That?" comes on to give us a different version of Tech Tuesday.

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 14:23


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel and hosts Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo. The CDC has cut the COVID isolation period from 10 days down to 5 while also recommending a shorter quarantine for those effected by COVID. And the Omicron variant has propelled a dramatic spike in COVID cases across California as hospitalizations become overwhelming yet again.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - Republicans Embrace Biden's Stimulus Money and Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 29:28


Bill Handel talks about how Republicans who originally assailed Biden's stimulus embracing the money. Also, retailers say thefts are at a crisis level, but the numbers say otherwise. Dr. Jim Keany of Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo joins the show for this week's edition of Medical News, where he and Bill talk about the Omicron variant and hospitalization.

Compassion & Courage: Conversations in Healthcare
Finding Redemption Within Our Stories

Compassion & Courage: Conversations in Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 18:55


In this episode, Marcus and The Hotness describe how some recent experiences of hearing stories have fed their souls. Yes, there is research that backs up how our compassion deepens when we get to hear the stories of others. As Marcus returns to some in-person speaking engagements, the part of his work he's missed the most is hearing the stories of healthcare professionals. As they chat, Marcus and The Hotness discuss the different ways we can cultivate compassion by simply listening and being open to the life experiences of others.      Key topics:[2:02] Is The Hotness tired of Marcus being home?[4:57] How Marcus' business has shifted in the pandemic[5:18] Marcus' first time being back live with an audience and how they got creative in order to hold the event for their staff[9:07] The three ways that we can generate more compassion[9:50] What Marcus has missed most from live events[10:37] By Marcus sharing his story, it organically opens a door for the audience members to share their stories with him, too[11:40] Finding redemption in our stories[13:56] Trying to teach presence while being virtual[16:16] A big thank you to Mission Hospital for all that they do[17:29] You have the power today to be present for someoneResources for you:Learn more on how Marcus can partner with your organization to help inspire and engage your people: www.MarcusEngel.comConnect with Marcus on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarcusEngelSpeaker/Connect with The Hotness on Facebook: https://bit.ly/FB-MarvelyneConnect with Marcus on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/blindguypictures/Connect with The Hotness on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marvelyneengel/Subscribe to the podcast through Apple: https://bit.ly/MarcusEngelPodcast Date: 11/29/2021Name of show: Compassion & Courage: Conversations in HealthcareEpisode title and number: Episode 17 – Finding Redemption Within Our Stories