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Best podcasts about state farm

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Latest podcast episodes about state farm

Hey Frase Podcast
RHOP Candiace Bassett Dismisses Eddie Osefo Cheating Rumors, Says Co-Star Robyn is a MILLIONAIRE

Hey Frase Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:16


Our girl Candiace Bassett is back on the pod to address ALL THE DRAMA we can expect to see from RHOP Season 6! Is Eddie really cheating on Dr. Wendy? What tf is going on between Candiace and Ashley?? Plus Candiace says Robyn Dixon's hat line made her MILLIONS. RHOP Season 6 premiers Sunday, July 11. Show is sponsored by MiracleCord (https://miraclecord.com/?sscid=61k5_j4jxv&), Jacob from State Farm (jacobsf.com | 571-261-9817), and Ballston BID (grab your #BandsandBrews presale tix from ballstonva.org/bbb).

Sports Daily
The Sports Daily Football Friday Picks of the Week

Sports Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 16:54


Well, no one is over .500... but Bruce, Paul, Jacob, and our pals from State Farm are picking again.  No KU or K-State to bet on this week, but plenty of college football and NFL games to ponder.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Business RadioX ® Network
Darcy Eikenberg With Red Cape Revolution

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


Darcy Eikenberg is a leadership and career coach who's worked with high-performing professionals at The Coca-Cola Company, Microsoft, State Farm, Deloitte, and Hewlett-Packard, among other great companies. She speaks inside organizations and at professional group events on career growth, personal development, and overcoming leadership challenges. Plus, Darcy’s the author of Red Cape Rescue: Save Your […]

Lone Star Lawyers
Monday Mentors with Houston Insurance Litigator Marty Sadler

Lone Star Lawyers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 42:26


Marty Sadler, insurance litigator with Litchfield Cavo in Houston, joins us on today's show! Marty talks about managing up, maintaining your humanity, and the importance of poise in an interview.His firm/practice22 offices across the nationfull service firmHouston office (15 lawyers) mostly does insurance work (he does 1st party and many in his office do third party)Texas lawyers needed for so much of the weather-generated work (hurricanes/hail/wind) that Texas generatesNew Texas Supreme Court opinion in Hinojos (v. State Farm) - related to payment of claims after an appraisal. Used to be that if you paid promptly, you avoided all the statutory delay interest penalties. The SC took that away.COVID update (9/29/21)With 22 offices there are 22 different COVID situations; every office doing their own thingHouston office: people can decide how much they want to work in the office v. at homeMarty has only been back in the office once since March 2020; and that one time was by order of a Federal Judge for a hearing!Very few in-person hearings; no trials since the start of COVIDExpects he will work in a hybrid office format for the rest of his careerWhat have we lost (or will lose) moving more to relationship online v in-person?Advice to lawyers in practiceAttention to detail is the most salient element for success as a young lawyerLearn how to "manage up" in your professional relationshipsDon't just reactCommunicate with your partners as to what your workload is like and ask for the priority order of the projectsTalk to other associates and see how they work with their partners/supervisorsResources:https://www.idealist.org/en/careers/managing-uphttps://www.wsj.com/articles/what-does-it-mean-to-manage-up-11608242276https://www.attorneyatwork.com/managing-up/Push to productHe can't revise a motion that you haven't given him, or that is missing large piecesHe wants to see the work twice: once as a framework of the work early that he can edit, and then a polished form of the product laterPartners may have a different process, so again it is important for you to get to know what each partner you work for expects/requires. Also have to manage the calendar to allow for the entire process to work before filingOn business developmentLearn how to be a lawyer firstYou don't have to be 50 to get your first referral; young lawyers have an opportunity to get cases early in their careersOn work/life balanceYou can always work longer/harder, so you can become consumed in being a lawyerYou have to figure out a way to remember you are a human being firstDon't go home to the family as a lawyerAdvice to Lawyers On The Lateral MarketHe likes to see some judicial intern/clerk experience if you are a new lawyer so you have been in the courtroomWriting samples are helpfulShow poise in the interview; comfortable and confident when things change on themFind ways to talk about what you bring to the firm and how you will help the firmFinal ThoughtsIf you are an associate, the best thing you can do to improve your career is to make yourself indispensable to your partner(s). Will increase your client contact, chances to do depositions, etc.Rapid Fire QuestionsName one trait/characteristic you most want to see in an associate: poiseWhat habit has been key to your success: attention to detailFavorite app/productivity tool: WordWhat would be listed first on the interest line of your resume: bird photographyFavorite legal movie: To Kill A Mockingbird / My Cousin VinnyCHECK OUT HIS BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY!On Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marty-sadler-61094120/detail/recent-activity/Thanks again to Marty Sadler for joining us on today's show!

Roundball Rock
A Complete Breakdown Of Every CP3 State Farm Ad w/ The Ad Wizards Podcast

Roundball Rock

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 91:37


In our final offseason pod of the year, We're joined by Land Smith and Aviva Seigel from the Ad Wizards podcast to talk our favorite subject, The State Farm ads with Chris Paul.Listen to Ad Wizards Here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ad-wizards/id1558231997Buy a T-shirt, Mug, Tote, Sweatshirt, or Covid mask here: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/roundball-rock-the-podcast?ref_id=13068 (Promo code: RoundRockPod for 30% off)SUPPORT: www.patreon.com/roundrockpodTWITTER & IG: @RoundRockPodE-MAIL: RoundRockPod@gmail.comPHONE: 323-682-0342MERCH: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/roundball-rock-the-podcast?ref_id=13068ALBUM: www.roundballrock.bandcamp.comSONG: "Droppin Dimes" by A Soulless Advertising Executive See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sports Daily
The Sports Daily Football Friday Picks of the Week

Sports Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 22:25


Jacob won last week; this week Jacob, Bruce, Coach Savage, and Paul Brucks from State Farm make their picks.  NFL and College Football games on tap... who will come out on top? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #39 “Dom the Hypnotist mental coach of Top NFL players, UFC fighters, and Olympians, speaks at the Tools For A Good Life Summit”.

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 51:28


Dom the Hypnotist crushes at the Tools For A Good Summit!  He will have you break through some of your limiting thoughts and patterns by the end.  And he gives you actionable tools for a healthier mind. Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://aMischa Zn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://aMischa Zn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://aMischa Zn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: 0:00:06.2 Mischa Zvegintzov: Welcome back, everybody, to the Tools For A Good Life Summit. And right now I would like to introduce to you Dom... And I might butcher your last name, so bear with me, Bertoncini.0:00:20.0 Dom Bertoncini: Yeah, you hit it right on the head, I'm surprised.0:00:22.8 Mischa Z: Alright, fantastic. AKA, or also known as, Dom The Hypnotist. And I'm gonna tell the people a little about you real quick.0:00:32.0 Dom the Hypnotist: Cool.0:00:33.0 Mischa Z: Alright, so Dom, you, specialize... You're certified in hypnotherapy, timeline therapy, and neuro-linguistic programming. You specialize in helping people get rid of anxiety, depression, and limiting beliefs, so they can live the life that they want. You have worked with some of the top athletes in the NFL, UFC, and Olympic athletes from all over the world. And a fun fact about Dom, you get randomly referenced by UFC fighters on the Joe Rogan podcast.0:01:11.8 Dom the Hypnotist: Yeah, awesome, thank you. I appreciate that intro. And sometimes people think that I only work with athletes, but I work with everyday people like myself. There's only so many athletes that you're gonna be able to work with, just because there's only... You think about the NFL, there's only a thousand people, and out of those a thousand people... I have a small group of people that I work with it. Same thing in the UFC, there's only 550 people on the roster. So sometimes people think, "Oh, does he only work with athletes?" or whatever. No, I work with everyday people, like I said, like myself, like yourself, so...0:01:49.9 Mischa Z: Yeah. Perfect, thank you for that. I will tell you, as I've been putting together this summit and I was searching madly for a hypnotherapist...0:02:00.0 Dom the Hypnotist: How did you... Did you go on Instagram and you went to the "hypnosis" tag or something? 0:02:04.9 Mischa Z: Yeah, exactly.0:02:05.9 Dom the Hypnotist: Oh, there you go.0:02:06.0 Mischa Z: Exactly. Yes, and yeah it was interesting, I'll tell you, you can find, obviously, a ton of people that way, and what I loved about you and what drew me to you is you seem like a down-to-earth real... Like, "Here's a real... " You present it in real-life terms, which I think is so powerful. Yeah, and then I'll tell you too, I was like... You invite a few people, and I'm like "Gosh I hope Dom says yes", 'cause I like your message, I think...0:02:39.9 Dom the Hypnotist: I think I got an email from you and then I thought it was spam and so I just kind of ignored it, 'cause I get emails like that all the time...0:02:46.1 Mischa Z: Yes.0:02:46.1 Dom the Hypnotist: People asking "Dom do you wanna get your blue check mark? Do you wanna get this or that?" or whatever. So I just kind of ignored it, and then the second email, I don't know what caught my eye but I think it seemed like it wasn't spam, and I kind of read through it like, "Oh, this guy actually looked at my account, it wasn't just a blast email."0:03:05.0 Mischa Z: Yes, yes. Yeah, cool. Tell me, just real quick, at two to three minutes, how did you get involved in hypnotherapy and NLP and all that sort of stuff? 0:03:14.0 Dom the Hypnotist: Yeah, so it was actually completely random. Ever since I was maybe 18-19 I've always been into NLP and Hypnotherapy and everything else, because for about 11 years, from 18-19 to about 31 I had done insurance sales. So in insurance sales, or any sales job, you're always constantly trying to improve your mindset, trying to get better and more effective at what you're doing, and so I had known about it for a very long time. But about...0:03:45.0 Dom the Hypnotist: So I've been doing this a little bit over two years, it's been March 5th, 2019 is when I graduated my first course, but what happened was my mom, she's into personal development, she's pretty successful, she owns an insurance company or an insurance brokerage as well, through State Farm, and so she's always doing personal development, she's always going to seminars and courses and all this. And so she had went to an NLP course and she was telling me about it, and she goes, "Yeah, you learn how to do hypnosis", and this, that, and the other, "And yeah, and it only took two days to learn it." And I was like... I was kind of blown away, 'cause I thought that it was something that it would take months and months and months of training before you could get to hone in your skills, right? 0:04:32.0 Mischa Z: Yes.0:04:32.1 Dom the Hypnotist: So that's why I never really got into, 'cause I was like "I don't have the time to go through all that." So she was telling me about it, I was like, "Wow, that sounds pretty interesting." So, I don't know, a couple of months go by and she ended up surprising me with it as a Christmas gift. So Christmas of 2018 she got me a three-day introductory course. So I was like, "Wow, this is kinda cool." Honestly, best Christmas present I've ever had, to this day. So I went to the course and I had literally zero expectation of doing this for a living.0:05:05.0 Dom the Hypnotist: I was just going to get rid of my own problems I was dealing with and maybe learn like a cool trick or something, you know, "Make yourself sleep!"0:05:12.5 Mischa Z: Yes.0:05:13.8 Dom the Hypnotist: Like you see on YouTube, right? So I had, like I said, zero expectation that I was gonna do this. So I went to the course and I just fell in love with it. I was really good at it, I took to it pretty well. And after that three days I really felt a shift in myself, like I could literally feel just energy coming out of me, like I could put my hands and feel it. And I'd never felt that in my life, I always thought like the chakra stuff and all that BS, I was like "That's fake, that's not real", and then I actually felt it coming out of my chest, I was like "Oh my God... "0:05:51.8 Mischa Z: What? 0:05:52.0 Dom the Hypnotist: What was I holding on to? Like... Jesus. So I thought, I was like, "Man, if I could help people feel like this and I can do this for a living, I would way rather do this than selling insurance." So I had made a goal initially to transition from doing insurance to doing a full-blown hypnotherapy business, and I figured it would take me about six months to build up a clientele and everything else.0:06:19.0 Dom the Hypnotist: So when I got out of that course I literally had zero belief that I could charge for my services, so I had no real confidence. Because when you're in the course you're doing it with people that paid to be there, so it's a little bit easier, right? They're a little bit easier to do the process with, so I thought, "Well. Is this gonna work on people outside of the course?" right? So then I just started offering free 20-30-minute sessions through my Instagram for anybody who was interested. So within the first week I worked with 45-50 people.0:06:55.6 Dom the Hypnotist: Just any free time I had, just back to back to back to back to back. And then the second week was the same thing, so within about two weeks I worked with over 100 people, and they were like... People were promoting it on their Instagram, their Facebook and everything else. So I got to the point where I was like, "Well hey, I have so many people that wanna do this that I have to charge for my services, and I have no time to do insurance", so I remember it was literally two weeks of the day, I woke up, I actually had a full schedule that day, and I called my assistant, I said, "Hey look, call these people and tell them I'm not gonna come to the meeting. I'm done selling insurance, this is it. I'm never selling another insurance policy for the rest of my life." And then two weeks in I stopped, and then now we're here.0:07:44.0 Mischa Z: Wow, Dom, that is amazing. Thank you for that.0:07:46.5 Dom the Hypnotist: Yeah, it was like completely random. I had no... Zero intention. But I'm so thankful and grateful for my mom for doing that, 'cause had she not, who knows? I'd probably still be selling insurance, hating my life, looking for something else that's more fulfilling, and I was one of the lucky ones I guess.0:08:06.9 Mischa Z: Yeah. You know, what I love about that story too is, well, the serendipitous nature of it, obviously, is great, but clearly the tool itself in action. So...0:08:17.2 Dom the Hypnotist: Yeah. That's the main thing. Taking action? 0:08:20.6 Mischa Z: No, yeah, taking action and also the tool itself, like that tool, the gift, the serendipitous events of your mother giving you that for a gift, right? 0:08:32.5 Dom the Hypnotist: Right.0:08:33.0 Mischa Z: And then you dove in and then you do it, and then to take the action that the tool inspired in you. Right? 0:08:43.2 Dom the Hypnotist: Yeah totally. Yeah, I just became obsessed, man. I was just like... It was all I thought about. And I'm still obsessed, but you know that... It's like that new car smell or the new car you buy, for the first couple of weeks you're like, "Oh my God!" you know? 0:08:58.9 Mischa Z: Yes. And it was just so exciting. So, yeah I really... I always tell people there's the three best decisions I ever made in my life: Number one, having my daughter, number two, starting my hypnotherapy business, and number three moving to Las Vegas. So yeah, it's been great. It's been truly life-changing.0:09:21.0 Mischa Z: That's amazing. I'm just taking note on that: Your daughter, starting your hypnotherapy business, and then moving to Las Vegas.0:09:33.1 Dom the Hypnotist: It used to be, before that, it was "Man, the best decision I ever made in my life was getting out of California and moving to Las Vegas." [chuckle] But then when I had my daughter and then, you know, so it is...0:09:42.1 Mischa Z: Yes, yes, kids are amazing, we're gonna save that for the bonus round. Yeah, I have two sons, 18 and 20, at the time of this, and they are just... It's an amazing, amazing experience. Big gifts too. Alright, so let's get to the meat of the matter. I'm gonna give you a scenario and then I'm gonna ask you a question. Okay? 0:10:07.9 Dom the Hypnotist: Let's do it.0:10:08.7 Mischa Z: Alright, fantastic. So, given this scenario, think of life as a three-legged stool of relationships, finances and health. And now think of someone who was or is successful and has had two of those legs fall out from under them. So this could be a combination of divorce, career upheaval, financial stress, these kids that we're talking about, kids acting out and not going the direction we want them to. There could be physical health challenges for themselves or for a loved one, maybe a death in the family or continued failed relationships.0:10:50.0 Mischa Z: And for me it was I went through a heavy divorce, both my parents died in rapid succession, within two weeks of each other, this was all going down. My career went... This was about 10 years ago, my career went into upheaval and financial distress, and up until that point my "pull myself up from my bootstraps" mentality, that "fix-it" mentality had worked, right? But then all of a sudden I needed new tools, and it was clear. Like working my way through it, like more success, more money, more toys, was not gonna solve the problem, so I needed new tools. So my question to you is, thinking of hypnotherapy as a tool, what are the exact next steps you would offer someone like me who's in that situation so that I know I'm headed in the new right direction, that I'll have positive momentum towards getting my life back on track? 0:11:57.5 Dom the Hypnotist: Good, so it's actually funny you say that, 'cause those are the three main areas that we help people with: Health, career relationships. And usually, for the most part, when people come to us, one of the areas is good but the other two are out of whack, everything's out of balance. So there's a couple of things. One is we have to figure out why this is happening, because we are all the creators of our reality, and once we understand that then we can take back the power and begin to change.0:12:32.0 Dom the Hypnotist: One thing that you find, especially in relationship stuff, is people always wanna blame the other person for why their life is the way that they are, right? So I'll give you a prime example, one of my clients... So I know this isn't a hypnotherapy thing, but you have to understand this concept first before the hypnotherapy will work. Because if you don't understand this concept, I could do this, I could hypnotize you every single day for the rest your life and nothing will work. So you have to understand this concept of cause and effect.0:13:04.1 Dom the Hypnotist: So, a client of mine, she was telling me about how her ex was so manipulative and "He's this and he's that", and blah, blah, blah, blah. Which we've all been there before. And I stopped her and I explained to her the concept of cause and effect, and you probably know what it is but for the people who don't know, I'm just gonna explain.0:13:29.0 Mischa Z: When things happen in life we are either at cause, in other words, we take responsibility for everything that happens to us in our life. Whether it's this guy just crashed into me, rather than blaming that person, we take the responsibility, Okay, what did I do? Or What am I not doing? Or what's going on in my mind, that is creating this reality around me, what is causing this to happen? So, you're either gonna take responsibility or you're at the effect. And we're at the effect of something, it's always something outside of us. It's her, it's him. It's my boss. It's this guy, it's... It's whatever, right? So there's a problem when you're at the effect of something is you give up your power to that person or to that situation, because if it's like, Oh well, it's him doing it to me, essentially what you're saying is that that person controls you and control your life, and has the power over you. So what we have to do, no matter what it is, I don't care if you caught your wife cheating on you, if... Like I said, somebody crashed in your car, your boss fired you. I don't care how bad it is.0:14:38.7 Dom the Hypnotist: You have to take responsibility and go, okay, it's not their fault, it's my fault, yes, they did that. But what am I doing or what am I not doing that's allowing this to happen? What am I doing or not doing that's allowing people to treat me this way, right? So going back to my client, I explained this concept, but I said, "Look, he's so manipulative and all this stuff," and I said, "Is it that he's a good manipulator, or are you allowing him to manipulate you?" And it was like a light bulb went off in her head and she was like," Well... " and I said, "Well, think about this for a second.0:15:16.0 Dom the Hypnotist: Do you think your ex, boyfriend or fiance is a good manipulator? Let's say I took him and I put him with a high, high level manipulator," let's think about the general of an army is somebody whose job is to do manipulation, now, manipulation isn't always... Isn't always a bad thing? It's just... Manipulation is good or bad, right? Your heart manipulates body to perform better. So I said, "If we took him and we put him with this guy... Is he a good manipulator?" And she was like, "Yeah, yeah, I guess, you're right?" I said, "Yeah, so it's not that he's a good manipulator, you're allowing him to manipulate you, and once you realize that and you go, oh, okay. It's me that's doing it. So what am I doing or what am I not doing that's allowing him to treat me that way?" The same thing with bullies.0:16:08.0 Mischa Z: Yes.0:16:08.6 Dom the Hypnotist: People always wanna blame the bully, blame the bully, blame the bully and... Yes, I understand that, but when you take your focus off the other person. You go okay, what am I doing or not doing well? Okay, well, my body language is communicating certain things, my tonality is communicating certain things, the way that I walk, everything is communicating to this person that they can treat me this way. Now, once you realize that you go, Okay, what can I do to fix that? Well, I can do some speaking classes...0:16:35.9 Mischa Z: Can I ask you a question? 0:16:37.3 Dom the Hypnotist: Yeah, yeah, yeah.0:16:38.9 Mischa Z: So would you suggest like anybody listening, and we said, Hey, for this step number one, figure out why this is happening, and we want you to understand that you're... The effect is not them it needs to be you... Would you suggest like... Yeah, would you suggest like writing an inventory for that or write down what's that...0:17:07.5 Mischa Z: What do you mean? Which part? Write down, which part? 0:17:10.2 Dom the Hypnotist: For example, if your client, for example, they said, "I am being manipulated." So you would say, How could you help somebody, like somebody who's listening and they're going all right, I'm ready to take accountability...0:17:27.5 Dom the Hypnotist: Right, right, right.0:17:28.3 Mischa Z: Literally, how could you help them take accountability? Reframe that statement, write down what you think the problem is, my ex is a son of a bitch, why don't you reframe that or...0:17:44.4 Dom the Hypnotist: I would reframe that as, "Sorry your ex is a son of a bitch, maybe you have low standards... " right? It's true. My boss is treating me this way, well, maybe you just don't have a backbone. So again, there's no real exercise that I do with people, but when I explain this concept, people get it, they go.0:18:08.8 Mischa Z: Love it.0:18:09.5 Dom the Hypnotist: Right, yeah. I can't sit here and complain about the bully and be, it's him, it's a bully about... No, it's not, it's you... Because again, if you spoke a certain way, if you had a certain belief system about yourself, if you pick martial arts or whatever, nobody's gonna mess with you, you don't even have to say it, people just know they pick up telepathically or unconsciously they know, don't mess with that guy, right don't treat this person that way. So that's the first thing, because again if people are always blaming others and they don't take responsibility they're powerless. The other thing that's important going back to these different areas. So we all have what are called limiting beliefs and limiting decisions, so limiting belief is just a belief that we have that limits us being able to create a certain reality for ourselves. So I'll give you an example of limiting beliefs that I used to have... I used to have the belief that every time something is going good, that something bad is gonna happen, right? And a lot of people have this belief.0:19:25.5 Mischa Z: Waiting for the other shoe to drop.0:19:27.8 Dom the Hypnotist: Like, Oh, shoot, man it's getting too good. What's gonna happen? It's going to... Around the corner. Well, here's the thing, if you have that belief that therefore becomes your reality. So we will unconsciously for the most part, which means we're not aware of it, match our outside reality to match that belief. So once we get to that point, we'll self-sabotage, we'll do all these things so that we basically confirm that it's true. So when I real, I didn't even know I had that belief 'til I was 31 right, when I went through this process of... So once I realized I had it we go back, we find out what it is, So for me, what it was, you know my parents had been there like 15 and 17, they weren't, they didn't stay together, so you know, I would split time between my parents and so my mom when she was 18, she actually joined the military.0:20:19.2 Mischa Z: Okay.0:20:19.8 Dom the Hypnotist: And so by that time I was two, three years old, and when she joined the military, if you're not married, you can't live with your parent, right, so you somebody else has to watch you or whatever, if you're a single mother. I don't know if it's the same for single father... Yeah, maybe it's changed but this is 30 years ago, whatever.0:20:36.2 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:20:36.7 Dom the Hypnotist: So she ended up going off to boot camp, the whole thing, and I don't know, a year into it or whatever, she ended up meeting my stepdad and they got married. So when I was about three or four years old, when I was living with my family, splitting time between my grandparents and my dad's and all that, everything was going good, and then my mom got married, so then boom, I get shipped off and then I move across the country to Maryland right. Then we're in Maryland for a year or two. And you know, if you know anybody in the military, they move around all the time. So after about a year or two, once I'm settled in, I've got my new little friends in preschool and all that... Boom, Now we moved to Hawaii, and then we're in Hawaii for about four or five years. Everything's going good again. You know, I'm really doing excelling in sports, I have a bunch of friends, the whole thing, and then when I was about 10 years old, we had to move to Washington, and then we lived in Washington for two years. You get the point.0:21:30.5 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:21:30.5 Dom the Hypnotist: So, as subconsciously, as a survival mechanism, I developed a belief like, Hey, don't get too settled in, don't get too excited because everytime you do, something bad happens and you know, moving for a kid is a pretty traumatic experience.0:21:46.7 Mischa Z: It is.0:21:47.2 Dom the Hypnotist: You're the new kid at school. You always got a freaking like prove yourself, you gotta worry about people picking on you, the whole thing, so as a survival tool, my subconscious or unconscious mind created that belief system, so then throughout my entire life, because I had that belief, it manifested itself over and over again, right so when my relationships were really good, that would go bad or my friendships were really good, they would go bad, when I was working out and I was in great shape in the gym, everything, I would get an injury, when I was doing really well financially, I would somehow self-sabotage and put myself, you get it? So now, that I've gotten rid of that belief and I realize, Look, when things are going good, they continue to get better. And that's what happens, yeah, there's little blips and there's little days where you don't want, and things don't always go my way, but instead of it, my life being like this, it's more like this.0:22:43.8 Mischa Z: Love that.0:22:44.2 Dom the Hypnotist: You get little, little tiny bliss, but it's always consistently getting better.0:22:48.7 Mischa Z: Love it, yes.0:22:49.5 Dom the Hypnotist: So we gotta go through, limiting beliefs, and then the last thing is going through and figuring out something that's called getting rid of what we would call your negative motivation, or in other words your pain motivator, so when we're motivated in life, we are either motivated to avoid pain or we are motivated towards pleasure. Okay, so the thing with pain motivation is, it's very, very powerful right, we've all been there before, or you're super broke and you got two pennies are up together... You're pretty freaking motivated to get out of that situation, right because like, Oh my God, it's so painful, I gotta get out of it.[chuckle]0:23:31.8 Mischa Z: Necessity is the mother of invention.0:23:33.6 Dom the Hypnotist: Yeah, exactly, it's like Okay, I have to do it.0:23:36.5 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:23:36.8 Dom the Hypnotist: Well when we're in that point, you know, here's the pain, here's being broke or out of shape, or I just had a heart attack, or I just had to break up or whatever, we feel that pain. Boom! The motivation kicks in. But then what happens as soon as we're not really feeling that pain point anymore, what happens to that motivation...0:23:54.3 Mischa Z: Right it tapers off, or it's that whole.0:23:56.9 Dom the Hypnotist: We procrastinate, we make excuses, we self-sabotage, we don't show up on time, we do it, and then all the way back down where you feel that pain again and then... Boom. The motivation kicks in. So pain, motivation causes very inconsistent results, so now, pleasure motivation, which is the opposite of that, instead of focusing on what you want to... On what you want to avoid, we focus on what you want to go towards the pleasure that you wanna experience, so for example, going back to finances rather than thinking yourself, Man, I don't wanna be broke, I don't wanna be stressed out about money, I don't wanna worry about money, I don't want to... Whatever. Now you're thinking, because, here's the thing, do people not wanna be broke, no, that's not what they actually want. What they want is to have financial success or abundance or freedom or whatever it is. So once we can hyper-focus on what it is you actually want, then that over time and patience, that's, that becomes our new reality, so now what happens is, it's a little bit easier said than done.0:25:04.3 Dom the Hypnotist: We all know that, like or not everybody, but a lot of people know that. But what's happening that even though we know that, we keep going back to the pay motivators. Well, what happens... When we go through our life, you know our subconscious mind, its number one objective is protection, is survival, above everything else. So when we go through life and we experience, "negative events" and I put that in quotes because there's no such thing as a negative event, there's no such thing as a positive event, all events in life are neutral, the only thing that gives it a negative or positive is the perception of the person who's observing the event, so.0:25:40.8 Mischa Z: Love that.0:25:41.2 Dom the Hypnotist: When we "go through negative experiences" our subconscious mind will hold on to that experience because it thinks it's protecting us Right. So going to the finances, if you grew up broke, if your parents struggled with money, if you lived in a cockroach infested apartment, if you lived in a bad neighborhood, if... You know, when you're 18 years old, you got yourself into credit card debt, all these things that build up, build up, build up, will, when we're trying to focus on pulling ourselves out of that, we're like, okay, focus on the financial freedom, focus on abundance, focus on this, in the back of our head or sub-conscious is like yeah, but remember that one time? This happened, remember when you grew up. And this happened.0:26:23.4 Dom the Hypnotist: What we have to do is we have to go back and we have to resolve all the "negative events" that we're holding on to subconsciously, and then once you resolve it and our subconscious goes, "Oh, that wasn't a negative event, it was actually a positive experience that's helping me in my life." Then you just clean all that stuff out, and now when you start to focus on your future abundance, creating success, everything else, then it's much, much easier because you've resolved all that stuff. Does that make sense? 0:26:51.1 Mischa Z: It does. It makes absolute sense.0:26:53.2 Dom the Hypnotist: And the other thing is, we get what we focus on. So if we focus on what we don't want, that's exactly what we get. We've all heard, don't look at the color black, don't see the color black, don't notice it... And then black is everywhere, right? So maybe it's I don't wanna be broke, I don't wanna be stressed, I don't wanna be worried. Your reticular activating system going, "Alright, Dom wants to be broke, he wants to be stressed, he wants to be worried," and then we'll self-sabotage, so... And it's the same thing in relationships, it's the same thing with health. So that's what I would tell people if they are struggling in those lives, number one, take back responsibility, find out what your limiting beliefs are, get rid of them, and then get rid of that pain motivation, so you can make the things in your life happen at a rapid pace.0:27:34.6 Mischa Z: That's beautiful, that's beautiful. When you're doing your work with a client and they roll in and they're open-minded, how... I guess then you would start implementing the hypnotherapy techniques that you use, what's the arc of change of... I'm not sure if I'm asking this right, but how soon could somebody feel better? And I'm not saying they have to have riches or a new relationship or be back in fighting shape, but perhaps they get that relief or that assurance that, yeah, I'm heading in the right direction.0:28:20.9 Dom the Hypnotist: I tell people all the time, I'm a hypnotist, I'm not a magician. So I can only facilitate, I can't magically make you rich, I can't magically... You have to meet me halfway. So when I work with clients, I give them certain homework assignments, things to do, because it's a do-with process, it's not just, I'm gonna lay here and do all this and then magically in a month from now, I'm gonna win a million dollars in a lottery. Okay. Yeah, maybe that can happen, totally, but we're gonna be realistic. So to answer your question right away, so when people... Number one, many of us have beliefs that we're unconscious to, right? We're not aware of it. Like I told you, I had the belief that every time something's going good, something's going bad, or something bad is gonna happen. I didn't know that until I was 31. So when you become conscious of the limiting beliefs and things that you have that are going on, that in and of itself, just becoming aware of it, will start to release those limiting beliefs, right? 0:29:21.5 Dom the Hypnotist: So I have a client recently, we did our first session, and her whole thing was like, she made great money, but somehow she would always give it back, always give it back, always give it back. And what it was... And she wasn't aware of this when we brought it to her conscious what it was, is that throughout her life, her dad basically was always like her hero, right? He would always come and save the day ever since she was a kid, and then throughout high school her car would break down, dad's there to fix it. This happened and dad's got the money. So unconsciously, she was doing that, basically self-sabotaging her life so that her dad can come and save her, because she wanted to fill that from her dad, and then she knows that her dad wants to feel that... Wants to be that hero.0:30:11.8 Mischa Z: Yeah, he wants to be the hero.0:30:13.2 Dom the Hypnotist: Exactly, and it was so funny when she was telling me that I'm getting... I don't know why I'm getting the chills talking about this, but it's just... It's just funny, I'm thinking about my daughter. But it's so funny because that's how dads are, that's kind of like what we do. And I was watching a movie a week before that, and in the movie, everything starts going bad with the family and the dad, the daughter was not really connecting with the dad, and she's like, "Yeah, whatever, dad." That kind of attitude. And then when the family got into a sticky situation, the dad was like, "I've been waiting for this moment in my entire life," and I was like, I know what you mean. Sometimes I wish somebody would do something so I can be the hero. So it's like, once she became aware of that, all of a sudden she's like, "Oh, I'm doing this little dance with my dad, and it's how we filled our relationship and it's not necessary." And then within that moment, now that she's aware of it, when she starts to do it again, she go, "No, no, no, this is not right. This is only enabling me to continue to self-sabotage, so I have to stop, set up boundaries," that's another thing, setting up boundaries between you and others and yourself. And so yeah, so right away, that was our...0:31:24.6 Mischa Z: That's beautiful.0:31:26.1 Dom the Hypnotist: Our second session is next week, but yeah, she literally... And she's like, "I can't believe what just came to mind. I never would have thought," and there were some other stuff in there as well. But yeah, one session right away.0:31:39.5 Mischa Z: Beautiful, thank you so much for that. I have a question for you. You said homework assignments, why don't you go down your top three or four homework assignments that you have people do, if you'd be willing to do that. Yeah.0:31:53.5 Dom the Hypnotist: Some homework assignments are gonna be specific to that person, so for example, her, she's unconsciously spending money, spending money, spending money, so we have to have her track her finances, what is she spending on a daily basis? If somebody is overweight, they're unconscious to how many calories they're consuming on a daily basis, so we have to get them to track their calories so they can be aware of it consciously, right? 'Cause if you don't know how many calories you're eating, you're at 3000-4000 for the day, you have no clue. But when you track it and you're at 2000, you go, "Oh, shoot, do I really wanna eat this extra, whatever?" And then you're probably gonna know it's not... And then it'll be... It'll go away. So a lot of it is tailored to specific people, but then there are certain things that I'll have everybody do. So one thing is making a list of everything that you don't want in your life. I don't wanna have anxiety. I don't wanna...0:32:44.6 Dom the Hypnotist: I don't wanna feel depressed anymore, I don't want to be broke, I don't wanna be alone. I don't want whatever. Everything you can imagine that is in your mind that you don't want. Okay? So the purpose of writing that down is because... So there's the four stages of learning. The first stage of learning is what we call unconscious incompetence. So unconscious means we're not aware, and incompetence, we're doing something wrong. So most of the time, like I said, every time something's going good, something's going bad, I was unconscious incompetent. I had no idea that that was a belief that I had.0:33:21.5 Mischa Z: Ignorant. We're just ignorant to it.0:33:23.0 Dom the Hypnotist: 'Cause we're ignorant to it. So once you write it on paper and you sit there and you think, and you really put your mind into it, certain things will be like, "Okay, these are obvious." But then other things will pop up like, Oh, I wouldn't realize I was thinking about that. Okay, good.0:33:37.7 Mischa Z: So good.0:33:39.1 Dom the Hypnotist: Then what we do... So once you do that, you graduate to the second stage of learning, which is conscious competence... Sorry, conscious incompetence. So now you're still doing it wrong, but you're aware of what you're doing wrong, so you can at least identify it.0:33:57.7 Mischa Z: I love it.0:33:58.3 Dom the Hypnotist: So that's... When we write it down, we go, Okay, this is what I'm doing wrong. Then what I have them do is I'll take that piece of paper and I have them write down what it is that they actually want instead. Okay. And I remind them in a specific way. Now, the reason we're doing this going back to the pain, motivation, pleasure, is because again, somebody doesn't actually not want anxiety. What do they want? They wanna feel calm, they wanna feel at peace, they wanna feel confident, they wanna believe in themselves, they wanna... Whatever. So those are two different pictures in our mind. When you're thinking about, I don't want anxiety, when you think about I don't want anxiety, you feel anxious.0:34:38.7 Dom the Hypnotist: But when you think about, Okay, I wanna feel confident and secure and calm or whatever, you get a completely different picture, and then thoughts create pictures in our mind, those pictures create feelings in our body and then we act based off those feelings. So if we're always thinking, I don't want anxiety, I don't want anxiety, I don't want anxiety, our pictures in our mind is anxiety, anxiety, anxiety. We feel anxious and we act anxious. But if it's calm, confident, whatever, it creates a different picture. So I have them flip it. So then by doing that, they graduate to the third stage of learning, which is conscious competence. So they're... Competence means they're doing it right, but they have to make a conscious effort. They have to... Oh wait, I'm having that negative thought, switch it to this.0:35:24.8 Mischa Z: Love it.0:35:25.7 Dom the Hypnotist: And then what will happen is through the process of doing the work that we do, releasing negative emotions, beliefs, all this other stuff, is they will graduate to the fourth stage of learning, which is unconscious competence, which means you're doing it correctly and you don't even know you're doing it correctly.0:35:41.9 Dom the Hypnotist: We've all done this before. The first time you learn how to drive, you don't know what... You're using two feet, you're all jacked up, you don't even know you're doing it wrong. And then your dad goes, Hey, it's one foot dude. Take it off the gas. So then the next time you go to do it, you're like, Oh, wait a minute. And then you make that conscious effort like, "Wait, take my foot off. Okay. Press the gas, press the break." And then after doing it for a little while, we're freaking talking on the phone, typing in our GPS, driving on the freeway, doing all this crazy stuff, and we're just unconsciously competent. So that's the level that we get to, is having it to where their brain is just programmed to automatically visualize and to think about what it is they want, the pleasure motivation instead. Now, there's something really important, and this may help a lot of people because we've all done affirmations before or tried it or heard about it.0:36:38.0 Dom the Hypnotist: But how many times do those affirmations come true. Not a lot. Okay. And there's a couple of reasons why. Number one is, most of the time, sometimes you'll hear like a 30-year guru who's been in the personal development space for a really long time, and they're very, very successful and they've done it, they have proof, track record, the whole thing. And they'll say, "Okay, you just have to write down: I am a millionaire every day." Until it comes true. The problem with that is that when we affirm things that aren't true, our subconscious mind will not take it on as a suggestion. So if I just sit here, watch... We'll do it together, Mischa. Close your eyes.0:37:27.0 Mischa Z: Okay.0:37:28.9 Dom the Hypnotist: Say what's... Well, let's say, I don't know, maybe you are worth this kind of money, I don't know. But let's say in your head, I'm worth $10 million.0:37:38.8 Mischa Z: Okay.0:37:39.5 Dom the Hypnotist: Okay. Now, what does that little voice in your head tell you? 0:37:43.5 Mischa Z: Yeah, right. [laughter]0:37:44.1 Dom the Hypnotist: Yeah, right. Exactly. So imagine every day you're writing, you're affirming something that isn't true, isn't true, isn't true, isn't true, your subconscious is rejecting it. It's actually causing more harm than good, because here's what happens. Imagine you're in a relationship with somebody, and all they did was lie to you every day. Well, eventually you're gonna stop believing the things that they say and you're gonna have distrust. So our conscious mind is like the father, the mother, the parent, and our subconscious mind is like the child. Most of us don't realize that our subconscious is in the background, it's operating on its own. So if you're constantly lying to your child, your child is like, "Hey man, I don't believe anything you're saying." So when you create that distrust, it actually has the opposite effect. Now, what we wanna do, again, as a parent, we wanna build trust between our children so that our children will trust us and believe the things that we say. So when we affirm things, we have to affirm things that are actually true. So close your eyes again. Now, I don't know, I don't know, what's a financial goal that you have that you haven't achieved yet, that you want. Let's say a million dollars, 10 million, whatever.0:38:57.3 Mischa Z: Yeah. Okay. Let's say, let's say liquid for $2 million.0:39:01.5 Dom the Hypnotist: Perfect. So I want you to say, I am focused on being... Creating $2 million in liquid assets.0:39:11.6 Mischa Z: I am focused on...0:39:14.2 Dom the Hypnotist: Creating $2 million in liquid assets.0:39:16.4 Mischa Z: Good. I am focused on creating $2 million in liquid assets.0:39:20.7 Dom the Hypnotist: Perfect. Now, what does that little voice tell you and how does it feel now? 0:39:24.4 Mischa Z: Yeah, feels good. I'm like, "Heck, yeah. Let's get this done."0:39:28.0 Dom the Hypnotist: Right. Yeah. You feel it, you...0:39:29.9 Mischa Z: Yeah. Dude, literally, my house just got lighter. I'm like...0:39:35.4 Dom the Hypnotist: Yeah, you're like... Because now it's true. You are focused on creating that and you don't have it now, and that's okay, but now your subconscious goes, "Okay, that's what we're focused on? We're focused on creating two million dollars?" I don't care if you have two dollars in your bank account or 200000. If you are at that whatever level that is true, so then once it's true, your subconscious will take it on as a suggestion. And once it takes on as a suggestion, it will allow you to start to manifest that into your reality. But again, going back to the guru, sometimes they're so far removed from where they were 30 years ago that they forget... Yeah, they did want this to come true, but they were more focused on the realistic steps to get there, right? 0:40:18.4 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah.0:40:19.9 Dom the Hypnotist: And that's another major thing with the homework, to answer your question, to circle back, so when I have them write that, I don't have them say I want this because they're in the feeling, in the space of wanting. We don't wanna necessarily want something because that doesn't necessarily mean you're gonna get it. But if I tell them I am focused on creating or becoming. Now it's more of, "Okay, I don't have that but I'm making it happen." I'm in the process of doing it as opposed to, I want this, right? It's a different frame of mind.0:40:54.1 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:40:54.4 Dom the Hypnotist: So let's say... So that's another thing and then the other thing is, if there is anything I can go back and tell my younger self, this would probably be it, is to create realistic goals that you can achieve, small, little achievable steps that you can build on because...0:41:12.2 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:41:14.0 Dom the Hypnotist: Again, you hear somebody say, "Oh, just think big and be worth 100 million or a billion." And then what would most of us do? We think about that and we go, "That'll never happen. That seems impossible. What if this happens? What if I get sued? What if this... What about if I have a problem with the police? How am I gonna get insured? And then we go, "Forget it. I don't wanna do it." Right? So it's kind of like this, Why can't you Mischa and when I say Mischa, I want you to build me a... I don't know, maybe you could do this but let's just assume you can't. I want you to build me a...0:41:41.9 Mischa Z: We'll find out.0:41:43.8 Dom the Hypnotist: Right? 0:41:47.7 Mischa Z: Okay.0:41:48.3 Dom the Hypnotist: How overwhelmed would you be at the thought of building a house? 0:41:49.6 Mischa Z: Yeah, it would be fairly overwhelming, for sure.0:41:51.9 Dom the Hypnotist: It'll be very overwhelming. And even if I said, "Look, Mischa it's a two million-dollar, 3 million-dollar house, you can have it free and clear, you just gotta figure out how to build it."0:42:00.5 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:42:01.3 Dom the Hypnotist: It would still be like, "Yeah, that sounds great but I don't know where to start." Right? 0:42:04.7 Mischa Z: Yeah. Yes. Ironically, I do have some experience and I could probably make it happen. But anyway, I get it. I get it, I'm sorry. No, I know.0:42:18.1 Dom the Hypnotist: What's that? 0:42:19.8 Mischa Z: I said, "I don't know." I just... It was funny, I thought I would cope to that. But go on, yes.0:42:25.8 Dom the Hypnotist: So, well what's the first thing you do before you build a house? You don't build the house. What do you do before that? Well, first you gotta find the piece of land that you're gonna build it on, right? And then you gotta get plans. You gotta do all that, but let's assume you have the plans all figured out. The first thing is I gotta go check this piece of land. I just gotta get the weeds and the trash and the grass, anything. I gotta get it cleaned out, right? That's the first step. Now, most people go, "Yeah, I could do that. That seems pretty easy. How hard can that be? I'm just cleaning it up." Right? 0:42:57.6 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:42:58.4 Dom the Hypnotist: Okay, cool. Now we gotta figure out how to flatten it out and some people might think, "Oh my God, I don't know how would I do that?" Think about it. If you had a 10 x 10 foot piece of land like the size of a small room...0:43:10.0 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:43:10.5 Dom the Hypnotist: You could figure out how to make that thing level. So if you could figure that out, you just duplicate your efforts.0:43:15.7 Mischa Z: Love it.0:43:16.4 Dom the Hypnotist: And go through the whole process, right? And then...0:43:17.4 Mischa Z: So good.0:43:17.4 Dom the Hypnotist: Step by step by step, you'd get there.0:43:21.2 Mischa Z: It's beautiful.0:43:21.9 Dom the Hypnotist: But what most people do is they put 90% of their attention on the house and 10% or zero on the what's the next step.0:43:32.5 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:43:32.9 Dom the Hypnotist: But really what we wanna do is we wanna flip it. So 10%, 'cause you still wanna have an idea of where you're going and what...0:43:40.8 Mischa Z: Yeah, the vision.0:43:41.7 Dom the Hypnotist: Yeah, the you wanna have the vision so 10, 20% goes on the house, and the other 80, 90% is what's the next step. What's the next step? 0:43:49.3 Mischa Z: It's beautiful.0:43:49.9 Dom the Hypnotist: What's the next step? 0:43:50.8 Mischa Z: It's beautiful.0:43:53.5 Dom the Hypnotist: So most people, when they come to me, they just have unrealistic expectations. I wanna lose 60 pounds. When's the last time you lost five pounds? [laughter]0:44:00.1 Dom the Hypnotist: Okay, so let's get to five pounds. Okay, cool. Then they get excited like, "Yeah, I could lose five pounds in two weeks. Cool." Then they do that, Okay, listen to... And then through time and patience and breaking it down before you know it, they're 60 pounds lighter and they're in the best shape of their life, right? So same thing financially. Rather than the 2 million, it's like, "Okay, I gotta save up. How do I get to 10 thousand, 20 thousand, 30, 50, 100, right? 0:44:22.9 Mischa Z: Yeah. It's beautiful. Dom, so so so good. Thank you for the last nuggets there. I'm gonna cut us off here really quick, and I think you've just over-delivered in such a massive way, so thank you, and thank you for... That little visualization was so good.0:44:44.9 Dom the Hypnotist: I am focused on creating today, yeah.0:44:46.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, it's beautiful. And so, audience here everyone who's listening and partaking, if this interview with Dom was fantastic and you wanna get even more content from Dom, upgrade to the all X all access pass for that bonus interview. And any final thoughts that we did not get a chance to cover, Dom? 0:45:13.1 Dom the Hypnotist: I mean, if you're thinking about signing up for this program or doing any personal development, this is what I always tell people, "Look, if you're on the fence"... I don't know how much it is or whatever, but if you're on the fence about it, I always think, "Okay, what's the worse gonna happen? You're gonna sign up for this plan and then maybe you don't really get much out of it. But on the upside potential, if you even just get one little nugget out of whatever, the VIP training and program...0:45:39.3 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:45:40.8 Dom the Hypnotist: Now, I know even one nugget, maybe certain people buy with this, certain people don't, and there's gonna be that person or those people they go, "Oh yeah, I have that same stupid belief, oh my God." Or "I've been thinking about doing too big too soon, and I gotta bring it." So even just one nugget, was worth whatever the cost of the VIP training is. So if you're on the fence about it, just freaking do it and I know it will be worth it.0:46:07.9 Mischa Z: I love that. Thank you so much for that Dom. And again, they can... Or not again, everybody can find you at domthehypnotist.com, and they can actually...0:46:23.1 Dom the Hypnotist: Go to... It's better if you find me on Instagram or YouTube. Those are the two main platforms that I interface with people with.0:46:28.1 Mischa Z: Okay.0:46:30.3 Dom the Hypnotist: So yeah, if you wanna go on there and then... Are you talking about to do a consultation, is that...0:46:33.5 Mischa Z: Yes, so I was just gonna say for a consultation, they can get a free consultation so go ahead and tell them where they can do that.0:46:38.6 Dom the Hypnotist: Yeah, yeah. So if you go on to my YouTube or on my Instagram, and I don't know if you're gonna have a link, I can send you the link to schedule a consultation, but if any of this stuff kind of buy with you and you thought like, "Okay, yeah." There are certain things that I don't help people with 'cause I don't feel I'm the best person for it, and a lot of times I have to turn people... I turn more people away than I accept just because I can't help everybody with every problem, right? So I don't feel like if somebody has a drinking problem... And it's not that I don't wanna help them, it's just that I've never experienced that, and so I don't know what it's like, so I really can't connect on that level. I'm not confident in myself that I could help somebody quit drinking. So quit drinking, quit smoking, things like that, it's not really my thing. But again, the relationship stuff, the health stuff, the career stuff, if that is something, fill out the... Click the link I'll share it with you... Fill out the form. If it's something we feel like we can help you with, that we can honestly and truly help you improve on, then we'll schedule a consultation with someone from my team and they go through and see if we'd be a good fit.0:47:42.2 Mischa Z: Perfect, perfect. Fantastic. And the link is next to this interview, so anybody watching, please click on the link. Get your free consultation, and then, where was I here? Yes, click the button on this page to get unlimited access to all of these interviews and the all X all access pass, so I'm gonna end right now and then we'll get started on our next session.0:48:12.3 Dom the Hypnotist: Okay, cool.

The Coaching Show
The Million Dollar Mind Reader with Jonathan Pritchard

The Coaching Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 62:30


Jonathan Pritchard is a highly sought-after consultant and speaker specializing in the area of applied psychology in life and business. His client list includes Fortune 500 companies like BP, State Farm, United Airlines, and more. He is the founder of the international consulting company "The Hellstrom Group" which has trained teams to improve their sales, negotiation, and presentation skills on six of the seven continents. His expertise comes from his background traveling the world as a Mentalist, a unique type of entertainer specializing in mind reading tricks. The applied psychology he uses on stage in Vegas, on TV, and online gives him an edge off stage as well. He is the author of several books focused on psychology, motivation, self-improvement, and more. Join his membership group at ELITE.University. He currently lives in Asheville where you can find him practicing Wing Chun Kung Fu every morning. Notes: Social dynamics and societal rituals  Permission to be wacky Becoming a Professional Mind Reader The Flaws in motivational speaking Perception and Awareness Programing Your Mind to see what you want vs what it would see on autopilot America's Got Talent Experience

Hey Frase Podcast
#676  Review: Welcome To Plathville Season 3, Olivia Moves Out

Hey Frase Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 19:59


You all have been asking for my thoughts on TlC's Welcome To Plathville Season 3, so here it is. There's a bombshell about Kim and Barry's parenting, do I really think Ethan and Olivia are separated? Moriah and Max, after he ragged on her about her clothing, can they stay together? Is Micah Plath's modeling career over and so much more.  Show is sponsored by: radleyacura.com, ourtownaudio.com, Jacob from State Farm jacobsf.com

Sports Daily
A new twist on the Sports Daily Football Friday Picks of the Week

Sports Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 21:21


A change being made to create more separation.  Bruce, Jacob, and Paul pick against Kevin Shields of State Farm on a Football Friday Tradition, the State Farm Picks of the Week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Liquor License
LL 323 "C.R.E.A.M. Please"

Liquor License

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 71:22


NFL review of week 2 and commercials. State Farm commercials this year stink. Our picks for this week's games and fucking LAMAR! Mr. Jackson is just a true player, one that LL endorses. Pete vs Truth. Cry Macho breakdown and why Hollywood grants films as prestige films. Entertainment Industry Segment (it's been a few months but its back): RIP AJ Johnson and the ugly side of Hollywood. People who work probably have more money than wannabe actors. WuTang tv series: way too much exposition and bridging of season1, RZAs voice change, and Divine looks just like the actual guy.   Check out our IG liquorlicensepodcast    Email: llpodcast@gmail.com

Oral Arguments from the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals
20-3481: Michael Vogt vs State Farm Life Insurance Comp

Oral Arguments from the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021


Oral argument argued before the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals on or about 09/23/2021

Sports Daily
The Sports Daily Football Friday Picks of the Week

Sports Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 15:36


Bruce and Coach Savage are leading in the picks, but Jacob and our friends at State Farm are pointing out... its only Week 2. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WULFF DEN Podcast
20 years of GameCube - WULFF DEN Podcast Ep 48

WULFF DEN Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 138:40


• 0:00 Intro • 3:38 BUT FIRST, Nintendo drops a NEW SWITCH UPDATE that allows Bluetooth Audio on the Switch • 12:28 The GameCube turns 20 years old, so we reminisce about all the great games we've played and the legacy it's had • 57:28 We TEST the Bluetooth Audio Switch update • 1:10:33 The Price of the Switch is being lowered in Europe • 1:19:58 EVERYTHING from PlayStation's September Showcase • 1:57:08 WarioWare Get It Together is ALRIGHT • 2:02:25 Analogue Pocket has been delayed, AGAIN • 2:04:23 NBA2K22 features Jake from State Farm • 2:06:58 Lego is doing another Nintendo thing • 2:08:33 The Epic vs Apple court case ruling • 2:10:28 Colors LIVE, now available on Switch • 2:21:08 Sony has shut down Little Big Planet Servers (PS3 & Vita) • 2:21:26 TWEET OF THE WEEK • 2:22:28 Unboxing • 2:23:48 Q&A Streamed: September 14th, 2021 on http://twitch.tv/wulffden

Stu Does America
Ep 347 | The Hypocrites' Ball: Fashion and Politics Collide with America's Stupidest People | Guest: John Ziegler

Stu Does America

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 44:18


Stu Burguiere looks at this week's Met Gala ball in New York, where liberal politicians and celebrities don ridiculous outfits and espouse even more ridiculous opinions (see: AOC's "Tax the Rich" dress). Are these people not even remotely aware of the irony, let alone the hypocrisy? Then, Mediaite's John Ziegler joins with the latest, and maybe slightly disheartening, news regarding the effort in California to recall the state's disaster of a governor, Gavin Newsom. Also, a deep dive into the mysterious history of "Jake from State Farm." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Checkpoint XP: Daily Podcast
Like A Good Neighbor & Deathloop is Great

Checkpoint XP: Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 39:11


The Gamecube turns 20 so we revisit some of the top titles on Nintendo's most famous blue box. Also, we ask why Jake from State Farm being in 2k22 is both brilliant and annoying. And with Deathloop getting rave reviews all over the place, we ask “what makes a game a 10 out of 10?” Subscribe to CheckpointXP Daily Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Google Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts.  Checkpoint Daily is hosted by gamers and video game journalists, Norris Howard and the Checkpoint XP Crew. They've got your daily update on all the things you love in 30 minutes or less.

The Surreal and Absurd Club
Ep. 131 The Harmonica

The Surreal and Absurd Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 60:31


We're back after a bit, sorry. Life.   We tackle the topics of being pleasant on a flight - both as passenger and as victim, BIG TEX JEANS, Jake from Statefarm (not an ad), our beginnings with beer, and The Ref Killer. PLUS MORE YOU JERKS.   @TheSAClubPod - Twitter/Instagram (talk to us, ask us questions, show us recommendations, BE ON THE PODCAST QUESTION MARK)   RATE   REVIEW   RESUME PLAY

Sports Daily
2021's State Farm Picks of the Week on Sports Daily

Sports Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 14:52


Its finally here, a yearly tradition on Sports Daily.  The State Farm Picks of the Week, where this year Bruce, Jacob, and Coach Paul Savage will go head-to-head along with a representative from our pals at State Farm. Terry Johnson making the picks for State Farm this week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show
CX Leadership: Are You Willing to Be Authentic, Have Difficult Conversations, and Break Silos?

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 38:23


Jenn Oyler and I discuss CX strategies that impact both the employees and customers in a B2B2C organization. We also explore some finer details of the work when we chat about the various CX KPIs that Jenn measures against, how they determine ROI, and her leadership style. Jenn is the vice president and head of customer experience at Principal Financial Group and has experience at State Farm.

BullCast
Episode 66: All About Insurance (with Joe Sarrio)

BullCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 47:15


Understanding insurance can be a tricky thing. Luckily, we've brought in an expert for today's episode to help us better understand the ins and outs of “assurance through insurance.” We'll kick off the episode with our list of celebrities who have policies on their body parts – yes, you heard that right. Then, Joe Sarrio, a State Farm insurance agent, will join Katie and Cort to discuss the peace of mind that comes with protecting your investments, lifestyle, and assets. Buckle up as Joe and the BullCast team expand on insurance topics such as auto, rental, home, business, and more! — The List: The Craziest Celebrity Insurance Policies — Hashtags of the week: #Insurance #StateFarm #JoeSarrio #Liability #UmbrellaPolicy #InsureYourMustache #LittleElvis #BullCastGuestSegment #JakeFromStateFarm — Visit us online: www.bullcastpodcast.com Produced by Cameron Spann | Powered by Pickler Wealth Advisors Sound effects obtained from https://www.zapsplat.com

Imaginary Players
"Jake From State Farm"

Imaginary Players

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 114:33


The Players are back with Episode 121The Players speak on the charity tournament(10:41) , John Speaks on his accidental high experience(11:55) , J.R Smith(27:16) , Relationships(38:05) , Bishop Sycamore(49:59) , Jake Paul(54:52) , Donda(1:16:54), & So Much More

Hey Frase Podcast
#668 Traveling With A 4-Month Old And Breastfeeding Karma

Hey Frase Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 18:02


I traveled for the first time, alone, with my 4-month old son. Here's everything that went down including how I forgot KJ's bottles and formula, and asking a random mom for a bottle. Her answer pissed me off. Spending the weekend in Dulles airport and witnessing countless Afghan refugees, and I'm starting to feel bad for RHOBH Erika Jayne. Plus, more of my life. Show is sponsored by Jacob from State Farm: jacobsf.com, zocdoc.com/tsfs, and join my patreon for $5 patreon.com/thesarahfrasershow

Reed's Ranch
Shootin' The Shield: AFC Preview

Reed's Ranch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 31:40


Jon and Cory are back to talk about the AFC. Shoutout to Marcos Garza and the Garza Law Firm and John Runyan with State Farm for sponsoring the podcast.

Hey Frase Podcast
#666 Daycare, Quitting Breastfeeding, And Selena Gomez Elle Magazine Cover

Hey Frase Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 24:28


I quit breastfeeding and some of you are surprised, here's my reason why. Also, I never realized sending your child to daycare was a big decision but Schman and I did it. A Tiktok doctor is explaining the mystery of why human feet have been washing up on beaches since 2007. The controversial Elle Magazine cover with Selena Gomez, why it's not controversial. Show is sponsored by Jacob from State Farm: jacobsf.com, and subscribe to my patreon: patreon.com/thesarahfrasershow

Change Cultivators
Leo Chan - Serious Play For Change

Change Cultivators

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 39:38


Can leading change be serious play? Can you help free yourself and your team to be more creative and approach disruption and change differently? Leo Chan is an expert on innovation, from mindset to thinking to culture and more. A graphic designer by early trade, Leo was catapulted into a long term fascination with innovation in his time at State Farm, and honed his craft by leading The Hatch, the multi-disciplinary hub of innovation at Chick-fil-A. Now as a sought-out speaker and a consultant / trainer Leo helps build innovators. In this discussion Leo shares his passion on creativity and innovation freely – covering a broad array of topics including the powerful methodology of Lego Serious Play, the Chick-fil-A innovation mindset, and how to create ‘safe space' for innovators. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

18 Summers: Candid Conversations About Family
Using The Freak Factor to Learn About Your Children and Yourselves with Dave Rendall

18 Summers: Candid Conversations About Family

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 41:12


There are a whole lot of things you could do to help your children overcome their weaknesses. Listen to this episode as David Rendall shares his expertise on how to develop your child's unique strengths while acknowledging their weaknesses. Key takeaways to listen for Uncovering your child's strengths and weaknesses Understanding the freak factor assessment Identifying and embracing their unique qualities  Finding a perfect group to share your individuality Principle of privacy, monitoring, and trust Ways to amplify your child's strengths  How to live a better life  Importance of learning experiences Resources mentioned in this episode The Freak Factor For Kid: The Weirdest and Weakest Children Make the Best Adults by David J Rendall The Freak Factor: Discovering Uniqueness by Flaunting Weakness by David J Rendall About Dave Rendall During the last fifteen years, David Rendall has spoken to audiences on every inhabited continent. His clients include the US Air Force, Australian Government, and Fortune 50 companies such as Microsoft, AT&T, UnitedHealth Group, Fannie Mae, and State Farm. Prior to becoming a Certified Speaking Professional, he was a leadership professor, stand-up comedian, and nonprofit executive. In between presentations, David competes in ultra-marathons and Ironman triathlons. David has a doctor of management degree in organizational leadership, as well as a graduate degree in psychology. He is the author of four books: The Four Factors of Effective Leadership, The Freak Factor, The Freak Factor for Kids and Pink Goldfish 2.0 Connect with Dave Website: David Rendall   Connect with Us To learn more about us, visit our website at www.18summers.com or email us at info@18summers.com. To get a copy of our book “The Family Board Meeting”, click here. Subscribe to 18 Summers Podcast and leave a rating and written review! Social Media Channels Facebook Group: 18 Summers LinkedIn: Jimmy Sheils Instagram: @18summerstribe

Scott Ryfun
Ryfun: Going Viral

Scott Ryfun

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 35:27


Hour 2 More COVID talk in a town that needs it. Plus two charities in the Golden Isles are eligible for a $25,000 grant from State Farm! Audio from WGIG-AM and FM in Brunswick, GA

Charlottesville Community Engagement
August 17, 2021: COVID update from Blue Ridge Health District; Charlottesville planning group reviews Rivanna corridor plan

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 18:02


In today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out is for the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign, an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you! On today’s show:An update on the Urban Rivanna River Corridor planAdvice and information from the Blue Ridge Health District Two Albemarle beaches remain open this weekend, and but another is done for the summerCharlottesville is cracking down on boat storage at the Ragged Mountain natural areaThis morning, the Virginia Department of Health reports another 2,244 new COVID cases and the seven-day percentage of tests that come back positive is now at 8.5 percent. Six months ago on February 17 that figure was 8.9 percent when the winter surge was beginning to recede. Now the figure has been climbing as the Delta variant of COVID continues to spread. Ryan McKay is the director of policy and planning at the Blue Ridge Health District.“We have been seeing an increasing number of cases on a daily basis really for about the last month or so so this current surge that we’re experiencing has happened somewhat quickly,” McKay said. McKay said the end of mandated social distancing and mask wearing means there are more close contacts than before, which adds to the tracing efforts. “Those who are testing positive are largely those who are unvaccinated, whether they are those who aren’t currently eligible to receive a vaccine, so children under the age of 12,” McKay said. “Or adults who for whatever reason medically can’t get vaccinated. And then obviously individuals who have not yet received their vaccine. So this Delta variant is much more contagious than we’ve experienced so far.”McKay said many of the new cases are tracing back to indoor settings, which is why health officials are recommending masks indoors especially for unvaccinated individuals. In the past week, Governor Ralph Northam has mandated facial coverings in Virginia schools, though some systems across the Commonwealth still plan to defy that order. McKay hopes people will do voluntarily in other indoor settings.“So anytime we’re indoors, individuals regardless of vaccination status, we want to make sure those individuals are wearing masks in indoor settings particularly if it’s a setting where there are a large number of individuals in an enclosed area to really try and minimize or reduce the spread,” McKay said. McKay said the Blue Ridge Health District expects cases to continue rising. With that, that means COVID testing is increasing. But, if you get a test at one of their events or facilities, you will not get notified if the result is negative. Here’s Kathryn Goodman, communications and public relations manager for the BRHD. “Instead we’re encouraging everybody to sign up for [the University of Virginia’s] MyChart and that’s where they can receive their test results within 12 to 24 hours,” Goodman said. People who have positive results will be contacted.Last Friday, the Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency authorization for a third dose of either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine for certain people who are immunocompromised. Here’s Dr. Denise Bonds, the director of the Blue Ridge Health District. “We are now offering third doses to anyone who is moderately or severely immunocompromised,” Dr. Bonds said. “This third dose of vaccine should be 28 days from their second dose of either Pfizer or Moderna and moderately to severely immunocompromised individuals who meet that category might be individuals who had an organ or a stem cell transplant, or who have advanced or untreated HIV infection, individuals who are currently undergoing treatment for cancer, or certain medications that an individual might take that might weaken the immune system.”Dr. Bonds said the recommendation is to get the same kind of vaccine as the first two doses, but that’s not a requirement. Anyone who got the Johnson and Johnson vaccine should not get one of these doses, and health officials are reviewing a strategy to provide boosters to those individuals. To get the third dose, you will need an appointment. Dr. Bonds recommends talking to your doctor. Visit the Blue Ridge Health District site to learn more. Officials do not anticipate supply concerns at this time. Later in the evening, Dr. Bonds and other district officials presented to both the Places29-Hydraulic Community Advisory Committee and City Council. Dr. Bonds said she knew that some members of Council are concerned about the ailment known as Long COVID where symptoms seem to remain. She cited a recent paper in Nature. (read the paper)“They looked at lots and lots of papers and tried to combine all the data to summarize it in a cohesive fashion and what they found was that 80 percent of individuals who have had a confirmed COVID infection continue to have at least one symptom two weeks following their acute infection,” Dr. Bonds said. Dr. Bonds said the most reported of those symptoms is fatigue, followed by headache, attention issues, hair loss, and shortness of breath.Mayor Nikuyah Walker said she is concerned that many students returning to classes do not have masks designed to prevent airborne transmission of viruses. She also expressed concern that many who have not received a vaccine so far may not do so if they are treated negatively.‘We in this community are doing the same thing that people around the country are doing, and I’m sure the world, where we’re treating the vaccine hesitant as the vaccine hostile and pushing those people from even considering it or changing behaviors,” Walker said. Teletha Howard is leading up the Blue Ridge Health District’s community outreach to people who are vaccine hesitant, including Black community members. “I’m very honest when I talk to people,” Howard said. “I tell them my story and my story is that I did not get vaccinated as soon as everybody did because I was hesitant. So it took me a while and the reason why I was hesitant was because I wanted to have conversations with more people and with the medical professionals before I was confident in getting the vaccine.”Walker thanked Howard for the way she is approaching her work. Dr. Bonds said the district is there to provide vaccines when people are ready.“Everyone needs a different amount of information,” Dr. Bonds said. “Everyone needs different questions answered. And, really, the way to help people who are vaccine hesitant is to help feel them reassured and answer their questions, not to be antagonistic towards them.”In today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out: The Rivanna Conservation Alliance is looking for a few good volunteers to help out on Clean Stream Tuesdays, a mile and a half paddle and clean-up to remove trash and debris from popular stretches of the Rivanna River. Trash bags, trash pickers, gloves, and hand sanitizer/wipes will be provided, though volunteers will need to transport themselves to and from the end points. Kayaks for the purpose can be rented from the Rivanna River Company. Visit the Rivanna Conservation Alliance's volunteer page to learn more about upcoming dates.The rest of today’s show logs information related to water. If you have a boat stored at the Ragged Mountain Natural Area, you’ll need to remove it by September 17. That’s when the city of Charlottesville will begin to enforce a ban on doing so that’s codified in the city’s ordinance. Non-motorized boats are allowed on the city-owned reservoir. They just can’t be stored there. The swimming beaches at Chris Greene Lake and Mint Springs Valley in Albemarle County will be open this weekend for one last hurrah, but the season is over at Walnut Creek. These places are open Thursday through Sunday. The Rivanna River serves as the boundary between eastern Charlottesville and the Pantops area of Albemarle County. To the north is the Pen Park within Charlottesville, and the river meanders south to the Sentara Martha Jefferson complex. The area has been studied for many years, and the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission has been working on a study intended to unify future planning and implementation efforts. Nick Morrison is a planner with the TJPDC who updated the Charlottesville Planning Commission at their meeting on August 10. (TJPDC page on the plan)“The goal of this phase of this planning project was to develop a vision and an action plan for that urban section of the corridor,” Morrison said. Morrison said a vision statement makes the argument that the Rivanna River is one of the community’s “greatest assets.” On the Charlottesville side, there’s a new apartment building nearing completion on River Road. Planning is moving forward with at least one pedestrian/bicycle bridge over the Rivanna. On the Albemarle side, apartments are planned along State Farm Boulevard and the fate of the State Farm headquarters building remains unknown. Their employees no longer have to report to work to do their duties. The idea of the plan is to coordinate infrastructure, and to make sure attention is being paid to the impact on the environment. “In terms of environmental protection, high-level, looking for approaches to protect any sort of sensitive biological or ecological areas, any sort of improved ongoing coordination between the city and the county, particularly in water quality and conservation,” Morrison said.   Commissioner Jody Lahendro noted that the report contains dozens of action items. “Where do you go from here?” Lahendro asked. “I’m worried about creating yet another report that is just overwhelming with so many action items that are so disconnected that it goes back on a shelf. What’s the implementation for this?”Sandy Shackelford, the director of planning and transportation for the TJPDC, said that before the plan is finalized, her staff will identify short-term goals as priorities. “My thought was that we focus on sort of the foundational action items that are going to be needed to build off of these other ones, so focusing on things like inventorying existing infrastructure or conditions, or systems, or things like that,” Shackelford said. Lahendro said he felt the cultural inventory conducted to date does not go far enough to protect certain areas that may have been Monacan sites. “You just assume that everybody wants to be able to visit all these cultural sites,” Lahendro said. “I expect there’s some prehistoric sites along this river that we don’t want to have people going with metal detectors ravaging and destroying.”Commissioner Rory Stolzenberg suggested the plan should take note of desire from many to limit additional parking spaces. He also said the plan should address transit. “The only thing that actually about transit is about signage from transit stops, which I think is good, but I think it would make sense to have stuff about connections to the river area both transit and pedestrian and bicyclist,” Stolzenberg said. “I’m also a bit confused by this idea that adding pedestrian facilities means we must add more parking as well.”The TJPDC is also helping Albemarle County with a study of how to expand transit, with the Pantops area being one of the study areas. (check the August 11 CCE for that story)Commissioner Liz Russell said language should be more clear about helping community members and visitors learn more about the history of the river, if it’s going to include a section on that topic. She noted the plan already includes examples from how other communities have utilized their riverfronts, such as Greenville, South Carolina and Richmond.“You know the Richmond case study really I think says very beautifully that ‘helping visitors develop a fuller understanding of different aspects of people’s lives throughout the history of the region will help them understand strong connections and understanding.’ I really think we’re not quite making that point in like why are we talking about the history, and what could that mean in anyone experiencing any of these opportunities within the corridor.”This is the second phase of the planning process. So far, there’s not a concrete plan for a third, but Shackelford said it would be more to design future infrastructure. “If you look at the Richmond plan, they ended up with a master plan where they put things on paper,” Shackleford said.Shackelford and the draft Rivanna plan refer to the Richmond Riverfront Plan, adopted by that city council in November 2012 and amended nearly five years later. Commission Chair Hosea Mitchell cautioned the plan should not be to create an urban environment such as in Richmond or Greenville. “We don’t want to be that developed I don’t think based on the emphasis on protecting the environment, protecting the river, being the prime directive,” Mitchell said. Commissioner Stolzenberg said he felt developing along the river in a way that put more eyes on it could be beneficial. “If you had apartments or restaurants that kind of fronted the river and had access to it, that would create a positive feedback loop where we would care more about the quality of the river, and more people would be able to use the river,” Stolzenberg said. “That might detract somewhat from the sense of being out in the wilderness but you can get that on the James, right?”The plan was originally to have been adopted by December 2020 but the pandemic affected the timeline. The Albemarle County Planning Commission has not yet had a presentation on the latest draft.What do you think about the Rivanna River plan? Let us know in the comments. I’ve spent a lot of time writing about plans, and this newsletter was created in part to keep the plans from being put on shelves and forgotten. I’m not here to say what should happen, but I want to shed light on previous studies, plans, decisions, and all sorts of things about what I’ve seen in my time as a reporter. Please consider becoming a subscriber through Substack or a Patreon contributor to help ensure I can keep doing this. And definitely share with someone you think might be interested! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Married to the Games Podcast
Episode 465: The Quirkiest Airline

Married to the Games Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 128:13


This week the guys talk more Blizzard bummers, all the Final Fantasy trophies earned, Abandoned..... and much much more!! Articles: Kellogg's pulls Overwatch sponsorship over ‘troubling' Blizzard allegations https://flip.it/oSv7Hi Also pulled sponsorship: Kelloggs (Pringles & Cheezits), IBM, State Farm, T-Mobile Only Xfinity and TeamSpeak remain, Coke technically still listed but weighing options Final Fantasy Fan Gets Every Franchise Trophy—And It Took A Decade https://kotaku.com/final-fantasy-fan-gets-every-franchise-trophy-and-it-to-1847452779 PS5 Exclusive Abandoned Misses Yet Another Trailer Drop https://www.inputmag.com/gaming/ps5-exclusive-abandoned-misses-yet-another-trailer-drop Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Geekoholics Anonymous Video Game Podcast
Pokémon Unite, Marvel's What If...?, Ted Lasso and more - Geekoholics Anonymous Podcast 318

Geekoholics Anonymous Video Game Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 123:46


On this weeks episode we blab about the following Games and topics: Whatcha Been Playing?   Pokémon Unite Fortnite News:Cross Platform / PC / Misc. Coca-Cola and State Farm are pulling back from the Overwatch League Jesse McCree, Diablo 4 Director No Longer At Activision Blizzard Fullbright co-founder steps down amidst studio exodus Niantic Responds to Fans' Fury Over Pokemon Go Changes PAX Australia Has Been Cancelled Rare Super Mario Bros. Copy Sells For $2m As Retro Bidding Explosion Continues Huge South Park Deal Includes 14 Movies, a New Game, and More Intellivision Amico Delayed A Third Time, Now Out By End Of Year PlayStation Here's everything revealed as part of Sony's PlayStation Indie Spotlight event Abandoned PS5 Demo Delayed by Technical Issues Nintendo Mario Golf: Super Rush adds Toadette, New Donk City Nintendo Switch sales top 89.4 million Here's everything announced during Nintendo's latest Indie World showcase Xbox Xbox Announces Gamescom Showcase Xbox Cloud Gaming launches in beta form on PC for Game Pass Ultimate members PSA's: Epic Games Store Freebie: Rebel Galaxy Free 4 All: Marvel's What If...? Ted Lasso Help support the show: - Subscribe to our Twitch channel http://twitch.tv/geekoholics - Use our Epic Creator Code: GEEKOHOLICS when purchasing items in Fortnite or buying games on the Epic Games Store - Please review the show (bit.ly/geekoholics) on Apple Music, Apple Podcasts and to share with your friends. Reviews help us reach more listeners, and the feedback helps us to produce a better show. Join our Discord server: CLICK HERE Don't forget to follow our Social Media Feeds to keep up to date on our adventures: Youtube TwitterInstagram Facebook Thanks for listening and have a great weekend! You can reach me on Twitter @RicF

Into The Video Game
Episode 214- Company Cage Match

Into The Video Game

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 53:50


NEWS: Switch hits 89M- 1:18 Nintendo Indie World Presentation- 6:19 Only 1 EGS Exclusive made Epic profit so far- 9:17 Google considered buying Epic during platform dispute- 11:16 Coca Cola, State Farm, and Kellogg back off from Overwatch League- 14:09 Group trying to "Save Titanfall" likely behind hacks- 24:13 TOPICS: Recent Destiny 2 campaigns were poor- 28:14 The Curse of Weeklies and Dailies- 30:21 Seek by iNaturalist is technically a video game- 40:19

Charlottesville Community Engagement
August 11, 2021: Studying the expansion of transit in Albemarle; Venture Central to launch to support new businesses

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 20:31


In today’s Patreon-fueled shout-out: With the summer heat in full swing, your local energy nonprofit, LEAP, wants you and yours to keep cool. LEAP offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!On today’s show:A new nonprofit launches to promote regional entrepreneurial activitiesA quick review of a recent stakeholder meeting on increasing transit in urban AlbemarleSeveral area destinations receive state funding for tourism marketingAlbemarle County seeking a consultant to help lead upcoming rewrite of the zoning ordinanceThe Virginia Department of Health today reports 2,117 new COVID cases, the highest one-day count in four months. The percent positivity is now at 7.5 percent. The seven day average for new cases is now at 1,733. The Blue Ridge Health District reports another 52 cases today. The percentage of Virginians fully vaccinated is now at 54.8 percent, a number that includes children. The number of adult Virginians fully vaccinated is now 65.8 percent. The seven-day average of shots per day is now 14,124. Source: Virginia Department of HealthNext week, the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles will open a window in the Scottsville Town offices. The DMV Select will open on August 16 in the second floor of Victory Hall at 401 Valley Street. DMV Select offices allow for limited transactions such as picking up registration decals, but do not issue driver’s licenses. For a full list of services, visit the DMV website. You’ll need to schedule an appointment and masks are required. (schedule an appointment)Speaking of Scottsville, repairs have been made to the library following heavy storm damage in late July. The library reopened yesterday at 1 p.m. A new nonprofit is launching in the Charlottesville area to support regional entrepreneurship. Venture Central is to be a partnership between the city of Charlottesville, Albemarle County, the University of Virginia, and the Charlottesville Regional Chamber of Commerce. The group has announced the first members of the Board of Directors and will begin a search for an executive director. According to a release, Sarah Rumbaugh of the firm Relish will serve as the chair. Other board members include the economic development directors of both Albemarle and Charlottesville. Governor Ralph Northam has announced the award of $861,080 in matching grants through the Virginia Tourism Corporation’s Recovery Marketing Leverage Program. The initiative exists to help expand the Virginia is for Lovers brand and to encourage new tourism marketing partnerships. (see a full list of recipients)The Charlottesville Convention and Visitors Bureau will get $10,000 for Birthplace of Virginia Wine programDairy Market will get $20,000 for Charlottesville’s Bite-Sized Adventures: A Foodie Bucket ListFront Porch Cville will receive $19,980 for Rivanna Roots: A Riverfront Concert Series 2022Blackburn Inn and Conference Center in Staunton will receive $20,000 for Sip, Stay, and Explore: Hiking Trails and Virginia WinesThe Heifetz International Music Institute at Mary Baldwin University will get $2,182.50 for a marketing programWaynesboro Economic Development and Tourism will receive $10,000 for EXPERIENCE WaynesboroWayne Theater Alliance will get $10,000 for an outdoor production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor DreamcoatPicking back up from the August 4, 2021 meeting of the Albemarle Board of Supervisors, that body agreed to apply for $314,000 in Community Development Block Grant funding for a food security program. Stacy Pethia is the county’s housing policy manager.“The proposed project would serve a total of 470 individuals and households through three distinct programs,” Pethia said. These are $110,000 for a grocery card gift program to serve up to 220 households, and $144,000 for the Local Food Hub’s Fresh Farmacy program to provide fresh produce for 18 months to 100 households. The funding would come specifically from a COVID relief program. Supervisors also agreed to amend a special use permit that allows the Monticello United Soccer Club to operate on land off of Polo Ground Road. Scott Clark is a planner with Albemarle County. “The proposal would increase the number of total number of fields to seven although only four would be used for play at any one time,” Clark said. “This is to enable them to move feels around, rest fields, prepare fields.”The land is within Albemarle’s rural area, and there are no permanent facilities on the property. There is no increase in the number of parking spaces. “This property could easily return to agricultural use in the future with a very low impact on the site,” Clark said. The Mon-U soccer field is on Polo Grounds Road, which is just to the north of where the furthest Charlottesville Area Transit route currently stops. That won’t change when the city-owned and operated agency alters its routes later this year, but CAT is conducting a review of how to expand service to the north. So is Albemarle County and the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission. You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement and time for another subscriber-supported public service announcement. The Charlottesville Jazz Society at cvillejazz.org is dedicated to the promotion, preservation, and preservation of jazz, and there’s no time like now to find a time to get out and watch people love to play. The Charlottesville Jazz Society keeps a running list of what’s coming up at cvillejazz.org. This week, find out that the Michael Elswick Gathering plays at the Pub at Lake Monticello on Friday and the Eric Franzen Trio plays at Early Mountain Vineyards on Saturday. Take a look at cvillejazz.org. At the same time, Albemarle County and the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission are doing the exact same work as part of a study partially funded by the Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation. Boris Palchik is a transit planning project manager with Foursquare Integrated Transportation Planning, a firm hired to help conduct the work. The other consultant is Michael Baker International. Palchik ran a meeting on July 26 that sought to get initial feedback for the study.“It’s really a feasibility study and implementation plan for expanding transit service in both population and employment centers in Albemarle County,” Palchik said. The July 26 meeting was for northern Albemarle County along U.S. 29, and one on July 28 was held for Pantops. We’ll focus on July 26 first. (watch the video)Palchik said the study may not result in several new fixed routes, but may include a combination of on-demand routes and other new transit options. The work consists of a market analysis, a service analysis, and stakeholder outreach. “The market analysis is looking at the underlying environment in which transit operates or needs to operate in the study area,” Palchik said. “The service analysis is looking at what’s happening today on the ground in terms of ridership and productivity.”Stakeholder outreach includes the July meetings and other ways to get a sense of what people might want and need in expanded transit. In addition, to Charlottesville Area Transit, Jaunt provides service in the area through on-demand, one fixed-route service, and through its partnership with Greene County Transit. “There’s really many different ways to provide transit service and each of those ways has its own ideal operating environment,” Palchick said. “When we’re looking at the market analysis, we’re trying to understand the environment that exists so we can make recommendations that are appropriate.”That means taking a look at population density, the built environment, employment opportunities, and other factors to measure the potential for public transit to work. “Transit service is most effective and most efficient in areas that have higher density,” Palchick said. “The kind of tipping point for where fixed route transit service really begins to make sense is once you have more than five people or jobs per acre.”Research conducted so far indicates moderate-to-high transit potential south of the South Fork of the Rivanna River. The highest population density in the area is along Commonwealth Drive, which is currently served by CAT’s Route 5. Service gaps are north of Rio Road and in the Hollymead / Forest Lakes area. A slide from the July 26 presentation (download)This work also comes at a time when Albemarle continues to become more dense, with more properties coming online such as North Pointe, Brookhill, and numerous other developments that will be more dense than single family homes. Palchick said the stakeholder analysis specifically sought out information that may not have come through their initial review. During the service analysis, stakeholders were shown older information on CAT routes, several of which are changing in the coming months. There will be alterations to Route 5, Route 7, Route 8, and Route 11, all of which serve Albemarle’s northern urban area.  Learn more about the CAT changes here. Scott Elliff is a member of the Forest Lakes Community Association’s Board of Directors. The FLCA has used a portion of its homeowner association fees to fight development of a mixed-use development on Ashwood Boulevard known as RST Residences. Elliff took the opportunity to speak at a discussion on expanding transit to point out that the existing character of his neighborhood is suburban. “The challenge that’s happening up here is that we’re starting to get developments that are going to be by necessity pretty dense,” Elliff said. “There’s one that’s being planned which we’re opposing and hasn’t come before the Supervisors yet. It would be a huge high story development on the corner of Ashwood and 29.”Currently there is fixed-route transit service in the Forest Lakes area provide by Jaunt through their Route 29 Express.According to Valerie Long of the law firm Williams Mullen, 75 percent of the apartments in the RST development will be rented to people who can demonstrate household incomes between 30 percent and 80 percent of the Area Median Income. Elliff is concerned that if all of those people drive, it will exacerbate traffic congestion out of a neighborhood that only has two direct connections onto U.S. 29. “The only solution from a transportation standpoint that I can think of is to have a dedicated service that picks people up at those affordable housing apartment buildings and takes them non-stop down to Barracks Road, downtown mall, and UVA where the jobs are,” Elliff said. Elliff claimed there were no jobs in his area. In fact, let’s hear more of what he had to say. “We’re up here in a beautiful area,” Elliff said. “There are no jobs. There are retail jobs… in the shopping centers north and south. If it’s going to be heavily affordable housing, these are people who are going to be working retail and they’re going to be working as administrative assistants or something in small companies but not around here. This is completely residential.”Elliff’s claim made me look up the latest information from the Virginia Employment Commission on the top employers in Albemarle County.  Several of them are within close proximity to the Forest Lakes neighborhood and all rough measurements below are taken from the pool at Forest Lakes South using main roads and Google Earth. (VEC profile)#4 is the Department of Defense and the various military installations at Rivanna Station (4.77 miles away) #6 is the Crutchfield Corporation which operates by the Charlottesville Regional Airport (3.5 miles away)#7 is the Northrup Grumman Corporation located in between both sides of Stonefield on U.S. 29 (4.4 miles away)#9 is Wal-Mart located just south of the South Fork of the Rivanna River on US. 29 (2.2 miles away)#18 is Emerson (listed as G.E. Fanuc) on U.S. 29 north of North Pointe (5.2 miles) #29 is Costco in Stonefield on U.S. 29 (4.5 miles away)#32 is Target in Hollymead Town Center (2 miles away)#36 is MicroAire Surgical Instruments in the former U.S. Postal Service building off of Airport Road (2.75 miles away)#38 is Rosewood Village Associates with facilities in Hollymead Town Center (2.4 miles away) The RST rezoning goes to the Board of Supervisors on September 15. From the Albemarle County profile from the Virginia Employment Commission (download)Now, on to the July 28 meeting, which covered the Pantops area. Fewer people attended that virtual call. Pantops is currently served by Charlottesville Area Transit Route 10, which will also be changing as a result of the upcoming route changes. Here’s Boris Palchik with Foursquare once again reviewing a market analysis. “In the Pantops area north of U.S. 250, there are a number of key kind of activity generators like multifamily housing, the Social Security administration building, but it’s still showing fairly low density,” Palchik said. Dick Hiss, the chair of the Pantops Community Advisory Committee, asked if the various analyses conducted take a look at future land use changes. “Have you considered the changes that we see coming in the Pantops area such as the motor vehicle department going somewhere?” Hiss said. “That building has had a sign on it for years saying it is moving.”Hiss said he is also wondering if State Farm employees will return to that building. State Farm is the fifth largest employer in Albemarle according to the VEC. Sentara Martha Jefferson is the third. Gina Morss-Fischer, a public affairs specialist with State Farm, confirmed in an email to me today that employees assigned to the Charlottesville-Albemarle office will continue to work from home. Palchick said the stakeholder meetings are intended to take note of comments such as this. For a time, Albemarle County had been updating development dashboards which depicted what projects were coming up in the near future. These have not been updated since February 2020 in part because of the pandemic and in part because a staff member moved on. Charles Rapp is the planning director in Albemarle County. “The staff member that was previously managing the dashboards is no longer with the county so we have used this as an opportunity to collaborate with our GDS department and create an updated version of the development dashboard,” Rapp said in an email to me this morning. “This new approach will have automated updates regularly and should provide a more streamlined approach toward conveying information.  We are working through the final details now and hope to have it ready for the public soon.”(review the current Development Dashboards on the Albemarle website)But back to transit. Palchick said on-demand microtransit could be an option for parts of Albemarle in the future.“The main difference between microtransit and Uber and Lyft is that Uber and Lyft operate with a fleet of vehicles that are not infinite, but you never quite know what kind of vehicle you are going to get when you request a service,” Palchick said. “Whereas with microtransit you have a set fleet of vehicles and a set group of drivers that are operating the service so it is more predictable and can be more closely branded with the local public transportation service and be more closely affiliated with it.”Currently, Pantops is also served by Jaunt’s Buckingham Connect East service. “So this service operates between Buckingham County and destinations in Charlottesville and Albemarle County,” Palchick said. “Those destinations include downtown Charlottesville, the University hospital, Martha Jefferson Hospital and the Westminster Canterbury retirement community.” Westminster Canterbury is the 14th largest employer in Albemarle County. A slide from the July 28 presentation on Pantops (download)In addition to the meetings on July 26 and July 28, the consultants are holding individual meetings. The goal is to complete the study by next January in order to apply for funding from the Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation to pay for a pilot project.Will any of this result in a better transit system? That means to be seen. Another thing I encourage people to see is the staff report of a February 11, 2008 joint meeting of the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors and Charlottesville City Council to discuss a study for a Regional Transit Authority that would be one unified system. That never happened, but eight years later, a Regional Transit Partnership was formed to encourage collaboration between area systems. That body next meets on August 26. (RTA staff report) This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Virtual Legality
Lawsuits, Proto-Unions, and Other Mutinies (California vs Activision Blizzard) (VL520)

Virtual Legality

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 47:12


In the face of California's Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) lawsuit, Activision Blizzard is now seeing mutinies across investors, employees, journalists, and sponsors. What did Week 2 bring and what might the future of all such stakeholder actions be? It's Mutinies all around, but Call of Duty still brings in a Bounty...in Virtual Legality. CHECK OUT THE VIDEO AT: https://youtu.be/eILMMN4PmzU #California #Activision #Lawsuit *** CHANNEL SUPPORT PATREON - https://www.patreon.com/VirtualLegality STREAMLABS - https://streamlabs.com/richardhoeg STORE - https://teespring.com/stores/hoeg-law-store *** CHAPTERS 00:00 Introduction 01:28 HR Firings and Investor Calls 14:04 A Proto Union is Formed 28:37 Investor Class Actions 43:16 Unhappy Sponsors 45:17 Conclusion *** Discussed in this episode: "California vs Activision Blizzard: A Legal View" YouTube Playlist - Hoeg Law https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1zDCgJzZUy9PBxr5dNcoQLh2erIt2XrZ "Blizzard President Departs as Game Maker Faces Labor Lawsuit" Bloomberg - August 3, 2021 https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-08-03/blizzard-president-departs-as-game-maker-faces-labor-lawsuit "Activision Blizzard (ATVI) Q2 2021 Earnings Call Transcript" Motley Fool - August 4, 2021 https://www.fool.com/earnings/call-transcripts/2021/08/04/activision-blizzard-atvi-q2-2021-earnings-call-tra/ "Activision Blizzard's Latest Investor Call Was An Especially Ghoulish Affair" Kotaku - August 4, 2021 https://kotaku.com/activision-blizzard-s-latest-investor-call-was-an-espec-1847422536 "Activision Blizzard Employees Form Coalition, Reject CEO's Choice of Law Firm" IGN - August 3, 2021 https://www.ign.com/articles/activision-blizzard-employees-abk-coalition-reject-bobby-kotick-law-firm "Activision Blizzard employees to protest leadership with walkout" Venture Beat/Games Beat - July 27, 2021 https://venturebeat.com/2021/07/27/activision-blizzard-employs-to-protest-leadership-with-walkout/ "Activision Blizzard Is Working With Law Firm That Specializes In "Union Avoidance" Amid Abuse Allegations" The Gamer - July 29, 2021 https://www.thegamer.com/activision-blizzard-unions-wilmerhale-lawsuit-sexism/ "Activision Blizzard Sued By Shareholder For "False And Misleading" Statements" August 3, 2021 https://www.gamespot.com/articles/activision-blizzard-sued-by-shareholder-for-false-and-misleading-statements/ "Cheng v Activision Blizzard" Filed August 3, 2021 https://www.bloomberglaw.com/public/desktop/document/ChengvActivisionBlizzardIncetalDocketNo221cv06240CDCalAug032021Co?1628012094 "CD Projekt Sued Over Alleged Cyberpunk Lies! Let's Read the Lawsuit! (VL379)" YouTube Video - December 28, 2020 - Hoeg Law https://youtu.be/_qXytLM4Gv8 "Employment of manipulative and deceptive devices." 17 CFR 240.10b-5 (Rule 10b-5) https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/17/240.10b-5 "Amid harassment lawsuit, Coca Cola, State Farm pull back from Blizzard's Overwatch League" August 5, 2021 - Washington Post https://www.washingtonpost.com/video-games/2021/08/05/activision-blizzard-sponsors-overwatch/ *** "Virtual Legality" is a continuing series discussing the law, video games, software, and everything digital, hosted by Richard Hoeg, of the Hoeg Law Business Law Firm (Hoeg Law). CHECK OUT THE REST OF VIRTUAL LEGALITY HERE: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1zDCgJzZUy9YAU61GoW-00K0TJOGnPCo DISCUSSION IS PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT TO BE CONSTRUED AS LEGAL ADVICE. INDIVIDUALS INTERESTED IN THE LEGAL TOPICS DISCUSSED IN THIS VIDEO SHOULD CONSULT WITH THEIR OWN COUNSEL. *** Twitter: @hoeglaw Web: hoeglaw.com

Sixteen:Nine
Chris Riebschlager, Dimensional Innovations

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 34:50


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT There have been numerous traditional sign companies that have, through the years, developed a sense of their ground shifting, and responded by adding a digital component to their business. A lot of the time, it hasn't worked out so hot, because it's just too far outside what a company knows and does. But sometimes it works, as is the case with Dimensional Innovations. The Kansas City company nicely straddles physical and digital components to jobs, bolstering the idea that having both skillsets, and mindsets, under the same roof is going to work better than sub-contracting. DI, for short, does projects all over the U.S., in particular, and while it has some especially active vertical markets, its work serves all kinds of different use-cases. DI does a lot of pro and college sports venue work, but it also does experiences for museums, hospitals and retail. I had an interesting chat with Chris Riebschlager, who runs the company's software efforts. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Hey, Chris. Thanks for joining me. Can you tell me what your company does?  Chris Riebschlager: Yeah, absolutely. So Dimensional Innovations started in the late 90s as a signage company, making just traditional signs, and in the time between the late 90s and now, the company has grown to include custom fabrication of all kinds and in the last six and seven years, we've added a really big technology practice to that.  So in addition to building and fabricating and designing spaces, also activating those spaces with interesting technology, that's hopefully beautiful and useful and makes spaces better.  Where's the company based?  Chris Riebschlager: The company is based in Kansas City.  But you have offices elsewhere, right? Chris Riebschlager: Yes, we have folks that live and work in LA, Atlanta, Minneapolis, a few in Colorado. So yeah, we got a presence all over the United States. All right, and are those offices or are those like home offices and that the big epicenter is Kansas City?  Chris Riebschlager: The epicenter is certainly in Kansas City. The other offices are focused a lot on project management and sales for the projects that we are working on and supporting in those locations, but yeah, the heart of it's here in KC. It's interesting. There's been a number of traditional print companies that have taken a look at the digital signage space and tried to get in it and for the most part, have not been very successful because it's just too different from what they normally do. What's been the difference with you?  Chris Riebschlager: So I think the way we approach spaces, I think lends well to activating those spaces with both digital signage and more immersive tech installations. I think when we approach a new project, it's really about getting inside the head of the person that is in that space. Why they're there, what they're doing there, what's important to them, what's in the front of their mind when they're in a space like that? So we had been satisfying those needs with built environmental stuff and I think it's a natural pivot to then say, what technology could help this person accomplish what they need to accomplish or make this space better or make a bad experience much better.  So you're already fabricating physical materials to make a space interesting, and digital allows you to introduce a different kind of material and make it active and so on, right? Chris Riebschlager: Yeah, absolutely, and I think part of what makes us special is that we are doing this from both sides, right? Both the fabricated and design side, but also the tech side. So I think if you can have that happening on one team, I think the end product always ends up better because, when I have to sit down at the table with a person who's going to build the thing, they understand what I needed to do, I understand what they needed to do, and I think that hand in hand tight integration just makes for better stuff.  And you run the software team. Am I getting that right?  Chris Riebschlager: That is correct.  Okay, and how big is that team?  Chris Riebschlager: We have six developers right now. We also have a 3D team that kind of has branched off from my software dev team. They focus on 3D modeling and animating, and also some of the game engine development stuff that we've been getting into with Unreal.  Oh, cool, and if you had to guess, I realize you're not the COO or anything, but you have some sense of what the split is of your business, between analog stuff and digital stuff, is it like 60:40 and has it evolved?  Chris Riebschlager: I'd probably flip that split, so maybe a 40% and then 60% goes to the physical build-out.  The blend there is kind of fuzzy. It's not all one or the other, usually in client engagement, there's a big fabricated, a big build-out that we're injecting technology into so that the borders between those two are pretty fuzzy. And that's how it should happen, right?  Cause God knows I've been involved in projects or being exposed to projects where it's all about the digital side of it, and they get fixated on that without thinking about the whole experience and the whole look and feel of it.  Chris Riebschlager: Yeah, absolutely. Ideally, I don't want a person walking into a space that we made and seeing a hard delineation between what is a physical built-out piece, and what's a digital add-on to that space. They should all feel very cohesive and family together in a way that makes sense holistically, and we're not picking apart digital activation and physical activation. And I guess it's helpful that because your company comes out of the physical background that you're not having to rely on third-party fabrication companies to build that side of it. You can control the whole bill of materials, so to speak.  Chris Riebschlager: Absolutely, and that's huge, especially when we're trying to make something that no one's ever seen before. You really need that tight integration between the physical engineering team and the software engineering team, because silly things like mounting a camera, having access to that camera, and knowing where cables need to run, etc. The tighter integration you can get between the person building the thing and the person who knows where those wires need to run, that's only going to end in better projects.  Yeah. You start embedding display technology into a physical enclosure. If you have no experience around that, you don't know about things like ventilation and then you have big problems.  Chris Riebschlager: Yeah, and at this point, we've run into all of those things. We've had all the problems. So at this point, we've hit our stride and now we have solved all those ones and do not worry about them anymore.  Yeah, which is very helpful, I'm sure. One of the things that were intriguing to me is with a lot of companies I talked to, they sorta have a defined vertical or maybe one or two verticals and that, like they're active in hotels or they're active in retail, whatever it may be, and I look at your kind of portfolio of projects and it's like all over the place.  You're doing sports stadiums, you're doing work for college athletic teams, but you are also doing work for children's hospitals and museums.  Chris Riebschlager: Yeah. We do have some verticals that we do specialize in. Stadiums being a big one, college athletics, being a big one, children's hospitals and zoos being another.  Also, there are corporate environments like corporate headquarters. We do a lot of client experience centers, just the big immersive environments that usually are attached to a corporate headquarters where they can tour clients through and show their product offerings in a compelling and interesting way. We're hopefully coming out of a pretty rough year and a half in terms of what's been going on and things like particularly the sports industry kind of being “on hold” as well as some college athletics, but the workplace has bubbled up.  Has business shifted in that time? Chris Riebschlager: I wouldn't say shifted. The last year forced us to reevaluate some of the things we were doing and the things we were adding to spaces and being a little bit more mindful of, as things opened back up, how are people going to want to interact with things in a space? Are they going to want to touch things? Are we going to need to figure out ways for people to interact without physically engaging with this stuff?  I don't think our core business changed at all, but the last year was a really interesting opportunity to reevaluate how these interactions work in these spaces.  Yeah. You have a product or service or something called DIVE, which is Dimensional Innovations Virtual Experiences. What is that all about and how has it resonated with the people you're talking to?  Chris Riebschlager: So the genesis of that was, early in 2020, we were starting - before COVID hit - we had planned a lot of client experience on our work with a few clients where we were going to install a bunch of new spaces that would serve in that client experience center capacity, where we're touring clients through and showing off-in an immersive environment type of way-product offerings, and since that was now off the table for 2020, we had to pivot into, okay, how do we provide that same experience and have that same docent or client-led multi-person experience, but in a way that isn't going to require someone to fly to a place and go into a building that is going to be closed for an indefinite amount of time. So we started messing around with some video conferencing technology and experimenting with ways to take that same content that we had running in a theater or large screen experience in the space and how to use that same content, those same ideas, that same spirit, and put it into an experience where a docent kit can invite a dozen or more people to a website where we're all seeing each other in video and they're able to tour people through these immersive environments, show content and throw up polls and questions, and different points of engagement there. So the same things that would be happening in that space, just distributed to everyone's devices, wherever they are.  Have you seen much take-up on that? Chris Riebschlager: Yeah. I think as people got burned out on Zoom, mid-2020, people were looking at and going, okay, this is fine. The utility of it is there, it's great. But there's gotta be something more we can do with this technology.  Like, if we can get everyone live audio and video between a bunch of people, there's gotta be more engaging things we can do with that. So I think as people started to push those edges, that was really appealing to people to be able to have what we had in DIVE, which is a way to craft a more immersive environment for those people to be in and have a little bit more interesting points of engagement than just sharing your screen and have a routine when looking at a PowerPoint or whatever. It seems a little bit like the virtual trade shows that of course came up like crazy in the past year and a half. How does it differ from that?  Chris Riebschlager: I think the main focus of DIVE is really just that custom content. The framework is Zoom-like. We have a video and audio connection. That's the solved problem. The more interesting thing in new client engagement with DIVE is, what are we going to do now that we have basically the entire web stack and everything you can do on a website, everything you can do with live audio and video, what are we going to do content-wise, in a compelling way to show, offer, to communicate the message that we want to communicate? And now that we're seeing physical trade shows and people are getting on airplanes and flying to go see clients and go to experience centers and do that sort of thing. Does your company see DIVE as something that was an interim measure and you put it back in the closet or has it got long-term legs? Chris Riebschlager: I think it has long-term legs. I think there are ways that it could be a supplement to what we're already doing in the built-out space, we've thought of incorporating it, even in a client experience center, where we have a bunch of people we've invited into the space, they're still maybe subject matter experts or people that we'd want to bring into this experience that couldn't fly in, or we want them there every day. We could use the same technology to put that person up on his screen. So we can say, “Now we're going to talk to Todd about X YZ, and now Todd's in that space. He's thousands of miles away, but now he's in this environment with us.”  So I think there are ways we could incorporate that same tech to enhance and supplement the stuff that we're doing in the building. I obviously follow a lot of what goes on in digital signage and innovations and new ideas and so on, and what I saw in the past year and a half, is some great stuff, but also a number of times where it really seemed like companies were just trying to find something that they could get attention for and that they could sell at a time when their traditional products were not really moving. And I would see efforts to do gesture-based interaction, like touchless displays and QR codes, and I was looking at something on LinkedIn yesterday that was like a live person on camera with her being replicated as an avatar, and I looked at it and thought why are they doing that? I don't want to see something that looks like something out of a Japanese anime cartoon. If this person looks presentable, put her on the screen.  So what has worked and what do you see as being effective and what is just eye candy that gets a client excited for 10 minutes? Chris Riebschlager: Yeah. So early in 2020, we'd decided to pivot on some of our touch activations. We obviously wanted to find a non-touch way to do those. So we did dive into the whole process of moving the interface to the user's phone methods, like just hitting a website via QR code on the display, and that I think is going to be something that now that we have that kind of locked and loaded, something that we can add as a value-add to existing projects. So in the future, if people aren't going to be a little bit more cautious about what they touch in public space, that's always going to be an option. I don't think touch is going away certainly. I think that's going to be. always in the mix, but now that we were forced to solve that problem at the moment, I think that's going to be a really great way to value-add the work that we do moving forward. I think your creative designers probably found that there are certain applications and in situations where that works well and others where it doesn't because I've seen pitches for stuff where just for us to snap a QR code and launch the controls on your phone and stand right in front of the display and do all that and I'm just thinking, just touch the damn display and use hand sanitizer after it's going to be a lot easier. So where does it best work?  Chris Riebschlager: I think it's really contextual to the project. So with something that's really content-heavy, where we need a lot of information from the user to present back to them, something that they want. For example, we do a lot of work with athletic departments where they want a way for everyone to see every athlete that had attended that school, and that usually involves some texts century and text century is usually best done with a keyboard or onscreen keyboard, and with that level of interaction, yes, you can offload that to a phone, but there's a point where you get diminishing returns with that. Getting someone to take out their phone, scan a code, and then go to the site, that's asking a lot of a person in a space like that where they really aren't in that mode of paying that much attention. So for that, I think for the foreseeable future, I think we're gonna keep moving the UI to the user's device as an option but I think a lot of that is just going to still happen on screen, but there's a lot of interactions that we do that are a lot lighter touch. So motion-driven interactives where we're using a connector or a camera to find human bodies in the space and the interaction is just driven by their emotion. I think for that level of thing, that's largely unchanged.  And there's no learning curve? It's just triggering something because it's picking up that there's something there.  Chris Riebschlager: Exactly. Is the learning curve important? Cause I think I've said this a number of times on different podcasts. I call a lot of these gesture-based systems that you see in public spaces like malls and transit stations and so on, I call them stupid people tricks because you're asking people to do things that are except for the extroverts, it's embarrassing and it takes awhile and may not work, and there's a subset of people-mostly kids-who would find that exciting, but most adults would go, “No, I'm not doing that.” Chris Riebschlager: Yeah. As you said, kids get it immediately. There's no learning curve with kids with these motion-based interactions. They mess around with it until they just get it, and then they're off to the races.  So there are well-established UI patterns with everything else that we interact with in a given day, like the phone, the computer, we all get how that stuff works. When we're presenting something entirely new to people, I think to get them over that learning curve and to get them over that curve quickly, I think it's just a matter of making it as simple as possible.  Like with Kinect-based installations, I hate introducing the idea of menus there, because we're thinking in terms of a mouse and a cursor. I think we need to take that off the table when we're talking about gestures. You're not there to point and select things. Let's think about different ways that you can use your body as this user interface that isn't just trying to copy-paste a mouse interaction or a keyboard interaction.  Yeah and stop thinking about Minority Report. Chris Riebschlager: Oh my gosh, Minority Report ruined my life when that came, out because that was the expectation. Just make it look like it was in the movie, right?  No, and you don't want that by the way.  Chris Riebschlager: It looks cool but in practice, it just leads to tears.  On the company website, you've got a pretty robust resource section and blog posts and so on, and you've written a couple of pieces around generative art. What does that mean to you and how is it applied?  Chris Riebschlager: So art is something that's really important to me, and it's one of the things that I'm just not very good at. Like I cannot draw to save my life, but I can program. I can write really decent software and I've found a way to create art that's interesting to me by using the tools, the software, and the frameworks that people smarter than me have created.  So generative art, I think is a really interesting way to explore ways of art-making that are a collaborative practice between you and a computer. It's like, I'm setting up some rules about what I want to happen. I set the computer to go follow those rules and make something interesting and present it back to me, and maybe I like it, maybe I don't, but that back and forth between the computer and me, is just a really interesting art making practice to me.  In the context of installations in corporate buildings, public buildings, airports, and so on, how is it applied and what do you need to think about?  Chris Riebschlager: So I think there's a lot of things to consider. In past projects, I think a lot of the creative direction comes from existing artwork in this space. So we did some work with the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, and they had already been working with an artist in the Netherlands, I believe and his work was just in the primary colors, blue, yellow, and red. So we knew we had a palette to work with. There is a lot of previous work already installed in the space so what we added to that space was just an interactive version of what was already happening there. So it was a familiar as well which was already existing there. But I think that's the primary consideration. What makes sense in that space? What other artwork does this need to live with?  But also I think an interesting way to approach this is what other inputs do we have available? If it's a lobby, do we have the motion of people? Do we have traffic data or weather data, or any interesting data from the country that we're working with that could be incorporated into this piece, that could present some meaningful message through the work? I think there are so many fun opportunities there to incorporate live data in and present that back to people in a beautiful and compelling way.  When I have conversations about data visualizations or generative art, I ask the question and I'll ask it again, does it matter, when you talk about data inputs, does it matter that the viewers understand that this is why this is changing because the weather has changed or the winds stronger or whatever it may be, or does it just need to be visually pleasing? Chris Riebschlager: It really depends on the client's expectation there. To me, you take work like a Refik Anadol, right? His work is ostensibly data-driven. If I look at one of his pieces, I have no idea what data is being presented to me and what it actually means. It looks amazing, but I have no idea. I mean he could just tell me that it's data-driven and I just have to take his word on it.  Yeah. I know the Charlotte airport, for instance, he uses things like baggage handling data and things like that on this giant display. But I think like a fraction, 1% of the people walking by would know that's why it's doing what it's doing. Chris Riebschlager: Exactly, and that could be a pre-rendered video and no one would ever know. But I think there are ways of incorporating those ideas into meaningful representations of that data. So the ways we've done that in the past are we did a lobby screen in Atlanta that was right next to a transit stop for a train and the idea was we have the actual transit information for that stop, like the next train arriving in five minutes on the screen. So that's one layer of this piece, but the bigger portion of the screen is given up to this flock of birds, and they're very calm and very chill when there's not a train arriving. And then as the train is approaching, they get more active. There's more happening on screen.  So we have the literal data that you need and also some supplemental, beautiful, interesting thing to show that is connected to that day. To me personally, drawing a clear connection between what's happening on screen and the data we're trying to represent is very important to me. Yeah. It reminds me of an ad on just like a digital poster in a subway platform, I think in Stockholm or something like that, and they did this very clever thing where you would have a model in the poster and as a subway train approached, her hair started to fall back and then, when the subway was coming into the station, she was in a wind tunnel and then she calmed down. I thought that's very clever. That's driven by data and triggers and everything else, and it's not quite generative art, but it's the same kind of thing. There's a relationship between what's happening and what you see. Chris Riebschlager: Exactly, yeah.  For the company, what are some projects that people who are listening to this would be familiar with? Chris Riebschlager: Oh, my gosh, locally here in Kansas City, we have a project that when people ask me where I work, I always say do you know the big books in the library garage downtown? We made those. So it's a parking structure next to the library downtown in Kansas City that we did and it's basically to make it look like a huge bookshelf and it's a really cool landmark here in Kansas City.  Is that an analog thing or is there a digital thing?  Chris Riebschlager: That is just an analog.  Okay, and in terms of digital ones, I think he did something with a big torch or something in a stadium?  Chris Riebschlager: Yes, we did. We just installed what is the largest 3D printed structure in North America, certainly, and I think the world for the Las Vegas Raiders. So we created the Al Davis Memorial torch, which they had in Oakland at a small, maybe 15-foot tall torch, and we wanted to create just a huge monument in the new stadium to that. So through our L Sam large-scale additive manufacturing machine, which is essentially just a carwash size 3D printer, we created a huge torch sculpture. I think it's 90 feet tall and has eliminated LED structure in the center to represent the flame, and it's just a remarkable, amazing piece that made the news.  I think it's transparent LED or LED mesh?  Chris Riebschlager: I don't think it's a LED mesh. It's LED in that metal structure that they basically made a flame form that goes in the torch and then eliminated that from within.  Have you done any big corporate lobbies and things like that with giant video walls where you're developing content for them? Chris Riebschlager: Oh, absolutely. A couple that comes to mind and we just did one last year for State Farm in their headquarters in Bloomington, Illinois. Overall, I think it's a 3,000 or 4,000 square foot space that is like a monument, a museum to  State Farm history, which has a century-long history, a lot of artifacts, a lot of video and audio content. It's a really amazing space. We recreated the office of the original founders, and then created an interactive where you can explore around the space and find out like, this is the pen that was actually used to sign the initial corporate contract or whatever, and as part of that, there's also an immersive theater in the center that lets you play different videos that kind of unpack the history of State Farm. Yeah, and that's a company like Geico, that's trying quite hard with its marketing and everything to not be just boring insurance company?  Chris Riebschlager: Yeah. Insurance can be a pretty dry topic, but we tried to make it as interesting as possible.  My son is in insurance. (Laughter) We can talk a lot about it but I don't want to get him in trouble.  Chris Riebschlager: It's a very fascinating and very important industry. It's an amazing industry.  With the company right now, what are some projects that over the next 6 to 12 months we should be looking for that you're allowed to talk about?  Chris Riebschlager: We have a lot of activities going on at the new SoFi stadium in Los Angeles, which is going to be the new home of the Rams and Chargers. So if you haven't seen images of that stadium, it is absolutely bananas. It's got what is the biggest Oculus LED screen?  Yeah, the giant Halo, the Samsung screen.  Chris Riebschlager: This is absolutely massive, and it's an amazing space to have the opportunity to install some work in. So we have some work for different brand activations in that space. So one of the big ones is the YouTube theater, which is a performance venue, as far as the stadium that we did a large LED wall on the outside of that theater and also a YouTube icon, a structural YouTube icon in the Plaza in front of the theater that we have the LED screen in that is going to function as a magic mirror. It's just fun, interesting, “look at me, I'm up there” and look at all kinds of crazy things, but also show off a YouTube content creator stuff and highlighting the content creators.  I'm sure the people in LA are excited about the concept of actually going to a football game that has the full capacity as we get healthy.  Chris Riebschlager: For sure.  All right, Chris, thank you so much for taking some time with me today. I really appreciate it.  Chris Riebschlager: Absolutely. Thank you.    

Loving me Is enough
8: Business Talk With "The Business Plug" & Darryl From State Farm

Loving me Is enough

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 60:56


GLT's Sound Ideas - Full Episodes
WGLT's Sound Ideas - Thursday 6/22/21

GLT's Sound Ideas - Full Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 25:42


Illinois' largest auto insurer says it is seeing a huge increase in thefts of catalytic converters nationwide and in this state. State Farm says pandemic unemployment and a hot market for platinum palladium and rhodium might be causes. A jazz musician who borrows from hip hop says the two art forms are more similar than you might think. Jon Norton has an interview with Saxophonist Christopher McBride before a Saturday concert in Bloomington. Bloomington Council Member Jamie Mathy is all about under the street infrastructure. And find out what kids are learning about media literacy.

Movement Guidance
Kim Hale

Movement Guidance

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 25:59


This week on Movement Guidance we have Kim Hale!   From working as a dancer, to teacher, choreographer, agent, and professor, she now is focusing on her new venture in Public Relations. Some of her credits include the  2020 Netflix Holiday musical Christmas In The Square, The Ellen Show, Grey's Anatomy, The Late Late Show, State Farm, Harley Davidson, Redken, amongst countless others.   Don't forget to follow us on Instagram: @movementguidance

The Great Trials Podcast
Ryan Saba and Robert Karwin | Nicholas Tusant v. City of Hemet et al. | $25.6 Million Verdict

The Great Trials Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 82:03


This week, your hosts Steve Lowry and Yvonne Godfrey interview Ryan Saba of Rosen Saba, LLP (https://www.rosensaba.com/) and Robert Karwin of the Law Office of Robert P. Karwin (https://www.karwinlaw.com/).    Remember to rate and review GTP in iTunes: Click Here To Rate and Review   Episode Details: Ryan Saba of Rosen Saba, LLP and Robert Karwin of the Law Office of Robert P. Karwin explain how they successfully represented California high school student Nicholas Tusant after he was struck by a truck in a lighted crosswalk, resulting in severe, life-altering injuries. On March 24, 2017, 16-year-old Nicholas activated the crosswalk's flashing lights and yelled for Joseph Gervais, who was driving a Dodge Dakota truck, to stop. Instead, Nicolas was hit in the crosswalk and rendered unconscious. Nicholas, one of 10 teens injured in this crosswalk between 2007 and 2018, spent 30 days in a coma and months in the hospital healing from a stroke, bone fractures and severe brain damage — all of which continue to make it difficult for him to walk and talk. Despite the City of Hemet's attempts to use a design immunity defense, cast blame on Joseph Gervais' negligent driving and assert that an accident on public property does not constitute a dangerous condition, a Riverside County, California jury found in favor of the plaintiff. In February 2020, Nicholas was awarded $25,656,686.58 in damages, marking the largest personal injury verdict in California in 2020. Click Here to Read/Download the Complete Trial Documents     Guest Bio: Ryan Saba Ryan Saba is an accomplished civil litigation and trial attorney. Ryan's practice consists of prosecuting and defending individual, class action and mass action claims. On the plaintiff side, each year Ryan obtains some of the largest settlements and verdicts.  On the defense side, Ryan is widely considered one of the premiere “bet-the-company” trial lawyers in California.  Ryan has extensive experience in a wide range of federal and state matters, including consumer litigation, employment litigation, women's rights, complex business and entertainment disputes, catastrophic injury claims, professional responsibility, copyright/trademark, civil rights, maritime, and municipal, insurance bad faith, landowner, and product liability.  Ryan has been working with Jim Rosen since 1999 and is a founding partner of Rosen“RosenSaba, LLP. Read Full Bio   Robert P. Karwin Robert P. Karwin began his career as a trial attorney for a personal injury defense firm in Glendale, California that represented such clients as Allstate, State Farm, Mercury, and Avis Rent-a-Car. With the experience gained there, he "has the other team's playbook" and uses those strategies in representing injured people against the insurance companies.  Mr. Karwin has a reputation of taking cases to trial, so insurance companies know he will not back down in his fight for you. He now represents injured people in such diverse matters as auto accidents, slip and fall, dog bites, medical malpractice, and other injury claims. Read Full Bio   Show Sponsors: Legal Technology Services - LegalTechService.com Digital Law Marketing - DigitalLawMarketing.com Harris, Lowry, and Manton - hlmlawfirm.com   Free Resources: Stages Of A Jury Trial - Part 1 Stages Of A Jury Trial - Part 2

Roundball Rock
Inside The State Farm Cinematic Universe

Roundball Rock

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 86:03


Sean and Joey are back to talk CP3 not turning into a basketball, Jeannie Buss' Stand up, the NBA finals and more!INFORMAL SUMMER LEAGUE MEET UP: 8/10/21 10:30 pm @ The Billionaire Buyer Slot Machines @ The Golden Nugget Hotel & Casino. We'd love to meet you. (Don't stab us please)Buy a T-shirt, Mug, Tote, Sweatshirt, or Covid mask here: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/roundball-rock-the-podcast?ref_id=13068 (Promo code: RoundRockPod for 30% off)SUPPORT: www.patreon.com/roundrockpodBLOG: www.roundballrock.netTWITTER & IG: @RoundRockPodE-MAIL: RoundRockPod@gmail.comPHONE: 323-682-0342MERCH: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/roundball-rock-the-podcast?ref_id=13068ALBUM: www.roundballrock.bandcamp.comSONG: "Stat It Up" by Sean Keane See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Crain's Daily Gist
07/15/21: Are home buyers holding off downtown?

Crain's Daily Gist

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 30:54


Our 500th episode of Crain's Daily Gist features residential real estate reporter Dennis Rodkin and host Amy Guth discussing the downtown condo rebound, why the city closed a Gold Coast tower's parking garage and all the latest news in the local housing market. Plus: New figures measure the downtown comeback; dramatic rate cuts pay off for State Farm; M1 Finance is Chicago's newest billion-dollar company; and $100 million deals keep venture funding on a torrid pace.

Bible Geeks Weekly
Episode 115 - "From All This Smiling"

Bible Geeks Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 41:55


Show Unexpected Kindness to OthersIn this week's edition of “Hello, My Name Is ...” four Bible women inspire us to greater mercy, as we admire the power of small deeds and imagine attending our own funeral. And as we learn morality from Blockbuster and State Farm (but mostly from Jesus and his “Good Samaritan”), this discussion of merciful deeds takes us back to some important basics. We close the episode by challenging ourselves to become kindness artists — becoming proficient in unusual, covert, creative kindness.The Big Idea: We reflect God's goodness when we seek out creative ways to bless others without expectation of any earthly reward.Weekly Challenges: Find this week's Through the Week challenges here.Show NotesCross Training - "Pay It Forward" (DAILY DOWNLOAD)Cross Training - Through the Week Challenges - Week 27Like the Teacher: Luke 10:25-37 (VERSE)The Bible Geeks Facebook Group (FACEBOOK)Support the Show

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON
Kwik Trip And State Farm Partner With Free Milk

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 50:00


Apples will be at center stage during Wisconsin Farm Technology Days 2021 in Eau Claire county.  Bob Bosold talks to Andy Ferguson of Ferguson Orchards about their role at Innovation Square. Kwik Trip and State Farm agents across Wisconsin are partnering up to provide people with free milk.  John McHugh, director of public relations with Kwik Trip, explains their continued commitment to Wisconsin's dairy industry. Watching weather this week with the development of tropical storm Elsa.  John Hineberg, market advisor with Total Farm Marketing out of West Bend, gives direction on where markets might be headed. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey Frase Podcast
#658 RHOP Candiace Bassett Dismisses Eddie Osefo Cheating Rumors, Says Co-Star Robyn is a MILLIONAIRE

Hey Frase Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 56:16


Our girl Candiace Bassett is back on the pod to address ALL THE DRAMA we can expect to see from RHOP Season 6! Is Eddie really cheating on Dr. Wendy? What tf is going on between Candiace and Ashley?? Plus Candiace says Robyn Dixon's hat line made her MILLIONS. RHOP Season 6 premiers Sunday, July 11. Show is sponsored by MiracleCord (https://miraclecord.com/?sscid=61k5_j4jxv&), Jacob from State Farm (jacobsf.com | 571-261-9817), and Ballston BID (grab your #BandsandBrews presale tix from ballstonva.org/bbb).

Screaming in the Cloud
Hacking AWS in Good Faith with Nick Frichette

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 35:31


About NickNick Frichette is a Penetration Tester and Team Lead for State Farm. Outside of work he does vulnerability research. His current primary focus is developing techniques for AWS exploitation. Additionally he is the founder of hackingthe.cloud which is an open source encyclopedia of the attacks and techniques you can perform in cloud environments.Links: Hacking the Cloud: https://hackingthe.cloud/ Determine the account ID that owned an S3 bucket vulnerability: https://hackingthe.cloud/aws/enumeration/account_id_from_s3_bucket/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/frichette_n Personal website:https://frichetten.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Thinkst. This is going to take a minute to explain, so bear with me. I linked against an early version of their tool, canarytokens.org in the very early days of my newsletter, and what it does is relatively simple and straightforward. It winds up embedding credentials, files, that sort of thing in various parts of your environment, wherever you want to; it gives you fake AWS API credentials, for example. And the only thing that these things do is alert you whenever someone attempts to use those things. It's an awesome approach. I've used something similar for years. Check them out. But wait, there's more. They also have an enterprise option that you should be very much aware of canary.tools. You can take a look at this, but what it does is it provides an enterprise approach to drive these things throughout your entire environment. You can get a physical device that hangs out on your network and impersonates whatever you want to. When it gets Nmap scanned, or someone attempts to log into it, or access files on it, you get instant alerts. It's awesome. If you don't do something like this, you're likely to find out that you've gotten breached, the hard way. Take a look at this. It's one of those few things that I look at and say, “Wow, that is an amazing idea. I love it.” That's canarytokens.org and canary.tools. The first one is free. The second one is enterprise-y. Take a look. I'm a big fan of this. More from them in the coming weeks.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Lumigo. If you've built anything from serverless, you know that if there's one thing that can be said universally about these applications, it's that it turns every outage into a murder mystery. Lumigo helps make sense of all of the various functions that wind up tying together to build applications. It offers one-click distributed tracing so you can effortlessly find and fix issues in your serverless and microservices environment. You've created more problems for yourself; make one of them go away. To learn more, visit lumigo.io.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I spend a lot of time throwing things at AWS in varying capacities. One area I don't spend a lot of time giving them grief is in the InfoSec world because as it turns out, they—and almost everyone else—doesn't have much of a sense of humor around things like security. My guest today is Nick Frechette, who's a penetration tester and team lead for State Farm. Nick, thanks for joining me.Nick: Hey, thank you for inviting me on.Corey: So, like most folks in InfoSec, you tend to have a bunch of different, I guess, titles or roles that hang on signs around someone's neck. And it all sort of distills down, on some level—in your case, at least, and please correct me if I'm wrong—to ‘cloud security researcher.' Is that roughly correct? Or am I missing something fundamental?Nick: Yeah. So, for my day job, I do penetration testing, and that kind of puts me up against a variety of things, from web applications, to client-side applications, to sometimes the cloud. In my free time, though, I like to spend a lot of time on security research, and most recently been focusing pretty heavily on AWS.Corey: So, let's start at the very beginning. What is a cloud security researcher? “What is it you'd say it is you do here?” For lack of a better phrasing?Nick: Well, to be honest, the phrase ‘security researcher' or ‘cloud security researcher' has been, kind of… I guess watered down in recent years; everybody likes to call themselves a researcher in some way or another. You have some folks who participate in the bug bounty programs. So, for example, GCP, and Azure have their own bug bounties. AWS does not, and too sure why. And so they want to find vulnerabilities with the intention of getting cash compensation for it.You have other folks who are interested in doing security research to try and better improve defenses and alerting and monitoring so that when the next major breach happens, they're prepared or they'll be able to stop it ahead of time. From what I do, I'm very interested in offensive security research. So, how can I as, a penetration tester, or red teamer or, I guess, an actual criminal, [laugh] how can I take advantage of AWS, or try to avoid detection from services like GuardDuty and CloudTrail?Corey: So, let's break that down a little bit further. I've heard the term of ‘red team versus blue team' used before. Red team—presumably—is the offensive security folks—and yes, some of those people are, in fact, quite offensive—and blue team is the defense side. In other words, keeping folks out. Is that a reasonable summation of the state of the world?Nick: It can be, yeah, especially when it comes to security. One of the nice parts about the whole InfoSec field—I know a lot of folks tend to kind of just say, “Oh, they're there to prevent the next breach,” but in reality, InfoSec has a ton of different niches and different job specialties. “Blue teamers,” quote-unquote, tend to be the defense side working on ensuring that we can alert and monitor potential attacks, whereas red teamers—or penetration testers—tend to be the folks who are trying to do the actual exploitation or develop techniques to do that in the future.Corey: So, you talk a bit about what you do for work, obviously, but what really drew my notice was stuff you do that isn't part of your core job, as best I understand it. You're focused on vulnerability research, specifically with a strong emphasis on cloud exploitation, as you said—AWS in particular—and you're the founder of Hacking the Cloud, which is an open-source encyclopedia of various attacks and techniques you can perform in cloud environments. Tell me about that.Nick: Yeah, so Hacking the Cloud came out of a frustration I had when I was first getting into AWS, that there didn't seem to be a ton of good resources for offensive security professionals to get engaged in the cloud. By comparison, if you wanted to learn about web application hacking, or attacking Active Directory, or reverse engineering, if you have a credit card, I can point you in the right direction. But there just didn't seem to be a good course or introduction to how you, as a penetration tester, should attack AWS. There's things like, you know, open S3 buckets are a nightmare, or that server-side request forgery on an EC2 instance can result in your organization being fined very, very heavily. I kind of wanted to go deeper with that.And with Hacking the Cloud, I've tried to gather a bunch of offensive security research from various blog posts and conference talks into a single location, so that both the offense side and the defense side can kind of learn from it and leverage that to either improve defenses or look for things that they can attack.Corey: It seems to me that doing things like that is not likely to wind up making a whole heck of a lot of friends over on the cloud provider side. Can you talk a little bit about how what you do is perceived by the companies you're focusing on?Nick: Yeah. So, in terms of relationship, I don't really have too much of an idea of what they think. I have done some research and written on my blog, as well as published to Hacking the Cloud, some techniques for doing things like abusing the SSM agent, as well as abusing the AWS API to enumerate permissions without logging into CloudTrail. And ironically, through the power of IP addresses, I can see when folks from the Amazon corporate IP address space look at my blog, and that's always fun, especially when there's, like, four in the course of a couple of minutes, or five or six. But I don't really know too much about what they—or how they view it, or if they think it's valuable at all. I hope they do, but really not too sure.Corey: I would imagine that they do, on some level, but I guess the big question is, you know that someone doesn't like what you're doing when they send, you know, cease and desist notices, or have the police knock on your door. I feel like at most levels, we're past that in an InfoSec level, at least I'd like to believe we are. We don't hear about that happening all too often anymore. But what's your take on it?Nick: Yeah, I definitely agree. I definitely think we are beyond that. Most companies these days know that vulnerabilities are going to happen, no matter how hard you try and how much money you spend, and so it's better to be accepting of that and open to it. And especially because the InfoSec community can be so, say, noisy at times, it's definitely worth it to pay attention, definitely be appreciative of the information that may come out. AWS is pretty awesome to work with, having disclosed to them a couple times, now.They have a safe harbor provision, which essentially says that so long as you're operating in good faith, you are allowed to do security testing. They do have some rules around that, but they are pretty clear in terms of if you were operating in good faith, you wouldn't be doing anything like that. It tends to be pretty obviously malicious things that they'll ask you to stop.Corey: So, talk to me a little bit about what you've found lately, and been public about. There have been a number of examples that have come up whenever people start googling your name or looking at things you've done. But what's happening lately? What have you found that's interesting?Nick: Yeah. So, I think most recently, the thing that's kind of gotten the most attention has been a really interesting bug I found in the AWS API. Essentially, kind of the core of it is that when you are interacting with the API, obviously that gets logged to CloudTrail, so long as it's compatible. So, if you are successful, say you want to do, like, Secrets Manager, ListSecrets, that shows up in CloudTrail. And similarly, if you do not have that permission on a role or user and you try to do it, that access denied also gets logged to CloudTrail.Something kind of interesting that I found is that by manually modifying a request, or mal-forming them, what we can do is we can modify the content-type header, and as a result when you do that—and you can provide literally gibberish. I think I have VS Code window here somewhere with a content-type of ‘meow'—when you do that, the AWS API knows the action that you're trying to call because of that messed up content type, it doesn't know exactly what you're trying to do and as a result, it doesn't get logged to CloudTrail. Now, while that may seem kind of weirdly specific and not really, like, a concern, the nice part of it though is that for some API actions—somewhere in the neighborhood of 600. I say ‘in the neighborhood of' just because it fluctuates over time—as a result of that, you can tell if you have that permission, or if you don't without that being logged to CloudTrail. And so we can do this enumeration of permissions without somebody in the defense side seeing us do it. Which is pretty awesome from a offensive security perspective.Corey: On some level, it would be easy to say, “Well, just not showing up in the logs isn't really a security problem at all.” I guess that you disagree?Nick: I do, yeah. So, let's sort of look at it from a real-world perspective. Let's say, Corey, you're tired of saving people money on their AWS bill, you'd instead maybe want to make a little money on the side and you're okay with perhaps, you know, committing some crimes to do it. Through some means you get access to a company's AWS credentials for some particular role, whether that's through remote code execution on an EC2 instance, or maybe find them in an open location like an S3 bucket or a Git repository, or maybe you phish a developer, through some means, you have an access key and a secret access key. The new problem that you have is that you don't know what those credentials are associated with, or what permissions they have.They could be the root account keys, or they could be literally locked down to a single S3 bucket to read from. It all just kind of depends. Now, historically, your options for figuring that out are kind of limited. Your best bet would be to brute-force the AWS API using a tool like Pacu, or my personal favorite, which is enumerate-iam by Andres Riancho. And what that does is it just tries a bunch of API calls and sees which one works and which one doesn't.And if it works, you clearly know that you have that permission. Now, the problem with that, though, is that if you were to do that, that's going to light up CloudTrail like a Christmas tree. It's going to start showing all these access denieds for these various API calls that you've tried. And obviously, any defender who's paying attention is going to look at that and go, “Okay. That's, uh, that's suspicious,” and you're going to get shut down pretty quickly.What's nice about this bug that I found is that instead of having to litter CloudTrail with all these logs, we can just do this enumeration for roughly 600-ish API actions across roughly 40 AWS services, and nobody is the wiser. You can enumerate those permissions, and if they work fantastic, and you can then use them, and if you come to find you don't have any of those 600 permissions, okay, then you can decide on where to go from there, or maybe try to risk things showing up in CloudTrail.Corey: CloudTrail is one of those services that I find incredibly useful, or at least I do in theory. In practice, it seems that things don't show up there, and you don't realize that those types of activities are not being recorded until one day there's an announcement of, “Hey, that type of activity is now recorded.” As of the time of this recording, the most recent example that in memory is data plane requests to DynamoDB. It's, “Wait a minute. You mean that wasn't being recorded previously? Huh. I guess it makes sense, but oh, dear.”And that causes a reevaluation of what's happening in the—from a security policy and posture perspective for some clients. There's also, of course, the challenge of CloudTrail logs take a significant amount of time to show up. It used to be over 20 minutes, I believe now it's closer to 15—but don't quote me on that, obviously. Run your own tests—which seems awfully slow for anything that's going to be looking at those in an automated fashion and taking a reactive or remediation approach to things that show up there. Am I missing something key?Nick: No, I think that is pretty spot on. And believe me, [laugh] I am fully aware at how long CloudTrail takes to populate, especially with doing a bunch of research on what is and what is not logged to CloudTrail. I know that there are some operations that can be logged more quickly than the 15-minute average. Off the top of my head, though, I actually don't quite remember what those are. But you're right, in general, the majority at least do take quite a while.And that's definitely time in which an adversary or someone like me, could maybe take advantage of that 15-minute window to try and brute force those permissions, see what we have access to, and then try to operate and get out with whatever goodies we've managed to steal.Corey: Let's say that you're doing the thing that you do, however that comes to be—and I am curious—actually, we'll start there. I am curious; how do you discover these things? Is it looking at what is presented and then figuring out, “Huh, how can I wind up subverting the system it's based on?” And, similar to the way that I take a look at any random AWS services and try and figure out how to use it as a database? How do you find these things?Nick: Yeah, so to be honest, it all kind of depends. Sometimes it's completely by accident. So, for example, the API bug I described about not logging to CloudTrail, I actually found that due to [laugh] copy and pasting code from AWS's website, and I didn't change the content-type header. And as a result, I happened to notice this weird behavior, and kind of took advantage of it. Other times, it's thinking a little bit about how something is implemented and the security ramifications of it.So, for example, the SSM agent—which is a phenomenal tool in order to do remote access on your EC2 instances—I was sitting there one day and just kind of thought, “Hey, how does that authenticate exactly? And what can I do with it?” Sure enough, it authenticates the exact same way that the AWS API does, that being the metadata service on the EC2 instance. And so what I figured out pretty quickly is if you can get access to an EC2 instance, even as a low-privilege user or you can do server-side request forgery to get the keys, or if you just have sufficient permissions within the account, you can potentially intercept SSM messages from, like, a session and provide your own results. And so in effect, if you've compromised an EC2 instance, and the only way, say, incident response has into that box is SSM, you can effectively lock them out of it and, kind of, do whatever you want in the meantime.Corey: That seems like it's something of a problem.Nick: It definitely can be. But it is a lot of fun to play keep-away with incident response. [laugh].Corey: I'd like to reiterate that this is all in environments you control and have permissions to be operating within. It is not recommended that people pursue things like this in other people's cloud environments without permissions. I don't want to find us sued for giving crap advice, and I don't want to find listeners getting arrested because they didn't understand the nuances of what we're talking about.Nick: Yes, absolutely. Getting legal approval is really important for any kind of penetration testing or red teaming. I know some folks sometimes might get carried away, but definitely be sure to get approval before you do any kind of testing.Corey: So, how does someone report a vulnerability to a company like AWS?Nick: So AWS, at least publicly, doesn't have any kind of bug bounty program. But what they do have is a vulnerability disclosure program. And that is essentially an email address that you can contact and send information to, and that'll act as your point of contact with AWS while they investigate the issue. And at the end of their investigation, they can report back with their findings, whether they agree with you and they are working to get that patched or fixed immediately, or if they disagree with you and think that everything is hunky-dory, or if you may be mistaken.Corey: I saw a tweet the other day that I would love to get your thoughts on, which said effectively, that if you don't have a public bug bounty program, then any way that a researcher chooses to disclose the vulnerability is definitionally responsible on their part because they don't owe you any particular duty of care. Responsible disclosure, of course, is also referred to as, “Coordinated vulnerability disclosure” because we're always trying to reinvent terminology in this space. What do you think about that? Is there a duty of care from security researchers to responsibly disclose the vulnerabilities they find, or coordinate those vulnerabilities with vendors in the absence of a public bounty program on turning those things in?Nick: Yeah, you know, I think that's a really difficult question to answer. From my own personal perspective, I always think it's best to contact the developers, or the company, or whoever maintains whatever you found a vulnerability in, give them the best shot to have it fixed or repaired. Obviously, sometimes that works great, and the company is super receptive, and they're willing to patch it immediately. And other times, they just don't respond, or sometimes they respond harshly, and so depending on the situation, it may be better for you to release it publicly with the intention that you're informing folks that this particular company or this particular project may have an issue. On the flip side, I can kind of understand—although I don't necessarily condone it—why folks pursue things like exploit brokers, for example.So, if a company doesn't have a bug bounty program, and the researcher isn't expecting any kind of, like, cash compensation, I can understand why they may spend tens of hours, maybe hundreds of hours chasing down a particularly impactful vulnerability, only to maybe write a blog post about it or get a little head pat and say, “Thanks, nice work.” And so I can see why they may pursue things like selling to an exploit broker who may pay them hefty sum, if it is a—Corey: Orders of magnitude more. It's, “Oh, good. You found a way to remotely execute code across all of EC2 in every region”—that is a hypothetical; don't email me—have a t-shirt. It seems like you could basically buy all the t-shirts for [laugh] what that is worth on the export market.Nick: Yes, absolutely. And I do know from some experience that folks will reach out to you and are interested in, particularly, some cloud exploits. Nothing, like, minor, like some of the things that I've found, but more thinking more of, like, accessing resources without anybody knowing or accessing resources cross-account; that could go for quite a hefty sum.Corey: This episode is sponsored by ExtraHop. ExtraHop provides threat detection and response for the Enterprise (not the starship). On-prem security doesn't translate well to cloud or multi-cloud environments, and that's not even counting IoT. ExtraHop automatically discovers everything inside the perimeter, including your cloud workloads and IoT devices, detects these threats up to 35 percent faster, and helps you act immediately. Ask for a free trial of detection and response for AWS today at extrahop.com/trial.Corey: It always feels squicky, on some level, to discover something like this that's kind of neat, and wind up selling it to basically some arguably terrible people. Maybe. We don't know who's buying these things from the exploit broker. Counterpoint, having reported a few security problems myself to various providers, you get an autoresponder, then you get a thank you email that goes into a bit more detail—for the well-run programs, at least—and invariably, the company's position is, is whatever you found is not as big of a deal as you think it is, and therefore they see no reason to publish it or go loud with it. Wouldn't you agree?Because, on some level, their entire position is, please don't talk about any security shortcomings that you may have discovered in our system. And I get why they don't want that going loud, but by the same token, security researchers need a reputation to continue operating on some level in the market as security researchers, especially independents, especially people who are trying to make names for themselves in the first place.Nick: Yeah.Corey: How do you resolve that dichotomy yourself?Nick: Yeah, so, from my perspective, I totally understand why a company or project wouldn't want you to publicly disclose an issue. Everybody wants to look good, and nobody wants to be called out for any kind of issue that may have been unintentionally introduced. I think the thing at the end of the day, though, from my perspective, if I, as some random guy in the middle of nowhere Illinois finds a bug, or to be frank, if anybody out there finds a vulnerability in something, then a much more sophisticated adversary is equally capable of finding such a thing. And so it's better to have these things out in the open and discussed, rather than hidden away, so that we have the best chance of anybody being able to defend against it or develop detections for it, rather than just kind of being like, “Okay, the vendor didn't like what I had to say, I guess I'll go back to doing whatever [laugh] things I normally do.”Corey: You've obviously been doing this for a while. And I'm going to guess that your entire security researcher career has not been focused on cloud environments in general and AWS in particular.Nick: Yes, I've done some other stuff in relation to abusing GitLab Runners. I also happen to find a pretty neat RCE and privilege escalation in the very popular open-source project. Pi-hole. Not sure if you have any experience with that.Corey: Oh, I run it myself all the time for various DNS blocking purposes and other sundry bits of nonsense. Oh, yes, good. But what I'm trying to establish here is that this is not just one or two companies that you've worked with. You've done this across the board, which means I can ask a question without naming and shaming anyone, even implicitly. What differentiates good vulnerability disclosure programs from terrible ones?Nick: Yeah, I think the major differentiator is the reactivity of the project, as in how quickly they respond to you. There are some programs I've worked with where you disclose something, maybe even that might be of a high severity, and you might not hear back four weeks at a time, whereas there are other programs, particularly the MSRC—which is a part of Microsoft—or with AWS's disclosure program, where within the hour, I had a receipt of, “Hey, we received this, we're looking into it.” And then within a couple hours after that, “Yep, we verified it. We see what you're seeing, and we're going to look at it right away.” I think that's definitely one of the major differentiators for programs.Corey: Are there any companies you'd like to call out in either direction—and, “No,” is a perfectly valid [laugh] answer to this one—for having excellent disclosure programs versus terrible ones?Nick: I don't know if I'd like to call anybody out negatively. But in support, I have definitely appreciated working with both AWS's and the MSRC—Microsoft's—I think both of them have done a pretty fantastic job. And they definitely know what they're doing at this point.Corey: Yeah, I must say that I primarily focus on AWS and have for a while, which should be blindingly obvious to anyone who's listened to me talk about computers for more than three and a half minutes. But my experiences with the security folks at AWS have been uniformly positive, even when I find things that they don't want me talking about, that I will be talking about regardless, they've always been extremely respectful, and I have never walked away from the conversation thinking that I was somehow cheated by the experience. In fact, a couple of years ago at the last in-person re:Invent, I got to give a talk around something I reported specifically about how AWS runs its vulnerability disclosure program with one of their security engineers, Zach Glick, and he was phenomenally transparent around how a lot of these things work, and what they care about, and how they view these things, and what their incentives are. And obviously being empathetic to people reporting things in with the understanding that there is no duty of care that when security researchers discover something, they then must immediately go and report it in return for a pat on the head and a thank you. It was really neat being able to see both sides simultaneously around a particular issue. I'd recommend it to other folks, except I don't know how you make that lightning strike twice.Nick: It's very, very wise. Yes.Corey: Thank you. I do my best. So, what's next for you? You've obviously found a number of interesting vulnerabilities around information disclosure. One of the more recent things that I found that was sort of neat as I trolled the internet—I don't believe it was yours, but there was a ability to determine the account ID that owned an S3 bucket by enumerating by a binary search. Did you catch that at all?Nick: I did. That was by Ben Bridts, which is—it's pretty awesome technique, and that's been something I've been kind of interested in for a while. There is an ability to enumerate users' roles and service-linked roles inside an account, so long as the account ID. The problem, of course, is getting the account ID. So, when Ben put that out there I was super stoked about being able to leverage that now for enumeration and maybe some fun phishing tricks with that.Corey: I love the idea. I love seeing that sort of thing being conducted. And AWS's official policy as best I remember when I looked at this once, account IDs are not considered confidential. Do you agree with that?Nick: Yep. That is my understanding of how AWS views it. From my perspective, having an account ID can be beneficial. I mentioned that you can enumerate users' roles and service-linked roles with it, and that can be super useful from a phishing perspective. The average phishing email looks like, “Oh, you won an iPad,” or, “Oh, you're the 100th visitor of some website,” or something like that.But imagine getting an email that looks like it's from something like AWS developer support, or from some research program that they're doing, and they can say to you, like, “Hey, we see that you have these roles in your account with account ID such-and-such, and we know that you're using EKS, and you're using ECS,” that phishing email becomes a lot more believable when suddenly this outside party seemingly knows so much about your account. And that might be something that you would think, “Oh, well only a real AWS employee or AWS would know that.” So, from my perspective, I think it's best to try and keep your account ID secret. I actually redact it from every screenshot that I publish, or at the very least, I try to. At the same time, though, it's not the kind of thing that's going to get somebody in your account in a single step, so I can totally see why some folks aren't too concerned about it.Corey: I feel like we also got a bit of a red herring coming from AWS blog posts themselves, where they always will give screenshots explaining what they do, and redact the account ID in every case. And the reason that I was told at one point was, “Oh, we have an internal provisioning system that's different. It looks different, and I don't want to confuse people whenever I wind up doing a screenshot.” And that's great, and I appreciate that. And part of me wonders on one level how accurate is that?Because sure, I understand that you don't necessarily want to distract people with something that looks different, but then I found out that the system is called Isengard and, yeah, it's great. They've mentioned it periodically in blog posts, and talks, and the rest. And part of me now wonders, oh, wait a minute. Is it actually because they don't want to disclose the differences between those systems, or is it because they don't have license rights publicly to use the word Isengard and don't want to get sued by whoever owns the rights to the Lord of the Rings trilogy. So, one wonders what the real incentives are in different cases. But I've always viewed account IDs as being the sort of thing that eh, you probably want to share them around all the time, but it also doesn't necessarily hurt.Nick: Exactly, yeah. It's not the kind of thing you want to share with the world immediately, but it doesn't really hurt in the end.Corey: There was an early time when the partner network was effectively determining tiers of partner by how much spend they influenced, and the way that you've demonstrated that was by giving account IDs for your client accounts. The only verification at the time, to my understanding was that, “Yep, that mapped to the client you said it did.” And that was it. So, I can understand back in those days not wanting to muddy those waters. But those days are also long passed.So, I get it. I'm not going to be the first person to advertise mine, but if you can discover my account ID by looking at a bucket, it doesn't really keep me up at night.So, all of those things considered, we've had a pretty wide-ranging conversation here about a variety of things. What's next? What interests you as far as where you're going to start looking and exploring—and exploiting as the case may be—various cloud services? hackthe.cloud—which there is the dot in there, which also turns it into a domain; excellent choice—is absolutely going to be a great collection for a lot of what you find and for other people to contribute and learn from one another. But where are you aimed at? What's next?Nick: Yeah, so one thing I've been really interested in has been fuzzing the AWS API. As anyone who's ever used AWS before knows, there are hundreds of services with thousands of potential API endpoints. And so from a fuzzing perspective, there is a wide variety of things for us to potentially affect or potentially find vulnerabilities in. I'm currently working on a library that will allow me to make that fuzzing a lot easier. You could use things like botocore, Boto3, like, some of the AWS SDKs.The problem though, is that those are designed for, sort of like, the happy path where you can format your request the way Amazon wants. As a security researcher or as someone doing fuzzing, I kind of want to send random gibberish sometimes, or I want to malform my requests. And so that library is still in production, but it has already resulted in a bug. While I was fuzzing part of the AWS API, I happened to notice that I broke Elastic Beanstalk—quite literally—when [laugh] when I was going through the AWS console, I got the big red error message of, “[unintelligible 00:29:35] that request parameter is null.” And I was like, “Huh. Well, why is it null?”And come to find out as a result of that, there is a HTML injection vulnerability in the Elastic—well, there was a HTML injection vulnerability in the Elastic Beanstalk, for the AWS console. Pivoting from there, the Elastic Beanstalk uses Angular 1.8.1, or at least it did when I found it. As a result of that, we can modify that HTML injection to do template injection. And for the AngularJS crowd, template injection is basically cross-site scripting [laugh] because there is no sandbox anymore, at least in that version. And so as a result of that, I was able to get cross-site scripting in the AWS console, which is pretty exciting. That doesn't tend to happen too frequently.Corey: No that is not a typical issue that winds up getting disclosed very often.Nick: Definitely, yeah. And so I was excited about it, and considering the fact that my library for fuzzing is literally, like, not even halfway done, or is barely halfway done, I'm looking forward to what other things I can find with it.Corey: I look forward to reading more. And at the time of this recording, I should point out that this has not been finalized or made public, so I'll be keeping my eyes open to see what happens with this. And hopefully, this will be old news by the time this episode drops. If not, well, [laugh] this might be an interesting episode once it goes out.Nick: Yeah. I hope they'd have it fixed by then. They haven't responded to it yet other than the, “Hi, we've received your email. Thanks for checking in.” But we'll see how that goes.Corey: Watching news as it breaks is always exciting. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and how you go about things, where can they find you?Nick: Yeah, so you can find me at a couple different places. On Twitter I'm @frichette_n. I also write a blog where I contribute a lot of my research at frechetten.com as well as Hacking the Cloud. I contribute a lot of the AWS stuff that gets thrown on there. And it's also open-source, so if anyone else would like to contribute or share their knowledge, you're absolutely welcome to do so. Pull requests are open and excited for anyone to contribute.Corey: Excellent. And we will of course include links to that in the [show notes 00:31:42]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Nick: Yeah, thank you so much for inviting me on. I had a great time.Corey: Nick Frechette, penetration tester and team lead for State Farm. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me why none of these things are actually vulnerabilities, but simultaneously should not be discussed in public, ever.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Hey Frase Podcast
#655 Sarah and Schman Talk Pop-culture, Politics, and Q&A

Hey Frase Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 38:16


Schman is on the show! From pop culture to politics we cover it all, plus, your email advice questions. We chat about Nick Cannon's 7 kids. Can you be a good father to 7 kids and work all the time? We're having 2 family Sip and Sees this summer, should we do a lottery to see who can hold KJ, and the Euros, I hate them.'The show is sponsored by: horizonfibroids.com, ballston bid Bands and Brews, July 24th, at 11am: ballstonva.org/bbb, Jacob Ayubi with pet insurance for State Farm (571) 261-9817

The Manuscript Academy
Your Elevator Pitch with Book-to-Film Producers & Editors Maritte Go and Eric Mofford

The Manuscript Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 54:57


Hey everyone! This is a live recording of a very special book-to-film event with Eric Mofford (producer and consultant) and Marty Go (producer and director) all about how to craft an elevator pitch. If you've ever wondered how to describe your work quickly—or panicked at the “So, what's your book about?” question—this episode is for you! Prefer to watch the video? Click here: https://manuscriptacademy.com/elevator-pitch-panel Want to hear about upcoming FREE events like this one? Join our mailing list here: https://manuscriptacademy.com/subscribe or check out our calendar of events here: https://manuscriptacademy.com/calendar Maritte Go is a Filipino-American filmmaker hailing all the way from West Palm Beach, Florida. Getting her start in theater, she began as an actress and went onto doing corny TV shows and commercials as a kid. This eventually led to attaining her BFA in acting from Florida State University. She then moved to LA where she was accepted into USC's prestigious Masters in Film and TV program and recently graduated. Go is a recent Fellow recipient of Armed With a Camera. Her latest Indie feature she produced called, Love Land, won the San Francisco Film Grant. She now happily pays the bills Directing, Producing, and Editing Indie feature films, commercials, and music videos for companies such as Disney, Sony, and State Farm. Eric Mofford is a producer, line producer and budget consultant. He has been involved in over 150 film, television and web productions as well as numerous music videos and commercials. His credits include the Emmy-winning television series 24 and the iconic indie feature, Daughters of the Dust. Recently he served as Head of Production at Lone Wolf Media overseeing documentary projects for NOVA, Nat Geo, Animal Planet, Smithsonian Channel and PBS. Previously, he served as Head of Production at Lady of the Canyon where he produced projects such as the dramatic television pilot, Finding Hope, with Chris Mulkey, James Morrison, Darby Stanchfield and Molly Quinn; and the comedy documentary, We'll Always Have Dingle, shot in Kerry County, Ireland. He also served as Head of Production at Unconventional Media, producing the Emmy-nominated award-winning documentary, Houston We Have A Problem, and the live action portions for the EA video game, Need For Speed: Undercover, with Maggie Q. Mofford, a member of the DGA, has written and directed projects for Disney Interactive, Saban Entertainment, The Discovery Channel, Image America, United Way and TBS. He co-produced Senior Year, a 13-part PBS documentary series on high school. He has sold two feature film screenplays and has various projects in development. His dramatic blues film, Travelin' Trains, won a dozen national and international film festival awards and continues to play in art museum showcases over 25 years later. He has done schedules and budgets for both large studio productions and small indies and has shared that knowledge teaching numerous media workshops, both in the United States and internationally.

Hey Frase Podcast
#653 Andrea Lopez! Paul Wharton! The Band Is Back Together

Hey Frase Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 65:40


You all know them and love them...prior co-hosts of this show Andrea Lopez and Paul Wharton rejoined the pod today to talk about their recent career moves, love life, and thoughts on the Chrissy Teigen scandal. Is Paul still with his man? Will Andrea be hosting a reality show? And, well, I have some updates too. And, how do we all deal with imposter syndrome? 'The show is sponsored by: State Farm's Jacob Ayubi call 571.918.1008, and healthyfreshmeals.com use code 25OFF for $25 off you first order and horizonfibroids.com

QP SPORTS EXCHANGE
Hoop Questions Monday! Easy Bake oven Dude!

QP SPORTS EXCHANGE

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 62:52


QP Sports Exchange Podcast sometimes will tackle hard subjects and this week's podcast is one of those topics. We discuss Becky Hammon as one of the leaders for a couple head coaching gigs and comment on some of the thoughts of people I spoke with on this topic. We discuss the MVP of the NBA getting tossed, we break down all the playoffs series as well. We show love for friend of the podcast Braylen McCain class of 23' and what he has been doing and we show appreciation to the Point God" CP3, also known as Chris Paul that tortured soul in the State Farm commercials. Enjoy the podcast and please further the discussion on any of the topics on our social media platforms. God Bless you all and thank you to all our faithful listeners, we have a chance this week to go over 10k for downloads. It is truly amazing and we here at QP Sports Exchange Podcast are so grateful, but the mission is not done until QP Nation are going toe to toe with Bill Simmons (The Ringer) and Kevin Smith (Smod Co.) tell some people to tap in and join this ever growing community! Twitter @QPPNetwork IG/FB QuestionPoint Pod Network

Air Buds
We're Living In A State Farm Commercial Now

Air Buds

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 44:10


Jamel and Peter get into a whole slew of wonderment. The fight in Denver, The age old KD versus Lebron argument, Embiid is incredible, Giannis' Euro Step, Luke Kennard makes a lot of money somehow, Rudy Gobert is a goofy goof ball, venture capitalizing, and how dope a 76ers/Suns finals would be. Support the buds at patreon.com/airbudspod! Get our t-shirts at https://airbuds.bigcartel.com and https://www.teepublic.com/user/airbudspodcast! Give us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts and we'll read what you write on the air!

Hey Frase Podcast
#652 My Body Image Sucks and One Night Stands Are Dead

Hey Frase Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 32:58


I'm body positive but since having a baby I've really been struggling to love myself, plus, my thoughts on KUWTK ending. Could you remain friends with someone who unfollowed you on social media? Upcoming documentaries to watch including ‘The Hustler and The Housewife. One night stands are apparently dead according to this new survey, and more. 'The show is sponsored by: State Farm's Jacob Ayubi call 571.918.1008, and healthyfreshmeals.com use code 25OFF for $25 off you first order Join My Patreon.com/thesarahfrasershow