Podcasts about Community engagement

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Best podcasts about Community engagement

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Latest podcast episodes about Community engagement

Collaborative Endeavors
Dr. Tara Mehta & Urban Initiatives: A partnership to promote children's mental health

Collaborative Endeavors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 23:30


FEATURED RESEARCHERS & PARTNERSTara Mehta, PhDAssociate Professor of Clinical PsychologyDepartment of Psychiatry, UIC College of MedicineConsultant, CCTS Community Engagement & Collaboration CoreUrban Initiatives650 W. Lake St., Suite #340Chicago, IL 60661info@urbaninitiatives.orgLearn more about the CCTS Pilot Grant program at ccts.uic.edu/funding If you would like to see your interdisciplinary team featured on the podcast, reach out to me at laurenw@uic.edu. Interested in volunteering to participate in health research? Today's researchers want to make sure that treatments and cures are designed for everyone's unique needs. Are you ready to make a difference? Learn more at go.uic.edu/healthresearch. The University of Illinois at Chicago Center for Clinical and Translational Science is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, through Grant UL1TR002003. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Youngstown Studio
Topic: Community Engagement - Choppin‘ it Up - 10/12/21

Youngstown Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 60:50


It's a full house as Don sits down with caterers, doctors, community leaders, and podcasters - Choppin' it up right here, in studio!

Strength in the Midst of a Pandemic
Building Trust through Community Engagement featuring Reshma Jagsi

Strength in the Midst of a Pandemic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 22:08


This episode of Strength in the Midst of Change features Dr. Reshma Jagsi, who received the Carol Hollenshead Inspire Award for Excellence in Promoting Equity and Social Change at CEW's 2020 Advocacy Symposium. Dr. Jagsi is the Newman Family Professor and Deputy Chair in the Department of Radiation Oncology and Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM) at the University of Michigan. She discusses her work at CBSSM on understanding how the move to a rapid learning healthcare system is received by patients in the community. Dr. Jagsi leads an NIH R01-funded investigation using deliberative democratic approaches to illuminate patients' attitudes towards secondary use of data collected in routine clinical encounters. Make sure to listen to the end to hear her advice for students setting out to pursue a role in medicine.

Madlik Podcast – Torah Thoughts on Judaism From a Post-Orthodox Jew

Parshat Noach - Join Geoffrey Stern, Rabbi Adam Mintz and Pastor Dumisani Washington of IBSI - Institute for Black Solidarity with Israel and Christians United For Israel for a live recording of a discussion on Clubhouse Friday October 8th with the Pastor regarding his book Zionism and the Black Church: Why Standing with Israel Will Be a Defining Issue for Christians of Color in the 21st Century. We follow a less traveled path down Noah's family tree. We discover the Biblical Mission of Africa and the bond between the Children of Shem and the Children of Ham. Sefaria Source Sheet: www.sefaria.org/sheets/352058  Transcript: Geoffrey Stern  00:00 [To Reverend Dumisani Washington] Thank you so much for being with us. On on our clubhouse when you come up to the platform, we say first of all that you're coming up to the bimah [the podium or platform in a synagogue from which the Torah and Prophets are read from]. And then second of all, when we make you a presenter, we give you smicha... So that means that you are ordinated. So instead of Reverend, we'll call you Reb. Is that okay? Dumisani Washington  00:20 That sounds good to me. Sounds good, no problem. Geoffrey Stern  00:23 So anyway, welcome to Madlik. Madlik is every week at four o'clock, and we do record it and post it as a podcast on Sunday. And if you listen to it, and you'd like what you hear, feel free to share it and give us a few stars. And what we do is disruptive Torah. And what we mean by disruptive Torah is we look at the ancient text of the Torah, with maybe a new lens, or to see a new angle. And today, I'm delighted to say that we're not only looking at it through a new lens, but we're looking at it through another lens, a lens of a pastor, of a man of God, who we will learn about his mission. I heard about it on clubhouse one evening, I was scrolling, and I stumbled upon you Reverend, and you're on a mission and you see Judaism and you see Zionism from a whole new perspective. So I want to thank you for coming on. And I want to say that, as I told you, in my email that I sent you that you know, every week about Saturday on Shabbat, on Sunday, I start thinking about what I'm going to pick as a subject matter for the coming Madlik session. And I purchased your book maybe two months ago, and it was sitting by the side of my bed, and for some reason, and of course, I'm sure there are no coincidences in this world. I picked it up this Shabbat. And it starts with our portion of Noah, it starts by talking about the line less traveled by us Jews of Shem's son Ham. And I should say that nothing is written for no reason in the Bible. And when it gives you a genealogy, it's because of what comes in the future. And many of us Jews will look at the genealogy in Genesis 10. And focus on Shem... with Semites. And that's where the name comes from. And we go down that path, and your book starts. And of course, I should say that your book is called "Zionism and the Black Church, Why Standing with Israel will be a Defining issue for Christians of color in the 21st Century". And it begins by traveling down this path less taken, of Ham. Welcome to Madlik.  But if you could begin by touching upon our portion of the week, no off and and and discussing what you see in it, and maybe your mission. Dumisani Washington  03:06 Absolutely. And thank you, again, Rabbi for having me on. Yes, there are six chapters in "Zionism in the Black Church". And the first chapter is entitled The African Biblical Tie to Israel. And so we as I say, in the book started the beginning, right, we start at the beginning of the Scriptures, and so as you know, between the two portions of "Bereshi"  I believe whether the towards the end is when Noah was first introduced, but of course in "Noach" there's the explanation of the nations where all the nations of the earth come from, from Noah's three sons Shem, Ham, and Jafet. And so we recognize that in the Scriptures, it is said that Ham has four sons. And there's a couple of unique things as you know, you read the book, that the scriptures that in the law of Moses deals, Psalms and some of the prophets, there's a term that's given several times in the scripture about Ham's descendants harms the sentence differently, then either Jafet or Shem.  The land of Ham is actually something that's in the scriptures. And I don't know what that Hebrew word is ... "Aretz Ham" ... I never looked at that part of it, Rabbi but it talks about that, which is really interesting because there's not, to my knowledge, and I've kind of looked at for a little while, a similar rendering like the Land of Japhet or Land of Shem. Right? We're obviously the genealogy is there, right? But there's not the same thing that deals with the land and the peoples .... interesting and we've come to know that of the four sides of Hem, which are in order Kush, which you know, is where obviously the Hebrew for later on Ethiopia I believe is a Greek word, but from that region Mitzrayim, which is Egypt. Fut or Put which is Libya, and then Canaan, which is Canaan, right? So those four sons who come from him. But interestingly in the scriptures when it says land of Ham, it almost exclusively refers to Egypt and Ethiopia, what we would call today, Africa, right? This region. And again, you're talking about an antiquity these regions were much broader in size. And they are today if you look at the map today, you see Egypt as a small state and go down to the south, west, south east, and you'll see Ethiopia then you see Yemen, you see Kenya, well, obviously all those states weren't there that happened much later in modernity is particularly after the colonial period where those nations were carved up by a few states in Europe, and they were given certain names everything right, but these were regions in the Bible. And so Kush, the land of Kush, and the land of Mitzrayim, they're actually dealt with many, many times. Right? After the words obviously "Israel" and "Jerusalem". You have the word Ethiopia, I believe one of the Ethiopian scholar says some 54 times or something like that the word Ethiopia actually comes up in the Bible, obviously not as many times as Israel or Jerusalem but more than virtually any other nation other than Egypt. Right? So Egypt obviously that we know too. Africa plays a huge role in Israel's story right? The 430 years in slavery is in Africa, right? The Torah was received at Sinai: Africa. All these things happen in Africa. At some point God tells Jeremiah during the time of the impending doom, the exile that will happen at the hand of of Nebuchadnezzar and God says to to the Israelites to the Judeans, and "don't run down into Egypt, Egypt won't be able to save you." Why does he say that? Well, because historically the Israelites would go to Egypt when it until it got safer, right? For those Christians who may be on the call, you'll know that in the New Testament, Jesus, his parents take him down into Egypt because Herod's gonna kill him. Right? So there's this ongoing relationship between Ham and Shem, that's very intertwined. Moses, his wife, or his second wife, depending on how you interpret it....  Some of the sages. She's Ethiopian, right? She's kushite. So you have this interchangeable thing all the time, throughout the scriptures, but actually starts with the genealogy. And I'll say just one last thing, rabbis ..... we're opening up. This is also unfortunately, as I mentioned, the book as you know, the misnomer of the quote unquote, "Curse of Ham", as we know in the text, Ham is never cursed for what happens with Noah it is Canaan that is cursed. And he actually says, a curse that Canaan become a servant of servants shall he be, even though it was Ham who however you interpreted.... I've heard many different interpretations of "uncovered the nakedness he saw his father, naked," but somehow, for whatever reason, Noah cursed Canaan, not Ham.  Who is Canaan...  is one of him so's, his fourth son, as we know those who are listening, you may know that it is The Curse of Ham, quote, unquote, that has been used sadly, unfortunately, among many other things as a justification of the slavery of Africans. Right? That somehow, Africans are quote, unquote, "Cursed of Ham", therefore, the transatlantic slave trade, the trans Saharan slave trade, those things are somehow...  God prescribed these things in the Bible, the curse was making him black. That's why he's like all those things that are nowhere in the text whatsoever, right? skin color is not in the text. slavery as a descendant of Ham. None of those things are in the text. What's in the text? Is that Canaan is cursed for that? And so we start there, Rabbi, and from there trying to walk out this whole Israel Africa thing. Adam Mintz  08:47 First of all WOW... thank you so much. I just want to clarify in terms of color, I think that's a very interesting thing. It's very possible that in the biblical period, everybody was dark. Dumisani Washington  09:00 Yes, sir. I mentioned that in the book as well. But yes, sir. Yes, yeah. All right. Sorry, Adam Mintz  09:04 I didn't see that in your book. But that's important, you know, because a lot of people are caught up in this color thing. Did you know that there's a distinction, we don't know it for sure but it makes sense that everybody was dark in those periods. So that the difference in color was not significant. So when, when Moses marries goes to Ethiopia, maybe is king of Ethiopia, and marries an Ethiopian. And the idea is that he marries a foreigner. The fact that she's darker may or may not have been true.   Dumisani Washington  09:39 Yes, absolutely. No, thank you Rabbi. And I do touch on that, as well. We say in the terms in this modern term, even in my book, I use the term Christians of color and I don't usually use those terms just in when I'm speaking. I did it that way in the title so that it would be presented in a way that is going to deal with some provocative things but hopefully the people that they read it they'll see what I mean by that and if you're talking about the Israelite people, the Hebrew people they are what I call an afro Asiatic people. Israel is still at that at the point of where those two continents meet right Southwest Asia northeast Africa is landlocked with Egypt I tell people God opened up the Red Sea because he wanted to right ... He's big and bad and he can do what he wants to do but you can literally; I wouldn't recommend it obviously, but you could literally walk from Egypt to Israel and you always have been able to for 1000s of years that has always been the case and so you have a people that in terms of skin tone or whatever... Yes, absolutely, they would be what we would call today quote unquote people of color right and so unfortunately particularly in our country we all know race and colorism is such a huge topic and it's often so divisive and it's used in so many different ways and we know much of that goes back to whether slavery, Jim Crow, people being assigned work obviously based on how dark or light they are all of those things but the problem as you all know is that those things aren't in the Bible right? There's no God likes this person doesn't like this person, this person's dark this person's like, that type of thing. But again, that's what men do, we are fallen creatures, we read what we want to read into the text, and then we use it unfortunately, in a way that's not helpful. Let me just say and pause here, I can tell you that as a Christian pastor, over the years of my just delving into what we often call the Jewish roots of our faith, by studying Torah with rabbis and with other Jewish scholars, my faith has been more important to me than ever in that it helps me understand even more so right, what is the Hebrew in this word here? What do the sages say about that, that's been a fascinating journey for me, over the last 30 some odd years since I've been doing this particular work. Geoffrey Stern  11:58 So I just want to jump in, you said so many things. But there is in this verse that we are reading today, the word "ashkenaz", he was one of the children of of Shem, and you quote, an Ethiopian Rabbi named Ephraim Isaac, and this is a sample of some of the humor in your book or the sense of discovery. And somebody said to him, You don't look Jewish. And he said:, "Ethiopia is mentioned the Bible over 50 times, but Poland not once." And I feel like that was, that was a great line. And what it really talks to is our preconceptions, and your book, and your vision, and your mission breaks preconceptions of what it is to be a Jew, what the mission of a Jew is, but most importantly, what the relationship is between the Jewish people and the African people. And one of the things that you touched upon was the sense of Mitzraim and Kush , and in your book, you really talk about how many times they're interchangeable, because really, it is the same area and those of us who think about Mitzrayim, or Egypt, we focus on the Exodus story, we focus on the pharaoh story. But as you mentioned, the prophets later on, we're having to talk to the Jews about not going back, because ultimately, the experience in Egypt was always favorable, it was our neighbor, and it was our place of refuge. Abraham goes down there with Sarah twice, Jacob sends his kids down there during a time of famine. The relationship and the reference to a Ham and to Mitzrayim  and to Kush is a very positive one. And yes, it does say in our week's parsha of all of the children, it says, "b'artzetam v'goyehem" , that they have a special language, and they have a family and they have a land. So the fact that we are neighbors is so important in the biblical context. So I said if we were going to walk down this wonderful path, and I would love for a second to talk about your mission about reuniting our two peoples and some of the challenges that you have. Clearly you don't speak to groups like us very much, although I think that I'm going to have an opportunity later to say that I think you should, because there's so much that we can learn. But what is your mission? How did you discover it? And what are your challenges? Dumisani Washington  14:40 Well, I'll do it concise, just because I don't want to take up too much time to firstly touch as much as we can. I am the founder and CEO of an organization called The Institute for Black Solidarity with Israel. I started it in 2013 but for about nearly seven years, I was not as active I started it. I did a lot of touring and a lot of speaking throughout the United States, churches, sometimes synagogues as well. And with this mission, it was a mission that was really placed in my heart. Actually in 2012, my first trip to Israel, I went as a guest of Christians United for Israel, I would come later on to join the staff with CUFA. But I was a guest pastor, I knew some friends who were part of the organization. And the short version of that story was my first tip ever, I'm in Israel, I'm at the Western Wall of the kotel. And I have a very intense experience in which I feel although Africa and Israel were passions of mine already, but the fusing of those two things together and a real work in which we continue to strengthen the alliance between Israel and Africa. And then obviously, in the States in the black and Jewish community. And there and finished the first edition of the book now, what you have there Rabbi is the second edition. And we started this organization for that very purpose to do both of those things continue to strengthen the black Jewish relationship, and also the Israel Africa Alliance. And so the challenges have been probably more than any other thing disinformation, right? There's a lot of false information that's there, when it comes to those things that would seek to divide and separate when you're talking about whether Africa Israel, now we're talking about the modern state of Israel, obviously, the rebirth of Israel in 1948. Israel's close ties with African nations throughout the continent, starting especially with Golda Meir, the foreign minister, all the way up into the 70s, where you have, as I mentioned in the book, Israel has more embassies throughout Africa than any other nation other than the United States, African economy, some of them are thriving, a great deal. You have a lot of synergy between the African nations and Israel. And after the Yom Kippur War in 1973, like never before Israel's enemies target that relationship between Israel and its African neighbors for different reasons. One of those is voting in the United Nations, right? And that became very much of a challenge. So one of the greatest challenges is, is information. What we share in the book and when we do our organization, we teach what we call an organization "Authentic History” is really simply telling what happened, how did something [happen]. Whether we're talking about biblically, whether we're discussing the parsha or we're talking about historically, right? We're talking about what the relationship was, and is. Why those connections there? And I'll just give one quick example if you're talking about black Jewish synergy in the United States, not just Dr. King's relationship with Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel in the civil rights community, not that it happened, right? But why, what was that synergy about? Right? So we've delve into that. We share from the documents from the Rabbinical Assembly; Dr. King's most famous words regarding Israel that were recorded 10 days before he was killed, right, why? And as a pastor, what we call a prophetic moment. Why 10 days before he's taken from us, is he telling the black community in the world to stand with Israel with all of our mind and protect its right to exist? Why is he saying these things? What's so important about it. And even the generation before? Why was it a black and Jewish man who changed the trajectory of this nation, Booker T. Washington, and Julius Rosenwald; millions of now first and second generation, slave; free slaves, right? but who had no access to education, not in a broader sense, and why that synergy saw some 5400 Rosenwald schools built throughout the segregated south. We touch on those historical points, and we delve into why that black Jewish synergy has been so powerful for so many people for so long. So that is our mission to strengthen those ties, because we believe that there's a great future ahead. Geoffrey Stern  19:05 You did such amazing research. I mean, I can tell you I never knew that Herzl said about Africa, "that once I have witnessed the redemption of Israel, my people, I wish to assist in the redemption of the Africans." And that is taking a small quote out of a full paragraph where the histories of the two people are so similar. I mean, it comes to us as a pleasant surprise, these synergies but it shouldn't because both our peoples have really traversed and continue to reverse the same pathway. And you quote Marcus Garvey and even Malcolm X and William Dubois. Malcolm X says "Pan Africanism will do for the people of African descent all over the world, the same that Zionism has done for Jews. All over the world." there was a sincere admiration for this miracle of a people returning to its land, we were talking before you came on about this whole kind of image of an ark. And it reminds you of Odesyuss... and it reminds you of all of these stories of man going on this heroic journey to find their their roots to come back, gain, experience and come back to their homeland, to their Aretz.. On the one hand, your job should be very simple. I guess, like any other fights, the closer you are, the bigger the friction can be. And there's nothing bigger than the friction between brothers. But it's such a challenge to address, as you say the misinformation. Dumisani Washington  20:51 Absolutely. And this is, again, why that's our primary goal. And then as part of what our mission is, we have launched here just recently, an initiative called The PEACE initiative. And PEACE is an acronym for Plan for Education, Advocacy, and Community Engagement, and the short version of that, again: We recruit young, black American and African young people from certain cities throughout the United States, a group of them, they go to a 16 week study course having some of the same conversations we're having now, including the modern state of Israel, ancient Israel, the United Nations, all these things that intersect when it comes to the black Jewish relations, then they will travel to Israel for about 10 days, and returned to the cities from where they've been recruited, and be the hub of black Jewish synergy in their communities. We believe with our organization that one of the reasons for the synergy that we've seen in the past, whether it was at the turn of the century with Booker T Washington, and Julius Rosenwald, or the mid part of the century with Dr. King and Rabbi Heschel, right now we are in different challenges, there are challenges that face particularly the more vulnerable black communities. And we see that that synergy could really address so many issues, whether it's education, whether it's jobs, those types of things, they can be really be addressed in a very holistic way. And really harnessing that synergy between the black and the Jewish community. And this is what we are doing. An Israel advocacy that is also rooted in these communities. And it's amazing. We see already rabbis and black pastors are working together all over the country. So that continues to happen. But we want to highlight those things even more and go even further in meeting some of the challenges what we call MC ambassadors will be leading that in different cities across the country. Geoffrey Stern  22:02 That's amazing. I want to come back to this sense of self-discovery and pride. And we always talk about it from our own perspective. So if you're African American, you want to make sure that your children believe that black is beautiful, that they come from an amazing heritage to be proud of who they are. And if you're Jewish, you want the same thing. But it seems to me, and you kind of cage the question in this way, "Why standing with Israel will be a defining issue for Christians of color", when we as Jews can see ourselves in the black community as we did during the civil rights movement that redeems us. And that empowers us. And I think what you're saying, and I don't want to put words into your mouth, but the same thing works in reverse. That in a sense, when the African community can recognize in Israel, its own story. It also can find a part of itself. Is there any truth there? Dumisani Washington  23:50 I believe so Rabbi. I believe that that's exactly as a matter of fact, what we saw was the synergy. So let me use the example and go back to the early 1900s with Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald. The way that story happens, as you may know is that Booker T Washington writes his seminal book "Up From Slavery". Julius Rosenwald, who lives in Chicago at the time, is very active in his community. As a matter of fact, he was active, using his wealth; of those of you who don't know of Sears Roebuck fame, he is the one who took his company to this whole different level, economically and everything. And so with his wealth as a businessman, he's helping the Jews who are being persecuted in Russia. And one of his own testimony, I don't say this part of the book, but I kind of alluded to it, that here he is driving to work from the suburbs to where his factory is where his store is, and he's passing by throngs of black people who've left the South, right? looking for a better life, but they're living in very, very bad conditions, a lot of poverty and everything. And he says to himself, basically, if I'm going to do all of this to help Russian Jews right, way over the other side of the world, and I have this human crisis right here, where I live, I want to be able to do that and his, his Rabbi was Emile Hirsch, one of the founding members of the NAACP. Right? So his Rabbi encourages him. And we see this with our Jewish brothers and sisters all the time, see yourself, do help, do use your wealth, use your ability, right? To help. And so he reads Booker T. Washington's book he's taken with him, they begin to correspond. And Booker T. Washington says, Here's how you can help me I'm trying to build schools for my people who don't have access. And Rabbi to your point. Here is this man, this Jewish man who is very well aware of his history, he knows his People's History of persecution and struggle and triumph, right? Very much sees himself in that black story, and then he uses his ability. It's amazing even what he does; there's a Rosenwald film about Rosenwald schools, I believe his children were the ones who produced it. And they were saying that what he actually did was pretty ingenious, he put up a third of the money, the black community raised a third of the money, and then he challenged the broader white community to partner with them and bring the last third and that is how those Rosenwald Schools began.  Because what he wanted to do, he wanted to see people come together, he wanted to see them all work together. Even though Booker T. Washington passes away only three years into that, right, that venture continues on Julius Rosenwald goes and sits on the board of the Tuskegee college, Tuskegee University, right? There's this long connection that's there. So in that struggle, the black American community, and he connected with this black American leader, the one of the most prominent of the time, Booker T, Washington, and they, like I tell people, changed the world. Like, can we imagine what the United States would have been if you had those millions of now freed slaves, right? with no access, and particularly those who are living in the Jim Crow South, no access whatsoever to education, Would the Harlem Renaissance have become what it become, with the black Wall Street, whether it was in Tulsa, whether in Philadelphia, these things that explode because of the access to education to now these first and second generations of people coming out of slavery, right? So I believe that that's the case and which is why I'll say again, here today, some of those challenges are there, some of the challenges are different than they were, obviously 50, 60, 70, 80 years ago, but we believe in organization that those challenges can be met with that same amazing synergy between the black and the Jewish community. Geoffrey Stern  27:26 A lot of people would argue that the rift or the change of the relationship between the African American community and the Jewish community was when the Jews or Israel stopped being looked at as the David in the Goliath story and we won the Six Day War. And how do you ensure that the facts are told, but also as you climb out of the pit, and as you achieve your goals, you shouldn't be necessarily punished for being successful. Success is not a sin. It's an inspiration. But it seems to me that's one of the challenges that we have, especially in the Jewish community for our next generation of children, who really do see ourselves not as the minority and don't see ourselves anymore mirrored in the African American community. Dumisani Washington  28:25 But one of my favorite things about the Jewish tradition of the Seder, is that you all lean and recline in the Seder today, and you tell your children, when we had the first one, we sat with our sandals on, our staff, in our hand, our belts ....because we were slaves leaving slavery, but now we are no longer. And that whole ethos of telling children, right? There's a strong parallel in the black American community, right? The whole point of going from struggle to a place where you can live in peace or at the very least, you recognize and realize the sacrifice of the people who came before you right? And I won't step into the controversial for lots of different reasons, we'll be able to unpack it, but let me just say this, for the black American experience when you're talking I often teach this in our sermons and other things that arc .... and let me say again, no, people are monolith. Obviously we just kind of put that on the table, all the Jews arent' alike all black Americans aren't alike..... Having said that, there is an overarching story when you talk about black Americans, who, from slavery to Jim Crow, segregation, black codes, all of those types of things to the modern era. And that story cannot accurately be told without talking about God and His people. In other words, when you're talking about the spirituals "Go Down Moses". "Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho" and I talked about that in the book, these songs that are rooted in the scriptures, most of the time in, in the Tanakh, our Jewish brothers and sisters' side of the Bible. I mean, sometimes in the New Testament, most of the time, these songs are being sung in hope. And that hope was realized, right? It's not an Negro spiritual song technically, but I put it in that category, part of the greatest one ever. I mean, how it culminates would be "Lift Every Voice and Sing" us a song that today has all these political things connected to it for lots of different unfortunate reasons. But when James Weldon Johnson wrote that song, wrote it as a poem? Those stanzas and anybody listening to this, I want to tell Google that Google Lift Every Voice and Sing"; just read the words. And this was a very powerful, very, very much God and God's love, and our hope and our faith and our trust, and our honoring the people who came before us; all of those things. And he talked about being free. Now, it's written in 1899. Right? You still have questions. I mean, there are no laws against lynching there going on, it's still crushing racism. However, he as a father in the black community is not only acknowledging what God has done, there's amazing things that are happening. One of the economist's that I quote, in my book, Thomas Sol said that the black community after slavery, and less than 50 years after slavery went from 0% literacy to almost 50% literacy, in that half a century, something economic historians say has never happened before. And now you're later on, you're talking about the black Wall Street, you're talking about black oil barons and landowners and factory owners, right? You're talking about this black middle class emerging. There's been no civil rights bill, right? There's been no Pell grants for school. These things don't even exist yet. We're talking about the 19 teens and the 1920s. You're talking about black people who had previously been slaves for hundreds of years. Why am I saying all that we as a people know full well; if we know our history, know full well what it is to come from all of those dire situations into a place of blessing, even though there may be struggles just like our Jewish brothers and sisters. We are convinced an organization that as we know, as a black community, particularly younger people that we are talking with, and teaching, as we know and appreciate our history, not the history that's regurgitated in terms of media and, and for political purposes. But truly our history, there is a great deal to be proud of about that. And to see, as I said in the sermon a couple of months ago, not only does it not a victim narrative, I descended from superheroes, my people went through slavery, Jim Crow, and still build on Wall Street still built the Tuskegee Institute. Still, we're soldiers who fighting for their own freedom in the Civil War. I mean, you're talking on and on and on things that they should have never been able to accomplish. When I consider what they accomplished with not very much help often. I recognize the greatness of the heritage that I come from, then that allows me to see an Israel rise like a phoenix from the ashes and not spurn that but recognize that our Jewish brothers and sisters have gone through millennia of this and Israel then to be celebrated, not denigrated. Adam Mintz  33:12 Thank you. We want to thank you. Your passion, and your insight is really brought a kind of a new insight to our discussion here. We really want to thank you, you know, we at Madlik we start on time and we end on time, Shabbat is about to begin in just a little while. Hopefully we'll be able to invite you back in the future as we continue this conversation. But I know I join Geoffrey and everybody on the call and everybody who's gonna listen to the podcast. Thank you for joining us and for really your insight and your passion. You really leave us with so much to think about as we begin the Shabbat. Dumisani Washington  33:51 Thank you. Thank you for having me. Adam Mintz  33:53 Thank you Geoffrey, Shabbat Shalom, everybody, Geoffrey Stern  33:55 Shabbat Shalom. And Reb Dumisani, you mentioned the songs. There's a whole chapter in your book about Negro spirituals. And as the rabbi said, w are approaching the Shabbat. And as you observe the Sunday we observed Saturday, but you know that the secret of living without a land or being on a difficult mission is that Sabbath, the strength of the Sabbath, and the connection between Noah and the word Menucha which is "rest" is obvious. And there was a great poet named Yehuda halevi. And he wrote a poem about the Yona; the dove that Noah sent out of the ark to see if there was dry land. And he he said that on Shabbat. Yom Shabbaton Eyn L'shkoach, "the day of Shabbat you cannot forget"  Zechru l'reach Hanichoach"  He also uses Reach Nichoach which is a pleasing scent,Yonah Matzah Bominoach, the yonah, the dove found on it rest v'shom ynuchu yegiah koach  and there in the Shabbat , in that ark of rest on that ark of Sunday or Saturday is where we all gain strength. So I wish you continued success in all that you do. And that this Shabbat and this Sunday we all gather the strength to continue our mission. But I really do hope that we get another chance to study Torah together. And I really hope that all of the listeners go out and buy your book, Zionism in the Black Church because it is an absolute thrill. And I understand you're coming out with a new book that's going to talk more about the Jewish people and the various colors and flavors that we come in. Dumisani Washington  35:55 Hopefully to put that out next year sometime. Absolutely. Geoffrey Stern  35:59 Fantastic. Well thank you so much so Shabbat Shalom and we are we are in your debt. Dumisani Washington  36:05 Thank you. Shabbat Shalom and looking forward to bye bye   Music: Lift Every Voice and Sing - Melinda Dulittle https://youtu.be/6Dtk9h1gZOI 

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history
Season 3, Ep. 11: West Side Environmental Racism, Past and Present

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 49:25


Date: September 20, 2021 (Season 3, Episode 11; 49:26 minutes long). Click here for the Utah Dept. of Culture & Community Engagement version of this Speak Your Piece episode which includes topics discussed in time, photos of guest speakers and additional resources and readings.Podcast Content:  Former Utah State University (USU) grad student Emma Jones and USU Assistant Professor of Environment and Society Dr. Mariya Shcheglovitova, shares the history and science related to the Home Owners' Loan Corporations' (HOLC) “redlining" of Salt Lake City; and their investigations of spatial distribution of environmental hazards contained in both the city's original west side (Pioneer Park neighborhood) and in expanded west side communities (Poplar Grove, West Pointe, Rose Park, Glendale, South Salt Lake, etc.), where most of Salt Lake City's communities of color reside.This podcast is all about how examining the past (history) along with geographical and public health data (science) can help a community like Salt Lake City see evidence concerning contemporary health and social problems, how such evidence can play a part in solving these problems, and point municipal and community leaders towards better city and development practices. “Scholars have found that race is the most significant predictor of environmental pollution exposure…Crowder and Downey (2010) [and they have] found that Black and Latinx households experience higher levels of proximate industrial pollution compared to White households.” This is an excerpt from Emma Jones' capstone project. Jones and Shcheglovitova anticipate their research to be used in further investigations regarding spatial patterns and terrestrial pollution in SLC. Their research connects the study of spatial distribution of terrestrial pollution to both historic and present-day planning practices which they believe perpetuate housing segregation and disinvestment in communities of color. Bottom line: Jones and Shcheglovitova documents the existence of environmental racism in SLC. Their identification of spatial patterns led them to create an interactive map accessible in Salt Lake West Side Stories -- post 35 (see within a link to Jones' complete paper).Bio: Emma Nathel Jones has a Bachelors of Science in Conservation and Restoration Ecology with an emphasis in GIS and a minor in Landscape Architecture. During their time at Utah State they worked on a variety of research projects concerning sustainable energy development and sustainable agriculture as a part of the Undergraduate Research Fellowship. They are currently pursuing a Masters in City and Metropolitan Planning at the University of Utah.  Bio: Dr. Mariya Shcheglovitova is a human geographer with interests that span environmental and social justice, urban political ecology, cultural geography, and environmental history. She completed her PhD at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County where she worked on a project investigating present-day and historic intersections of street tree planting programs, waste management, and housing segregation. Do you have a question or comment, or a proposed guest for “Speak Your Piece?” Write us at “ask a historian” – askahistorian@utah.gov

Ahead of the Curve
Episode 36: Pamela Wideman

Ahead of the Curve

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 47:03


In this episode, we discuss the City of Charlotte's approach to affordable housing and how to leverage data for affordable housing strategies.About Pamela WidemanPamela Wideman currently serves as the Director of the City of Charlotte's Housing & Neighborhood Services Department, the 15th largest city in the country. In this role, she is responsible for oversight of the City's Affordable Housing efforts including the Housing Trust Fund, Emergency Repair, Rehabilitation Homelessness, and Down Payment Assistance Programs. Additionally, Pam is responsible for the City's Code Enforcement, Community Engagement divisions, the Office of Equity, Mobility and Immigrant Integration, and the Char-Meck 311 Call Center.Ms. Wideman has more than 25 years of local government experience. She is adept at forging creative solutions to government issues at the local level. Pamela was awarded the Master of Public Administration Alumna of the Year and received a Leadership in Black Excellence from her alma mater, the University of North Carolina – Charlotte. She was also nominated as a Women's In Leadership Champion by the Charlotte Chapter of the Urban Land Institute. And, she was recognized as one of the top 10 “Behind the Scenes” newsmakers by the Charlotte Business Journal in both 2017 and 2020.Ms. Wideman currently serves as a member of the International City/County Management Association, the Urban Land Institute, and the National Forum for Black Public Administrators.Previously, she served on the Board of Directors for the PNC Community Development Bank and as the Vice-Chair of the N.C. Department of Transportation's Affordable Housing Committee where she provided guidance and recommendations for policy and funding approaches to support and encourage the development of affordable housing near transit stops. Additionally, she was a participant with the German Marshall Fund Dialogue for Change Cohort. She is past President of the Southern Piedmont Chapter of the National Forum for Black Public Administrators and a former member of the Board of Directors for the Mental Health Association of the Greater Carolinas.Pamela received her Master's Degree in Public Administration from UNC - Charlotte and her Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration from Belmont Abbey College. She is a graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill's Institute of Government - Municipal Administration Program and completed the Senior Executives in State and Local Government Program, an Executive Education Program at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School. She completed the National Forum for Black Public Administrator's Executive Leadership Institute program, designed to develop future Assistant and City Managers throughout the County.

Casting The Pod with Adam Schaeuble
200: Grow your podcast with a Community Engagement Lead Magnet

Casting The Pod with Adam Schaeuble

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 48:09


If you are looking for some Podcasting Tips on how to get more podcast downloads, get more audience engagement, and how to monetize your podcast this episode will be your JAM! Check out EP 200 of Podcasting Business School as I teach you how to grow your podcast with a Community Engagement Lead Magnet. Top Takeaways from this episode: *How to use this technique to create superfans of your podcast. *How to create an irresistible reason to attend your session. *How to properly market your first session to your podcast listeners.  *My exact event format and the follow up process I use to maximize engagement from the participants.   *************** Are you a podcaster with a show that is doing less than 1,000 downloads per episode? Start your 14 day free trial inside the Download Growth Club: https://www.podcastingbusiness.school/download-growth-club

What's New in Adapted Physical Education
Community Engagement & the Need for Evidence Driven Work: An Interview w Dr. Martin Ginis

What's New in Adapted Physical Education

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 53:26


I recently had the opportunity to sit down with Dr. Kathleen Martin Ginis and discuss some of her work that has focused on physical activity interventions and recommendations for individuals with disabilities, how to change health-related behaviors, and the dissemination of knowledge related to health and disability. Dr. Martin Ginis is a professor at the University of British Columbia and the founding director of SCI Action Canada (which is a lab that "conducts research on how to inform, teach and enable people living with spinal cord injury to initiate and maintain a physically active lifestyle"). Dr. Martin Ginis is one of the most prolific researchers to have been spotlighted by the What's New in APE platform, as she has over 300 peer-reviewed published articles and received over $11 million in grants. Within the episode, we discuss Dr. Martin Ginis's journey to becoming a researcher in the field of adapted physical activity, the need for evidence/guidelines to support physical activity interventions for individuals with disabilities, and how practitioners can help to create sustained change in individuals with disabilities' health-relate behavior. In addition, Dr. Martin Ginis defines knowledge translation, and the need to effectively translate knowledge so that people with disabilities and those that work with them in physical activity spaces can access quality information about disability and health.

Collaborative Endeavors
Interdisciplinary Approaches to Training Rural Health Professionals

Collaborative Endeavors

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 28:19


Featured researchers:Hana Hinkle, PhD, MPHInterim Director and Department Head, National Center for Rural Health ProfessionsAssociate Director, Illinois Area Health Education Center Network Program ResearchAssistant Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine RockfordMichael Glasser, PhD (retired)Former Director, National Center for Rural Health ProfessionsAssociate Dean, Rural Health Professions ProgramResearch Professor, Medical Sociology and Dr. George T. & Mildred A. Mitchell Endowed ProfessorUniversity of Illinois College of Medicine RockfordLearn about rural health training opportunities through the National Center for Rural Health Professions and Illinois AHEC.To learn more about translational research, visit ccts.uic.edu.Interested in volunteering to participate in health research? Today's researchers want to make sure that treatments and cures are designed for everyone's unique needs. Are you ready to make a difference? Learn more at go.uic.edu/healthresearch.The University of Illinois at Chicago Center for Clinical and Translational Science is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, through Grant UL1TR002003. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Oakland A's Podcast
A's Cast - Community Spotlight - Ft. Stephanie Gaywood

Oakland A's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 8:15


A's radio broadcaster Vince Cotroneo sits down with community leaders every Wednesday throughout each month. For this edition of the Community Spotlight, Cotroneo met with Stephanie Gaywood, the A's Director of Community Engagement & the Community Fund. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Community Corner with Beth McIntyre
Becoming the Voice of Your Community Members with Nicole Burch

The Community Corner with Beth McIntyre

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 15:55


Learn more about Nicole:Nicole's LinkedInRead More About AthennianAthennian's Help SiteEpisode resources:Go to pod.bevy.com for more resources about how to create your own community If you enjoyed this episode then please either:Subscribe, rate, and review on Apple PodcastsFollow on Spotify

The Plywood Podcast
Leading with Gratitude with Jen Hidinger-Kendrick

The Plywood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 39:52


In this week's episode, we are sitting down with Jen Hidinger-Kendrick, Co-Founder of the nonprofit The Giving Kitchen and Staplehouse Restaurant (Bon Appétit magazine's Best New Restaurant in America in 2016). Currently, she is Senior Director of Community Engagement at the Giving Kitchen. Jen shares her story of loss and how The Giving Kitchen is directly related to the work the organization does. Jen talks about the importance of excellence, gathering together, and community engagement. Jen is full of joy and shares her journey with honesty. We hope you'll jump in with us!Learn more:The Giving KitchenStaplehouseBook Recommendation from the Plywood Team for anyone who hosts events (big or small):The Art of Gathering by  Priya Parker---Welcome to the Plywood Podcast: Real talk for social entrepreneurs and nonprofit leaders. Plywood is a nonprofit in Atlanta leading a community of startups doing good. Over the past 12 years, we have worked with over 800 startup founders and nonprofit leaders wrestling with the tensions of starting, growing, and sustaining.Think of The Plywood Podcast as a kitchen table conversation debating the pros and woes of running a business and sustaining a nonprofit. We dive into building business plans, sustaining relationships (personal and professional), diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace, forming values while being a part of true cultural change for good, and so much more.Learn more about Plywood at PlywoodPeople.com

Nugent Good News Podcast
(Ep. 43) Helping Community Prosper with Nikki Walker

Nugent Good News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 30:47


Community thrives when we can all come together. For one person, it's a mission. Adam Nugent and Kate Strong welcome Nikki Walker to the podcast. She is the Director of Brand Experience and Community Engagement at Domo, Inc. When people of different races, cultures, and sexual orientations share ideas and work together, it enriches businesses and communities. Find out more about how lives are being changed through diversity and inclusion, and how opening a diverse pool of candidates in business has created tangible results and success! Find Out More About Nikki On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nikkiwalkerpr  Nugent Good News: https://nugentgoodnews.com/

Outcomes Rocket
Bridging Relationships with Startups and Enterprise Hospitals in the Texas Medical Center with Emily Reiser, Senior Manager of Innovation Community Engagement at Texas Medical Center

Outcomes Rocket

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 27:03


In this episode, we are privileged to host Emily Reiser, the Senior Manager of Innovation Community Engagement with the Texas Medical Center. TMC is the largest medical city in the world and is at the forefront of advancing life sciences. Emily discusses how her organization drives collaboration between and among different institutions. She also shares how TMC provides access to multiple health systems, how they act as the connection between innovators and health systems. We also cover how TMC measures success, tracking metrics, and more. Emily also shares two cool examples of how her organization is adding value to healthcare. This is definitely a fantastic conversation you shouldn't miss, so please tune in! Click here for the show notes, transcript, and resources: outcomesrocket.health

Silicon Ranch Radio
Our Commitment to Community Engagement

Silicon Ranch Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 38:33


We believe our employees can make a real difference in the communities we serve, and as Silicon Ranch celebrates its tenth anniversary, we remain committed to that mission. In this episode, Director of Project Development, Ali Weaver, and Director of Economic and Community Development, Gina Brown, join host Jim Bausell to discuss the integral role Silicon Ranch has played as a corporate citizen of the many communities we serve, and the creative ways that engagement and development has allowed us to make a profound, sustainable impact on the local and global community.

Atlanta First United Methodist Church Sermon Podcast
The Fortitude of Courage - Sermon for Sunday, September 19, 2021

Atlanta First United Methodist Church Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 21:06


The sermon from the Sunday, September 19, 2021, worship service of Atlanta First United Methodist Church by Jay Horton, our Director of Community Engagement and Connections, entitled “The Fortitude of Courage” in the sermon series “Courage.” Sermon scripture: Luke 9:1-6 (Common English Bible).Support the show (http://www.atlantafirstumc.org/give)

A Woman's View with Amanda Dickson
Do we know how many children in our kid's school have Covid?

A Woman's View with Amanda Dickson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 7:25


We learned this week that the number of kids with Covid is being undercounted in school. In other words, more kids have Covid than the schools are aware of, which means parents aren't being informed about children in classrooms who have Covid. KSL Newsradio's Amanda Dickson asks her guests this week on A Woman's View what we can do about that. Her guests this week include Kathy Nelson with Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services, Crystal Young, Executive Director of the Utah Cultural Alliance and Liz Sollis, Associated Director of Community Engagement for Salt Lake County Parks and Recreation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A Woman's View with Amanda Dickson
Did General Mark Milley uphold or betray his oath?

A Woman's View with Amanda Dickson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 9:30


General Mark Milley called his counterpart in China twice to reassure him we were not going to war - once just before the election and once just after January 6th. Do you consider that an important cautious move or a violation of his duty, or is there a third choice? KSL Newsradio's Amanda Dickson gets perspective from her guests this week on A Woman's View. Her guests this week include Kathy Nelson with Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services, Crystal Young, Executive Director of the Utah Cultural Alliance and Liz Sollis, Associated Director of Community Engagement for Salt Lake County Parks and Recreation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A Woman's View with Amanda Dickson
What more can be done to reduce homelessness in SLC?

A Woman's View with Amanda Dickson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 10:01


What more can be done to help homeless people in Salt Lake City? Salt Lake devoted millions of dollars to open four new homeless shelters, and yet the problem persists - it's just moved to a new location. KSL Newsradio's Amanda Dickson asks her guests this week on A Woman's View what else can be done? Her guests this week include Kathy Nelson with Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services, Crystal Young, Executive Director of the Utah Cultural Alliance and Liz Sollis, Associated Director of Community Engagement for Salt Lake County Parks and Recreation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A Woman's View with Amanda Dickson
Should there be a memorial on the National Mall for the War on Terror?

A Woman's View with Amanda Dickson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 8:08


Jennie Taylor wrote an op ed this week in which she explained her desire to have a memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. for all members of the military who served in the War on Terror. There should be a place where the veterans and the families can go to pray and to mourn. KSL Newsradio's Amanda Dickson gets perspective from her guests this week on A Woman's View. Her guests this week include Kathy Nelson with Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services, Crystal Young, Executive Director of the Utah Cultural Alliance and Liz Sollis, Associated Director of Community Engagement for Salt Lake County Parks and Recreation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

MTR Podcasts
Petula Caesar

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 38:52


Petula Caesar is a multi-talented all around artistic being. She is a writer, performer, creator, producer, recording artist and arts administrator. She got her start writing erotica when she was published in New York Times bestselling author Zane's erotica anthology “Caramel Flava” and has published two volumes of erotic ficton and an audiobook of erotic fiction. Petula has written for various publications like Baltimore's former alternative weekly City Paper, The Afro-American Newspapers, and Baltimore Magazine. Petula is also a storyteller and performance poet who has been featured at signature Baltimore events like Artscape, Stoop Storytelling, The Baltimore Book Festival, and Charm City Kitty Club. She has performed erotic poetry and suggestive storytelling with her band in tow for audiences up and down the East Coast and has performed with The Punany Poets from HBO's "Real Sex" series. After spending much time onstage in front of audiences of all kinds, Petula grew to love backstage just as much, and moved into theatrical production, event production and artist booking. She has curated, directed and produced events at most major venues in Baltimore, including The Creative Alliance, The Motor House, Arena Players, The Arch Social Club, The Reginald Lewis Museum and Metro Gallery and has worked with numerous Baltimore performers like The 5th L, Eze Jackson, Lea Gilmore, Jonathan Gilmore, Navasha Daya, and Joyce Scott. She created Caesar Productions LLC to present and elevate various aspects of African American culture, especially performance and literary arts through events ranging from live performance to workshops. Petula released her memoir entitled “She's Such A Bright Girl: An American Story” in June 2018, where she recounts an upbringing full of conflict and tension centered around colorism. The book won an Honorable Mention at the North Street Books Prize for creative non-fiction, and throughout 2018 and 2019 Petula could often be found appearing at branches of the Enoch Pratt Library and at other community events talking about her book and other themes related to race. Petula became director of Community Engagement for the Baltimore Rock Opera Society (BROS) in 2019. In her role of finding ways for BROS to become more reflective of Baltimore's demographic (majority African American), she assisted with creating programming with that audience in mind by using Black creatives both onstage and behind the scenes to execute that programming. This included serving as producer of a series of virtual concerts in 2020 called Rock Opera 101 (during the height of COVID no less). And while 2021 finds us still facing COVID, Petula continues to create, serving as Executive Producer and Co-Creative director of a theatrical presentation called “Funktopia - An Intergalactic Tribute To Funk and Hip Hop” that will feature music from Outkast, Kendrick Lamar, George Clinton, Funkadelic, and similarly funky artists.***If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It really makes a difference and it's always nice to read kind words.Follow us on Twitter and  InstagramBe sure to check out our other podcasts:Mastermind Team's Robcast - Mastermind Team's Robcast is an irreverent and hilarious podcast covering all things pop culture and weird news. Let's Watch It Again - Let's Watch It Again is a movie review podcast from MTR The Network.★ Support this podcast ★

Kearney eFree Podcast
eFree Podcast: God can work in a variety of ways to impact our community

Kearney eFree Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 32:23


What is Community Engagement and what does that look like for you? Listen to Justine Tschetter, eFree's Community Engagement Director, talk through how God can work in a variety of ways to impact our community.

New Books in Gender Studies
Ginetta Candelario on Feminism, Race, and Transnationalism

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 60:09


Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. So we are reaching across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. In this episode you'll hear about: Dr. Ginetta Candelario's path from journalism-major-hopeful to sociologist, how her family history shaped her intellectual questions, what inspired her to return to Smith after campus racism drove her out, a model for building an intentional community, editing a journal dedicated to the scholarship and voices of women of color, and a discussion of Meridians: 20th Anniversary Reader. Our guest is: Dr. Ginetta Candelario, who is a faculty affiliate of the Latin American and Latina/o Studies Program, the Study of Women and Gender Program, and the Community Engagement and Social Change Concentration at Smith College. She is the founding vice president of the National Latin@ Studies Association, and a founding executive committee member of the New England Consortium for Latina/o Studies, and was appointed by the American Sociological Association to its Committee on Professional Ethics for 2017–20 and to the Finance Committee for 2021-2024. Dr. Candelario is widely published, serves on editorial boards, and is a peer reviewer. Her research interests include Dominican history and society, with a focus on national identity formation and women's history; Blackness in the Americas; Latin American, Caribbean and Latina feminisms; Latina/o communities (particularly Cuban, Dominican and Puerto Rican); U.S. beauty culture; and museum studies. She has been a Fulbright Scholar in the Dominican Republic twice, and has been the editor of Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism since July 2017. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, the co-creator and co-producer of the Academic Life podcasts. She is a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode may be interested in: Dr. Candelario's Ted Talk Meridians' materials referenced in the podcast Meridians' portal for submissions Cien años de feminismos dominicanos, 1865-1965. Tomo I: El fuego detrás de las ruinas, 1865-1931. Co-edited by Ginetta Candalario, April J. Mayes, and Elizabeth Manley, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic: Archivo General de la Nación, 2016. Black Behind the Ears: Dominican Racial Identity from Museums to Beauty Shops, Durham: Duke University Press, December 2007. Salome by Julia Alvarez Almanac of the Dead by Leslie Marmon Silko Democracy in Chains by Nancy McClean YouTube recording of the Meridians' 20th anniversary celebration talks Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books Network
Ginetta Candelario on Feminism, Race, and Transnationalism

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 60:09


Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. So we are reaching across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. In this episode you'll hear about: Dr. Ginetta Candelario's path from journalism-major-hopeful to sociologist, how her family history shaped her intellectual questions, what inspired her to return to Smith after campus racism drove her out, a model for building an intentional community, editing a journal dedicated to the scholarship and voices of women of color, and a discussion of Meridians: 20th Anniversary Reader. Our guest is: Dr. Ginetta Candelario, who is a faculty affiliate of the Latin American and Latina/o Studies Program, the Study of Women and Gender Program, and the Community Engagement and Social Change Concentration at Smith College. She is the founding vice president of the National Latin@ Studies Association, and a founding executive committee member of the New England Consortium for Latina/o Studies, and was appointed by the American Sociological Association to its Committee on Professional Ethics for 2017–20 and to the Finance Committee for 2021-2024. Dr. Candelario is widely published, serves on editorial boards, and is a peer reviewer. Her research interests include Dominican history and society, with a focus on national identity formation and women's history; Blackness in the Americas; Latin American, Caribbean and Latina feminisms; Latina/o communities (particularly Cuban, Dominican and Puerto Rican); U.S. beauty culture; and museum studies. She has been a Fulbright Scholar in the Dominican Republic twice, and has been the editor of Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism since July 2017. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, the co-creator and co-producer of the Academic Life podcasts. She is a historian of women and gender. Listeners to this episode may be interested in: Dr. Candelario's Ted Talk Meridians' materials referenced in the podcast Meridians' portal for submissions Cien años de feminismos dominicanos, 1865-1965. Tomo I: El fuego detrás de las ruinas, 1865-1931. Co-edited by Ginetta Candalario, April J. Mayes, and Elizabeth Manley, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic: Archivo General de la Nación, 2016. Black Behind the Ears: Dominican Racial Identity from Museums to Beauty Shops, Durham: Duke University Press, December 2007. Salome by Julia Alvarez Almanac of the Dead by Leslie Marmon Silko Democracy in Chains by Nancy McClean YouTube recording of the Meridians' 20th anniversary celebration talks Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Rise and Lead
Leading with a Limp: How to Leverage Your Imperfections with Dr. Terry Johnnson - RAL 49

Rise and Lead

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 30:37


 In this episode Benjamin sits down for a great conversation with Dr. Terry Johnnson, VP for Community Engagement at Advent Heath and former serviceman in the U.S. Air Force Presidential Honor Guard at the White House for three U.S. Presidents. Dr. Johnson shares much of his story about overcoming severe dyslexia and how he became the longest serving honor guard in history.  He also talks about breaking through his own self-imposed limits of what he saw as attainable and possible for himself. Have you ever wanted to interact with the President of the United States? Dr. John has, and on this episode he describes an forgettable moment he shared with President Ronald Reagan. Don't forget to subscribe to the Rise and Lead Podcast to ensure you get notified when new episodes release every month.  When you share about the podcast, make sure and tag @benjaminlundquist, and he'll always try and give you a re-post. Remember, the best time to rise and lead is now!

Inside Outside Innovation
Ep. 264 - Wayne Li, Director of Design Bloc & Professor of Design and Engineering at Georgia Tech on Design, Design Thinking and Changing Trends

Inside Outside Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 25:14


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Wayne Li, Professor of Practice of Design and Engineering, School of Industrial Design at Georgia Tech and Director of Design Bloc. Wayne and I talk about the growing importance of design and design thinking, and we explore some of the changing trends when it comes to technology, tools, and tactics for building new products and services that matter. Let's get startedInside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help you rethink, reset, and remix yourself and your organization. Each week, we'll bring you latest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses, as well as the tools, tactics, and trends you'll need to thrive as a new innovator.Brian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Wayne Li. He is Professor of Practice of Design and Engineering, School of Industrial Design at Georgia Tech, Director of Design Bloc. Welcome to the show, Wayne.Wayne Li: Hi thanks. Thanks Brian. Thanks for having me. Brian Ardinger: Hey, I'm excited to have you on, because you have had a long career in this whole world of design and innovation. You were a founding class member at the Stanford d.school. You've worked with great companies like Ford and Pottery Barn and VW. And I think you were a part of the original team that helped develop the original Tesla Roadster. I think I'll start off the conversation with where you're currently at with Design Bloc and how it got has origin. Wayne Li: Design Bloc is a multidisciplinary Design Thinking initiative on Georgia Tech Campus. So, you can think a center. We try to bridge different schools and colleges. Think like a large university, they're separated in different units or colleges. You have a college of engineering and college of design, college of natural sciences.And what Design Bloc tries to do is to teach in a multidisciplinary type of way. And so we partner with professors from all over the Institute to try to offer courses that teach not only Design Thinking, but do it in a way that bridges more than one unit, more than one college. We have things like Bio-inspired Watercolor Painting all the way to Transportation Design.Community Engagement and Service, like a humanitarian design project. And again, you can see that those problems exist. They exist beyond just the sphere of one unit. For example, you're saying, okay, I'm going to address developing countries energy grid. That's not just engineering that requires public policy. It requires cultural engagement and community knowledge. You have structure or architecture there. So, you can see a problem like that is multifaceted. We shouldn't be teaching in a siloed or singled mono disciplinary manner. You know, I learned this really early on, probably back when I was still in college, actually. But I worked at IDEO product development very early on in my career.You know, I think the reason why it came to be like, you mentioned, like, you know, what is it, how did it get started? Was that when I went to undergraduate, I was both a fine arts and engineering major. I kind of saw how the perception of an object, its beauty, its appearance, had a cultural relevance to it.And then you coupled that with how well it was engineered. How well it was built. What it was actually intended to function as and whether or not those mesh together well. And I think that's kind of what got me to my work at IDEO. But I think that was the benefit. And so about almost seven years ago, an alumnus from Georgia Tech, Jim Oliver, went back and visited the Institute and just notice that the College of Engineering and the College of Design really didn't talk to each other that much. Even though he himself had had a similar background. In undergraduate, he also had a mechanical engineering and industrial design background just like me.So, he basically put out a search and said, I want someone. I will donate a certain sum of money. And I want someone to establish this kind of initiative, whose goal it is to teach students in a more well-rounded way. And so, I'm very lucky and very blessed after a nationwide search that I managed to get it. That's kind of how it came to be.So, we started about six, seven years ago with basically one class. With 8 students to 12 students in it. And now we teach about 20 classes a year, with about a thousand to 2000 students. Right? So, it has grown. It's wonderful to see it. I love being the director of it and seeing it grow and getting partners and collaborators who are really psyched about it.And the cool thing is, yeah, you actually see professors who have a PhD in something, so they're very, very intelligent about something. All of a sudden get intrigued, like I never thought of myself as a designer. Well, everyone, little d design. Brian Ardinger: That's an interesting point because obviously people are beginning to understand that design is a core component of every facet of their life nowadays. But tell me a little bit about like what's the process of Design Bloc and how do you go from an idea to creating something valuable in the market? So, walk me through the whole process of Design Bloc. Wayne Li: Design Bloc, the initiative, right? Is you, like you mentioned, I did my graduate work at Stanford. We were in the class that helped to found the Stanford d.school. So, let's take like the little d design. Don't think like I'm a fashion designer or I'm a software designer or I'm a car designer. Let's take the little d design. So, design, if we just think about design process, right. Stanford has a certain method for their design process. They call it Design Thinking Process. But if we just think of it as a process, when anyone goes through steps or goes through mindsets or phases in order to create something, they go through a design process. Design is a very flexible word. It's like Smurf, it's the only word where you can almost use it like six or seven times and still get the actual understanding.Like I could say, well, I'm designing a design that will design a design to design. So, and you'll be like, what? But that would make sense, right? I'm designing a design; I'm creating a blueprint that will create a robot that will actually learn and make something of use. That's what it is. The idea of course, is that when they build anything. They're going through what we consider a process, a design process. And again, this isn't something that necessarily is taught at an Institute. You know, an Institute will teach physics, or it'll teach mathematics or Latin. They're not actually teaching the process of how you create novel, useful, effective ideas, right, for society. The Design Thinking processes that Stanford created along with the Hasso-Plattner Institute in IDEO. Talks about how can you hone and better your design process regardless of what it is. Regardless of what you're building. So, I think in that sense, Design Bloc is also trying to create courses that allow students to learn about the design process, hone it, and foster good mindsets and behaviors as they go through it.Like for example, with pick something relatively trivial, but let's just for kicks. You get up in the morning and you want to make eggs for your partner or your wife or your spouse. That's a design process, right? You're making something that serves a need or a benefit to someone or some entity. So technically you went through a design process.Now the question is, if you think about it, if you really wanted to make eggs well for your spouse or partner, what would you have to do? Well, you kind of needed to know what they like. So, if they love poached eggs and you give them hard-boiled, they might not like that. And then you also have to be creative.You have to know how many different ways can you make eggs. You also have to think about whether or not it gets well received. Obviously, if you don't know your partner or spouse very well, and you make horrible eggs for them, they'll let you know about it. So sooner or later, and of course that last part is the cycles, the iteration, the more and more you do it, the better you get at it.Right. The better you get at making eggs, the better you get at making the eggs the way your partner or your spouse likes them. So, you can imagine that's another, like a semi trivial one day activity. But whether or not you're making eggs, an electric car, a public policy, a courtroom drama, novella, all of those are design processes. Now apply it to something more serious and you get my drift. Brian Ardinger: Is there a standard iteration of step one, do this step two do this. Or is a lot of it driven by the learnings that you find by moving the idea forward in the first place? Wayne Li: Yeah, no, this is great because I mean, there are many design practitioners and researchers and, you know, people who are designed professors, people who study design, and the people who practice it, who have put terminology around their design process. You might hear these in the industry, right. You know, Google will say, well, we use Design Sprint, it's an Agile Methodology. You might hear maybe a traditional company say, well, we use a double diamond approach, right? Where we go out and we go in, they have their terminology. And of course Stanford's Design Thinking Process is empathize, define, ideate, prototype, test, or evaluate. And they've put words to that. I think when people get a little bit tripped up on is when they hear things defined with either a series of words or a diagram that like, it looks like it moves to the right.It's like, oh, arrow, arrow, arrow moves to the right. They get into this mindset that if I blindly follow a process from start to finish, I will be guaranteed a great result. And that's where I think practitioners understand that the design process is not linear. It's messy, it's cyclical. It repeats it folds on itself. It goes backwards. You jump two steps forward or back. Part of it is the sense and respond. That's why, what I mentioned before, the more and more you practice your design process through experience, and through each phase, you get better at understanding how the design process is going to affect the final result.And that takes some skill. It takes experience. You know, it can also be taught. It can be learned. As you go through a phase, are you sensing how it's going? Do you understand the implications of what you're doing at the time? And then can you respond? For example, if you're in a ideate phase, it is a creative phase. I need to know how many different types of eggs I can make to address my partner.Let's say I only know how to make one. I only know how to boil eggs. I don't know how to poach them. I don't know how to fry them. I don't how to scramble. If you only make one solution and then go get that tested, chances are you're wrong. You know, one out of 10 shot that or one out of seven shot that that's right. If you're not creative by nature or your company doesn't have a creative culture in it, then blindly going through that phase of creating or ideating, isn't going to help.So, if you don't know how to ideate, you're going to be in trouble because that phase will result in the same ideas you always come up with. Part of that is again the sense and respond. Knowing how you execute. Knowing what your strengths and weaknesses are in each phase and whether or not you can cultivate those.If you know, you're not a very creative person in the sense that you very quickly drill down to one possible solution, and then you're very dogmatic about it, then realize that's a weakness in your creative process. It's a weakness of your design process. At the same time, if you're really blue sky and you just love imagining all day and at the end of the day, you need to put something in front of someone, otherwise this product doesn't get built, then you're going to have to learn about your execution and critical thinking skill.At a certain point, I think we try to instill in our students is that, you know, the design process is fluid, it's living and it's part of you. You need to understand how you use it, and then you need to understand how companies use it. Cause that's not always the same thing. Brian Ardinger: That's an interesting point. Are there particular areas that you find, doing these workshops and working people through a process, where people tend to get stuck? What's the biggest aha moments about teaching a process and how to think about designing? Wayne Li: A lot of this is cultural, right? A lot of this deals with people, and of course you see this right with various established or rigid companies that have very, very well-documented well hewn, traditional processes. They love buying out startups. Why? Because the startups are small four employee kind of entities that are usually young. They take risks. They don't know what they can't do because they've never been slapped on the wrist so many times. For them like big companies who are really staid, who don't encourage or empower all levels of their company to come up with ideas, will usually get into this group thing. Like, well, I can't possibly be right. No one values my opinion. The only person that's valued is the CEO or the executive management or the senior vice president. So, then that just destroys a kind of innovative culture because the creativity is not fostered. It's not empowered across all levels. I see that often, usually when I'm brought in to consult with a company or a company comes in and wants a project with a Design Bloc and we do projects for companies. You know, they're always like looking for something like, let's just show something we don't know. That they usually, something will surprise them. And part of that is because young students don't know what they can't do. When they come up with an idea, a lot of the times, the reason that large companies can't or companies that don't have an innovative culture, they don't ask that question anymore.Right. So, like maybe three generations ago, they stopped doing it a certain way because they learned something. But now the business environment has shifted and no one's bothered to really question why they can't do it that way. Or why they can't do it in a new way. Right. It's always so we've always done it that way.Well, yeah, that's the group thing, right? No, one's empowered to ask and go, wait a minute. Yeah, that was true 20 years ago, but the technology has shifted around you. The audience has shifted around you, the people that use your product has shifted around you. Why not go back and question some of those baseline assumptions.Brian Ardinger: Have you learned any techniques that you could help folks that are in that particular environment to open up their thinking or open up their exploration and not fall into this typical traps? Wayne Li: There are a lot of different ways that you can do that, Brian. What I tend to always ask is when someone is in kind of that group think is to say, okay, wait Taguchi calls it Root Cause Analysis.I think Dev Patnaik  uses, who teaches Needfinding at Stanford has taught like a Contextual Ladder, which is like a How Why Ladder. If you're confronted with a problem, do you understand the constraints with which you are assuming are already frozen. Taguchi method is just, why does that exist as a root problem?That's not necessarily creative, but what it does is it tries to ask, do you understand your context? If you're confronted with, I only know one way to do this, or this is the way that we think the company always wants to work, then at least questioning that constraint to say, well, why do we do it this way? What assumptions are we making about either our processes or our customers, that make us decide that we should be doing it this way? Brian Ardinger: And basically being okay with the fact that let's assume that this is an assumption. And then like, how do we find evidence to figure out is this assumption true or false? I think a lot of people don't go back to that process, like you said, and just double-check like, I know we've been doing this 20 years like that, does it still hold true. Its an important part of the process.Wayne Li: And one thing I always love is just pushing constraints, right? I mean, ultimate creativity is having no constraints. But it's difficult in a business environment because you always have some type of like time and money are always going to be constraints. You don't have infinite time. You don't have infinite money.If you had those, you can make anything you wanted and take as long as you want it to make. So you always have some type of constraint. But what I always like to do is push against it. So if you say something like we can't build that, that's too expensive. Then if you say, okay, well we'll hold on a second.What are those assumptions? And then say, there's inherent assumptions in that way. You're building it the same way. That's one assumption. If you built it with a different material or different process, you could maybe save money. If you built it with a different volume, it could be cheaper. So you're like, well, you're assuming that we can only sell that to 10,000 people.What if we sell to 10 million? Or you're assuming no one will pay for it at a higher cost. So again, really, it is about pushing on that constraint to say, we can't do this. Flip that and reframe it. What are all the different ways that we can actually push beyond that boundary? And I take each, sometimes I'll take the top three constraints and kind of see if they're related and in tandem, push against them.Sometimes I'll take each constraint and basically brain on each one separately. Right. But ultimately I'm always asking why is this assumption here and why is this constraint here? And, you know, sometimes somebody will say, well, that just defies the laws of physics. I'm like, no, that just defies the laws of your creativity of your brain.Right. You're not framing it well enough. The only meaningful attribution you have is that that must be a mechanism that follows the laws of physics or follows the laws of finance. Like it has to, you know, supply demand. You must sell something for more than you make it. But those laws are inherent in a human assumption.Somebody is using that device. So the laws of physics change if a 10 year old uses it versus a 30 year old. So if you're like making a shovel, a kid's plastic shovel is way different than a 30 year olds Gardener's shovel. So one shovel is made out of metal costs, maybe $25, and one's made out of plastic and cost two. So again, your physics law didn't change, but your framing did. Part of that is understanding your framing when you'd make an assumption, Brian Ardinger: I'd lIke to switch gears a little bit and talk a little bit about some of the things that you're seeing, what are some of the interesting trends in UX, UI design, and maybe even technology that you've seen and where do you see this whole I guess, industry going Brian?Wayne Li: That's a great question. I mean, I work with industrial design students and mechanical engineers, electrical engineers, computer scientists, human computer interaction, math graduate students. Definitely the thing you see faster and faster and faster for UI and UX is both portability and anticipation. So let me kind of explain what that means.Portability in the sense that devices get smaller, they get more personal, right? No, one's out of client terminal. There's no client terminal relationship anymore. So the portability meaning your ability to consume data, manipulate software, has to be more and more flexible, more and more intuitive. You basically be at the will it like, you know, sooner or later, you might not even use your hand.It's going to be so fluid and so natural. Then you can talk to it. You can gesture at it. The interactions will be more and more natural and quicker, faster, smaller. Now the other thing, like I said is the anticipation. Everything you do is being logged so sooner or later between the machine learning algorithm and the companies that are constantly monitoring your data, they'll be able to truly understand what you are based on your behavioral pattern. If you've read the Singularity Is Near, they basically say, you know, pretty much by 2045, your consciousness will be digitized. So in that sense, if we, if we got what 20 some odd years, 24, some odd years to get there, that basically means AI will be conscious by then, in the sense that hopefully if I live long enough, I could go back and go, what did Wayne think in 2019, every thought that you put into Instagram, Facebook, anything you put into your computer will be logged and kept. So every thought you've ever had. You may no longer corporally exists, but someone got a, what would Professor Li have thought in 1998, about this vehicle. And based on the machine learning though, well, Wayne said this about certain vehicles. And this vehicle and this vehicle people are very similar. So even if I'm not alive in 2080, and there's a 2080 sports car, they're going to go, well, what would Wayne have thought about this 2080 sports car?And they would probably, the machine learning algorithm will say, well Wayne talked about these vehicles or design these sports cars. And these were his thoughts on them because they've all been logged. And by the weighting metric I have, he would have liked it. Or he would have said blah-blah-blah send it.  Sooner or later, we'll have digital avatars that anyone can consult. And so that's the anticipation part. If you can anticipate that now how will that change, what you do Brian Ardinger: Tomorrow is Tesla's AI day. And they're gonna be talking a little bit about some of the new mind of the car stuff that they're working on. Similar to what you're saying, where the car can anticipate based on its surroundings, what's happening and self-driving and everything else around that.But you know, you take that beyond just transportation. You take that to everything else and how does that change the world and what we're looking at? Even things like I think about technology and how it's accessible to anybody now. So I have to be a coder, for example. A lot of no code tools and things along those lines that allow you to experiment and build and try things that 10 years ago, 15 years ago, you had to have a design development team to make that happen. So it'll be interesting to see where that trend takes the world of design as well. Wayne Li: Yeah, no, absolutely Brian. I mean, going back to what you said. I mean, obviously the sort of research area of mine, because I have an automotive interface, a human machine interface lab at Georgia Tech, right. That looks at futuristic automotive experiences. And absolutely you're right. I mean, thinking about it this. Not only can all the cars, right now is 5g. Like let's just think, think about 5g. If 4g was something like, oh, it was novel for us to have one HD movie streaming on our phone. Like that's the data of 4g, without major compression. 5g is like 40 simultaneous HD streams. So for example, if we just take some of that bandwidth and each car is communicating to the 15 nearest cars next to it, and those cars are connected and getting next to the internet enabled lampposts signage traffic stops, then that information is being shared very, very quickly.So if there's something that optimizes traffic flow like a stop says, well, this is open, right now. And there's really no need for a green light or a red light or a yellow light anymore, because everyone's already talking to each other. Brian Ardinger: Tie that into a person's phone and you realize, well, Joe's a crappy driver and he's, he's in the lane next to me. I probably need to adjust for that. Wayne Li: Yeah. Every car in the compass directions around you will notice that, right. Or based on your driving pattern already know that you're a bad driver based on your previous driving history. Right? So that economists levels between semi and fully is tricky. But that data, if it's freely shared, is there. The same thing and will be the minute you tell your car where you're going. So if you say, oh, I'm going to work and it's like, great, I'm driving you there. That's great. It will then ping everyone who's also going to work with you. And so it'll just say, oh, well, you know your neighbor down the street who works at the same company, why don't y'all platoon together.And all of a sudden you match up and you can streamline your traffic. Right? So, same thing, if you, all of a sudden, you tell the car out, I'm going to a concert. It's a new thing. It'll ping everyone on the internet who's interested in that same topic, who's going to the concert with you. And your windshield will turn into a screen.We actually have this in the lab, a windshield that is an augmented reality screen. And then you can then meet 15 people who will meet you at the door. Cause you'll be all dropped off at the same time to the same concert. So now you can go to the concert with not only the friends in your own car, but feel close kinship to 15 other cars that have the same people going at the same concert.It's an interesting concept when you can share that much data that quickly, and you see that as a trend. Yes, privacy is an issue, but you don't really see people pushing against it that much. They're sharing their information. Brian Ardinger: I love what you're doing and some of the things that you've seen in the past, and that. If people want to find out more about yourself or more about Georgia Tech or Design Bloc, what's the best way to do that?Wayne Li: My email's fine. That's just my name. W A Y N E . L I @ design . G A T E C H - Georgia tech.edu. If you want to know more about Design Bloc, basically design bloc without the K so D E S I G N B L O C.ga tech.edu. So they can go to our website and then see what we do. There's a contact us button there.Obviously, if you're a Georgia tech student or a prospective high school student, plenty to learn about what we do, which classes you can take. We do do workshops and not only for students, but we have done workshops for other entities. And so we are in the process of getting those things approved by the Institute. Right. But we have mechanisms in which we do give workshops to companies or groups like the Georgia Tech Alumni Association. We've done Design Thinking workshops for them. So you'll see a list of all the workshops we tend to give. And if it's something that you are interested in or you're interested in giving to your company or entity, then there's a connect to us button and we can talk about that.Brian Ardinger: Wayne, thanks again for being on Inside Outside Innovation, look forward to seeing what the future brings Wayne Li: Me too. It's been a pleasure. Thanks so much for having me on.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. 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Inside Outside
Ep. 264 - Wayne Li, Director of Design Bloc & Professor of Design and Engineering at Georgia Tech on Design, Design Thinking and Changing Trends

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 25:14


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Wayne Li, Professor of Practice of Design and Engineering, School of Industrial Design at Georgia Tech and Director of Design Bloc. Wayne and I talk about the growing importance of design and design thinking, and we explore some of the changing trends when it comes to technology, tools, and tactics for building new products and services that matter. Let's get startedInside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help you rethink, reset, and remix yourself and your organization. Each week, we'll bring you latest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses, as well as the tools, tactics, and trends you'll need to thrive as a new innovator.Brian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Wayne Li. He is Professor of Practice of Design and Engineering, School of Industrial Design at Georgia Tech, Director of Design Bloc. Welcome to the show, Wayne.Wayne Li: Hi thanks. Thanks Brian. Thanks for having me. Brian Ardinger: Hey, I'm excited to have you on, because you have had a long career in this whole world of design and innovation. You were a founding class member at the Stanford d.school. You've worked with great companies like Ford and Pottery Barn and VW. And I think you were a part of the original team that helped develop the original Tesla Roadster. I think I'll start off the conversation with where you're currently at with Design Bloc and how it got has origin. Wayne Li: Design Bloc is a multidisciplinary Design Thinking initiative on Georgia Tech Campus. So, you can think a center. We try to bridge different schools and colleges. Think like a large university, they're separated in different units or colleges. You have a college of engineering and college of design, college of natural sciences.And what Design Bloc tries to do is to teach in a multidisciplinary type of way. And so we partner with professors from all over the Institute to try to offer courses that teach not only Design Thinking, but do it in a way that bridges more than one unit, more than one college. We have things like Bio-inspired Watercolor Painting all the way to Transportation Design.Community Engagement and Service, like a humanitarian design project. And again, you can see that those problems exist. They exist beyond just the sphere of one unit. For example, you're saying, okay, I'm going to address developing countries energy grid. That's not just engineering that requires public policy. It requires cultural engagement and community knowledge. You have structure or architecture there. So, you can see a problem like that is multifaceted. We shouldn't be teaching in a siloed or singled mono disciplinary manner. You know, I learned this really early on, probably back when I was still in college, actually. But I worked at IDEO product development very early on in my career.You know, I think the reason why it came to be like, you mentioned, like, you know, what is it, how did it get started? Was that when I went to undergraduate, I was both a fine arts and engineering major. I kind of saw how the perception of an object, its beauty, its appearance, had a cultural relevance to it.And then you coupled that with how well it was engineered. How well it was built. What it was actually intended to function as and whether or not those mesh together well. And I think that's kind of what got me to my work at IDEO. But I think that was the benefit. And so about almost seven years ago, an alumnus from Georgia Tech, Jim Oliver, went back and visited the Institute and just notice that the College of Engineering and the College of Design really didn't talk to each other that much. Even though he himself had had a similar background. In undergraduate, he also had a mechanical engineering and industrial design background just like me.So, he basically put out a search and said, I want someone. I will donate a certain sum of money. And I want someone to establish this kind of initiative, whose goal it is to teach students in a more well-rounded way. And so, I'm very lucky and very blessed after a nationwide search that I managed to get it. That's kind of how it came to be.So, we started about six, seven years ago with basically one class. With 8 students to 12 students in it. And now we teach about 20 classes a year, with about a thousand to 2000 students. Right? So, it has grown. It's wonderful to see it. I love being the director of it and seeing it grow and getting partners and collaborators who are really psyched about it.And the cool thing is, yeah, you actually see professors who have a PhD in something, so they're very, very intelligent about something. All of a sudden get intrigued, like I never thought of myself as a designer. Well, everyone, little d design. Brian Ardinger: That's an interesting point because obviously people are beginning to understand that design is a core component of every facet of their life nowadays. But tell me a little bit about like what's the process of Design Bloc and how do you go from an idea to creating something valuable in the market? So, walk me through the whole process of Design Bloc. Wayne Li: Design Bloc, the initiative, right? Is you, like you mentioned, I did my graduate work at Stanford. We were in the class that helped to found the Stanford d.school. So, let's take like the little d design. Don't think like I'm a fashion designer or I'm a software designer or I'm a car designer. Let's take the little d design. So, design, if we just think about design process, right. Stanford has a certain method for their design process. They call it Design Thinking Process. But if we just think of it as a process, when anyone goes through steps or goes through mindsets or phases in order to create something, they go through a design process. Design is a very flexible word. It's like Smurf, it's the only word where you can almost use it like six or seven times and still get the actual understanding.Like I could say, well, I'm designing a design that will design a design to design. So, and you'll be like, what? But that would make sense, right? I'm designing a design; I'm creating a blueprint that will create a robot that will actually learn and make something of use. That's what it is. The idea of course, is that when they build anything. They're going through what we consider a process, a design process. And again, this isn't something that necessarily is taught at an Institute. You know, an Institute will teach physics, or it'll teach mathematics or Latin. They're not actually teaching the process of how you create novel, useful, effective ideas, right, for society. The Design Thinking processes that Stanford created along with the Hasso-Plattner Institute in IDEO. Talks about how can you hone and better your design process regardless of what it is. Regardless of what you're building. So, I think in that sense, Design Bloc is also trying to create courses that allow students to learn about the design process, hone it, and foster good mindsets and behaviors as they go through it.Like for example, with pick something relatively trivial, but let's just for kicks. You get up in the morning and you want to make eggs for your partner or your wife or your spouse. That's a design process, right? You're making something that serves a need or a benefit to someone or some entity. So technically you went through a design process.Now the question is, if you think about it, if you really wanted to make eggs well for your spouse or partner, what would you have to do? Well, you kind of needed to know what they like. So, if they love poached eggs and you give them hard-boiled, they might not like that. And then you also have to be creative.You have to know how many different ways can you make eggs. You also have to think about whether or not it gets well received. Obviously, if you don't know your partner or spouse very well, and you make horrible eggs for them, they'll let you know about it. So sooner or later, and of course that last part is the cycles, the iteration, the more and more you do it, the better you get at it.Right. The better you get at making eggs, the better you get at making the eggs the way your partner or your spouse likes them. So, you can imagine that's another, like a semi trivial one day activity. But whether or not you're making eggs, an electric car, a public policy, a courtroom drama, novella, all of those are design processes. Now apply it to something more serious and you get my drift. Brian Ardinger: Is there a standard iteration of step one, do this step two do this. Or is a lot of it driven by the learnings that you find by moving the idea forward in the first place? Wayne Li: Yeah, no, this is great because I mean, there are many design practitioners and researchers and, you know, people who are designed professors, people who study design, and the people who practice it, who have put terminology around their design process. You might hear these in the industry, right. You know, Google will say, well, we use Design Sprint, it's an Agile Methodology. You might hear maybe a traditional company say, well, we use a double diamond approach, right? Where we go out and we go in, they have their terminology. And of course Stanford's Design Thinking Process is empathize, define, ideate, prototype, test, or evaluate. And they've put words to that. I think when people get a little bit tripped up on is when they hear things defined with either a series of words or a diagram that like, it looks like it moves to the right.It's like, oh, arrow, arrow, arrow moves to the right. They get into this mindset that if I blindly follow a process from start to finish, I will be guaranteed a great result. And that's where I think practitioners understand that the design process is not linear. It's messy, it's cyclical. It repeats it folds on itself. It goes backwards. You jump two steps forward or back. Part of it is the sense and respond. That's why, what I mentioned before, the more and more you practice your design process through experience, and through each phase, you get better at understanding how the design process is going to affect the final result.And that takes some skill. It takes experience. You know, it can also be taught. It can be learned. As you go through a phase, are you sensing how it's going? Do you understand the implications of what you're doing at the time? And then can you respond? For example, if you're in a ideate phase, it is a creative phase. I need to know how many different types of eggs I can make to address my partner.Let's say I only know how to make one. I only know how to boil eggs. I don't know how to poach them. I don't know how to fry them. I don't how to scramble. If you only make one solution and then go get that tested, chances are you're wrong. You know, one out of 10 shot that or one out of seven shot that that's right. If you're not creative by nature or your company doesn't have a creative culture in it, then blindly going through that phase of creating or ideating, isn't going to help.So, if you don't know how to ideate, you're going to be in trouble because that phase will result in the same ideas you always come up with. Part of that is again the sense and respond. Knowing how you execute. Knowing what your strengths and weaknesses are in each phase and whether or not you can cultivate those.If you know, you're not a very creative person in the sense that you very quickly drill down to one possible solution, and then you're very dogmatic about it, then realize that's a weakness in your creative process. It's a weakness of your design process. At the same time, if you're really blue sky and you just love imagining all day and at the end of the day, you need to put something in front of someone, otherwise this product doesn't get built, then you're going to have to learn about your execution and critical thinking skill.At a certain point, I think we try to instill in our students is that, you know, the design process is fluid, it's living and it's part of you. You need to understand how you use it, and then you need to understand how companies use it. Cause that's not always the same thing. Brian Ardinger: That's an interesting point. Are there particular areas that you find, doing these workshops and working people through a process, where people tend to get stuck? What's the biggest aha moments about teaching a process and how to think about designing? Wayne Li: A lot of this is cultural, right? A lot of this deals with people, and of course you see this right with various established or rigid companies that have very, very well-documented well hewn, traditional processes. They love buying out startups. Why? Because the startups are small four employee kind of entities that are usually young. They take risks. They don't know what they can't do because they've never been slapped on the wrist so many times. For them like big companies who are really staid, who don't encourage or empower all levels of their company to come up with ideas, will usually get into this group thing. Like, well, I can't possibly be right. No one values my opinion. The only person that's valued is the CEO or the executive management or the senior vice president. So, then that just destroys a kind of innovative culture because the creativity is not fostered. It's not empowered across all levels. I see that often, usually when I'm brought in to consult with a company or a company comes in and wants a project with a Design Bloc and we do projects for companies. You know, they're always like looking for something like, let's just show something we don't know. That they usually, something will surprise them. And part of that is because young students don't know what they can't do. When they come up with an idea, a lot of the times, the reason that large companies can't or companies that don't have an innovative culture, they don't ask that question anymore.Right. So, like maybe three generations ago, they stopped doing it a certain way because they learned something. But now the business environment has shifted and no one's bothered to really question why they can't do it that way. Or why they can't do it in a new way. Right. It's always so we've always done it that way.Well, yeah, that's the group thing, right? No, one's empowered to ask and go, wait a minute. Yeah, that was true 20 years ago, but the technology has shifted around you. The audience has shifted around you, the people that use your product has shifted around you. Why not go back and question some of those baseline assumptions.Brian Ardinger: Have you learned any techniques that you could help folks that are in that particular environment to open up their thinking or open up their exploration and not fall into this typical traps? Wayne Li: There are a lot of different ways that you can do that, Brian. What I tend to always ask is when someone is in kind of that group think is to say, okay, wait Taguchi calls it Root Cause Analysis.I think Dev Patnaik  uses, who teaches Needfinding at Stanford has taught like a Contextual Ladder, which is like a How Why Ladder. If you're confronted with a problem, do you understand the constraints with which you are assuming are already frozen. Taguchi method is just, why does that exist as a root problem?That's not necessarily creative, but what it does is it tries to ask, do you understand your context? If you're confronted with, I only know one way to do this, or this is the way that we think the company always wants to work, then at least questioning that constraint to say, well, why do we do it this way? What assumptions are we making about either our processes or our customers, that make us decide that we should be doing it this way? Brian Ardinger: And basically being okay with the fact that let's assume that this is an assumption. And then like, how do we find evidence to figure out is this assumption true or false? I think a lot of people don't go back to that process, like you said, and just double-check like, I know we've been doing this 20 years like that, does it still hold true. Its an important part of the process.Wayne Li: And one thing I always love is just pushing constraints, right? I mean, ultimate creativity is having no constraints. But it's difficult in a business environment because you always have some type of like time and money are always going to be constraints. You don't have infinite time. You don't have infinite money.If you had those, you can make anything you wanted and take as long as you want it to make. So you always have some type of constraint. But what I always like to do is push against it. So if you say something like we can't build that, that's too expensive. Then if you say, okay, well we'll hold on a second.What are those assumptions? And then say, there's inherent assumptions in that way. You're building it the same way. That's one assumption. If you built it with a different material or different process, you could maybe save money. If you built it with a different volume, it could be cheaper. So you're like, well, you're assuming that we can only sell that to 10,000 people.What if we sell to 10 million? Or you're assuming no one will pay for it at a higher cost. So again, really, it is about pushing on that constraint to say, we can't do this. Flip that and reframe it. What are all the different ways that we can actually push beyond that boundary? And I take each, sometimes I'll take the top three constraints and kind of see if they're related and in tandem, push against them.Sometimes I'll take each constraint and basically brain on each one separately. Right. But ultimately I'm always asking why is this assumption here and why is this constraint here? And, you know, sometimes somebody will say, well, that just defies the laws of physics. I'm like, no, that just defies the laws of your creativity of your brain.Right. You're not framing it well enough. The only meaningful attribution you have is that that must be a mechanism that follows the laws of physics or follows the laws of finance. Like it has to, you know, supply demand. You must sell something for more than you make it. But those laws are inherent in a human assumption.Somebody is using that device. So the laws of physics change if a 10 year old uses it versus a 30 year old. So if you're like making a shovel, a kid's plastic shovel is way different than a 30 year olds Gardener's shovel. So one shovel is made out of metal costs, maybe $25, and one's made out of plastic and cost two. So again, your physics law didn't change, but your framing did. Part of that is understanding your framing when you'd make an assumption, Brian Ardinger: I'd lIke to switch gears a little bit and talk a little bit about some of the things that you're seeing, what are some of the interesting trends in UX, UI design, and maybe even technology that you've seen and where do you see this whole I guess, industry going Brian?Wayne Li: That's a great question. I mean, I work with industrial design students and mechanical engineers, electrical engineers, computer scientists, human computer interaction, math graduate students. Definitely the thing you see faster and faster and faster for UI and UX is both portability and anticipation. So let me kind of explain what that means.Portability in the sense that devices get smaller, they get more personal, right? No, one's out of client terminal. There's no client terminal relationship anymore. So the portability meaning your ability to consume data, manipulate software, has to be more and more flexible, more and more intuitive. You basically be at the will it like, you know, sooner or later, you might not even use your hand.It's going to be so fluid and so natural. Then you can talk to it. You can gesture at it. The interactions will be more and more natural and quicker, faster, smaller. Now the other thing, like I said is the anticipation. Everything you do is being logged so sooner or later between the machine learning algorithm and the companies that are constantly monitoring your data, they'll be able to truly understand what you are based on your behavioral pattern. If you've read the Singularity Is Near, they basically say, you know, pretty much by 2045, your consciousness will be digitized. So in that sense, if we, if we got what 20 some odd years, 24, some odd years to get there, that basically means AI will be conscious by then, in the sense that hopefully if I live long enough, I could go back and go, what did Wayne think in 2019, every thought that you put into Instagram, Facebook, anything you put into your computer will be logged and kept. So every thought you've ever had. You may no longer corporally exists, but someone got a, what would Professor Li have thought in 1998, about this vehicle. And based on the machine learning though, well, Wayne said this about certain vehicles. And this vehicle and this vehicle people are very similar. So even if I'm not alive in 2080, and there's a 2080 sports car, they're going to go, well, what would Wayne have thought about this 2080 sports car?And they would probably, the machine learning algorithm will say, well Wayne talked about these vehicles or design these sports cars. And these were his thoughts on them because they've all been logged. And by the weighting metric I have, he would have liked it. Or he would have said blah-blah-blah send it.  Sooner or later, we'll have digital avatars that anyone can consult. And so that's the anticipation part. If you can anticipate that now how will that change, what you do Brian Ardinger: Tomorrow is Tesla's AI day. And they're gonna be talking a little bit about some of the new mind of the car stuff that they're working on. Similar to what you're saying, where the car can anticipate based on its surroundings, what's happening and self-driving and everything else around that.But you know, you take that beyond just transportation. You take that to everything else and how does that change the world and what we're looking at? Even things like I think about technology and how it's accessible to anybody now. So I have to be a coder, for example. A lot of no code tools and things along those lines that allow you to experiment and build and try things that 10 years ago, 15 years ago, you had to have a design development team to make that happen. So it'll be interesting to see where that trend takes the world of design as well. Wayne Li: Yeah, no, absolutely Brian. I mean, going back to what you said. I mean, obviously the sort of research area of mine, because I have an automotive interface, a human machine interface lab at Georgia Tech, right. That looks at futuristic automotive experiences. And absolutely you're right. I mean, thinking about it this. Not only can all the cars, right now is 5g. Like let's just think, think about 5g. If 4g was something like, oh, it was novel for us to have one HD movie streaming on our phone. Like that's the data of 4g, without major compression. 5g is like 40 simultaneous HD streams. So for example, if we just take some of that bandwidth and each car is communicating to the 15 nearest cars next to it, and those cars are connected and getting next to the internet enabled lampposts signage traffic stops, then that information is being shared very, very quickly.So if there's something that optimizes traffic flow like a stop says, well, this is open, right now. And there's really no need for a green light or a red light or a yellow light anymore, because everyone's already talking to each other. Brian Ardinger: Tie that into a person's phone and you realize, well, Joe's a crappy driver and he's, he's in the lane next to me. I probably need to adjust for that. Wayne Li: Yeah. Every car in the compass directions around you will notice that, right. Or based on your driving pattern already know that you're a bad driver based on your previous driving history. Right? So that economists levels between semi and fully is tricky. But that data, if it's freely shared, is there. The same thing and will be the minute you tell your car where you're going. So if you say, oh, I'm going to work and it's like, great, I'm driving you there. That's great. It will then ping everyone who's also going to work with you. And so it'll just say, oh, well, you know your neighbor down the street who works at the same company, why don't y'all platoon together.And all of a sudden you match up and you can streamline your traffic. Right? So, same thing, if you, all of a sudden, you tell the car out, I'm going to a concert. It's a new thing. It'll ping everyone on the internet who's interested in that same topic, who's going to the concert with you. And your windshield will turn into a screen.We actually have this in the lab, a windshield that is an augmented reality screen. And then you can then meet 15 people who will meet you at the door. Cause you'll be all dropped off at the same time to the same concert. So now you can go to the concert with not only the friends in your own car, but feel close kinship to 15 other cars that have the same people going at the same concert.It's an interesting concept when you can share that much data that quickly, and you see that as a trend. Yes, privacy is an issue, but you don't really see people pushing against it that much. They're sharing their information. Brian Ardinger: I love what you're doing and some of the things that you've seen in the past, and that. If people want to find out more about yourself or more about Georgia Tech or Design Bloc, what's the best way to do that?Wayne Li: My email's fine. That's just my name. W A Y N E . L I @ design . G A T E C H - Georgia tech.edu. If you want to know more about Design Bloc, basically design bloc without the K so D E S I G N B L O C.ga tech.edu. So they can go to our website and then see what we do. There's a contact us button there.Obviously, if you're a Georgia tech student or a prospective high school student, plenty to learn about what we do, which classes you can take. We do do workshops and not only for students, but we have done workshops for other entities. And so we are in the process of getting those things approved by the Institute. Right. But we have mechanisms in which we do give workshops to companies or groups like the Georgia Tech Alumni Association. We've done Design Thinking workshops for them. So you'll see a list of all the workshops we tend to give. And if it's something that you are interested in or you're interested in giving to your company or entity, then there's a connect to us button and we can talk about that.Brian Ardinger: Wayne, thanks again for being on Inside Outside Innovation, look forward to seeing what the future brings Wayne Li: Me too. It's been a pleasure. Thanks so much for having me on.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Atlanta First United Methodist Church Sermon Podcast
The Hope of Courage - Sermon for Sunday, September 12, 2021

Atlanta First United Methodist Church Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 27:47


The Sunday, September 12, 2021, worship service of Atlanta First United Methodist Church. Sermon “The Hope of Courage” in the sermon series “Courage,” by Jay Horton, our Director of Community Engagement and Connections. Sermon scripture: Luke 5:17-26 (Common English Bible).Support the show (http://www.atlantafirstumc.org/give)

Black and Highly Dangerous
Episode 192: Professional Community Engagement w/ Dr. Castel Sweet

Black and Highly Dangerous

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 94:35


For today's episode, Tyrell and Daphne welcome Dr. Castel Sweet, an embedded sociologist and community engagement professional. During the conversation, they explore her motivation for pursuing a non-traditional academic career (40:30) as well as her research on how hip-hop artists engage with their communities (43:05). They also discuss the importance of bridging the gap between academic institutions and the communities in which they are embedded (56:00), her day-to-day work as a community engagement professional (1:05:21), and her recent article on community engaged learning (1:17:35).  Other Topics:  00:30 - Catch up with Tyrell and Daphne  11:45 - BhD “Oh Lawd” News   36:00  - Introduction of the Topic  38:26 - Learn More about Dr.  Sweet  50:40 - The Kanye, Drake, and Andre 3000 Controversy  1:28:08 - Ty and Daphne Reflect on the Interview Resources: BhD Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/bhdpodcast  Dr. Castel Sweet - http://castelsweet.com  Teacher took off her mask to read aloud and infected half her students - https://thehill.com/changing-america/enrichment/education/570059-teacher-took-off-her-mask-to-read-aloud-and-infected  The August jobs numbers have economists worried. Here's why - https://www.cnn.com/2021/09/03/economy/august-jobs-report/index.html  What The Texas Abortion Ban Does — And What It Means For Other States - https://www.npr.org/2021/09/01/1033202132/texas-abortion-ban-what-happens-next  Hate crime reports in US surge to the highest level in 12 years, FBI says - https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/30/us/fbi-report-hate-crimes-rose-2020/index.html  What we know about the mu variant and why Fauci is 'keeping a very close eye on it' - https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2021/09/03/covid-mu-variant-what-we-know/5716264001/ 

Find Calm Here Podcast
Find Calm creating your community strategy with Jenny Weigle

Find Calm Here Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 34:16


In this episode of the Find Calm Here Podcast, Jenny Weigle shares how she's creating, executing, and reviewing strategies for online communities for more than 10 years. She's worked with more than 100 brands on various aspects of their community strategy and implementations, including launch, migration, programming, and planning. Jenny has consulted for Airbnb, Google, HP, Quickbooks, Pinterest, REI, Samsung, Sephora, Splunk, Visa, and many more. When she's not geeking out on community strategy, Jenny spends time in Los Angeles with her partner, John, and stepdaughter. In her personal life, she is a proud member of a number of communities: Southern California Gator Club, Spiritual Sisters of Los Angeles (which she founded), Oak Park LA (CrossFit), Sofar Sounds, D23: The Official Disney Fan Club, and others.Show notes:2:40: Jenny starts by explaining what interested her in building a community. The beginning of her career focused on the social media community, which was the one-to-many type of interactions, but then switched focus to enterprise brand communities with more one-to-one interactions.9:19: Jenny explains first impressions are key in retaining and growing your community, recommending an immediate personal welcome message. Set clear expectations for what the experience is going to be like for founding members.17:15: When opening her workshops, Jenny shares she likes to lead by having everyone think about communities they are a part of and what value they get from it, helping individuals envision the community they want to create.22:49: Jenny touches on features she would enjoy seeing in the industry; for example, the marriage of audio form platforms with enterprise communities and to start seeing more senior positions with appropriate titles. She mentions platforms she prefers, with the recommendations being dependent on each individual clients' needs. Learn more about Find Calm Here Subscribe to the Find Calm Here Community Newsletter to learn more community-building tips, resources, and upcoming LIVE events to help you build, launch, and grow your community!Deb Schell is the founder of Find Calm Here LLC, an online consulting agency supporting entrepreneurs, founders, creators, and speakers as they build, launch, and grow a paid online membership. As a community strategist, Deb helps clients find calm in the community-building process through the CALM Method of Clarity, Awareness, Learning, and Motion so that they can lead with energy, confidence, and purpose. She brings together entrepreneurs who feel overwhelmed with building, launching, and growing their paid online membership and offers strategies that can be used on any online platform by offering a great member experience by helping others transform. Join Us! 

Where We Live
Refugee Resettlement Efforts Underway As Afghans Arrive in Connecticut

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 49:00


The U.S. military mission in Afghanistan ended Aug 31 with 123,000 evacuations, including 6,000 American citizens and tens of thousands of at-risk Afghans. But not everyone got out. Refugee settlement organizations in Connecticut expect to receive more than 700 Afghan refugees this year. The University of Bridgeport and Goodwin University announced plans to open up dorms to the newly arrived immigrants, and also offer English lessons. A Congressional aide to U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Connecticut) told WWL that the senator's office “has worked on over 100 cases for Connecticut residents who have reached out to the office regarding family members who remain in Afghanistan. These cases often involve multiple family members, some of whom served as interpreters for the U.S. government.” According to Patrick Malone, spokesman for Congressman Jim Himes (D-Connecticut): “We've flagged 702 individuals' situations for the Department of State. This includes American citizens, Legal Permanent Residents, SIVs, P1s, P2s, and otherwise at-risk Afghans -- 270 of those 702 individuals have some Connecticut connection.” Today on Where We Live, we look into the ongoing efforts to extricate and resettle Afghan refugees in Connecticut, and hear from Afghan-Americans whose families are in danger half a world away. GUESTS:  Aaron Sarwar - Connecticut Air National Guard, and Owner, Hartford City FC Anonymous -Aaron Sarwar's family member, Afghanistan Ann O'Brien - Director of Community Engagement, Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS) Camila Vallejo - Housing Reporter, WNPR Martine Dherte - Refugee Services Program Manager, Connecticut Institute for Refugees and Immigrants (CIRI) Maryam Wardak - Second Generation Afghan-American in Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Where We Live
Refugee Resettlement Efforts Underway As Afghans Arrive in Connecticut

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 49:00


The U.S. military mission in Afghanistan ended Aug 31 with 123,000 evacuations, including 6,000 American citizens and tens of thousands of at-risk Afghans. But not everyone got out. Refugee settlement organizations in Connecticut expect to receive more than 700 Afghan refugees this year. The University of Bridgeport and Goodwin University announced plans to open up dorms to the newly arrived immigrants, and also offer English lessons. A Congressional aide to U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Connecticut) told WWL that the senator's office “has worked on over 100 cases for Connecticut residents who have reached out to the office regarding family members who remain in Afghanistan. These cases often involve multiple family members, some of whom served as interpreters for the U.S. government.” According to Patrick Malone, spokesman for Congressman Jim Himes (D-Connecticut): “We've flagged 702 individuals' situations for the Department of State. This includes American citizens, Legal Permanent Residents, SIVs, P1s, P2s, and otherwise at-risk Afghans -- 270 of those 702 individuals have some Connecticut connection.” Today on Where We Live, we look into the ongoing efforts to extricate and resettle Afghan refugees in Connecticut, and hear from Afghan-Americans whose families are in danger half a world away. GUESTS:  Aaron Sarwar - Connecticut Air National Guard, and Owner, Hartford City FC Anonymous -Aaron Sarwar's family member, Afghanistan Ann O'Brien - Director of Community Engagement, Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS) Camila Vallejo - Housing Reporter, WNPR Martine Dherte - Refugee Services Program Manager, Connecticut Institute for Refugees and Immigrants (CIRI) Maryam Wardak - Second Generation Afghan-American in Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Two Sides of the Spectrum
Executive Function Supports for Everyday Life with Oswin Latimer

Two Sides of the Spectrum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 61:06


Oswin Latimer is the founder and President of Foundations for Divergent Minds (FDM) and former Director of Community Engagement for the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN). In this episode, Oswin and I talk about the specific executive function strategies we can use to support our autistic clients' participation in meaningful daily activities. 

Build Me Up
Building a Destination Medical Center in Rochester, Minnesota

Build Me Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 43:21


The City of Rochester, Minnesota is home to the world-renowned Mayo Clinic, and the city is booming with economic growth. At the heart of it all is the Destination Medical Center, or DMC, initiative. This $5.6 billion dollar economic development plan is the largest in Minnesota's history and is positioning Rochester as a global destination for health and wellness. The City of Rochester welcomes over 3 million visitors annually, and DMC's Heart of the City project is revamping downtown Rochester to create a unique and engaging gathering space for residents and visitors alike. As the “front door” to the Mayo Clinic, Heart of the City includes enhanced safety measures, greater accessibility, more trees, interactive art displays and water features, and a family-friendly space to gather in the downtown area. DMC's Community Engagement and Experience Director Jamie Rothe, the City of Rochester's Development Director Josh Johnsen, and Kraus-Anderson Project Superintendent Troy Dale discuss the Heart of the City project and the future of the City of Rochester.

Christ City Church, Washington DC
The Spirit is at Work

Christ City Church, Washington DC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 27:35


Nikki Wiggins, Christ City Church's Minister of Youth, Families, and Community Engagement, reminds us that the Spirit is always at work. Pay attention to the gifts that God has given you and how the Spirit is at work in you and through you. 

Small Things Make A Big Difference
Heroes Wanted: Rodney Bullard (VP Chick-fil-A , Author, Board Member)

Small Things Make A Big Difference

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 32:23


We can all be a Hero to somebody! This week Rodney Bullard shares insights from his book - Heroes Wanted (Why the World Needs You to Live Your Heart Out). This episode will leave you inspired to make a difference to the person within 3 feet of you and realizing how important everyday heroes like you are needed now more than ever. Rodney D. Bullard leads Global Corporate Social Responsibility, which includes responsibilities for Community Affairs, Community Engagement and Environmental Sustainability at Chick-fil-A, Inc., and Executive Director of the Chick-fil-A Foundation. A frequent speaker, he previously served in the US Air Force, NASA, and the Department of Justice. He is an alumnus of the Air Force Academy, Duke Law, the University of Georgia's Terry School of Business and the Harvard Business School's Advanced Management Program. Author of Heroes Wanted - grab your copy today! https://heroeswantedbook.com/

Atlanta First United Methodist Church Sermon Podcast
The Conviction of Courage - Sermon for Sunday, August 29, 2021

Atlanta First United Methodist Church Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 19:52


The sermon from the Sunday, August 29, 2021, worship service of Atlanta First United Methodist Church by Jay Horton, our Director of Community Engagement and Connections, entitled “The Conviction of Courage” in the sermon series “Courage.” Sermon scripture: Luke 13:10-17 (New International Version).Support the show (http://www.atlantafirstumc.org/give)

Mike McConnell on 700WLW
Sports Talk with Lance McAlister - 8/26/2021

Mike McConnell on 700WLW

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 97:10


In hour one, Lance reacts to the Reds series against the Brewers the past three days. In hour two, Lance talks about athletes fans would like to see one more time. He also talks to Alex Simons, the Bengals Director of Community Engagement on an announcement the Bengals announced today. In hour three, Lance honors Marty Brennaman ahead of his Hall of Fame induction tomorrow night.

The Warblers by Birds Canada
Who's singing? AI powered bird sound identification at your fingertips, free.

The Warblers by Birds Canada

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 48:14


It's a dream come true – there's finally an app for identifying bird sounds. In the next episode of The Warblers podcast, we'll explore the Merlin Bird ID app's new Sound ID feature and how artificial intelligence is redefining birding. We talk with Drew Weber and Jody Allair and go deep into the implications and opportunities that this technology will bring for birds, and new as well as experienced birders.  Drew Weber coordinates the Merlin project at the Cornell Lab, as well as some web development for eBird and Macaulay Library. He enjoys expanding Merlin Bird ID to include new regions and new features to help users identify birds, whether it's their first bird or their life list is over 5,000. He has been birding since he was a kid and loves anything with birding and technology, he combines these two things every day. @drewweber on Twitter.Jody Allair is an avid birder and naturalist who enjoys sharing his enthusiasm for the natural world. He is the Director of Community Engagement at Birds Canada and has written numerous articles on birds, birding and connecting with nature. You can find him on Twitter and Instagram at @JodyAllair.Please remember we would love to hear from you, let us know what you think about the podcast here or which topics you will love -> podcast@birdscanada.orgDownload Merlin Bird ID App here - > https://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/download/Learn all about AI powered Sound ID here  Learn how to record and submit your bird recordings to the Macaulay Library.Smartphone recording tips. Andrea Gress studied Renewable Resource Management at the University of Saskatchewan. She pivoted towards birds, after an internship in South Africa. Upon returning, she worked with Piping Plovers in Saskatchewan and now coordinates the Ontario Piping Plover Conservation Program for Birds Canada. Follow her work at @ontarioploversAndrés Jiménez is a Costa Rican wildlife biologist with a keen interest in snakes, frogs, birds and how human relationships are interconnected with the living world. He studied Tropical Biology in Costa Rica and has a Masters in Environmental Problem Solving from York University. He is Birds Canada's Urban Program Coordinator and you can follow him at @andresjimo 

Education Law Insights
Educational Equity: Engaging and Re-engaging Students and Families for 2021-2022

Education Law Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 59:00


This episode will focus on engaging and reengaging students and families following the disruptions over the last year and a half. We are excited to welcome Dr. Zakieh Mohammed, Senior Manager for Attendance and Truancy, Office of Student Support and Engagement; Adrian Segura, Interim Chief Officer for Family and Community Engagement; and Claire Bohmann, Manager for Students in Temporary Living Situations, all of the Chicago Public Schools. The work of engaging students and families in the school community is always critical. And after more than a year of remote and hybrid learning through a pandemic that brought disruptions to all aspects of life, reconnecting with and supporting students is more important than ever. Chicago Public Schools is undertaking enormous projects to reach thousands of families to get students back into school and connected with needed supports. Kendra Yoch and Amy Dickerson serve as moderators as we discuss strategies and legal considerations related to re-engaging students, especially those who have been truant and those who are experiencing homelessness.

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history
Season 3, Ep. 7: “Run it up the Flagpole...” Utah Considers a New State Flag

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 55:28


Date: June 21, 2021 (Season 3, Episode 7; 55:28 minutes). Click here for the complete Speak Your Piece shownotes for this episode. Podcast Content: In this Speak Your Piece episode, three guests: political historian Ronald Fox, State Representative Stephen Handy and State Senator Daniel McCay, discuss the idea of a new flag for Utah. Law SB-48 which was passed during the last legislative session (sponsored by Handy and McCay) and signed by Governor Spencer Cox, does not actually call for a new flag, but creates a task force to look into the possibility of one.  If you are against the idea, or supportive, or you are not sure and want to hear more regarding the matter, here is the place to start. This episode also includes the history of Utah's current flag, and outlines SB-48's intentions, and Governor Spencer Cox June 14th, American Flag Day press release, where the governor announced that he will, at least initially, serve as chair of the task force, joined by Lt. Governor Deidre Henderson, Jill Remington Love, Executive Director of the Utah Department of Culture & Community Engagement, along with three state senators and three state representatives, all to offer a transparent and all encompassing statewide process, for considering the idea. See also "Additional Reading & Sources," and  “Topics Discussed in Time '' listed on the "Speak Your Piece: A Podcast About Utah's History" website, to see these lists click here. Guests: Bio: Senator Daniel McCay represents District 11 (R-Riverton, Draper and Bluffdale), and was formerly a member of the Utah House of Representatives, representing District 41 (R-Riverton and Bluffdale) from 2013 to 2018. Among numerous other committee and subcommittee assignments, McCay serves on the Infrastructure & General Government Asppropriations Subcommittee and the Natural Resources, Agriculture & Environmental Quality Appropriations Subcommittee. McCay earned a JD from Willamette University, and professionally is an attorney, real estate portfolio manager and vice president of the Suburban Land Reserve, Inc. He lives in Riverton with his wife, Tawnee, and their six children.Bio: Representative Stephen G. Handy (R-Layton) represents Utah's 16th Legislative House District. Appointed in 2010 he has been re-elected five times thereafter. Two of his committee assignments include serving as Chair of the Political Subdivisions Committee, and as a member of the Public Utilities, Energy & Technology Committee. Handy also serves as co-chair of the Utah Legislature's Bi-Partisan Clean Air Caucus. Handy owns a public relations and marketing firm which he launched after 17 years as the marketing director for the Ogden Standard-Examiner and the Deseret News. A graduate of the U of U, Steve has a bachelor's degree in English and a masters degree in Human Resources Management. He and his wife Holly, have six children and 16 grandchildren and have lived in Layton for 42 years. Bio: Ronald L. Fox is a long-time rare book, artifact and photograph dealer. He is also an author and political historian, and a former owner of a public affairs firm focusing on government advocacy. Fox has served as an advance coordinator for Executive Branch visits to SLC from Washington, D.C., and he served on the Utah Martha Hughes Cannon Statue Committee. He was recently appointed by Utah Governor Spencer Cox, to be a co-chair of Utah's Semiquincentennial (1776-1926) United States of America Committee.  Do you have a question or comment? Write us at “ask a historian” – askahistorian@uta

Solving Healthcare with Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng
COVID-19: Impact on Racialized Communities, Vaccine Hesitancy & The Power of Community Engagement, with Dr. onye Nnorom

Solving Healthcare with Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 79:10


SOLVINGWELLNESS: An amazing wellness platform for healthcare professionalsSOLVINGWELLNESS.COMKEYNOTE SPEAKINGsolvinghealthcare.ca or kwadcast99@gmail.comBETTERHELPBetterHelp is the largest online counselling platform worldwide. They change the way people get help with facing life's challenges by providing convenient, discreet and affordable access to a licensed therapist. BetterHelp makes professional counselling available anytime, anywhere, through a computer, tablet or smartphone.Sign up today: http://betterhelp.com/solvinghealthcare and use Discount code “solvinghealthcare"Solving Healthcare Seminars & Merchandise.The full conference can be purchased for $9.99 at solvinghealthcare.ca/shopDepartment of Medicine site: https://ottawadom.ca/solving-healthcareResource Optimization Network website: www.resourceoptimizationnetwork.com/Follow us on twitter & Instagram: @KwadcastLike our Facebook page:https://www.facebook.com/kwadcast/YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLmdmYzLnJeAFPufDy1ti8wBridges Over Barriers:https://t.co/jxsWRsnWwH?amp=1

ADInsider Podcast
Maximizing Fans in the Stands: Marketing Game Day

ADInsider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 45:24


IIn this AD Insider podcast, we feature a segment from the AD Insider LIVE | Thursday 30, presented by Hudl, we've compiled interviews from high school athletic administrators and a collegiate marketing director to unveil their systems, strategies, and checklists to maximize the fans in their stands.Topics Include:In-School Student MarketingSocial Media Post Tips and TricksInspiring Faculty Members to AttendWhat Your Website Needs to ShowCreating the Fear of Missing Out With VideoChecklists That Get It All DoneGuests Include:Jonathan MacKerchar, Athletic Director - Penn Yan Central Schools (NY)Emily Barkley, Athletic Director - Union Public Schools (OK)Tim Schultz, Asst. Athletic Director - Tampa Preparatory School (FL)Brynne Davis, Director of Community Engagement & Marketing - Colorado State University AthleticsSupport the show (https://coachesinsider.com/sign-up/)

Vitamin PhD Podcast
Navigating Community Engagement and Outreach

Vitamin PhD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 30:46


In this episode, Rohin and Jess are joined by David Meshoulam, co-founder of Boston's Speak for the Trees, and Daniel Zietlow, education designer at NCAR Education and Outreach. This episode, we talk all about community engagement and how to know if you're reaching your target audience. We learn about the challenges and rewards of working directly with the community and debate, "is everyone a scientist?"Links to Share:From Daniel - Provare Media: https://www.provaremedia.com/NCAR: https://ncar.ucar.edu/what-we-offer/education-outreachFrom David -Speak for the Trees Boston: https://treeboston.org/

Sex & Spirituality
Relationship OCD & Sexually Intrusive Thoughts with Jenna Overbaugh

Sex & Spirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 51:02


In today's episode, I speak with Jenna Overbaugh, LPC and senior manager of community engagement at NOCD. We answer the following... - What is Obsessive Compulsive Disorder,  - How to know whether this is a disorder/abnormal vs something we just experience day to day, -  Subtypes with specific focus on sex, relationships, scrupulosity/spirituality Further explanation into the subtypes including examples of intrusive thoughts/experience individuals have & why they're so troublesome - What treatment looks like, i.e Exposure and Response Prevention - why this is so beneficial & what people could expect -  How to know if you need to seek additional help and resources Jenna Overbaugh is a licensed professional counselor in Wisconsin.  She has been working with people who have OCD and anxiety since 2008.  She currently works as a therapist and is the Senior Manager of Community Engagement at NOCD, a teletherapy platform for those who struggle with OCD.  She also has a podcast called "All The Hard Things" to help spread education about OCD and anxiety as well as Exposure and Response Prevention.  www.nocd.com www.jennaoverbaugh.com Instagram: @Jenna Overbaugh podcast: "All The Hard Things" www.nocd.com/support-groups --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lauren-colletti/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lauren-colletti/support

Learnings from Leaders: the P&G Alumni Podcast
Kevin Clayton, Cleveland Cavaliers, VP of Diversity, Inclusion & Community Engagement

Learnings from Leaders: the P&G Alumni Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 56:29


“Connecting diversity, equity, inclusion and engagement to the business allows everybody to see themselves playing a role.” Kevin Clayton is Cleveland Cavaliers VP of Diversity, Inclusion and Community Engagement. Kevin leads the diversity, inclusion and engagement strategies, business imperatives which affect all areas of the team's business and basketball operations. Prior to joining the Cavs, Kevin held leadership roles with Bon Secours Mercy Health, the American Cancer Society, the U.S. Tennis Association, Russell Corporation, and spend 10 years in sales and marketing at Procter & Gamble. Kevin even also ran a successful consulting business for more than a decade. Kevin grew up in Cleveland, OH, and attended North Carolina Central University and Wilmington College. You'll enjoy this candid conversation about Kevin's lived experiences, how he views the competitive advantages of driving diversity, equity, and inclusion - not just as a human issue, but a business driver.

Our College, Your Voices
165: Meet the Hamilton County Team

Our College, Your Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 15:38


On July 1, 2021, Ivy Tech Hamilton County will become Ivy Tech's 19th campus. This C3 (Ivy Tech's classification for small campuses) will serve about 1200 students in the 4th largest and fastest growing county in the state. New programs will align to top industries including IT, STEM, Agriculture, Manufacturing, as well as specific programs designed for transfer. The campus team is small but mighty and they talked in the episode about how they are building a culture of family and caring from the ground up. Thanks to my guests: Dr. Stacy Atkinson – Chancellor, Hamilton County Campus Dr. Rachel Kartz – Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Hamilton County Campus Jessica Metz – Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Services and Student Success, Hamilton County Campus Dr. Dan Clark – Vice Chancellor for Community Engagement, Hamilton County Campus Please like the Ivy Tech Hamilton County Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/IvyTechHamiltonCounty) to stay updated on progress and happenings at the campus!  Tell your friends about us! Get in Touch You can connect with Kara Monroe on Twitter @KNMTweets Reach out with show ideas, comments, or questions via Twitter or at our email address - ourcollegeyourvoices@ivytech.edu. Leave us a voice mail at 317-572-5049. Respond to the Call for Action, ask a question, give a shout-out to a colleague, or an episode suggestion. Check out show notes, listen to past episodes, and get instructions on how to access the podcast on our website at http://www.ivytech.edu/podcast.

ThinkResearch
Making an Impact on COVID-19 Vaccination Efforts

ThinkResearch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 48:52


This special podcast will focus on a partnership to successfully deliver community testing and vaccination for marginalized communities in Massachusetts most impacted by COVID-19. Guests: Gina Kruse, MD, program faculty for our Community Engagement program, speaks with Eddie Taborda, MS, senior clinical research coordinator at Mass General Hospital, Rosa Torres, patient service coordinator at Mass General Hospital - Everett, and Daniel Cortez, community engagement specialist for the Chelsea Police Department.

Living Sport Podcast
How to Show You Are Made for this Industry | Jennifer Wunder, Gateway Grizzlies

Living Sport Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 42:34


Welcome to the Living Sport Podcast, where we connect you to young professionals and sport business experts from around the world. I am Connor Herlihy, your host, and this episode I am joined with Jennifer Wunder, Living Sport Hamburg '19 Alum and Director of Promotions and Community Engagement at the Gateway Grizzlies. What will you learn in this episode? How to utilize your network, how to stand out from the crowd in this competitive industry, how to challenge yourself creatively, and the importance of leaving your comfort zone!

Transition Virginia
How do we bridge the urban-rural divide?

Transition Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 48:12


Michael and Thomas are fresh from their vacations and back at the podcast studio. Their guest this week is John Provo, director of the Center for Economic and Community Engagement at Virginia Tech and the author of Vibrant Virginia, a forthcoming book about the Urban-Rural divide in the Commonwealth. Often framed as weak rural economic development, John reframes the issue as one that really has more to do with our understanding of wealth and class. We discuss rural broadband and how telecom providers rigged the system against local governments from providing or subsidizing municipal infrastructure. Click here to sign up to be notified when the book publishes: https://cece.vt.edu/VibrantVirginia/VVBookNotifications.html