Podcasts about Columbine

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Best podcasts about Columbine

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Latest podcast episodes about Columbine

Estadão Notícias
A relação entre massacres em escolas e a cultura do ódio

Estadão Notícias

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 30:17


O caso de Aracruz, no Espirito Santos, quando um adolescente invadiu 2 escolas armado e matou 4 pessoas e feriu outras 12, acendeu um alerta sobre a recorrência desses casos nos últimos anos. Coincidentemente, com a facilitação do acesso às armas no Brasil, durante o governo Bolsonaro, houve um aumento desse tipo de crime no País. Além disso, o crescente ódio na sociedade brasileira, que não aceita o contraditório, pode ter influenciado nesses casos. O pai do atirador de Aracruz tinha postagens no Instagram de apoio ao atual presidente e de ódio à esquerda. Ele, que é policial militar, postou também uma imagem do livro “Mein Kampf”, que traz a ideologia nazista. Em entrevista exclusiva ao Estadão, ele negou que seja nazista, ou que tenha incentivado o filho a cometer o crime. Segundo ele, o filho sofria bullying na escola, e que esse pode ser o problema que serviu como gatilho para fazer o que fez. O policial militar, no entanto, admite que errou ao deixar suas armas desprotegidas. Afinal, como podemos resolver esse problema de ataques nas escolas? Como o discurso de ódio influencia na mente de jovens em formação? O que explica o aumento vertiginoso deles nos últimos anos? No ‘Estadão Notícias' de hoje, vamos conversar sobre o assunto com Telma Vinha, pedagoga, doutora em educação e professora da Faculdade de Educação da Unicamp. O ‘Estadão Notícias' está disponível no Spotify, Deezer, Apple Podcasts, Google podcasts, ou no agregador de podcasts de sua preferência. Apresentação: Emanuel Bomfim Produção/Edição: Gustavo Lopes, Jefferson Perleberg e Gabriela Forte  Sonorização/Montagem: Moacir Biasi.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Peter Boyles Show Podcast
Peter Boyles November 26, 10am

Peter Boyles Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 45:03


Frank DeAngelis is on the air with us in the 10-o-clock. Peter gets on the subject of mass shootings, ghost guns, and gun laws. Frank has done a lot of research in this area as he was a survivor of the Columbine shooting, now retired principal, which leaves us trying to answer; How do we stop the rise in mass shootings? It's starting to be clearer that it isn't the guns, but something must be done. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kenosha Police Department Podcast
Would YOU Change YOUR Training? SURVIVING AN ACTIVE THREAT (part 2)

Kenosha Police Department Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 23:12


In this episode of our series on "How to Survive an Active Threat," we discuss the changes in law enforcement protocol after Columbine and the civilian lessons learned from the Virginia Tech Massacre.  We will explain why citizens should do more than "sit tight" and wait for the "Calvary." 

ex.haust
Episode 92: The Dirties ft. PsyOp Cinema

ex.haust

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 83:13


Brett and Thomas from PsyOp cinema join Emmet to talk about the school shooter movie The Dirties (2013). They talk about Columbine, the role media plays in "traumatizing" its audiences, social engineering, media saturation as grand social atomizer, the figure of the "outsider," and more! Check out PsyOp cinema here! (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/psyop-cinema/id1584525928) Closing Song: Do Not Reply by Stuck (https://stuckchi.bandcamp.com/track/do-not-reply)

The Opperman Report
Inside Story of Columbine: Lies. Coverups. Ballistics. Lessons.

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 60:32


This is the behind the scenes story of the Columbine tragedy, from a year before the killings, telling the entire story up to today. This book covers many of the unknown details, the cover-ups, the lies, the secrets and the real life story of the family involved in Columbine. If you think you know the story of Columbine, you are wrong. This is the real story of the tragedy, from the point of view of the family at the center of the tragedy. This is a unique opportunity to read the true history of Columbine, from someone on the inside. This is not a book with an agenda. This is the truth. No matter how painful it is, this book is the truth. An invaluable chance to read the real history of one of the great tragedies of this Country.You will read about the coverup by the police, the lies and deception, the bullying, the reason for the killings, and about ballistics details that have never been released. All of this information is well documented, and taken from the investigative files. If you want to know what really happened at Columbine and in the ensuing years, this is the source.Read it and learn.The bonus chapter is about how to stop School Shootings. It is invaluable information.The final chapter discovers the reason behind the coverups and lies.This is the only source for that information.

The Opperman Report
Jenn Thompson Columbine Witness

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 53:31


Jenn Thompson Columbine Witness describes how she saw other shooters and the police tried to intimidate her into changing her story.

Finish Strong With Fearless Faith
Persecution Is GOOD??? #73

Finish Strong With Fearless Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 24:59 Transcription Available


We love to talk about God's blessings and we love to talk about God's faithfulness.  But do we enjoy talking about persecution?  That is exactly what we talk about in this episode of “Finish Strong!”  (I can almost hear the needle on the record sliding across and bringing everything to a screeching halt.)Jesus talked about persecution during his public ministry.  In fact, he said that we are blessed when we are persecuted during his famous Sermon on the Mount.  Have we got your attention? Christians are suffering in many countries around the world.  Believe it or not, it is even beginning to happen in the United States of America.  But don't let your heart be troubled.  Our Fearless Faith crew explains how persecution  and suffering can actually be a good thing!Fearless Faith Websiteffaith.orgTo leave a review - Open Finish Strong on the Apple Podcast app and scroll down until you see "Ratings & Reviews". There will be a link to click so that you can "Write A Review"FacebookYouTubeInstagram

Baby Boomer Tales
Ep. 198 - Oh My Darling Columbine

Baby Boomer Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 15:00


Thar is a big ole elk.

Your Lot and Parcel
Conscious Parenting in The Age of Columbine

Your Lot and Parcel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 36:57


My guest feels that he has a tremendous responsibility to children and their families. The practice of pediatrics has made him a better person. Parents seek medical care and trusted counsel from a respected health care provider with the following abilities—to listen, to diagnose, to provide care, to empathize, to be trusted, to prescribe, to recommend, and to treat their patients like one of their own. While pediatricians do not use holy water in their interactions, they do invest an incredible amount of professional experience and emotional energy as they engage in a partnership with their families. My patients effectively become my children, he says. Years later when these children grow up and have their own children, pediatricians have the real privilege of seeing and often caring for this next generation. www.mychildrenschildren.comhttp://www.yourlotandparcel.org

Hybrid Ministry
Episode 016: Derry Prenkert on how the invention of the iPhone has radically changed how Pastors and ministry leaders accomplish the mission

Hybrid Ministry

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 43:52


SUMMARY In this episode, Nick sits down with his friend, Derry Prenkert, a 20+ year youth ministry veteran. Derry shares about the monumental shift of the invention of the smart phone. How things were before, and how things have shifted, but most importantly, how we utilize this technology for our benefit and gain to reach more students for the mission of Jesus. Follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/hybridministry Find all the resources you need from the podcast http://www.hybridministry.xyz Follow Derry online: -TWITTER: https://twitter.com/derryprenkert -INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/derryprenkert/ -PODCAST: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/my-third-decade-in-youth-ministry/id1338273697 SHOWNOTES Steve Job's introduction of the iPhone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7qPAY9JqE4 Derry's Parenting Resource: https://www.downloadyouthministry.com/p/adolescence%2C-technology-and-parenting/training-3996.html Johnny Mac's Stuff: https://yourhouseblend.com/jonnysblend TIMECODES 00:00-03:30 Intro 03:30-10:53 The impact of the invention of the iPhone 10:53-14:30 What happened in ministry after the invention of the iPhone 14:30-23:20 How have you responded since then? 23:20-32:44 When do you ask phones to be put away? 32:44-41:23 How can we utilize technology now to further and advance God's mission? 41:23-43:38 Outro TRANSCRIPT Nick Clason (00:00): What is up everybody? Welcome to another episode of the Hybrid Ministry podcast. Excited to be with you today. Uh, today we have our very first, uh, guest interview, uh, friend of mine Derry Pinker. He's located in, um, Amish town, Nape Indiana. Um, right now, uh, he worked at that church for over 20 years, and then he was at another church for just a couple years, super large church in, uh, Kentucky. So, um, excited to bring you Derry's conversation. Uh, he mentions a couple of different links. He talks about Steve Jobs' keynote, a resource that he has on download youth ministry and echo ministry. I'm gonna include all of those in the show notes, but without any further ado, let's just hop in so you can get to know Derry. Nick Clason (00:51): All right, well, what's up Derry? Good to have you on the podcast. Welcome, man. Derry Prenkert (00:56): Yeah, it's so good to be with you, Nick. Thanks for having me on. Nick Clason (00:58): Yeah. So as we were talking a little bit before I hit record here, you have a podcast or did, or what would you define the, the existence of your podcast? Right Now? Derry Prenkert (01:11): The status of my third decade. It is, it has been on the longest hiatus ever. Um, yeah. And it is coming back. Um, it's tied to this whole world of the shift that I've, I've made from being in a local church to now serving pastors in the local church. Yeah. And I'm in a season of getting all the groundwork laid for that. I, uh, have every intention, every intention by, uh, early 2023 that it's gonna launch back out. And there are some, there are actually some things already recorded for it, so, so it hasn't completely gone away. There, there is, there is a future to it. Nick Clason (01:46): That's good. Cuz it's still in my podcast catcher, so I'm not unsubscribing from, I just wanna let you know that it's still there. So, um, but back when I mowed the lawn when I worked two churches ago, I think I heard you, um, talk about like, uh, this really big shift in culture and you noticed that it was, uh, have to do with when the iPhone came into existence. Mm-hmm. , just give us a little bit, like give us your story, how long you've been, you know, doing youth ministry, um, and how you have a beneficial perspective of before technology and phones are a part of what we have to navigate and deal with. And then post, and then maybe we can just kind of chat about how we navigate that as, you know, people who are, uh, ministering to people, students, um, who are very much entrenched in this technology, like Lane and world. Derry Prenkert (02:42): Yeah, absolutely. So, um, my story is somebody that started in youth ministry at 19 years old. I was just about to turn 20 and I started an internship and that was back in 1996. Mm-hmm. . Yeah, I'm old. Um, and so graduated from high school in 95, start in, in ministry in 96. And so I get 11 years of ministry. Um, and in those 11 years, uh, you know, cell phones, car phones were around when I started . Yeah. And cell phones were around when I finished college in 1999. But they were, they roamed the minute you got outside of about 10 miles from your house and you only use them in emergencies. And then, and then it moved into, you know, 2004, 2005, the razor flip. Flum was the coolest thing in the world is texting, kind of entered the picture mm-hmm. . Um, and then, you know, so I, but, but really it was 2007 when Steve Jobs holds up this, this phone. Derry Prenkert (03:36): And it's actually interesting to go back and watch, I don't know if you've ever watched that keynote when he does it. No, I should, but, but he, he, he introduces it and is pretty prophetic, like the level of what he's talking about where technology is heading. Cause he said this is gonna revolutionize and change. And he says, he says, What would happen if we were to introduce a computer operating system, a phone and a iPod all in one thing. Yeah. And that's, that's the heartbeat of what they did. Um, and actually I, I do a technology thing with parents, uh, adolescents, technology and parenting. Mm-hmm. , uh, what I do is, I'll actually, it's, it's a fun little exercise cuz if you think about, you got, most parents of teenagers right now are, are there children of the eighties if they're really, if they've got younger, like their youngest kids are teenagers now, nineties or maybe early two thousands mm-hmm. . And so what I do is I'll put up on the screen different, like, what was the technology of our time. And so like, you know, in the eighties you got like VCRs and corded phones and, and a Walkman or a giant computer that has a green screen maybe. Nick Clason (04:41): Yeah. I found the VCR yesterday in our building, so that was cool, Derry Prenkert (04:46): Dude. And, and did you try playing anything? Cause it probably just ate the tape, right? Nick Clason (04:49): Yeah, no, I was like, I don't, I don't even know if we would ever need this, but, Right. Yeah. Here it Derry Prenkert (04:53): Is. Yeah. Yeah. It's, see the, in the eighties in technology, like everything got fixed by blowing on it. Um, so like the VHS tape wasn't working. You blew on it. The, the Nintendo cartridge. Yep. You blew in that and then blew in the box. Mm-hmm. . So that was, you know, eighties in the nineties, you have cell phones come, you got the Discman mm-hmm. that I remember. I would, as the nineties I would run or exercise with a discman, but I had to be careful not to run too hard because the CD would skip Yeah. Nick Clason (05:17): As I skipping. I Derry Prenkert (05:18): Remember that. Yeah. Yeah. Um, and then, you know, early two thousands social media in MySpace shows up. Yep. But, you know, garins show up, Uhhuh, um, digital cameras are a big deal in another 2000 flat screen TVs. Right. So we walk through these different, different moments and I say in 2007, Steve Jobs holds up this, this little device. And everything I just said was around in those different decades now lives inside this single device. Mm. Interesting. It is your video games. It is your music, you know, it's your disc man, it's your VCR or your DVD player. It is your Nick Clason (05:53): Computer, your calendar. Yeah. Derry Prenkert (05:55): Yeah. It's everything. It's all there. And, and so for parents, it's just saying like, recognize how significant this shift is. And so for those of us in ministry, if we are in that age, it's important to recognize that for those of us that are, I I, a lot of youth pastors are maybe a little, um, younger than the parents that they have. Right. Remember, like, these are the parents you're working with that, that this shift has happened. It might be a little more native to you as a youth pastor if you're in your, your mid to early twenties mm-hmm. . But it's foreign. It's, it's, it's so different and, and it's, it's changed so much. Um, the two things to kind of say, when I look at youth culture, cuz that's where I spent a lot of my time Yeah. That I would say are huge, is, uh, one youth group in church. Derry Prenkert (06:40): I was at a church that ha drew from multiple high schools. And pre 2007, we were the place to go to connect with friends. Hmm. Um, now we saw God move and we were, we were, we were unapologetic that that wasn't the, that wasn't the primary point. The primary point was to encounter a relationship with Jesus, to understand your call, to be a part of this kingdom work. But the appeal for my kids, I'm gonna drop names that nobody knows from Wawa c high school at Northwood High School. Mm-hmm. and Goshan High School. Someone knows each other. Yeah. Yeah. Right. Yeah. Um, uh, they can meet weekly at our place. Right. Uh, now with the institution of not only, you know, the, just the move of the cell phone with texting, but then once the iPhone came in, it wasn't just you, you could, you didn't have to go there to meet a place you could actually interact face to face, you know, through FaceTime, through, through, um, whatever it might be. Derry Prenkert (07:33): Google Meet all do different stuff. You could, you could do that over the phone. So it became less important. The other thing that's super intriguing is, I don't know about Eich, but the greatest day of my life, uh, as a teenager was when I turned 16 in one month in my town, because that was the day I could get my driver's license. Yeah. And by getting my driver's license, that meant a whole new, uh, level of freedom, empowerment, and ownership. Like that driver's license was my ticket to independence. Yeah. I've noticed, um, a major change. I can't believe how many kids I interact with that are like 16, 17 and, you know, we're doing an event. They're like, Hey, can I get a ride? I'm like, You don't have your license yet. Yeah. No. And, and, and, and I I don't have like the scientific proof to this, just the conversation. Derry Prenkert (08:25): Sure. It's, they're like, Why would I, why would I need it? Well, yeah, the big shift came like that that license was my way to get to my friends. Mm-hmm. and my community. Now, this, this thing that we can hold in our hands is our ticket to interact. And so, so like one of the, I guess like the big implication that I would throw out that is huge is it it has radically transformed our connectivity mm-hmm. , um, even with the people right next to us. Yeah. Um, so I mean, so many other thoughts, but there's, those are just a couple things like that we recognize. Another way I say it is like we basically now are carrying around super computers in our pockets. Yeah. That, uh, it's, they are that we're, we have, we have excessive, uh, access to information. We are, we are constantly connected. Um, and it's like invasive, you know, it's not like it's, when's the last time I I I, you can answer this or the people are listening, When's the last time you actually turned off powered down your phone Nick Clason (09:26): On your own? Well, mine's new, so never Derry Prenkert (09:29): Yeah. . Nick Clason (09:30): Right, Derry Prenkert (09:30): Right. And it's, it's like impossible to, like, they've made it so it's hard to do. And so it's always there. Now, now I might sound like I'm interesting. Yeah. I'm negative on this. I do mourn more in some things because I'm old and I'm an old guy sitting saying, Get off my lawn kids. You know, a little bit. But, um, but those are some of the things that I think are big that have changed. And so, so just the way we go about ministry has to change with it. It is in my mind, we measure time on before and after like, events that come to mind in youth ministry world, most youth pastors that were around before Columbine mm-hmm. and after Columbine, they know it changed the way you had to handle liabilities and safety Nick Clason (10:10): Measures. Yeah. Derry Prenkert (10:11): Mm-hmm. pre nine 11. Post nine 11 as a, as a culture, our life shifted on how we view, uh, things pre covid, post covid. We're still learning that all. Yeah. I still could make the argument pre iPhone and post iPhone, pre smartphone and post iPhone could be, could be the most significant watershed cultural moment that we've experienced in the LA since World War ii. Yeah. Nick Clason (10:35): I don't, one of, one of like, I, one of the guys I listen to a lot, his name, you know, Brady Shear mm-hmm. , he talks about this being the biggest communication shift that we've seen in 500 years. So he's referencing that being the printing press. Yeah. And now with all this digital stuff. So that's a great call. Let's go like, let's go there a little bit. You said, um, pre iPhone people would gather from multiple high schools to your church. Did you notice that stopping, um, after, did you notice attendance shifting or did you just notice that still happens but there's, there's now just an iPhone in everyone's pocket and that's changing how they're interacting. But things are still, still sort of the same. Like, what would you say was, uh, like a, an actual effect, right? Yeah. Of that attendance thing you're talking about. Derry Prenkert (11:25): This is not scientific at all. It's very guttural and it's nature. Uh, and it's my experience, I would say it didn't, for some it stopped. But I would say the bigger thing is it got more sporadic. In fact, you we're just talking, I don't know, it would be fascinating. You know, they talk about how people are coming to church less often Right. Than they used to. That a regular attendant is, attender is considered once every month or once every three weeks. Right? Yep. I wonder how that correlates to the institution of like the, the actual cell phone and smartphone because Yeah, because that was the thing. Like pre pre smartphone, um, even kids from the same school, there was the chance to just, you know, we're not just going through in passing periods. We're gonna have a small group time. We're gonna have a pre hangout post hangout mm-hmm. Derry Prenkert (12:09): once a week. This is my guaranteed time. I'm gonna get time with my friends. Yeah. Um, and so it got more sporadic. Yeah. Uh, definitely. And, and that could be in part because they could have the community outside of the youth group. Um, but it still, that's why I would, I would still be a firm believer. There is a limitation to what you can accomplish over digital. I think anybody that truly had to walk through the PA pandemic and live completely on a screen would a hundred percent agree with me. You can't replace, um, interpersonal in person reaction Totally. With digital. But you can find more connection or, or you can find connection in the gaps through that. And so I think it got more, um, more sporadic, uh, in nature. And yes, they are showing up with them. And I mean, man, whew, how many conversations do I have? Derry Prenkert (12:58): I had with parents and leaders on, We gotta, we gotta, we gotta like force kids to turn these off or tell 'em they can't have 'em at all. And then, and then the issue of parents talking about what age do I give my kid a phone? When do I not? Because not only are they carrying it around, I mean, it's just, it's just there. And so the amount of attention that was going down to it when they were around that, that I'd say kinda really hit in the two, like 2014 15 phrase when everybody got one. Mm-hmm. , uh, everybody had one. Nick Clason (13:28): Yeah. Yeah. I mean, like, even my kids in first grade and his teacher sended stuff on his like e backpack and then his like e folder and he has like iPad time. Like, so my sort of thing is, while you may lament the loss of some of what was prefo and pre-technology, um, it's not going anywhere. And so, you know, cuz I, I'm with you sometimes I have leaders who are like, We just need to get rid of the phones, take 'em away from the kids. Like make sure that they, you know, only use paper bibles and that, you know, it's, it's wrong to read God's word on a screen type of thing. And that's, that's a high preference maybe mm-hmm. . And there may be some validity to some of those things, but the fact of the matter is like, why, You know, my argument is why are we discouraging a kid from reading the Bible if it's super accessible to them and in their pocket 24 hours a day? Nick Clason (14:25): Um, you know, so, So what have you noticed or what are some of the things that you've done realizing like, we can't, we can't get ourselves away from these. They are everywhere. They're on all the time. They are our everything. Our day planner, our calendar and our social life in a lot of ways. You know, like what are some of the things that you've, you've tried to embrace as a youth pastor, um, to maybe leverage them or lean into them and then maybe what are some of the times that you've discouraged use of them? Because you're like the, the, you know, the re the result of what's gonna happen here physically is gonna be greater than what is happening if you're on your Derry Prenkert (15:02): Phone. Yeah. It's great. Um, in the thing I do with parents, which total shameless plug, it's actually on D ym, you get it, download Youth Mystery Nick Clason (15:12): And then you have an extra $4 in your pocket. Yeah, yeah, Derry Prenkert (15:15): Yeah. From that roof. Yeah. It's called Adolescents Parenting and Technology. I use an illustration. I, and I, it's an illustration that, that hit me is our phones are a knife, um, and a knife, uh, can serve many purposes. Uh, a knife is, can be used to spread butter. It can be used to whittle wood to make, uh, amazing things. It can be, it can be, uh, used to, you know, cut through things that are hard to cut through. It also can be used to kill people. Um, it's really about what is happening with the person that has it in their hands. And a part of that is what's their intentions as well as what's their awareness of a knife. You know, I've got, you've got younger kids. Mm-hmm. , I had a six year old that early on, he just got us obsessed with our steak knives when he was three or four. Derry Prenkert (16:03): And we had to like, put those things up high cuz he just, he didn't understand the danger involving those knives. Right. Um, and, and so, uh, so with that, like, with that illustration in mind and looking at it that way, I, I look at this thing, a knife is really, for the most part neutral. Unless it's this crazy butcher knife that is, for the most part, a knife is neutral. It's what you're doing with it in your hands. So then it becomes about making sure to check your motives as well as prepare the person that has it in their hands to use it in the right way and to know how to use it in the right way. And, um, I think in that, like, especially if we're talking to ministers and I, I would put this across the board, in fact mm-hmm. , I would argue that senior pastors teaching pastors should be coaching, uh, 50, 60 year olds how to utilize their phones wisely, even more so than those that are just growing up with it, a native part of their life. Derry Prenkert (17:03): Hmm. Um, cuz I don't see a lot of students, uh, just making a fool of themselves on how they treat people on, on social media is, uh, as much as I see adults, uh, in what they're saying and everything else. So, so the, it's across the board. Like we have a responsibility to look at what does scripture say about, especially from a discipleship aspect of how we are to love our neighbors ourselves, and then how does it play out on this thing, you know? Mm-hmm. . So, so that would be, that would be a thing. So, um, so that's just, sorry, little rant there, but the knife and, and, and we, we have a responsibility to show them. Uh, I am a big fan Nick, of just intentionality in ministry overall. I think a lot of pastors, uh, I'm, I'm dedicating really, I feel like the second, second half of my life is I just want youth pastors and any pastors to be healthy in ministry. Derry Prenkert (17:53): And a big part of that is guarding your own heart. Um, another part is just thinking clearly and strategically in Christ's focus and inten and intentionality in what you're doing is a big part of that. Um, and so I would, I would argue that anybody that is in charge of a program, uh, a ministry, uh, any regular ministry gathering, there should be a side to say, Okay, what's our philosophy in how phones play into this? Mm-hmm. . And it can take up a lot of different forms. Yeah. One is what's our, so we're gonna be teaching this series, How's it showing up on their phones? Mm-hmm. , are we gonna do digital notes that they can look at while they're in the room? Are we going to do follow up stuff through social media that's gonna create interaction? Um, you've done some great stuff on the importance of don't just use your social media of as a, as a billboard that uses this interactive place. Derry Prenkert (18:47): You know, thinking through those things. Mm-hmm. , um, how are we going to actually handle the phones inside the space? What are, are, are, uh, uh, to what, what do we need to take into account if a middle school, I, I'm helping out in middle school right now, and I'm at a pretty conservative community mm-hmm. where I'd say it's six through eight grade, I would say no more than half the kids are, are actually walking in with smartphones. Now I know some would go, That's ridiculous. Well, that's my community. Sure. So I need to be thinking through, um, that I, I have to have a path for the non phone user. Right. But also I need to be thinking through for the phone user to begin to show them now. Like, Hey, if you're gonna follow Jesus, that plays out in this thing. Yeah. Derry Prenkert (19:28): So how do we do that? So what, what am I teaching? You know, when I get to the practical steps of my teaching, how am I intentionally saying, Hey, this is how this plays out on your phone. You know, that can be a part of it. Um, and then, and then I think, uh, there's just the overall, uh, idea of, I, I have kind of these categories I think through that I want to try to do inside the programming. And this is very youth ministry specific. I want to have times where, uh, where they have it and it's on, but they're encouraged to put it to, to the side mm-hmm. and not access it at all. Because, because we need to be able to do that in real life at times. Mm-hmm. , you know mm-hmm. . And so small groups, a lot of times, I don't know if you have this some, sometimes they'll do like the basket or, or, or things to say, Hey, it's here. Derry Prenkert (20:14): Or just even stack them in the middle of the room like, it's here, but we're not gonna use Oh yeah. Use that right now. Yeah. And, um, or it's just even a, Hey, let's put this in our pockets. Just hang tight with me for a little bit. Um, then there's then there's times where it's like off or not there at all. And we can talk about that one a little bit more. Probably it'd be a good one of, of, Hey, this is a no cell phone situation. Yeah. I think that's very debatable on how much we're often, but there's times where it's important to just, I mean, uh, solitude, simplicity, um, making sure that we're not controlled by things all apart of following Jesus. But then most importantly is we're gonna have times where we use this thing in a redemptive manner. Yeah. Um, we're gonna find ways. Derry Prenkert (20:57): So, so we are closing out and we've talked about, uh, the importance of praying for others and what ha you know, maybe we're doing a series on prayer and it's about praying for others. And, and what we say is, Okay, here's what we're gonna do right now. If you have a phone, I want you to pull it out and I'm just gonna ask the Lord to speak to us, to give you a name right now as somebody you could pray for. Hmm. And, and now I want you to pull out your phone and I want you to text them, not not, not text them that you are praying for them, actually text out what your prayer for them is. Hmm. Or when you walk out the room tonight, I want you to use that little voice memo thing. I did this this morning. Uh, I got a friend who just started first day in ministry today. I, I did a voice memo to him that was just solely my prayer and that was it. Like, here's my prayer for you today as you started on ministry. Yeah. That's cool. So, so finding ways to use it, redemptively. So again, I kind of went different, but use it redemptively. Find ways to put it to the side, find ways to turn it off or not have it there at all. And do all of that intentionally. Nick Clason (21:51): Yeah. I mean, a lot, a lot of what we say on here is that digital and physical, uh, both are important, but they're both categorically different. And so that's why I do think there is value in things that are strictly physical only. I think, like you said, we learned a lot of things about ourselves and people during covid when what was physical could not be completely replicated digitally. Yeah. Um, and vice versa. Right. And that's, that's the thing too, is like, I think the vice versa piece is like, there are some digital things that are digital only, like mm-hmm. me. Like you can do message recaps and, and things like that where you're calling back to what you did, um, throughout the week. Like on things like social media where people are not physically gathering in your room on a Tuesday morning, or they can be reading a u version plan on their own when they wake up on Thursday afternoon, you know, at lunch, whatever. Nick Clason (22:46): So mm-hmm. , that's, that's this whole idea of hybrid is it's, there is room for, for physical only. And there's also space, I think for digital. And that's part of the thing is we've, and I think a lot of churches are kind of running up into this, is they're, uh, Hey, you're, you're a youth pastor so you have to do all of it. Mm-hmm. , it's like these are two completely like different lanes. And so there's, I mean, there's staffing conversations and budget conversations I think like around all these things that are gonna be coming, coming down the pike at, at churches, so mm-hmm. , what would you say are times, um, maybe where you would, you would say, Hey, let's put phones away all together. Maybe talk about like camp situation Sure. Or, or retreats or whatever. Yeah. I'm sure that's probably one of the, the main ones that comes to people's minds. Derry Prenkert (23:32): Yeah. Yeah. Nick, you and I are a part of different youth ministry communities. Um, Facebook groups are a wonderful mess at times. . And one of the, one of the hot topics amongst many other things is when this gets asked of, Hey, what's your policy on cell phones? And it's interesting. It's like just hot takes start firing all over the place. Right. So, um, I was a part of one church for 23 years mm-hmm. , and I was a part of another church for 2.3 years. That's my little joke, uhha. But, um, , uh, in the one church that I was at for 23 years that I also grew up where technology was unfolded. And we, we had a hard and fast rule that really any trip that we did, we started with the idea of no cell phones would be allowed. And it was because we had a high emphasis on interactivity and, and, and it, cell phones weren't around when we set the rule. Derry Prenkert (24:24): It was, you can't bring your walkmans, your discmans your game boys because we're here to interact with each other. And the minute you look down on that thing, you're not there. So that just kind of lended itself over to cell phones and everything else. Mm-hmm. . And so, um, so any camp retreat, anything like that, we just, we put a pretty hard and fast rule with the one except perception being our senior retreat that we do with grads. We'd say, Hey, you can bring it. It was almost like this. Oh, you're old enough now. I, I don't know that I liked the motives in it, um, in, in it all. So, but then I went to, uh, another church where it was like, you can have them all the time mm-hmm. . Um, which, and the interesting thing I saw was effective ministry was taking place in both situations. Derry Prenkert (25:09): Um, but we hadn't really stopped and re strategized in my 23 year church to say, Hey, we're kind of, we kind of just stumbled into this, but these things are so much a part of his life. So we need to understand when we ask a kid to leave theirself at home, we're asking them to leave their most prized valuable mm-hmm. , um, possession mm-hmm. at home. Um, and then at the other church it was like, it's all there. But where we really said, Hey, how are we, are we, are we assessing how we're we're using these? And so I don't, I don't come from the mindset that says definitely no. Or definitely yes. As much as, again, back to that word, intentionality. Yeah. Um, have a plan. Yeah. Talk about it. So, so where we really landed, where at the church I was just at, was, um, if the event is going to be primarily focused on those that don't know Jesus coming into the situation, we're gonna be very hesitant to say he phones. Derry Prenkert (26:06): Yeah. Because they're not gonna get the idea of it. If the event is, is high, um, service based, um, intentional discipleship mm-hmm. and deepening, we're gonna stop and say, Hey, you know what, let's, this might be a time, Yeah. Let's evaluate this, where we're gonna maybe more lean toward this is a no-go, but then we're gonna say, here's why it's a no-go. If it's heavy discipleship, it's gonna say, this is gonna be a significant time. Where the primary things we're gonna do is we're gonna focus in on your connection with God and your connection with others, and we're gonna challenge you to find ways to do that outside of the technical technological world. Can you do that inside the technological world? Absolutely. But we see the value of a break. Um, and so that's kind of where we landed. Uh, but I mean the, the, I'm back, I'm back around the church that I was at for 23 years, though a lot of the rules are still in place that if it's a trip or retreat, it's no go. The interesting thing is, um, parents hated a whole lot more than students did. Nick Clason (27:03): Yeah. Now they were the one were noticing that too. Yep. Derry Prenkert (27:05): Yeah. If you, I would argue you wanna try to institute a no cell phone rule and you don't have it, it's gonna be really hard and it may not be worth the fight and it won't be because the kids, it's gonna be the parents. Parents are be, How do I get a hold of Johnny? Yeah. And, you know, in whatever case. Um, but, but when we take seniors on the retreat, when we were taking them, you know, and we'd allow to have phones, it just naturally had come up in conversations. They would go, Wait, are you gonna start allowing this for other kids on your, on, on campus? Like, we didn't have. And and I'm like, and, and I'd get into the conversation with 'em like, Oh, are you ticked because you had to suffer through not having 'em. Yeah. And you're, and you wanna make sure they get punished like you did. Derry Prenkert (27:42): And the seniors would be like, No, no. Like, I'd love that. We didn't have 'em. Yeah. I, I I actually would come back from camp. So grateful that you really pushed that on us for that time. Mm-hmm. . Now, is that right or wrong? No, I, I like, does that mean that you absolutely shouldn't do it? No, but it was just, it's an interesting aspect to it all. So again, long, long talking to just say it's about intentionality, it's about thinking through why would we want to do this? Mm-hmm. and then, and then making sure to communicate to those that are participating. And if it's in youth ministry, the parents of saying here's why. Yeah. Um, and then being ready for a fight, if you wanna say No phones. Cause it's, it's a challenge. Nick Clason (28:20): Yeah. That, No, that's really good. And again, right, like there's things that only physical can accomplish and there's things that only digital can accomplish. And I think an experience like a camp or whatever, there is a lot of connection that needs to take place. And most students, and you know, back to what you said earlier, people in church like don't know how to live in a world where it's just that where their phone isn't constantly dinging or lighting up or vying for their attention. And so I, I too have noticed in those types of environments where students, people are like grateful and thankful or say, man, like I'm, I haven't even like, wanted my phone. They're kinda surprised by it. You know, that that's, that's kind of the case. So Yeah. It's so Derry Prenkert (29:05): Interesting. Can I give two practical, just real practical tips if you choose to do no phones, especially if you're a youth pastor. Yeah, yeah. Um, one is bring in a, at at least one, maybe multiple people who's their sole job is to capture photos and videos of the experience mm-hmm. . And at the beginning of the experience, make sure that the students know who that person is, because one of the things you're asking them to sacrifice is Nick Clason (29:28): Capturing, capturing Derry Prenkert (29:30): The memories Nick Clason (29:30): Of Derry Prenkert (29:31): It all. And that's bigger than ever, right? Yeah. Because they can do that. And so making sure that that's there, and then making all those photos and videos available as soon as you possibly can. Um, and I, I noticed that, um, the, a camp I was at this summer there, the photographer was actually uploading those, um, to their social media platform, like with a link while the camp was there, even though the kids didn't have phones, so that as soon as they got home within like one hour, the kids were like posting their, you know, their real, their reels that recaps, like that's good. Building up all the stuff on the, That's really good. So I think that's a big one. And then two is think through your strategic feedback loop to parents. The parent freakout is, I don't, I, how do I know? Well mm-hmm. Derry Prenkert (30:14): , if you have a, a way of saying, Hey, here's, here's where you can go, um, whether it's a Facebook page or group, or if it's your Instagram, or if it's even like a, a remind, uh, setup or whatever, texting, like, here's where it's at. We found that Facebook lives where you could at a camp mm-hmm. , um, actually doing a, Hey, I'm gonna, I'm gonna go live at this time. I'm actually gonna give you a little glimpse into the session just for a short bit so you can just see what's going on and then come back and update you. And the beauty of a Facebook Live, every parent is still on Facebook, uh, for the most part. So they, they, they're there and so they can jump on live and then you can let it sit there. So, um, but those two things will, will go a long way in helping the resistance you might get. Um, when it comes to the no phone Nick Clason (31:00): Rule. Yeah. We, we, we do, we've done like a photographer and my, my favorite, and it always depends on like if the church or I have the budget to pull this off, but like get a videographer as well, or the same person, um, and have them do a daily, like, recap video. Those are great for opening your like sessions, but they're also amazing to throw up on YouTube and then text a link out. And so, you know, parents who, uh, send their kids without phone or whatever, they feel this like sense of relief if like they see their kid. Absolutely. Then the downside is one, one time I had to, uh, remove a clip because a kid was like picking his nose and the mom like, wanted it out. Yeah. Um, and then another time ano a mom was like, I haven't seen my kid in any of the recap bees. Yeah. And I'm trying not to freak out, but like, are they having fun? Like, are they making friends? Like, and I get it, like as a, as a dad myself, you know, now, like I would also want to try and like lay eyes on my kids. So Derry Prenkert (32:01): Totally same. Totally same. Actually Gabe, the pastor at the church that I'm serving with now, he did a meal time at camp and he just said, Okay, who needs to see their kid Facebook Live, , who needs to see their kid? And he just went around and said, funny. And he put up the phone, he said, Tell your mom you're okay. And, and it was like one of the most viewed Yeah. There are a lot of people there, so Yeah. And that is legit. And it's, you gotta be ready for it for that whole world. And, um, it is, that is evidence again, of the different world. And, and as a parent of a high schooler and a middle schooler, I wasn't at the high school camp. I was at the middle school camp. I was watching for my kid. Yeah. Derry Prenkert (32:38): That I didn't quite quite realize. So. Nick Clason (32:40): All right. Last, last thing. Um, how can we, as pastors, people in ministry, what are ways there that you see that we can optimize technology, um, now Cause like the overall mission, right? Of the church mm-hmm. to make disciples. And Paul used, you know, the thing available to him writing letters at the time to reach churches that he was not near. So what are some ways, just maybe a couple ideas off the top of your head that you have seen effective or ideas that maybe you haven't seen totally fleshed out, but are ruminating inside. Like Yeah. Where we can use what is available to us in technology. I mean, even the fact that I'm sitting in Texas here in northern Indiana and we're having this conversation and we're seeing each other, like, that's an advantage that wasn't available to us pre 2007. Right. And so, uh, what are some of those things maybe that you have seen or have thought about that we can use to our advantage to help kids take steps closer to Jesus? Derry Prenkert (33:40): Yeah. Let me throw you a little bit of a curve on where I might go with this to start only, um, in that I've been a part of large to very large churches mm-hmm. , and you've been a part of larger churches where there's a budget that's available and mass communication through technology. And so our minds might immediately go to Yeah. Podcasts and video streams mm-hmm. and, uh, you know, Instagram and getting somehow in with you version so you can build up a Bible reading plan. And I Yes. Yeah. Nick Clason (34:10): But I would it if you can Derry Prenkert (34:11): Yeah. I would say pastors and ministers to remember to that this is an incredible one to one ministry tool still mm-hmm. . And so, um, and, and this has gotten especially big to me as I've shifted over into this world now where my primary job that I says God's called me to is just to pastor pastors, especially those that are youth pastors. Well, they're all over the nation. Yeah. And so, um, last night, Sunday night for me, I'm recognizing I was just like, Lord, who are the people right now that might just kind of be in that spot that a word of encouragement or a check-in could go a long way? And there were, there were four texts that were sent out to individuals going, Hey, you're on my mind. How did today go? Or what's going on in your mind? Woke up this morning and like I already told you about, there was one guy that is first day he shifted from the education world to the church world. Derry Prenkert (35:03): Hmm. And so, um, so I, I would just start by saying yes, I mean, as we think about the massive ways to do it, let's not forget that pastoring at its best that's good is a one to one, a one to three relationship mm-hmm. . And so, uh, connecting with our parishioners are people that we're discipling, whoever they might be, uh, through the phone and doing it healthily and thinking through safeguards and all those things are really important, especially for youth pastors. Um, which probably is a whole other episode to talk through at some point. . Yeah. But, um, but to understand like, this is a ministry tool at its core. And so a a properly placed text, phone call, FaceTime, um, like, or comment on a, um, on a, on a post, uh, can is, is ministry, like, is deep ministry and meaningful ministry at times. Derry Prenkert (35:53): Mm-hmm. . Um, That's great. It was interesting Nick, uh, my former youth pastor, uh, my dad died 10, uh, 13 years ago now, and my former youth minister is no longer in youth ministry. And, but it was an incredible influence on my life. Mm-hmm. . And it was about, uh, it was, it was right around eight years after my dad had died, I posted just a memory of him and below in the comment section, my old youth pastor got on and he, all he wrote was, I'm so proud of you Derry. And I read that and I lost it. And, and I talked to him and, and what happened in that moment was like, I realized, uh, can, like, thank you. I miss I miss having my dad, and I'm not, I don't have a dad that can physically say to me, I'm proud of you anymore. Derry Prenkert (36:39): And I'm, I'm like a 36 year old man, like blubbering over my youth pastor telling me he's proud of me. But it's because he, he, in that moment, he ministered to me through a simple comment on a Facebook group mm-hmm. that also helped me work through some grieving that I was at. I hadn't really just walked through and said, God, I'm kind of ticked, I'm kind of ticked right now because I've lost, like, why did this happen? And, and it helped me kind of break through to a new level. And so, so anyway, like just, I, I, that's the one thing I would just say is as we think through the strategic and the greater stuff, let's not forget this is a incredible tool for the most effective ministry that is relational and personal in nature. That's good. That's good. Um, um, I would say otherwise though too is, um, I have a good friend, John McAllen, Johnny Mack, he did this thing, he started, it was called Echo Ministry. Derry Prenkert (37:25): And the idea was how do you take and create echos of what's happening on the, on the weekend? How do you have the message echo through the rest of the week? And our technology, our cell phones are such a primary tool to make that happen. You said it so well, there are things that we can do now because we have these, um, where it can show up in the moment, in, in different ways, uh, whether it's, uh, uh, a thinking through, uh, devotional journey, like I said, through you version. Mm-hmm. , uh, uh, the youth group that I just was at for the last couple of years, they're doing a thing called sale up Moments every week. They have just one moment that, that where they, they use on social media where they say, Okay, you're scrolling through, but stop, exhale, um, and listen to God allow 'em to speak to you. Derry Prenkert (38:16): You know? And there's a whole acronym to it. I can't remember what the H was good. Yeah. I like that. You know, have a burger, I think was the last, no, I can't remember what the H was, but, um, they, they, they walked through it and, and so using that was, um, was, was a way to do it. So I, I think it's that matter of how can we echo it mm-hmm. . And there's a lot, you know, podcasts can be a part of it. Uh, I started something called Digging Deeper with our main services when I was, uh, at my own church. And, and what we did was every Wednesday I would sit down with whoever was preaching mm-hmm. . And if I, I, I was a part of the teaching time. If I was preaching, somebody else would come in and the first thing we'd say, Hey, hey, what hit the cutting room floor? Derry Prenkert (38:53): What were you not able to get to this weekend that you wish you could have? And people just love that aspect, but then we would pick it part a little bit more mm-hmm. . And so, and it, it's not hard. It's a, you know, get, get a little basic, um, Yeah. Recording set up and you can get it set up pretty easy. Um, and so there's just so many ways, but I would just start with the, like, how can we echo into the week, what happened on the weekend Yep. And use it on a digital format. Nick Clason (39:16): Yeah. No, that's good. I, I also personally think that we don't know yet like, the answer to some of these questions. Yeah. Like, I still think that there's, uh, things yet to be discovered, you know, in front of us. And so I think, uh, if there's any sort of like, challenge for anyone listening, I would just say like, just do something. Um, and you may stumble upon something great. You may find some stuff that's terrible and you need to cut it out. Um, but if you're, if you're always looking that direction, uh, you'll, you'll stumble upon something good that you maybe don't even know, or you maybe didn't, you know, you maybe weren't even able to see it right now when you started it because of a limited technology or budget or whatever. And so just be looking for ways. Cuz like I said, it's less, I think, I personally think it's easy to make digital about being flashy, um, or whatever, looking good to parents or other youth pastors or other people in ministry, whatever. Nick Clason (40:15): But I think it's far less about that for me at least, and it's more about how effective can I be in spreading the message of Jesus with all the tools that he's given to me. Yeah. Like, I'm, I'm alive in 2022 with access to podcast microphones and phones that can take incredible videos and pictures, like mm-hmm. , how am I going to use steward those things to reach the most amount of people, you know, that have an audience to reach. So I think that's, that would be my challenge to whoever's listening is think what Dare said, think through all the things that, with intentionality, Um, and then just be open, you know, to, to utilizing some stuff. Derry Prenkert (40:52): So yeah. You're, you're so right on. We don't have it all figured out. Probably one of my greatest pet peeves in life are, uh, those that are convinced they have it all figured out. Um, Yeah. and I, I, I can do that at times. And usually when I'm at that point and I'm like, Oh yeah, I know how to do this. Mm-hmm. , that's the moment when I will fall flat on my face. And so, so there's a ton to be learned. There's a ton to be determined I love, or Nick Clason (41:14): That's when a new iPhone comes out, Right. And you're like, Oh, this changed everything. Or Covid hit and this changed everything. So yes. Totally. Good. Yes. I think we're living through that. Well, hey man. Um, anything else off top of your head? You don't have to, but I just wanna make sure you said everything you wanted to say. Didn't leave anything unsaid. Derry Prenkert (41:30): I think the only thing I would maybe end with is in that same vein is, um, it's everywhere. It's so much. Uh, also don't be afraid to not feel like you have to do everything, you know? Um, uh, especially to the minister that's trying to think through how to do effectively. There is a, there is a moment where less is more because your soul needs to rest, you know? Mm-hmm. , if you're finding yourself trying to, uh, late at night when you should be being around your family, invest your family or on your day off going, this is the time while Ill dive into all this digital stuff. Eh, you know what, maybe, maybe that's, uh, not worth it. No, not, maybe it definitely is not worth it. Definitely not worth, There's just, that's the part of like this thing, there's just so much out there. Mm-hmm. don't, I, I I guess it's like that idea of don't gain the digital world at the cost of your soul. Yeah. good is, is, is a big thing. And I just, I say that out of a season where I'm just seeing so many of us burn out. Um, and we're burning out in a lot of different ways, but one is because we're just constantly on and we don't hit the off switch. That's Nick Clason (42:34): Good. That's good. Love it, man. Well, hey, thanks again. Uh, you referenced a couple things in here. I'll toss 'em in show notes, like your resource on D ym so that all tens of our listeners can go get it. There you go. Um, anyway, thanks for hanging out man. And uh, absolutely. We'll chat again. Chat again. Yeah. Awesome. Nick Clason (42:52): Well, wasn't that great, Uh, super thoughtful, super helpful. Um, I hope that you found this interesting and helpful as well. Hey, um, we are online on Twitter at Hybrid Ministry. Would love to have you come hang out, follow us over there. Um, we're still growing, not super active yet, but, uh, we're well on our way. And also everything you need, show notes, links, transcripts, all kinds of stuff. You can find out hybrid ministry.xyz along with a now growing bank of archive and older episodes. So if you're just not stumbling upon us, we'd love to have you go back and check it out. Uh, you can do all of that at hybridministry.xyz (http://www.hybridministry.xyz) Ze. Again, thanks for being with us today and we'll chat next time.

Testimony With Jensine Bard
Testimony - Greg Stier - Unlikely Fighter

Testimony With Jensine Bard

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 28:30


Evangelist and Author, Greg Stier - Tells the Story you haven't heard in his latest riveting and authentically raw read: Unlikely Fighter! How a Fatherless Street Kid Overcomes Violence, Chaos, Confusion and More - To Become A Radically Transformed Kid for Christ and Miraculously so!! A Must Read For Life and Hope!!

Testimony With Jensine Bard (audio)
Testimony - Greg Stier - Unlikely Fighter

Testimony With Jensine Bard (audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 28:30


Evangelist and Author, Greg Stier - Tells the Story you haven't heard in his latest riveting and authentically raw read: Unlikely Fighter! How a Fatherless Street Kid Overcomes Violence, Chaos, Confusion and More - To Become A Radically Transformed Kid for Christ and Miraculously so!! A Must Read For Life and Hope!!

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich
Half-baked and Disconnected with Dr Lisa Strohman - Episode 2221

Fitness Confidential with Vinnie Tortorich

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 80:57 Very Popular


Episode 2221 - On this Friday's show, Vinnie Tortorich speaks to Dr. Lisa Strohman about how some technology and social media have led to kids being "half-baked", how much of it creates disconnection not connection, the ill effects of certain social media, and more. http://vinnietortorich.com/half-baked-disconnected-dr-lisa-strohman-episode-2221 PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS HALF-BAKED Vinnie welcomes Dr. Lisa to the show, who is the author of two books, and . Vinnie starts by telling Dr. Lisa about what he observed at the gym recently when a young man literally couldn't put his phone down. (2:30) So many people are dependent on their phones, but he doesn't want his life ruled by a 2" x 4" piece of glass! (7:00) Vinnie says kids are "half-baked" and what he means by that. Dr. Lisa agrees; kids do not have a real sense of self without having external affirmation; as a result, everything is distorted. (8:00) Kids don't understand tech as a mere tool. She has witnessed the psychology behind the use of certain technology. Dr. Lisa talks about the psychological profiling of the two teens behind the Columbine shooting in 1999. (11:40) This is a mental health problem--the disconnect is very real; many kids don't even know how to make eye contact. (17:20) She reviews some of the issues that impact kids at younger and younger ages. The addiction-reward neural pathway is getting activated early on. Vinnie shares an uncomfortable story about a teen he used to know years ago. (19:40) Dr. Lisa shares what she knows about how insidious "ad bundles" lure kids in. (23:20)  DISCONNECTED They also chat about what they observe at places like restaurants, as well as how body image and filters are distorting reality and expectations. (30:00) The conversation turns to social media and the messages people see and respond to. (53:30) Vinnie gives the example of treatment between Lizzo vs. Adele. They chat about trending and how being negative gets you seen more; there is desperation to be relevant. The art of conversation, connection, and communication are getting lost. Vinnie asks Dr. Lisa what we can do. (47:30) Dr. Lisa gives several examples, including what she has done with her children. Many parents have given up because it's easier to hand over the device than to step up. She explains how devices are stealing children away from their parents.  They also discuss the hyper-sexualization of girls and boys at younger ages and how they become brazen in their behavior. (52:45) Dr. Lisa and Vinnie talk about some of the trends, and how they affect standards of behavior towards one another, especially sexual behavior. They transition to the early days of online dating and today's online culture of dating apps and what it means to "swipe." (1:05:00) She talks about how some of her clients she see often deal with emotional issues from rejection. Ghosting is rude. Vinnie invites Dr. Lisa back as this is her specialty--dealing with the psychological challenges of tech and life online. [the_ad id="20253"] PURCHASE BEYOND IMPOSSIBLE The documentary launched on January 11! Order it TODAY! This is Vinnie's third documentary in just over three years. Get it now on Apple TV (iTunes) and/or Amazon Video! Link to the film on Apple TV (iTunes):  Then, Share this link with friends, too! It's also now available on Amazon (the USA only for now)!    Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter! FAT: A DOCUMENTARY 2 (2021) Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: Then, please share my fact-based, health-focused documentary series with your friends and family. The more views, the better it ranks, so please watch it again with a new friend! REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter! FAT: A DOCUMENTARY (2019) Visit my new Documentaries HQ to find my films everywhere: Then, please share my fact-based, health-focused documentary series with your friends and family. The more views, the better it ranks, so please watch it again with a new friend! REVIEWS: Please submit your REVIEW after you watch my films. Your positive REVIEW does matter!  

Crime with a K
Cassie Jo Stoddart - The Scream Murder

Crime with a K

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 75:39


This week, Kelsie walks us through the horrifying details of the murder of Cassie Jo Stoddart. Two high school boys obsessed with Columbine and the movie Scream, wanted to film their own horror movie, and wanted to do it at the expense of their classmates life. Make sure you subscribe as we upload a new episode every week. As always, thanks so much for listening!Sources for this episode include: https://www.oxygen.com/crime-news/brian-draper-torey-adamcik-convicted-killing-cassie-jo-stoddart https://www.sportskeeda.com/pop-culture/cassie-jo-stoddart-murder-5-quick-facts-know https://allthatsinteresting.com/cassie-jo-stoddarthttps://www.ranker.com/list/cassie-jo-stoddart-facts/jacob-shelton

The Opperman Report
William Zabel: Conspiracy at Columbine

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 86:17


William began researching political, social, and economic crimes by the U.S. Government in 1989 after the Panama invasion where the U.S. Military committed numerous crimes against the Panamanian people to include murder and rape of civilians. William's first work was in fact Panama as he was there to photograph the events for Associated Press International. Some of that photographic work was presented in the film; The Panama Deception. From there William collected documents and video evidence concerning the Rocky Flats scandal involving possible theft of nuclear material in the 90's. This material was presented in the two hour documentary; On Deadly Ground: The Rocky Flat's Cover-up. William attended graphic design and film school and after graduating has been using those skills to expose government corruption including school shootings through the web and documentary films.

Attack of the Final Girls
Paving the Way for the Manic Pixie Dream Girl (Idle Hands - 1999)

Attack of the Final Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 59:33


Idle Hands is a quintessential late 90s horror comedy. Join Juliet and Theresa as they revisit 1999 and talk about the precursor to the Manic Pixie Dream Girl trope, the evolution of stoner culture, and the unfortunate timing of this movie's release. Content Warnings: a brief mention of suicide; a long conversation on Columbine that touches on mass/school shootings in modern AmericaTheme music: "Book of Shadows" by Houseghost (Rad Girlfriend Records) Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

ShelfLogic
Talking True Crime (Part 4?)

ShelfLogic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 42:55


Shelf Logic has seen many an episode about true crime! Alyssa and Caroline embrace a different brand of scary for October as they discuss their favorite true crime books! Books mentioned include "My Friend Dahmer" and "Kent State" by Derf Backderf, "Conviction: The Untold Story of Putting Jodi Arias Behind Bars" by Juan Martinez, "Killer Book of Serial Killers" by Tom Philbin, "Columbine" by Dave Cullen, and many more!

The Secret Sits
Cassie Jo Stoddart: The Scream Murder: Part 2

The Secret Sits

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 20:58 Transcription Available


The murder of Cassie Jo Stoddart took place in Bannock County, Idaho, on September 22, 2006, when Cassie, a student at Pocatello High School, was stabbed to death by classmates Brian Lee Draper and Torey Michael Adamcik.We would like to provide a warning that this episode includes actual audio of the murderous teens plotting and carrying out their sinister plans.-listen at your own discretion.We are looking for hometown True Crime stories for future episodes.  Please send your stories to us at: TheSecretSitsPodcast@gmail.comFollow us on our social media at:https://drum.io/thesecretsitshttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwnfvpNBYTo9BP1sVuFsfGQTheSecretSitsPodcast (@secretsitspod) / Twitterhttps://www.instagram.com/thesecretsitspodcast/https://www.facebook.com/TheSecretSitsPodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@thesecretsitspodcast?lang=enSupport the showhttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/TheSecretSits#CassieJoStoddart #CassieStoddart #Scream #ScreamMovie #BrainDraper #PocatelloHigh #ToreyAdamcik #NeveCampbell #CourteneyCox #DavidArquette #KillBill #GhostFace #Halloween #Columbine #TrueCrime #Podcast #YouTube #ApplePodcast #Spotify #FollowSupport the show

The Secret Sits
Cassie Jo Stoddart: The Scream Murder: Part 2

The Secret Sits

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 20:58 Transcription Available


The murder of Cassie Jo Stoddart took place in Bannock County, Idaho, on September 22, 2006, when Cassie, a student at Pocatello High School, was stabbed to death by classmates Brian Lee Draper and Torey Michael Adamcik.We would like to provide a warning that this episode includes actual audio of the murderous teens plotting and carrying out their sinister plans.-listen at your own discretion.We are looking for hometown True Crime stories for future episodes.  Please send your stories to us at: TheSecretSitsPodcast@gmail.comFollow us on our social media at:https://drum.io/thesecretsitshttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwnfvpNBYTo9BP1sVuFsfGQTheSecretSitsPodcast (@secretsitspod) / Twitterhttps://www.instagram.com/thesecretsitspodcast/https://www.facebook.com/TheSecretSitsPodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@thesecretsitspodcast?lang=enSupport the showhttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/TheSecretSits#CassieJoStoddart #CassieStoddart #Scream #ScreamMovie #BrainDraper #PocatelloHigh #ToreyAdamcik #NeveCampbell #CourteneyCox #DavidArquette #KillBill #GhostFace #Halloween #Columbine #TrueCrime #Podcast #YouTube #ApplePodcast #Spotify #FollowSupport the show

The Secret Sits
Cassie Jo Stoddart: The Scream Murder: Part 1

The Secret Sits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 27:01 Transcription Available


The murder of Cassie Jo Stoddart took place in Bannock County, Idaho, on September 22, 2006, when Cassie, a student at Pocatello High School, was stabbed to death by classmates Brian Lee Draper and Torey Michael Adamcik. We would like to provide a warning that this episode includes actual audio of the murderous teens plotting and carrying out their sinister plans.-listen at your own discretion. We are looking for hometown True Crime stories for future episodes.  Please send your stories to us at: TheSecretSitsPodcast@gmail.comFollow us on our social media at:https://drum.io/thesecretsitshttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwnfvpNBYTo9BP1sVuFsfGQTheSecretSitsPodcast (@secretsitspod) / Twitterhttps://www.instagram.com/thesecretsitspodcast/https://www.facebook.com/TheSecretSitsPodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@thesecretsitspodcast?lang=enSupport the showhttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/TheSecretSits#CassieJoStoddart #CassieStoddart #Scream #ScreamMovie #BrainDraper #PocatelloHigh #ToreyAdamcik #NeveCampbell #CourteneyCox #DavidArquette #KillBill #GhostFace #Halloween #Columbine #TrueCrime #Podcast #YouTube #ApplePodcast #Spotify #FollowSupport the show

The Secret Sits
Cassie Jo Stoddart: The Scream Murder: Part 1

The Secret Sits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 27:01 Transcription Available


The murder of Cassie Jo Stoddart took place in Bannock County, Idaho, on September 22, 2006, when Cassie, a student at Pocatello High School, was stabbed to death by classmates Brian Lee Draper and Torey Michael Adamcik. We would like to provide a warning that this episode includes actual audio of the murderous teens plotting and carrying out their sinister plans.-listen at your own discretion. We are looking for hometown True Crime stories for future episodes.  Please send your stories to us at: TheSecretSitsPodcast@gmail.comFollow us on our social media at:https://drum.io/thesecretsitshttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwnfvpNBYTo9BP1sVuFsfGQTheSecretSitsPodcast (@secretsitspod) / Twitterhttps://www.instagram.com/thesecretsitspodcast/https://www.facebook.com/TheSecretSitsPodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@thesecretsitspodcast?lang=enSupport the showhttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/TheSecretSits#CassieJoStoddart #CassieStoddart #Scream #ScreamMovie #BrainDraper #PocatelloHigh #ToreyAdamcik #NeveCampbell #CourteneyCox #DavidArquette #KillBill #GhostFace #Halloween #Columbine #TrueCrime #Podcast #YouTube #ApplePodcast #Spotify #FollowSupport the show

The Brain Candy Podcast
EP656: Richard Simmons, Jeffrey Dahmer, and Repressed Memories

The Brain Candy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 61:54


Today we hear what went wrong with Susie's lip fillers and why she is a glutton for punishment because she'll do it again. We discuss "performing beauty" and how these alleged feminists willingly modify their body. Susie talks about a Richard Simmons documentary that, while it wasn't well-made, was interesting in its explanation for Richard's "disappearance." This led us to a discussion about how documentaries are changing, and why it's making Susie more cautious about what she watches. We discuss the Bling Ring and Sarah's surprising connection to the burglars. Susie discusses Jeffrey Dahmer and how he had the perfect "recipe" of personal ingredients to become a serial killer and she explains how it's similar to John Wayne Gacy and a Columbine shooter. Plus, we discuss "repressed memories" and how therapists in the 80s and 90s were persuading people to believe they'd experienced trauma that they hadn't actually experienced. Join our book club, shop our merch, sign-up for our free newsletter, & more by visiting The Brain Candy Podcast website: Connect with us on social media: BCP Instagram: Susie's Instagram: Sarah's Instagram: BCP Twitter: Susie's Twitter: Sarah's Twitter: Sponsors: Go to for 15% off your first purchase! Go to to learn more or find Julie at your nearest Walmart today! More podcasts at WAVE:

A Kids Book About: The Podcast
Crystal Talks About Survivors of School Shootings

A Kids Book About: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 23:54


Crystal Woodman Miller, author of A Kids Book About School Shootings and A Kids Book About School Shootings for Survivors, continues the conversation about her experience at Columbine, supporting survivors, and working through trauma.A Kids Book About School Shootings (view book)A Kids Book About School Shootings for Survivors (view book)Full Book Description:School shootings are a tragic reality. And while they're not as common as they seem, they are still very real, and so is the fear, anxiety, and trauma that comes with them—even if you've never actually experienced one. This book will help grownups and kids better understand school shootings and encourage us to be prepared while reminding us that we should never let the fear of the what ifs take over our lives.About the Authors:Crystal Woodman Miller is an author, speaker, Columbine shooting survivor, mental health advocate, and warrior of hope who encourages others in the challenges they face. She's also the creative director of making magical memories for her three kids and husband and attempts to love others like she has been loved by God.*If you want to be on a future episode of A Kids Book About: The Podcast or if you have a question you'd like us to consider, have a grownup email us at listen@akidsco.com and we'll send you the details. 

Dpen Crimini
Il Massacro di Parkland: Never Again

Dpen Crimini

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 54:40


The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Alexey Vermeulen - Gravel Cyclist and exclusive ride partner for Willie, the fastest known dog

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 46:17 Very Popular


This week we sit down with professional gravel cyclist, Alexey Vermeulen.  Alexey is currently ranked 2nd in the Life Time Grand Prix going into the series finale at Big Sugar.  2022 has been a breakout season for this rising star with a big win at BWR San Diego.  In addition to his racing exploits, Alexey is one of the founders of the From The Ground Up Project and the excluse ride partner for the 'fastest known dog', Willie the weiner.   Alexey's website  Episode Sponsor: AG1 by Athletic Greens Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Alexey Vermeulen [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the show. We welcome Alexi Vermilion. Alexi is a professional off-road cyclists competing in the lifetime grand Prix series this year. With only one event left big sugar in Bentonville, Arkansas coming up this month. He is sitting in second in that competition it was a great time to check in with Alexi. Alexia is not only a great athlete, but also a great ambassador for the sport. He always seems to be around, to share a smile or a laugh after some of these big events. If you don't know him for his professional cycling career. You may have also seen him with a dog on his back, riding a bike. Yeah. We'll get into his relationship with Willie. And what type of terrain Willie likes to ride? I'll give you a hint. It's the off-road kind. Before we jump in, I need to thank this week. Sponsor athletic greens and I've been using athletic greens for many years now. And I like to refer to it as my nutritional insurance. I don't always have the best diet and it just gives me a baseline of some of the nutrients and minerals that I need throughout the day. One tasty scoop of athletic greens contains 75 vitamins minerals and whole food sourced ingredients. Including a multivitamin multimineral probiotic, green superfood blend. And more, all that work together to fill those nutritional gaps in your diet. Increase energy and focus. Uh, aid with digestion and support a healthy immune system. All without the need to take multiple products or pills. This is what I think I really love. It's simply every morning I have a routine. I get a scoop of the powder, put it over ice and water. Shake it up. Get some hydration and get all those nutrients and vitamins in me in one fell swoop again on days where I go deep on the bike, sometimes I'll do a second class. I know for me, I start to feel sort of just run down and drained and I don't have the luxury of sitting back with my feet up after a ride. I often have to jump right into enjoying my son and caring for him. So I love just being able to top off and make sure I've got my recovery. Athletic greens is offering a free one year supply of vitamin D and five free travel packs to all my listeners with their first Simply visit athletic greens.com/the gravel ride. And join health experts, athletes, and health conscious go getters around the world who are making a daily commitment to their health. Again, simply visit athletic greens.com/the gravel ride. And get your free year supply of vitamin D and five free travel packs today. Would that business behind us let's jump into my conversation with Alexi. Alex, welcome to the show. [00:03:06] Alexey Vermeulen: Thanks a lot. Thanks for having me. [00:03:07] Craig Dalton: I feel like this is a long time coming, like Cody [00:03:10] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah. Since what, two years almost now? [00:03:12] Craig Dalton: Yeah, exactly. I remember when we met at Rodeo, I had asked Neil Shirley about, you know, just who was gonna be there and who I might talk to, and he's like, Here's Alex. He's the fastest guy in gravel you don't know about yet. [00:03:26] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah. I think Neil believed in me maybe before I believed in myself. But I think that was my rodeo. Strava kms were the beginning of my success. [00:03:33] Craig Dalton: Put you on the radar, but you'd been on the radar for a long time. So I, I always start off the podcast with just getting a little bit about your background. So why don't you tell me, tell us where you're from and how you got into cycling, and then ultimately let's talk about that journey into gravel and MTV territory. [00:03:49] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah. I'll try to keep this somewhat short. If we start at the beginning, I probably, I started in like kids triathlons. My mom was doing em. As with any cycles, I feel like hated this swimming portion. You just like get to the, get to the run and bike and they're like, Okay, let's go. This is fun. Ran with my helmet on my first triathlon. That was cool. But yeah, it just kind of transitioned to my love of just going fast and pushing boundaries. Right. I think I was 1211 at that portion and my grandfather immigrated from Holland, actually grew up racing. And when he immigrated to Canada, didn't really continue. He did a lot of riding. That kind of caught on at some point when I was doing triathlons. I remember this very vivid ride. I was on like a 24 inch wheel trek and we did a, like, supposed to be a 30 mile ride, became 60, you know, and like completely bumped 10 miles to go and like the entire last 10 miles, I would like fall back into his hand. He'd give me a push and I'd spin as hard as I could, you know, for minute and a half. But I think like as I grew up and started doing other sports, I did a lot of things, played hockey, played soccer, cross country. It eventually in high school fell to cross country and cycling. And I was, I think, somewhat naturally gifted. Just I enjoyed endurance and pushing myself, but it just became a, a choice between the journey, right? Like cycling took me to new places. I got to go to Vermont to scream out stage race. I got to travel. We did family weekends. Cross [00:05:03] Craig Dalton: you live in a community? Did you live in a community that sort of embraced endurance athletics? Where were you? [00:05:08] Alexey Vermeulen: So I grew up in Michigan. Yes, it's good. Good job. You're good at this? Yeah. No, I grew up, grew up in Michigan. Born in Memphis, Tennessee, but grew up in Michigan since I was two years old. And that's kinda like, I think just where I was. Ann Arbor about an hour south of Detroit. It's just, it's a big. Community for the Midwest at least. This big, an AVE Club was there and definitely like, you know, had the Tuesday crib practices. Like there wasn't a, a pathway, wouldn't say there was many kids my age. But there was definitely, like, I remember I hear stories now about, Guys come up and talk to me and they're like, Oh yeah, your dad used to drop you off the local school and just say, don't let him get dropped. I'll see you guys at the other end. But I didn't know that, you know, I was like, Oh, I'm on this alone. I'm 12 years old. Ah, look at all these guys. You know? So there definitely was, maybe not, maybe unbeknownst to me at the beginning, but I do. I. There's a lot of hard Midwest guys that come out because you don't, I realize that even when I go back, you can't stop peddling Colorado. I'm like, Oh, I've got three hour ride. I'll climb for two hours and descend and coast down Michigan. You got a three hour ride, you're peddling for three hours. [00:06:04] Craig Dalton: So I was talking to someone about this the other day. It's so different, like even in California on the coastal range here, I get a lot of breaks where I'm not pedaling. So when I go somewhere where I actually have to continue to turn the pedals for four hours in a row, I'm absolutely crushed. [00:06:17] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, it's, it's a big deal. I, yeah, every time I go back I feel like I bon every third ride. Probably my issue with not eating, but another story. But yeah, so it just kind of continued. Probably, so sophomore year of high school was like that deflection point. I won nationals, which I always say somewhat lucky. Obviously you can put in the work, but there's also 10 other guys doing it at a minimum. And that kind of gave, opened up the financial side of it for my parents, where the national team covered some of the, And I got to go to and I was 16 racing at 17 at the time, and European racing, you just fit me man. I like, I loved it. The CME style all out. Just like if you're not in the front, you're in the back. I just like, it was everything I had dreamed. I remember I went over there with like 700 euro spending away with my parents and like came back with like 1400, like doubled it and I was like, Oh, this is great. And just like it was the first moment I remember like not thinking this is my career, but. Like, Oh, I wanna push harder cuz this is really fricking fun. And it's also, you get to be in Europe, right? Your kids are, your friends are back at high school and you're like, you know, you skip three, three weeks, you go home. But that trip, that was supposed to be three weeks at ces, turned into going to the World Championships in Copenhagen cause I did well. And so that kind of opened up this whole pathway to actually having a chance at something. Juniors. So that was the World Championships in Copenhagen in thousand 11. You know, cut a race with guys that I grew up watching. Canara, KA Dish. All these guys race up the same course I day to day earlier, which is just like, there's no words for it, right? Like when you grow up dreaming of something or like watching random videos. [00:07:40] Craig Dalton: Yeah, and unless you've observed or watched one of these things, you just cannot understand like the spectacle of having everybody racing with their country flags on their bodies. No trade teams. Like, it's just such an amazing experience. I, I love, and I've had good fortune of going to two world championships to watch, and it was just electric, both of [00:07:58] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, it's, it's unbelievable. And I think it's like, it's, yeah. Something I'll never forget. That kind put me on a pathway in to fast forward this, you know, in cycling there's a couple jumps, right? There's under 23. So when you, when you're 18 years old, jumping into the next category, which is a four year category, but that also coincides with in the, pretty much everywhere, college, university. And so I made. Little packed with my parents like, Hey, if I have offers from one of one or both of the two big teams in the US at the time, which were lived strong in bmc, it was just coming on that I could def still apply, but defer college for at least two years through that contract and see what I could do. I was fortunate enough to have an offer from both and ended up choosing bmc. Cause I just loved the racing in Europe and they were, had to schedule it primarily there. And I just, it just kept growing. Like, I feel like this, that first year on bmc, you know, you're not making much, you're making 15 grand or something, but you're, you're 18 years old, you're living in Europe with your best friends. And it was the first time I was like, Wow, you can make this your job. Like, that's like, where can this go? What, what can I do? And three years on, I was lucky enough to get an email from, from Lato Yobo. And you know what? Transitioned and became the job. And it was that moment where I like, had completed this USA cycling pipeline and I was like, Okay, so what's next? You know, I signed this big contract and I was, I was stoked. You're 21 years old and it's what you've dreamed of your whole life in a sense. But also felt like I, like, okay, so am I doing this for 15 years or am I doing this for 10 years? Like, it was such a, I questioned a lot of it. Right. [00:09:23] Craig Dalton: You a, I mean, presumably in those BMC years, you were forced to live that professional lifestyle and make start to begin to make significant sacrifices to continue progressing. [00:09:36] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, I think BMC was lucky because you got to see it also, right? So we were at the development team right underneath the Pro World tour team. You know, you got to watch guys like Brent Book, Walter, who's American and Larry War Bass. Go through their version of it, right? Like, help you kind of pick, Hey, if I actually move, if I actually make this jump, where do I wanna live? Do I wanna live in east? Do I wanna live in drone? And kind of see before you had to deal with it, see the struggles and see the positives of racing at that level. But yeah, like it, it just came down, you know, once I signed that contract, I just, I wanted more and more and more. And it was this weird feeling of like, unless you were winning, You couldn't make, you couldn't do more, You couldn't make an impact on sponsors or people or community. [00:10:15] Craig Dalton: And this is at at the then the jumbo team at [00:10:17] Alexey Vermeulen: yeah, yeah. Sorry. So two years on and I loved it, right? You get to race these, like, we all dream of like Lia Best and Lombardia Doe. Right? [00:10:25] Craig Dalton: Yeah. It's probably somewhat lost. It's probably somewhat lost on a listener. I'm sorry to interrupt, but it's somewhat lost that that is. That's the big time. You're, you're on. I mean, everybody knows it now, but it's the one of the biggest and best teams in the world. You sort of made it there, obviously, like it continues to be a journey when you're a neo pro and you've got your first year in these big pro tour teams. But I think you were just getting into sort of this idea of, okay, now what's my identity? What's my role in this big organization in the biggest league in the world? [00:10:55] Alexey Vermeulen: yeah. And even in life, to be honest, right? You're 21 years old. I honestly, I think if I. In hindsight, probably would've given myself my last year in under 20 threes. But like when you take a chance, like you don't turn down, like at the time that I went, it had been almost three years since the American had gone to the world tour. So it was one of those things that like when is the opportunity if going to come again? Like, you're just young, right? You learn everything. Like, I remember my first moment, I, I chose to move to J and I just, I got a, a key mailed to me and I'm like, Google translating the back of a taxi in Spanish. Like, I think is this addressed? I'm like getting out, trying. It's like nine o'clock at night's dark. I'm like trying to find the lock, like eventually find where I'm going. And there's like life experiences at the same time. That, you know, back to not going to school. I like, kind of feel like I was educated by the bike. Like I learned a lot of like life. Balance. I don't know, just maybe not directly academic, but I learned a lot about myself in, in that time. And it kind of just transitioned into when I was racing at the top level, what, what is next? What can I do? What do I want to do? And I remember, you know, you kind of mentioned it quickly if I wanted to go to mountain bike or not, but like, I remember thinking like, okay, I can continue doing this. Maybe get better, right? Because that's 21, 23. But like I didn't, I wanted to be a GC rider. That's what I'd grown up doing. And I kind of felt like I wasn't good enough in a sense. Like you never know you're young, but like I was like, there's a lot of work to be done here to be able to climb like Andy sch Slack or anything that I watch growing up. Right? So just, you know, in 2018 was like, I kind of wanna just go send it and see what happens. And I was good enough at the business side of her like connection side that I had relationships with Bianchi and kind of took a lot of the sponsors I had on Lato to back into the US and said, Hey, I wanna try this mountain bike thing. And very quickly realized that the World Cup mountain bike is the exact same as what I was doing. Just different bikes and wider titers. But gravel was growing and so I, you know, I was trying to figure out where I belonged and my identity had kind of changed, but that was the beginning of what I'm doing now, which there's things I miss, but I don't have any regrets. It's, it's really cool to see what's growing in the us [00:13:04] Craig Dalton: Yeah, no doubt. So you to just unpack it a little bit, you move over, you get a, you get what maybe described as a private tier program with Bianchi. You start trying the mountain bike thing. Discover it's, it's sort of emotionally and maybe sim physically similar to what you've just been going through in the world tour and leaving the world tour. You were looking to do something different and have a different relationship with your vocation as a professional cyclist. [00:13:32] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, a little bit. I mean, I think the biggest thing was that I, I wanted to actually positively impact either the companies I worked with or. Individuals community around me, right? Like athletics of any kind are very selfish. You have to be selfish on some level to, to grow as a person, as an athlete. But on the world tour team, you know, you have 28 riders and you have these companies paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to be a part of this team. And rightfully so, the team wants one answer, not 28 different answers. And I felt like, well, there's eight of us here who could actually make an impact on this company that's giving a lot of money to this team yet. You're blocking it. So I felt like there was kind of a, a backup or like a flaw in the system. And not that I was the only one that ever saw that, but I was like, I actually like the portion off the bike as well. I like enjoying and talking. Like, it's not exhausting to me. I enjoy, you know, being a human and talking through things, Hey, this worked, this didn't, or like, let's figure out how to do this better. I'm up for do that content, you know? So I saw that gap kind of existing in the US as things grew. But I don't think I ever thought it would grow into what it is now. [00:14:36] Craig Dalton: Yeah. And was that sort of just timeline wise, was that the beginning of the pandemic that you had done your mountain bike thing and you were gonna transition into gravel that 2020 season? [00:14:46] Alexey Vermeulen: 29. I had one full year, 2019. I did a good schedule. Mostly mountain bike, almost all mountain bike. But I did, I like Belgium, Fri, San Diego and Flatted out of, and like I was definitely that year and even with my coach, we were all just like, let's just go test events this year and see what happens, you know? Had to convince my parents I wasn't being an idiot. But other than that it was easy. And it was just like, it was fun to. Start to build those relationships that we talk about now, right? Like, I pride myself on not ever burning a bridge and like being able to go back to anybody. And like I feel like I talk to companies I've worked with in the past, even just as a consultant nowadays which like is kind of just cool to me. Like I enjoy, like this is doing well. This is not like, you know, it is just such an interesting space to be in. [00:15:30] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it really is. And the, I think the athletes that can articulate feedback about the product and the experience, or even the vibe that companies are trying to create, that's gold, right? That's where you wanna be spending your money. [00:15:42] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah. Yeah. And it's a, it's a battle as you know, like trying to figure out advertising is such an interesting thing especially in sport, because sport is hard to quantify. And like the way I, I mean like, not to give away my secrets, but the way I kind of pitch this thing as an athlete is, It has to be at least three parts, right? You have to validate equipment on some level, and so that doesn't mean you need to win every race, but you need to be up there validating a new bike, a new set of wheels, a new handlebar. Like does it work at the highest level? Why does it work? But I think that's, you know, 30% of it. Maybe the other part is just being a face for a brand, which to talk about vibe. Like it means like, you know, not having some sterile company with a tent at an event, like talking through things, real life shit, having a dog, right? Like Willie's been such a. It would make jokes about it. Just such a conversation opener when you're just standing. Like, who? We all want carbon wheels. We're all buying them every day. No. So how do you just be a person? And the last is the internal feedback, right? That it just takes time and you have to work with a company for a long time for that to actually be beneficial. Right. I think people are like, Oh, Alex had that bike a year before it launched, so he put all the feedback. Dude and I had feedback that'll affect the next generation of that bike, but it's so far in advance that to truly, positively impact a company, you have to be involved really early on. [00:17:01] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah, that makes sense. [00:17:02] Alexey Vermeulen: So I, I think if you put all those together, that's the full athlete, you know, doing well in the US and privateer. [00:17:07] Craig Dalton: And it seems like one of the things you recognized was this idea that, you know, you will be required to create content as an athlete in this new space, and you took a very proactive vision on what that content was gonna be and how you were gonna show up [00:17:25] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, I tried to, I mean, I think it's, especially now, like you look at a race, like on band, I feel like there is almost more videographers than racers sometimes. Right? It's kind of, And content for content sake. Is the bane of my existence. Like I, I, I hate to be, and like even the way you and I just chatted before we started this podcast, like I struggle with podcasts that just jump in and say the same thing the entire time. Because if you have an i, if you have an agenda and you asked me exact same questions I talked about last week on a different podcast, it doesn't benefit anybody, right? It's just content for content's sake. Cause not that I'm not gonna be listened to, but you could go to some other channel list and the exact same. Unless, you know, you give me the option to talk through things and figure things out and open up what I wanna get to as well. So I think that's the same thing with what I took into content. I was like, what do I enjoy this sport and why did I change what I'm doing? It's not that I was the best world tour writer, I was very far from it, but I have a, an experience at a different level and I enjoyed the relationship. So I was like, that's what is interesting to me. So, I've just focused a lot on any content I can. I want to be about relationships and how this works. You know, like my relationship with Neil and Envy, like that's what's interesting to me. And then the humanity of the sport is what actually draws people in or inspires and motivates more than the next, Hey, the widest wheel set, cuz that's, You can find that on the web. [00:18:46] Craig Dalton: quick, quick follow up on your dog since not everyone is familiar with Willie, although they should be. Just describe Willie and why he's got a little bit of notoriety in the cycling world these days. [00:18:58] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, Willie's probably the fastest, fastest known dog in the cycling world. No, but he's a long haired miniature din, looks like a mini golden retriever if you trying to picture it. And early on in the pandemic, I started riding with him when my girlfriend did runs and he just loved it. And it's kind of just grown, I mean, He's done rides as long as seven hours. He gets out, goes to the bathroom, goes back in the backpack, and we just ride. But he is like, you know, you got his shoulder over his head, over one of your shoulders and it's kind of like, it's great as a training partner also. Like, I'll go ride three hours and come pick him up for an hour at the end. And I don't have to talk to anybody, but I kind have someone they are with me, like a little training partner and no one yells at you on the bike path. So it's a win, win, win. [00:19:38] Craig Dalton: does Willie have a preference between road riding and gravel riding? [00:19:41] Alexey Vermeulen: He probably likes gravel more in Colorado cause he loves prairie dogs. He loves like, you know, hunting from, from up high. He's actually most into mountain biking, which I try to like ride trails before I take him there. But like, he knows when the goggle, he hates the goggles, but he knows when the goggles go on, it's like it's, there's gonna be branches in this face. It's gonna be time to focus. And he just like, he gets all four legs up on my shoulder, like a par. Just kinda like if there's someone in front of me, he is just like, his head is probably three or four inches in front of my face and just like, he's trying to just like, we have to get back to them. He just, I think he just loves the interactive nature of it. So I don't take him mountain biking that off and it's probably his favorite. [00:20:19] Craig Dalton: So podcasting is not the medium to really enjoy Willian, but I encourage the listener to follow you on Instagram cuz I I love it. Everybody loves it. Willie's a hero. [00:20:28] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah. He makes everyone smile, which is a goal in life, so it's. [00:20:32] Craig Dalton: you also seem to have linked up with someone who is your, is your frequent video videographer partner, and that seems like be like a really interesting relationship to give us insight into your, your comings and goings and your career and your successes and your failure. [00:20:47] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, so that's, that's funny. So like, this is, that was something I started last year. So Avery stu, like he does all my, almost all my photo and video that's not through another company and even if it is but we just started, he DMed me when I was back racing Iceman one year, which is a big mountain bike racing in northern Michigan where I grew up. And we've just kind of weirdly just been on the same path. He moved out to, to Boulder about three months after I did. And I think we both have an understanding of what the other's job is to get done, right? I think there's a lot of cyclists who just expect, Hey, this car and video, this photographer will follow me and just take pictures. But like, that's not, it's not that easy, right? It's back and forth and, hey, this is the great, this is the gap. And it's annoying at times. And then the same as he understands I have to get work done right. So he'll just come, Hey, I'm gonna go out in the car with you for four hours. I'm gonna ask you to turn around six or seven times. But like, so we're able to create really cool content because we both are just in it cuz of our friendship less than money. If I were to like, like I've had people ask me this year, like, Oh, what do you pay? YouPay him hourly. I was like, Are you kidding me? That guy works more hourly with me than I think I could ever pay him in my entire life. But it's more, Cause it's friendship, right? It's something that just, it, the relationship is the reason that we work together, not anything else. And so this year going in, I was, that was kind of the goal. I was like, I went to companies and I was like, Hey, I, I want to try to bring Avery to all of the races because to me, First off, you'll get pictures after the race, which every company wants if you go do well, but more importantly, I want to show the relationship side of this. Right? And a really good example of that is if anyone's who made a video at Belgium Welfare Ride that I won this year in San Diego, but there's a moment in there about two thirds the way through where the person I had feeding me just it's kind of shit the bad that day. It's kind of struggling sometimes you just aren't on the same wavelength. They keep missing you. They don't see your jersey, whatever it is. And Avery literally just stopped filming and handed up two bottles, which was like, ch I would've dropped outta the race, very honestly. And that kind of like moment, that's a relationship thing, right? If I'm paying someone to take pictures and videos, they're gonna do that till the end of the day. But the relationship side of him knew, Hey, my friend is struggling. Feeding is more important than filming right now. And I will always cherish that because that's what matters more and that's what moves the the world go, not what makes the world go. [00:22:56] Craig Dalton: yeah. When you, when you were structuring your sponsorship agreements for this year, were you, did you specifically carve out like a dollar amount for him and. This is going to him to make sure he can get everywhere with me. [00:23:08] Alexey Vermeulen: it was hard. Concepts proven are easier to sell, right? So this year I would say I spent, I spent a good amount of my own money getting in places cuz I, I believe in it, right? And so if anyone's interested, like we have a YouTube channel just like Alexian Avery Which I think we've had, I think it'll be at the end, like 18 videos this year. But so I had, you know, a couple companies that I think believed in what I was doing, sign on, you know, like Envy for example. Neil was like, that's great that we need this, this is perfect. We want to add humanity to what we do already. And there's other companies that were less excited about it because the thought process and cycling has always been, we wanna pay for this direct photo shoot, not for this like big ambiguous season. But I think also everyone this year has come back and now, next year I've kind of stipulated it for everybody. Like, Hey, if we're working together, I really need to ask you to put a percentage of, like, I've pretty much said a percentage of my paycheck you need to add in on top of to pay for bravery to come to races cuz you've all benefited from it this year. And if you haven't then you need to show me where you didn't. Cuz it's just such a organic way of doing things, right? When it's more about the relationship of it and everyone's include. It's just fun. Like I took, I took Avery and our friend tra, we had two videographers at Sea Oder, and it was a blast, right? It was the three, two of us and Willie hanging out the biggest event all year, right? Like just, I don't know, like the bike race is the smallest portion of it, and that is, it's the biggest portion of my life, but it's, it matters least it's just the vehicles. All of us to go hang out at events and the community of it is what has growing, what I'm a part of. Right. [00:24:43] Craig Dalton: Yeah, that's a good point. I think for the outsider, just to understand gravel, it's not about who every section of the race and who's winning. It's about the overall experience. It's the pre rise, the shake down rides. The post ride hang out. That's what makes it so magic. [00:24:57] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah. And like it's intoxicating, right? Like I think that is the coolest thing. I had a. I had a quote the other day about, you know, at some point in every race, the winner of the pro race is gonna struggle as much as the person finishing lasts. And I think that's beautiful, right? Like we're all riding on the same course and taking on these things and it's just, it's just about the different journey, right? The struggle is going to be different whether it's mental or physical or mechanical, but in the end, we're all gonna send up, end up sitting the same place, and that is something that never existed where I was at the road. [00:25:27] Craig Dalton: Yeah, yeah, yeah. I wanna get a little bit into the Grand Prix, but along those lines, the Grand Prix, I mean, I think people, listener's gonna know it's Park Mountain, bike Park gravel racing. As we think about it, when you, just to follow up on the sponsorship thread as you designed your season. Being aware of the Grand Prix and the requirements of having both a, a gravel bike and a proper mountain bike to race these races, how did you kind of figure that all out? Because I think you had alignment maybe with a gravel bike set up, and maybe the mountain bike was like, Oh shit, where am I gonna get one of those? [00:25:58] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, no, I think it's also, again, to start relationships, right? It's easy to, to leave the sponsorship thing and say, Oh, look at this. This company has all, all the bikes I need and this company doesn't. But to me, longevity of the company matters more than getting what you need. If I have to go buy a bike, I'm willing to but I was lucky enough to structure it, so, I ride road and gravel bikes from Envy, which is cool cause it's just a past relationship I've had since I left the road. And I signed on with Factor for Mountain Bikes, which it's funny cuz both of those companies launched their bikes for the first time this year. So it's been a chaotic year. But it's cool. I mean that's the, also the beauty of this is I feel like both companies in a weird way gain from knowledge that I learned of launching bike. Simple sides, right? And even if they're not the exact same discipline and it's a weird defined space there cause it doesn't really exist sometimes. , I think. I love that people can understand that and as long as it's like written down and talked about, nobody feels like they're losing out because it's just a, it's about growing the sport more than selling bikes all the time. [00:26:52] Craig Dalton: And how does the jukebox team fit into all this [00:26:57] Alexey Vermeulen: yeah. So I got a complicated setup this year. Yeah, so Jukebox is printing company in Vancouver. You know, stickers, business cards, you name it, posters we'll have many willy stickers to. If you're wondering but no, they, Loredo whos the company kind of wanted, he has an image entertainment in Canada and he wanted to grow this, like the community side of it. He supports Israel Cycling Academy on the world tour stage, but. He had this idea of, Hey, how can you tie athletes together with a title sponsor? Right? So we all have, if you look at someone like Phil Guyman is quote unquote on this team. Pretty much the only sponsor, Phil and I have the same is Jukebox and Phil's not racing, and I'm very ous racing focused right now. But the goal is that you kind of have this traveling community that fits into all disciplines that you couldn't find the corners of without. Alienating anybody. So I think there's five or six people now. All from different backgrounds. [00:27:48] Craig Dalton: And is there any sort of I mean, are you guys connected in any meaningful way? Like do you, do you train with Dylan Johnson here and there? [00:27:56] Alexey Vermeulen: Not really train cause we all live in different places, but like, even like big sugar, we're all gonna be in the same house. Just doing photo stuff and hanging out and I think it's been hard to, with co like as Covid was still tailing off, like, get everyone together. Cause I think that's the goal. Like there's a lot of talk of getting everyone together in, in Canada and, you know, doing a training camp and things like that. Which I hope happens next year, but this year it was very much focused on. These guys are racing. You know, I've seen Dylan and Ashton and Adam at every race because we're all doing the Grand Prix and that's how it goes. And then I've seen, I haven't seen Phil once this year, but hopefully that changes, you know? And then there's also people like you know, there's downhill cycle cross racers that I will probably never see cuz I don't do those things. [00:28:34] Craig Dalton: May, maybe Sea Otter, you [00:28:36] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, exactly. Yeah. See Otter hopefully. But yeah, it's been weird, but I've actually enjoyed it cuz you, the non-endemic side of the sport is like, when I talk about enjoying the business side and figuring out relationships, it's where it becomes more fun because it takes work and homework to actually figure out how to actually benefit that company. [00:28:53] Craig Dalton: Yeah, yeah, yeah, for sure. So onto the Grand Prix, I mean, presumably you found out about this short towards the tail end of last year and. Getting an invite to participate in the series was a big commitment. Obviously, there's six races on the calendar, half mountain bike, half gravel bike. It was really gonna have to take the sort of cornerstone position in your calendar, I presume, for the year if you were gonna intend on being successful. [00:29:19] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah. In a lifetime, Grand prs been kind of, I probably went into it a little more relaxed than I should have. I. Was excited about racing it, but also cognizant of how it can kind of, it's a long season and mentally it can really drain, drain you. So, you know, going into c was probably a little undercooked and like kind of focused on just building throughout the season and being as consistent as I could. Back then in April I was like, Oh, I think you can finish top 10 in every race and finish in the podium. I don't think that's true. I think it'd be more consistent than that. And I also don't think I, anyone ever thought Kegan was gonna be as dominant as he has been. If in hindsight I probably would've tried to peak a little more for different races, but I've had this thought process of just being very consistent throughout the year. Not really peaking for anything, just trying to be fit and be mentally have a lot of mental freedom to, to not feel like I'm ever pressured. And so from, I didn't start racing until April cause that was kind of the goal. I did one race in Michigan, very rbe before Sea Otter, but otherwise was pretty much. Very fresh. And then throughout the year, I've probably taken almost a month off the bike throughout the year, just finding that balance between things, right? Maybe it's not always off the bike, but not worrying about training. You know? 10 days before Leadville went to watch my girlfriend compete in the Commonwealth Games, which was incredible and. Maybe lost me half a percent, but like mentally, I had this space to go from Leadville straight into like this very different block to get ready for the final races. I think that's the biggest thing about this is I've, throughout the last six months or seven months said, Okay, here's my calendar, here's the races, and if it's a mountain bike race, I'm gonna spend per most of my time on that bike before the event and do. Workouts that affect that, but hopefully hold this fitness and just kind of changed little bits to be ready for different things. Got a big climbing race in Utah. Okay. Do some longer threshold efforts. And then the minute Leadville, like in Leadville is obviously a big training camp just to be ready for altitude. And the minute Leadville finish it was like, okay, full on three to five minute efforts, Endurance Doesn't matter anymore. And that's, that is somewhat the beautiful thing is once you get through unbound, If you have like cycling such a build sport year after year that you can kind of hold endurance most of the year. I don't have to really focus on that during the week and I can turn a lot of my rides into like, Hey, how hard can I go? Because that's what these races become. Like if we wanna talk numbers like Schwam again, the two hour mountain bike sprint we just did was like 330 normalized for two hours, just like it was, it just on the whole day. And it's like something I dreamed of, but we haven't done it all year. [00:31:45] Craig Dalton: It was such a gear shift just as a fan of the sport. To see everybody now have to do like a two hour event, like what the hell? [00:31:51] Alexey Vermeulen: I loved it. Yeah, and then just like, not to jump away from the grand pretty quickly, but I think that was something that's interesting about my background is there's a lot of really strong guys in the Grand Prix. Guys that I thought were gonna stick out and are probably, are, are coming around like Locklin. Alex have had some, both of 'em have had some bad luck, but Rob and even Dark Horse, in my opinion, Pete Stat, you have a lot of guys that come from a road background and have the. To do well at all these events. But I think moving two years earlier than a lot of those guys has made a difference for me. Cuz dude, I struggle a lot with the technical side of the sport on the dirt because it's just different on the road. You just expect you, you find lines and that's it. And, There's a flow to it. Mountain biking and gravel riding's a lot more. Like, you kind of like, Hey, you're gonna slide sideways and you're gonna find your edge and then you're gonna keep moving. And it's so foreign. And I felt like I really struggled for the two years before this and kind of found my feet at the right time with the Grand Prix. People always act like, like for example, Leadville as a road race, mountain bike, race. Dude, I disagree. Like if when you're going 35 down power line on a hard tail with the, with guys that are pure mountain bike, You have to be able to handle your bike. [00:32:58] Craig Dalton: sure. Yeah. It, I mean, I, and it depends on the, the weather that particular year, the year I did it, it was pouring with rain, which took another different skill set. I mean, people were just absolutely falling apart during that event. Yeah. Speaking of, I mean, I guess since this is gonna publish in early October, we've got one race remaining. You're in second place in the Grand Prix. Keegan's obviously been crushing it all year, but I think there are, A couple people within range that if he had a horrible day, like something drastic could happen in the results. [00:33:33] Alexey Vermeulen: Kegan's theoretically safe now because he can drop a race and he's done so well. So Ke Kegan has won the, won the Grand Prix now but second through, Well, it's just because, it's just because he can drop a race. So theoretically he could not, he has to show up, but he. He can have his worst result and his worst result right now is fourth, which is insane. His worst result is fourth at Schwam again after he crashed. So if he drops big sugar and finishes 45th, it still doesn't matter cause he has more points than I do right now. But yeah, it'll be interesting. I mean, big sugar being in Batonville is like, it's known for sharp rocks, right? It's a, it's gonna be kind of a race of attrition, Put it all out there, but also be intelligent about it. For me, I'm definitely gonna err on the side of insurance, you know, like we talked about, inserts a little bit, little extra sealant. But I've never, I've tried to never go into any of these races thinking about the Grand Prix because if, like, if you race to win, you'll be up there. I can't think about where Cole is or Pete or Russell like doesn't help. I enjoy racing my bike too, so I think, yeah, I mean theoretically all of them I think up to seventh could theoretically pass me. I guess I haven't really done math cause it's kind of hard, like Cole didn't race unbound, so he doesn't have a drop race. So like if he does worse than my tent at Crusher. He can't beat me. But, you know, it's, it's so, it's really up in the air until you finish. And that's been cool about the point system in a way for me. Yeah, it's hard to say. I'm like, for the first time this year, nervous. Cause I've really tried to not think about the Grand Prix until this point because it's just, it's so up in the air and you have one bad day. Like, I pulled my front trailer cable out at Crusher. Like, so weird things can happen to anybody. Right. [00:35:09] Craig Dalton: Yeah. [00:35:10] Alexey Vermeulen: But yeah, I, I will say that I'm happy. That I was somewhat a mountain biker's, turf in the mud for two hours in Wisconsin. And I, I fared. And so I think we're a little bit more to my benefit in Bentonville. [00:35:24] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's, it's, it's got so many punchy climbs in addition to kind of the, the big potential rock hazards there. It will be interesting from a racing perspective, like who's gonna go all in early? Does it stay together? Like, how are you gonna turn the screws to each other? I'm excited. [00:35:41] Alexey Vermeulen: I'm stoked. I mean, I think it's, you're mainly gonna see guys like Pete that is in fourth and Russell is in fifth, try to make moves because like, at least until we get to the end, like racing wise to win the race, I have no reason to do much before then. But it's also easy to say till you get it in that moment and it's pissing rain or something, weird's happening and just becomes full on chaos for five hours. So, yeah, I don't know. It's, it's kind of, it's weird and everyone's taking different paths to get there too. You know, some guys are still on mountain bikes. I kind of came back and immediately started doing, you know, hard, harder efforts to kind of get ready for a sprint finish. And but yeah, I mean, I, like in the end, yes, I wanna finish on the, putting the gram pretty, but I, I kind of wanna win big sugar, like love kicking to death. I would like him to not win another fricking race. So that, that would be the, the real goal on top. Cherry on top, like finishing on the podium. Grand PR is great, but de that kid's been dominant this year, so that's probably the biggest goal for me. [00:36:33] Craig Dalton: and, and best of luck to him this coming weekend in the world. So that's just insane that he's on that team right now. [00:36:39] Alexey Vermeulen: I just, yeah, I just, I love that there is a transfer between gravel and road because you, you do have a lot of guys come over here that I think think they, because they're really strong on the road, they could just jump in. Like you look at Nick Tetra at Leadville, obviously he is, that altitude's not used to it, but it's not the same. You gotta be able to put the whole package together to do a lot of these races and to get through a whole season of it. I think the Grand Prix has been the hardest in that sense, right? That it's pretty much one race a month and that. to peak for six races every month. You kind of have to pick and choose or just be consistent. Yeah, and I think the only person do it perfectly this year is been Kegan and I guess perfection was lost at Swan again, but still, I, I would still say he was perfect. [00:37:16] Craig Dalton: We'll see. We'll see after big sugar. [00:37:18] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah. [00:37:19] Craig Dalton: That's exciting. Well, I'm super excited to ra watch that race, as I said, and hopefully I'm gonna be there myself to watch the action first hand, or at least from way, way behind you guys. [00:37:29] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah. It, it, it'll be fun. And Bentonville puts on a p puts on a party every time too, which I love. Right. They so much. It's all about cycling in that community right now. And I every, it's intoxicating every time you go there. [00:37:42] Craig Dalton: A hundred percent. I wanted to take a step back and talk about your other sort of big, I don't know if you call it your personal project, but it's, I think it's just been a big part of your journey the last couple years to Leadville and the from, from the ground up project. Can you talk a little bit about that? [00:37:55] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, I think I'm really bad about just giving you a quick synopsis. So I'll start. There is, so from the ground up is we take three riders who haven't been on a bike or haven't raced before to Leadville the hardest mountain of race in the nation, in my opinion. And the goal is just to make the sport less intimidating, more accessible through showing. The questions and vulnerabilities of people who are going to struggle at the event, let alone the pros. Cuz pros are stupid and don't show it even though we all struggle. So it started in 2021 was the first season we did, the second season this year. And I say season cuz it's a TV series on the back end. But it's really, it's this pathway just learning how. How hard cycling can be, whether it's lingo or training or getting into this sport financially. And it's, it's been something I've been super passionate about and takes a lot of my time from January to August. But it validates everything. And the reason I left the road, it's something that like, it's easy to talk about making positive impacts on people, but also very, very difficult to do it while racing as a professional. And I, for the first two years, for 20 18, 20 19, I struggled with that. Like I would say it to companies and then you get to racist and you're like, Dude, I'm getting flogged as it is, like let alone trying to stand out here on my feet all day in the sun talking to people. And so it's been really cool to see like Covid brought this whole new way of people into the sport and it allowed this access to. People that, you know, literally didn't get on their bike because of Lance or Greg. They got on their bike because they're gym closed. The need of mental sanity. And that is a very different pathway than anything we'd ever seen before. You know, all of a sudden cycling was like a marathon, you know, It was, it was just to do it. It was just to accomplish something. And I think there was a little bit of a disconnect because of how elitist cycling can. that we struggled to inform people that, hey, maybe Unbound isn't the best first race, you know, Or, Hey, maybe you should figure out how to change a tube before you take on this gravel race. But in all reality, it still became this big question of how do we keep these people in the sport and make it exciting? And that's what from the ground up has kind of been, you know, it's trying to show that normal everyday people can take on the hardest thing in the world or the hardest thing in the cycling world, in my opinion. Then go on and you know, even if they don't finish, they can go on and take on normal races and it's never gonna feel very hard. Right. Cuz yeah, you do the 100 at Unbound, it's hard, but it's not at 10,000 feet, it doesn't have 11,000 feet of climbing. It's not with the sense there's so much that that grows and I would equate finishing the Leadville 100 to, to doing an Ironman and we have multiple on film being like, Oh, I finished two Ironmans and this was way harder. Cuz it's just, it's so mentally taxing, you know. A lot of it is mental, more than physical, and that's really hard. [00:40:28] Craig Dalton: A hundred percent. Like my personal experience there was I was, I was about ready to quit and honestly, like, I think had my wife been at the feed station before Columbine, I might have quit, but I was like, Well, I don't have a ride home so I might as well continue going. Unfortunately, and miraculously, by the time I came back down, I was feeling good and I was like, I can make it. [00:40:50] Alexey Vermeulen: But that's how life is too, right? Like that's the coolest part of this is at the same time I go and race my race, I don't know how they're doing. And at the some point on Leadville, if you don't know it's out and back course. So I end up hopefully crossing them if their days are going all right. And that's just so cool to me, right? That you could have these people taking on something the first time very much in the understanding of how impossible it is and still towing the. That's motivating and inspiring. Right? And like cycling is made for everybody of all sizes, of all shapes, of all anything you want to name it, right? But we don't show that. We don't say it. It's very hard to talk about because it is primarily white is primarily male and you have to have money to be into it. And I think as that changes, we all. Gain value, like the sport is more important and it doesn't have to be about racing. You can be any type of rider, right? We have, in our first season, Shauna, you know, she finished, she stopped Leadville, I think at the Twin Lakes aid station was like, that's it. But no, went and took on like fat bike nationals in northern Wisconsin and like a different side of the sport. She's never wanna race laville again, but bikes can be anything. You can go become fricking bike commuter if you want. That's still, that vehicle of the bicycle is the cool part of the project. [00:42:01] Craig Dalton: Where can people watch the project? [00:42:04] Alexey Vermeulen: First season was on YouTube the second season I was on outside. But it's not behind a pay wall, so, [00:42:09] Craig Dalton: Yep, [00:42:09] Alexey Vermeulen: And there will be a third season. I just, first you heard it first here. But no, the hard part is not to cut you off. Like the hard part is figuring out how do you make it less overwhelming? Cause every year you're like, Wow, this is really sadistic. Why are we doing this to people? [00:42:23] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's hard to imagine like someone not just off the couch, but just off the couch wanting to do Leadville. I mean, there's, when they're submitting their application to you, they're submitting it to do Leadville, so at some level they've decided they're willing to do it. [00:42:38] Alexey Vermeulen: but they don't understand. That's the beautiful part of it, right? They don't have any idea. And there's this process of like growing up and six weeks out we go to like a Leadville training camp, and they get to feel the altitude for their first time and ride the course over three days. [00:42:50] Craig Dalton: Yeah. [00:42:51] Alexey Vermeulen: And it is, I cannot tell you how like just wide-eyed, like what the did I sign up for? And, but none of them quit cuz they're, they've invested so much of their life for the last five months into it. They're like, Shit, I'm here. May as well. [00:43:06] Craig Dalton: The cards fall. [00:43:07] Alexey Vermeulen: yeah, I mean that's definitely the balance side of it that I've enjoyed is being able to do something like that. Cause you could never do that when you're racing on the road. [00:43:13] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's a great, it's a great, I don't know, series I think was the right word that you used. It's a great series. I watched it on outside tv. Super powerful to, I mean, I'm, I'm always impressed when anybody takes on a journey that's bigger than themselves, whether it's a marathon or a gravel race or whatever it is. There's something absolutely admirable about someone who's willing to tackle something like that, knowing that, like, we may finish, we may not, but I'm gonna do something huge. [00:43:41] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, and I think that's the takeaway, right? Is that hopefully like there is a connection between cycling and life and. We have those rolling hills, You come down Columbine and all of a sudden you feel okay again. And that's the reality of all of this. Like most of the days you train, you feel like shit. That is the majority of cycling. Like even a professional athlete, 99.9% of the time is just bullshit. Get out the door, maybe convince yourself to get a coffee and stop for a couple minutes, but like get the work done and move on cuz you don't feel great every day. And I [00:44:07] Craig Dalton: I think someone said, said like, if you're not, if you're, if you're feeling good, better than 30% of the time, you're probably not training well. [00:44:15] Alexey Vermeulen: Yeah, it's true and that, but I think that's not, because that's not what we, that's not what anyone shows on social media or anything else. Right. It's always the good time. So yeah, my advice Could yourself, a wiener dog and ride your bike? [00:44:26] Craig Dalton: I love it, which is the perfect note to end on. Wiener dog promotion, which by the way, I will have another one if I didn't already have two dogs, and that's a long story. We would have a wiener dog cuz that's my wife's jam right [00:44:38] Alexey Vermeulen: yeah. They're perfect. The right at the right size. That's the, that's the true goal. [00:44:43] Craig Dalton: Yeah, my actual golden retriever does not fit well on my back and in a backpack, [00:44:48] Alexey Vermeulen: See, but that is like my goal after my, after my career is I've told my girlfriend I wanna get a golden retriever, not another wiener. So I could just be like, Oh, this one didn't grow. [00:44:55] Craig Dalton: I love it. I love it. Thanks so much for the time, man. It's great to catch up. Good luck at Big Sugar. Hopefully I see you there and good luck at Belgium Waffle Ride Michigan. I know that will be a, a great one for you being a Michigan. [00:45:07] Alexey Vermeulen: No, thank you so much. It's, it's exciting. And Yeah, just hope the sport keeps growing and thanks for talking through it. [00:45:12] Craig Dalton: Of course we'll see you, my man. [00:45:14] Alexey Vermeulen: See ya. [00:45:16] Craig Dalton: That's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. Huge. Thanks to Alexi for joining us and big, thanks to athletic greens and ag one for sponsoring this week's episode. If you're interested in connecting with me, I encourage you to join the ridership. Simply visit www.theridership.com. That's a free global cycling community where you can connect with gravel athletes from around the world. It's also your straight line to having a conversation with me, making episodes, suggestions, et cetera. If you're able to support the show, please visit buy me a coffee.com/the gravel ride. Or ratings and reviews are hugely appreciated. It really helps in me connecting with additional gravel cyclist. Until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels

The Know with Nikki Spo
66. Nikki Spo on the Pillow Talk Podcast Hosted by Will Beck

The Know with Nikki Spo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 60:40


This week is an episode… inside of an episode! Nikki recently had the opportunity to be a guest on Will Beck's podcast, Pillow Talk with Pillow Cube. You may remember Will Beck on episode 55 of The Know who spoke so bravely about surviving the Columbine massacre. This time, Nikki is the one being interviewed. Will and Nikki talk about life, suffering, what it's like being a coach's wife, and so much more. Nikki and Will discuss some fun questions like what is their favorite movie and who is their favorite musician. They also delve into some more serious topics such as suffering, what it means to define yourself, how to cope in difficult situations, and so much more. This episode is the perfect mix of light-hearted banter and deep conversation. Tune in to hear Nikki answer tons of questions asked by Will Beck! You don't want to miss it! Here is a sneak peek of some of the questions asked by Will: How do you define yourself? What's Your Favorite Movie? Do you feel like society dictates what you need to be? What is the best part of being an NBA coach's wife? Why did you want to get into podcasting? When you do your podcast, how are you trying to influence people? What does being successful look like to you? In this episode… Sleep habits Influences of society Self-awareness What it's like being the wife of an NBA coach Becoming a better person Suffering Beautiful souls being born Refinement Anger and resentment Who is influencing you Being conscious of who is in your life Shared experiences Being intentional Happiness and peace of mind Connecting to your higher power “There is good and bad that comes from suffering. It is such an interesting balance. When I think about my life, I think about the bad things I went through and how those have made me who I am.” “I became myself by trying to be everything else.” “There were so many years I tried to define myself, and heard something the other day where the message from God is simply, ‘I AM.'” “Even saying ‘I am' gives me goosebumps because I am not one thing. I am ALL of the things. I am everything. And I am nothing. All at the same time.” “I have intentionally been trying to move away from what defines me.” “When I live in my truth, I know I am helping other people.” “When you think of other people first, you will be happier. That is the balance in life. I need to focus on myself and others.” - will beck --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nikki-spo/support

Confronting: O.J. Simpson with Kim Goldman
Wondery Presents - The Rewatcher: Buffy The Vampire Slayer

Confronting: O.J. Simpson with Kim Goldman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 4:35


Welcome to the Hellmouth Weirdos! Your favorite Morbid hosts Ash and Alaina are branching out from true crime and heading to Sunnydale for the ultimate Buffy the Vampire Slayer Rewatch podcast! Alaina is a Buffy superfan and Ash has never watched a single episode, so whether you're Team Angel, Team Spike, or have no clue who those people are…they've got you covered! Join them each week as they slay their way through the series, episode by episode, re-watching, and watching for the very first time. They'll break down Buffy and her friends adventures through weekly recaps, categories, and awards while Ash takes some (wooden stake) stabs at predicting what she thinks will happen next. They'll also welcome the occasional Buffy cast member, guest star, or celebrity superfan to join in the slaying. Listen to The Rewatcher: wondery.fm/CF_REWATCHERSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

1999: The Podcast
Election: "Pick Flick" with Brian Rodriguez

1999: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 89:30


When Election premiered on April 23rd, audiences, it is safe to say, did not Pick Flick. Election was a pretty giant dud. With a reported $25 million price tag, the film earned just $15 million at the box office, making it the 98th-highest grossing movie of the year. And that's despite near universal critical acclaim and a number of major awards nominations. What went wrong? A lot, including a very limited release right after Columbine and sandwiched between The Matrix and The Mummy. But Election also defies genre, and having the MTV Productions label attached to it made the movie seem like something it...wasn't. But the growing acclaim for its writer-director Alexander Payne in the years that followed made audience give it a second look, and today Election is something of a cult favorite, as well as powerful time capsule for a lot of the pre-9/11, pre-millennium, post-Clinton angst that made 1999 so unique. John and Joey invited High School Slumber Party host Brian Rodriguez on to chat about this very not-a-teen-movie high school comedy.

A Kids Book About: The Podcast
Crystal Talks About School Shootings

A Kids Book About: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 21:03


Crystal Woodman Miller, author of A Kids Book About School Shootings and A Kids Book About School Shootings for Survivors, talks about how to create a safe space to discuss/process school shootings and shares tools for how to manage our emotions.A Kids Book About School Shootings (view book)A Kids Book About School Shootings for Survivors (view book)Full Book Description:School shootings are a tragic reality. And while they're not as common as they seem, they are still very real, and so is the fear, anxiety, and trauma that comes with them—even if you've never actually experienced one. This book will help grownups and kids better understand school shootings and encourage us to be prepared while reminding us that we should never let the fear of the what ifs take over our lives.About the Authors:Crystal Woodman Miller is an author, speaker, Columbine shooting survivor, mental health advocate, and warrior of hope who encourages others in the challenges they face. She's also the creative director of making magical memories for her three kids and husband and attempts to love others like she has been loved by God.*If you want to be on a future episode of A Kids Book About: The Podcast or if you have a question you'd like us to consider, have a grownup email us at listen@akidsco.com and we'll send you the details. 

Free Thinking Through the Fourth Turning with Sasha Stone
The Myth that MAGA is Driven by "White Rage"

Free Thinking Through the Fourth Turning with Sasha Stone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 44:25


No matter how justified you think it is, prosecuting someone for what lives inside their minds and hearts is a road to ruin. It's even worse than that. It's a road to moral panics that lead to systematic dehumanization that wrecks whole societies. Julius and Ethel Rosenberg might have been selling secrets to the Soviets but that didn't mean everyone in America who ever supported Marxist ideology was a traitor. Fear of what you can't see leaves it up to your imagination, and when it comes to human beings, that is an unreliable source. Systematic dehumanization meant that newly freed slaves had to be turned into existential threats to an otherwise pristine uoptia in the South. They were thieves, murderers and rapists. In Nazi Germany, Jews were parasites, draft dodgers, and uniquely evil. It's been decided that Trump supporters, or MAGA, are all angry white men. They are an existential threat because inside their minds and hearts is the unique evil of racism. This has never been questioned. It is a fear that has become a certainty across all institutions, culturally and politically, not just on the Left but on the Establishment Right. That is the kind of rot that must live inside the mind and heart of Hillary Clinton so that she could casually compare working class people to Nazi Germany. She saw them raising their hands to Trump without looking a little more closely to see that wasn't the Nazi salute but cell phones.Trump supporters have no status. They don't have a net worth of $120 million, or an Apple-TV show, or a house in Chappaqua, New York. They've been beaten, spit on, screamed at, demonized, and called every name imaginable from Nazi to Fascist to Racist, and now to “domestic extremist,” “insurrectionist,” “election deniers.” Even before Trump won, the Left believed their violence against Trump supporters was justified: We can survive political differences. We can't survive this. What I realized over the past few years as I've gotten to know the world of MAGA it's that we have a choice: assume the worst about people or give them the benefit of the doubt.I would like to say I would give Hillary the benefit of the doubt. After all, I was the person who made this sign and marched along with millions for the Women's March:But with a teenager possibly run down and smeared as a “Republican extremist,” with Biden's militant fascist speech, with a death threat on Justice Kavanaugh's life, all running parallel to a dangerously politicized Department of Justice, I'm much too concerned with the fate of the country to worry about protecting Hillary one more time.White men and women are the new existential threat to the Left. But it is existential, not based on skin color. Black men can be “white supremacists in BlackFace,” like Larry Elder. Non-white women can be “Far Right Latinas” like Mayra Flores. Black women can be viciously attacked and trend for days on Twitter, like Candace Owens, receiving none of the protection she would get from the “antiracists.” Steve Bannon's secret weapon is that he knows MAGA isn't driven by “white rage.” He's been actively engaged in building a coalition of working-class Black and Hispanic voters, or what he calls “inclusive, participatory, nationalist populism” for at least five years. Anyone who dips a toe into MAGA Land quickly sees it's not about racism at all. It's driven more by class and yes, by Judeo-Christianity. From a story on Breitbart:“We've got to start having access to capital to black and Hispanic entrepreneurs,” Bannon said.During the financial crisis, Bannon said that the Wall Street class were taken care of by the government but that the smaller banks got crushed since many of them loaned money to working-class people who didn't get rescued by the government.“The elites took care of themselves,” he said.Bannon said that he was putting together a “task force” of black and Hispanic entrepreneurs to help them build their communities.That, he explained, was the way to evolve the Republican party into a working-class party for all Americans.“That's why the media and that's why the Democrats are freaked out about that,” he said.Up until recently, Christianity was the beating heart of this country that united most Americans by roughly 80%. I was never raised with any kind of religion because I am a child of the Left. Most Conservatives, though, don't look to politics for their collective sense of purpose. They look to God. This might explain why all of a sudden a new term has been dropped into the mix to demonize the MAGA movement: White Christian Nationalism:Only recently has the idea of someone being a Christian become a clear and present threat to the newfound religion of the Left. Says a story in Politico by Stella Rouse and Shibley Telhami:Christian nationalism, a belief that the United States was founded as a white, Christian nation and that there is no separation between church and state, is gaining steam on the right.Prominent Republican politicians have made the themes critical to their message to voters in the run up to the 2022 midterm elections. Doug Mastriano, the Republican nominee for governor in Pennsylvania, has argued that America is a Christian nation and that the separation of church and state is a “myth.” Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, the Georgia hard-liner, declared: “We need to be the party of nationalism and I'm a Christian, and I say it proudly, we should be Christian Nationalists.” Amid a backlash, she doubled down and announced she would start selling “Christian Nationalist” shirts. Now Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis seems to be flirting with Christian nationalist rhetoric, as well.Always pivoting to racism is a convenient out for the Biden administration, which is disgraceful. But it's also a great way to sabotage this country, to keep us weak and divided. Although they don't yet realize it, the Left is gambling with its own existence. They're hoping to solve our population decline with the migrants flooding in from mostly Latin American countries. Most of the countries are rooted not in Wokeness but in Catholicism. Democrats believe they will be so grateful they'll vote Blue no matter who, but are they so sure about that?By hanging their entire platform on urging women to see abortions as no big deal, or even an act of empowerment, they're flirting with disaster if America begins to rise once again as a Christian nation, thanks to the influx of millions of new migrants. Not to mention most of them are likely to be socially conservative, which will run counter to the platform of the new Left.With declining sperm counts and fertility rates, not to mention population decline our future will not be siding with those who have the most abortions, but with those who have the most babies. It's simple math. Awaiting the RaptureUnless you were part of it, it's hard to explain the rapture most of us experienced when Obama rose to power. It was not just pure love for him, or that he had so much charisma, no scandals or baggage, a perfect family, or that he'd graduated from Harvard and had such sophisticated tastes, it was the idea that America had its first Black president. A new religion was born. For my generation and the one that came before, growing up without religion was cool. Only Republicans were church goers. Boomers traded their Christian upbringings in the 1950s for a cultural renaissance in the 1960s, Black Power, the Feminist movement, Civil Rights - it all exploded outward, away from traditional religion.As children of the “me” generation, we helicopter parents were spiritually adrift, aimless, and emotionally destroyed. We sought fulfillment in self-help therapy, where we talked about the abuse we suffered at the hands of narcissistic parents. We had Oprah every day at 3 pm where we worked out all of our problems as a society. Then came the McMartin preschool scare, Columbine, and 9/11. By the turn of the millennium, we were dealing with one threat after another. A 24-hour news cycle thanks to the OJ Trial, and now, the internet would provide us with second-to-second input of all the threats everywhere. We were primed and ready for one person to rise and give us all a collective sense of purpose. That person was President Barack Obama and the Obama coalition he built mostly online, Twitter specifically. As our kids took to the internet to escape our nonstop attentive coddling, an entire generation came of age as social media natives. They were forging new virtual identities, with new rules and new ways of seeing and identifying themselves with one another. What better way to do that than by skin color, gender, or victim status? If you were marginalized, you were protected. If you weren't, you were an oppressor; therefore, it was open season. For white kids without any cultural identity, gender became their way of distinguishing themselves from “cis-gendered, hetero-normative, colonizing white supremacists.”To them, identity was and is everything. They absorbed our growing fear about the rise of racism in America, which took root in 2008, with Conservatives like Steve Schmidt and John McCain concluding Sarah Palin was a xenophobic warrior for the White Race. We see this epiphany play out in the HBO movie Game Change. And just like that, the birth of the Never Trump movement and the idea that there were “good” Republicans and “bad” Republicans, and all of it was based on racism, was born. It just so happened that The Tea Party was challenging the whole system, Democrats and Republicans alike, who had sold out the country with a $700 billion bank bailout and bad trade policies. How convenient, then, to target them as racists: And when Trump questioned Obama's birth certificate, what else could that be, we all thought, except blatant racism? Obama graciously supplied a copy of his birth certificate but then mocked Trump publicly at the White House Correspondents Dinner. The two locked horns in 2011, and we're still watching a battle between Obama's America and Trump's. It also has morphed into a war between the Great Awokening and the Judao-Christian ethic. Many of the Zoomers, children of the newly Woke religious Left, grew up with the certainty that America was not only a systemically racist country, but they were living among millions of their fellow Americans who were racists. The social justice movement that now dominates the Left began in virtual hives on social media. Those kids went to the indoctrination factories our universities have become, grew up, joined the workforce and essentially did to America in 2020 what a group of activists did to Evergreen University. The Democrats, like the administration at Evergreen, the people who run the Motion Picture Academy, and all other members of the 1% buckled under the pressure. The New “Red” ScareIf history had gone differently, a moral panic in America in 2022 might have looked like another Red Scare. A discovery of Harvard professors selling information to the Chinese Communist Party, colliding with the virus from Wuhan, not to mention a near-complete takeover of our manufacturing jobs, might have set Americans on edge that Communists were once again at the gates. But look at the date. January 28, 2020. The focus wasn't on China, Chinese spies, or even the COVID pandemic, which was just starting to make its way into the United States. Americans were in the grips of a different kind of moral panic.This moral panic is destroying us in all ways, turning us against ourselves and making us much more vulnerable and weak to our adversaries. Russia, China, North Korea or any major enemy of the United States would no doubt have figured out that there was one surefire way to bring the most powerful country in the world to its knees: accusations of racism. The Chinese have our number. They even have a special name for it:Sooner rather than later, we'll need leadership that can't be so easily undone, that isn't given to nonstop fits of mass hysteria. We need a steady hand to guide this ship at such a dangerous time. MAGA LandAt some point in 2020, I found myself staring at my Twitter feed and had what I can only describe as blood poisoning. There was so much hate - it was in my heart, it was in my veins. I just could not live with it anymore. I decided I had to find out - was it true, were they really racists?I'd already experienced what it was like to be called a racist. When I pointed out on Twitter that not all Asian hate crimes were “white supremacy,” members of my own community targeted me as a white supremacist. It didn't matter that I'd spent at least ten years advocating for Black artists to win Oscars on my website. It made no difference. I was seen only by my identity as a white woman online. I then decided to take a trip to MAGA Land. I began following a youtube site called Right Side Broadcasting. They are Christian-based and staunchly pro-life. Each video begins with an image of a fetus in the womb. They hold weekly prayer meetings and live stream all of Trump's rallies. They usually set up early in the day and begin recording as the crowd begins to form. Hours later, the music plays - the same song introducing Trump to the crowd. … And I'm proud to be an AmericanWhere at least I know I'm freeAnd I won't forget the men who diedWho gave that right to meAnd I'd gladly stand up next to youAnd defend Her still today'Cause there ain't no doubtI love this landGod Bless the U.S.A.Then Trump finally shows. He often has a handful of red hats that he tosses out into the crowd. Trump's speeches are almost always the same. They're funny. He tells jokes, a lot of the time, at his own expense. In the old days, back in 2016, his speeches were much darker and angrier. Now, they aren't. Being banned from Twitter seems to have changed Trump for the better. This is a cautionary tale of the evils of a social media algorithm that feeds off of outrage and hysteria.You can't dip a toe in MAGA land and come away seeing it as a movement driven by racism, not if you're being honest. That tells you a lot already about what kind of media class we have in this country, that they were leading the charge for what has become shameful, systematic dehumanization of a whole group of people with no benefit of the doubt, no due process, no path to redemption. But the truth still matters, even if it's met with a tsunami of mass hysteria and moral panic. I have watched every Trump rally since he began holding them in 2020 - every single one — and not only is the MAGA movement not driven by “white rage,” but they are far more diverse and multicultural than the media or the Democrats seem to believe. And these Trump supporters I follow on TikTok:And if you want to know why so many Latinos are flipping red? So if it's not about racism, what's it about? Well, Ungar-Sargon has an idea: She has been fearless in her efforts to bridge the divide between the mass hysteria on the Left and the working class on the Right. She and Matt Taibbi, Glenn Greenwald, Megyn Kelly, Walter Kirn, and Tulsi Gabbard have maintained their objectivity, humanity, empathy, and willingness to see the bigger picture.As Matt Taibbi often points out, we seem to be missing the old-school lefties like William Kunstler, who would defend Civil Liberties at all costs. Now, only one remains—Alan Dershowitz, who has taken on the lost cause of Mike Lindell. Lindell is a hero in MAGA land and a joke to high-status folks like Jimmy Kimmel and Jon Stewart. A man whose life was nearly ruined by addiction found God and started not just a charity, but a business called My Pillow. When you see how beloved Lindell is with MAGA, much of it is to do with their shared faith, that cross that hangs around his neck. He, like Trump, gives them hope. These are people not driven by hate or rage, but by love. For people who had been shut out of every part of American culture, demonized for six long years, called the worst names imaginable, not welcomed in many places, lost friends and family, they somehow haven't lost their hope and their optimism. A lot of that has to do with Trump, believe it or not. He's one thing they haven't been able to take away from them. As enemies of the state - they have plenty of reasons to be angry. We saw some of that on January 6th. But 2020 was a year that broke people. Only one group was ever held accountable for losing it, even though Trump supporters pride themselves on being non-violent. Now, the state has managed to intimidate them to prevent them from using their Constitutional right to protest. But to take love of country away from people whose entire identity is wrapped up in patriotism seems to me an act of unimaginable cruelty. However, they still have a vote, and if they turn out in large enough numbers, they can have more of a voice in DC.MAGA voters have every reason to be mean and bitter. But you know what? It's people like Hillary Clinton, the Never Trump Republicans, and most in the media and on blue-check Twitter who have become the mean and bitter ones, abandoning basic human decency in their desire to eliminate a group of people they see as an existential threat to their otherwise pristine utopia. But, as with the Grinch Who Stole Christmas, they will soon learn that what MAGA voters care about most is not something they can't take away. I don't know what Hillary saw. My guess is that she was looking for what she wanted to see, not what was really there. If she watched a MAGA rally, really watched it, she would not see miserable people, upset that they aren't allowed into the country club, or mouth-frothing Nazis. Instead, she'd see mostly happy people, like the Whos in Whoville. That is happiness that only comes when your mind and your heart are free.So if you want to understand MAGA start there. Plenty of people gravitate to Trump for different reasons - a rebellious spirit, their religious faith, but what unites them as a movement is love of country. Nationalism is not itself fascism or even racism. James Strock's Substack focuses on the need for an invigorated new nationalism, writing:What a calling is to an individual, nationalism can be to a commonwealth. It can be a source of solidarity. It's expressed over space and time through a unifying narrative. From history it derives values and experiences that can inform our navigation of the present. These elements yield a vision for conjuring and creating a future.Our moral panic that there are racists, racists everywhere is nowhere near finished. At the very least, however, we must vote out those politicians who are primed and ready to convict people on what they think exists inside their minds and hearts. Liz Cheney and the January 6th Committee will continue Joe Biden's ignorant campaign to use racism as the justification for their authoritarian show trial, and politicization of the DOJ. History will shame them for it.Ultimately, though, the way I figure it, hate eventually exhausts itself. Love wins. Get full access to Free Thinking Through the Fourth Turning with Sasha Stone at sashastone.substack.com/subscribe

The Culture Cast
Gun Violence - Episode 3: 'Columbine' by Dave Cullen

The Culture Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 32:38


Dr. Kristen shares her review and insights about Dave Cullen's book 'Columbine,' which covers the Columbine school shooting in Colorado in 1999. Show Notes: Our resource list: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1hzY27OCq7vBoOi5r4D7Sy33npibB2yymyT0AlhKyfgg/edit?usp=sharing Available from Bookshop.org: https://bookshop.org/books/columbine/9780446546928 If you want to check out more of our content or if you think The Good Doctors could help your organization, click here for our link portal Or sign up for our monthly digest to get all the latest news

El libro de Tobias
ELDT: 10.4 Magnolia

El libro de Tobias

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 212:13


paypal.me/LibroTobias Esta semana en nuestra “Sección principal” hablamos de la película “magnolia” a petición de nuestro donantes vía PayPal Albert Clemente Mairal. Albert ha pedido esta obra maestra del genial Paul Thomas Anderson y uno de los mejores repartos jamás reunido. Además en nuestra sección “El callejón oscuro” os traigo a Takahiro Shiraishi, apodado el "asesino de Twitter" que escondía trozos de los cuerpos de sus víctimas en el congelador de su propio apartamento. Asesino a ocho mujeres y a un hombre. Finalmente en la sección “¿Qué fue de?” esta semana os hablo de Regina Rohde, una joven que sobrevivió a la masacre del Columbine y años más tarde, en la universidad, sobrevivió a tragedia de Virginia Tech, los dos peores tiroteos ocurridos en USA. Tiempos: Sección principal: del 00:03:35 al 01:55:44 Sección “El callejón oscuro”: del 01:55:45 al 02:47:00 Sección “¿Qué fue de?”: del 02:47:01 al 03:26:34 Presentación, dirección, edición y montaje: Asier Menéndez Marín Diseño logo Podcast: albacanodesigns (Alba Cano) Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

MomsLikeUs Podcast
An Anti-Bullying Program That Works Part 1 with Sandy Austin

MomsLikeUs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 37:17


In this episode, Mona talks with special guest Sandy Austin about how we can work to prevent bullying. Sandy was one of the most involved school counselors in the aftermath of the tragic Columbine school shooting in 1999. She shares the organization she created to support and encourage students going through challenging times.   Related Links: Want more Mom Mentoring help from Mona?: https://liftable.tv/momslikeus/ Join the MomsLikeUs Academy: https://momslikeus.org/academy/ MOM-entum Killer Quiz: Find out if you're stuck in one of the most common MOM-entum Killers: https://bit.ly/2W1JTZM Check out the No-Regrets Motherhood Blueprint: https://momslikeus.org/shop/#courses Follow me on Social Media! FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/MonaCorwinAuthor INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/mona_corwin PODCAST: Follow on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/momslikeus-podcast/id1538198488

Grit, Guts and Determination: The Leadville Race Series Podcast
Hear How Ironman Pro Angela Naeth Did at the Leadville Trail 100 MTB! Spoiler Alert: We Think She's Coming Back!

Grit, Guts and Determination: The Leadville Race Series Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 25:31


Tune in here to this episode of Grits, Guts, and Determination, The Leadville Race Series Podcast, a leading authority for all things Leadville! Host Cole Chlouber, son of race founder Ken Chlouber, takes us on a story-telling journey of the 38-year rich history of this race. We learn all the tips, tricks, and stories from the Leadville community members! Joining us today is Angela Naeth. In this episode, Angela shares her experience at the Leadville Trail 100 MTB and her plans for women cycling in the future. Now having experienced the race for herself, listen as Angela talks about Leadville's mental and physical challenge. Pushed to limits she had never been, Angela enjoyed seeing just how far she could go. She begins walking the listener through race morning. Having stayed just outside Leadville with friends, she was excited and ready to begin the day. Riding up to start, the cheering crowds, energy, PA system, and overall experience was an awesome way to begin. As the racers took off, Angela shares her experience, riding downhill on pavement, pushing together with fellow mountain bikers. After her first climb, listen as Angela recounts her crash on Powerline teaching her to no go past her limits. She recovered well and went on to a single track and a flat section before she arrived at the crew station. The atmosphere of the station and the break it afforded prior to Columbine was enjoyable. After grabbing more fuel, Angela began her climb of Columbine. Halfway up, she was impressed as some of the pro male riders were already descending. The technicality offered by Columbine's surprisingly steep ascent was challenging. Over the last three to four miles, occasional bailing was necessary due to the slippery terrain. Not considering herself a mountain biker, Angela realized that practice will be required for next year's race. She coached herself to keep moving and get to the top as the final two miles of ascent proved harder than expected. Once there, four gels from the aid station were appreciated. Listen as she then describes her exhilarating descent back down Columbine, calling it the most fun she had all day. Angela finished the race in 9:07 and wants to come back. Cole asks Angela helpful questions for all to hear. Take note as Angela highlights the parts of the course which she underestimated, her future nutrition plans, how she plans to prepare for next year, and how she, who lives at sea level, plans to better prepare for the high altitude of Leadville. Angela additionally discusses the benefits of racing with groups, such as her own Race Like a Girl and Gritty Like a Girl groups. For female athletes, Angela explains why this is a good crossover race, amazing challenge, and great opportunity for women. Thanks for tuning in! Don't forget to like, share, and subscribe, and we hope to see you in Leadville!

FedSoc Events
Did the Law Cause Columbine? [Archive Collection]

FedSoc Events

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 119:45


On August 13, 1999, the Federalist Society's Criminal Law & Procedure Practice Group sponsored a panel at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. The panel considered the question "Did the Law Cause Columbine?". Featuring:Introduction: Justice George Nicholson, California Court of Appeal, Third DistrictModerator: Troy Eid, Chief Counsel to Gov. Bill Owens (CO)Chief Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson, United States Court of Appeals, Fourth CircuitAnn Beeson, Staff Attorney, ACLUMichael J. Horowitz, Senior Fellow, Hudson InstituteProf. William F. Kilpatrick, Boston CollegeJames A. Rapp, Editor in Chief, Education Law

Whatever it may be
Columbine Survivor Will Beck Shares his story

Whatever it may be

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 46:53


in this episode i chat with Will Beck. A columbine survivor with an incredible story and an inspirational outlook! tune in

Criminal Discourse Podcast
Murdered & Missing Columbine Survivors

Criminal Discourse Podcast

Play Episode Play 53 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 39:50


What happens to victims who aren't killed or visibly injured, but who are left in the wake of a crime to pick up the broken pieces and carry on with life? What happened to Columbine student and school shooting survivor Brandi Jo Malonson, who was last seen around Christmas 2006? Who killed her friends and classmates Nick Kunselman and Stephanie Hart-Grizzell less than a year after Columbine?  In this episode, we will look at these and other lesser-known cases from Littleton, Colorado, the community where the infamous school shooting took place.

True Crime Horror Story
S6E2: The Columbine High School Massacre

True Crime Horror Story

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 46:54


In the second episode of Season 6, your host JD Horror brings you the story of the Columbine High School Massacre.On April 20th, 1999 high school seniors Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold planned an attack on Columbine High School that would lead to 13 dead and 21 injured. The tragedy would have a long lasting impact on all of those involved and American culture in general, with countless copycats trying to continue their mission in what experts describe as "The Columbine Effect". Join JD as we tell the story as well as examine what kind of things could have been done to prevent this event and others like it from happening in the future. (E. Harris / D. Klebold, Colorado, USA)If you like what you hear here on True Crime Horror Story please subscribe and give us a 5 star review. You can also think about joining our Patreon At patreon.com/truecrimehs and then Stay tuned after this show on Patreon for the True Crime Horror Story After Show w/ Dom & JD as well as early access to Ad free episodes and exclusive bonus content available only on Patreon.This episode features research and writing by Mis Demeanor, music by Mechanical Ghost, Producer LB from the No One Likes Us Podcast, and The Quiet Type as well as Artwork by Nuclear Heat Graphics. Sources for this episode's cases are available in the credits section of our website.Has violent crime impacted you or someone close to you? Send us your story at truecrimehorrorstory@gmail.comSPONSOR: MAGIC MIND BRAIN BOOSTERTry yours today at http://www.magicmind.co/jd to get 40% off your first subscription or 20% off your one time order with my discount code JD20. That's http://www.magicmind.co/jd and code JD20 at checkout. Safe School Helpline 1-800-325-4381Break the Silence. Prevent the Event.http://www.truecrimehorrorstory.com

Every Night's A School Night
Night School #511: "The Gnarled Branch of Columbine"

Every Night's A School Night

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 102:58


Night School #511: "The Gnarled Branch of Columbine" by Every Night's A School Night

Real Talk With Susan & Kristina
What To Tell Your Child About School Shootings with Joe Hendry

Real Talk With Susan & Kristina

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 32:30


In this episode of Real Talk, KJK Student Defense Attorneys Susan Stone and Kristina Supler are joined by Joe Hendry, a Senior Director of onsite services for Navigate 360. They discuss school safety and best practices.  The conversation includes why schools are still a relatively safe space for kids , the importance and limitations of a threat assessment in today's day and age, and what parents, students, and school faculty need to know to properly prevent and manage threatening school situations. Links Mentioned In the Show: KJK Student Defense Navigate360.com Show Notes: (01:06) What makes today's guest perfect to discuss children's safety in school (02:48) Are schools in this day and age considered a safe environment for kids? (03:15) The unprecedented spike in mental health issues in schools since the onset of the pandemic (03:56)  Have professionals and experts in the field determined a specific profile that indicates one can become an active shooter? (04:50) The limitations of threat assessment in a school setting (05:50) An instance where 2 separate threat assessments were fatally inaccurate  (07:49) How to distinguish a possible threat indicator from an unremarkable firearm post on social media  (08:45) How conducting risk assessments can aid in improving safety and security protocols in the school setting overall (09:37) Typical issues Joe and his team identify during risk assessments in school districts  (11:10) Why over 90% of these catastrophic incidents are actually internal threats (12:00) The importance of early intervention to prevent behavioral issues in students from escalating (13:43) What parents and their children need to know about school lockdowns during dire situations (16:28) Why simply containing dangerous situations within the school physically is not always to correct solution and might even work in favor of the assailant (18:29) Flexibility is the key to an effective lockdown protocol; there is no one-size-fits-all lockdown Susan Stone: Today's topic is quite serious. School safety.  Kristina Supler: This is a really difficult topic to discuss. It's. It's a topic that evokes anxiety and fear and. It's top of mind for all of us, particularly as families and households are getting ready for children to go back to school. So we really thought it was essential to do an episode on school safety. Susan Stone: And every time there is another school shooting, it seems like there's a lot of finger pointing and blame placed and it's not constructive to constantly place blame. So we really wanted to have a guest here to talk about what are steps we could take to. Be more solution focused.  Kristina Supler: With that in mind. Let's kick it off with today's guest, Joe Hendry.  We're here today to talk about school safety and best practices. We're so pleased to be joined by our guest, Joe Henry, Joe served in the Marine Corps and then was a law enforcement officer for nearly 30 years. Now he's transitioned. He's in the private sector where he's senior director of onsite services for Navigate 360, which is basically a company that provides safety solutions for school. Susan Stone: We really are lucky to have you here, Joe, can I just brag about you a little bit before we ask you questions? You were named by the Ohio department of Homeland security. I'm gonna do it anyways. Even if it embarrasses you and the Ohio attorney General's office, as an expert in civilian and law enforcement responses to active threats. Mr Hendry he was also selected as a one of only 18 subject matter experts in school security in the world, by his peers at the, and correct me if I get this wrong, Joe, the ASIS International organization. And we've really avoided this topic, Kristina, because fortunately school safety hasn't been hasn't really hit our practice. We haven't really dealt with that issue in terms of our clients and our cases, but too much has happened. And we felt it was really important to bring you on Joel. And thank you so much for agreeing to talk about school safety.  Joe Hendry: Sure.  Kristina Supler: Thanks again for joining us. through the pandemic, Susan and I in our practice have seen a, a surge in students with mental health issues. And now we turn on the news and here we are. So let's start with the big question. Are schools safe today?  Joe Hendry: I think schools are relatively safe compared to a lot of other locations because there's so much, in place from prior events since Columbine occurred Schools have taken security for the most part fairly seriously. So a lot of things were in place potentially physically security wise from incidents at Columbine and Virginia tech and, Sandy hook that started requiring, special locks, doors, fencing, things like that. But you are correct. There's been a huge uptick in mental health issues. Since the pandemic And that affects security in ways that we haven't seen before prepared for actually,  Susan Stone: Kristine and I deal with mental health issues that impact the types of accommodations that students need in schools, such as ADHD or dyslexia or autism. We're talking about something very, very, very different. And I just wanna know in your experience working on these issues, is there a profile of the type of person or who would become an active shooter?  Joe Hendry: So the secret service is done two major studies since Columbine and has been really unable to come up with a definitive answer. There's a profile for an active shooter. We have a profile for someone who's a serial killer. There are indicators of person who may become an active shooter, but having a set threat assessment profile of one there isn't there's overlap with things, obviously the most recent one at all day that individual really didn't have any run ins may have had some mental health issues that really didn't. Very obvious through the education system. I've read that he was denied access to some educational benefits to him because he wasn't classified as needing them by the school district. It sounds like he began to leave the education system in a very slow way was having problems at Develop fascination with guns, things like that. Those are indicators potentially of someone who may be prone to violence. It's one of those things where you know, it, when you see it, but because we don't train people how to identify it sometimes threat assessment works and sometimes it doesn't, it's not the exact science. So the way you guys deal with a lot of things, you see ADA access, ADA access, things like that. What I see on my side of the house and I'm trained in NTAC that's national threat assessment center for mental health, you know, identifying people with mental health issues that may become violent. Those type of people require professional assessment by people who are psychologists people who are involved, potentially parents, teachers. Law enforcement security people that run into them in the education system. And even that isn't particularly 100% full proof in identifying those people because there is no exact profile. So a lot of times you may not even know you stop somebody in the path to violence by doing a good behavioral threat assessment on them. But a lot of times it becomes an issue where they don't even. Be able to identify people. You guys remember the Arapahoe shooting a few years ago? Yeah. At the stem school. So that individual it had two threat assessments, one done by the school and one, his mother actually had done by a professional psychologist and both of them actually identified him as a low threat and here he becomes an active shooter. There's no 100% cure all for some of the threats we see in the education system that all makes. Yeah,  Kristina Supler: well, it it's, it's actually frightening to think about what you're saying in that there's all these mental health professionals and experts and law enforcement professionals, and other safety professionals who study this for a living. And you say there's no specific. Profile. And it begs the question, Susan and I regularly handle student misconduct cases that might involve the student getting in trouble for posting a picture with a toy gun or fake bullets, things like that. And we've seen believe it or not. We've seen students expelled for these types of social media posts. So can you talk to us a little bit about what's the difference between. Maybe a real warning sign versus something along the lines of a student making a joke. That of course is not funny.  Susan Stone: No. And I just wanna add, because the, every year it seems like Kristina, wouldn't you agree? They always happen in September. The jokes come online often,  often. Yeah. That's a good  point. And we're seeing middle school kids because they have access to devices younger and younger, and I don't wanna profile, but typically boys who will post pictures. And they, they really do think it's a joke or that it's just for friends. They don't expect it to get out. So how's a school supposed to know the difference between this is just a normal kid. And if you expel this kid, you're really derailing their education or causing a school to prison pipeline, versus we gotta watch this kid,  Joe Hendry: right. It's really the entirety of behavior of the student who actually has the incident, right. A kid drawing a picture of a gun could go either way. Right. Does he have an unhealthy obsession with a gun? Does he have access to firearms? Has he done things in the past? That would lead people to believe that he's violent, that has, tendencies potentially is the individual suicidal. Does he have. Does he bully other children? All those things come together, drawing the picture of the firearm itself in and of itself may be absolutely nothing. And that's one of the problems we have. Since Columbine, there was this big, huge zero tolerance for violence policy. Sure. Yeah. And that doesn't work. Really doesn't that's why professional behavioral threat assessment is. So I. There's a couple different programs out there. And, you know, in my role as a school professional, one of the things that I do is we do company does risk assessments and I go and conduct risk assessments. In fact, I'm in the process of actually writing a risk assessment for a school district that had an active shooter last year that we were at. And one of the things we at you  Susan Stone: clarify, Joe, when you say a risk assessment, I just wanna understand for the institution, or do you do it on a specific student? I just wanna make sure  Joe Hendry: we're doing it on the institution. Thank you. The entire, I just didn't understand that. Okay. Facility. So we're looking at all their safety and security procedures and their personnel and their training. And there's a lot of interviews. We look at the physical security safety, and all those things come together because that require. Safety and security requires a very comprehensive plan and it's not just the physical side of things. It's the mental health side of things. Are you providing, behavioral threat assessment you're providing training to people, are you training, emergency operation plan, continuity of operation plans? All those things go into a risk assessment. But one of the things we see is when we start going to do a risk assessment of district, and we ask for paperwork, they'll tell us that they have a threat assessment team, right? They maybe have a school psychologist or social worker on the team. They have a, maybe a school resource officer, principal teacher sometimes outside professionals, depending on the case, what we find is they're meeting, but they really don't have a good guide sense of guidelines on how to conduct the assessment. They don't have good record keeping they're not using, the national threat assessment center from the secret service has professional standards and. In order how to conduct a risk assessment for someone who potentially could be violent or potentially it's a student acting out, or like you said, it could be a student who just did something that thought it would be funny among his friends and it blew up in their face. So what's the decision has to be, what is the difference between all three of those individuals? Having a policy that says if anyone does anything, we kick them outta school. doesn't benefit anyone, especially the student that is the subject of the behavioral threat assessment.  Kristina Supler: So, so was, let me ask you, is there any way there's a lot that goes into this. This is a complicated issue, of course. Is there any way for schools to identify early on before the catastrophe happens? When a, a potential shooter a student. Who might engage in some sort of violence enters the building  Susan Stone: or a stranger? Sure. Doesn't have to be a, a student. It could be just, you know, unidentified citizen, Joe Hendry: you know, a lot of people don't understand specifically active shooter events in education over 90% of them are internal threats. There're students, staff members of people. Wow. That's really interesting's. So it's not strange. It's meant associated with the school.  Wow. Okay. When you say associated, could you tell. Who, what are the who's in that 90%?  I'm curious. So if you're talking students, there's been staff members, obviously there have been, husbands of teachers parents, they're all people that are intimately associated with the school, that know facility that know where people are, all of that stuff. And I'm not gonna get in the lockdown right now, cuz we're on a different topic. When you realize they're gonna get there,  Susan Stone: Joe. Hey, tight.  Joe Hendry: okay. When you get to 90, when you're thinking about 90% of the people are either from the facility or intimately acquainted with it, these are people that a lot of times that are known now, sometimes it's former students that commit crimes, but a lot of times, if we can identify behavioral issues and students that are young without labeling them as a threat, maybe they just had behavioral issues. That, they need to work on kind of stuff. Those kind of things are early interventions with students that, you can maybe potentially change behaviors in young students so that they don't become disillusioned, that they don't become bullies or victim of bullying, things like that. Those are all things that kind of need identified early in the process. A lot of times I'll see and hear from teachers and staff on risk assessments that they. Anti-bullying training maybe at the junior or high level and the high school level, but they're not doing it at elementary school when it actually really is beginning. Susan Stone: Well, when you talk about early intervention, you're speaking our language, cuz we're all about advocating for early intervention, but I wanna shift a little bit. Sure. Because this podcast, we're both parents; you're a parent, Joe; you're talking to parents. So if you were going to speak to parents, what you're doing now, what should parents be telling their children about? God forbid, if something happens how to respond. I know, I would say, and it's probably the wrong thing. You're gonna tell me it. But my instinct is that fight flight, but really in this case, it's flight, like run away, go  Kristina Supler: don't. Yeah. I'm not sure that I, I don't think when I hear my daughter talk about the training she does, it's it? Her school it's it's the opposite. So I I'm curious, Joe, you're you're the expert. What should parents be talking to their kids about? Realistically?  Joe Hendry: So what a lot of people don't understand is, you know, we, we talk about it in a very ubiquitous way, the word lockdown, right? It kind of covers everything. Everybody uses it for everything, lockdowns a code word, number one, which we shouldn't even be thinking about using, FEMA came out in 2050 that don't use codes, tell people exactly what's happening so they know how to respond. And I keep hearing the word lockdown. It  Susan Stone: scares me. I don't feel trapped. Joe Hendry: It's a verbal word. You're actually trapping. You're doing the one thing that someone who becomes an active shooter or, you know, is a suspect in one of these things. Lockdown actually does. The one thing that the gunman is completely unable to do by themselves. That is gain control of an entire facility that is populated on by almost every room by people and gives 'em complete and utter control of the facility. And absolutely almost in no way, is there anything that's going to happen other than potentially you put a door lock between a suspect and a room full of kids, but that door lock the windows in the doors, the doors, none of those are manufactured to withstand gunfire. There. The infrastructure doesn't match the response. Kristina Supler: Everyone wants to get in the room. They're gonna get in the room, right? Yeah, no,  Susan Stone: I, I, I, like I said, my instinct has always has not like the idea of telling your kid to stay in the room. So what do you do, joe?  Joe Hendry: Yeah, here's the thing. And really, we have examples of this already nationally in training and fire response. I mean, fire response, all of us know how to respond to a fire and we've been train. Nationally to how to respond to a fire since 1960. And that 62 years of training has told us that if the building's on fire and you're under danger, you should leave. But it also gives us other options. Like if we're in contact with a fire, you catch on, fire's supposed to stop, drop and roll. We train people if other people on fire and they panic and they start to run, knock them down, roll on top of them. Extinguish. With your own body. We're trained in fire extinguishers, the infrastructure, the buildings built around us surviving a fire and everything. But the interesting thing is, and this is originally why we got on this call is we don't train people to fight fires. Right. We just, we don't do that, but we train 'em how to do everything else, active shooters, the exact same thing. But because back Lockdown tactics and active shooter come from Southern California from the 1970s. But the problem is rooted in the 1960s. The riots in Watts in Los Angeles caused a Los Angeles unified school district to fence in several of their properties around their schools to keep threats outside. Right. A very common concept called concentric rings of security to prevent threats from coming from the neighborhoods onto the school. That concept worked very well for particular types of threat. However, at that moment in time, too, at that moment in time, and that moment in time, cuz that  infrastructure works very well, right for certain threats. But however, in the 1970s, when the FBI defeats the mafia in Southern California, basically, right, it creates power vacuum, the power vacuum still by gangs. Those gangs begin to target each other where the mafia really targeted people in a. Particular way, right? They found a target. That was the person was the target. The gangs began to just spray gunfire in the streets and drive-by shootings became like a major event in these cities. And still to some extent they are, but really in the seventies and eighties, this was huge problem into the 1990s. But what happened was the kids who were at the school when they were shot at, on the street, had the ability to run away. But the fencing for the threats that was installed in the 60. Became a trap for the students that were on school ground, know anything about Los Angeles, the school grounds. A lot of the it's warm all day, right? So the kids are outside. Their cafeterias are outside. Their lunch rooms are outside. Their gyms are outside. They have courtyard open schools with doors that open in the courtyards. There's no interior hallways. So when these events happen, the ability to run away was fixed by the fence mm-hmm and they could not leave the area. So Los Angeles had to come up with a different response and they actually began to call what's called drive-by shooting drills. You can actually look these up. The first reference I can find to them in a national publication is an ed week in January of 1993, where a reporter does a study on how drive-by shooting drills are being used for shootings that are beginning to happen on school campuses. So this is 30 years ago.  Susan Stone: Apply those however day. Are we supposed to train? Are students in an orderly way, how to get out of the building,  Joe Hendry: For fire. Yes. But here's the problem. When we see training, right. Organizations good in training and you, you know, you need to crawl, walk, run when you do training. Right. But we don't pick the time, the place or the victims of an event. And if you have a one size fits all plan like lockdown, single option or. And you have to be in a room and you have to do certain steps in order to remain safe. Those plans are not flexible. They're not like a fire plan that has flexibility based on your location to the fire. You know, if I told you to go into a room and close the door and wait for the fire department to come save you during a fire, you would tell me I was insane. But that's the fact, but let ask you this  Kristina Supler: practice shooter what's that if, if. One teacher, it sounds like. So I hear you. We can't have one size fits all cuz you can't, you don't know exactly what threat is going to present itself, but I isn't. It also true. You can't have some teachers evacuating students and other teachers in the same school, keeping students locked in cuz isn't that a, a, a total recipe for chaos  Joe Hendry: actually chaos works on our favor during these events. These are human beings committing these crimes. Human beings can only focus on one thing at a time. And if you give them control of an entire facility, in which every room in that facility, I don't people say you're hiding and they turn off the lights and all that stuff. That is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard because the threat is 90% of 'em come from the facility or intimately acquainted with it. And you know, at 1:23 in the afternoon, on a Tuesday at a school, how many rooms are occupied?  Susan Stone: So Joe, I'm gonna press you. Because our listeners need something to take home. What would you tell your child to do depending on the age? Could you break it up between sure. Elementary, middle and a high school student,  Joe Hendry: young elementary school students should listen to the teachers, but that requires the teachers to be properly trained based on the location of the event. Right. So my kids. Regardless of where they're at in school right now in elementary school, only about 60 to 70% of the school day spent in a classroom. So you could potentially lock down in a classroom, right? That may be an option based on your location, based on where the threat is. However, they're also on the playground in the cafeteria and the bathroom and the hallways and the library, um, in the gym. All of those locations may require a different. That may require evacuation. So it doesn't mean everyone in the building does the same thing. Every response is based on your location, based on where the threat is. And you have to have some type of ability to adjust to a threat. If you are in contact with it. I'm sure everyone read  Susan Stone: about what's that I gotta push you on this. And I normally don't push my guests hard. Oh no, go ahead. But what should the parent tell the high school kids, the high school kids,  Joe Hendry: high school kids. I, I told my high school kids, the first thing you do, regardless of what's happening, if you know there's a threat and you're able to evacuate the facility, the policy means nothing. Leave the facility.  Kristina Supler: There you go. Susans in  Susan Stone: thinks we're correct leaves. What I've always told  Joe Hendry: my kids. Leave, leave the facility. Number two, if you don't know where the threat is, or you're in close contact with it and you have the ability. You don't have the ability to leave the facility. That's when you use lockdown, but it's not traditional lockdown. I'm only relying on a door. I'm barricading a door. There's a lot of doors in schools where students cannot lock them because they don't have keys. Right. Teachers may not be present. All those things affect the response. That's why you need the ability to be flexible. So students need to know how to barricade a location. They need to know how to prepare countermeasures inside. If the location is. All of these things, the people killing them normally are their classmates. So they know these people and they know who they are, the ability to barricade. Location's good. If my, and I've told my children, if you are in contact, you know, once they probably hit junior high, I told them if you're in contact and you cannot evacuate, and there's no ability to barricade, cuz like I said, bad guy pick the time, the place and the victims, you do whatever you need to do to survive that. It could be swarming the gunman. It could be throwing things at the gunman's face to crack them. It could be trying to run past the gunman. We're all different as human beings training. You know, I did a, there's a scientific study that I had published with two professors in the journal of school violence, where we actually studied response with lockdown and, and multi option response with active shooter. Individuals that use multi option response. It doesn't mean everyone survives. It doesn't mean no one's injured. What it does mean is the casualties decrease in that circumstance by over 75%, when you use multi option response over lockdown, when there's an actual threat. So it becomes important to tell the kids everything that they can do to survive. Not just one single thing, because if the one single thing fails, then pretty much everyone that's at that location ends up being shot.  Susan Stone: Thank you. So  Kristina Supler: it's such a, it's such a complicated issue. I I'd like to take a few moments to turn our attention to the report. That's recently come out examining the Uvalde shooting. We know that there were the report indicates that it was total chaos and in a multitude of systemic failures what transpired that day? How do we prevent the chaos when people realize a shooter might be in the building and it's terrifying. And, and can you tell us what are some of the key takeaways from that report and what do you think we should all know and learn from that report? Joe Hendry: I guess we'll start with the school response. It's pretty obvious that the school and it's interesting because the state of Texas certified that school is being prepared for an active shooter.  Kristina Supler: Oh, my gosh.  Joe Hendry: I, so that was one of the big, huge takeaways from the report. The state said they were okay. Which means obviously what they had in place. It's not just the law enforcement failure. It was the failure of their training. It was the failure of their planning. It was the failure of whatever they had told their students to do when something happened, the teacher in the one classroom where all the students were killed and the teacher survived which I, I don't know if I. How I feel about myself. The teacher said that their plan failed and when the gunman came in the room, they were all sitting on the floor where they had been told to hide. And the gunman just block down, shot all of them. And that's not the first time that it's happened in the use of lockdown. So the school did not have, whatever the state said they had in place, obviously didn't work. There were sounds like broken door locks or doors that were propped things like. Those are huge safety concerns. Any at any time, especially with a school that was having a ton of lockdowns because of the border patrol activity in the area, things like that, where they were leaving doors open, apparently which anyone could have come into the school. They had fencing around the school. It was only five feet high. That is not a proper height. It doesn't sound like they had professional risk assessment, which is the basis of everything you do. And you never one you never, ever, and you guys know this never, ever assess yourself. And your capabilities, you always have. Kristina Supler: No. Cause of course we're biased. We also, no. Susan Stone: And, and Joe, I don't know if you agree with this, but I think that in preparing for today and just every day, reading the news, the response, both healthcare workers, getting kids out of there, getting them medical attention Having law enforcement go in and know how to manage it. Having school safety officers know how to manage it. There was a lot to take away from this situation.  Joe Hendry: When I, so it was a former law enforcement officer and a master trainer for our state and solo engagement. Um, and I was former SWAT member. There were 376 police officers there and no one took charge. No one. No one ran operations inside. It sounds like no one ran operations outside. It was mass chaos. I was kind of hoping the report would maybe talk about whatever the fire and emergency medical service response was. You know, were they organized? Were they prepared? Because usually, there's a thing called unified command and unified command is the law enforcement fire response. And you guys didn't mention this in my bio, but I sit on NFPA 3000, which writes the national standards for law enforcement, fire and EMS to respond. Those things that are in the code in NFPA 3000. I don't believe were followed at all from what I've read, uh, and know so far it's to me as a law enforcement officer, it's very disheartening to see what happened. And to know that one of the, and it came out in the report that one of the agencies that supposedly talked about the law enforcement response didn't even conduct their own investigation. They took state reports and were trying to tell what went wrong during the incident. Obviously from a legal standpoint, we all know that is completely the wrong way to do that. And it'll be very interesting when the interview started happening with the officers, especially the command level officers that were there. And it's now come out with the report that the, the majority of officers at the scene were actually federal and state level law enforcement officers, not local law enforcement officer. So Joe, that tells me training had failed at all levels.  Susan Stone: I, I agree that that is an example and it's tragic. But can you give us a positive example of where something has gone, right. Because yeah, we  Kristina Supler: only hear, are there any, are there any  Susan Stone: positive success? Are there stories where there was a potential actor shooter, a school sought responded, and that is the model that we should be promoting. And I, I do wanna, I always try to give a takeaway to parents and end on some positive notes because all we're hearing is what went wrong Joe Hendry: . Trying to think of a good one that probably everyone would know. And I I'll go with Ohio. Chardon's response was actually pretty good. 10 years ago to their event. Um,  Kristina Supler: oh yes. The TJ Lane shooting. That's right.  Joe Hendry: Yeah. Okay. I never say the gunman's names, but yeah, that shooting, um, who was in the media so we can say yeah, there, there that incident. Well, not perfect. Actually went fairly well because. You guys all remember Frank Hall, right? The, the football coach hero, the football coach, the students initially some of the classrooms and stuff, barricaded, things like that. So that response was pretty good. Students were hiding under cafeteria tables, which was a lesson learned. It's like get out of the cafeteria. We had a student in the cafeteria whose mother was trained by one of my instructors at Kent state at the time. and her, she had told her child to evacuate and the, in, when that incident happened the gunman was shooting children underneath the cafeteria table and she was at the table next to it. She actually grabbed her friend and some kitchen even know at the time and drugged them out of cafeteria and left. So there were some good lessons learned there. Frank Hall charging at the gunman, distracted him from shooting students. Frank actually chases him out of the building. And definitely Frank's actions while there were still students that were wounded and killed. His response stopped that incident from being way worse than it could have. There, one of the things we learned from that incident Chardon nationally was how important the reunification process is. Um, because the reunification process worked very well when they evacuated the building with the students. That's important things to work on for events could be applied to other incidences and crimes or incidents in the school, but those were good takeaways, you know, not trying to hide in direct contact with a gun and obviously was a lesson learned, but other rooms in the facility, students evacuating students, barricading locations, that was, those were all good actions taken actually on the scene by the students themselves. Because obviously it was before school started. Some of the students weren't even. Uh, really supervisor or even had the ability to take direction from teacher. When an incident occurred. So it also showed how,  Kristina Supler: and that's a good point because to what you said earlier about the older kids, essentially older students, I should say use their judgment and respond to what's going on immediately around them. That incident unfolded in the early hours of the school day before school even was ahead. Officially started. I, I think and correct me if I'm wrong.  Joe Hendry: They were, my kids were in the cafeteria. Some were waiting for buses and some were, so those  Kristina Supler: students, they, they instinctively their instincts and, and. We're able to respond better. Susan Stone: Look, I think from a career working with students, it is important for parents to tell students. And it's the first question we ask: schools are safe. This is happening, but school, you, you need to have some, we all have to live our lives. We can't walk around being fearful every day or the other mental health issues are gonna skyrocket and then you'll have other problems. We don't want more anxiety. We don't want more depression. But we have to be ready. And. Joe. I just wanna thank you because we need people like you to come into the schools. We need to learn from the errors that have occurred and move forward somehow. So I appreciate the conversation today.  Joe Hendry: Yeah. I thought it was very good. Kristina Supler: Thanks for joining us. It was really time well spent to hear from you as an expert and, and there's so much more to learn and consider on this topic. Thank you so much for your time. We really appreciate  Susan Stone: it. Bye  Joe Hendry: Joe. Thank you for having me. I appreciate it.

Battle4Freedom
Battle4Freedom - 20220830 Potential Threat Assessments - Midterm Maniacal Musings

Battle4Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 55:59


Midterm Maniacal Musingshttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11159153/Raging-Safeway-shooter-depressed-loner-inspired-Columbine -detailed-shooting-plans.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11158745/Rifle-wielding-Antifa-thugs-face-Proud-Boys-demonstrators-Texas-drag-brunch.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11157559/Rioter-encountered-senator-gets-4-years-prison.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11159143/GOP-senators-DEMAND-Facebook-hands-FBI-communication-suppressing-Hunter-Biden-scandal.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11159205/PICTURED-Gunmen-shot-Washington-Commanders-star-Brian-Robinson-botched-robbery.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11157521/Canadian-bible-camp-investigation-camp-counsellor-performed-exorcism-teenager.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11158027/Chilling-Ring-camera-video-shows-man-shoot-kill-daughters-ex-boyfriend-22.htmlJames O'Keefe????https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11157341/US-needs-build-478-EV-charging-ports-DAY-eight-years-cost-35BN-meet-demand.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11157131/How-Americans-13-states-TAXED-1-100-Bidens-student-loan-relief-plan.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11157219/FBI-agents-finished-reviewing-documents-seized-Mar-Lago.html

The Opperman Report
Jenn Thompson Columbine Witness

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 54:44


Stop the Killing
S2 E12 CHRISTCHURCH - HATRED WITHOUT BORDERS

Stop the Killing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 57:11


CHRISTCHURCH - HATRED WITHOUT BORDERS We are going back to Sarah's home country for a local case that rocked the world, the Christchurch Mosque massacres, note that is plural……massacres. If Christchurch, New Zealand isn't your backyard then it may seem a world away but the Christchurch shooting is to white supremacists what Columbine is to school shooters  This is hatred without borders. It may not have happened in your backyard but it may be the reason the next shooting is…. Want early access, ad-free episodes, bonus content, and membership to our ever growing community Patreon.com/stopthekilling  LINK TO OUR DARKEST DAY PODCAST  GET KATHERINE'S BOOK HERE WANT TO SUPPORT US: Patreon.com/stopthekilling  Message us on instagram :  @conmunitypodcast @stopthekillingstories And for all things Katherine Schweit including where you can purchase her book STOP THE KILLING: How to end the mass shooting crisis head to: www.katherineschweit.com RESOURCES Stop the Bleed training FBI  RUN, HIDE, FIGHT This is a CONmunity Podcast Production on the Killer Podcasts Network Check out more: CONNING THE CON KLOOGHLESS - THE LONG CON GUILTY GREENIE Check out our Zencastr offer here: zen.ai/stk Promo code: stk Supporting our sponsors supports the show Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices