Podcasts about Howe

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Best podcasts about Howe

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Latest podcast episodes about Howe

Wealthion
Neil Howe: The Entire Power Structure Will Be Shattered During This Unfolding Fourth Turning (PT2)

Wealthion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 45:29


Here in Part 2, famed researcher and demographer Neil Howe, co-author of the best-selling book The Fourth Turning, explains why the weight of history strongly suggests we are headed into a decade-plus period of economic and social disruption that will transform our political, economic, financial and social systems. Volatility will reign. Crushing inflation looks likely. We may see a stock market crash and widespead job losses. Perhaps even war. But as with all preceding fourth turnings, Howe predicts we'll come of it ok. Yes, with some bruises; but likely also with some net improvements for society. See the YouTube Video for the charts and graphics: https://youtu.be/eAuGfUli0gs

It's a Strange World After All
The Strange and Tragic Case That Canceled Halloween : Shauna Howe

It's a Strange World After All

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 39:00


 In today's episode, we discuss the Shauna Howe case. Shauna Melinda Howe was an 11-year-old girl from Oil City, Pennsylvania, who was kidnapped and murdered in Oct. 1992. Her murder was unsolved for 12 years and received widespread media attention. Brit and Dee also discuss one of their Halloween rituals.Have you ever heard a strange bump in the night? Have you ever seen shadow figures moving about? Have you ever stumbled upon something unexplainable? We want to know about it and with your permission share it with our listeners.  Please send those story submissions to our email at itsastrangeworldafterall@gmail.com or DM us on any one of our social media platforms. Watch:"Cold Case Files" Little Girl Lost (2017) IMDbLiving Single Trick or Trust Episode aired Oct 27, 1994"Martin" The Night He Came Home Episode aired Oct 29, 1992"Martin" Boo's in the House Episode aired Oct 31, 1996Sources:https://vocal.media/criminal/cold-cases-1-shauna-howehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Shauna_Howe"Cold Case Files" Little Girl Lost (2017) IMDb

The Climate Pod
Will We Decarbonize Transportation Fast Enough? (w/ National Geographic's Craig Welch and Sam Howe Verhovek)

The Climate Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 69:52


This week, we look into the future of decarbonizing transportation with two great writers featured in National Geographic's October cover story on the issue. First, Craig Welch talks about his piece “The Future of Driving is here - and it's Electric”  that examines the car industry and how quickly the electric vehicle market is developing all around the world. Second, Sam Howe Verhovek joined the show to discuss his article "How Green Can We Make Air Travel? And How Soon?" Sam outlines the problems the airline industry is facing as it tries to decarbonize and the future technologies that might hold the key. Subscribe to our Substack newsletter "The Climate Weekly": https://theclimateweekly.substack.com/ As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our new YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group.   

Fierce Calling with Doris Swift
Jodi Howe: Finding God in the Midst of Anxiety & the Mental Storms of Life

Fierce Calling with Doris Swift

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 43:43


Jodi thought she was having a heart attack at her college graduation... Today on Fierce Calling, we're talking about a serious and often debilitating mental health issue which is also often misunderstood--we're talking about anxiety. My guest today, Jodi Howe, has a heart for helping others find hope, healing, and peace in the midst of anxiety and mental storms. Jodi has a fierce calling from God to share this message because she has lived it. She shares encouraging and wise words that you need or someone you love needs to hear today. I know what Jodi shares will inspire, encourage, and challenge you, so listen in while I have a chat with Jodi Howe. Quotes from the Show "I didn't find God in the easy--I found Him in the hard of my life". "...it was that moment when I released myself to Christ." "God is ultimately what brings that peace through the mental storms that I deal with with anxiety and panic attacks..." - Jodi Howe Connect with Jodi! You can connect with Jodi at jodihowe.com and find her podcast there as well. More about Jodi... I am married to a cool, fun, techy husband named Ken.  We have been together for over 28 years and married for 24.  We got married very, very young. lol!  We have two beautiful daughters, a 20-year-old named Morgan Rose who is a gamin lovin, animal lovin' gal', tugging at my heart daily, she is a Kenny replicate and oh I so adore her.  My 15 year named Abigal Grace is a mini-me, singer, dancer, actress sweet as honey and my twinkle, twinkle little star.  My cup runneth over with love for these girls.  We also have a 110 pound German Shepherd named Loki and a feisty cat named Daisy (we call her Teeger for short) She is also "Crazy, Daisy."  am a huge fan of all kinds of music (especially Christian/Worship) and have spent my life studying music and performing as a female vocalist.  I currently lead worship in my church's worship band.  It's my happy place, no doubt.  I have also served as a guest on several podcasts. Connect with me! If you like listening to Fierce Calling, I would so appreciate it if you would take a moment to follow, rate, and leave a review over at Podchaser! It helps others discover the show too! I'd also love to connect with you so reach out to me here on my Contact Page! Check out my speaking page, grab my flyer, and let's talk about me speaking at your next women's event... Free Gifts for You... Grab one of my free downloads by scrolling down to the bottom of the page! Love & God's Perfect Peace to You! Doris

Lee Taft Performance Podcast
Episode 82: Flexibility & Fundamentals (With Brady Howe)

Lee Taft Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 36:21


Come and enjoy a great talk with Brady Howe, VP of Health and Performance for the Phoenix Suns. Brady shares what it is like to be adaptable and flexible to ensure players get what they need. He also speaks about the value of fundamentals and never allowing those to stray.   Check out www.BasketballSpeedSpecialist.com for my new course!

Financial Quarterback Josh Jalinski
Josh Jalinski Talks to David Ranson, President/Head of Research at Howe & Co. & Laurence Kotlikoff, Professor at Boston University

Financial Quarterback Josh Jalinski

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 110:31


Speed and Power Podcast
Ep 64: Brady Howe, Phoenix Suns Senior Director of Health and Performance- Microdosing Training, Creating Opportunities, Assembling A Team Of Coaches

Speed and Power Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 54:58


Presented By:  www.exxentric.com/speedandpower  Brady Howe is the Senior Director of Health and Performance for the Phoenix Suns. Brady has worked for a number of professional organizations as an athletic trainer and strength coach prior to his current role.    https://www.instagram.com/bhowe6/  Checkout my Multidirectional Plyometric Course:  www.multidirectionalpower.com  

The Filmreelcast
Moneyball - Review

The Filmreelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 79:24


This week the gangs back and feeling in a sporty mood, we're reviewing 2011 Moneyball starring Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill, In 2001, General Manager Billy Beane's Oakland A's lose to the Yankees in the playoffs then lose three stars to free agency. How can Beane field a competitive team when the A's player salaries total less than a third of the rich teams'? To the consternation of his scouts, Beane hires and listens to Peter Brand, a recent Yale grad who evaluates players using Bill James' statistical approach. Beane assembles a team of no names who, on paper, can get on base and score runs. Then, Beane's manager, Art Howe, won't use the players as Beane wants. Can Beane circumvent Howe, win games, make it to the 2002 Series, and stand baseball's hidebound conventions on their heads?

Curiosity Daily
Monks Meditating After Death and a Marathoning Woolly Mammoth

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 10:51


Learn about the mystery of how Tibetan monks seem to keep meditating after death; and a woolly mammoth that walked VERY far. Thukdam Project scientists still stumped over how deceased Tibetan monks continue to meditate after death by Grant Currin Berman, R. (2021, August 5). The strange case of the dead-but-not-dead Tibetan monks. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/surprising-science/thukdam-study  ‌Burke, D. (2021, July 28). Inside the First-Ever Scientific Study of Post-Mortem Meditation. Tricycle: The Buddhist Review. https://tricycle.org/trikedaily/thukdam-project/  ‌Lott, D. T., Yeshi, T., Norchung, N., Dolma, S., Tsering, N., Jinpa, N., Woser, T., Dorjee, K., Desel, T., Fitch, D., Finley, A. J., Goldman, R., Bernal, A. M. O., Ragazzi, R., Aroor, K., Koger, J., Francis, A., Perlman, D. M., Wielgosz, J., & Bachhuber, D. R. W. (2021). No Detectable Electroencephalographic Activity After Clinical Declaration of Death Among Tibetan Buddhist Meditators in Apparent Tukdam, a Putative Postmortem Meditation State. Frontiers in Psychology, 11. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.599190  Researchers found a Pleistocene era woolly mammoth that walked far enough to circle the Earth…twice by Cameron Duke  Koumoundouros, T. (2021). An Ancient Woolly Mammoth Trekked So Far, It Could Have Circled The Globe Twice. ScienceAlert. https://www.sciencealert.com/researchers-decipher-the-travel-diary-written-within-a-17-000-year-old-mammoth-s-tusk Wooller, M. J., Bataille, C., Druckenmiller, P., Erickson, G. M., Groves, P., Haubenstock, N., Howe, T., Irrgeher, J., Mann, D., Moon, K., Potter, B. A., Prohaska, T., Rasic, J., Reuther, J., Shapiro, B., Spaleta, K. J., & Willis, A. D. (2021). Lifetime mobility of an Arctic woolly mammoth. Science, 373(6556), 806–808. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.abg1134 Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

5 Plain Questions
Redux Keith Braveheart On Oscar Howe

5 Plain Questions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 64:03


We messed up last week. We uploaded the unedited clip for the episode instead of the episode that was produced. Since we don't have an intern to blame and fire, and Joe would mean no staff would be on the podcast we will have to just offer our apologies for the mix-up. Please enjoy this redux episode of Keith Braveheart on Oscar Howe.

Fringe Radio Network
Where Did the Road Go? DOUBLE! - Saucers, Spooks and Kooks with Adam Gorightly

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 91:16


Adam Gorightly talks about his most recent book "Saucers, Spooks and Kooks: UFO Disinformation in the Age of Aquarius". In the information-packed discussion, topics include: government disinformation operations, Paul Bennewitz, the Cash-Landrum incident, U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigations, Richard Doty, National Security Administration, APRO, Bill Moore, cattle mutilation, Gabe Valdez, Linda Moulton Howe, the mythos of an underground joint U.S. government/alien base near Dulce New Mexico, hypnotic regression, Myrna Hansen, tinfoil, orbs as (human) military technology, John Leer, Gulf Breeze UFO sightings, Ed Walters, the "Gulf Breeze Six" military personnel, William Leer, David Perkins, Tom Adams, the "Dulce Papers", MJ-12, Ann West, MUFON, William Cooper, government infiltration and manipulation of the UFO community, Bill English, Bob Lazar, anti-government politics in ufology, To The Stars Academy, "disclosure", the Aviary, Robert Bigelow, black projects, foreign intelligence and counter-intelligence, and much more!

Things That Are Blank
Stephanie Campbell

Things That Are Blank

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 19:27


Have you been listening? Because Rachel Shuman is STILL WINNING. This week, Stephanie Campbell is going to try to take her down. Will she do it? Listen in and find out! CARD 1 CLUE: Ice ice baby CATEGORY: Hockey players ANSWERS: Crosby, Hull, Ovechkin, Howe, Orr, Lemiuex, Gretzsky CARD 2 CLUE: Shaken and stirred CATEGORY: Things associated with a martini ANSWERS: Drink, Cocktail, Gin, Dry, Olive, James Bond, Vodka CARD 3 CLUE: Wake up CATEGORY: Things you do in your sleep ANSWERS: Dream, Toss, Talk, Snore, Drool, Twitch, Lie CARD 4 CLUE: It's your cue CATEGORY: Things associated with billiards ANSWERS: Felt, Corner, Chalk, Rack, Break, Score, Shot CARD 5 CLUE: Yar har fiddle dee dee CATEGORY: Thigns associated with pirates ANSWERS: Hook, Parrot, Sword, Bones, Maps, Anchor, Blackbeard CARD 6 CLUE: What an expensive element CATEGORY: Things associated with diamonds ANSWERS: Baseball, Ring, Carats, Jewel, Engagement, Carbon, Cut

Subscription Box Basics with Julie Ball
Live video marketing with Melanie Howe

Subscription Box Basics with Julie Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 44:42


#091 - In this episode of Subscription Box Basics, Julie is joined by Melanie Dyann Howe to talk about live video marketing.Mel is a self-proclaimed tech junkie who shows you how to look and sound like a pro without breaking the budget and getting over the overwhelm of tech and software.Summary:Introduction of Melanie Howe (00:01:52)Why should we go live? (00:09:36)What do we talk about when we go live? (00:11:57)Recommended tech for newbies (00:27:52)What to do about fear? (00:34:29)Links:50 Facebook Live Ideas: https://www.melaniedyann.com/fifty Melanie's website: https://www.melaniedyann.comMelanie's Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/MelanieDyannDIY Marketing with Melanie Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DIYMarketingWithMelanieStreamYard: https://streamyard.com?fpr=julieball 

The ABMP Podcast | Speaking With the Massage & Bodywork Profession
Ep 150 – Baker's Cyst: “I Have a Client Who . . .” Pathology Conversations with Ruth Werner

The ABMP Podcast | Speaking With the Massage & Bodywork Profession

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 10:50


A client with a history of total knee replacement reports a Baker's cyst. The massage therapist wonders what indications or contraindications are present. But the Baker's cyst might not be the real issue here. In this podcast Ruth has a couple of assumptions challenged, which can be fun.   Sponsors:     Anatomy Trains: www.anatomytrains.com      Books of Discovery: www.booksofdiscovery.com       Host Bio:                    Ruth Werner is a former massage therapist, a writer, and an NCBTMB-approved continuing education provider. She wrote A Massage Therapist's Guide to Pathology, now in its seventh edition, which is used in massage schools worldwide. Werner is also a long-time Massage & Bodywork columnist, most notably of the Pathology Perspectives column. Werner is also ABMP's partner on Pocket Pathology, a web-based app and quick reference program that puts key information for nearly 200 common pathologies at your fingertips. Werner's books are available at www.booksofdiscovery.com. And more information about her is available at www.ruthwerner.com.                                     Recent Articles by Ruth:          “Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy and Massage Therapy,” Massage & Bodywork magazine, September/October 2021, page 33, www.massageandbodyworkdigital.com/i/1402696-september-october-2021/34.           “Pharmacology Basics for Massage Therapists,” Massage & Bodywork magazine, July/August 2021, page 32, www.massageandbodyworkdigital.com/i/1384577-july-august-2021/34.       “Critical Thinking,” Massage & Bodywork magazine, May/June 2021, page 54, www.massageandbodyworkdigital.com/i/1358392-may-june-2021/56.                         Check out ABMP's Pocket Pathology: www.abmp.com/abmp-pocket-pathology-app               Resources:   Hommel, H., Perka, C. and Kopf, S. (2016) “The fate of Baker's cyst after total knee arthroplasty,” The Bone & Joint Journal, 98-B(9), pp. 1185–1188. https://doi.org/10.1302/0301-620X.98B9.37748.   Ricci, M. A. and Howe, J. G. (1996) “Baker's Cyst Causing Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Case Report,” Vascular Surgery, 30(4), pp. 355–358. https://doi.org/10.1177/153857449603000417.   Baker's Cyst | Swelling Behind The Knee | Treatment and Causes (no date). Available at: https://patient.info/health/knee-pain-patellofemoral-pain/bakers-cyst   Baker's (popliteal) cyst: Treatments, symptoms, and causes (no date). Available at: www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/184714.php.   “Cystic Lesions About the Knee: Practice Essentials, History of the Procedure, Problem.” (2018). Available at: https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1250593-overview#showall.   Demange, M. K. (2015) “Baker's Cyst,” Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia, 46(6), pp. 630–633. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2255-4971(15)30317-7.   Frush, T. J. and Noyes, F. R. (2015) “Baker's Cyst,” Sports Health, 7(4), pp. 359–365. https://doi.org/10.1177/1941738113520130.   About our sponsors:   Anatomy Trains is a global leader in online anatomy education and also provides in-classroom certification programs for structural integration in the US, Canada, Australia, Europe, Japan, and China, as well as fresh-tissue cadaver dissection labs and weekend courses. The work of Anatomy Trains originated with founder Tom Myers, who mapped the human body into 13 myofascial meridians in his original book, currently in its fourth edition and translated into 12 languages. The principles of Anatomy Trains are used by osteopaths, physical therapists, bodyworkers, massage therapists, personal trainers, yoga, Pilates, Gyrotonics, and other body-minded manual therapists and movement professionals. Anatomy Trains inspires these practitioners to work with holistic anatomy in treating system-wide patterns to provide improved client outcomes in terms of structure and function.                   Website: anatomytrains.com                   Email: info@anatomytrains.com                Facebook: facebook.com/AnatomyTrains                Instagram: instagram.com/anatomytrainsofficial        YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UC2g6TOEFrX4b-CigknssKHA          

InsightLA Long Beach
(2021-09-05)Perfect View with Cayce Howe

InsightLA Long Beach

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 37:51


Dharma talk on "Perfect View" with InsightLA teacher, Cayce Howe. InsightLA, Sunday Sit, September 5th, 2021.

5 Plain Questions
Keith Braveheart on Oscar Howe

5 Plain Questions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 67:31


Listen to Keith Braveheart's presentation on Oscar Howe at the 2020 Oscar Howe Memorial Lecture at the University of South Dakota in September 2020.

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. - In Conversation with Dr. Otis Brawley (Part 1)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 21:57


In this two-part episode of Oncology, Etc., hosts Dr. Patrick Loehrer (Indiana University) and Dr. David Johnson (University of Texas) speak with Dr. Otis Brawley, a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Oncology at Johns Hopkins and former Executive Vice President of the American Cancer Society, about his incredible life and career. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts | Additional resources: education.asco.org | Contact Us Air Date: 9/7/2021   TRANSCRIPT SPEAKER: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. No mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. PAT LOEHER: Hi. I'm Pat Loeher. I'm director of the Centers of Global Oncology and Health Equity at Indiana University Melbourne and Bren Simon Cancer Center. DAVID JOHNSON: And good morning. I'm Dave Johnson. I'm professor of Internal Medicine Oncology at the University of Texas Southwestern in Dallas. We're really excited to be back with the second episode of our ASCO Educational Podcast Oncology, et cetera. And I don't know about you, but my arm's really sore from entering all the fan mail we got from the first episode. Either that or maybe it was that shingles shot I got last week I don't know. PAT LOEHER: No, I agree. I really appreciate Bev. Your wife just kept texting me how wonderful I was, and it was-- I enjoyed it. DAVID JOHNSON: Well, I'm glad you mentioned that, because I wanted to read this one fan mail. It says, dear, Dave. Thanks for carrying Pat [INAUDIBLE]. I don't know who that is, but I appreciate it. PAT LOEHER: Yeah, it works both ways. Works both ways. So what have you been reading lately, Dave? DAVID JOHNSON: Well, as you know, I love to read. And actually what I'm reading right now is The Howe dynasty by Julie Flavell. It's about the brothers Howe that were involved in the Revolutionary War. But the book I finished just prior to the one I'm reading now is Adam Grant's Think Again, which I really enjoyed. It made me think again. What about you? PAT LOEHER: How many times have you read the book by the way? DAVID JOHNSON: Again. Twice. PAT LOEHER: Think again. Yeah. There was the book that's called The One Thing. I know if you saw that book which I read a while back. It took me, like, a year to do it, because I just kept doing other things while I was reading it. I felt so guilty about it. I did read the book Caste recently, and it was on Oprah Winfrey's list. Barack Obama picked it. And actually read that on my way to Kenya a couple of months ago and found it very fascinating actually. You know, the notion of the juxtaposing of Nazi Germany, of the caste system in India, and the racial struggles that was going on here in this country. And I thought it was a very well written book. DAVID JOHNSON: Yeah. You mentioned that book to me, and I finished reading it a couple of weeks ago. I agree with you. I enjoy it very much. I learned a lot. We want to introduce today's guest. We're really, really fortunate to have with us today Dr. Otis Brawley. Dr. Brawley Is the Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Oncology and Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University. He's a graduate of the University of Chicago School of Medicine. He completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the University Hospitals in Cleveland Case Western Reserve and did a Fellowship in Medical Oncology at the National Cancer Institute, where he spent a good portion of his early career. In the 2000s, he relocated to Atlanta, where he became medical director of the Georgia Cancer Center for Excellence at Grady Memorial Hospital. One of the really most famous safety net hospitals in America. He was deputy director of Cancer Control at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. And then he moved on to really a significant role. He became the chief medical and scientific officer and executive vise president of the American Cancer Society from 2007 to 2018, and we'll have a chance to perhaps query him about that. Currently, he leads a broad interdisciplinary research program on cancer health disparities at the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. Dr. Brawley has received innumerable awards. It would take the whole podcast to list them all. But among them are the American Medical Association Distinguished Service Award, University of Chicago Alumni of Professional Achievement Award, and-- one that I think is particularly poignant for ASCO members-- the Martin D. Abeloff Award for Excellence in Public Health and Cancer Control. In 2015, Dr. Brawley was elected to the National Academy of Medicine and well deserved. So just welcome to oncology, et cetera. Thank you so much for taking the time to be with us today. OTIS BRAWLEY: Thank you for having me. It's a pleasure to be with you and Pat. DAVID JOHNSON: Well, it's great to have you. I can tell you that. So let's just start with just a little background. Why don't you tell us about yourself? Where are you from? Where did you grow up? OTIS BRAWLEY: I grew up in Detroit. I grew up in one of the automobile worker neighborhoods, a blue collar neighborhood, and went to the Catholic schools there. The nuns in grade school pushed me toward the Jesuit school for high school, and the Jesuits in high school taught me how to think and really propelled me. And indeed much of my career, much of my writings, my philosophy toward medicine was really influenced by early education with the Jesuits. DAVID JOHNSON: Wow. PAT LOEHER: Hey, Otis. I just want to throw in-- in terms of books that we've read, one of the other books that I want to give a shout out is the book you wrote called How We Do Harm, which was really a wonderful book. I think it was several years in the making. Would love to hear how you made that. But I do-- while you're talking about your background, speak a little bit about Edward McKnight Brawley and Benjamin. OTIS BRAWLEY: Oh, OK. Benjamin Brawley was my grandfather's brother, and Edward McKnight Brawley was my grandfather's father. They're both ministers in the Methodist Church, the AME Church. Benjamin Brawley was dean of Morehouse College back in the 1920s, and he was the first Brawley to graduate from the University of Chicago. He got a PhD from the University of Chicago back during the 19-teens. And those are just a couple of my relatives. If you go to Morehouse, you'll find that the English building is Benjamin Brawley Hall, and Edward McKnight Brawley was his father and was a free Black back before the Civil War, and a minister before, during, and after. PAT LOEHER: Incredible legacy. Incredible legacy. DAVID JOHNSON: Those were your relatives from the South from the Georgia area? OTIS BRAWLEY: Well, my father grew up in Northwestern Alabama. An area called Leighton, Alabama. It's near Muscle Shoals. So those of us who remember the Beverly Hillbillies. My mother is from the middle of Arkansas. She's from Pine Bluff, Arkansas. And they met in Detroit. They were part of that northern migration in the early 20th century, where a large number of Blacks left the rural South and went up North to get jobs primarily in the industrial North. My father arrived there right after World War II. He served in World War II, got discharged, and went to Detroit. My mother actually went to Detroit really early on during World War II and worked in an airplane factory during the war. Then the two of them met. My father was a janitor at the Veterans Hospital in Detroit, and my mother worked in the cafeteria there. And that's how they met. They had my older sister, who was 8 years older than me, who became an attorney. And my younger sister was a certified public accountant. PAT LOEHER: What a remarkable story for your parents. And tell us a little bit about your journey to become a physician. How did that happen? OTIS BRAWLEY: It was very interesting. In high school, I was very talkative. I was very interested in policy. I did debate. It was very not a sciencey kind of person. In college, I became very interested in Chemistry and for much of College. I was going to go to graduate school in Chemistry. And luckily, when I was in college, I came under the influence of an infectious disease doc named Elliot Kieff. And he and I became very good friends. He was chief of infectious disease at the University of Chicago at that time. And over about two years, Elliott convinced me to drop the Chemistry thing and go to Medical school. And I applied to Medical school late, because I was so late in making that decision. I got into the University of Chicago and stayed there because my support system was there. And then in Medical school came across another gentleman. I've been very fortunate to have good mentorship and good people. They influenced me over the years. John Altman, who was one of the original medical oncologists back in the 1950s when there was arguments about how we should be staging people. Should there be four stages or three stages, and that sort of thing is when John really cut his teeth in Oncology. He became a great lymphoma doc. John took me under his wing while I was in Medical school, and pretty much open the world up to me, and explained to me how the world rotates in Medicine. And that heavily influenced me. Told me to go into Oncology because I still had an interest in Policy. And he said there's going to be a lot of policy in oncology in the future, and the best way to get involved with it is to get your credentials as a medical oncologist. And in many respects, I think in the early 1980s, John was thinking I was going to be chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, which I obtained in 2007. PAT LOEHER: Wow. Yeah. We want to hear more about that. I just have to throw this in parenthetically that one of the things I did here is that I applied late to Medical school and got into the University of Chicago. I just wanted to know that I applied early, and there was a lesser known school in Chicago that sent me a rejection letter. And not only did they reject me, the last line of it says, good luck in whatever career you decide to go into, meaning that, if you can't get into our school, there's no way you'll be a physician. So I really admire you. DAVID JOHNSON: Yeah. I applied late too and-- PAT LOEHER: Got into Vanderbilt. DAVID JOHNSON: No. No. No, no. I didn't go to Vanderbilt. I only got into accepted to one medical school, and it was late. I was just like my career as a chief. And I was, like, the last person admitted to my class in med school. That's unbelievably interesting. Tell us, was John your influence to go to the NCI? Or what prompted you to choose the NCI for your medical oncology training? OTIS BRAWLEY: Actually, John was very influential in that decision. I told him I wanted to go into medical oncology when I was a resident in Cleveland. And he said, Otis, in his Austrian accent, I have been expecting this phone call. And he then told me where I was going to apply and gave me a list of nine places to apply. He told me I would get an interview at every one of those places. And as I was going place to place, I should rank them one, two, three, four. And so I called them with his ranking. And my first choice was not the National Cancer Institute. At which point he told me, if you go to that place, I will never speak to you again. PAT LOEHER: Oh wow. OTIS BRAWLEY: And I said, but you told me to go there to interview. He said, I wanted you to interview there, but I don't want you to train there. And I said, well, my first choice is the National Cancer Institute. And he said, fine. And a couple of days later, I got a phone call from the National Cancer Institute, and I got hired. And I will also tell you I called John up. And he says, Otis, I have been expecting this phone call. And then he said, now I want you to realize something. There is an old boys network, and your job is to get more Blacks and women into it. That's how you will thank me. PAT LOEHER: Wow. Wow. DAVID JOHNSON: So you were at the NCI at a period of time where many people would say it was the heyday of the NCI. I think it's still the heyday now, but tell us about your experiences there. What was it like? OTIS BRAWLEY: It was fascinating. It was when Vince DeVita was still the director. I was there for the transition. Eli Glatstein was the chair of Radiation Oncology. It was an amazing group of people. Dan Longo was there doing lymphoma. Marc Lippman was still there doing breast. It was just an amazing group of people when I applied, and interviewed, and when I first got there. And there was still a lot of excitement. We were still heavily involved in chemotherapy. Of course, I was up on the 12th and 13th floor building 10. Down on the second and third floor was Dr. Rosenberg doing his immunotherapy work, which of course, has now paid off dramatically. Some of the old monoclonal antibody work that led to a number of wonderful drugs was being started at that time in the mid to late 1980s. And so it was still a very, very exciting time at the National Cancer Institute. And in many respects, we were still on that burst of optimism that started with Nixon's war on cancer in 1971. It was still felt almost 20 years later at the National Cancer Institute. DAVID JOHNSON: And you linked up with an old friend of mine from the old Southeast Cancer City, a gentleman by the name of Barry Kramer? OTIS BRAWLEY: Yes. DAVID JOHNSON: What a wonderful relationship. So how influential was Barry in your involvement? OTIS BRAWLEY: Barry was incredibly influential. As I said, I have been very fortunate that along the way I have come under the influence of some amazing physicians, and I've had amazing mentorship. And that's actually, I think, important for all of us in oncology. Barry and I got to work together for quite a long while. Barry influenced me and literally taught me epidemiology. Got me some major opportunities at the National Cancer Institute and really was influential in promoting me and boosting my career. PAT LOEHER: I want to move you a little bit longer in your career and talk about the ACS and a little bit your experience there, Otis. And then with that, actually, maybe the secondary question is, a commentary on the leaders over the years that you have had-- the aspects of good things about leadership and the poor things. And obviously, you have certainly much to share on that. OTIS BRAWLEY: Yeah. Well, as I devote my career at the National Cancer Institute, I went to the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. Under Barry, learned a lot of epidemiology, and learned a lot about screening, learned a lot about treatment outcomes, got very involved with some of the disparities or minority health issues. And then I was very fortunate to be detailed to work in the surgeon general's office and work with David Satcher when he was surgeon general. He's the one who started using the words, health disparities. Prior to that, we called it minority health or special populations. He used health disparities. And I was able to use some of my epidemiologic talents to develop some of those arguments using science to show. And actually some of the things that we had to show, believe it or not, was we had to show that equal treatment yields equal outcome amongst equal patients, because a lot of people, especially the politicians we need to deal with, were really hung up. And we still see this to this day that people are hung up that Black biology is different from white biology. Even in breast cancer today I hear that even though I like to point out there are now six states where the Black death rate for breast cancer is the same as the white death rate for breast cancer. And there are 12 states in the United States where white women have a higher risk of death from breast cancer than Black women in Massachusetts. But anyway, we got into this biology thing. And so I was very fortunate again to work for David Satcher and had some exposure to Tuskegee syphilis trial and the president's apology for that. So I was really involved with a number of things. And then the Jesuits still back there-- always think, always be contemplative, always reflect on what you're doing, always question what you're doing. Father Pawlikowski's maxims, which Dick Cheney sort of preferred is a few years later. And that is there are things you know, things you don't know, things you believe. Question what you know more so than anything else. And so that's really how I develop my concerns about orthodox use of Medicine. And using the science and applying it in a very Orthodox way, I started realizing that a lot of the disparities were due to wasted resources with people being non-scientific especially in the era of the 1990s, where everybody was doing prostate cancer screening, and there was not a single trial to show that prostate cancer screening saved lives. Yet all the resources were going into that, and people were literally-- I was able to go to various safety net hospitals and see all the resources being diverted away. People would shut down cervical cancer screening programs to do prostate cancer, which just didn't make sense. So I got very interested in how you practice medicine. Went to the Emory in 2001, because I wanted some practical experience outside of government. And had a wonderful opportunity to go there. Work at Emory. Work at one of the largest safety net hospitals in the country. Learn a little bit about the practical application of Medicine and some of the problems that people at safety net hospitals encounter. Worked with the School of Public Health and folks who did health education to learn how to convey messages. And then I was very fortunate. You know, the American Cancer Society is right down the street from Emory University. And I had met the chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, Harmon Eyre, back in the 1990s when I was at the National Cancer Institute. And again this sort of mentoring thing comes up again. Harmon called me up one morning and said, why don't we go to lunch? And so we went to one of the student cafeterias at Emory and had lunch. And he essentially said, you know, I'm 67 years old. I've had this job for 20 years. I'm tired of it. Why don't you take it? PAT LOEHER: Wow. OTIS BRAWLEY: And so I applied to be chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society and got to know John Safran, who, at that time, was the CEO, who was a wonderful man with incredible vision. Again, this mentorship thing comes up again. PAT LOEHER: Well, Dave we had a lot of information here. We're going to carry this over. This concludes the first part of our two-part interview with Dr. Brawley. And our next episode will air on October 5. We'll talk a little bit more about Dr. Brawley's life experiences and particularly his work with the American Cancer Society NCI. He's been an incredible individual, and we look forward to finishing up this conversation. Thank you to all our listeners for tuning in to Oncology Et Cetera an ASCO Education Podcast, where we'll talk about anything and everything. If you happen to have an idea for a topic or guest you'd like to see on the show, please email us at education@ASCO.org. Thanks again. And remember Dave has a face for podcast. SPEAKER: Thank you for listening to this week's episode of the ASCO eLearning weekly podcast. To make us part of your weekly routine, click Subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive e-learning center at elearning.asco.org.

The OCD Stories
Story: Micah Howe (#293)

The OCD Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 64:01


In episode 293 I interviewed Micah Howe who has kindly agreed to share his story with us. I chat with Micah about his OCD story, growing up as an evangelical Christian, his early memories of anxiety, fears of perfection, worries of offending people, how OCD impacted his faith, hoarding behaviours, scrupulosity, health anxiety, the process of getting therapy, advocacy, medication, setting up an IOCDF affiliate in IOWA, words of hope, and much more. Show notes: https://theocdstories.com/episode/story-micah-howe-293 The podcast is made possible by NOCD. To find out more about NOCD, their therapy plans and if they currently take your insurance head over to https://go.treatmyocd.com/theocdstories

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Friday, September 3, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 12:11


“Hands off our bodies, my body is my own”… and more on today's CrossPolitic Daily News Brief This is Toby Sumpter. Today is Friday, September 3, 2021. But first, have you become a CrossPolitic Club Member? First off, this is the best way you can support this newsbrief and rowdy Christian media. We believe that Jesus is Lord of all, and that means He is Lord of the public square, politics, economics, foreign policy, criminal law, and everything in between. Our goal is grow the Fight Laugh Feast Network into a full-blown Audio/Video Network that takes the whole Bible and applies it to all of life. That's what we mean by rowdy. Not that we don't have any manners, but just that in this crazy world, if you actually believe that we should obey Jesus when it comes to COVID regulations and eviction moratoriums and Afghan crises, well you'll get accused of being uncouth. If you haven't been paying attention, we'll be just outside of Nashville, Tennessee in Lebanon next week for the Fight Laugh Feast Conference. There's still room, if you're one of those last minute homeschooling road-trippers, but in the off chance you can't make it, all of the talks and some of the breakout sessions will be live-streamed for club members. So why not join today? Go to flfnetwork.com and click join. A Texas Abortion Law Went Into Effect Yesterday and the Left Is in a Complete Panic I believe this is one of the chants the prophets of Baal used on Mt. Carmel Play Audio Sounds coming from the Texas Statehouse on Wednesday after the Supreme Court Declined to grant an emergency injunction Tuesday allowing the Texas law to go into effect on September 1. The law is ingenious in that simply makes abortions after heartbeats are detected around 6 weeks illegal and allows for a minimum of $10,000 per infraction, but prohibits the state from enforcing the law and instead leaves that to private citizens. Thus, the Supreme Court's majority argued they could not provide an injuction for something that the state and no identifiable private citizen had actually come forward with intention to sue anyone. Meanwhile abortion clinics in Texas sought to fill up as much judgment as they could for themselves on Tuesday night, conducting murders until midnight, but then apparently immediately ceased from their blood-letting and leaders from the Left all announced the end of Roe v. Wade. https://dailycaller.com/2021/09/02/critics-blame-ginsburg-texas-abortion-law-supreme-court/ Smelling all the blood, Critics on the left took aim at one of their own --the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who passed away in September of 2020, saying that she should have retired while former President Barack Obama was in office and had a majority in the Senate. That would have ensured that Obama would choose her replacement rather than former President Donald Trump, who replaced Ginsburg just before the 2020 presidential election with Justice Amy Coney Barrett. The theory was that one more left-leaning judge might have made the difference on the Texas law before it was allowed to take effect on Sept. 1. One angry leftist tweeted: Ruth Bader Ginsburg's categorical refusal to retire brought us here. So thanks you old dead white bitch. But all panic on the left is actually quite puzzling. Isn't this just another heartbeat law with some fancy enforcement language? I'm scratching my head wondering why they don't just bulldoze through the law. It's really intriguing actually. Why not keep doing abortions and wait for the first lawsuit to come and then appeal it in court? What am I missing? This feels almost supernatural. I mean, is there some group of grandmothers gathered for prayer in Texas, and now the liberals are terrified to mess with this Texas? And I'm actually very serious. It feels like that. Or is this the moment in the story where all the screaming and blood-letting of the prophets of Baal just doesn't look so powerful anymore? And for what it's worth, when Reformation comes, it will be something like that. It won't be a perfect abolitionist bill that gets passed, it will be a duct-tape covered ark that doesn't sink because there are angels holding it up. We're at the point in the story where Elijah calls for more water to be poured on the altar in the middle of a three-year drought. More water. Because we need God's fire to fall. Speaking of protection:" Let's talk about self defense and firearms. Jesus commanded in Luke 22:36 “he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one”; should we likewise carry a pistol and defend those we love? Shan and his team at Werkz specialize in concealed carry holsters for pistols with lights. They believe defensive pistols should have a light and a holster because violent encounters often happen outside the home, and in the dark. Werkz offers holsters for 1,274 pistol and light combinations, plus can help outfit your pistol with a light. Go to Werkz.com/CrossPolitic and be prepared to defend day and night." Meanwhile, in Australia… The Atlantic reports: “People in South Australia will be forced to download an app that combines facial recognition and geolocation. The State will text them at random times, and thereafter they will have 15 miinutes to take a picture of their face in the location where they are supposed to be. Should they fail, the local police department will be sent to follow up in person. ‘We don't tell them how often or when, on a random basis they have to reply within 15 minutes,' Premier Steven Marshall explained. Rebel News Released Audio of Police Officers in Sidney Apparently plotting to trump up charges on a free-lance journalist Play Audio 2:53-4:17 Psalm of the Day: Chester Let tyrants shake their iron rod, And Slav'ry clank her galling chains, We fear them not, we trust in God, New England's God forever reigns. Howe and Burgoyne and Clinton too, With Prescot and Cornwallis join'd, Together plot our Overthrow, In one Infernal league combin'd. When God inspir'd us for the fight, Their ranks were broke, their lines were forc'd, Their ships were Shatter'd in our sight, Or swiftly driven from our Coast. Play: 0:00-1:18 Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. This is Toby Sumpter with Crosspolitic News. A reminder: if you see news stories and links that you think we should cover on the daily news brief, please send them to news @ crosspolitic.com and don't forget to check deft wire dot com where we are constantly posting all our stories. Support Rowdy Christian media, and share this show or become a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member. You always get a free Fight Laugh Feast t-shirt with a membership and remember if you didn't make it to the Fight Laugh Feast Conference or Rally, club members have access to all the talks and lots more. Join today and have a great day.

Goizueta Effect
Millennials at Work

Goizueta Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 39:02


Andrea Hershatter has led the Undergraduate BBA Program for two and a half decades, overseeing its growth and curricular development and helping to secure its place among the most elite undergraduate business programs in the world. Andrea holds a faculty position in organization and management and teaches entrepreneurship. She regularly provides consultation to top corporations and leaders in academia on the millennial generation.  Defining Generations Each generation has a particular personality and role in society. Biologically, a generation is defined as a range of anywhere from 15 to 23 years. As babies are born, their parents raise them in response to what's going on in the world. Therefore, they are influenced not only by societal dynamics but also by what they see in the generation coming of age. Dynamics about child rearing emerge that lead them to have certain propensities in the way that they raise their kids. What Makes a Millennial? Millennials are so named for the high school class of 2000, born in around 1982, that started the generation that entered adulthood at the turn of the millennium. This was a dynamic generation that the media shone a dynamic spotlight on. Strauss and Howe's theory of fourth turning suggests that generations move in cycles and that the generation coming of age is being raised to fulfill the societal gap being abandoned by the generation that's phasing out.  Therefore, millennials are being conceived of as the generation that will replace the GI generation. The GI generation was the generation that became profoundly impactful leaders whose job was to change and protect the world. Millennials were put in a similar spotlight of being expected to grow up to shoulder heavy societal burdens and have a profound impact on the world.  Exploring Boomers Boomers are associated with the baby boom and, at their moment of coming of age, were in the center of a generational war and redefined culture. They fought in and protested Vietnam. As boomers created their own culture, they shut out older generations and have held onto that role until now. These boomers responsible for creating culture retain a profound influence on how American culture is depicted in movies because even if they are not directly acting or producing them, they control the flow of money. That entertainment gets disseminated all over the world. A Look at Gen X Gen X was the victim of the educational wars and performed poorly on standardized tests because they lacked a common body of knowledge. At the same time, mothers went back to school, but society lacked after-school support and infrastructure. Therefore, Gen X became the latchkey kids who came home to empty houses, becoming free thinkers that were dismissed as slackers. They also came of age at the dawn of the technological revolution, creating the infrastructure and changing the capacity of information to revolutionize our current lives. Zoomers According to the fourth turning, Gen Z, or Zoomers, will replace the “silent generation” in terms of their societal role. The silent generation actually ushered in the civil rights and women's rights movements, so Gen Z is fighting systemic inequities, pioneering movements about gun access, climate change, and Black Lives Matter. This generation understands diversity as non-binary and not fixed, which is difficult for older generations to grasp. They think about self-identity and roots in ways that have created an entirely new language. They will likely shape the world in fascinating ways that are unimaginable right now. Millennials and Technology For millennials, technology was embedded into their earliest ways of knowing, rendering it a noncognitive sixth sense instead of an intellectual endeavor. Millennials approach a problem using technology without thinking about it and are capable of multitasking while using it. In terms of how it influences the workforce, there are two important aspects. Technology impacts how millennials work and how firms reach consumers. In the workforce itself, millennials demonstrate competence in using the technology that suits the task at hand. It is important to them that others understand which mode fits a certain message and intention. Through social media, millennials and zoomers have created a performative life that expects immediate feedback, a cycle which leads to extrinsic motivations. That influences how, for example, millennials expect to be acknowledged for the work they do in a company. This can be stress-inducing if you don't receive positive feedback, affecting your sense of personal agency. Using Steve Nowicki's assessment of locus of control, over time, generations have developed a more external locus of control. This is problematic because when you feel out of control (such as in a global pandemic), your locus of control determines what you believe you can do to influence your own personal circumstances. Ages of Millennials in the Workforce Early studies showed the leading edge of Millennials demonstrating a strong desire to have personal purpose aligned with their company. However, with younger respondents, that importance drops as people work to fulfill Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Research shows this younger cohort is more concerned with stability and economic security. In a recent Harris poll, it was determined that millennials are willing to take on supervisory responsibilities leading to career advancement, but feel burnt out and find it difficult to unplug. Millennial managers also have a less traditional focus, prioritizing communication, culture, and people rather than operational results or budgetary responsibility. As the younger millennials enter the workforce, they want feedback, collaborative opportunities, flexibility, and autonomy. However, peer-to-peer, millennials are harsh judges with high expectations who have been held to high standards. The question is, how will older managers, whether they're millennials or Xers, motivate younger workers by giving them flexibility, while maintaining the accountability and performance standards? Millennials' Relationship with Organizations Across every socioeconomic dynamic, the parents of millennials devoted more of their discretionary income into raising their children than ever before, including enrollment in expensive schools and extracurriculars. As consumers of those, parents micromanaged these organizations to shape them into the ideal experience for their children, demanding what they wanted to see. Millennials who grew up being told they were the future were accustomed to the organization molding itself to meet their needs. Many millennials or zoomers entering a workplace will demand the tools they need to contribute to the organization and improve it, which clashes with older generations' ideas of an organization with set principles and rules. This clash results in the older generation seeing millennials as entitled. Google is a prime example of an organization that has molded to is employees. The entire campus is lifestyle-based, which builds trust and makes employees feel cared for by the company. Google knows that if they fuel the whole person, employees will be able to bring something better, more innovative, and more creative to the table. How COVID-19 Has Impacted Millennials and Zoomers For millennials and zoomers, their comfort with technology and their capacity to multitask has given them a leg up during the pandemic, because the notion of remote work was not as derailing as it was for older generations. COVID also led to an enormous amount of burnout, cutting organizational learning but also providing the opportunity to develop many other skills and expand reach. Geographic diversity led to new insights and increased opportunities for learning. Online school and work also leveled the playing field for different types of thinkers and workers, as well as those with differential access to resources. Decreased commute time provided flexibility and more prominently underscored the concept that time spent in physical locations does not make someone a better worker. Mental health is also important; while a workplace is important for productivity, time spent at home is equally important. Dynamics Between Boomers, Millennials, and Zoomers Boomers and millennials had a particular bond, where the leading edge of millennials were very interested in finding purpose and meaning in life and learning from their elders. Gen X managers have had to deal with economic erosion and a lack of organizational training. They were simply thrown into the deep end. Gen X and older millennials are beginning to be caught in that pressure moment where they are responsible both for young children at home and for aging parents, so they really strive for a work-life balance. In comparison, zoomers are still young and want flexibility for pursuits like travel.  The Next Generation and The Future Gen Z is resource-savvy, works cooperatively, and excels at finding each person's fundamental abilities. Through the use of technology, they have a reach and a capacity for mobilization that enables them to invent technology-dependent solutions. This generation is looking at what's structurally or systemically broken and focused on fixing it.  Dean Hershatter's Motivation  My energy comes from the relationships I've developed; some are short term but some are lasting relationships. When I bring in speakers who are returning to Goizueta, I can still see the 18-, 19-, or 20-year-old in them, but I also see these wonderful, amazing people they have become and what they've been able to accomplish in their personal and professional lives. I derive enormous pride and vicarious fulfillment from that. Playing even the tiniest role in who our students become is a privilege of working at a place like Goizueta. We attract incredibly talented and dynamic people. I often hear from our alumni that they were incredibly inspired by a comment or idea shared by a faculty member that has shaped their life in a deep and meaningful way. That to me is so fulfilling and energizing, and it is for sure what drives me. 

The Alisa Childers Podcast
#119 A Seminary Professor Answers Your Toughest Questions about Christianity

The Alisa Childers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 93:05


Join Dr. Richard Howe and Alisa for a round of "Stump the Professor," as they took on your toughest questions about Christianity. Dr. Richard Howe is Provost, Professor of Philosophy and Apologetics, and Norman L. Geisler Chair of Christian Apologetics at Southern Evangelical Seminary in Charlotte, North Carolina. Some of the questions Dr. Howe addressed: Can God change his mind? Can you lose your salvation? Can we be happy in heaven if our loved ones are in hell? Where is Jesus' body right now?

Physical Preparation Podcast – Robertson Training Systems
Brady Howe on the Power of Soft Skills in Leadership and Athletic Development

Physical Preparation Podcast – Robertson Training Systems

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 55:17


Brady Howe has had many titles throughout his career. He has been an athletic trainer, strength coach, and equipment manager for various institutions and teams, including the Utah Flash, Weber State University, the Salt Lake City Stars, the Idaho Stampede, the Atlanta Hawks, and the Phoenix Suns. But the common threads that run through these […] The post Brady Howe on the Power of Soft Skills in Leadership and Athletic Development appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Soul CEO
Anything but Average Coach Mastermind Interview Series: Rebecca Howe Russell - Build your business (and life) the way YOU want

Soul CEO

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 45:08


  Rebecca Howell is a health mindset coach who helps women create better relationships with their body and their health.   Rebecca has only known burn out as the path to hitting massive achievements in her life until a chronic illness changed everything. Her diagnosis was the catalyst for her journey to become a health coach herself, learn how to change her own thinking to heal her body and feel better, AND commit to finding a different way to build her business.  In this episode Rebecca and I talk about her journey and how being committed to this mastermind helped her create bigger results than EVER in her business without the burnout.     Learn more about the Anything but Average Coach Mastermind here!

Surely, You Jest!
S4E11 - Howe About That!

Surely, You Jest!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 37:00


DJ, Billy & Bestie Tommy go on an anniversary roadtrip Write to DJ at djstarsage@gmail.com Leave a comment on our page at syjpodcast.wordpress.com Follow DJ on Twitter Friend DJ on Facebook This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

IEN Radio
Army Testing Robotic, Drone-Launching Tank from Fast & Furious Fame

IEN Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 2:17


What's better than an autonomous, 10-ton, diesel-electric tank that can hit off-road speeds of up to 25 miles an hour? Probably one that also features a remotely operated 30-millimeter cannon and 7.62-millimeter automatic machine gun.That's what the U.S. Army is currently putting through its paces as part of its Robotic Combat Vehicle-Medium program, which also falls under its Next Generation Combat Vehicle Cross-Function Team.Built via a partnership between Textron Systems and Howe & Howe, the Army took receipt of four RCV-M prototypes — better known as Ripsaws — earlier this year. Testing is set to continue into the fall. Ideally, armed with promising test data, the Army plans to seek over $84 million from Congress to continue development across the Robot Control Vehicle platform. First unveiled about three years ago, the Ripsaw's autonomous functionality would ideally allow it to be sent in ahead of soldiers to provide data on the terrain, identify any chemical agents or weapons systems, seek out potential ambush locations, and clear out small-unit enemy positions. All of these applications would obviously play a key role in ensuring safer troop movement, and in capturing more intel for operational planning. Adding to the Ripsaw's recon features is the ability to deploy drones that, according to a report on TaskandPurpose.com, were produced by FLIR systems and capable of delivering 360-degree, high-quality video feeds on the surrounding environment.A Kongsberg Defense Systems Protector turret serves as the remote-control platform for the aforementioned cannon and machine gun. Additional add-ons that are under consideration include the XM813 Bushmaster chain gun (think of a cannon/machine gun hybrid), smoke grenades, retrofitting kits for amphibious operations, countermeasures for taking down enemy drones, and the Common Remotely Operated Weapon Station, also known as CROWS, which features a Javelin anti-tank missile.If the Ripsaw does eventually get the green light, U.S. soldiers won't the be the first to reap its benefits. A stripped-down version of the vehicle has appeared in a number of films, including Fast and Furious 8: Fate of the Furious.

Breathe Pictures Photography Podcast: Documentaries and Interviews
#255 Photowalk: Find your photo MOJO & Edmond Terakopian Pt.1

Breathe Pictures Photography Podcast: Documentaries and Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 84:16


The new Friday Photowalk season starts complete with guest Edmond Terakopian, one of the UK's most respected photojournalists talking about photographic passion. Also this week, shoot without pressure, long exposures, to mask or not to mask on photographic commissions, showing the real you on social media and can you make a best selling photobook with just an iPhone? Inspirational guest appearances by Jason P. Howe and Tim Johnston. Supported by mpb.com and our patrons. See links and photos on the SHOW PAGE.

Community Forged
Bridgemont - 1st Ever Online Montessori for Middle and High Schoolers with Robin Howe and Danielle Parker

Community Forged

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 43:27


Bridgemont International School provides an alternative for secondary students who want to graduate from a Montessori high school, but do not have that option in their community. As more students discover that learning online at home and in the local community works, Bridgemont aims to offer so much more than the typical home school program. I'm delighted to have two guests with me today - Dr. Robin Howe, Director of Bridgemont and Danielle Parker, one of the lead teachers and developers of the program. We're going to explore the world of Montessori education and Bridgemont, this exciting new initiative in the online education space, launching this fall.

Modern Education Movement
Bridgemont - 1st Ever Online Montessori for Middle and High Schoolers with Robin Howe and Danielle Parker

Modern Education Movement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 43:27


Bridgemont International School provides an alternative for secondary students who want to graduate from a Montessori high school, but do not have that option in their community. As more students discover that learning online at home and in the local community works, Bridgemont aims to offer so much more than the typical home school program. I'm delighted to have two guests with me today - Dr. Robin Howe, Director of Bridgemont and Danielle Parker, one of the lead teachers and developers of the program. We're going to explore the world of Montessori education and Bridgemont, this exciting new initiative in the online education space, launching this fall.

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #74 - The Whys and The Hows of the Clinical Doing: A Conversation with Rochelle Cohen-Schneider

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 50:26


Dr. Katie Strong, Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Central Michigan University, talks with Rochelle Cohen-Schneider from the Aphasia Institute about the importance of developing and attending to our clinical selves. Rochelle Cohen-Schneider is the Director of Clinical and Educational Services at the Aphasia Institute in Toronto, Canada. She has worked in the field of aphasia (across the continuum of care) for most of her career spanning 38 years. She studied Speech and Hearing Therapy in South Africa and completed a master's degree in Adult Education in Toronto. In addition to her interests in clinical education, continuing education and working within a social model of aphasia Rochelle is passionate about understanding ‘how clinicians think, and why they do what they do.' In this episode you will:  Hear stories about clinicians connect the dots in the things you can't see as a clinician but have a critical role in the work you do. Understand the difference between reflective and reflexive work, and why both are essential to developing our clinical selves. Learn a few tips and some resources to broaden and deepen your clinical lens. KS: Rochelle, welcome to this episode of the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. I'm so excited for you to be here today, and to have this conversation and for our listeners to really hear about your work and perspectives. RCS: Thank you very much for this invitation, Katie, I'm really looking forward to digging into this topic with you. Thank you. KS: Oh, me too. I'm just so excited. And as we get started, Rochelle, I'd love for our listeners to hear a bit about your story and how you became interested in this area of the ‘clinical self'. That's powerful, that's powerful Rochelle. I mean I Wow. RCS: So, Katie, it became clear to me that the therapeutic encounter was a multi-dimensional endeavor requiring multiple skill sets, right from the days of being a student in, as you said earlier, in Johannesburg, South Africa. So, the physical structure of what was known as the Speech and Hearing Therapy Department housed both lecture halls, and small clinic rooms, where we, the student clinicians, carried out our therapy activities under the watchful eyes of our clinical tutors. These tutors watched from behind one-way mirrors and spent a lot of time debriefing with us about the session, our goals, the treatment methods, we chose, why we chose them, how we performed, and also how we enacted our clinical selves. In other words, how we related to our patients, where we sat, why we sat where we set, and we will often put through the paces to have us begin to understand how we positioned ourselves as clinicians. And it was really important in the clinical setting and how we learned to be, the relationship and relating to the clients was really, really important. And in fact, when we wrote our reports for our tutors, the first goal, regardless of age, or communication disorder, had to be establishing rapport. And actually, as the literature tells us rapport is actually only one small element within the clinical relationship. Maybe it's a gateway. It's a fairly static notion, because the relationship is much more dynamic, you know, interactive and an unscripted interaction. So because of the way this physical physically was set up, our academic and our clinical learning took place under the same roof, allowing for a very dynamic and stimulating learning environment, which focused both on rigorous academic growth and clinical development. So as a clinician stepping into the role of a clinician. And I think I might be able to say that this environment really helped us student clinicians “think with theory”, as Felicity Bright calls it. And we were trained to understand both the objective and subjective aspects of being a clinician and that fully engaging in a therapeutic encounter is really important. Another little aspect of this was in our third year of training in a four-year Honors Program, the clinical load was divided over four years and kind of matched what we were learning in those lecture halls. In the third year, we were observed by one of the professors from the psychology department. We had a couple of observations, and his job was simply to observe our therapeutic interactions, and how we engaged with the clients. And he obviously was not able to comment on the content of the therapy session because he had no idea. But he again, like our tutors, but even more rigorously asked us lots of questions around our positionality, both the physical and conceptual positionality, and all kinds of really very difficult and grueling questions. When I interviewed for the job at the Aphasia Institute, and I was interviewed by my boss, Dr. Aura Kagan, she asked me to tell her a little bit about what my day involved. That was one of the interview questions. I told her about the fact that I had to go, unlike the other professions, the physiotherapists who seem to have their own porter, me as a speech pathologist, had to porter my own patients or clients and I brought my clients into my room, and I started therapy. And she said, “Okay, no, no. Go one step down. Tell me more. What did you talk about when you were bringing the patient down?” Now, obviously, the patient was forward facing, and I was behind. But she was interested in the topics that I would think to talk about. And so, you know, we talked about what happened last night? Did you have any visitors? Did you watch TV? How's the food?  Anything else you want to say? And then I would get my office, I would wheel the client in, and then I had a ritual. I didn't realize it was a ritual. But I leaned over, and I put my white coat on. And that signaled to me, the clinician, that the personal self is out the door, and now I am the professional, I am the clinician.  KS: That's powerful, Rochelle. I mean, wow! RCS: And she said to me, “Okay, so what's the difference?” and she probed, and I started having the beginnings of the understanding of pulling together the personal self and the professional self, that maybe then becomes the clinical self. And this very clear demarcation fell away completely when I joined the Aphasia Institute, where there were no white coats, and there were almost no doors. And so, we worked in open spaces. And obviously, there of course, were times when doors and private spaces were called for. But I suddenly had this dawning realization that, you know, a couple of years, seven, eight years into my career, I had never, ever watched another clinician work. And here I was suddenly watching these brilliant clinicians work, and I wanted what they had. And so that set me on my journey. And, and just being very, very interested in how to develop that part of myself, that would engage our clients in a life participation model. KS: That is such a journey and I so appreciate you sharing that with us. You know some big ‘aha moments' about who we are as clinicians and how that changes or doesn't change based on who we're interacting with. I'm so excited to talk more about this. I'd like to first talk about an article that you co-authored a clinical focus article in the 2020 ASHA perspectives journal titled Spotlight on the Clinician in the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia, Balancing Relationship-Centered Care and Professionalism. Could you tell us a little bit about how this article came to be? RCS: Katie, before I tell you that I just want to...thinking about and talking with you, I've kind of connected many, many dots. And the dots are some are visual dots, some are auditory, some have cognitive, some are emotional dots. And so, one of the things that dawned on me, when I used to read to my children, there is a well-known book here in Canada called Something from Nothing. And it tells a story of a little boy whose grandfather is a tailor. And the grandfather makes the grandson a jacket. And of course, with each passing year, as the boy grows, the grandfather has to refashion the garment. It becomes a vest, then a tie and finally, the fabric simply covers the button. As the grandfather is snipping away, pieces of the fabric are falling through the floorboards. And unbeknownst to them, there is a little family of mice who live under the floorboards. And they're getting all these pieces of fabric. And they are designing and furnishing their house with this with this fabric. The minute I saw this image, I said to myself, that is what interests me. It's everything that we don't see. The mouses house was about one eighth of the page, (of the book). It was a fairly big book. And to me, that was the clinical encounter underneath. And when working with social workers for many, many years, I thought that that's where they worked, in the things that you can't see. And again, I wanted to go there.  KS: Wow! RCS: After the over many years of working together with Aura, we had spoken so much about the value of working with social workers and our learnings and how we really feel so privileged to have social workers by our side for so many different reasons. And one year at an Aphasia Access Summit, Aura heard Denise McCall and Ann Abrahamson, SLP and social worker respectively, from SCALE, The Snyder Center for Aphasia Life Enhancement in Baltimore. And she heard them give a talk about what they call ‘the dance', how they learned to work together, despite having such disparate perspectives. Denise actually bravely talked about what got in the way and how the speech pathology lens got in the way of the in the way of a satisfactory client encounter. And Aura came back to me and she said, “You know what, you've got to reach out to Denise and Ann because they think like you think.” And so that's kind of where it started. But also, in my quest to understand the nuts and bolts of how we do our job, I have also explored how my colleagues work and what they know about how they work. What I understand as their deep tacit knowledge. KS: What they know about how they work, that's deep.  RCS: That's what I'm constantly trying to understand. We don't spend a lot of time articulating what it is we know and why we do what we do. We spend a lot of time talking about the evidence-based approaches and absolutely we should. We should totally give as much time and attention to that as possible. But there's this whole, rich, rich source of information and rich source of data that we're all generating every single day as we interact with clients. And the literature tells us that these kinds of things are really, really important in understanding and dealing with because it makes us more effective. Clinicians offering evidence-based models, treatment services, assessments, etc.  KS: We are an ingredient to the therapeutic interaction.  RCS: Absolutely, absolutely. Many years ago, I read a research article, and I cannot remember exactly what it wasn't it, I think it was possibly not even our field. But the title of the research article was Hardening the Soft Data, which I think those of us and those of you who are involved in qualitative research are totally engaged with. But to me that really spoke to trying to take this whole, the subjective part of the relationship and trying to see exactly what it is. And so that sort of set me on the path with this article.  KS: That's great. So, the focus of the article is about relationship-centered care, and you co-authored it with colleagues, Denise from SCALE and social workers and speech pathologists.  It's really about relationship-centered care. I was hoping you could talk with our listeners about this approach to care and why it really is essential for our work as clinicians who embrace the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia. RCS: Yeah. In the article, the first vignette that I bring forward is the contribution of Denise, and Ann where they tell this story of a session, where they were working collaboratively with a client. The session by their account, did not go well. And as I mentioned earlier, Denise very bravely explains why in her opinion, it didn't go well. And she says, the speech language pathologist changed the subject, and ignored the social workers cues to continue the conversation. And so, a key opportunity was missed. And I thought so much about all of our missed opportunities, where we just don't have the lens to catch things that we don't see. So, they continue their story and tell us that they debriefed and obviously have a trusting relationship with each other. The interprofessional collaboration was enriched by that discussion. They go back and they resolve the issue. And it was a serious issue. It was a family secret that the client was carrying. And so of course, made me think about all the secrets that our clients carry. And what if you don't have a social worker to work with you? And so those of us who do are really, really, really fortunate. I think the contribution of social workers is significant. I think they inherently and as part of the learning, are engaged with learning about the therapeutic relationship, and also the tensions that arise from that, around professionalism and boundaries. And of course, their scope of practice naturally includes gathering information about goals, roles and interactions among family members and within social network. They are also interested in learning about clients and families before the health incident that caused the aphasia and of course, the impacts. So social workers de facto have always had a broader clinical gaze than we have. But of course, now with the Life Participation Approach, the model and the model of the A-FROM (Framework for Outcome Measurement in Aphasia), the model that Aura Kagan and a bunch of her colleagues have created. So, I think with these models we are catching up. And we are broadening our gaze and considering many, many more domains for our intervention. I think as we continue to understand the impact of aphasia, on all aspects of the client's life, we have no choice but to go there. And I think also in terms of the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia, which clearly puts the client at the center of the clinical endeavor, we've had to do our own dance, I guess. This again makes me think about Felicity Bright, drawing from sociology. She talks about our positionality in the therapeutic encounter and so we are no longer the expert. We are the expert guide, but the client is the expert of themselves. I'm not in a university setting, so I don't exactly know how students are being taught. I would imagine is such a tension between trying to teach the scope of our professional responsibilities and expertise, that I don't know exactly what's being taught. We need to shift these positions and to be open to partnering more with a client. I think we have to really follow and pay attention to the relay, a relationship-centered care framework. And Linda Worrell talks about this incredibly eloquently. She bases the work on the model that was developed for physicians. And, you know, talking about the fact that we as therapists, and our patients bring full dimensions of ourselves as people into the relationship. Thinking backward Aura challenged me, “You know, you can't leave yourself out the door, you came with yourself, even if you had to mark that moment when you transitioned, you came with yourself.” And so, as we are delving into clients lives and our position of power is changing, and we're opening ourselves to interrogating ourselves in a sense, based on how the clinical encounter proceeds. KS: Yeah. I love the thought of the broadening of the gaze. And your point to training clinicians, I think it's something that we really need to start paying attention to, early in the development. Just like you were sharing about your story with your own training and having someone be able to help you talk about, “Why are you sitting where you're sitting? Or  Why are you sharing with this? Or when this happened, by saying this, you shut, you shut the door or shut someone down about something that was very important to them.” I think it's, you know, really essential. I feel like, historically, we've ignored it or just expected that to happen after you get your knowledge about evidence-based practice knowledge. And I really feel like we need to be better at helping our students that were training into the field, to do such beautiful work to be able to develop themselves early on, so that they're able to better serve their clients and themselves really.  RCS: Yeah, yeah, absolutely. You know, one year I was at ASHA, and I went to a really powerful presentation, by the late Shirley Morganstein. And I looked around the hall. It was such a brilliant presentation. And I saw just older clinicians there. To your point, Katie, of, you know, you first learned this, and then you learn that. After the presentation, I went up to Shirley and we chatted, and there were a couple of other people standing around and just to your point of trying to get this in as early as possible. Kind of braiding it together the subjective and the objective. And just building that awareness, because the subjective enables the stronger version of the objective. KS: Absolutely. I think we've got work to do in that. I know you've been a guest speaker in the course that I teach. I've been fortunate to develop an elective called The Engaged Clinician: Our Behavior Matters. I think I've taught it for three or four years now. It's kind of viewed as a special time to be able to focus on that. And I think what's sad is that it shouldn't be special. It should be an integral part of how we train our workforce, our clinicians.  RCS: Yeah. And I think we're lucky that we are seeing a not a resurgence, but an emergence of interest. And we're seeing it from people who are thought leaders in our field and, you know, sort of narrower area. And so I think, it'll roll around. There's some really, there's some really amazing and powerful work being done right at the moment, which is exciting. KS: Absolutely. You mentioned earlier one of the vignettes. The article that you co-authored has six vignettes that provide examples of how SLPs navigated clinician-client boundaries. It's a fabulous article, it really is. I was wondering if you could pick one more to walk us through another vignette just to give us a flavor for the article. RCS: Sure, thank you. One of the exciting things is, some of these vignettes have been floating around in my brain for a while because I've, as I mentioned earlier, kind of after some of my colleagues. Each time I come back to them, I see something else, which is really enriching for me. And again, thinking about this talk today has given me some additional perspective. So. I will take you through one, and it's been Vignette #5. I titled all the vignettes, together with my second co-author, Melody Chan. We titled them to sort of give some clues. So, this is called Recognition as Relating. I'll just quickly read a small segment of this.  The SLP says, “the client was quite reserved, and he began telling me about his job. I could see that he took a lot of pride in it. And when I reflected that back to him, I said to him, ‘You're, quite a perfectionist.' He broke down and he cried. It was quite a moment because it was just one word.”  And as I think about this tiny little window into a clinical encounter, there is so much richness here. The client she was talking about an assessment encounter. She had just met the client for the very first time. It was not a long-standing relationship, and she recounts this piece that what had happened sort of at the beginning of the session is he had walked into the room, and he'd noted that the picture. There was a picture that was crooked. And so, he either commented, or he kind of adjusted it, I can't remember. And so, she was starting to form a picture in her mind. So, I think what happened was, it wasn't just one word. It was the fact that she's saw into this man. She saw into his identity, and she recognized who he thought he is. Who he is, his essential self. And I think what a moment for a person with aphasia, was had their whole life quickly, suddenly up ended by a very traumatic event. And his identity has sort of been shattered as well and stolen and all the words that that we use when we talk about identity. And here is somebody who he has never met. And she says, “I see you”. And that is incredibly powerful. And I think that my new reflection on this is that at that moment, the clinician must have been golden for him. Of course, I wasn't there. But I imagined that the level of engagement and connectivity must have spiked significantly. And so, I really have learned a huge amount from the work of Felicity Bright, and I'll talk about that in a little bit. But co-constructing engagement between a client and clinician is a relational act, it's happening with you pay attention to it or not, it's happening. The fabric is falling under the ground, it's happening. You're not seeing it. We're not seeing it. And so ultimately, the more engaged and connected a clinical encounter feels for the patient, the more positive the patient experience is, which leads to all kinds of positive foundational elements that allow a clinical encounter to be successful, and a therapy session to be successful, and a treatment approach to be successful. And so, for me in this vignette in this anecdote, the clinician is primed to look for identity. She knows how important this is. It didn't take any time. It took no time whatsoever. She still completed the assessment in the required amount of time. But that one thing, just hit the ball out of the park. It's such a powerful story to me. KS: It is what it is to me too. I'm a little teary and I've read the article before. But it you know, that's, you know what we're talking about. And not every session has to have that amount of power, but those little instances where they happen, weave together this stronger relationship where you're more willing and able to work collaboratively together, because there's this respect and trust.  RCS: Yeah.  KS: Thank you. Well, thinking about the critical incidents like the one you just walked us through with that vignette is really an integral part of developing who we are as clinicians or our clinical selves. And I know you've read a lot and examined this quite a bit in your experience, and particularly in your expertise in adult education. And I was hoping you could share a few tips for our listeners, who might be ready to expand their reflective practice. RCS: Absolutely, Katie. So, I think that the Master's in Adult Education was a direction that I really never thought that I would go. I had always thought that I would be interested in going back for either social work or psychology. I always had a deep interest in counseling. I think many of us who've ended up in this particular subset of a subset of a subset or subfield, many of us have this interest. But I was asked many years ago by a one different social work and speech pathology team to videotape a session that they were running with two couples were both in both instances, it was the husband who had had aphasia, they were doing a counseling, training kind of session. And so, sitting behind the camera, it became clear to me that I wanted to pursue what I'd always thought about, you know, you've heard that the seed from the very beginning, the whys and the hows of the clinical doing. It was clear, I didn't want to be the social worker, but I wanted to know what the social worker was thinking. And so somehow, I found my way to adult ed, and I think it served me really well. There was a lot of learning in something outside of our field, but certainly the, the field of teaching and learning, and education and pedagogy and teachers, and nurses really do a lot of self-examination. And so, there's been a lot of kind of building of theoretical models and thinking around what can help teachers and various other professionals look into this whole endeavor, or whether it be a clinical endeavor or a pedagogic endeavor. And so, I think one of the key things that I learned that I had to sort of sum up. There were two main areas, but I'll talk about what you've just raised, the reflective, is kind of thinking a little bit about both the reflective and the reflexive ideas. So reflective, to me is something that we tend to do afterwards. We reflect on how the session went. We pull things apart. And it's extremely valuable because it builds all kinds of muscles and lenses. But I think what became really clear to me, and what was really interesting was thinking about being reflexive, which would be in the moment of things happening, being able to identify it. And we don't always talk about that in our field. In in nursing there's a nurse educator called Patricia Benner and she talks about going from novice to expert. And I think that probably for those of us in the academy, that those are concepts that are well known to you. But we don't always talk about it out in the field. And so, reflexive is being able to make those tweaks as you go along. And, of course, that is what, whether you in the academy, or we're whether you're a field supervisor as I have been, it's what we're teaching our students. You know, make the adjustments as you go. Sometimes you can, and sometimes you can't, but look for them and see them. And then under being reflexive is critical reflexivity, which is understanding all about yourself, and how that impacts your environment. And so I think those were really, really key learning issues. And I just want to, I want to just take advantage of your question, Katie, if I may, and just go through one of the other vignettes that sort of demonstrates kind of reflexivity.  So, the clinician says, “I was scheduled for an assessment. And when I prepped and read the chart, I saw the client was a gentleman in his late 70s, early 80s. And I had an oh moment as I realized that this client was born in Germany, and that my own grandmother had survived the Holocaust. I did have a bit of a personal reaction to his potential life situation at that time, so I had to check myself in the moment, aka do a little moment of reflexivity. And I had to make sure that I wasn't showing the reaction to the client.” And the clinician realizes that having been attuned to her critical reflexivity, she says, “I guess in that moment, it was a point of growth. Because I didn't think that early on in my career, I would have been able to have that self-talk in my head, and still be able to carry on with the assessment.” So, I think, you know, she caught herself, she had that little conversation with yourself in that moment. It was a real moment of reflexivity. And I would imagine, I never have asked her that she's added that to her toolbox of critical reflexivity. And she now knows that about yourself a) what triggers her and b) what she can do about it. So, I think that was the big learning from adult age.  KS: And you know, that's just so important because, you know, we haven't really talked about this at all today and didn't really plan on it, but the aspect of stress levels and burnout and you know, taking care of ourselves as clinicians and, this work of reflection and reflexivity is helpful in helping us to navigate the really intense experiences that happen when you're living a clinical life. RCS: Yeah. Yeah. And there is I won't read the vignette, but the last vignette in the article is about is a clinician telling a story of how negative how negatively a client impacted her, because he embodied all the things that ran counter to her values of how she lived her life. And this tension of, you know, duty of care and intense dislike of somebody. And I think what we drew as a collective as our team from that, is there has to be a safe place. Back to your point about stress and burnout, there has to be a safe place that a clinician can come and say, I cannot work with this gentleman. Who does he not trigger? And if he does not trigger you, could you please be the one? And that's actually what we did. So, this is making time for reflection and reflexive talk, and is really important butt it has to be in a safe environment for clinicians. Yeah.  KS: Well, so, you know, I think most of us think about things like journaling or talking with colleagues. Not complaining with colleagues, but debriefing and really sharing about, where you were, where you were at, and what you were thinking and how you're feeling currently, you know, are really vital parts of our job. What are some of your top resources that you would recommend for someone who wanted to explore into this area? RCS: Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. So, I'll break him down into two major categories. The first one, I will just run off a couple of names within our field, whose work is so inspirational and so groundbreaking and continues to break ground, even if they've been saying and talking these thoughts for many, many years. So, I'm going to start there. I do have to talk about the impact that my boss Aura Kagan has had on me, and Nina Simmons-Mackie, Audrey Holland's work from being a student in South Africa was absolutely (inspiring). Discovering and falling upon this work, and this reading was just, you know, an absolute godsend. It felt like an oasis in a desert sometimes. So Audrey Highland, Jackie Hinckley's work, and Linda Worrall's work. Felicity Bright's' work. And Martha Taylor Sarno's work. I don't know if people have read and if it even possible to get hold of a lecture she once did called the James Hemphill Lecture or award or something that. These works just helped to open up an additional lens and an additional dimension. So those are people in our field. And Katie, classes like yours are also groundbreaking for clinicians to, as you said, to be learning early on. So those are really, really inspiring.  In terms of stepping out of our field, an area that has been extremely important and influential for me, is the area of Narrative Medicine, in all of its forms. And a lot of medical schools are starting to adopt the principles. Narrative Medicine comes out of the medical humanities. It involves using the arts to help clinicians see and think and develop what's called narrative competence. I'll give a shout out to a group of clinicians in Toronto who are using a Narrative Medicine framework for some student training. And we at the Aphasia Institute have jumped on board as they've allowed us into join them. This is very, very powerful in helping students write and tell stories from the perspective of the client. Very, very important. There so there are Narrative Medicine courses. The Narrative Medicine, Columbia, runs an incredible Narrative Medicine course and Jackie Hinkley will back meet up. We found each other at the course many, many years ago.  KS: Oh, that's fabulous! RCS: So, that that would be a strong recommendation, then on Twitter. And I do see sometimes speech pathologists, and whatever we do with Twitter. It's the handle the hashtag is #medhumchat. And it's sometimes worth just scrolling through there to get just great thoughts and ideas. I omitted to mention all of the clinicians who are part of that original Life Participation Approach to Aphasia core group, any of them and their work is really instrumental in in moving us forward in this domain. And finally, looking outside of the field into the field of maybe social work for courses. I was very fortunate to be able to take a two-year externship in family therapy. And the clinician is, well there's no way to hide in that field. And so, there's a lot of things that I learned and I'm thinking about it from there. And so, again, encouraging people to look outside of the field for any education.  KS: Thank you. I know you sent a list of some favorite reads and so we will have reference citations and some links in the show notes. We'll make sure to put the med hum chats hashtag in there also. So be sure to check out the show notes if you're listening and you're wanting to dig a little bit deeper into this. Rochelle, any thoughts that you'd like to share as we start to wrap up this conversation today? RCS: Yes, I'd like to just share just two final thoughts. The one is what you actually had said, Katie, you know, they are all these great resources out there, but there are a lot of things that clinicians maybe can do locally, in their own departments. And so, you know, not complaining, you said by talking about, both for the purpose of de-stressing, and for the purpose of deepening, and building lenses and muscles. One of my biggest learning opportunities, and I mentioned it early, has been to see and watch and hear and feel my colleagues working. I don't know if that's possible for people to do. You don't have to do it often, just once asked if you would be permitted to sit in and watch a session where you work, you know. You both see the same thing. And ideally, of course, like we do with students, sometimes if you can record it, but I know there are issues of time and privacy, those do get in the way. But at least looking for sort of things that are in place already, that you can just think about different topics. So, if there is a journal club, or case discussions, once in a while just shifting the focus onto some of these. Remembering the image of the mice underneath just to the tiny little piece, the liminal space underneath there, I think it could be really helpful. And I just am going to end off with a story. And a resource that I did not mention, Cheryl Mattingly, who is an anthropologist, who has watched occupational therapists, and I am not exactly sure how that came to be. But there's an incredible vignette that she tells, and I don't have the book because it's sitting in my office, and we're not yet back on site. But it's the story goes something like she observed a young occupational therapist, doing a session with a group of older gentlemen, possibly in a Veterans Hospital. And when she walked in, the gentlemen were, you know, they were in wheelchairs, they were hunched over, they were drooling, listing to one side. And the girl, the occupational therapist came in the clinician came in, and she sort of sat down. It took her a minute, and then she looked out the window, and she said, “isn't it you know a glorious day? “And then she said, “Oh, I'm really excited about my vegetable garden or something.” And I sort of get goose bumps. Katie, you had tears. And I've read this a million times. But suddenly, Cheryl Mattingly says these gentlemen sat up, stop drooling, paid attention, looked at the clinician, and she could imagine them in the gardens with a bottle of beer, leaning over digging into the beds, and it became a very animated discussion. And then she says, and then something happened, and the occupational therapist said, “Okay, now let's get to our task.” And whatever the task was, it was the most boring, soul-destroying task. And these men, that she had enlivened, and awakened, suddenly just became, like they were in the beginning. It's a beautifully rendered piece that she writes, and she said, she was just heartbroken. She was heartbroken for the men, but she was also heartbroken for the clinician, because she missed such an opportunity. And so, I would just encourage us to, you know, look for the opportunity look for the buddy, the buddy colleague who might have the same lens as you and build on that together and hopefully impact everybody around you.  KS: Thank you, Rochelle, this has really been a delightful conversation. So much to think about. And you inspired me, and I know our listeners will be thinking more about the important role that we have as clinicians as people as persons as in contributing to this thing we call therapy. So, thank you so much. It's been great to have you on the show.  RCS: Thank you so much, Katie. And thank you for your work.   On behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. For more information on Aphasia Access and to access our growing library of materials go to www.aphasiaaccess.org If you have an idea for a future podcast topic email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org. Thanks again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access.   Websites and Social Media Aphasia Institute  https://www.aphasia.ca/   Aphasia Institute on Twitter @Aphasia_Inst    Links Mentioned in Episode Boundaries and Clinical Self Readings Cohen-Schneider, R., Chan, M. T., McCall, D., Tedesco, A. M., & Abramson, A. P. (2020). Spotlight on the clinician in the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia: Balancing relationship-centered care and professionalism. Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, 5, 414-424. https://doi.org/10.1044/2019_PERSP-19-00025  Duchan, J. F., & Byng, S. (Eds.). (2004). Challenging aphasia therapies: broadening the discourse and extending the boundaries. Hove, East Sussex: Psychology Press. Penn, C. (2004). Context, culture, and conversation. In Challenging Aphasia Therapies (pp. 83-100). New York, NY: Psychology Press. Sherratt, S., & Hersh, D. (2010). “You feel like family…”: Professional boundaries and social model aphasia groups. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 12(2), 152-161. doi:10.3109/17549500903521806 Walters, H. B. (2008, Fall). An Introduction to the Use of Self in Field Placement. In The New Social Worker: The Social Work Careers Magazine. Retrieved July 26, 2019 from https://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/field-placement/An_Introduction_to_Use_of_Self_in_Field_Placement/  Kagan, A. (2011). A-FROM in action at the Aphasia Institute. Seminars in Speech and Language, 32(3), 216-228. doi:10.1055/s-0031-1286176   Clinical Engagement Readings Bright, F. A., Kayes, N. M., Cummins, C., Worrall, L. M., & McPherson, K. M. (2017). Co-constructing engagement in stroke rehabilitation: a qualitative study exploring how practitioner engagement can influence patient engagement. Clinical rehabilitation, 31(10), 1396-1405. doi: 10.1177/0269215517694678 Bright, F. A., Kayes, N. M., Worrall, L., & McPherson, K. M. (2015). A conceptual review of engagement in healthcare and rehabilitation. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37(8), 643-654. doi:10.3109/09638288.2014.933899   Kayes, N.M., Mudge, S., Bright, F.A.S., McPherson, K. (2015). Whose behavior matters? Rethinking practitioner behavior and its influence on rehabilitation outcomes. In K. McPherson, B.E. Gibson, & A. Leplege (Eds.), Rethinking Rehabilitation Theory and Practice (pp.249-271). Boca Raton: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis. Worrall, L., Davidson, B., Hersh, D., Howe, T., Sherratt, S., & Ferguson, A. (2010). The evidence for relationship-centred practice in aphasia rehabilitation. Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders,1(2), 277-300. doi:10.1558/jircd.v1i2.277 Narrative Medicine Readings Charon, R. (2008) Honoring the Stories of Illness Oxford University Press. New York Hinckley, J. H. (2008). Narrative-based practice in speech-language pathology: Stories of a clinical life. San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing Inc. Medical Humanities Chat on Twitter @MedHumChat   #medhumchat

The Fashion Collective
The Fashion Collective: The Amanda Howe Interview

The Fashion Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 57:59


IG: @a__howe Website: https://www.amandahowedesigns.com/ Canoe Club Promo Code: FASHIONCOLLECTIVE15 (15% off your next order)  Canoe Club Website: https://shopcanoeclub.com/ Hello, I'm Alexander Walker of The Fashion Collective Podcast! If you're a returning listener, welcome back! If you're a new listener, then thank you for taking the time to check us out! The Fashion Collective Podcast is a place for creatives to learn, share, collaborate, and support each other. Each week, you'll get in-depth interviews with creators talking about their creative process, inspirations, giving advice, and sharing their opinions on the industry's major topics. If you're interested, I would encourage you to follow us on social media to get updates on all new podcasts. Website: Link: https://anchor.fm/thefashioncollective/support Support: https://anchor.fm/thefashioncollective/support Social Media: Instagram: @thefashioncollectivepodcast & @alexwalkerph Twitter: @TFC_POD Available Platforms: The Fashion Collective Podcast will be available on Apple Podcast, Spotify, YouTube, and Patreon. Patreon: To get full access to all the podcast episodes, private playlists, live streams, videos, and much more, you can sign up to be a patron on our Patreon page for only $5/month. Link: https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=35257084 The Fashion Collective Mix Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/playlist/the-fashion-collective-mix-2/pl.u-MDAWvJjFGaBqkR Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/2pe55VPWVvt04XiqT4cS0z?si=AzriDzDCRAGh4CvMBactuA --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thefashioncollective/support

Daily Detroit
410,000 without power; Detroit COVID cases up; Plus 6 stories around town

Daily Detroit

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 9:13


Show was delayed due to lack of power, but once we got the batteries plugged in, we were good to go. Our stories: 410k Metro Detroit houses were out of power in a snap thanks to a harsh thunderstorm that cause a lot of damage Wednesday. COVID cases have almost doubled in the city of Detroit and the city has strongly encourage indoor mask wearing. The city has a low vaccination rate. Statewide, we're pushing 1400 cases a day. Schools are going in all different directions, which is worrisome as the Delta variant impact children far more than Alpha did. Howe's Bayou in Ferndale is closed until further notice for lack of staff, and Eater Detroit reports that Noodletopia has a robot server that acts like a cat. Lear is going into the old Cadillac Stamping plant site on Detroit's east side. The QLINE Streetcar returns to service in late September with promises to change. The suburban bus system SMART has a new General Manager, who served in Cincinnati and a number of other cities. Detroit's O'Hair Park was rededicated after $2 million in improvements. Jer also gives you a little Detroit history. And finally - Smokey Bones is coming to Shelby Township. They call themselves "The Master of Meat." Are they? Have you been to one? We need intel! A reminder we're on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and wherever fine podcasts are found. Also, thanks to our members on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/dailydetroit for keeping this thing going.       

RF-SMART Podcast: Taking Inventory
The Episode your CFO Needs to Hear

RF-SMART Podcast: Taking Inventory

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 25:43


A few years ago, Shafer, Troxell, and Howe, an industrial pump distributor and consulting firm based in Maryland, began their journey to the cloud. Seeking to unify their four disparate software solutions, STH chose to evaluate NetSuite. The CFO and IT director at STH worked together to create an ROI analysis that could help them decide if NetSuite would fit the categories they were evaluating.What You'll Learn:How STH performed an ROI analysis to determine what software was right for themHow CFO involvement can play a pivotal role in supply chainWhat criteria to consider in your own ROI analysisAdditional Resources: Download the resource: ROI on Mobile Inventory ManagementListen to Episode: Lessons Learned from More than 500 ImplementationsLearn more about NetSuite: RF-SMART for NetSuiteWho You'll Hear: JD Slough, CFO, STH Inc. Avery Trent, IT Systems Administrator/NetSuite Administrator, STH Inc. Sarah Archer, Content Marketing Specialist, RF-SMART - Sarah has been a team member at RF-SMART since 2018. She is the host of this podcast and the YouTube series Q&A. Sarah is currently pursuing her Master's degree in Communication at the University of North Florida. Sarah loves working at RF-SMART because of the many opportunities to lead and advance in her career!

InsightLA Long Beach
(2021-08-08) The Determination to Be Free with Cayce Howe

InsightLA Long Beach

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 36:21


Dharma talk on "The Determination to Be Free" with InsightLA teacher, Cayce Howe. InsightLA Long Beach, Sunday Sit, August 8th, 2021

Progressive Voices
Free Forum - Guest DAVID KAISER 08-07-2021

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 60:00


I talk with historian DAVID KAISER about two books. His own A LIFE IN HISTORY suggests that as fields like African-American History and Women's History emerged to deal with evidence nobody had bothered to look at before, we've tended to look less at our roots in European politics and diplomacy or at history's broader sweep. Might this increase our tendency to repeat the past? THE FOURTH TURNING: An American Prophesy (Straus & Howe) holds that history is not linear, but cyclical, and that every 80 years or so, a crisis disrupts society, the old order crumbles, and a new order emerges. No surprise - we're in the midst of such a crisis. Do we emerge broken or renewed?

Conversations With Matt Dwyer
Mackenzie Howe - Pet Dress/The Wild Reeds

Conversations With Matt Dwyer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 66:12


Mackenzie Howe joins Dwyer to talk about going to a Waldorf school, growing up taking care of herself vintage clothing, the inspiration of Suzi Quatro, travels to India and what the definition of success is.Opening Song - "It's Your Mind," from the EP Fear of Breakdown by Pet DressPet Dress Bandcamp HEREPet Dress Instagram HERE Mackenzie's Bandwagon Vintage's Instagram HEREAll Things Dwyer HERE Conversations With Dwyer is Produced, Hosted, and Edited by Matt DwyerConsulting Producer - Dustin Marshall See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

EST. - For the Established Church with Micah Fries, Sam Rainer and Josh King
A Needed Perspective About The Moms On Your Church Staff (Ep. 245)

EST. - For the Established Church with Micah Fries, Sam Rainer and Josh King

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 36:54


Many churches have women who serve on staff. A number of them have children. Beth Howe joins the show to discuss what "balance" really looks like and how churches can be sensitive to working moms. She gives some creative and practical solutions for pastors and churches. Episode Sponsor: This summer, Southwestern Seminary announced a new name and vision for their undergraduate college. Scarborough College is now Texas Baptist College! TBC exists to glorify God by providing trustworthy Christian higher education for more faithful Kingdom service. Wherever God calls you, you can get the Christ-centered, Scripture-driven, and student-focused education you need at Texas Baptist College. Visit texasbaptist.com to learn more.

Free Forum with Terrence McNally
Episode 520: DAVID KAISER-How predictable were today’s crises? What happens when we forget history?

Free Forum with Terrence McNally

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 58:12


I talk with historian DAVID KAISER about two books. His own A LIFE IN HISTORY talks about how the study of history has changed. Fields like African-American History and Women's History deal with evidence nobody had bothered to look at before. But as these focused areas have developed, Kaiser says we look less today at history's broader sweep. Might this increase our tendency to repeat the past? THE FOURTH TURNING: An American Prophesy (Straus & Howe) holds that history is not linear, but cyclical, and that every 80 years or so, a crisis disrupts society, the old order crumbles, and a new order emerges. No surprise - we're in the midst of such a crisis. Will we emerge broken or renewed?

Curiosity Daily
Anger Looks Guilty, Quantum Microscope, Good News About Cancer

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 12:38


Learn about anger makes you look guilty; a new quantum microscope; and why the fight against cancer is going very well. Anger makes you look guilty by Kelsey Donk Johnson, S. (2021, June). Falsely accused? Stay calm, because anger makes you look guilty. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/mind-brain/signs-of-guilt  DeCelles, Katherine, Gabrielle Adams, Holly S. Howe, and Leslie K. John. "Anger Damns the Innocent." Psychological Science (in press). https://www.hbs.edu/ris/Publication%20Files/DecellesEtAl20%20-%20Anger%20Damns%20the%20Innocent_7e5cda61-ed8b-4592-866e-bea68f944a70.pdf  New quantum microscope can reveal biological structures that would otherwise be impossible to see by Briana Brownell Lu, D. (2021, June 9). Quantum leap for medical research as microscope zooms in on tiny structures. The Guardian; The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2021/jun/10/quantum-leap-for-medical-research-as-microscope-zooms-in-on-tiny-structures  Researchers create quantum microscope that can see the impossible. (2021, June 9). Phys.org. https://phys.org/news/2021-06-quantum-microscope-impossible.html  Casacio, C. A., Madsen, L. S., Terrasson, A., Waleed, M., Barnscheidt, K., Hage, B., Taylor, M. A., & Bowen, W. P. (2021). Quantum-enhanced nonlinear microscopy. Nature, 594(7862), 201–206. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03528-w  We'll never "cure cancer," but the fight against cancer is going very well by Cameron Duke Berezow, A. (2021, June 14). We're winning the war on cancer. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/surprising-science/were-winning-war-on-cancer  Mulcahy, N. (2021, April 14). Rankings of Most Common Cancers to Shift Over Next 20 Years. Medscape; Medscape. https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/949253  Rahib, L., Wehner, M. R., Matrisian, L. M., & Nead, K. T. (2021). Estimated Projection of US Cancer Incidence and Death to 2040. JAMA Network Open, 4(4), e214708. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.4708  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Rush Hour Melbourne Catch Up - 105.1 Triple M Melbourne - James Brayshaw and Billy Brownless
We've found our favourite Olympic Athlete, Aaron Finch, Jeremy Howe - The Rush Hour podcast - Tuesday 3rd August 2021

The Rush Hour Melbourne Catch Up - 105.1 Triple M Melbourne - James Brayshaw and Billy Brownless

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 34:53


Tokyo 2020 overnight wrap, AFL news, we've found our favourite Olympic Athlete, Aaron Finch, Jeremy Howe, Golden Cockup - Jock Landale, Billy's Joke See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NWCZradio's Down The Rabbit Hole
The Fourth Turning

NWCZradio's Down The Rabbit Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 64:47


Based on a book published in 1997, authors Strauss and Howe believe we are currently in the Fourth Turning. The Crisis describes the Fourth Turning which leads to a new societal High. However, there is pain on the way. And, when we have made it through the crisis just who will be in control and what will the new "High" look like? We discuss it all this episode! Email us at: downtherh@protonmail.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/darrell-g-fortune/message

Capturing Christianity Podcast
CC144: A Sound Refutation of Presuppositionalism with Dr. Richard Howe

Capturing Christianity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 23:46


In this in-person interview, I sit down with Dr. Richard Howe to discuss his objections to Presuppositionalism. He makes some very important distinctions that help clarify where the view goes wrong. Link to the YouTube Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ug-Gge1SDz0 Our Website: www.capturingchristianity.com Our Patreon: www.patreon.com/capturingchristianity

The Apple Seed
EXTRA: "The Monkey's Necklace" by Priscilla Howe

The Apple Seed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 5:11


Priscilla Howe shares a story of a princess, her favorite necklace, and the monkey who steals it from her.

RotoGraphs Fantasy Baseball
The Sleeper and the Bust Episode: 960 – Are We Worried? ft. Alex Howe

RotoGraphs Fantasy Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 87:24


Adam Howe of Pitcher List joins Justin Mason and Jason Collette to talk about potential cuts and players we might be worried about.

The Team House
Paul Howe | JSOC operator | Ep. 104

The Team House

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 126:24


Paul Howe served in Panama and Mogadishu with the Army's Special Mission Unit and today works as a tactical marksmanship instructor. Today's sponsors:

A History of the United States
Episode 147 - Philadelphia Falls

A History of the United States

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2021 14:39


This week we look at the Washington's time in Valley Forge and evaluate the career of Howe.

Out Of The Blank
#853 - Still Breathing (Nicholas Howe)

Out Of The Blank

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021 80:14


Even though his podcast is on hiatus till further notice, I'm happy to chat with Nic again and enjoy some mood boosting conversation. Through the past year everyone has been through a lot and if the sense of humor remain even through all the bad its got a glimmer of hope. What and where do you find your mind wandering to and how will you achieve it by either think of a different way to handle the situation or getting some insight into how to handle it better.

Q & A**: The Podcast by Q
Episode 54 - Mike Murphy - Historically Significant

Q & A**: The Podcast by Q

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 49:23


This week we're joined by another member of the South Africa hunting group! We have Mike Murphy of Griffin & Howe sit down with us and give us some history and insight on his company. Griffin & Howe makes the ultimate custom traditional sporting rifles and have done so for some of the biggest names in history(Hemingway, Dwight Eisenhower, and more). Mike is the lead rifle instructor and a former Marine and his wealth of knowledge within shooting as well as on the history of Griffin & Howe is amazing. Great guy, super interesting, and a pleasure to be around. You'll like this one. Make sure to Like, Share, Subscribe...you know what to do. Go to https://www.tacticaldistributors.com/ and use code UNPOSSIBLE15 at checkout for 15% off your order. *Exclusions apply* Email: podcast@liveqordie.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_official_q/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/unpossibleq Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UNPOSSIBLEbyQ/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/q-llc

Christian Woman Leadership Podcast
160: [Best of Year 2] Mental Health, Leadership & The Church - Laura Howe

Christian Woman Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 56:36


How can leaders identify when they are nearing burnout or experiencing compassion fatigue? And how can churches more effectively support those leaders so that they can serve their congregations from a place of health and wholeness? We're continuing our celebration of 3 years of the Christian Woman Leadership Podcast with our next episode in our “Best of” series. Today's episode is the best of our second year of the podcast: Episode 81: Dealing with Burnout, Compassion Fatigue, and Mental Health as a Christian Leader with Laura Howe. Even if you heard this episode when it originally aired, I'm sure you'll benefit from taking a listen again. Or, if you missed it the first time, be sure to take a listen today. For the full show notes, visit estherlittlefield.com/episode160.

Wealth Power & Influence with Jason Stapleton
A World In Crisis: Predictions & Possibilities

Wealth Power & Influence with Jason Stapleton

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 73:21


When our Nomad Network members heard this episode live, they said it was one of the best shows we've ever had.Perhaps that's because we just finished reading two of the most interesting books we've ever read.The first one is “The Fourth Turning: An American Prophecy - What the Cycles of History Tell Us About America's Next Rendezvous with Destiny”, written by Neil Howe and William Strauss. They describe an 80-year generational cycle that has persisted throughout Western civilization since at least the 1400s. Written in 1997, the book predicts the 2008 housing crisis, and they predicted the COVID crisis, to within a few years of when both events actually happened.If we follow the pattern their theory describes, we should expect some type of major global total-war-style event over the next 3-6 years. Perhaps we're already in it.But that's only the bad news. The good news is, the cycle predicts that that major event will be followed by a restart of the cycle into an era of peace, prosperity, and growth, a la the post-war era in America (1946-1963).The second book is called “Wanting: The Power of Mimetic Desire in Everyday Life”, by Luke Burgis. The book draws on the seminal work of French polymath Rene Girard, who introduced the concept of mimetic theory to the world. According to Girard, we are driven by our desires, yet we don't arrive at these desires independently. We learn both how and what to desire by mimicking of other people. Like gravity, mimesis is a powerful force that always affects us, even (especially!) when we aren't aware of it.When you combine these two concepts — the fourth turning and mimetic desire — you create an incredibly powerful tool for both predicting the nature of the next crisis and identifying the best path through it.You don't have to to go through the next crisis. You can just opt out. The choice is yours.******+ Give your business an unfair advantage in less than 3 minutes a day. Get the daily newsletter that delivers the most actionable and tactical growth strategies available today, straight from the mind of a marketing genius: http://dailyalchemy.me+ Learn the blueprint for generating predictable and sustainable income from anywhere on earth: http://www.nomadicwealthoffer.com.+ Become a member of our Nomad Network: https://www.stapletonagency.com/nomad-network1617822560645+ If you're ready to take control of your life, income, and future, go to http://mynomad.network to get started.+ Jason on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jason_stapleton+ Jason on IG: https://www.instagram.com/thejasonstapleton+ Jason's website: https://jasonstapleton.com+ Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/realkingpilledQuestion or comment? Text Jason: (323) 594-8781Don't forget to like and subscribe, and please share the show!

Hawk Central Podcast
Ferentz Era Draft - Offense

Hawk Central Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 115:45


Which offensive players do Leistikow, Dochterman, Kakert and Howe want to build around in the Ferentz-era draft? Let's find out.