Podcasts about embassies

Group of people from one state present in another state to represent the sending state

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EpochTV
US Embassy Warning: Do Not Travel to China

EpochTV

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 23:00


Do not travel to China, and if you're already there, stay where you are, advises the U.S. embassy in Beijing. Another warning comes from 42 U.S. senators to Beijing. They say consequences will follow if the communist regime suppresses its protesters. A major sporting event scheduled for next year in Shanghai has been canceled. And the city's Disneyland theme park is shutting down for the second time in just one month. A request to drop the charges against Huawei's CFO comes after the executive struck a deal with prosecutors last year, following her 2018 arrest. ⭕️Watch in-depth videos based on Truth & Tradition at Epoch TV

EpochTV
Capitol Report : Lawmakers Investigating FTX Also Benefitted From Company; Sen. Braun Responds to Anti-CCP Protests

EpochTV

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 22:27


It looks like a rail shutdown will be averted; Senators voted Thursday afternoon to impose a tentative agreement on rail workers. President Joe Biden welcomes French President Emmanuel Macron to the White House. What do the two say after Macron openly criticized Biden's policies? Congress is beginning to look into the collapse of crypto giant FTX. Financial expert Peter Schiff joins us to discuss what it could bring—and the future of crypto. Protestors calling for the end of the Chinese Communist Party's (CCP) rule gathered at the Chinese embassy in Washington, D.C., Wednesday night. A U.S. senator is telling them to persist. U.S. citizens are urged not to travel to China. The zero-tolerance-COVID policies are too risky, according to a recent alert from the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. David Goldman, deputy editor for Asia Times, joins us to discuss the unrest in China and other national security concerns facing the United States. ⭕️Watch in-depth videos based on Truth & Tradition at Epoch TV

Highlights from Ukraine
30 Nov: NATO to consider Ukraine's membership application after it defeats Russia, explosion at the Ukrainian Embassy in Spain, Germany recognised Holodomor as genocide

Highlights from Ukraine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 4:08


Latest news from 30 November 2022, as reported in the Ukrainian media. Easy ways to support us: Subscribe to our Patreon to give monthly support https://www.patreon.com/highlightsfromukraine Send us a one-time 'thank you' tip via PayPal at: highlightsfromukraine@gmail.com. Special thanks to our top Patreon supporters - Helena Pszczolko O'Callaghan, Pete Carroll, mattg629 and krissi!

Falun Dafa News and Cultivation
930: Cultivation Story: [European Fa Conference] Cultivating While Peacefully Protesting Outside the Chinese Embassy in London for 20 Years

Falun Dafa News and Cultivation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 21:00


London: Marking 20 years of the 24-hour peaceful protest outside the Chinese Consulate, a practitioner shares cultivation insights and heart-warming encouragement from locals. Original article from Minghui.org: “[European Fa Conference] Cultivating While Peacefully Protesting Outside the Chinese Embassy in London for 20 Years”

AJC Passport
Celebrating Mizrahi Heritage Month with The Forgotten Exodus: Iran

AJC Passport

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 37:56


Too few people know that parts of the Arab world and Iran were once home to large Jewish communities. This Mizrahi Heritage Month, let's change the story, with the final episode of the first season of The Forgotten Exodus, the first-ever narrative podcast series devoted exclusively to the rich, fascinating, and often-overlooked history of Mizrahi and Sephardic Jewry. Thank you for lifting up these stories to celebrate Mizrahi Heritage Month. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to listen to the rest of The Forgotten Exodus, wherever you get your podcasts.   __ Home to one of the world's oldest Jewish communities, the story of Jews in Iran has been one of prosperity and suffering through the millennia. During the mid-20th century, when Jews were being driven from their homes in Arab lands, Iran assisted Jewish refugees in providing safe passage to Israel. Under the Shah, Israel was an important economic and political ally. Yet that all swiftly changed in the 1979 Iranian Revolution, which ushered in Islamic rule, while chants of “Death to Israel” and “Death to America” rang out from the streets of Tehran.   Author, journalist, and poet Roya Hakakian shares her personal story of growing up Jewish in Iran during the reign of the Shah and then Ayatollah Khomeini, which she wrote about in her memoir Journey From the Land of No. Joining Hakakian is Dr. Saba Soomekh, a professor of world religions and Middle Eastern history who wrote From the Shahs to Los Angeles: Three Generations of Iranian Jewish Women between Religion and Culture. She also serves as associate director of AJC Los Angeles, home to America's largest concentration of Persian Jewish immigrants.  In this sixth and final episode of the season, the Hakakian family's saga captures the common thread that has run throughout this series – when the history of an uprooted community is left untold, it can become vulnerable to others' narratives and assumptions, or become lost forever and forgotten. How do you leave behind a beloved homeland, safeguard its Jewish legacy, and figure out where you belong? __ Show notes: Listen to The Forgotten Exodus and sign up to receive updates about future episodes.  Song credits:  Chag Purim · The Jewish Guitar Project Hevenu Shalom · Violin Heart Pond5:  “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Oud Nation”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Haygaz Yossoulkanian (BMI), IPI#1001905418 “Persian”: Publisher: STUDEO88; Composer: Siddhartha Sharma “Meditative Middle Eastern Flute”: Publisher: N/; Composer: DANIELYAN ASHOT MAKICHEVICH (IPI NAME #00855552512), UNITED STATES BMI Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. “Frontiers”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Pete Checkley (BMI), IPI#380407375 “Persian Investigative Mystery”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Peter Cole (BMI), IPI#679735384 “Persian Wind”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Sigma (SESAC); Composer: Abbas Premjee (SESAC), IPI#572363837 “Modern Middle Eastern Underscore”: Publisher: All Pro Audio LLC (611803484); Composer: Alan T Fagan (347654928) “Persian Fantasy Tavern”: Publisher: N/A; Composer: John Hoge “Adventures in the East”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI) Composer: Petar Milinkovic (BMI), IPI#00738313833. ___ Episode Transcript: ROYA HAKAKIAN: In 1984, when my mother and I left and my father was left alone in Iran, that was yet another major dramatic and traumatic separation. When I look back at the events of 1979, I think, people constantly think about the revolution having, in some ways, blown up Tehran, but it also blew up families. And my own family was among them.  MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: The world has overlooked an important episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. This series, brought to you by American Jewish Committee, explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel. I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman. Join us as we explore family histories and personal stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience. This is The Forgotten Exodus.  Today's episode: Leaving Iran MANYA: Outside Israel, Iran has the largest Jewish population in the Middle East. Yes, the Islamic Republic of Iran. In 2022. Though there is no official census, experts estimate about 10,000 Jews now live in the region previously known as Persia.  But since the 1979 Iranian Revolution, Jews in Iran don't advertise their Jewish identity. They adhere to Iran's morality code: women stay veiled from head to toe and men and women who aren't married or related stay apart in public. They don't express support for Israel, they don't ask questions, and they don't disagree with the regime. One might ask, with all these don'ts, is this a way of living a Jewish life? Or a way to live – period?  For author, journalist, and poet Roya Hakakian and her family, the answer was ultimately no. Roya has devoted her life to being a fact-finder and truth-teller. A former associate producer at the CBS news show 60 Minutes and a Guggenheim Fellow, Roya has written two volumes of poetry in Persian and three books of nonfiction in English, the first of which was published in 2004 – Journey From the Land of No, a memoir about her charmed childhood and accursed adolescence growing up Jewish in Iran under two different regimes.  ROYA: It was hugely important for me to create an account that could be relied on as a historic document. And I did my best through being very, very careful about gathering, interviewing, talking to, observing facts, evidence, documents from everyone, including my most immediate members of my family, to do what we, both as reporters, but also as Jews, are called to do, which is to bear witness. No seemed to be the backdrop of life for women, especially of religious minorities, and, in my own case, Jewish background, and so I thought, what better way to name the book than to call it as what my experience had been, which was the constant nos that I heard. So, Land of No was Iran. MANYA: As a journalist, as a Jew, as a daughter of Iran, Roya will not accept no for an answer. After publishing her memoir, she went on to write Assassins of the Turquoise Palace, a meticulously reported book about a widely underreported incident. In 1992 at a Berlin restaurant, a terrorist attack by the Iranian proxy Hezbollah targeted and killed four Iranian-Kurdish exiles. The book highlighted Iran's enormous global footprint made possible by its terror proxies who don't let international borders get in the way of silencing Iran's critics.   Roya also co-founded the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, an independent non-profit that reports on Iran's human rights abuses.  Her work has not prompted Ayatollah Khameini to publicly issue a fatwa against her  – like the murder order against Salman Rushdie issued by his predecessor. But in 2019, one of her teenage sons answered a knock at the door. It was the FBI, warning her that she was in the crosshairs of the Iranian regime's operatives in America. Most recently, Roya wrote A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious about the emotional roller coaster of arriving in America while still missing a beloved homeland, especially one where their community has endured for thousands of years. ROYA: I felt very strongly that one stays in one's homeland, that you don't just simply take off when things go wrong, that you stick around and try to figure a way through a bad situation. We came to the point where staying didn't seem like it would lead to any sort of real life and leaving was the only option. MANYA: The story of Jews in Iran, often referred to as Persia until 1935, is a millennia-long tale. A saga of suffering, repression, and persecution, peppered with brief moments of relief or at least relative peace – as long as everyone plays by the rules of the regime. SABA SOOMEKH: The history of Jews in Iran goes back to around 2,700 years ago. And a lot of people assume that Jews came to Iran, well at that time, it was called the Persian Empire, in 586 BCE, with the Babylonian exile. But Jews actually came a lot earlier, we're thinking 721-722 BCE with the Assyrian exile which makes us one of the oldest Jewish communities.  MANYA: That's Dr. Saba Soomekh, a professor of world religions and Middle Eastern history and the author of From the Shahs to Los Angeles: Three Generations of Iranian Jewish Women between Religion and Culture. She also serves as associate director of American Jewish Committee in Los Angeles, home to America's largest concentration of Persian Jewish immigrants. Saba's parents fled Iran in 1978, shortly before the revolution, when Saba and her sister were toddlers. She has devoted her career to preserving Iranian Jewish history.   Saba said Zoroastrian rulers until the 7th Century Common Era vacillated between tolerance and persecution of Jews. For example, according to the biblical account in the Book of Ezra, Cyrus the Great freed the Jews from Babylonian rule, granted all of them citizenship, and permitted them to return to Jerusalem to rebuild their Temple.  The Book of Esther goes on to tell the story of another Persian king, believed to be Xerxes I, whose closest adviser called Haman conspires to murder all the Jews – a plot that is foiled by his wife Queen Esther who is Jewish herself. Esther heroically pleads for mercy on behalf of her people – a valor that is celebrated on the Jewish holiday of Purim.  But by the time of the Islamic conquest in the middle of the 7th Century Common Era, the persecution had become so intense that Jews were hopeful about the new Arab Muslim regime, even if that meant being tolerated and treated as second-class citizens, or dhimmi status. But that status had a different interpretation for the Safavids. SABA: Really things didn't get bad for the Jews of the Persian Empire until the 16th century with the Safavid dynasty, because within Shia Islam in the Persian Empire, what they brought with them is this understanding of purity and impurity. And Jews were placed in the same category as dogs, pigs, and feces. They were seen as being religiously impure, what's referred to as najes. MANYA: Jews were placed in ghettos called mahaleh, where they wore yellow stars and special shoes to distinguish them from the rest of the population. They could not leave the mahaleh when it rained for fear that if water rolled off their bodies into the water system, it would render a Shia Muslim impure. For the same reason, they could not go to the bazaars for fear they might contaminate the food. They could not look Muslims in the eye. They were relegated to certain artisanal professions such as silversmithing and block printing – crafts that dirtied one's hands.  MANYA: By the 19th century, some European Jews did make their way to Persia to help. The Alliance Israélite Universelle, a Paris-based network of schools founded by French Jewish intellectuals, opened schools for Jewish children throughout the Middle East and North Africa, including within the mahalehs in Persia.  SABA: They saw themselves as being incredibly sophisticated because they were getting this, in a sense, secular European education, they were speaking French. The idea behind the Allianz schools was exactly that. These poor Middle Eastern Jews, one day the world is going to open up to them, their countries are going to become secular, and we need to prepare them for this, not only within the context of hygiene, but education, language.  And the Allianz schools were right when it came to the Persian Empire because who came into power was Reza Pahlavi, who was a Francophile. And he turned around and said, ‘Wow! Look at the population that speaks French, that knows European philosophy, etc. are the Jews.' He brought them out of the mahaleh, the Jewish ghettos, and said ‘I don't care about religion. Assimilate and acculturate. As long as you show, in a sense, devotion, and nationalism to the Pahlavi regime, which the Jews did—not all Jews—but a majority of them did. MANYA: Reza Pahlavi took control in 1925 and 16 years later, abdicated his throne to his son Muhammad Reza Pahlavi. In 1935, Persia adopted a new name: Iran. As king or the Shah, both father and son set Iran on a course of secularization and rapid modernization under which Jewish life and success seemed to flourish. The only condition was that religious observance was kept behind closed doors. SABA: The idea was that in public, you were secular and in private, you were a Jew. You had Shabbat, you only married a Jew, it was considered blasphemous if you married outside of the Jewish community. And it was happening because people were becoming a part of everyday schools, universities.  But that's why the Jewish day schools became so important. They weren't learning Judaism. What it did was ensure that in a secular Muslim society, that the Jewish kids were marrying within each other and within the community. It was, in a sense, the Golden Age. And that will explain to you why, unlike the early 1950s, where you had this exodus of Mizrahi Jews, Arab Jews from the Arab world and North Africa, you didn't really have that in Iran.  MANYA: In fact, Iran provided a safe passage to Israel for Jewish refugees during that exodus, specifically those fleeing Iraq. The Pahlavi regime considered Israel a critical ally in the face of pan-Arab fervor and hostility in the region. Because of the Arab economic boycott, Israel needed energy sources and Iran needed customers for its oil exports.  A number of Israelis even moved to Tehran, including farmers from kibbutzim who had come to teach agriculture, and doctors and nurses from Hadassah Hospital who had come to teach medicine.  El Al flew in and out of Tehran airport, albeit from a separate terminal. Taking advantage of these warm relations between the two countries, Roya recalls visiting aunts, uncles, and cousins in Israel.  ROYA: We arrived, and my mom and dad did what all visiting Jews from elsewhere do. They dropped to their knees, and they started kissing the ground. I did the same, and it was so moving. Israel was the promised land, we thought about Israel, we dreamed about Israel. But, at the same time, we were Iranians and, and we were living in Iran, and things were good.  This seems to non-Iranian Jews an impossibility. But I think for most of us, it was the way things were. We lived in the country where we had lived for, God knows how many years, and there was this other place that we somehow, in the back of our minds thought we would be going to, without knowing exactly when, but that it would be the destination. MANYA: Relations between the Shah and America flourished as well. In 1951, a hugely popular politician by the name of Mohammad Mosaddegh became prime minister and tried to institute reforms. His attempts to nationalize the oil industry and reduce the monarchy's authority didn't go over well. American and British intelligence backed a coup that restored the Shah's power. Many Iranians resented America's meddling, which became a rallying cry for the revolution. U.S. officials have since expressed regret for the CIA's involvement.  In November 1977, President Jimmy Carter welcomed the Shah and his wife to Washington, D.C., to discuss peace between Egypt and Israel, nuclear nonproliferation, and the energy crisis.  As an extension of these warm relations, the Shah sent many young Iranians to America to enhance their university studies, exposing them to Western ideals and values.  Meanwhile, a savvy fundamentalist cleric was biding his time in a Paris basement. It wouldn't be long before relations crumbled between Iran and Israel, Iran and the U.S,. and Iran and its Jews.  Roya recalls the Hakakian house at the corner of Alley of the Distinguished in Tehran as a lush oasis surrounded by fragrant flowers, full of her father's poetry, and brimming with family memories. Located in the heart of a trendy neighborhood, across the street from the Shah's charity organization, the tall juniper trees, fragrant honeysuckle, and gold mezuzah mounted on the door frame set it apart from the rest of the homes.  Roya's father, Haghnazar, was a poet and a respected headmaster at a Hebrew school. Roya, which means dream in Persian, was a budding poet herself with the typical hopes and dreams of a Jewish teenage girl.  ROYA: Prior to the revolution, life in an average Tehran Hebrew Day School looked very much like life in a Hebrew Day School anywhere else. In the afternoons we had all Hebrew and Jewish studies. We used to put on a Purim show every year. I wanted to be Esther. I never got to be Esther. We had emissaries, I think a couple of years, from Israel, who came to teach us how to do Israeli folk dance. MANYA: There were moments when Roya recalls feeling self-conscious about her Jewishness, particularly at Passover. That's when the family spent two weeks cleaning, demonstrating they weren't najes, or dirty Jews. The work was rewarded when the house filled with the fragrance of cumin and saffron and Persian dishes flowed from the kitchen, including apple and plum beef stew, tarragon veal balls stuffed with raisins, and rice garnished with currants and slivers of almonds.  When her oldest brother Alberto left to study in America, a little fact-finding work on Roya's part revealed that his departure wasn't simply the pursuit of a promising opportunity. As a talented cartoonist whose work had been showcased during an exhibition in Tehran, his family feared Alberto's pen might have gone too far, offending the Pahlavi regime and drawing the attention of the Shah's secret police.  Reports of repression, rapid modernization, the wide gap between Tehran's rich and the rest of the country's poor, and a feeling that Iranians weren't in control of their own destiny all became ingredients for a revolution, stoked by an exiled cleric named Ruhollah Khomeini who was recording cassette tapes in a Paris basement and circulating them back home.  SABA: He would just sit there and go on and on for hours, going against the Shah and West toxification. And then the recordings ended up in Iran. He wasn't even in Iran until the Shah left. MANYA: Promises of democracy and equality galvanized Iranians of all ages to overthrow the Shah in February 1979. Even the CIA was surprised.  SABA: I think a lot of people didn't believe it. Because number one, the Shah, the son, was getting the most amount of military equipment from the United States than anyone in the Middle East and in the Persian Gulf. And the idea was: you protect us in the Gulf, and we will give you whatever you need. So they never thought that a man with a beard down to his knee was able to overthrow this regime that was being propped up and supported by America, and also the Europeans. Khomeini comes in and represents himself as a person for everyone. And he was brilliant in the way he spoke about it. And the reason why this revolution was also successful was that it wasn't just religious people who supported Khomeini, there was this concept you had, the men with the turbans, meaning the religious people, and the you know, the bow ties or the ties, meaning the secular man, a lot of them who were sent by the Shah abroad to Europe and America to get an education, who came back, saw democracy there, and wanted it for their country.  MANYA: Very few of the revolutionaries could predict that Tehran was headed in the opposite direction and was about to revert to 16th Century Shia Islamic rule. For almost a year, Tehran and the rest of the nation were swept up in revolutionary euphoria.  Roya recalls how the flag remained green, white, and red, but an Allah insignia replaced its old sword-bearing lion. New currency was printed, with portraits bearing beards and turbans. An ode to Khomeini became the new national anthem. While the Shah had escaped on an Air France flight, corpses of his henchmen graced the front pages of newspapers alongside smiling executioners. All celebrated, until the day one of the corpses was Habib Elghanian, the Jewish philanthropist who supported all of Iran's Hebrew schools. Charged and convicted as a Zionist spy.  Elders in the community remembered the insurmountable accusations of blood libel during darker times for Iran's Jews. But younger generations like Roya's, who had not lived through the eras of more ruthless antisemitism and persecution, continued to root for the revolution, regardless of its victims. Meanwhile, Roya's Jewish day school was taken over by a new veiled headmistress who replaced Hebrew lessons with other kinds of religious instruction, and required robes and headscarves for all the students.  ROYA: In the afternoons, from then on, we used to have lessons in a series of what she called: ‘Is religion something that you inherit, or is it something that you choose?' And so I think the intention, clearly, was to convince us that we didn't need to inherit our religions from our parents and ancestors, that we ought to consider better choices. MANYA: But when the headmistress cut short the eight-day Passover break, that was the last straw for Roya and her classmates. Their revolt got her expelled from school.  Though Jews did not universally support Khomeini, some saw themselves as members of the Iranian Communist, or Tudeh Party. They opposed the Shah and the human rights abuses of his monarchy and cautiously considered Khomeini the better option, or at least the lesser of two evils. Alarmed by the developments such as Elghanian's execution and changes like the ones at Roya's school, Jewish community leaders traveled to the Shia holy city of Qom to assure the Supreme Leader of their loyalty to Iran.  SABA: They did this because they wanted to make sure that they protected the Jewish community that was left in Iran. Khomeini made that distinction: ‘I am not against Jews, I'm against Zionists. You could be Jewish in this country. You cannot be a Zionist in this country.'  MANYA: But that wasn't the only change. Right away, the Family Protection Law was reversed, lifting a law against polygamy, giving men full rights in divorce and custody, and lowering the marriage age for girls to nine. Women were banned from serving as judges, and beaches and sports events were segregated by gender.  But it took longer to shut down universities, albeit for only two years, segregate public schools by gender, and stone to death women who were found to have committed adultery. Though Khomeini was certainly proving that he was not the man he promised to be, he backed away from those promises gradually – one brutal crackdown at a time. As a result, the trickle of Jews out of Iran was slow.  ROYA: My father thought, let's wait a few years and see what happens. In retrospect, I think the overwhelming reason was probably that nobody believed that things had changed, and so drastically. It seemed so unbelievable. I mean, a country that had been under monarchy for 2,500 years, couldn't simply see it all go and have a whole new system put in place, especially when it was such a radical shift from what had been there before. So I think, in many ways, we were among the unbelievers, or at least my father was, we thought it could never be, it would not happen. My father proved to be wrong, nothing changed for the better, and the conditions continued to deteriorate. So, so much catastrophe happened in those few years that Iran just simply was steeped into a very dark, intense, and period of political radicalism and also, all sorts of economic shortages and pressures. And so the five years that we were left behind, that we stayed back, changed our perspective on so many things. MANYA: In November 1979, a group of radical university students who supported the Iranian Revolution, took over the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, seized hostages, and held them for 444 days until President Ronald Reagan's inauguration on January 20, 1981. During the hostages' captivity, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein invaded Iran. The conflict that ensued for eight years created shortages on everything from dairy products to sanitary napkins. Mosques became distribution centers for rations. ROYA: We stood in line for hours and hours for eggs, and just the very basic things of daily life. And then it became also clear that religious minorities, including Jews, would no longer be enjoying the same privileges as everyone else. There were bombings that kept coming closer and closer to Tehran, which is where we lived. It was very clear that half of my family that was in the United States could not and would not return, because they were boys who would have been conscripted to go to war. Everything had just come apart in a way that was inconceivable to think that they would change for the better again. MANYA: By 1983, new laws had been passed instituting Islamic dress for all women – violations of which earned a penalty of 74 lashes. Other laws imposed an Islamic morality code that barred co-ed gatherings. Roya and her friends found refuge in the sterile office building that housed the Jewish Iranian Students Association. But she soon figured out that the regime hadn't allowed it to remain for the benefit of the Jewish community. It functioned more like a ghetto to keep Jews off the streets and out of their way. Even the activities that previously gave her comfort were marred by the regime. Poetry books were redacted. Mountain hiking trails were arbitrarily closed to mourn the deaths of countless clerics.  SABA: Slowly what they realize, when Khomeini gained power, was that he was not the person that he claimed to be. He was not this feminist, if anything, all this misogynistic rule came in, and a lot of people realize they, in a sense, got duped and he stole the revolution from them. MANYA: By 1984, the war with Iraq had entered its fourth year. But it was no longer about protecting Iran from Saddam Hussein. Now the Ayatollah wanted to conquer Baghdad, then Jerusalem where he aspired to deliver a sermon from the Temple Mount. Meanwhile, Muslim soldiers wounded in the war chose to bleed rather than receive treatment from Jewish doctors. Boys as young as 12 – regardless of faith – were drafted and sent on suicide missions to open the way for Iranian troops to do battle.  SABA: They were basically used as an army of children that the bombs would detonate, their parents would get a plastic key that was the key to heaven. And the bombs would detonate, and then the army would come in Iranian army would come in. And so that's when a lot of the Persian parents, the Jewish parents freaked out. And that's when they were like: we're getting out of here.  MANYA: By this time, the Hakakian family had moved into a rented apartment building and Roya was attending the neighborhood school. Non-Muslim students were required to take Koran classes and could only use designated water fountains and bathrooms.  As a precaution, Roya's father submitted their passports for renewal. Her mother's application was denied; Roya's passport was held for further consideration; her father's was confiscated.  One night, Roya returned home to find her father burning her books and journals on the balcony of their building. The bonfire of words was for the best, he told her. And at long last, so was leaving. With the help of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Roya and her mother, Helen, fled to Geneva, and after wandering in Europe for several months, eventually reunited with her brothers in the United States. Roya did not see her father again for five years. Still unable to acquire a passport, he was smuggled out of Iran into Pakistan, on foot.  ROYA: My eldest brother left to come to America in the mid-70s. There was a crack in the body of the family then. But then came 1979, and my two other brothers followed. And so we were apart for all those very, very formative years. And then, in 1984, when my mother and I left and my father was left alone in Iran, that was yet another major dramatic and traumatic separation. So, you know, it's interesting that when I look back at the events of 1979, I think, people constantly think about the revolution having, in some ways, blown up Tehran, but it also blew up families. And my own family was among them.  MANYA: While her father's arrival in America was delayed, Roya describes her arrival in stages. She first arrived as a Jewish refugee in 1985 and found her place doing what she had always done – writing in Persian – rebuilding a body of work that had been reduced to ashes.  ROYA: As a teen I had become a writer, people were encouraging me. So, I continued to do it. It was the thing I knew how to do. And it gave me a sense of grounding and identity. So, I kept on doing it, and it kind of worked its magic, as I suppose good writing does for all writers. It connected me to a new community of people who read Persian and who appreciated what I was trying to do. And I found that with each book that I write, I find a new tribe for myself.  MANYA: She arrived again once she learned English. In her first year at Brooklyn College, she tape-recorded her professors to listen again later. She eventually took a course with renowned poet Allen Ginsberg, whose poetry was best known for its condemnation of persecution and imperial politics and whose 1950s poem “Howl” tested the boundaries of America's freedom of speech.  ROYA: When I mastered the language enough to feel comfortable to be a writer once more, then I found a footing and through Allen and a community of literary people that I met here began to kind of foresee a possibility of writing in English. MANYA: There was also her arrival to an American Jewish community that was largely unaware of the role Jews played in shaping Iran long before the advent of Islam. Likewise, they were just as unaware of the role Iran played in shaping ancient Jewish life. They were oblivious to the community's traditions, and the indignities and abuses Iranian Jews had suffered, continue to suffer, with other religious minorities to keep those traditions alive in their homeland.   ROYA: People would say, ‘Oh, you have an accent, where are you from?' I would say, ‘Iran,' and the Jews at the synagogue would say, ‘Are there Jews in Iran?' MANYA: In Roya's most recent book A Beginner's Guide to America, a sequel of sorts to her memoir, she reflects on the lessons learned and the observations made once she arrived in the U.S. She counsels newcomers to take their time answering what might at first seem like an ominous or loaded question. Here's an excerpt: ROYA: “In the early days after your arrival, “Where are you from?” is above all a reminder of your unpreparedness to speak of the past. You have yet to shape your story – what you saw, why you left, how you left, and what it took to get here. This narrative is your personal Book of Genesis: the American Volume, the one you will sooner or later pen, in the mind, if not on the page. You must take your time to do it well and do it justice.” MANYA: No two immigrants' experiences are the same, she writes. The only thing they all have in common is that they have been uprooted and the stories of their displacement have been hijacked by others' assumptions and agendas. ROYA: I witnessed, as so many other Iranian Jews witness, that the story of how we came, why we came, who we had been, was being narrated by those who had a certain partisan perspective about what the history of what Jewish people should be, or how this history needs to be cast, for whatever purposes they had. And I would see that our own recollections of what had happened were being shaded by, or filtered through views other than our own, or facts other than our own. MANYA: As we wrap up this sixth and final episode of the first season of The Forgotten Exodus, it is clear that the same can be said about the stories of the Jewish people. No two tales are the same. Jews have lived everywhere, and there are reasons why they don't anymore. Some fled as refugees. Some embarked as dreamers. Some forged ahead without looking back. Others counted the days until they could return home. What ties them together is their courage, perseverance, and resilience–whether they hailed from Eastern Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, or parts beyond. These six episodes offer only a handful of those stories–shaped by memories and experiences. ROYA: That became sort of an additional incentive, if not burden for me to, to be a witness for several communities, to tell the story of what happened in Iran for American audiences, to Jews, to non-Iranian Jews who didn't realize that there were Jews in Iran, but also to record the history, according to how I had witnessed it, for ourselves, to make sure that it goes down, as I knew it. MANYA: Iranian Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who in the last century left their homes in the Middle East to forge new lives for themselves and future generations.  Many thanks to Roya for sharing her family's story and for helping us wrap up this season of The Forgotten Exodus. If you're listening for the first time, check out our previous episodes on Jews from Iraq, Yemen, Egypt, Libya, and Sudan. Go to ajc.org/theforgottenexodus where you'll also find transcripts, show notes, and family photos. There are still so many stories to tell. Stay tuned in coming months. Does your family have roots in North Africa or the Middle East? One of the goals of this series is to make sure we gather these stories before they are lost. Too many times during my reporting, I encountered children and grandchildren who didn't have the answers to my questions because they never asked. That's why one of the goals of this project is to encourage you to find more of these stories.  Call The Forgotten Exodus hotline. Tell us where your family is from and something you'd like for our listeners to know such as how you've tried to keep the traditions and memories alive. Call 212.891.1336 and leave a message of 2 minutes or less. Be sure to leave your name and where you live now. You can also send an email to theforgottenexodus@ajc.org and we'll be in touch. Tune in every Friday for AJC's weekly podcast about global affairs through a Jewish lens, People of the Pod, brought to you by the same team behind The Forgotten Exodus.  Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can follow The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can sign up to receive updates at AJC.org/forgottenexodussignup. The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. If you've enjoyed the episode, please be sure to spread the word, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us.

EpochTV
People Worldwide Gather, Support Protesters in China

EpochTV

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 24:35


Protests in China are spreading worldwide. The gatherings are displays of solidarity with the rare glimpses of discontent in China, directed at the communist regime. Beijing is clamping down on the wave of unrest. Police forces are rolling in after the nationwide demonstrations rocked the country. Stock up on medication, water, and food, with a 14-day supply for each household member—these are instructions for Americans living in China, straight from the U.S. Embassy. Britain's prime minister announced the end of the “golden era” between the UK and China, as the UK is ousting China from a nuclear power project. Dr. Anthony Fauci is taking aim at Beijing. According to him, China failed to cooperate with an investigation into COVID-19's origin. ⭕️Watch in-depth videos based on Truth & Tradition at Epoch TV

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast
30YearsWar #69: Maiming Spain [1640-41]

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 31:48


By 1640, two rebellions shook Madrid to its core, and had a dramatic knock on effect on Spain's ability to support its Habsburg cousins in Vienna. In summer, Catalonia erupted in revolt after years of provocations and intransigence. When Portuguese soldiers were sent to quell the rising, those soldiers took home news of Spanish weakness, and by December, Portugal had broken away, and declared itself independent under King John IV. It was plain that Spain couldn't suppress the original Dutch revolt with this disaster on its doorstep, and its war against France was also in doubt, as Richelieu took the opportunity to take Catalonia under French protection. The writing was on the wall, the wheels were coming off, but even with this maiming, Spain was not done yet.**DON'T FORGET TO FOLLOW THESE LINKS!**1) To support the podcast financially in return for some extra audio content, check out Patreon!2) To find a community of history friends, look at our Facebook page and group!3) To keep up to date with us, follow us on Twitter!4) Matchlock and the Embassy, our new historical fiction novel, is out NOW! Get it here5) Researcher? Student? Podcaster? Use Perlego to access a massive online library of books, and get a week for free! Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

RNZ: The Detail
When New Zealanders get into trouble overseas

RNZ: The Detail

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 23:11


If you're arrested or detained overseas, who do you call for help back home - and can they really help you?

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Foreign Affairs Minister under pressure to reverse plans to re-open Ireland's embassy in Iranian capital Tehran

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 7:14


China In Focus
People Worldwide Gather, Support Protesters in China

China In Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 24:34


People Worldwide Gather, Support Protesters in ChinaHong Kong: 66 y/o Activist Assaulted at Solidarity ProtestBeijing Cracks Down on Rare Protests Across ChinaFiretruck Blocked by COVID-19 Fence in Sichuan, ChinaU.S. Embassies in China Ask U.S. Citizens to Keep 14-Day Supply of Medication, Food, WaterWhite House Supports Peaceful Protests in ChinaBlinken, Pompeo Voice Support for ProtestersUK Ousts China from Critical Nuclear Power ProjectFauci: China Failed to Cooperate with COVID-19 ProbeS. Korea Warns North: 'Unprecedented Response'U.S. Navy Disputes Chinese Military Claim Against a U.S. Missile CruiserIndia, France Ministers Meet for Defense TalksChina's TikTok Threat: Expert on U.S. Cybersecurity

Fan2Fan Podcast - A Conversation Between Fans About Movies, Comics, TV, Video Games, Toys, Cartoons, And All Things Pop Cultu

In this episode of the Fan2Fan Podcast, writer/editor/amateur film scholar Orrin Grey joins host Bernie Gonzalez to talk about John Carpenter's The Fog. They discuss personal memories of watching the 1980 film along with production, casting, special effects, and more.  Bernie and Orrin also examine the movie's themes as well as Carpenter's historical, literary, and cinematic inspirations. For more info about the Fan2Fan Podcast, visit: https://linktr.ee/fan2fan

EWTN NEWS NIGHTLY
2022-11-29 - EWTN News Nightly | Tuesday, November 29, 2022

EWTN NEWS NIGHTLY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 30:00


On "EWTN News Nightly" tonight: The Senate is voting on legislation that seeks to protect same sex marriages. Democrats and a handful of Republicans have been pushing this bill titled Respect for Marriage Act for months. The Mormons and other denominations give the proposal a thumbs up. Managing Director for the Coalition for Jewish Values, Rabbi Yaakov Menken, joins to discuss what the opinion is of the Jewish community. Correspondent Owen Jensen was able to ask Congressional leaders about the controversial bill that opponents fear will harm religious freedom and punish those who believe in traditional marriage. Meanwhile, high prices and inflation woes did not seem to dampen the spirits of early holiday shoppers. Black Friday sales soared to the tune of more than $9 billion in online spending alone, which is an increase of 2.3% over last year. Cyber Monday also stayed in stride as it was still the biggest online shopping day of the year. Research Fellow for Regional Economics at the Heritage Foundation, EJ Antoni, joins to help us break this down. Finally this evening, in the United Kingdom, officials are highlighting the rise of sexual violence in areas of conflict. Last Sunday, its Embassy to the Holy See held a march in Rome. UK Ambassador to the Holy See, Chris Trott, tells us more about the march the embassy planned and why they decided to plan it. Don't miss out on the latest news and analysis from a Catholic perspective. Get EWTN News Nightly delivered to your email: https://ewtn.com/enn

EU Now
'Tis the Season: EU Holiday Cookbook 2022!

EU Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 11:15


Travis speaks with Chef Frida Johansson from the Embassy of Sweden about her contribution to this year's EU Holiday Cookbook, now available at euholidaycookbook.org. We also revisit Slovakian Chef Agnesa Zalezakova's recipe for Cinnamon Stars, which she shared with listeners in 2021.

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Gordon Chang, Amb. Yoram Ettinger and Bill Walton

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 52:55


GORDON CHANG, Contributor, Gatestone Institute, Newsweek, Author, “The Coming Collapse of China,” “Nuclear Showdown: North Korea Takes the World, “Losing South Korea,” and “The Great US-China Tech War,” @Gordongchang China's impact on the U.S. in the fentanyl market Various “warfares” being waged against the United States by China Are members of Congress unintentionally advancing CCP interests? YORAM ETTINGER, Former Minister for Congressional Affairs at Israel's Embassy in DC, Consultant to Israeli and US legislators Why is the Middle East an epicenter of anti-American terrorism? Has the U.S. State Department been ruined? BILL WALTON, Host, The Bill Walton Show What are ESG values in American investments? Do energy investments provide good value? How big of an issue is climate change?

Embassy Church Sermons
A Song About Security for the King

Embassy Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022


Embassy member David Marus preaches this Sunday (November 27, 2022) on Psalm 61. The 61st sermon in the Psalm series, David's big idea is that king David's prayer for the source of his security is the answer for the source of our security. From the three requests of security that the psalmist makes, we see that the gospel of Jesus Christ is what ultimately secures us, the great King and foundational cornerstone of our lives. The Scripture readings from our worship service were from Psalms 42-43, Matthew 7:24-29, and 1 Timothy 6:15-16. Discussion Questions: How do we know God is always good, no matter the circumstance? What are other examples in the word? How do we know where we find our security is found? What are indicators of where our security is found? How do we respond when life is hard? What do you tend to go to for comfort? What kinds of things do you tell yourself? How does this psalm teach us to pray when God feels distant? How does God's presence impact our daily walk? How have you seen God be a strong tower in His word? how have you seen Him be a strong tower in your life? What does it look like to be closer and closer to God in His presence? How does this psalm teach us to pray according to God's word? How does God's word describe steadfast love and faithfulness? How have you experienced God's steadfast love and faithfulness? How do we know we have security in Jesus Christ? What would that look like in our daily lives? What does it mean that Jesus is our cornerstone? What does that look like to have Jesus be the cornerstone of our lives? How have you seen God make you or others strong in Him in the midst of difficulty? How have you seen the Holy Spirit comfort you or others? What does it look like to find refuge in God? What does our confidence rest in? how does your life reflect what your confidence is found in? What does it look like to cry out to God with our lives? How does this psalm teach us to cry out to God with our lives?

Dragnet
Dimension X - Embassy

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 29:58


RNZ: Checkpoint
Teen calls for Russian embassy's street to be named after Zelenskyy

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 3:42


As tensions escalate in Russia's war on Ukraine, one young Kiwi says New Zealand should be doing more to condemn the conflict. The 14-year-old from Whakatāne has contacted the Prime Minister and other officials to share his ideas. Our reporter Soumya Bhamidipati and cameraman Angus Dreaver have the story.  

Productivity Protected by PKWARE
Leading the Way: Israel's Investment in Cybersecurity

Productivity Protected by PKWARE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 38:02


Over the past several decades, Israel has become a powerhouse in cybersecurity, supplying a large percentage of the world's cyber technology. Israel has also focused on assisting smaller nations in creating cybersecurity startups. Josh Cohen, Director of Cyber Security at the Economic and Trade Office at the Embassy of Israel in Washington, D.C., joins host Spencer Kupferman to discuss more about Israel's ongoing investment in cybersecurity both for its own nation and the world.

Coast to Ghost
The Disappearance of Natalee Holloway

Coast to Ghost

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 43:42


In May of 2005, Natalee Holloway embarked on a trip to Aruba with dozens of classmates. She soaked in the sun, drank by the pool, went to nearby bars, and vanished without a trace. What follows is a series of false confessions and faux hope for those still searching for Natalee Holloway. "If you have any information concerning this person, please contact your local FBI Office; or the U.S. Embassy in Caracas, Venezuela, Legal Attache, at 011-58-212-907-8335.Field Office: Birmingham" Check Out Our Sources --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Small Potatoes
#85 - Baby Embassy

Small Potatoes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 30:25


Small Potatoes takes to the sky this week as we discuss flight attendant eye contact, sexy pilots, confusing storage, and window shopping for your next fine china set. But it's not all aviation themed, we also cover text voices, Anthony's baby bib, Trevor's pill issues, and Spencer's kissing brother. So strap in, keep your tray table up, and thank you for flying Small Potato Airlines!

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Capt. James Fanell, Elaine Donnelly and Amb. Yoram Ettinger

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 52:55


CAPT. JAMES FANELL, Retired Intelligence Officer for the Indo-Pacific, US Navy, former National Security Affairs Fellow, Hoover Institute How can the U.S. deter the CCP? How does the U.S. Navy compare to China's The ongoing deterioration of the United States military ELAINE DONNELLY, Founder and President, Center for Military Readiness What values is the U.S. military prioritizing? The DoD's emphasis on Critical Race Theory A recruiting crisis among the armed forces YORAM ETTINGER, Former Minister for Congressional Affairs at Israel's Embassy in DC, Consultant to Israeli and US legislators How do the midterm elections impact the U.S.-Israeli relationship? Intensification of recent Israeli conflict with Palestinians Can Israel be a force-multiplier for the U.S. economy?

Urban Space Radio
UA: THE DAY THAT WE SURVIVED | ep.33 | Vsimdim: Temporary Housing for People Who Lost Them in War

Urban Space Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 14:00


NGO Vsimdim (or Home for Everyone) produces mobile houses for the families displaced from their homes because of the war in Ukraine. Its founders have developed an adaptation program. They want to give people not only a roof over their heads but also provide them with tools to return to a normal life. We met with Kyrylo Yarko and Tetiana Kameneva, who work on the project. You can support them here: vsimdim.org/help#card You can also support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/UrbanSpaceRadio_UA This episode was created with the support of the Embassy of the Czech Republic in Ukraine.

Paranormal UK Radio Network
Aliens Revealed - Viedamour Elliot: The Alliance for Extraterrestrial Diplomatic Contact

Paranormal UK Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 42:38


The Alliance for Extraterrestrial Diplomatic Contact (AEDC) is an international network of diplomats, politicians, government officials, experts in extraterrestrial affairs, and interested people, with the shared goal of welcoming extraterrestrial civilizations to establish diplomatic missions on our planet. Their overall mission? It's greeting extraterrestrial civilizations. Viedamour Elliot is the Media Relations Officer of the Alliance for Extraterrestrial Diplomatic Contact.

Tour Guide Tell All
(MINI) Embassy Row

Tour Guide Tell All

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 25:58


Canden and Dan are back with a short episode about Embassy Row, a uniquely DC place in Washington DC. Find out more about Embassy Row: https://freetoursbyfoot.com/embassy-row/   Comments or Questions? Or have an idea for future episodes - #pitchtothepod? Email us tourguidetellall@gmail.com Support Tour Guide Tell All: • Want to send a one off donation to support the podcast team? We have a venmo @tourguide-tellall • Check out our STORE for Tour Guide Tell All podcast paraphernalia from tote bags to stickers - https://tour-guide-tell-all.myshopify.com/ • Become a Patron for bonus episodes and early release: https://www.patreon.com/tourguidetellall   You're Listening To: Canden Arciniega and Dan King Produced & Edited by: Canden Arciniega Intro/Outro Music: Well-Seasoned from Audio Hero    

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast
30YearsWar #68: With Allies Like These [1640-41]

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 29:26


By 1640, both the Habsburgs and their foes had reached something of a crisis. There were opportunities to be had, if a new campaign could be pursued, but where to find the money, and how to support the soldiers in lands no longer suitable for massive armies? As they sized each other up, diplomacy continued in the background. Could the Swedes and French finally achieve that seizmic victory they desperately needed? Could anything plug the gaping hole in Habsburg financial and military resources long enough to reclaim the Empire for the Emperor? If Vienna could not rely on Madrid, and Stockholm could not depend on Paris, there was no guarantee that a new campaign would be in the offing at all. But this is only 1640, so you know we've eight more years to go. They were destined to be arguably the longest years of all.**DON'T FORGET TO FOLLOW THESE LINKS!**1) To support the podcast financially in return for some extra audio content, check out Patreon!2) To find a community of history friends, look at our Facebook page and group!3) To keep up to date with us, follow us on Twitter!4) Matchlock and the Embassy, our new historical fiction novel, is out NOW! Get it here5) Researcher? Student? Podcaster? Use Perlego to access a massive online library of books, and get a week for free! Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Living Artist
Interview with Morgan Fox, Curatorial Assistant with Art In Embassies

The Living Artist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 64:00


In this episode of The Living Artist, Preston sits down with Morgan Fox. Morgan is a curatorial assistant with Art in Embassies, an office of the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in History at Furman University, and received her Master of Arts degree in Art and Museum Studies at Georgetown University in 2017. She has also studied and worked at many prestigious institutions, such as Sotheby's Institute of Art in London, the National Archives, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the George Washington University Museum and Textile Museum, to highlight just a few. During this conversation, Morgan shares her origins falling in love with the arts from an early age, her numerous studies and positions within the art world, landing a position with Art In Embassies, what AIE is and does as an organization, her love for connecting artists with ambassadors and communities around the world, how she discovered Preston's work, advice to artists and art professionals, the importance of perseverance, and much more. Please enjoy this in-depth conversation with Morgan Fox! Art in Embassies' statement: “Art is, in essence, visual diplomacy. It accelerates cultural connection, sparks conversation, and helps diplomats convey who we all are as Americans. Art in Embassies creates exhibitions, installations, exchanges, and public programming that convey how art can transcend national borders and foster connections among people around the world.” Visit Art In Embassies at https://www.art.state.gov for more information, or to submit your artwork. Find out more about Morgan Fox at https://www.linkedin.com/in/morgan-fox-926621b1/ For more information on Preston M. Smith and his artwork, visit https://www.pmsartwork.com, or follow him on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/pmsartwork (social media everywhere @pmsartwork). You can also now subscribe to his YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/pmsartwork. You can now support the Podcast with a donation. Go to https://www.pmsartwork.com/podcast to check it out and donate. Huge thank you to Feedspot for choosing The Living Artist for their list of the Top 60 Art Podcasts You Must Follow in 2021. It is a huge honor to have made this amazing list (coming in at #11) with so many other wonderful podcasts. Big thank you to Feedspot! You can check out this list and more of Feedspot at https://blog.feedspot.com/art_podcasts. Podcast theme music: "Music by Jason Shaw on Audionautix.com"

Embassy Church
Ephesians 3:14-21 | Union | Confidence in God's Power

Embassy Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 20:22


Unfortunately, due to a recording error, we were only able to post the first 20 minutes of Derek's sermon from this past Sunday. We apologize for the inconvenience!November 6th, 2022 | Derek Jones

Small Town Missing
Mysterious Disappearance of Amy Lynn Bradley

Small Town Missing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 27:21


Join the team as they discuss the disappearance of Amy Lynn Bradley.  The twenty-three year-old went missing on March 24,1998 while on a cruise with her family.  Was she abducted from the ship?  Did she fall overboard?Merrian Lynn Carver and Annette Marie Mizener also vanished while on cruises.If you have any information regarding the missing women discussed on this episode, please contact your local FBI field office or U.S. Embassy.  You can also submit tips to tips.fbi.gov.  Tips can be anonymous.Sources for this episodeWanted by the FBI: Missing Woman Amy Lynn Bradley — FBIAMY LYNN BRADLEY — FBIWanted by the FBI: Seeking Tips in Amy Bradley Investigation - Bing videoAmy Lynn Bradley – The Charley ProjectSearch Results - SpecialPages - Alaska Department of Public SafetyMerrian Lynn Carver – The Charley ProjectAnnette Marie Mizener – The Charley Project

History Daily
The Iran Hostage Crisis

History Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 21:28


November 4th, 1979. United States diplomats and citizens are held hostage after a group of militant Iranian college students take over the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

What A Day
True Crime Rates

What A Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 25:06


In the run-up to the midterm elections, Republicans have made crime a central issue in their attacks against Democrats. But the fear tactics aren't backed up by facts.North Korea tried to launch a powerful long-range missile on Thursday, following an intense volley of short-range missile tests earlier this week. And with tensions already high in the region, there's concern that North Korea may attempt a nuclear weapons test.And in headlines: former Pakistani prime minister Imran Khan was shot and wounded during a protest rally, U.S. Embassy officials met with Brittney Griner in Russia, and tens of thousands of student workers across the University of California system voted to authorize a strike.Show Notes:Vote Save America: Every Last Vote – https://votesaveamerica.com/every-last-vote/Crooked Coffee is officially here. Our first blend, What A Morning, is available in medium and dark roasts. Wake up with your own bag at crooked.com/coffeeFollow us on Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/whataday/For a transcript of this episode, please visit crooked.com/whataday 

HistoryPod
4th November 1979: Iran hostage crisis begins when Iranian students storm the American Embassy in Tehran

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022


The students seized 66 hostages, 14 of whom were released before the end of the crisis. The other 52 hostages were held for 444 ...

Narcology
US EMBASSY ISSUES ALERT IN ECUADOR DUE TO INCREASE CARTEL ACTIVITY

Narcology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 2:44


AP Audio Stories
US Embassy officials visit Brittney Griner in Russia prison

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 1:01


AP correspondent Ben Thomas reports on Brittney-Griner.

My Fourth Act Podcast
E80 | Alan Hughes | How I Became A Rock'n Roll Chef

My Fourth Act Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 50:38 Transcription Available


Alan Hughes is an Argentinian-born chef, restaurateur, rock'n roller and inveterate world traveler. He began his career in some of New York's finest restaurants – The River Café, Sarabeth's, Union Square Café – and did a stint as private chef in Gracie Mansion, New York City's mayoral residence, under mayors Ed Koch and David Dinkins. In Miami, Alan founded One Ninety, a pioneering restaurant in the city's Design District, and The Embassy. Alan hosted an online cooking series for Yahoo en Espanol titled Cook N' Rock, contributed to award-winning cookbooks and produces highly entertaining and deeply personal culinary segments for his YouTube channel from every part of the world – all while performing in rock n' roll clubs everywhere. What I have learned about life from cooking in famous restaurants, on private yachts, in the homes of the wealthy. How I became a restaurateur. Why I continue to travel the world. How becoming a grandfather and the death of my mom have impacted my life. https://www.chefalanhughes.com/ (https://www.chefalanhughes.com/)

The Money Show
Special broadcast of The Absa Champagne in Africa Festival 2022. And, Shapeshifter, Chris Weylandt, CEO at Weylandts - the man behind luxurious furniture

The Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 89:33


  Exclusive interview with Paul Edouard Bertin, Director of Champagne BILLECART-SALMON about being the Seven generations of the same Billecart-Salmon Champagne family and house which was started by his many times great grandparents in 1818 in Ay outside Epernay in northeast France.   Rui Morais, CFO at Dis-Chem Pharmacies takes Bruce Whitfield through the interim financial results.  Dis-Chem beefs up its interim dividend after a jump in profit despite high inflation and interest-rate hikes squeezing consumer spending.   Shaun Anderson, Ambassador of the Embassy at Order of Champagne in Africa on the future for Champagne in Africa.   Benedict Maaga, head of Corporate Reputation & Integrated Communications at Absa on the lender's involvement with the Absa Champagne in Africa Festival 2022.   Lorraine Geldenhuys, Wine maker and senor lecture at the The Elsenburg Agricultural Training Institute – on everything champagne and blind tasting   Chris Weylandt, CEO at Weylandts is this week's shapeshifter on his career path and growth of the business. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SBS Nepali - एसबीएस नेपाली पोडकाष्ट
Nepal Embassy to operate mobile passport service

SBS Nepali - एसबीएस नेपाली पोडकाष्ट

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 5:06


Ambassador Kailash Raj Pokharel has confirmed with SBS Nepali that the mobile passport team will reach Tasmania on the 5th of November.

Profiles in Public Service
Diplomacy, Diversity, and Dialogue at the U.S. Embassy to Israel

Profiles in Public Service

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 32:19


Samantha Sutton, a 2022 Service to America Medals® Emerging Leader finalist and current Political Advisor for the United States Mission to the United Nations, shares her story of working in diplomacy as a career civil servant who started as an intern with the State Department. Sutton has worked on Middle East peace issues across three different presidential administrations and has provided important continuity during transitions to advance peace in the region. Sutton joined Profiles in Public Service from Israel where she was most recently serving as chief of staff to Ambassador Tom Nides, alongside Fred Wilson, the U.S. Embassy to Israel's first Chief Diversity Officer. Wilson led efforts to encourage greater dialogue among senior leaders, embassy staff, and the diverse communities Mission Jerusalem works alongside. Sutton and Wilson discuss their accomplishments and challenges working on the Israel-Palestinian conflict as well as their suggestions for emerging leaders interested in pursuing international relations and diplomacy work through the federal government. This episode is the fourth of four highlighting some of our 2022 Service to America Medals® finalists. Nominate an outstanding public servant for a 2023 Sammies medal today through our nomination form! Tune in on November 23rd at 8 pm on Bloomberg Television and the Partnership's YouTube Channel linked in our show notes. A transcript of this episode can be found here. Additional Resources: Reach out to Sam Sutton and Fred Wilson on LinkedIn. Learn more about internships and fellowships at the Department of State. Learn more about the United States Mission to the United Nations.

The Jeremiah Show
SN10 - Ep505 - Joe Sohm - America's Photo Historian

The Jeremiah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 78:48


My very special guest today is Joseph Sohm - America's Photo Historian He's the Author of “Visions of America – Photographing Democracy” with forward by Paul Theroux Website - visionsofamerica.com (visionsofdemocracy.com) Joe Sohm has photographed our 50 states spanning 3 decades. Joe's images have been published internationally more than 1 million times in his career, 50,000 times a year - in all major print media, TV, Internet and Motion Pictures. His images have been published in publications such as the National Geographic, Time Magazine, The New York Times, and Washington Post, as well as on CNN, ABC's “The VIEW,” and in films like “Night of the Museum”. His work is featured in President Clinton's book "My Life" and in his Presidential Library as well as in Frederick J. Ryan's portrait of Ronald Reagan, "The Great Communicator;" in Al Gore's Oscar-winning film "An Inconvenient Truth;" in NBC's "Embassies." He has presented his work with the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington DC, the Boston Pops, Philly Pops, New West Symphony, and the Kansas City Symphony orchestra and he has given talks to over 100 venues across America. In his speaking appearances, Joe explores what he has gleaned during his travels and how he has fallen in love with America. The LIVE SHOW is at the VENTURA COUNTY MUSEUM on Thursday, November 3, at 6:30 PM PST - Hosted by noted Journalist Ivor Davis. Ivor Davis: Up Close and Personal with Joe Sohm Joe Sohm joins host Ivor Davis for a discussion of his work as one of the nation's preeminent political photographers. Sohm's award-winning photographs have been featured in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, National Geographic, and Time Magazine as well as on news outlets such as MSNBC, CNN, ABC, and PBS. This discussion will offer guests the opportunity to hear the insights of two journalists who have covered some of the most pivotal political moments of the last 50 years. Doors open at 6 pm In-Person Members may attend for free. Non-Members In-Person Fee: $10 Non-Member Zoom Fee: $5

Pineland Underground
The Day the Earth Shook | A Special Forces Team responds to the catastrophic 2015 Nepal Earthquake

Pineland Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 98:57


Two Special Forces Teams arrive in Nepal to conduct a training exercise with the host nation's military but immediately find themselves in the middle of leading crisis response efforts after a massive earthquake hits Nepal in 2015. Luckily, one of these teams was a special skills mountaineering team already acclimatized to extreme altitudes.Dan Kurtenbach is a former Army Special Forces and Infantry officer with Special Operations and conventional assignments in the Middle East, Europe, and Asia.  Notably, he led and Infantry platoon in Iraq, commanded the Special Forces “A” team responsible for conducting rescue operations during the 2015 Nepal earthquake, and subsequently led a Special Operations element in the US Embassy in Bangladesh during the 2016 Dhaka terrorist attacks. He is currently a Director at an AI/ML company and a doctoral candidate at Johns Hopkins SAIS. He was previously a White House Fellow (2020 – 2021) and a program manager for new product introduction at Apple in Silicon Valley.   Dan earned a B.S. from West Point, MBA from MIT, and an MPA from Harvard.Sergeant Major (Retired) Mitch Elwood  is a retired Green Beret from 1st Special Forces Group with 25 years of active service.  He stomped ground and broke bread in 35 countries during that time, and conducted combat operations in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the highly contested area of the southern Philippines.  He served on Special Forces ODA 153/1223 as a Medic and ODA 1121 as a Team Sergeant – all Mountain Teams!  Mitch is a disaster magnet having found himself in the Philippines during Typhoon Yolanda in 2013, in Nepal for the 7.8 magnitude earthquake in 2015, and responded to Indonesia for the tsunami and liquefaction event of Sulawest in 2018.       When he wasn't on an ODA he worked as an Operations NCO for Special Operations Task Force 511, Joint Special Operations Task Force – Philippines, and a future plans Sergeant Major in 1st Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group in Okinawa, Japan. Email Us!pinelandunderground@gmail.comUSAJFKSWCS InstagramSpecial Warfare Center (@u.s.armyswcs) • Instagram photos and videosUSAJFKSWCS Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/jfkcenterandschool/YOUTUBE:(1) Pineland Underground Podcast - YouTubeDVIDS:https://www.dvidshub.net/unit/USAJFKSWCS Contact the Hosts:Sergeant Major Chuck Ritter - Deputy Commandant at the SWCS Noncommissioned  Officer AcademyChuck Ritter InstagramChuck Ritter (@charles.p.ritter) • Instagram photos and videosChuck Ritter LinkedInwww.linkedin.com/in/chuckritterspecialforcesChuck Ritter Facebookcharles.ritter.12Twitter@chuckritter7 Major Bobby Tuttle - Director of the SWCS Language, Regional Education, and Culture officeBobby Tuttle FacebookBobby Tuttle | FacebookBobby Tuttle LinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/bobbytuttle Pineland Underground Recording and Editing TeamJason Gambardella#pinelandunderground #bestpodcastinthemilitary #relentlessawesomeness #specialoperation #usajfkswcs #chuckritter #bobbytuttle #community #specialforces #Nepal #Mountain #1stSFG #crisisresponse  

Urban Space Radio
UA: THE DAY THAT WE SURVIVED | ep.31 | Ukrainians` Reaction to Russia’s Nuclear Threats

Urban Space Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 12:25


The State Emergency Service instructions, "nuclear backpacks" for schoolchildren, potassium iodide, and an orgy on Shekavytsia Mount. Whether the nuclear threat from Russia is real or not, Ukrainians do not despair and invent various ways to survive an attack. This episode was created with the support of the Embassy of the Czech Republic in Ukraine. You can also support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/UrbanSpaceRadio_UA

Black and White Sports Podcast
Brittney Griner Protesters SMOKE OUT Russian Embassy In Washington for WNBA Player

Black and White Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 7:52


Brittney Griner Protesters SMOKE OUT Russian Embassy In Washington for WNBA Player Make Sure You Subscribe on Podcast & YouTube! Make Sure You Subscribe on Podcast! Available on Google Podcast, Spotify, Castbox, Apple Podcasts (ITunes): https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports Become a Paid Subscriber: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports/subscribe The podcast is all about the world of sports news, sports reactions, and the games. Website: www.blackandwhitenetwork.com Get your MERCH here: https://teespring.com/stores/blackandwhitesports Use Promo Code "USAFIRST" for 25% off any of the merch! After Pay Now Available! NFL PA Threatens LEGAL ACTION after AWFUL Head Injury on Tua Tagovailoa on TNF after SUNDAY's Game! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitenetwork/support

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast
30YearsWar #67: The Ravages of War [1639]

When Diplomacy Fails Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 32:27


War is hell, as the saying goes, but just how bad was the war by the late 1630s, after two decades of fighting? As we learn here, the worst aspects of the conflict didn't come from the deaths in battle, but what went along with the battle - armies that marched over aching, increasingly desolate lands; the ruination of the delicate agricultural system; the acute crisis of starvation that followed, and the spread of disease that followed it. The picture was depressing, but it tells a story of a continent that grew more desperate for peace by the month. Could the Holy Roman Emperor make it happen? Let's find out...**DON'T FORGET TO FOLLOW THESE LINKS!**1) To support the podcast financially in return for some extra audio content, check out Patreon!2) To find a community of history friends, look at our Facebook page and group!3) To keep up to date with us, follow us on Twitter!4) Matchlock and the Embassy, our new historical fiction novel, is out NOW! Get it here5) Researcher? Student? Podcaster? Use Perlego to access a massive online library of books, and get a week for free! Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Foreign Affairs Interview
Alone in Beijing: A View From the Embassy

The Foreign Affairs Interview

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 45:30


The past six months have marked an especially rocky chapter in the U.S.-Chinese relationship. Chinese President Xi Jinping's zero-COVID policy has made it difficult to travel around the country and has largely kept foreigners away. In August, Beijing cut off key channels of communication with Washington in response to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan. In the months since Moscow launched its invasion of Ukraine, China has not condemned Russia's unprovoked assault, nor has it publicly moved away from its “no limits” partnership with the Kremlin. More recently, new trade restrictions from the Biden administration have dealt a serious blow to the Chinese semiconductor industry. All in all, it has been a tense and unusual time in this fragile but immensely important relationship.  As the United States' top diplomat to China, Ambassador Nick Burns has had to navigate the challenges of the last few months, strongly pushing back on China where the Biden administration disagrees with Beijing but also trying to find opportunities where communication, and even cooperation, is possible. He brings enormous experience to the job. Burns previously served at the State Department as undersecretary for political affairs, as ambassador to NATO and to Greece, and as State Department spokesperson. He has also worked on the National Security Council staff on Soviet and Russian affairs.  We discuss the challenges facing China, how China views American power, and what it's like to represent the United States in Beijing today. You can find transcripts and more episodes of “The Foreign Affairs Interview” at https://www.foreignaffairs.com/podcasts/foreign-affairs-interview.  

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff
What Problems Will You Enjoy Solving?: Jade Watson of SickBird

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 23:39


Ever since she was a child, Jade Watson enjoyed storytelling in all its forms. Inspired by the notion that you could get paid to travel the world and share these stories, Jade knew she was destined for a career in production and media. The major caveat: as a Canadian citizen, Jade had to convince the U.S. Embassy to allow her to run her own company stateside. Luckily, two years at a venture capital firm and a heap of legal research prepared Jade for exactly the kind of skills she'd need to not only get government approval, but also to fund her business from the start. Cornering the market in original content on emerging platforms, SickBird Productions is a media empire in the making, and this is only the beginning. Thanks for listening! Don't forget to order Rebecca's new book, Fearless: The New Rules for Unlocking Creativity, Courage, and Success. Follow Superwomen on Instagram. Social Media @jadewatson @sickbirdproductions Big Ideas People pick (a lot of) their problems – how can you cultivate a life where you encounter the kinds of problems you enjoy solving? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/superwomen/support