Podcasts about racoons

medium sized procyonid mammal native to North America

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Best podcasts about racoons

Latest podcast episodes about racoons

Under Pressure Outdoors Podcast
Ep. 150 Sea Ducks, Seals and Racoons

Under Pressure Outdoors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 107:23


Join the crew this week as they share memories from their trip to NC with Hattys Game Calls in search of sea ducks. Did they find them? Sort of. Did they kill a some? Kinda. Did they make memories that will last a lifetime? Absolutely. UPO Social Media - https://linktr.ee/underpressureoutdoors Hazmore Outdoor Products- Hazmore.netUse Code UPO15 at checkout for 15% off your next order Hatty's Game Calls- https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100083279825404

Live 95.5
Racoon Rescue

Live 95.5

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 3:24


Racoon Rescue by Live 95.5

Downhill Fast
Scorpion shit hot licks and racoon rumbles

Downhill Fast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 71:37


This week's episode goes downhill fast out of the gate. Tamara really is to blame. As an agent of chaos she thought lollipops with a scorpions in them would be a good idea. They were not a good idea. Furthermore, Tamara thought a nitro Pepsi would be fun to try. It exploded and made a huge mess. Rheannon thought she was going to come face to face with a raccoon. She started the fight empty handed, but it did end with her having a dart gun. Luckily it didn't go as downhill fast as it could have.  

The Jon DiVito Show
Papa Jon's Podcast November 20, 2022

The Jon DiVito Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 93:52


We has a great show today. I had Racoon 6 and Shannon call in. We talked about Thanksgiving, favorite holidays, horror movies, Trump back on Twitter, 2022 election, and a variety of other topics. This was a very good show. I hope you enjoy it. 

What The Fartlek Podcast
Series 8 Episode 11: Mike Seaman

What The Fartlek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 116:03


It's Thursday and you know what that means Alton Towers is in the rear view but we are looking forward on the road to 100.  In our main event, Rob chats to Mike Seaman and accomplished runner in his own right who has racked up some amazing challenges and achievements, he also happens to be the CEO of Racoon events and the man behind the National Running Show. We hear all about his journey as well as venturing into the world of running events management It's a bumper one this week as the lads reflect on a massive community weekend with the Fartlek Family, Bemma were in South Wales for Parkrun and Sammy joins us for a chaotic roll call= If you would like to take part in our World Cup Prediction game then email the podcast on whatthefartlekpodcast@gmail.com for full info ore donate directly to our Make A Wish fund on our JUST GIVING The National Running Show North is back in January and you can bag a free ticket using the code FARTLEK over at their website  - it's only valid until 21st November so be quick and be a part of the UK's biggest and best running expo Remember you can join our Fartlek Family at any time, be part of our 100+ strong community of amazing people, organising meet ups, catch ups and general nonsense all year round Make sure you keep up to date on all our goings-on, upcoming events and latest episode details by signing up to our BRAND NEW NEWSLETTER Make sure you subscribe, rate, review and checkout our social media channels: Website: What The Fartlek Podcast Instagram: @Whatthefartlek_Podcast  Facebook: What The Fartlek Podcast Twitter: @WhatTheFartlek  YouTube: What The Fartlek Podcast Email us at - whatthefartlekpodcast@gmail.com Music by: Graham Lindley Follow on: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube Email at: g.lindley@hotmail.co.uk

Berlin Briefing
17.11.2022 - Election repetition, Gas prices, Fatal accident, Racoons

Berlin Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 7:43


Election repetition Gas prices Fatal accident Racoons ** Please check out the show notes for the links to our sources. Donate: https://www.berlinbriefing.de/donate/ Twitter: @berlinbriefing Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BerlinBriefing/ Mail: berlinbriefing@gmail.com

WTF did she just say?
The Rattlesnake ... the racoon ... and my key to manifestation

WTF did she just say?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 22:22


In this episode, I talk about manifesting seeing, hearing and taking a picture of a rattlesnake and also, seeing racoon.  I was on two very short trips and I openly declared that I was going to see them … AND I DID.  This is the story of both of those experiences and a story on how you can use this same process to manifest what YOU want.  Here it is:Step One:  Get clear on what you wantStep Two:  Embody the version of you who has the thing (in this case it was full confidence that I WAS the chick who would see them)Step Three:  Fuck the How for nowStep Four:  Take inspired Actionand my own addition …Step Five:  "Stay in the stars”I hope you love this story … it's a total Sandra Priestley-esque story and I love it so much.SandraFor more on regaining your own personal power + manifesting more of what you want and less of what you don't … you can join THE POWER OF YOU at any time and get lifetime access.  Link is here:     www.thefengshuichick.ca/power

Real Black Consciousnesses Forum
Adam "Smallhat" Silverman Met With Kyrie Irving - Now All The raCOONS Change Their Tune, SMH!

Real Black Consciousnesses Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 33:51


#NBA #KyrieIrving #Shaq Email the podcast: rbcforum313@yahoo.com https://cash.app/$BlackConsciousnes Join us as we have a conversation about how almost the entire Black sportscast community went against Kyrie Irving for sharing a documentary on his Twitter because they thought he was finished. But our brother Kyrie Irving stood his ground, met with the NBA commissioner, and left the meeting with a pretty decent outcome. So now, all of a sudden, the bought neeeegkroes have changed their tune so their conversation will match up with their NBA Massa...and this is an issue that must be discussed. According to YahooSports: NBA commissioner Adam Silver on Kyrie Irving meeting: I have ‘no doubt that he's not antisemitic' NBA commissioner Adam Silver spoke about his meeting with Brooklyn Nets star Kyrie Irving for the first time Thursday. Though Silver didn't elaborate much on their meeting — which came earlier this week after the Nets suspended Irving for sharing an antisemitic film on social media — he said he doesn't think Irving is actually antisemitic. “It's something I've been very involved in. It's obviously an incredibly unfortunate situation,” Silver said, via The New York Times' Sopan Dep. “It's not a secret. I met with Kyrie earlier this week. I personally, based on what he said directly to me, have no doubt that he's not antisemitic, but I think there's a process that he's going to now need to go through. I think he understands that and incidentally, it's now with the Nets who are working with specifics.” Silver said that the Nets will decide when Irving can return "in consultation with the league." Hashtags: #kyrieirving #nba #kyrie #basketball #lebronjames #kevindurant #lebron #jamesharden #stephencurry #ballislife #lakers #kobebryant #stephcurry #nike #k #brooklynnets #nets #kobe #kawhileonard #nbabasketball #curry #kd #jordan #nbaplayoffs #russellwestbrook #bball #dunk #sports #giannisantetokounmpo #brooklyn --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/realblackforum/message

TerraSpaces
Late Night Degen with Jade

TerraSpaces

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 83:08


Today on the Ether we have the last hour or so of the Late Night Degen space hosted by Jade. This is a fun space because the Racoon gang tries to shill their project to a bunch of crypto normies. You'll hear from Rarma, Robo, LiLGainzz, DefiDon_ETH, Aztec, Rise, and more! Recorded on November 5th 2022. If you enjoy the music at the end of the episodes, you can find the albums streaming on Spotify, and the rest of your favorite streaming platforms. Check out Project Survival, Virus Diaries, and Plan B wherever you get your music. Thank you to everyone in the community who supports TerraSpaces.

TerraSpaces
Crypto and Racoons with Mayor Ed Dantes Pt.2

TerraSpaces

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 123:44


Today on the Ether we have part 2 of a 3 part space hosted by Mayor Ed Dantes with Stinky and the Brain, and the rest of the Racoon gang. You'll hear from Sir Yawpster, Brasco, Bbandz, Homestead Cosmonaut, LiLGainzz, CryptoTank, CosmoClay_, Amanda, nftspacecadet, Jade, Sheldon Dearr, Finn, Sunnyside Reapers NFTs, and more! Recorded on November 5th 2022. If you enjoy the music at the end of the episodes, you can find the albums streaming on Spotify, and the rest of your favorite streaming platforms. Check out Project Survival, Virus Diaries, and Plan B wherever you get your music. Thank you to everyone in the community who supports TerraSpaces.

TerraSpaces
Crypto and Racoons with Mayor Ed Dantes Pt.3

TerraSpaces

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 86:11


Today on the Ether we have part 3 of a 3 part space hosted by Mayor Ed Dantes with Stinky and the Brain, and the rest of the Racoon gang. You'll hear from Sir Yawpster, Brasco, Bbandz, Homestead Cosmonaut, LiLGainzz, CryptoTank, CosmoClay_, Amanda, nftspacecadet, Jade, Sheldon Dearr, Finn, Sunnyside Reapers NFTs, and more! Recorded on November 5th 2022. If you enjoy the music at the end of the episodes, you can find the albums streaming on Spotify, and the rest of your favorite streaming platforms. Check out Project Survival, Virus Diaries, and Plan B wherever you get your music. Thank you to everyone in the community who supports TerraSpaces.

TerraSpaces
Crypto and Racoons with Mayor Ed Dantes Pt.1

TerraSpaces

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 185:12


Today on the Ether we have part 1 of a 3 part space hosted by Mayor Ed Dantes with Stinky and the Brain, and the rest of the Racoon gang. You'll hear from Sir Yawpster, Brasco, Bbandz, Homestead Cosmonaut, LiLGainzz, CryptoTank, CosmoClay_, Amanda, nftspacecadet, Jade, Sheldon Dearr, Finn, Sunnyside Reapers NFTs, and more! Recorded on November 5th 2022. If you enjoy the music at the end of the episodes, you can find the albums streaming on Spotify, and the rest of your favorite streaming platforms. Check out Project Survival, Virus Diaries, and Plan B wherever you get your music. Thank you to everyone in the community who supports TerraSpaces.

Talking in the Driveway Podcast

Welcome back to The Driveway.  The full crew discusses the tequila issue and the Captain taking on a racoon.  We whip around the world of sports discussing the world series, college football playoff rankings, the NBA and the NFL.  We make our picks and share some email.  Pour yourself a cold one and join us in The Driveway.

Vibration Elevation - Energy Clearing
Animal Spirit Guide Racoon - The Inventor

Vibration Elevation - Energy Clearing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 7:26


Juggle Your Roles in Life Todays clearing is to help you work with racoon energy. If you are inventive and creative, this energy can help you stay in integrity with all the roles you play in life. Enjoy

Buck Junkie Podcast
EP30: Creating The Perfect Environment For Hunting Deer

Buck Junkie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 56:56


On today's episode of the Buck Junkie Podcast, the guys are excited and preparing for the upcoming deer season (00:17)! The turnips are PLENTIFUL on The Farm, and that's a good and bad thing… (00:44) The guys explain the importance of having seeders on the farm to improve efficiency on food plots (01:36). There's a new tractor on the farm (06:48)! These tractor attachments can provide tremendous support with ditches (09:45). Let's recap “Should You Hunt Early or Late?” from Episode 29 (11:20). This is how you make deer nocturnal (13:03). Our Game Cams are having issues (14:53), because these opossums and racoons are following scrapes on the animal trail (16:03). Are cellular cams beneficial to surveying before a hunt (17:00)? There are turkeys everywhere on the farm (19:56)! Let's talk about our seasonal growth and updates around the farm (21:30). These ladder stands might not be OSHA approved… (23:21). The deer are following kudzu to move around the land (25:45). Malcom, Mikey, and Mark talks about their “Buck Bomb” incident (26:55). What are the guys' thoughts of supplemental feeding in Mississippi (30:08)? Deer just can't get enough of corn (35:37). Are people breaking CWD regulations and hunting laws (36:30)? The guys experiment with molasses and corn on the wildlife (37:35). What happens when you tie peanut butter to a tree (40:41)? Mikey's sweet potato mountain (41:30). What are the guys craziest deer feeding stories (43:27)? Is there a right or wrong way to properly feed deer (44:38)? It might be difficult to create the perfect environment for deer (46:21). Malcom and Mikey go quail easter egg hunting (47:21)! Is THIS legal to hunt (48:50)? What's been cookin' with the guys (50:00)?

To Live and Try in LA
Halloween and Wild cougars in our area

To Live and Try in LA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 46:17


This week we cover our costumes, the costumes we wish we had thought of ahead of time, the fall of Kanye, Dia de los Muertos, and review Black Adam! Got a comment or question? Send it to: toliveandtryinlapodcast@gmail.com Follow us on: Instagram: @toliveandtryinlapodcast Twitter: @toliveandtrypod

Monster Fuzz
Resident Evil: Hunter's Moon

Monster Fuzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 40:25


It's time for another spooky season story. Little bit of fanfic here from the world of Resident Evil. Hope you guys enjoy it! - EamonnDont ever write stuff in my descriptions again - Rob

Inside The Mind of a Child Genius
#46 - How to Raise a Kid 1/2: Racoon King

Inside The Mind of a Child Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 77:45 Transcription Available


Do you want to be the guy whose clothes are always wet? Do you feel like the neighborhood dogs don't need you? Are you wondering if Skechers makes shorts now? If you answered yes to any of those questions, then this delightful podcast episode will be a treat for your little ears. Listen to it. Also in this episode: “Where's my driving wine?”, “In Texas, we don't just mess with alligators, we molest them.”, explosive diarrhea, Bob's Butt Plug Emporium, Michigan State, and UNC.

Hoops Temple
114. The Jazz Are More Than 3 Racoons in a Trench Coat Pretending to be Human

Hoops Temple

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022


Dylan and Nathan begin the pod just in time to watch the Lakers go 0-3. Our duo recounts their favorite moments of the first week. Read us at Hoop-Social.com Tiktok @Hoopstemple Aaron's tiktok @Possiblechairs Follow us on Twitter @HoopsTemplePod https://linktr.ee/Temple_EAM On twitter at @Nathans127

TerraSpaces
RAC Community Call Pt.1

TerraSpaces

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 179:40


Today on the Ether we have part 1 of a 2 part Racoon community call hosted by the one and only Rugbro Shillby. He's since gone missing so if you see him, tell him mum misses him. Recorded on October 24th 2022. If you enjoy the music at the end of the episodes, you can find the albums streaming on Spotify, and the rest of your favorite streaming platforms. Check out Project Survival, Virus Diaries, and Plan B wherever you get your music. Thank you to everyone in the community who supports TerraSpaces.

TerraSpaces
RAC Community Call Pt.2

TerraSpaces

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 115:46


Today on the Ether we have part 2 of a 2 part Racoon community call hosted by the one and only Rugbro Shillby. He's since gone missing so if you see him, tell him mum misses him. Recorded on October 24th 2022. If you enjoy the music at the end of the episodes, you can find the albums streaming on Spotify, and the rest of your favorite streaming platforms. Check out Project Survival, Virus Diaries, and Plan B wherever you get your music. Thank you to everyone in the community who supports TerraSpaces.

Sons of Ben: The Pod
Episode #109 -Playoffs! w/ Sean Brace & The Rally Racoon

Sons of Ben: The Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 55:42


The lads are joined by Sean Brace from Fox Sports the Gambler! We talk about the recent SOB elections, we preview the playoff match up vs Cincy, and Adam share's his thoughts on the USMNT

Best of Roula & Ryan
101422 7a Angry Racoon Trash Can Prank Call, Look At Me Now, Zombie-oke Is Back

Best of Roula & Ryan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 36:27 Very Popular


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ticket Top 10
The Musers- 840 Bit- George's Racoon

The Ticket Top 10

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 6:37


10.6.22.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dark Side of Wikipedia | True Crime & Dark History
462: Woman Brings Pet Racoon To Bar, Arrest Ensues | True Crime Daily Brief

Dark Side of Wikipedia | True Crime & Dark History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 2:37


A woman from North Dakota was arrested after she allegedly brought her pet raccoon into a nightclub. A 38-year-old woman is facing criminal charges after she was allegedly caught bringing her pet "non-domesticated raccoon" to a club. According to the Benson County Sheriff's Office, Erin Christensen was brought into custody Sept. 14 on accusations of giving false information to law enforcement, tampering with evidence, and other North Dakota Game & Fish offences. After "executing many search warrants in the Maddock area and identifying a non-domesticated raccoon," the Benson County Sheriff's Office and North Dakota Game & Fish apparently concluded their investigation into Christensen. Christensen allegedly took her pet raccoon to a neighborhood watering hole. The Benson County Sheriff's Office reported that officials became concerned about a possible rabies exposure and "put down and transported to be tested for rabies and other diseases" the raccoon. She posted $1,500 bond on September 21, according to court documents. The Bismarck Tribune writes Christensen could face up to two years in jail and a cost of up to $7,500. As the story goes, she has a pet raccoon whom she calls Rocky. Jesus Christensen issued a statement to the Bismarck Tribune saying, "Too much effort was put in to wrongfully imprison a harmless raccoon. They didn't seem to care if we were rabid or not. They were concerned about locating and killing Rocky, and then locking me up." Christensen claimed inside the pub, "Rocky never left my arms." According to reports, Christensen and her family found Rocky on the side of the road and were caring for him until he was healthy enough to be released back into the wild. According to reports, Rocky's rabies test came back negative. According to the Bismarck Tribune, it is against the law in North Dakota to keep a raccoon from the wild as a pet. Christensen told the Bismarck Tribune that her children were "devastated and inconsolable" after authorities took Rocky from them, and that the whole family had been "traumatized" by her arrest. During the conversation, she remarked, "Simply put, he was hungry, lonely, and terrified. My family and he were together for three pleasant months. We regret he will never fully develop his raccoon personality." If you like TRUE CRIME TODAY - Be sure to search and subscribe wherever you download podcasts! Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/true-crime-today-a-true-crime-podcast/id1504280230?uo=4 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0GYshi6nJCf3O0aKEBTOPs Stitcher http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-ghost-stories-online-2/dark-side-of-wikipedia-true-crime-disturbing-stories iHeart https://www.iheart.com/podcast/270-Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-Tru-60800715 Amazon https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/565dc51b-d214-4fab-b38b-ae7c723cb79a/Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-True-Crime-Dark-History Google Podcasts https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hdWRpb2Jvb20uY29tL2NoYW5uZWxzLzUwMDEyNjAucnNz Or Search "True Crime Today" for the best in True Crime ANYWHERE you get podcasts! Support the show at http://www.patreon.com/truecrimetoday

Dark Side of Wikipedia | True Crime & Dark History
465: Racoon In Da Club! | True Crime Podcast

Dark Side of Wikipedia | True Crime & Dark History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 41:47


A woman from North Dakota was arrested after she allegedly brought her pet raccoon into a nightclub. Two suspects in the kidnapping, murder, and dismemberment of a Phoenix man over an unpaid debt have been arrested. Man, allegedly throws hatchet at parkgoers, runs away into the sewer, and then threatens to shoot police officers. If you like TRUE CRIME TODAY - Be sure to search and subscribe wherever you download podcasts! Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/true-crime-today-a-true-crime-podcast/id1504280230?uo=4 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0GYshi6nJCf3O0aKEBTOPs Stitcher http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-ghost-stories-online-2/dark-side-of-wikipedia-true-crime-disturbing-stories iHeart https://www.iheart.com/podcast/270-Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-Tru-60800715 Amazon https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/565dc51b-d214-4fab-b38b-ae7c723cb79a/Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-True-Crime-Dark-History Google Podcasts https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hdWRpb2Jvb20uY29tL2NoYW5uZWxzLzUwMDEyNjAucnNz Or Search "True Crime Today" for the best in True Crime ANYWHERE you get podcasts! Support the show at http://www.patreon.com/truecrimetoday

Real Ghost Stories Online
Racoon In Da Club | True Crime Sunday

Real Ghost Stories Online

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 42:19 Very Popular


A woman from North Dakota was arrested after she allegedly brought her pet raccoon into a nightclub. Two suspects in the kidnapping, murder, and dismemberment of a Phoenix man over an unpaid debt have been arrested. Man, allegedly throws hatchet at parkgoers, runs away into the sewer, and then threatens to shoot police officers. If you like TRUE CRIME TODAY - Be sure to search and subscribe wherever you download podcasts! Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/true-crime-today-a-true-crime-podcast/id1504280230?uo=4 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0GYshi6nJCf3O0aKEBTOPs Stitcher http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-ghost-stories-online-2/dark-side-of-wikipedia-true-crime-disturbing-stories iHeart https://www.iheart.com/podcast/270-Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-Tru-60800715 Amazon https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/565dc51b-d214-4fab-b38b-ae7c723cb79a/Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-True-Crime-Dark-History Google Podcasts https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hdWRpb2Jvb20uY29tL2NoYW5uZWxzLzUwMDEyNjAucnNz Or Search "True Crime Today" for the best in True Crime ANYWHERE you get podcasts! Support the show at http://www.patreon.com/truecrimetoday

TerraSpaces
Racoon Supply First NFT Hodler Distribution Party Pt.1

TerraSpaces

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 101:06


Today on the Ether we have Robo aka RACeyser Söze Mayor of RACville hosting a historic space. The first ever Racoon Supply NFT hodler distribution! This is part 1 of 2. You'll hear from Racøøn, LiLGainzz, Finn, Stake Dragons, Dickie PIMP Sheriff of RACville, SirRAC, Marty O.G, Michael T, Mayor Ed Dantes, and more! Recorded on October 1st 2022. If you enjoy the music at the end of the episodes, you can find the albums streaming on Spotify, and the rest of your favorite streaming platforms. Check out Project Survival, Virus Diaries, and Plan B wherever you get your music. Thank you to everyone in the community who supports TerraSpaces.

TerraSpaces
Racoon Supply First NFT Hodler Distribution Party Pt.2

TerraSpaces

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 112:12


Today on the Ether we have Robo aka RACeyser Söze Mayor of RACville hosting a historic space. The first ever Racoon Supply NFT hodler distribution! This is part 2 of 2. You'll hear from Racøøn, LiLGainzz, Finn, Stake Dragons, Dickie PIMP Sheriff of RACville, SirRAC, Marty O.G, Michael T, Mayor Ed Dantes, and more! Recorded on October 1st 2022. If you enjoy the music at the end of the episodes, you can find the albums streaming on Spotify, and the rest of your favorite streaming platforms. Check out Project Survival, Virus Diaries, and Plan B wherever you get your music. Thank you to everyone in the community who supports TerraSpaces.

The Grave Talks | Haunted, Paranormal & Supernatural
Racoon In Da Club! | True Crime Preview

The Grave Talks | Haunted, Paranormal & Supernatural

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 42:19


A woman from North Dakota was arrested after she allegedly brought her pet raccoon into a nightclub. Two suspects in the kidnapping, murder, and dismemberment of a Phoenix man over an unpaid debt have been arrested. Man, allegedly throws hatchet at parkgoers, runs away into the sewer, and then threatens to shoot police officers. If you like TRUE CRIME TODAY - Be sure to search and subscribe wherever you download podcasts! Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/true-crime-today-a-true-crime-podcast/id1504280230?uo=4 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0GYshi6nJCf3O0aKEBTOPs Stitcher http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-ghost-stories-online-2/dark-side-of-wikipedia-true-crime-disturbing-stories iHeart https://www.iheart.com/podcast/270-Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-Tru-60800715 Amazon https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/565dc51b-d214-4fab-b38b-ae7c723cb79a/Dark-Side-of-Wikipedia-True-Crime-Dark-History Google Podcasts https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hdWRpb2Jvb20uY29tL2NoYW5uZWxzLzUwMDEyNjAucnNz Or Search "True Crime Today" for the best in True Crime ANYWHERE you get podcasts! Support the show at http://www.patreon.com/truecrimetoday

Two New Yorkers A Thousand Opinions
Happy National Neighbors Day, Happy World's Rabies Day (??!!) It's International Universal Access to Information Day aka Evelyn-Google Day! Celebrate Ask A stupid Question Day!

Two New Yorkers A Thousand Opinions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 30:41


Pasquale and Evelyn discuss to rabies tragedy for Racoons in New Jersey, how the people in charge of choosing national days, etc. should spread them around!, Evelyn and Eric are blaming Mercury Retrograde for their catching the Covid and their canceling of the San Diego trip because of the hurricane that's barreling towards West Florida!, The pair voice their outrage about the monetization of Xmas with the decorations in the stores coming out earlier every year! It's outrageous!! Pasquale gets "deep" with an Evelyn-Google question. Like us AND SHARE on https://www.facebook.com/2newyorkers1000opinions/and follow us on Twitter and Instagram --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/2newyorkers1000opinions/message

Reality Redemption
A Woman Walks Into A Bar With A Racoon On Her Shoulder

Reality Redemption

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 52:42


Back to the studio to talk about Queen Elizabeth II's funeral, the sad tale of Rocky The Racoon, Hillary's Emails, the Woman's Teamster conference in Seattle, Ken Casey's rant, Brent Terhune on The Little Mermaid, Dan Reynolds talking about therapy , Elvis, Memphis, Ducks, football picks and Bootsie's Delta Funk. Dial 988 if you find yourself in crisis as Suicide Awareness Month wraps up #Monarchy #KingCharles #Harry #Racoons #HillaryClinton #FBI #Teamsters #DeshaunWatson #DropkickMurphys #Boston #HallieBailey #LittleMermaid #Disney #Elvis #Graceland #Memphis #TomHanks 

Terry Boyd's World Audio On Demand
The Racoon With A Drinking Problem

Terry Boyd's World Audio On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 2:57


Terry and Jeetz talk about the 3 weirdest stories of the day! It's called the 533! Today includes: A vegan cannibal, an alcoholic racoon, and man banned from owning glue! 

Noctivagant: A Paranormal Book Club
34 - King Behavior

Noctivagant: A Paranormal Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 142:08


For the first time we wander the midnight roads in search of Bigfoot. Join us as we wade into the world of Supernatural-Squatch with "Where the Footprints End” By Joshua Cutchin and Timothy Renner, and try to figure out if the Sasquatch is a relic hominid, a ghost, or maybe something even stranger.   Racoon video mentioned in video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0DfGf4M3QZoWant to reach out? Email us at noctivagantpodcast@gmail.comJoin our discord server and discuss all things weird with us: https://discord.gg/PkdZN7K2Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoctivagantPod https://mobile.twitter.com/mxrorywixhttps://twitter.com/midwestundeadhttps://mobile.twitter.com/bearishterrorTheme song by Matt Wixson Noctivagant Voice by Mike McGettiganArt by Nichelle Denzel  *The views and opinions expressed by guests/books that appear on this show belong to those guests and/or authors, and may not reflect the views and opinions of the Noctivagant crew.*

Noctivagant: A Paranormal Book Club
34 - King Behavior

Noctivagant: A Paranormal Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 142:08


For the first time we wander the midnight roads in search of Bigfoot. Join us as we wade into the world of Supernatural-Squatch with "Where the Footprints End” By Joshua Cutchin and Timothy Renner, and try to figure out if the Sasquatch is a relic hominid, a ghost, or maybe something even stranger.   Racoon video mentioned in video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0DfGf4M3QZoWant to reach out? Email us at noctivagantpodcast@gmail.comJoin our discord server and discuss all things weird with us: https://discord.gg/PkdZN7K2Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoctivagantPod https://mobile.twitter.com/mxrorywixhttps://twitter.com/midwestundeadhttps://mobile.twitter.com/bearishterrorTheme song by Matt Wixson Noctivagant Voice by Mike McGettiganArt by Nichelle Denzel  *The views and opinions expressed by guests/books that appear on this show belong to those guests and/or authors, and may not reflect the views and opinions of the Noctivagant crew.*

Weird Science DC Comics Podcast
DC Comics Ep 450: Batman vs Robin, Social Media vs Trap Jaw, The Question vs Batgirls & Racoons vs the Rainforest / Weird Science DC Comics

Weird Science DC Comics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 149:01


DC Comics Ep 450: Batman vs Robin, Social Media vs Trap Jaw, The Question vs Batgirls & Racoons vs the Rainforest / Weird Science DC Comics - a bunch of books including a banger and some not-so-bangers!   0:00:00 - Intro 0:16:22 - Batman vs. Robin #1 0:52:06 - Superman: Son of Kal-El #15 1:17:44 - Mail 1:38:07 - Batgirls #10 2:02:25 - Wonder Woman #791   Join our Patreon and help us feel loved for as little as $1/Month @ https://Patreon.com/WeirdScience This Week's Badass Patreon Spotlight Show: Dark Crisis: Worlds Without A Justice League: Wonder Woman #1 & I am Batman #13- 1 Hr 20 Min Show! Click Here for Weird Science Links: https://campsite.bio/weirdsciencecomics   Keywords: DC Comics, Comics, Comic Books, DC Comics Podcast, Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, The Flash, Aquaman, Green Lantern, Justice League   Weird Science DC Comics Weekly Podcast Schedule: Wednesday - DC Comics Mid-Week Show Friday - TGIG DC Comics Review Show Sunday - Main DC Comics Podcast  

News/Talk 94.9 WSJM
Gal walks in to a bar with a racoon.. Daily BuZz!!

News/Talk 94.9 WSJM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 4:28


If you didn't post it, did it really happen? Work from home ‘back.' And can you name every teacher you ever had? That's what Paul Layendecker is BuZzin' about today on The Daily BuZz!!

FOX Sports Knoxville
The Drive PODCAST HR 3 "Rabid Racoon Walks into a Bar" 9/15/22

FOX Sports Knoxville

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 47:58


The Drive PODCAST HR 3 "Rabid Racoon Walks into a Bar" 9/15/22 by FOX Sports Knoxville

Second Amendment Radio
Some people hunt racoons... and eat them

Second Amendment Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 13:11


Marc & Bo talk with Conservation Agent Christina Hibler from the Missouri Dept of Conservation about raccoons – it's huntin' season.

Second Amendment Radio
It's Racoon Season, a Data Breech in California, Bourbon & Pitbull

Second Amendment Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 40:07


Welcome to 2nd Amendment Radio & the Great Outdoors with Marc Cox & Bo Matthews – as always we are produced by Carl Middleman (Pew Pew)! This week the boys talk with Conservation Agent Christina Hibler from the Missouri Dept of Conservation about raccoons – it's huntin' season!  Then Sam Paredes is the Executive Director with Gun Owners of California. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of Gun Owners of America and Treasurer of Gun Owners Foundation. The concealed-carry gun bill just died in the California Legislature, despite backing from top Democrats, which is a huge blow to Governor Newsome and all his woke liberal buddies. This bill failed to pass by two votes. Plus Marc was on the Bourbon Trial and Carl dressed up as Pitbull. 

OH NO Disc Golf
Poor, Sad Opossums - OH NO Disc Golf Episode 79

OH NO Disc Golf

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 39:56


Like, subscribe, and leave a review! Use code OHNO for free shipping on any item over at our Teespring store! Use code OHNO10 for 10% off over at discbaron.com Linktree: /ohnodiscgolf Instagram: @ohnodiscgolf Facebook: /ohnodiscgolf Twitter: @ohnodiscgolf Tiktok: @ohnodiscgolf Youtube: Search OH NO Disc Golf Patreon: /ohnodiscgolf Notes from the Episode (Spoilers) Topic #1 Palmer Park. First Tournament in many months coming up Sept 10th. Ace Race style tournament. One disc. Brittany is also competing with me. Competing with someone who has been in pdga longer than i have been alive. PDGA # in the thousands. Andrew Garza won MI State Championships. Topic #2 Worlds Matty has been competing at the top level of disc golf for 17 years. Tristan Tanner battled from first day B pool to a tie for 3rd. 3 Tristan Tanner,Chris Clemons, Matt Orum -42 2 Aaron Gossage -46 1 Paul McBeth -46 1st Time someone overcame a 3 stroke deficit to win. Aaron Gossage would have been the lowest ranked player to win Worlds. 3 Holyn Handley -25 2 Henna Bloomros -30 1 Kristin Tartar -38 5 highest rated rounds at and FPO worlds. First time Catrina Allen finished outside the top 6 at FPO worlds in her career 12 straight seasons of placing 6th or better. She finished 11. Topic #3 Top 5 Animals to see on the course 5.Squirrels/Marmots 4.Deer/Elk 3.Racoon/opposum 2.Ducks 1.Otters --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ohnodiscgolf/support

The Cafeteria
Episode 110: Racoons and Terhunes

The Cafeteria

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 54:05


Ryan's rasslin', Jonny's real sweaty and Brent's, well, also real sweaty. 

UNEXPLAINED MYSTERIES with bestselling author and researcher Steph Young
Missing time, Doppelgangers, and the talking racoon!

UNEXPLAINED MYSTERIES with bestselling author and researcher Steph Young

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 29:13


When famous poet Percy Bysshe Shelley was living with writer of ‘Frankenstein,' Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley in Italy, he was said to be bereft over the deaths of three of his children, who had died soon after their births.  One day, on June the 24th 1812, he went for a walk alone, and his wife later wrote of what happened to him in a letter to a friend. Shelley saw the figure of himself as he walked on the terrace, and it said to him, “How long do you mean to be content?” On another occasion, a friend was staying with them, Mrs. Jane Williams, who was described by Shelley's wife as ‘a woman of sensibility' who ‘has not much imagination and is not in the slightest degree nervous – neither in dreams or otherwise.' Mrs Williams was standing inside the house gazing out of a window that looked out onto the terrace, when ‘she saw, as she thought, Shelley pass by the window, as he often was, without coat or jacket. He passed again, as he passed both times the same way – towards which he went there was no way to get back except past the window again, except over a wall twenty foot from the ground. She was struck at seeing him pass twice thus, and looking out and seeing him no more, she cried, “Good God, can Shelley have leapt from the wall? Where can he be gone?” She was told that Shelley was not at the villa at the time. ‘She trembled exceedingly when she heard, and it proved indeed that Shelley had never been on the terrace and was far off at the time she saw him.' Shelley's final encounter with his doppelganger came when he was walking alone on the beach. Again, he encountered himself. On this occasion, the doppelganger was looking at him, but his hand was pointing out to the sea. Not long after this, Shelley's body would be found in the sea after he drowned while sailing back from Liverno in a storm in the bay of Spezia on July the 8th 1822. He was a month short of his 30th birthday. The boat had been custom built for Shelley in Genoa, but it sank. Some, including Shelley's friend Edward John Trelawney, said Shelley lacked the seamanship skills to have undertaken this 7-hour journey with two friends, retired Navy officer Edward Ellerker Williams and boat-hand young Charles Vivien. Richard Holmes of The Guardian however says, ‘Despite what Trelawny implied, Shelley had considerable experience sailing boats, from schoolboy expeditions up the Thames, to sailing single-handed down the Arno, the Serchio, and beyond Livorno out to sea. He had successfully survived perilous incidents on the Rhine in 1814, on Lake Geneva (with Byron) in 1816, and on the Pisan Canal (with Williams) in 1821,' however, crucially he adds, ‘It was true, however, that Shelley was a river sailor.' Mary Shelley later claimed in her ‘Note on Poems, 1822,' that the design of the boat had been defective, and had never been seaworthy. Says Richard Holmes, ‘Unknown to Shelley,' his boat ‘had a fundamental design-fault. A twin-master schooner could not simply be scaled-down to a small, undecked, open boat.' Some suggested Shelley's sadness over his children's deaths had led him to want to drown himself, while others suggested he had been attacked by pirates; but there were many who whispered that he been assassinated for political reasons while out to sea. Shelley's boat was found 10 miles off shore after the storm had sunk the boat. Some suggested it had been rammed, for one side was caved in. His friend Trelawny said that William's shirt was ‘partly drawn over the head, and he was missing one boot.' He felt that this meant Williams had been in the act of undressing for bed when he died. Shelley's father was a Baron in Parliament. Shelley was staunch in his own radical and outspoken anti-establishment political views. Biographer Richard Holmes says Shelley's political interests included ‘Radical reform of the Houses of Parliament, disestablishment of the Anglican Church, formation of trade unions, universal suffrage.' In a letter to a Mr. Leigh Hunt,

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism
Urban Paganism with Special Guests Eric Steinhart and Joh

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 57:44


Book mentioned: “Powwowing in Pennsylvania: Braucherei & the Ritual of Everyday Life” by Patrick J. Donmoyer https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40605053-powwowing-in-pennsylvania Eric's website is at www.ericsteinhart.com Remember, we welcome comments, questions and suggested topics at thewonderpodcastQs@gmail.com   S3E27 TRANSCRIPT:----more----   Mark: Welcome back to the Wonder Science: Based-Paganism. I'm your host Mark. Yucca: And I'm the other one Yucca. Mark: And today we have a very special episode of The Wonder. We're really excited to discuss urban paganism with two guests from New York City, Joh and Eric Steinhart. And so welcome to both of you. Eric: Hello. Joh: Hi, thank you so much for having us great to be here. Mark: really delighted to have you, so I guess, to get started why don't we just ask you to tell us a bit about yourselves? How did you come to non paganism? You wanna start Joh? Joh: Sure. My name is Joh. I've lived in New York for about 16 years. My path is very new. It's only about four years old. I've always been drawn to certain. Aesthetics around the occult I was a teen goth in the nineties, which perfect for that, but I never, I never really thought that I fit into any of those paths. I couldn't put my finger on why. A few years ago I purchased a, a beginner's book on, on witchcraft and developing your own identity as a witch. I got it just for fun, for a long train ride. There's a bit in there in the beginning that outlines different kinds of witches or witchcraft like green witches, kitchen, witches, chaos, magic, wicca. I'd heard some of these. Terms before, but they're described very plainly in the book and it gave me a little bit of a glimpse into how vast of a world paganism might be that I didn't know anything about, or I hadn't realized. So I started reading a lot more about developing a practice, but still didn't really feel like I fit in. I couldn't relate to the belief system parts. And in one of my internet rabbit holes, I learned about the book godless paganism, which described paganism from a more science based lens. And I just got really excited about what that sounded like. So I ordered it to my local bookstore and I devoured that book, the concepts, it taught me even more about how personal one's path can be and that there is this little corner of this world that felt like a fit and like I could belong. So then I started looking for a community because I was so excited and I wanted to talk about it with people. And I was clicking on links and links and links online and finally found the atheopagan Facebook group, which was the first active community that I had found that actually had recent activity in there. So I, I joined and I've been in that community for about two to three years, and it's just such an incredibly supportive, inspiring place that gives me ideas of how to develop my practice even more. And you know, now fast forward to today, I'm just really grateful to have found this community and group and little subset of of the path. Mark: That's great. Thank you. Yucca: Yeah, Eric, what about you? Eric: Yeah. So, I mean, I come from a very strange place. I mean, I'm Pennsylvania, German and Pennsylvania, German culture often known as Pennsylvania, Dutch, but we're not Dutch. We're Germans. And that culture is a magical culture and, you know, magic was normalized in that culture from the very beginning from its very roots. And so I grew up with a lot of that stuff. I mean, I grew up in, in a culture that was filled with magical practices of all sorts. And I mean, nominally, I mean, you know, nominally explicitly a Christian culture, but probably a lot of Christians would say, no, you know, you guys are doing some weird stuff. And, you know, I, I became attracted to science and early on and, you know, just don't really have a theistic worldview at all. So combining some of those things got me and I, you know, and I was in, I was involved sort of in, in atheist movements for a while and found a lot of atheism to be kind of, practically shallow, you know, there's, it's like, yeah, after you're done being mad at God, what do you do then? I mean, and there was like nothing. And you know, my, I would always say things like, look, there's no atheist art. You know, there's like atheist music, you know, there's just, you know, there's, there's no culture, right. Or the culture is, and more and more people have observed this. It's kind of parasitic on Christianity in a way. And so I found that very unsatisfying, right? Certainly I know plenty of atheists. I'm a philosopher, I'm a philosophy professor and I know plenty of, you know, professional atheists and all they do is talk about God. And so I'm like, look, I don't wanna talk about God. Let's let's let's talk about something else. Let's do something else. And I found that paganism in various forms, it was just kind of, kind of starting, but in various forms, you know, had a culture had art, had aesthetics, had practices, had symbols had a fairly rich worked out way of life. And as a philosopher, you know, I've got plenty of training in ancient cultures, particularly Greek and Roman but also also Germanic. And you know, I just thought, oh, This stuff, all kind of fits together. And so I became very interested in thinking about ways and I've advocated among atheists to say things like, look, you guys have to start. And, and, and women too, you've gotta start building a culture and you can't build a culture of negativity, you know, a culture of no, a culture and especially not a culture. That's essentially a mirror image of Christianity that all you're doing is talking about God. And you know, I've had a little success there, but it's a, it's a tough hall. But I think more and more something like a kind of atheopagan could really be a live option for the future of lots of aspects of American culture, right? As people become de Christianized, what are they gonna do? And some people say, well, they're just gonna be secular. But that's not really an answer and that's not a culture. And as you start looking around, you start to see these other cultures that are kind of bubbling up and developing. So yeah, I mean, I came to it from, you know, both the sort of old ethnic, Pennsylvania, German angle, the kind of philosophy and science angle and dissatisfaction with you know, sort of mainstream atheism. So lots of different roads in Yucca: Wow. That's a, that's a really interesting path to, to come on. So it'd be interesting hear more about the practice, the magical kind of practices that you talked about. Eric: well, there's a good, there's a good book by this guy, Patrick, Don moer called pow wowing. So you can check that out. It's incredibly rich and incredibly weird stuff, you know, Yucca: well, we'll find that and put it in the show notes. If people wanna take a look at it. Eric: Right. Mark: Yeah. Well, both of your stories are really very interesting that way in, in in that identification of Something being missing, but the, the main, the main offerings that are, that surround us in our culture, not really fitting that hole. That's certainly what I found as well, you know, and it's the reason that I wrote the essay that first started out a paganism. And I, I should probably introduce at this point that Eric, you, you especially have been involved with various non theist pagan efforts since long before I wrote that essay I just was, did a poor job of research and didn't find the other naturalistic non-theistic paganism efforts that were being done around the world. Until after I had already, you know, published and was starting to get attention for atheopagan So, as urban pagans living in the city what do your practices look like? Joh, you wanna, you wanna start on that? Joh: Sure. My practice may not be super urban sounding, but, but. There's some stuff about like spots in the city that, that I do. But generally my, my daily practice is in the morning. My apartment faces east and I wake up early enough to catch the sunrise every day. And I'll kind of first just stare at stare at it and kind of greet the sky every morning. I do stretches to start the day and I position my mat to face that window so that I can really connect with the day while I'm waking up. I have a small focus that I decorate seasonally. I really connect with ritual and the different physical objects around my practice, probably because I was raised Catholic and I always loved the sacred spaces, the incense, the bells, the rituals, and the regalia of it all. So it's a very tangible practice for me. And I have a. Personal calendar with the, the, you know, the solstice and the equinoxes in it. But also with other days that are very personal to me. Like I celebrate Freddie Mercury's birthday every year, for example, and, and the anniversary of when I move to New York and I'll actually take that day off of work and like use that whole day to really explore parts of the city that I love. And don't as easily make time for during the rest of the year. And then I also try to cook and eat seasonally as much as possible and really understand what the, what the ecology of this region is like. And I made this spreadsheet that tells me what's in season around here based on what month it is. It makes it easier to shop for and plan meals and things like that. Mark: Hm. Yucca: Hmm. Mark: Wow. That's a lot. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: Yeah, that's very cool. Thank you, Joh. Yucca: you have any parks nearby that you go to? Is that part of your practice or more? Just the relationship with the city and the sky. Joh: There is a really beautiful community garden in my neighborhood. That's open to the public a couple of days a week, and sometimes I'll walk there or ride my bike there and just kind of slowly walk down the paths and see how everyone's set up their plots and what they're growing. And there are bees everywhere and some benches off to the side. So sometimes I'll sit there and journal a little bit, or just kind of stare into space. And, you know, the people who have plots there are required to volunteer, you know, certain number of hours every week. And there's this section at the end where you can see everyone composting and things like that. So there's that piece. And then. In the city as well. There are different ways. Speaking of composting, that you can participate in kind of that cycle. So you can go to a drop off spot and bring your food scraps and they'll compost them and, and then use that for the public parks and things like that. Yucca: Oh, nice. Joh: that's like another way that allows me to feel more connected to the public parks and spaces of nature that are kind of engineered in such a dense area. Mark: Uhhuh. Nice. Nice. Eric. How about your practice? Eric: Yeah. I mean, my practices are probably a little too intellectual. I mean, one of my main practices is trying to figure out how all this stuff can work out and how to make sense of, of, of pagan ideas and practices. Right. That's cuz I'm a philosopher. That's what I do. I mean I do have a little I have a little altar and I do, you know, things, things like that, but I, I do try to think. A lot about how what paganism means and what kind of pagan concepts are relevant, for instance, in an urban context, right? I mean, cities are not trying to be forests. That's not what they're trying to do. They're not. And, and, you know, trying to work out pagan contexts or concepts and beliefs and practices in an urban setting it may, you, you have to think a little bit differently, right. Because there's a lot of you know, what you might call mainstream paganism that has a very I think very biased view of what paganism is or should be like we're all supposed to be farmers or, or, or Amish or something. I mean, I grew up with the Amish, you know, I mean, so I'm like, no, no, I know what that is. And so, you know, thinking of the ways that that cities are natural spaces and that cities are ecosystems not because they're trying to be, you know, a national park, right. I mean, and there's more and more wonderful research among, you know, biologists and ecologists of, of how cities themselves are ecosystems, you know, they are not, they're not phony ecosystems like, oh, New York. City's great because it's got central park. No, you know, the, the city isn't eco, I mean more and more research onto this is fascinating stuff because you're finding all these species, not just humans, humans are a natural species, but you know, raccoons, cougars, coyotes, you know, and New York city has there, there's beautiful research that's been done in New York city. Right. We have herds of deer. Wandering the city. We have, you know, foxes. I mentioned the, the raccoons, I think the bird life in New York city is, you know, and so you find things like, and there's a term for this, a technical term for these kinds of critters, right. Sin, Andros, right. These are animals that have adapted to humans and now live. They flourish with humans. They flourish in cities, right? So, New York city for instance, is an extraordinary place to be a Raptor, a bird of prey, right? New York city has some of the highest Paran, Falcon and Hawk populations anywhere. Right? Because they love the tall buildings. They love the bridges. Like the bridges are filled with Paragon, Falcon nests. And you're like, yeah, these, you know, life is adaptive. And So I try to think of all the ways that we live together with all these things in the cities and how humans have made a home, not just for humans, but for, for a whole ecosystem of, of critters. And, you know, like urban raccoons are not like rural raccoons, right. They've things. Right. And it's really interesting, you know, and people study this, you know, scientists, they study like how cities are driving bur particularly birds and raccoons. Are the species been studied most to become more intelligent, they're learning how to solve all sorts of problems. Right. So, so I find, you know, so part of, I guess my practice is sort of learning about that, observing that, thinking about ways that I mean, we haven't, we have a general issue. In the United States, right. Which is that so much of our space and structure is thoroughly Christianized. And it's not an easy thing to say, oh, well, let's, we're, you know, we're just gonna do something different, right. When all of your space is structured around a certain way of life. And so, you know, I, I try to think about ways that we can think of all kind like, okay, the four elements, you know, fire earth, air and water for me, light, you know, how do those relate in an urban context, right? Then in the, in a great way in New York city, you know, you can actually go into the earth. You know, in ways that most ordinary people can't right. And you can go deep into the earth right. In the, in the subways. I mean, you can do that on a daily basis. Right. And you can, you know, I mean, being stuck on a subway, train deep in the earth right. Is a way to like, encounter something that's terrifying and forceful. So how do you think of that sort of thing in, in a, in pagan ways, right? How do you think of, I mean, New York city is also very close to water. I mean, that's the reason the city exists. Right. It's one of the greatest bays in the world. We have dolphins, we have whales in the Hudson seals thinking of that kind of life as part of the city too. And I'll mention one other thing, thinking of things like, I don't know if people know about, I mean, you know, about Manhattan henge. Right. So, so you've got, you know, you've got structures there that people recently have started to say things like, Hey, we Stonehenge, we have Manhattan henge. You know, we have a, we have a thing and it wasn't designed that way, but Mark: Eric, would you like to explain what that is for our listeners? That don't know what it is? Eric: Yeah, Manhattan henge because Manhattan, the you know, the streets are in a sort of Southeast Northwest orientation. There are two times of the year when the sun come, you know, if you're stand on 42nd street in the middle and you've got skyscrapers on either side, my head is the sun, right. And the son just comes down between, you know, vertically between the skyscrapers and sets, right. You know, across the water sort of like Stonehenge, right? Like coming down between these monoliths. And I've seen it is, is really incredible. And people, you know, thousands and thousands of people go out in the streets to photograph it. And Thinking about ways that that kind of stuff can develop. And it might not be stuff that somebody says explicitly like, oh, this is pagan, like it's Wiccan or ARU or drew it, or, or whatever, or witchy witchcraft or something, but these are cultural things that people start to do. Right. And if you start to look around, you see all kinds of little shrines in the city, you know, I mean, there are, there are some obvious big ones in the statue of liberties, like a big pagan statue. And there are statues of old Greek and Roman deities in the city. There's like, mercury and Atlas are down at Rockefeller center, right? There's a statue of pan at Columbia university there. These, you know, these things exist. And not to, I mean, I, I think also, you know, a lot of urban places in a sort of practical sense of things to do things like art museums, right. Where you can go in, in New York, the metropolitan museum, and you can see lots of in fact they just are now having a big show on what old pagan statues used to look like. Right. Because they weren't white, they weren't white Mar they were painted. Right. They were dye. And so they've taken a bunch of them made replicas and they could still find microscopic traces of these dyes in the rock. And so they've now repainted them as they looked. So I'll go see that soon. So there's lots of opportunities for people to do all kinds of things. And I, and I real, but I really do think that. There's a, still a need to develop a lot of cultural infrastructure, right? You could go out in central park and, and do some ritual on the solstice or something, but that's really not. That to me is like something that sort of slides right off the surface of the culture, cuz it doesn't have any connections to things. There used to be some larger connections before COVID there was a network of drum circles. I don't know if people had been to prospect park in Brooklyn, there were some immense, there was immense drum drum stuff going on there. COVID kind of brought an end to a lot of that. So we'll see how that starts up, but I, I think there's a lot of There's there's a lot of thing. And if you do wanna go out in, in you know, in a kind of less urban environment, you know, New York city is actually is the highest density of Woodland trails over 2000 miles of trails within a 60 mile radius of the city, cuz the Appalachian mountains just arc right across the north. Mark: Right. Eric: And so you can, you can, yeah. It's the highest concentration of Woodland parks and trails anywhere in the United States. Mark: Wow. Eric: There's a lot, there's a lot still to be done. And I think I'll just, I'll just leave off with that. Mark: I was that's. Yeah. There's so much to say there. I mean, you mentioned the met and it's that talk about sacred spaces? I, I mean, the metropolitan museum of art is one of the great sacred spaces of the world. It's like a shrine to all human culture. Joh, I, I know you live in Queens, so I imagine you get to the Cloisters which is another super sacred space for me. This is kind of out of order of the, the questions that we talked about doing, but are there specific places or sacred spaces that you think of? When you, when you think about urban paganism in your city, Joh: Yeah. One thing that New York really does well is bigness. There are a few very stereotypically New York spaces that I have like religious experiences and in their giant. So the inside of grand central terminal is one of them. It's massive. It's echoy. The ceiling is painted with this beautiful night sky scene with the Zodiac constellations on it. Part of what feels so humbling being in there is going off of something. Eric said before is knowing that it's also this hub of this massive living transportation network that enables the movement of thousands, millions of people within this tri-state area. Another one is the branch of the New York public library with the very iconic lions out front it's, it's a beautiful piece of architecture. It's also inside cavernous full of this beautiful art, larger than life and quiet. It's really like church almost. You feel like when you're in there, cuz you have this like reverence and respect and gratitude for all of this knowledge that's contained in there and that it's free. Like you can just go and like getting a card is free. It's it still blows my mind. This one is pretty kind of cliche, but the empire state building it's so tall, but the city is so dense that I never expect to see it when I do so I'll be walking somewhere, probably distracted, multitasking, and then I'll look up and it'll just be there in front of my face. And it's this like instantly calming moment for me and kind of resets me in whatever's going on in life at the time. And then there's like smaller little smaller spots. Like there's a Steinway piano showroom near times square that I like to go visit. I play the piano and it's a really silencing experience, even though it's so busy around there and, and crowded and, and loud, but just to stand outside and gaze in at these beautiful pianos that are handmade just across the river in Queens, like it's really, really cool how accessible places like this are because of that, you know, that network that connects, although the parts of the city, so well, the subway. So yeah, those are, those are a few that come to mind. how about you? Eric: Yeah, I think, I think Joh says some great things. I mean, one point there is like the urban sublime, right? Like these, you know, towers that rise to infinity. I mean, it, you can have a kind of experience. That's hard to get anywhere else. If you go like up to the observation deck on the, you know, the freedom tower that replace the world trade centers or the empire state building or Rockefeller center, right. You go up on tops of these things and you see, you know, from a. Point, and that kind of space is you know, I mean, it's commercial, right? You pay, you're going up to the top of, of a skyscraper, but you, it can induce kinds of experiences that are hard to get elsewhere. And sure, grand central station, that's like a great example of a kind of space that's already, you know, sort of semi pagan in its kind of classical thing. Like the Zodiac is there and it's this immense space and you can, you can go in and just be you can experience awe and, and, and humbleness and things like that. A lot in the city. And I think, you know, especially when I first started coming to the city and, and probably a lot of people would have a similar experience. You, you just feel overwhelmed. I mean, the, the sheer size of these things that are around you and unlike I mean, other cities have some of this, but you know, it's not like in New York city, you can walk, you walk a few blocks and you're out. Right. I mean, if you're in Manhattan, you can walk for like 12 miles through this amenity and you're sort of like, I mean, it's, it's humbling. So I think that, I think, and I think there's a lot of symbolism that goes into that. I'll mention that there have been a couple of urban terror decks, right? That use, I mean, if you think of the tower and you think of just, well, the tower, you know, or you think of things like that, there have been some there have been, there are a couple of urban TA decks, some better than others, but you know, people are, and this is what I think about the cultural infrastructure. People are starting to build that kind of thing. Right. And start to see these symbolisms in these, in these places. So, yeah, that, I like, I like that. What Joh said about sort of the urban sublime and what mark, you said about kind of these museums that hold all this, this cultural stuff and. You know, I often think of, of paganism in terms of the symbolic, right. Rather than you know, I'm not much for, for ancient, ancient roots. That, that seems a little racist to me. I'm more into thinking about the future and thinking about things like, you know, if I think about superhuman minds, right? I mean, the city itself is like a high of mind. You know, the city itself is a super organism. It's a superhuman intelligence. Right. And, and things like me, I'm just like a little sell in this organism. I'm passing through contributing something to it, but the, the amount of energy that flows through San Francisco or New York, or, you know, something like that is astonishing. Mark: Yes. Eric: And it's it's information too. I mean, places like, okay. New York, Tokyo, you know, San Francisco, you know, are, are some of the most information rich places on the planet. Mark: London, Hong Kong. Eric: Right. And, and so if you think of like, you know, you think of a deity like mercury or somebody like, or thought, or Glen, you know, these, you may think of these divine minds and these patterns of information. I mean, I prefer to leave those Dees in the past where they lived, but now you look at super, if you want a symbol, cuz for me, a lot of this is symbolic. If you want symbolism for superhuman intelligence, you know, superhuman mind a superhuman agency, right? I mean the place to one place to find that there are other places, but one place to find that is in the, you know, the rich information flows the density of information flows in cities. Mark: Mm-hmm Eric: Right? You, you can really, you can, you don't have to think like, I mean, Okay. I lived in New York city. This means I am part of something that is immense it's 400 years old. It's I don't know how long it'll last, but you know, so many people have contributed to it and you're there you feel it you're like, yeah, I there's this thing, you know, it's immense, I'm a tiny little part of this huge thing. So. Mark: and, and I think that's really well said, and it also, it extends beyond the bounds of New York city so much. I mean, I, I think about watching old movies where pretty much everybody came from New York or their immediate family came through New York. It's like the entire culture of the United States is deeply informed by this urban collective experience that then spread throughout the rest of the country. I was thinking about, you were talking about culture and of course, city is where the culture is, right? I mean, there's culture everywhere, but big cities are there're places where it's easier for people that are cultural creatives to make it. There are more opportunities for them to, to make a living. And it reminded me, I've lived in two big cities in my life. I've lived in San Francisco and in Barcelona. And one of the things that attracted me the most about both of those places is busking in the underground. Eric: Oh  Mark: the, the caliber of musical performance that you can experience. Just at random, you know, by stepping off of a train and suddenly finding yourself surrounded by it is it's like this, this spontaneous moment of, you know, truly religious kind of joy to me. And it's, it's one of the things that leaps immediately to mind to me, when I think about my fondness for those cities, right. Eric: Yeah. I mean, I, I think, and maybe Joh can speak to this too. I mean, the you know, thinking of those of those spaces where you can go and, and, and hear music and often the, the cultural thing is, is mixtures of cultures too, like in San Francisco or Chicago or New York. I mean, I can, you know, there are all these little I think, was it, Joh, did you mention Centia, did somebody mention that somebody mentioned that, but you know, there are all these, there are all these, you know, Afro-Caribbean cultures that have come into New York city and you could find all these little things, like all over the streets. You know, and they have some, you know, Afro-Caribbean significance and there they are. Right. And so you already find lots of, you know, there are lots of alternatives to a dominant, this sort of dominant Christian narrative. There are lots of alternatives already in these urban spaces, right. That come from from other other sources. Joh: I was actually also thinking about the, the mixture of different cultures. When thinking about some of the places that I like to visit there, there are a couple of neighborhoods in downtown Manhattan that I like to just I'm drawn to them. And I just like to walk around in and think about. The history and evolution of culture in those neighborhoods, like the history of music, of counterculture, of the different immigrant communities that settled there over time and everywhere you look, you can see little remnants of all this history from like a German inscription in the brick facade of a building or a plaque telling you that Charlie Parker lived in that building a 24-hour Ukrainian diner founded by refugees in the sixties that like still you know, still you can't, you it's always a weight. So there's that, there's that kind of magic too. And then I think just walkable urbanism in general, like increases the likelihood that you'll have chance encounters with not just different cultures, but like different kinds of people who are living different lives from you. Like. There's a community of local businesses and neighbors, and then the city workers, and it's all happening all in the same space. Like there's no alleyways in New York city. There's like two in the whole city. And so all that stuff is, and activity is just running up against itself and like keeping the environment running and thriving and kind of with this magical energy all the time. Mark: Yeah. And, and when you think about that, when you think about all those different cultures and different sort of value systems and so forth, all kind of coming together and finding a way to coexist, then it's no surprise that it's the cities that are the blue parts of the United States, right? It's like in the cities, people have figured out how to get along, cuz they have to, there's no choice about it, Joh: Yeah. And to coexist peacefully. Mark: And eventually to thrive. I mean, not, not just to coexist, but I to actually have melding of cultures and you know, new and interesting combinations of stuff like jazz, for example in new Orleans and New York and Chicago. Anyway, I, I don't know where I was going with that, but it, it occurs to me that the, the values that we associate with paganism, right? The inclusiveness, the tolerance, the the appreciation for beauty and culture and diversity and all those things, they really thrive more in the cities than they do in the, in the rural areas, which we think of as more natural, right. Eric: Yeah. I mean, that's a weird, you know, you find that kind of, to me, very, almost paradoxical or contradictory view in a lot of paganism, which is like, oh, the rural environment is the pagan environment. And you're like, no, the rural environment is filled with fundamentalists, man. Mark: Well, not entirely, not, not Yucca. Eric: nah, well, I mean sure, but, but still it's it's yeah, I mean, if you have a sort of polycentric culture where you've got lots of different cultures and lots of different religious ideas and lots of TISM lots of mixing of different religious ideas and you've got, you know, intelligent raccoons and, and you know, sparrows and yeah. Racoons have little hands, you know, they're learning to work stuff. They're gonna, that's what we're that's what's gonna take over after we're gone. You know, so, so I think that that's already seeing the multiplicity. I, I think of paganism often in terms of multiplicity, instead of, you know, unity, it's like, yeah, there are, there are many perfections and many ways to bring those together and, and integrate them into a system without, you know, reducing 'em to a, to like everybody has to act the same, you know? And I do think so. I think in, in that sense mark, what you said yeah. About cities having that, all those combinations right. Are really good. Really good. I don't think we're quite there yet in trying to figure out what, you know, the sort of next culture is gonna be, but won't happen in my lifetime, but I, I hope it will happen. So. Yucca: One of the things to kind of shift a little bit that, or some qualities that are usually not associated with urban environments that sometimes are, are highly valued in certain pagan circles are things like solitude and stillness and quietness. And those are things that I'm curious. Do you feel like. It is a fair assessment. That that's not something that really happens in urban environments. And also, is that something important in your practice? If it is, how is that something that is a pagan you, you search out or cultivate in your life? Joh: This made me think of something really specific. So it's actually, I feel like one thing that happens here is there's so much stimuli going on all the time. That it's actually, for me, at least fairly easy to, to, to be find myself in solitude. I, I live alone and You know, during the pandemic, especially, I didn't see anybody. And it was, it was very quiet. Actually, if you, you know, if you live in a more busy part of the city and you have an apartment facing the back of the building, that's like a sign that it's gonna be quiet. It actually can get really quiet here, surprisingly. But one thing that I don't know, I think this happened in multiple places around the world, in the beginning of the pandemic, but this, this thing started happening here where at 7:00 PM every day, everyone would leave their apartment and go outside and start clapping for the healthcare workers and essential workers who were actually having to still leave their apartments and help the city run. And this happened for months and months, every day at 7:00 PM, everyone would go outside and start clapping and, and it really helped, I think with the. Precarious kind of mental health situation that we were all finding ourselves in because we were trapped in these tiny boxes for so long, like scared of going outside because of the density and everything. And it helped us feel kind of alone together in a way. So that, that goes veers a little bit off of what you were asking, but I think it's actually not that it's pretty easy to find that piece and that, that that quiet and solitude if you if you try, like, not during a global pandemic, but but yeah, that just my mind kind of went there when you asked that. Eric: I think that was, that was a, a great place to go. I mean, I remember that we didn't go outside, but we leaned out our windows and banged on pots and pans, you know? And that's that was kind of a collective ritual. Mark: Yeah. Eric: I mean, it kind of, I mean, it was a collective ritual and I think, you know, I, I wonder about some of that solitude or something. I mean, certainly in, in lots of urban areas, there's a lot more, I think maybe I'm maybe I'm wrong here, but you know, a lot of collective action, there's a lot of political awareness political activity. And maybe that solitude, isn't quite what people are wanting. Right. Because it's not like I'm gonna go into myself and, and I'm gonna go, I mean, cities face outward, right. I mean, and that energy gets radiated outward. And I, I probably, if I had to think of my most well, you know, the two very pagan moments in New York city, both were musical. One was when I heard the band high long in New York, which was. You know, almost surreal in the, in the, the juxtaposition of this, this high, long shamanistic, you know, whatever they're trying to bring up. And it's in, it's in a theater in Manhattan and there are thousands of us there and we're all chanting and clapping and dancing and stuff like that. But probably even, even a little more, you know, pagan than high, long was like one time when I went to a Patty Smith concert in Manhattan. And that was just an, you know, an, I don't like to use this word, but that was intense. You know? I mean, that was something that was, I've been to a bunches of concerts and that was, you know, everyone just collectively this was, I think the 50th anniversary of her horses album and that's what they played. Mark: Oh, Eric: Right. And everyone knew all the words of course, and everyone was simply. Well, like in this unison and that's already you know, Patty Smith's already like, what space is she in with with these kinds of cultural things? You know? So I, I think there's a lot of opportunities for those kinds of collective mu I mean, music is one, art is one political, you know, political gatherings are be they protests or just activist gatherings.  Mark: Dancing thing. Eric: Dancing. Yeah. All those kinds of activities really happen in, in cities. So I wouldn't go with the no, I mean, yeah, like, I mean, Joh was right. You can be solitary in the city if you want to. I mean, it's probably more solitary there than anywhere else. Right. Because it's certainly in New York because you know, if you're not engaged, like nobody's gonna talk to you. Mark: Yeah. Eric: Right. I mean, they're gonna leave you alone. And but I, I do think that there is an enormous amount of col I mean, that's the point of a city it's collective activity. Right. You know, I lived on a farm. I know what I know what rural isolation is. Like I, you know, I don't wanna do that ever, ever again, so yeah, I dunno if that answers that, but there you go. Mark: You know, it occurs to me when you talk about that. When I was, when I was in late high school and, and into my first couple of years of college, I was really into punk rock. And of course I was living, you know, very close to San Francisco and there was a huge punk rock scene there at the Maha gardens and some other places. And so I saw a ton of shows and one of the things that always struck me was these bands never come 60 miles north to where I live. They, they don't leave an urban environment. Right. Because punk lives in the cities and and many of those concerts were truly ecstatic experiences. Eric: Right. Mark: I, I mean, the mosh pit was just this glorious experience of mutual trust, where we knew we weren't going to hurt one another, but we were going to fling one another around. My partner NAEA tells a story about being in a pit in Philadelphia where somebody lost a contact lens and the entire pit sort of went who to make a space so that they could find their contact lens. And they actually did find their contact lens. So, you know, it very, I mean, there's a, there's a very abrasive kind of quality to the punk aesthetic, but really people who cared about one another and, you know, were, were part of something. And that was very much an urban experience. Yucca: Hmm. Eric: Right, right. I mean, I think you, can you get that kind of you get those kinds of energies and a lot of that so far is kind of aesthetic, right? Music, art, dancing, things like architecture, you know? And, and it'll be interesting to see, you know, people translating that more. You know, that's why, I mean, I think for instance, sort of the pagan music is really interesting and the ways that that can go. And different kinds of artistic expressions. And one of the things we didn't really talk about, which I think of as kind of pagan is sort of the, the visionary community, right? The transformational festivals and, and, you know, visionary art and that stuff, which to, to my mind, is in entirely a pagan culture, a pagan subculture. And that's, that's there too. Right? A lot of that is in urban areas. Also in New York city, there was an San Francisco too, I believe, but they're a big, you know, I think of stoicism as, as a pagan movement, contemporary stoicism, and there's an enormous enormously rich stoic groups in in New York. San Francisco comes to mind and a few, there are a few other cities that have, but yeah, San Francisco certainly has all this transformative tech stuff.  Mark: And the, the whole burning man phenomenon, which is really interesting when you think about it. Because a lot of the people who go to burning, man, don't come from urban centers, but they have to build a city Eric: right. Mark: in order to have. The kind of crucible of creativity that they want. And burning man is a very pagan experience in, in at least the one time I was there. It definitely was not necessarily in a worshipful kind of way, but in a, in a cultural way, the, the kind of mutuality and celebration and expressiveness and creativity that you have in those kinds of environments are they remind me of the pagan community. And of course there's a lot of people there who are pagans. Eric: Oh yeah. Yucca: A lot of rituals. Mark: Yeah. Yeah. Eric: Yeah, that's gotta be like a paradigm case of how to do religion differently than it was done before. Right. And yeah, I mean, I teach a lot about burning man and you know, I always say to my students, I'm like, well, what do you think a new religion would look like? It's not gonna look like the old ones, you know? And you find, I mean, there's a lot of that around, I mean, that's, that's obviously closely connected with San Francisco, but there is a lot of that around not just burning man, but there's a, there's lots of places around New York city that are filled with that kind of stuff. I mean, yeah. I'm thinking in particular of like Alex Gray's chapel of sacred mirrors, Mark: mm-hmm Eric: which, which used to be in Manhattan, Joh, did you ever see that? Joh: No, I didn't. Unfortunately. Eric: It used to be in Manhattan. And now it's moved up the river into the Hudson valley and COVID kind of shut it down, but that guy used to have like weekly I'll just say raves at his place. Right. Wa in Weiner's falls check an hour north of the city. So, so that stuff is all around. Right. And it will be interesting to see if it gets more, you know, as things go on, if it gets, I mean, maybe it will just remain at a kind of level where it's people doing aesthetic things. Right. And they'll come together in these kind of groups and maybe it'll get more organized. I don't know. Mark: Hmm. Eric: Yeah, go to go to, Wappinger go to the chapel. I can't wait till the chapel sacred mirrors opens up again. I went with my, my friend, my friend of mine, Pete, and there was something about, I don't know what, you know, iowaska or something. And Pete looked at me and said, I didn't think this guy would be into drugs if you know, Alex Mark: Alex Gray. Really? Eric: yeah. It's like, Mark: the man who envisions gigantic halos of color all around the human form. Eric: you know, like 47 eyeballs, you know, like yeah, right. A little irony. But you know, that's, that's you know, it's all around and you know, maybe people don't conceive of it as pagan in a unified way, but maybe they should. Right. So we'll, we'll see where that goes. Mark: And I think, you know, the other part of it is that people are looking for rituals for, for shared communal experiences. Some of which we've just been talking about, but even people that are doing rituals in a more formally pagan kind of way, they have a much easier time finding others of like mind in a city than they do in an area like mine. For example, even though I'm close to San Francisco and there's a pretty large population of pagans here there's exactly one atheopagan other than me living in my county to my knowledge. Oh, that's not true four, there, there there's four of us, including me. And that's a, you know, there's half a million people living in my county, so yeah. Cities become this focus of such energy and, and collaboration. Eric: Yeah, I think they might. I mean, I, I, you know, there's probably like, you know, 7 million atheopagan in, in New York city. They just don't call themselves that. Mark: Huh? Eric: Right. And I think that's an inter I don't know if that's quite true, but it's, I think an interesting point, right? That you have people that are maybe nominally secular, but yet they do all these kinds of things. Right. And they don't I mean, I make contact with this through my students. Right. Who don't identify as, you know, pagan or atheists, but yet they're doing all sorts of they, you know, if you ask them, do they believe in God? No, but they don't identify as atheists. It's just, they just, they just don't do that stuff, but then they do all kinds of other things. Right. And you know, they, they do all sorts of, I mean, witchcraft was a kind of popular thing. I don't know if it still is, but they do things right. And they have all sorts of little rituals. Some of which are, are, come from family, traditions, others, you know, they do strange things with crystals, with their cell phones. Right. Those kinds of things could easily become more you know, a little deeper and a little more widespread where people start to think organically like, oh, what? And sometimes they might just not say, no, I'm not doing anything religious because they think of religion as Christianity and maybe they're right. And maybe that's right. And so I do find it an interesting point. That you say like, yeah, there might be a lot of atheopagan around you. They just don't call themselves that, Mark: right. Eric: you know, and they don't, you know, I mean, I know Masimo is a big leader of the stoic community and we just have this debate about whether or not he was a pagan. He'd be like, no, cuz that's like star Hawk. And I was like, no, dude, you're reviving, you're reviving an ancient pagan way of life, which is, oh, by the way, your own family history by your own admission, you know? And he's kind of like, like, guess that's true, you know? But he wouldn't call himself a pagan. Right. But he's doing the thing. So I, I do. And all those people out in San Francisco who do like the transformative text stuff and. A lot of the kind of consciousness hacking and things that goes into like some Americanized forms of Buddhism and things like that. That's, you know, there just might not be a single word for it yet. Mark: Sure sure. And all the, all the tech millionaires going to south America for iowaska ceremonies, you know, I mean, these, these are not the, the men who founded IBM in the 1950s and all wore an identical blue suit with a white shirt and tie. You know, this is, this is a very, very different culture that we've got now. Eric: Yeah. I think so. Was there, Joh, were you gonna say it, that it looked like you were gonna say a thing. Joh: The thing you were the thing you said about, you know, there, there might be 7 million Athens here, but they don't call it that. I just keep thinking about that because there's so many parts about like the set of values and the just human universal human needs, or like seeking for community for for ritual. The I've, I've seen acts of service, like in the past couple of years, like just becoming more community based here, like mutual aid, community fridges things like that. And, and what you were describing, like not, not your IBM founder, you know, people kind of looking for more right. Trying to. To look for more meaning it's all these little pieces kind of just existing at the same time, but not being named in any way. Eric: Yeah, or people aren't quite sure. That's why I think that, you know, building a cultural infrastructure, you know, some way to fit things together that says, oh, you guys are all have a lot in common. Right. I don't Joh, maybe, you know, maybe you're tapped into the secret networks. I mean, I don't know, like allegedly there's a zillion you know, iowaska rituals, like all the time in New York or there were before the pandemic. I don't know what the Panda, I mean, the pandemic transformed so much. There are big psychedelic conferences in New York, right? The the horizons which I've gone to. And but I, I don't know if this stuff is all, is all, you know, secret or, or not. Mark: Well, it seems as though we're at a time where culture and particularly the monopoly of Christianity has really shattered. And of course it's rebelling right now and trying to lock down everything it possibly can, as it loses its grip on the population. But there are all these fragments of things that are kind of floating around. It's like the accretion disc around a star, you know, Those things are going to, to glom onto one another and get bigger and bigger. And some of them will just spin off into space and be their own thing or dissolve. But I feel like nontheistic paganism is a kind of an organizing principle that a lot of these things can fit under because it provides meaning it provides pleasurable activities that people find joyful, provides opportunities for people to be expressive and to create family in whatever form that is meaningful and helpful to them. So it's, it's kind of an exciting time and I, I agree with you, Eric. We're not gonna see the outcome in our lifetimes. I don't think, but this, I think we're at a really pivotal time in this moment. And so working to be a culture creator is a really exciting thing. Eric: Yeah, I think that's true. And I, I mean, sure. I mean, I think that you know, and I don't know what to make of this as a, you know, an American who's growing older, but yeah, the, the sort of angry Christian nationalists trying to lock down what they can. And I don't know what it's like to live in, you know, Tennessee or Georgia or Indiana. I lived in the Northeast and, you know, Pennsylvania's an interesting case too, but I mean, you know, New York and north and east, it's like, Christianity's gone. Mark: Yeah. Eric: It's like, it's not here anymore. And I don't know if California or the west coast is that way. Certainly you have pockets here and there, but what a strange, yeah, that's just strange, Mark: After 2000 years of complete hegemony, right? Eric: Well, right. And you know, how are people living their lives around that? I mean, one of the things I like to do is catalog the existence of stone circles in the United States, you know? And like they're all over the place. I just found one like three miles from where I am now, Mark: Wow. Eric: know? I mean, and so what are people doing? Like what, Mark: It's a lot of work to build a stone circle. They must be doing something. Yucca: Is this is this in a park. Eric: No, this is on private land, up in the Hudson valley, you know, and I, and I just, just learned about it and you know, so I, I, I think we're all gonna, my prediction is we're everybody's gonna smoke weed and look at birds that's gonna be the, that's gonna be the thing, you know, bird. Now he's a bird, you know, now that now that weed is legal, but yeah. Where's this gonna go, Joh? You're young. It's up to you. Mark: Yucca is young Eric: Yucca is young too. That's right. You guys are young. Not, not is old, old foggy like us. Mark: Yeah. Eric: So what are you gonna do? I telescopes you got it all there. Yucca: Oh, yeah, I'm a science teacher. that's this is my classroom back here. Yeah. Eric: Oh, all right. Mark: Well, this has been an incredible conversation and I know we could go on for hours. But I think it's probably a good point for us to kind of draw down for this episode. And I would imagine we're gonna get a lot of really positive response from this episode. And we may ask to have you back to talk more about these things, cuz it's, it's really been just wonderful and super interesting talking with both of you. Yucca: Thank you for joining us so much to think about. Eric: Yeah. Thanks. Thanks for having us. Thanks for having Joh: Yeah, thank you so much. Us on, this was super fun to, to reflect on and think about, and talk about in this group. So thank you. Mark: You're very welcome. And of course we welcome feedback and questions from our listeners. The email address is the wonder podcast, QS, gmail.com. That's the wonder podcast, QS, gmail.com. So we hope to hear from you have a great week, everybody, and we'll be back next week.  

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First Ring Daily
First Ring Daily 1280: Racoon Technology

First Ring Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 10:03


On this episode of First Ring Daily, a little more earnings news, Ignite gets a date, and fighting the beast.

Birds, Booze, and Buds Podcast
Talking Dall Sheep Hunting and Racoon Trapping

Birds, Booze, and Buds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 65:52


Sam joins us this week to talk about an EPIC trip he is packing to take. We also cover lots of conversation topics such as Pittman Robertson, predator trapping, Turkey Hunting, and much much more!

The Michael Berry Show
This Car Wash Supplies You with Crack and Racoon Meat | AM Show Hr 1

The Michael Berry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 35:45


Today on the first hour of The Michael Berry Show:Judge Darrell Jordan calls refers to himself as "king."There was a Houston barber shop that was a front for drugs.There is also a car wash that gives you drugs and racoon meat.