Podcasts about Hebrew Bible

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Canonical collection of Hebrew scriptures

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  • Oct 18, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Hebrew Bible

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Latest podcast episodes about Hebrew Bible

BibleProject
Literature for a Lifetime – Paradigm E6

BibleProject

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 55:11


What's the ideal way to study the Bible? Is it 20 minutes of reading every morning or larger blocks of time throughout the week? In this episode, join Tim, Jon, and Carissa as they discuss what it means for the Bible to be ancient Jewish meditation literature. The biblical authors never intended for it to be understood in one sitting, but over the course of a lifetime of re-reading.View full show notes from this episode →TimestampsPart one (0-19:30)Part two (19-30-32:00)Part three (32:00-46:00)Part four (46:00-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim's library here.David Andrew Teeter, Hebrew Bible scholarShow Music“Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Acedotes” by MakzoShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder.Powered and distributed by Simplecast.

Jew Oughta Know
129. TFTYOS: Who Wrote the Bible?

Jew Oughta Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 25:32


Who wrote the Hebrew Bible, when, and how? Boiling a huge topic down to the basics: a thousand-year long literary tradition built by authors across the centuries, compiling story after story to arrive at what we have today.

City Church San Francisco
The 10% - Deborah: Prophet, Judge, Woman of Fire

City Church San Francisco

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 27:01


Rev. Jonathan Gundlach continues our Fall Sermon Series, "The 10% - Listening To The Woman of the Hebrew Bible" with a sermon on Deborah: Prophet, Judge, Woman of Fire. All are welcomed, loved and affirmed (🌈) at City Church.  You can support the work of City Church at www.citychurchsf.org/give

Science of Mind Spiritual Center Los Angeles
The Wisdom of Healing – October 17, 2021

Science of Mind Spiritual Center Los Angeles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 25:50


Loving greetings and welcome to the topics of October's Sunday talks which, by the way, you can listen to any other day of the week as well. Our theme of the month is “The Heart of Wisdom.” Did you know the word “wisdom” is mentioned 222 times in the Hebrew Bible? Obviously, developing wisdom is […]

TOV
Digital Ministry: The Future or Failure?

TOV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 26:16


Is digital ministry worth the time and effort? Isn't it far inferior to in-person ministry? Join Levi Hazen and Steven Cauthen as they discuss these questions and find out about Life in Messiah's digital outreach among the Jewish people!

Torah Class Three
Lesson 88 - Matthew 26

Torah Class Three

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 53:46


First Reading
Job 42:1–6, 10–17, with Will Kynes

First Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:05


God's Consolation Lectionary Date: October 24, 2021 [22nd Sunday after Pentecost, Year B] Job is a long book that only gets a small showing in the Revised Common Lectionary. So we invited a scholar to help us unpack this week's conclusion to the book in the context of the themes raised by the whole. Dr. Will Kynes is Associate Professor of Biblical Studies at Samford University. His research focuses on wisdom and suffering in the Hebrew Bible viewed from the varied perspectives of various biblical texts and their readers across history. Dr. Kynes is currently working on a book on how different cultures have found hope in the biblical tradition of wrestling with God. He is also the cohost (with Rony Kozman) of a great new podcast, "The Two Testaments," which you can find over at www.thetwotestaments.com. So (after you listen to First Reading), head over there and give them the First Reading bump!

BibleProject
Who Is the Bible About? – Paradigm E5

BibleProject

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 55:44


Is the story of the Bible about humans or God? Because the Bible is about the Messiah—the God who became human—it's about both God and humans. In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa discuss how the story of the Bible and all of its main themes come to their fulfillment in Jesus, making it a story that's personal but not private, a redemption story for all of us.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00 - 16:45)Part two (16:45 - 31:00)Part three (31:00 - 46:30)Part four (46:30 - End)Referenced ResourcesThe Liberating Image: The Imago Dei in Genesis 1, J. Richard MiddletonDavid Andrew Teeter, Hebrew Bible scholarInterested in more? Check out Tim's library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“On a Walk” by FantompowerShow produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.

City Church San Francisco
The 10% - Mahlah, Noa, Hoglah, Milcah, and Tirzah: Resisting the Progress Narrative

City Church San Francisco

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 19:36


Angie Hong (@angiekayhong) continues our Fall Sermon Series, "The 10% - Listening To The Woman of the Hebrew Bible" with a sermon on Mahlah, Noa, Hoglah, Milcah, and Tirzah.  All are welcomed, loved and affirmed (🌈) at City Church.  You can support the work of City Church at www.citychurchsf.org/give

Science of Mind Spiritual Center Los Angeles
The Wisdom of Knowing – October 10, 2021

Science of Mind Spiritual Center Los Angeles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 29:15


Loving greetings and welcome to the topics of October's Sunday talks which, by the way, you can listen to any other day of the week as well. Our theme of the month is “The Heart of Wisdom.” Did you know the word “wisdom” is mentioned 222 times in the Hebrew Bible? Obviously, developing wisdom is […]

God Forbid - ABC RN
A Jewish perspective on sacred texts

God Forbid - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 54:07


Some Jewish sacred texts are over 3000 years old, but are still read by nearly half the world's population. In addition to Jews, there are four billion Christians and Muslims in the world, who draw - in differing ways - on the Hebrew Bible, or the Tanakh. Join James Carleton and the panel as they examine the Tanakh, and the text's impact in history and on society today. 

narratology.
29. sarai, hagar, and abram pt. 1 - genesis E21

narratology.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 50:09


Thanks for listening! We are happy you took some time out of your day to meditate on God's word with us. This episode is the first part of two episodes consisting of a conversation on Genesis 16. Please feel free to share this episode with a friend! We appreciate you.Episode produced by Brett JohnsonInstagram: @narratology.podcast

Restitutio
412 One God 2: Yahweh Our God, Yahweh Is One

Restitutio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 36:31


This is part 2 of the One God Over All class. This class is all about who God is. That Yahweh is our God and that Yahweh is one are truths we must take to heart if we want to think biblically about God. Today we’ll continue our march through the Hebrew Bible, stopping to Read more about 412 One God 2: Yahweh Our God, Yahweh Is One[…]

Restitutio Classes
412 One God 2: Yahweh Our God, Yahweh Is One

Restitutio Classes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 36:31


This is part 2 of the One God Over All class. This class is all about who God is. That Yahweh is our God and that Yahweh is one are truths we must take to heart if we want to think biblically about God. Today we’ll continue our march through the Hebrew Bible, stopping to Read more about 412 One God 2: Yahweh Our God, Yahweh Is One[…]

Resist and Restore
The Making of Biblical Womanhood: Interview with Beth Allison Barr (Ep 42)

Resist and Restore

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 91:11


Interview with professor and author Beth Allison Barr. Rachel and Jonny interview Beth on her book “The Making of Biblical Womanhood.” They talk about patriarchy in the church and in the Bible, medieval Christian women and dragon slayers, the history of gender-inclusive language in the Bible, how the industrial revolution changed the narrative around women's roles, and more. It's a rich interview full of history that challenges the patriarchal view of women's roles in the church. Also in this episode, the pastors talkback to an email they received from a friend in response to the previous podcast episode where Ben and Jonny discuss the Bible. Later, a little Spiritual Show and Tell: a poem about fatherhood from Poetry Magazine, a reminder of Sabbath and the gift of divine rest, Psalm 8, and bad jokes. //Notes// -Interview with Beth Allison Barr- Beth Allison Barr: https://twitter.com/bethallisonbarr Beth Allison Barr's The Making of Biblical Womanhood: http://www.bakerpublishinggroup.com/books/the-making-of-biblical-womanhood/404050 - Spiritual Show and Tell - Psalm 8 (Jonny's translation, with Robert Alter's) For the lead player, on the gittith, a David Psalm. Lord, our Maker, how majestic Your name in all the earth! Whose splendor was told over the heavens. From the mouth of babes and sucklings You founded strength on account of Your foes to put an end to enemy and avenger. When I see Your heavens, the work of You fingers, the moon and the stars You fixed firm, “What is a human being that You should note them, And the mortal, that You pay them heed, and You make them little less than the gods with glory and grandeur You crown them? You make them rule over the work of Your hands? All things You set under their feet. Sheep and oxen all together, and also the beasts of their field, birds of the heavens and fish of the sea, what moves on the paths of the seas.” Lord, our Maker, how majestic Your name in all the earth! The Hebrew Bible by Robert Alter: https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393292497 Bad Jokes Where does an 800 lb gorilla sleep? Anywhere it wants. What kind of star wears sunglasses? A Movie star. Who was the first animal in space? The cow that jumped over the moon. What do you do when a monster sneezes? Get out of the way! How do you talk to giants? Use BIG words. What did the big chimney say to the little chimney? You smoke too much. Love Letter from Inside Fatherhood by Fritz Ward https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/156313/love-letter-from-inside-fatherhood //About this Podcast// Resist and Restore is a podcast by Circle of Hope. We're extending the table of our dialogue! Tune in bi-weekly as the Circle of Hope pastors—Rachel, Ben, Julie, and Jonny—sit down to dialogue about faith, God, Jesus, the spiritual life, and everything in between. Available on Spotify, iTunes/Apple Music, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, and more. //Contact Us// Website: https://circleofhope.church Email: ResistandRestorePodcast@circleofhope.net IG/TW: @circleofhopenet YouTube: https://youtube.com/circleofhope FB: https://fb.me/CircleofHopePhillyRegion Help keep the show running! Contribute at: https://circleofhope.church/share

#STRask with Greg Koukl
Why Isn't the Sabbath a Universal Commandment?

#STRask with Greg Koukl

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 21:05


Questions about responding to the objection that the New Testament mistranslated and misrepresented the Hebrew Bible and why the Sabbath isn't a universal commandment like the other nine. How can I overcome the objection from Torah-only people that the New Testament mistranslated and misrepresented the Hebrew Bible? What about the Sabbath commandment makes it not a universal one like the other nine?

OnScript
Matthew Lynch – Portraying Violence in the Hebrew Bible

OnScript

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 59:56


Dru Johnson discusses Matt's recent book Portraying Violence in the Hebrew Bible. Matt discusses ways that the Old Testament depicts the problem of violence, some of the surprising ways that biblical writers portray violence, and ways that the Old Testament challenges modern ideas about violence. Also listen to Matt fail miserably in the speed round. The post Matthew Lynch – Portraying Violence in the Hebrew Bible first appeared on OnScript.

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall
1279. Google Play Store Ebook. "The Dead Sea Scrolls." 10/05/21.

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 0:38


(For Educational Purposes Only. The Creator owns the content.)"'Probably the most important archaeological find in history ... Vermes' translations are a standard in the field' Los Angeles Times The discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the Judaean desert between 1947 and 1956 was one of the greatest finds of all time. These extraordinary manuscripts appear to have been hidden in the caves at Qumran by the Essenes, a Jewish sect in existence before and during the time of Jesus. Written in Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek, the scrolls have transformed our understanding of the Hebrew Bible, early Judaism and the origins of Christianity. This acclaimed translation by Geza Vermes has established itself as the classic version of these texts. Translated and edited with an Introduction and Notes by Geza Vermes."

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall
1277. Google Play Store Ebook. The Hebrew Study Bible 10/05/21

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 11:53


(For Educational Purposes Only. The Creator owns their content.) "First published in 2004, The Jewish Study Bible is a landmark, one-volume resource tailored especially for the needs of students of the Hebrew Bible. It has won acclaim from readers in all religious traditions. The Jewish Study Bible, which comes in a protective slipcase, combines the entire Hebrew Bible--in the celebrated Jewish Publication Society TANAKH Translation--with explanatory notes, introductory materials, and essays by leading biblical scholars on virtually every aspect of the text, the world in which it was written, its interpretation, and its role in Jewish life. The quality of scholarship, easy-to-navigate format, and vibrant supplementary features bring the ancient text to life. This second edition includes revised annotations for nearly the entire Bible, as well as forty new and updated essays on many of the issues in Jewish interpretation, Jewish worship in the biblical and post-biblical periods, and the influence of the Hebrew Bible in the ancient world. The Jewish Study Bible, Second Edition, is an essential resource for anyone interested in the Hebrew Bible."

To The Brim (Second Life Church)
Highway to Hell pt.2

To The Brim (Second Life Church)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 44:45


Join us today as we finish the conversation about heaven and hell.  Although the conversation is over there is still so much more to talk about.  Feel free to reach out and give us your thoughts and feed back.  This is part 2 of 2Gehenna (/ɡɪˈhɛnə/, /ɡəˈhɛnə/[3]), the Aramaic name of the Valley of Hinnom,[1] or Gehinnom, is the corresponding geographical term modified in the process of translation of the Hebrew Bible, which has received various fundamental theological connotations.In the Hebrew Bible, Gehenna was initially where some of the kings of Judah sacrificed their children by fire.[4] Thereafter, it was deemed to be cursed (Book of Jeremiah 7:31, 19:2–6).[5]. ~Wikipedia  Evangelist and businessman Dwight Lyman Moody established the Moody bible institute in 1886. (Quote from their website Moody.edu)Movie:DogmaBook:Heaven by Randy AlcornConnect:Tothebrim message line# 561- 316-7915 Pastors@secondlifechurch.comGive: secondlifechurch.com/giving

In the Studio with Michael Card
Surprised By Kindness

In the Studio with Michael Card

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 52:59


On the next edition of In the Studio with Michael Card we're going on the road for teaching and music from a Biblical Imagination conference. Join us as Michael continues his study on the most important passage in the Hebrew Bible about the character of God. This is the second part on the encounter Moses had with the Glory of God from Exodus 34. Throughout the hour there's music that Michael shared that surrounds this teaching recorded at the Conference. It's a great opportunity to sit with other Bible students as we learn and worship together, In the Studio with Michael Card.

York Alliance Church Sermons
Building the People of God: The Strategy of the Enemy - 10.3.21

York Alliance Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 51:56


The book of Exodus is a powerful foretelling of the work of salvation and restoration that God has done through Jesus. From a macro perspective, Exodus is one part in the five-volume epic that begins the Hebrew Bible. From the micro perspective, slavery in Egypt is a type for bondage of sin. Only when we see our helplessness and God's covenant love are we able to truly see the power of God's deliverance.

BibleProject
How the New Testament Came To Be – Paradigm E4

BibleProject

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 52:39


At first glance, the New Testament can seem wildly different from the Old Testament––but is it? Jesus saw himself as the fulfillment of the Hebrew Scriptures and the climax of the story that began thousands of years before his birth. In this episode, join Tim, Jon, and Carissa as they explore the unity of the New Testament and the intricate yet consistent storyline of the Bible.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00-10:40)Part two (10:40-23:30)Part three (23:30-34:50)Part four (34:50-End)Referenced ResourcesThe Canon of the New Testament: Its Origin, Development, and Significance, Bruce M. MetzgerThe Question of Canon: Challenging the Status Quo in the New Testament Debate, Michael J. KrugerAll Things New: Revelation As Canonical Capstone, Brian J. TabbThe Oxford Handbook of ChristologyInterested in more? Check out Tim's library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Day One” by Deric Torres“Day Two” by Deric Torres“Temple Garden” by BVGShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.

Adventure through the Bible Podcast
The One Who Kept the Blessing Alive

Adventure through the Bible Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 9:49


One thing that is common in the Hebrew Bible is that Yahweh often called for prophetic reenactments of things yet to come. This reenactment seems to be about the sacrifice that Jesus would one day pay. Yahweh asked Abraham to play the part of Himself in the sacrifice of his own son. Jesus and Isaac are both keys in unlocking this story and seeing how Isaac is the one who kept the blessing alive. Adventure Through the Bible is brought to you by Ben Lock. Ben is a Campus Minister at Christian Student Fellowship on Indiana State University's campus. He loves going on adventures with his wife and the students he serves. He also loves helping people discover and live out the adventures God has placed within them. Resources for Further Study: Why Did God Ask Abraham to Sacrifice Isaac? Isaac and Rebekah - Bible Story

City Church San Francisco
The 10% - Miriam: Silenced Mother of the Women Prophets

City Church San Francisco

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 34:35


Rev. Fred Harrell continues our Fall Sermon Series, "The 10% - Listening To The Woman of the Hebrew Bible" with a sermon on Miriam, the oldest sister of Moses.  The story of Miriam is often overlooked within the patriarchal lens that elevated the story of Moses but if we look at the story through Miriam's eyes what we find is a portrait of strength and passion.  Hebrew Scholar and Biblical Feminist, Phyllis Trible, said of this story... Stepping back to view the whole, we see a story beginning at the bank of the river, moving to the shore of the sea, continuing into the wilds of the wilderness, disappearing in the new land, and recovering there through prophecy and song. From overlays of patriarchy, Miriam's true portrait begins to emerge.  Lo, the fragments the builders have rejected have become tesserae in a mosaic of salvation.  Let all women and men who have eyes to behold this mosaic join Miriam in singing an updated version of her song of deliverance: Sing to the Lord, for God has triumphed gloriously! Patriarchy and its horsemen God has thrown into the sea! All are welcomed, loved and affirmed (🌈) at City Church.  You can support the work of City Church at www.citychurchsf.org/give

Madlik Podcast – Torah Thoughts on Judaism From a Post-Orthodox Jew

Parshat Bereshit - Exile and Return is a seminal Jewish theme we normally associate with Exodus and the narrative of the Jewish People. We discover this theme in the first chapters of Genesis and in so doing discover the Hebrew Bible's universal message regarding the trauma of birth, the anxiety of life and the rewards of creativity and expansion. Sefaria Source Sheet: www.sefaria.org/sheets/349788 Transcript: Geoffrey Stern  00:00 Welcome to Madlik disruptive Torah. And every week, we record half an hour of what I call disruptive Torah, where we kind of look at the Torah with a new lens and maybe from a new angle and try to share that sense of discovery with our participants. So thank you all for joining. And we are going to start with Bereshit. And for those of you who have been listening and participating in clubhouse, I think you already know that one of my favorite commentators is Rashi. He wrote a commentary on all of the books of the Torah, including the Talmud, the Mishanh, I just an unbelievable encyclopedic review of the Holy Writ of the Jewish people. But it's not the expanse, it's the detail and he always brings a midrash or a quotation that is absolutely insightful and actually kind of positions the whole discussion. So the first verse of the Torah we all know "In the beginning God created the heaven in the earth." And the first Rashi starts as follows: "Rabbi Isaac said, the Torah, which is the law book of Israel, should have started with Exodus 12: 2 the first commandment "This month shall be unto you the first of the months", which is the first commandment given to Israel. "What is the reason" asks this Rabbi Isaac "then that it commences with the account of creation?" Pretty good question. We'll discuss the question in a second and its premise. And he answers "because of the thought expressed in Psalms, "God declared to his people the strength of his works, in order that he might give them the heritage of the nations.".  Rashi continues, "for should the people of the world say to Israel, 'are robbers because you took by force the lands of the seven nations of Canaan', Israel may reply to them and say, from Psalms, all the earth belongs to the Holy One, bless be he. He created it, and gave it to whom he pleased, when he willed, he gave it to them. And when he willed he took it away from them and gave it to us." So Wow, what a way to begin studying the the narratives of the cosmology, the creation of the world, and our foreparents with a question of, well, what are we even reading this for? The Torah is a book of laws. It's a book that gives us the "hora'aot" the direction, the path that we should walk down. Why are we wasting our time with this mythology? And then he gives an answer, but let's stop for a second Rabbi and discuss the premise of his very question. Adam Mintz  03:09 The premise is very problematic. The premise is that the only purpose of the book is to teach us laws. Ramban, Nachmanidies, the great Spanish scholar who lived in the 1200s. he disagrees with Rashi, here at the beginning of the Torah immediately. He says that the purpose of the book of Bereshit, of Genesis is not to teach us laws, but it's to teach us moral cause. He has a great phrase, the phrase is "Ma'aseh avot, siman l'banim" "the actions of our forefathers our models to the children", and therefore that's the reason we have all the stories in Bereshit. Rashi seems to argue with that. Rashi seems to say that, no, it's not about morality, it's about law. And if you think it's about law, there's no reason for the book of Bereshit. So Rashi needs to explain that it's to teach us about our connection to the land of Israel. So in that very first Rashi, there actually is a fundamental question about the purpose of Torah. Geoffrey Stern  04:22 So I love the fact that you quoted  "Ma'aseh avot, siman l'banim" which literally as you say means "the are stories of oure foreparents. "siman" is a sign for the children. And of course, you could expand and say "avot" could also mean as in "avot melacha" or "Pikei Avot", it could mean the most basic primary principles. So the stories of our roots, of our beginnings are is a siman is a sign for its children. But in a sense, "sign" is very similar to myth. Meaning to say that even Ramban quoting this Talmudic phrase, there's almost the recognition that we're not just telling stories here that either the stories actually occurred but they have deeper symbolic meaning. Or it's not that important that every one of them occurred because the symbolic meaning is what drives us. And if you think about that for a second, I'm not sure that is that different from what Rashi ends up answering, which is okay, the reason we need this is because these stories justify the Jewish people's coming from another place and coming into the land that was at the time that they came in occupied by another people. And the ethical, moral, or you could even say political message, the "siman" that we are getting from these stories is that you know what, no one owns anything. The earth belongs to the Lord. And he can give and he can take and that's a big message, I think for life. But but really they're all kind of on the same page from the fact that none of them, correct me if I'm wrong, is interested or believes that these stories by themselves as a historical record, belong in our holy book, they have to symbolize something, they have to inspire us in some way. Would you agree to that? Adam Mintz  06:51 I would agree. Now, the idea of myths is a fascinating idea. I actually spoke about this right before Yizkor. There's the new book by Dara Horn. the book by Dara Horn is some title like people, "Why do people love dead Jews?" It's a provocative title. But she has a collection of essays. She raises the following idea, which is a great idea. You know, we're all brought up Geoffrey with the idea that the way that we all got our American names is our forefathers, our grandparents came to Ellis Island, and they only knew Yiddish. So they were asked by the by the representative at Ellis Island: "What's your name?" And they answered, "shoyn Forgesin", which means in Yiddish "I forgot". And the representative said, okay, your name is "Shawn Fergeson"And that's how everybody got their American names. They didn't know any English so they made up something and that became their American names. Dara Horn, the author points out that that is not true. We know that that's not true. What's true is that in the 1930s, we have multiple court records about Jews who actually went to courts in America, especially in New York, to change their names, because there was so much anti semitism in America, and they couldn't get jobs and they couldn't get into schools, and they couldn't get into colleges. And therefore they they asked to change their names. She said, Where does the myth come from? The myth comes from the fact that we as American Jews want to protect America, we want to protect the Jewish relationship with America. So therefore, that myth of Ellis Island is a much better myth than the truth. And I think Geoffrey, that's a very interesting idea here. When you talk about the myth of the stories in the book of Genesis. Did they happen? Did they not happen? The point is, it doesn't make any difference whether they happened or they didn't happen. But each one of them grapples with a moral issue. And not all of them are easily resolvable. Let's take Geoffrey the most difficult one of all, God says to Abraham, I want you to sacrifice your son. Now, the question is not whether that actually happens, or not, the question is why Abraham said, Okay, I'll sacrifice my son. What right did he have to sacrifice his son even at God's Word? So the entire book of Genesis is made up of these  "Ma'aseh avot, siman l'banim" these stories, these myths that come to teach us a moral lesson. So I think Dara Horn is really on to something, that sometimes the myth is more important. Then the fact because it comes to teach us something important. Geoffrey Stern  10:05 I think that's great. And clearly, these are myths that resonated, certainly when the Torah was edited, put together, and then re-read over and over again, these are myths that work picked for a reason. And then by simply being repeated so many times they take on a life of their own. And you get to see how different generations and different people react and interact with them. I have to say, as an aside here, that Elie Wiesel wrote a book on Rashi. And it struck Elie Wiesel that the first Rabbi that Rashi quotes is named Rabbi Yitzchok. And of course Rahi's name is Shlomo ben Yitzchak. So the truth is, this is a rabbi that comes from the Yalkut Shimoni it was not his father. But again, it does give another rendering to  "Ma'aseh avot, siman l'banim" that we are looking almost like a Rorschach inkblot at the same stories that were looked at, by our forefathers, our forbearers in the case of Judaism, by Christians, by Muslims, by scholars. And that's kind of fascinating, too, I just find that the term that the stories of our past are a sign to us is so so pregnant with meaning, and makes it all so exciting. And getting back to your point about the sacrifice of Isaac, you know, another way to look at myths, and we're gonna start talking about how the psychoanalysts looked at it is like a dream as well. And, you know, the thing about a dream, especially a nightmare, is it's made to resolve certain things, talking about it, hearing it, repeating it over and over again. And then we can manufacture the ending sometimes. So the ending does become important. So I've always thought that the punch line of the sacrifice, or the binding of Isaac was that he wasn't sacrificed. But that is a story that we are going to discuss in the future. What I want to spend the rest of today's discussion talking about is something that I thought about for the first time this year. And that is that when Rashi  brings up this point, that why do we need the stories? And he answers with a seemingly very provincial, national answer saying, well, it's in order that we should not be called colonizers, because we're going to come and we're going to, at a certain point in time, take this land that we admit, we are not originally from. And we need these stories to justify that land grab, so to speak. But what it really comes down to, and this is the insight that I want to spend the rest of the day talking about, is that the earth belongs to the Lord. And I would say, it's arbitrary that we own this, or we sit here or we live there. And then there's this other issue, which I really want to focus on, which is that none of us belong to a particular place in the sense we're all alienated from it. From the beginning of the Torah, we're going to see more than I think any of us ever expected. The theme of exile, over and over again in the first, just four chapters of Genesis. And Rashi is even here talking about this concept of exile and return that comes up much later in the narrative. But he brings it to the beginning of the Torah and that I think is not provincial is not partisan, but actually is one of the primary themes of the Bible. So in terms of the Bible itself, we all know that Adam in the second chapter, it has the story of man being created by himself. Maybe he was androgynous we don't know. But after looking for a helpmeet throughout the animal kingdom, God fashioned his rib in 2: 22 And it says, "and he had taken from the man into the woman, and he brought her to the man, then the man said, this one at last is bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh, this one shall be called woman." So here you have this beautiful image of the unity of mankind of a man cleaving to his wife. And then it goes on to say, "for from men, she was taken. Hence, a man leaves his father and mother, and clings to his wife, so that they shall become one." So we have already in the second chapter, the first instance of this tension between being unitary, whole, complete, and being separated. And there's almost this sense of the separation is a necessary part of our identity. Ever think, and I'm not even talking about the amount of times in the process of creation itself. We had God is doing "havdalah" where he's creating by separating Earth from land, sky from the abode. Have you ever thought about it this way Rabbi Adam? Adam Mintz  16:21 Yeah, well, the idea of separating.... you brought up a whole bunch of different things here. Let's talk about the last thing, the idea of separating the entire story of the six days of creation, is the story about separating, separating night from day, light from darkness, animals from people, the sun and the moon, everything has its opposite. What do you make of that? Why do you think that's so important, that in the story of creation, everything has its opposite? Geoffrey Stern  17:03 Well, I think again, it gives us an insight into the biblical mind, the mind of the Bible's sense of God. And so many things about Genesis is about either dividing or choosing and when you choose, you also are selecting one thing and rejecting something else. It just seems so written in to the fabric. You can almost make the case that creation itself was not so much out of nothing, which is a Greek term, a modern term, but was this act of separating and repositioning. And it does become something that if you use it as a lens, enables you to understand much about the different narratives. In this particular case. I focused first upon man and wife, which is kind of, you know, the beginnings of society, separate from their father and mother, who is the father and mother of Adam and Eve. It's God in a sense, and of course, that story gets picked up a few verses later, in chapter three, when the famous Original Sin occurs. And at this point, God says to the woman, I will give you birth pangs, "b'etzev tilady", you shall give birth in pain, when you bear children, and your husband will rule over you, but also will struggle to pull crops from the ground, "by the sweat of your brow, shall you have bred to eat". Some of the modern day psychologists look at this whole story as the beginning of the "trauma of birth", that here, man was first created without those birth pangs. And he was first created without needing to separate the crop from the earth and to create creation, so to speak. And the first story of creation is this major separation where we are thrown out of the Garden of Eden. So again, everything that we've been talking about till now has focused on this separation. You can even call it alienation That we are torn apart. And that's how on the one hand, you could make an argument creation happens. But certainly it's the source of a lot of anxiety. Adam Mintz  20:12 I mean, there's no question that that's right. A couple of things you brought up, number one, the idea of Adam and Eve not having parents. But then you have the story in chapter three of the sin. And God really takes the position of Adam and Eve's parents in the sense that he's the one who reprimands them, and he's the one who punishes them. I was always wondering, Geoffrey, the rabbis say an amazing thing. The rabbis say that Adam and Eve were created, they were put in the Garden of Eden, but they never actually slept a night in the Garden of Eden. They couldn't even make it one night, before nightfall they had already sinned. Why do you think it is that there was somehow a need for the Torah to tell us that they sinned so quickly, that part of the nature of human beings is to sin? What do you make of that? Geoffrey Stern  21:16 Well, it's certainly the source or the intention of that type of explanation of the myth would come from the fact that it was it was just a taste, it was just so fleeting. And it happened in an instant. And I think that what I kind of come up with is, first of all, how final the divorce, how final the expulsion from the Garden of Eden was, you have these Cherubim, you have these angels with a sword, standing guard over it. It almost sounds as if it was part of the birth pang. It was a rupture, it had to occur, that everything that lies ahead, is after this fact. And that this story was there less to tell you about the bliss of the Garden of Eden, but more to focus you on the project that begins after the expulsion. That's my read. But it's true. We don't spend a whole lot of time on the pearly gates, the beauty of the Garden of Eden, it's almost as though On the flip side, the Torah doesn't spend much time, or any time at all, I would argue on describing a heaven. on describing a pearly end it's all about what lies ahead of us.. Adam Mintz  23:08 That point is such a good point. Because the Garden of Eden is much more important symbolically as the place where they will go back to, right? When we say when somebody dies, "b'gan eden t'he menuchatam"  that their resting place will be in the garden of Eden. So the Garden of Eden becomes a place we're going back to not a place that we spend very much time in. That's a fascinating idea. Geoffrey Stern  23:42 So that's a great segue for me to talk a little bit about the psychoanalytic analysts and Otto Rank, wrote two two books 10 years apart. One was called "The myth of the birth of the hero", and the other was called "The trauma of birth". And in the myth of the birth of the hero, he gives much credit to Freud and Freud actually, I wrote on this subject in a book he wrote called "Moses and Monotheism" and that is, and we'll discuss this when we get to Moses, is how almost to a "T" in every one of the ancient mythologies whether it's Romulus and Remus, or whoever. There's this story about the Royal heir, the prince who is expelled from the home, maybe it's because the father is afraid that he's going to come and usurp the throne, has to go out .... many times he's put into a raft through a boat,  is raised by animals or simple people. And then you have like Odysseus, a whole way of coming back. Ultimately, if you get to the Oedipus story, he then comes back and he kills his father. He gets his mother and all is resolved. And that's what Rank writes about in this "myth of the birth of the hero". But he makes a major change when he talks about "the trauma of birth". And what he says there is that there's something even more primal, then this, Oedipus and this hero, and what that is, we are all born of women, so to speak, we all are ruptured and thrown into the world. And we are separated from that warm place of our origins. And unlike the Oedipus myth, he claims and I think he's right, and that's why I'm bringing it up now is that it doesn't necessarily or it does necessarily not get resolved. In other words, none of us can go back into the womb. And he brings the Cherubim outside of Eden, because he does see the creation of Eve from Adam, as a way to, to kind of detour around the birth of of humans as it actually occurs. And he does talk about taking the apple off the tree as giving birth to it and separating it. And what he talks about is the whole sin, the whole original sin that all of us human beings have to try to address and not necessarily resolve is this original disruption in our lives. And what argues is that you do not go back to Eden. And I do think you're absolutely right, that we talk about "Gan Eden Mi'Kedem". And we talk about in our prayers going back to Eden, but Eden does not feature as much in Judaism as in Christianity, the Fall does not feature as much. But certainly, there's this sense that the trauma of birth is something that we can't put back, you can't put the genie back inside of the bottle. And that's what kind of is intriguing to me. And again, when we look at myths, some myths, you can wrap with a bow, and they resolve themselves, and others are ones that are just the human condition that we have to deal with. Adam Mintz  27:29 Yes, that is right. And you say that here in the in the very beginning of the Torah, we're really introduced to different kinds of myths. Now we talk about myths. Then you talk about the story of fratricide where Cain kills Abel. That's very much not a myth. That feels very real, doesn't it? Geoffrey Stern  27:56 Well, it absolutely does. But thank you for bringing it up. Because that, I would say is the fourth instance, in our parsha this week, where we have this sense of being a wanderer on the earth, the punishment that Cain gets goes back to the same thing that happened with Adam. It says, If in Genesis 412, it says, "If you till the soil, it shall no longer yield its strength to you." So this birth process will no longer be natural. And then it says you shall become a ceaseless wanderer on the earth. "Na v'nad ti'hiye b'aretz" Then he goes on to say that I "geyrashta" I will divorce you from the face of the earth. And it uses the phrase that we discovered in Deuteronomy at the end of the story, and it goes "umipanecha Ester" and I will hide my face from you. So again, these themes that we thought developed all the way at the end, were there all the way at the beginning as kernels. And then finally, where does Cain go to live and This to me is discovering humor in the Bible as well. "veYashav b'eretz Nod", and he settled he dwelt in the land of Nod.  Nod is the same word for Na v'nad", that is he settled in the land of wandering. Adam Mintz  28:05 Which means he never settled.   Geoffrey Stern  29:34 He absolutely never settled. He felt responsible for death, he had that guilt. And again, you can say yes, it's a real story. It's not a myth. But if you look at it in terms of all of the narratives that we've seen in Genesis, so far, through this lens, in the first four chapters, it's all about being sent into exile, alienated from one's source ripped away from whether it's the tree, whether it's the father, be it God or one's parents.... cleaving on to each other, to me, it just is so amazing that even though we're not talking about the story of the Jewish people that Rashi focused us on to, the idea is in humanity is this same trope of, of literally from the beginning, we are separated. And if you ask the same question that Rashi asks, from that perspective, then the answer is it needs to start here, because the journey is all about somehow regaining that unity that  wholeness, that, that completion. So what what I also discovered is this amazing essay by Bialik, and it's called "Jewish Dualism". And he looks at all of Jewish history, he picks up on where Rashi left off. And he says that, you know, we've been out of the land more than we've been in it. Every time we've left, we've expanded, we've grown. He talks about "a group which adapts itself to the ways of life of the whole world, but nonetheless remains a people dwelling apart." And that's part of the other narrative. And he talks about this strength that it gives us. And I think he wrote it in the same year, as Otto Rank, wrote his book, and they both come to an interesting conclusion. And that is that it's not all a negative thing, that from each expansion and contraction from each exile and return. We enrich ourselves and we enrich others. And Bialik, who is considered the poet Laureate of Zionism, even ends his essay with the following statement, which is mind blowing, he says "And who knows, perhaps after hundreds of years, [of living in the State of Israel], we will be emboldened to make another Exodus, which will lead to the spreading of our spirit over the world, and assiduously striving towards glory." So he really sees it as a pathway going forward of enrichment that is intrinsic to the biblical project. And Rank talks about artists and philosophers and religionists who are able to take this trauma of being born against one's will being passed out and separated from one's natural mother parents from God from this sense of unity and he sees it also as a potential for amazing creation. And He therefore doesn't call the hero the hero anymore he calls it the artist which is kind of fascinating to me so I really do think that the the question is a good one Why do we read these stories? It's a question we all have to ask ourselves and how we answer it really says a lot about ourselves and the direction we want to go in but certainly having multi generations talk about the same texts like Rashi and his father Yitzchok and like you and I and like our listeners is part of the creative project which I think brings us together so anyway, I just love discovering these themes of exile and return so early in the mythological narrative, and I hope you do as well.   Adam Mintz  34:11 What a good star Geoffrey. We thank everybody enjoy the parsha Bereshit, and we look forward to continuing Noach next week. And we look forward to a great year of studying parshiyot together with you on Madlik. So thank you, everybody. Shabbat Shalom and enjoy the parsha.

Queer Theology
Mythology vs. History – Genesis 2:18-24

Queer Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 27:45


In this episode, we answer another anonymous question from a Tumblr follower who used to veil a lot before knowing […] The post Mythology vs. History – Genesis 2:18-24 appeared first on Queer Theology.

Science of Mind Spiritual Center Los Angeles
The Wisdom of Being – October 3, 2021

Science of Mind Spiritual Center Los Angeles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 22:22


Loving greetings and welcome to the topics of October's Sunday talks which, by the way, you can listen to any other day of the week as well. Our theme of the month is “The Heart of Wisdom.” Did you know the word “wisdom” is mentioned 222 times in the Hebrew Bible? Obviously, developing wisdom is […]

Inverse Podcast
Rev. Dr. Wil Gafney- Womanism's Prophetic Challenge

Inverse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 50:01


The Rev. Wil Gafney, Ph.D. is the Right Rev. Sam B. Hulsey Professor of Hebrew Bible at Brite Divinity School in Fort Worth, Texas. She is the author of Womanist Midrash: A Reintroduction to Women of the Torah and of the Throne, a commentary on Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah in the Wisdom series; Daughters of Miriam: Women Prophets in Ancient Israel; and co-editor of The Peoples’ Bible and The Peoples’ Companion to the Bible. She is the author of a Women’s Lectionary for the Whole Church and translator of its biblical selections; the first two volumes, Year A and W (a stand-alone volume) are due in August. She is an Episcopal priest canonically resident in the Diocese of Pennsylvania and licensed in the Diocese of North Texas, and a former Army chaplain and congregational pastor in the AME Zion Church. A former member of the Dorshei Derekh Reconstructionist Minyan of the Germantown Jewish Center in Philadelphia, she has co-taught courses with and for the Reconstructionist Rabbinical Seminary in Wyncote, PA. Follow Rev. Wil Gafney on Twitter @WilGafney and find her at www.wilgafney.com Follow Drew Hart on Instagram and Twitter @druhart. Follow Jarrod McKenna on Instagram and Twitter @jarrodmckenna. Discover our global community on Twitter and Instagram @inversepodcast. Become a Patron of Inverse at https://www.patreon.com/InVerse Inverse Podcast is produced by Jen Kinney @iamjenkinney With thanks to David Andrew (@davidjandrew) for the ongoing use of his music in this podcast.

Writ Large
Genesis

Writ Large

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 37:36


In a podcast about books that have changed the world, I bring you the book that I think changed the world the most: The Hebrew Bible. Specifically, the first book of the Hebrew Bible: Genesis. The Book of Genesis is an account of the origins of the world, human beings, and the Jewish people. It is a foundational text for three world religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. For thousands of years, Genesis has given its readers a foundation, a story that helps give an account of why the world exists, who we are, and how we should act. In a chaotic and unpredictable world, Genesis, this ancient set of stories, offers grounding, continuity, and deep meaning.  Ronald Hendel is the Norma and Sam Dabby Professor of Hebrew Bible and Jewish Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of The Book of Genesis: A Biography See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod.

BibleProject
The Bible had Editors? – Paradigm E3

BibleProject

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 58:05


How can a collection of ancient manuscripts written by numerous people over thousands of years tell one unified story? In this episode, Tim, Jon, and Carissa dive into how the Bible was written and how such a diverse collection of authors, literary styles, and themes can form one divinely inspired, unified story.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (00:00 - 13:30)Part two (13:30 - 22:00)Part three (22:00 - 36:00)Part four (36:00 - 45:40)Part five (45:40 - end)Referenced ResourcesThe Shape of the Writings (Siphrut: Literature and Theology of the Hebrew Scriptures), Julius Steinberg and Timothy J. StoneThe Journey from Texts to Translations: The Origin and Development of the Bible, Paul D. WegnerLee Martin McDonald's collected worksDominion and Dynasty: A Theology of the Hebrew Bible, Stephen G. DempsterThe Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible's Grand Narrative, Christopher J. H. WrightInterested in more? Check out Tim's library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS"Aftersome" by ToonorthShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.

City Church San Francisco
The 10% - The Way of the Midwives

City Church San Francisco

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 35:47


Rev. Dr. Peter Choi, our scholar in residence and program director of the Faith and Justice Network, continues our Fall Sermon Series, "The 10% - Listening To The Woman of the Hebrew Bible" with a sermon on the Midwives from Exodus 1. All are welcomed, loved and affirmed (🌈) at City Church.  You can support the work of City Church at www.citychurchsf.org/give

Leading Saints Podcast
The Peculiar History of Calling Leaders in the Church | An Interview with Kevin Tolley

Leading Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021


Kevin Tolley has worked for Seminaries and Institutes of Religion for over twenty years. He taught release-time seminary in Utah for ten years and has spent the remainder of his career teaching Institute in Southern California. He earned a BA degree from Brigham Young University in Near Eastern Studies with a minor in Hebrew, an MA degree from the University of Notre Dame in Theology, and a PhD degree in Hebrew Bible at Claremont School of Theology. After serving a full-time mission in the California, San Bernardino mission, Kevin met and married his wife RaShelle in the Toronto Canada Temple and they have five incredible children. He has served as an elders quorum president, in a bishopric, and is currently serving as a counselor in a stake presidency. In this interview, Kevin takes us through Church history and the calling of apostles and prophets.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Tikvah Podcast: Peter Kreeft on the Philosophy of Ecclesiastes

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


This week, Jews celebrate the holiday of Sukkot, during which it is traditional to read one of the most philosophically interesting books of the Hebrew Bible, Ecclesiastes. The narrator of the book, known by Jewish tradition to be King Solomon, has spent his life exploring the many corners of human endeavor, from the responsible life […]

The Tikvah Podcast
Peter Kreeft on the Philosophy of Ecclesiastes

The Tikvah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 30:13


This week, Jews celebrate the holiday of Sukkot, during which it is traditional to read one of the most philosophically interesting books of the Hebrew Bible, Ecclesiastes. The narrator of the book, known by Jewish tradition to be King Solomon, has spent his life exploring the many corners of human endeavor, from the responsible life of politics to the pleasures of body and mind, and he has come to say that each corner, no matter how satisfying to certain parts of us, cannot answer our deepest needs—or perhaps cannot answer anything at all. Everything is vanity, the book whispers famously, and nothing more. This week's podcast guest, the Catholic philosopher Peter Kreeft, admires Ecclesiastes not for its ultimate answers to the fundamental questions of life but for its honest look at human problems. As he writes in his own commentary, “honest hedonism is spiritually superior to dishonest self-delusion.” In conversation with Mosaic editor Jonathan Silver, he mines the biblical book for the wisdom it may offer. Musical selections in this podcast are drawn from the Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, op. 31a, composed by Paul Ben-Haim and performed by the ARC Ensemble.

Israel Bible Podcast
A Bible Shaped by Trauma

Israel Bible Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 19:22


Dr. David M. Carr (Union Theological Seminary, New York) is a leading scholar on the textual formation of the Hebrew Bible. His books include: Holy Resilience: The Bible's Traumatic Origins; The Formation of the Hebrew Bible: A New Reconstruction; and The Erotic Word: Sexuality, Spirituality, and the Bible. In this profound conversation with Dr. Yeshaya Gruber of the Israel Bible Center, Prof. Carr explains the role of personal and communal trauma in the composition of the Bible and describes the place of academic study in enabling us to decipher ancient messages today.Listen to the conversation Trauma and Biblical Origin.Explore the large collection of podcast episodes HERE.Sign up to be a student at IBC with access to a huge collection of courses: https://israelbiblecenter.comStay connected with IBC on Facebook @IsraelBibleCenter or Twitter @IsraelStudy

Torah Class Three
Lesson 87 - Matthew 25 & 26

Torah Class Three

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 53:46


Irenicast - A Progressive Christian Podcast
Beyond the Binary of Deconstruction and Reconstruction Part Four - The Rob Bell is Full of Sh*t Spectrum - 186

Irenicast - A Progressive Christian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 57:21


In Beyond the Binary of Deconstruction and Reconstruction Part 4 the hosts discuss the voices that helped them reconstruct some semblance of belief… or non-belief.  The legend and public persona of Rob Bell unexpectedly becomes the yardstick that each host measures their rebuilding experiences against.  Each host shares a ton of resources and voices that helped them in their movement away from fundamentalist authority.  Some that became irrelevant and others that still ring true today. The episode finishes with the revival of an old segment formerly known as Jesus or Jay-Z and now rebranded as Friday Night or Sunday Morning.  Each host guesses if a set of lyrics is from a ‘christian' or ‘secular' musician. Conversation on Beyond the Binary of Deconstruction and Reconstruction Part Four (01:26)Friday Night or Sunday Morning Segment (44:07) ANNOUNCEMENTS Get Bonnie's New Book - Partnering with God: Exploring Collaboration in Open and Relational Theology!  Can creatures actually partner with God?  This book answers that question... in the affirmative. The responses vary and the proposals provoke new insights. Along the way, the ideas break new ground.  Get Your Copy Today! Intersections is a group of un-fundies and exvangelicals meeting to support each other and process our evolving faith journeys. Facilitated by Bonnie, Casey, Rajeev and Jeff.  Our next session will be Thursdays, February 3rd through March 10th at 7pm PT.  Register today. RELEVANT LINKS From Conversation on Beyond the Binary of Deconstruction and Reconstruction Part Four Rob Bell (American author, speaker and former pastor) N.T. Wright (English New Testament scholar, Pauline theologian and Anglican bishop) Walter Brueggemann (American Protestant Old Testament scholar and theologian) Harold Camping (​​American Christian radio broadcaster and evangelist) Bart Ehrman (American New Testament scholar) John Dominic Crossan (Irish-American New Testament scholar, historian of early Christianity, and former Catholic priest who was a prominent member of the Jesus Seminar) Frontline Series from Jesus to Christ Donald Miller (American author, public speaker, and business owner) Philip Yancey (American author) What's So Amazing About Grace by Philip Yancy (Book - Amazon Affiliate Link) Anne Lamott (American novelist and non-fiction writer, progressive political activist, public speaker, and writing teacher) Paul Ricœur (French philosopher) John Milbank (English Anglican theologian) Radical orthodoxy (Christian theological and philosophical school of thought which makes use of postmodern philosophy to reject the paradigm of modernity) Renita Weems (Ordained minister, a Hebrew Bible scholar, and author) Gustavo Gutiérrez (Peruvian philosopher, Catholic theologian, and Dominican priest, regarded as one of the founders of Latin American liberation theology) We Drink from Our Own Wells: The Spiritual Journey Of A People by Gustavo Gutierrez (Book - Amazon Affiliate Link) From Our Friday Night or Sunday Morning Segment Christian Rock Hard (ninth episode of the seventh season and the 105th overall episode of the American animated series South Park) Semi-Charmed Life by Third Eye Blind Touch Me Lord Jesus Medicine Man by Keb' Mo' Deconstruction by Justin McRoberts Life Is Sweet by Natalie Merchant Holy by Justin Beiber Jesus, Baby - South Park     SUPPORT THE SHOW You can always count on Irenicast providing a free podcast on the 1st and 3rd Tuesday of every month.  However, that does not mean that we do not have expense related to the show.  If we have provided value to you and you would like to support the show, here are a few options. PAYPAL - You can make a one-time, or recurring, tax-deductible donation to the show through PayPal. Just go to Irenicast.com/PayPal to make your donation. We are a 501(c)(3). MERCH - Irenicast has a merch store at Irenicast.com/Store.  We are always developing more items so check out our current offerings. AMAZON - Next time you go to make a purchase on Amazon consider using our Amazon affiliate link.  This will give us a small portion on everything you purchase.  No additional cost will be passed on to you. IRENCAST HOSTS Rev. Bonnie Rambob, MDiv | co-host | bonnie@irenicast.com You can connect with Bonnie on Facebook and at Parkside Community Church-UCC and haystackspodcast.com. Pastor Casey Martinez-Tinnin, MTS | co-host | casey@irenicast.com You can follow Casey on Twitter and Facebook, or you can check out his blog The Queerly Faithful Pastor or loomisucc.org Jeff Manildi | co-founder, producer & co-host | jeff@irenicast.com Follow Jeff (@JeffManildi) on facebook, instagram & twitter.  You can also listen to Jeff's other podcast Divine Cinema. Rev. Rajeev Rambob, MCL | co-host | rajeev@irenicast.com You can connect with Rajeev at Parkside Community Church,  Facebook, Twitter, Medium, LinkedIn, and Haystacks Podcast.   ADD YOUR VOICE TO THE CONVERSATION Join our progressive Christian conversations on faith and culture by interacting with us through the following links: Read Us on our blog Irenicon Email Us at podcast@irenicast.com Follow Us on Twitter Like Us on Facebook Listen & Subscribe to Us on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeart Radio, Spreaker, Pandora and SoundCloud Speak to Us on our Feedback Page and the Post Evangelical Facebook Group See Us on Instagram Support Us on PayPal, Amazon or at our Store Love Us? CREDITS Intro and Outro music created by Mike Golin. This post may contain affiliate links.  An Irenicon is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

Twice Blest: Exploring Shakespeare and the Hebrew Bible
“I will better the instruction”: Sufferance and Vengeance in The Merchant of Venice and Jewish Thought — With Rabbi Dr. Dov Lerner

Twice Blest: Exploring Shakespeare and the Hebrew Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 42:52


Shakespeare's portrayal of Shylock as a cruel and vengeful Jew in the early 16th century gave rise to some of the most enduring racial stereotypes. He also gave Shylock depth and sympathetic qualities. In one of the most stirring speeches in all of Shakespeare, Shylock underscores his humanity, famously asking, “hath not a Jew eyes?” Yet the conclusion of that monologue requires further examination as it ends with the Jew's assertion that he learned revenge from his Christian neighbors. Is there a basis for this claim? What is the Jewish understanding of revenge and retributive punishment? How do we reconcile the divine prohibition against revenge in the Hebrew Bible with its description of God as vengeful? And of what relevance is the long-suffering biblical Jacob, whose life is discussed by the characters in this play? In this episode, Rabbi Dr. Dov Lerner offers a master class on biblical exegesis, the relationship between interpretation, law, and justice, and what we can learn from Jewish tradition about how to end the cycle of vengeance. Twice Blest was recently selected as one of the top 20 Shakespeare podcasts by Feedspot. Audio Credits: The Merchant of Venice: Arkangel Shakespeare The Merchant of Venice (2004) Mentioned in This Episode: The Jews as They Are by C.K. Salaman The Beginning of Wisdom by Leon R. Kass The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins Violence and the Sacred by René Girard Theater of Envy: William Shakespeare by René Girard The Warrior's Honor: Ethnic War and Modern Conscious by Michael Ignatieff Hosted by Straus Center Resident Scholar Dr. Shaina Trapedo Produced by Uri Westrich and Sam Gelman Outro by Straus Scholar Ayelet Brown Learn more about the Straus Center Like the Straus Center on Facebook Follow the Straus Center on Twitter Follow the Straus Center on Instagram Connect with the Straus Center on LinkedIn

BibleProject
Who Wrote the Bible? – Paradigm E2

BibleProject

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 52:28


How does God work in the world and communicate with humanity? In this episode, Tim and Jon explore God's relationship with his creation and the relationship between the Bible's divine and human origins. They also discuss how God uses human words to communicate his divine word.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-16:30)Part two (16:30-31:30)Part three (31:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim's library here.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Birth” by Mr. Käfer“Tending The Garden (feat. Kennebec)” by Stan Forebee Show produced by Cooper Peltz. Edited by Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.

City Church San Francisco
The 10% - Remembering Bilhah and Zilpah

City Church San Francisco

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 23:40


Jen Fisher, co-founder of Launchpad Partners and a church planter in Cincinnati, joins us virtually to continue our Fall Sermon Series, "The 10% - Listening To The Woman of the Hebrew Bible" with a sermon on Bilhah and Zilpah from Genesis 30. All are welcomed, loved and affirmed (🌈) at City Church.  You can support the work of City Church at www.citychurchsf.org/give

New Books Network
Emmanuel Navon, "The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 43:33


The first all-encompassing book on Israel's foreign policy and the diplomatic history of the Jewish people, The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel (Jewish Publication Society, 2020) retraces and explains the interactions of Jews with other nations from the ancient kingdoms of Israel to modernity. Starting with the Hebrew Bible, Emmanuel Navon argues that one cannot grasp Israel's interactions with the world without understanding how Judaism's founding document has shaped the Jewish psyche. He sheds light on the people of Israel's foreign policy through the ages: the ancient kingdoms of Israel, Jewish diasporas in Europe from the Middle Ages to the emancipation, the emerging nineteenth-century Zionist movement, and Zionist diplomacy following World War I and surrounding World War II. Navon elucidates Israel's foreign policy from the birth of the state in 1948 to our days: the dilemmas and choices at the beginning of the Cold War; Israel's attempts to establish periphery alliances; the Arab-Israeli conflict; Israel's relations with Europe, the United States, Russia, Asia, Africa, Latin America, the United Nations, and the Jewish diasporas; and how twenty-first-century energy geopolitics is transforming Israel's foreign relations today. Navon's analysis is rooted in two central ideas, represented by the Star of David (faith) and the scepter (political power). First, he contends that the interactions of Jews with the world have always been best served by combining faith with pragmatism. Second, Navon shows how the state of Israel owes its diplomatic achievements to national assertiveness and hard power—not only military strength but economic prowess and technological innovation. Demonstrating that diplomacy is a balancing act between ideals and realpolitik, The Star and the Scepter draws aspirational and pragmatic lessons from Israel's exceptional diplomatic history. Renee Garfinkel, Ph.D. is a psychologist, writer, Middle East television commentator and host of The New Books Network's Van Leer Jerusalem Series on Ideas. Write her at r.garfinkel@yahoo.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Emmanuel Navon, "The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 43:33


The first all-encompassing book on Israel's foreign policy and the diplomatic history of the Jewish people, The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel (Jewish Publication Society, 2020) retraces and explains the interactions of Jews with other nations from the ancient kingdoms of Israel to modernity. Starting with the Hebrew Bible, Emmanuel Navon argues that one cannot grasp Israel's interactions with the world without understanding how Judaism's founding document has shaped the Jewish psyche. He sheds light on the people of Israel's foreign policy through the ages: the ancient kingdoms of Israel, Jewish diasporas in Europe from the Middle Ages to the emancipation, the emerging nineteenth-century Zionist movement, and Zionist diplomacy following World War I and surrounding World War II. Navon elucidates Israel's foreign policy from the birth of the state in 1948 to our days: the dilemmas and choices at the beginning of the Cold War; Israel's attempts to establish periphery alliances; the Arab-Israeli conflict; Israel's relations with Europe, the United States, Russia, Asia, Africa, Latin America, the United Nations, and the Jewish diasporas; and how twenty-first-century energy geopolitics is transforming Israel's foreign relations today. Navon's analysis is rooted in two central ideas, represented by the Star of David (faith) and the scepter (political power). First, he contends that the interactions of Jews with the world have always been best served by combining faith with pragmatism. Second, Navon shows how the state of Israel owes its diplomatic achievements to national assertiveness and hard power—not only military strength but economic prowess and technological innovation. Demonstrating that diplomacy is a balancing act between ideals and realpolitik, The Star and the Scepter draws aspirational and pragmatic lessons from Israel's exceptional diplomatic history. Renee Garfinkel, Ph.D. is a psychologist, writer, Middle East television commentator and host of The New Books Network's Van Leer Jerusalem Series on Ideas. Write her at r.garfinkel@yahoo.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Torah Class Three
Lesson 86 - Matthew 25 cont

Torah Class Three

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 53:46


BibleProject
How Do You Read the Bible? – Paradigm E1

BibleProject

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 64:58


Have you ever read the Bible and felt like you're not “getting it” or that you're not connecting with God? In this episode, Tim and Jon take a look at the (often unhelpful) paradigms through which we interact with Scripture. They explore how seeing the Bible as a unified story that leads to Jesus not only gives the Bible space to do what it was created to do, but frees us up to be transformed by the story it's telling.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-15:00)Part two (15:00-27:00)Part three (27:00-39:00)Part four (39:00-52:00)Part five (52:00-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim's library here.A Greek-English Lexicon, Henry George Liddell and Robert Scott, edited by Henry Stuart JonesShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Evil Needle” by Sound EscapesShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.

Pulpit Fiction Podcast
TNS 9-1: Wil Gafney

Pulpit Fiction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 61:56


A conversation with The Rev. Dr. Wil C. Gafney, author, Episcopal priest and The Right Rev. Sam B. Hulsey Professor of Hebrew Bible at Brite Divinity School about her newest books: A Women's Lectionary for the Whole Church, Year A and A Women's Lectionary for the Whole Church, W (which is a stand alone volume). Find more of Rev. Dr. Gafney's great work at: Other Books wilgafney.com Facebook Twitter: @WilGafney

OnScript
Jewish Bible Translations – Leonard Greenspoon with Mary Buck

OnScript

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021


Episode: For this episode Mary Buck is joined by Dr. Leonard Greenspoon, the Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization at Creighton University. Dr. Greenspoon discusses his recently published book, “Jewish Bible […] The post Jewish Bible Translations – Leonard Greenspoon with Mary Buck first appeared on OnScript.

BibleProject
Hyperlinks and Patterns in Jonah – Jonah E3

BibleProject

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 54:37


What makes a person worthy to be chosen by God to do his work? In the story of the Bible, some of God's choices seem obvious, people with lots of merit. Other times, his rationale is less clear to us––as with Jonah, a chosen one who might be worse than the people he was supposed to help. In this episode, listen in as Tim describes the biblical design pattern of the chosen righteous intercessor. This is a sneak peek into our free graduate-level course on Jonah, which will be featured in the new Classroom resource available in 2022. View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-16:35)Part two (16:35-22:30)Part three (22:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim's library here.Jonah class session notes, including the handout “How to Read a Text Like the Hebrew Bible” (page 5)Jonah: A Literal-Literary Translation, Tim MackieShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Keep an Open Mind” by Olive MusiqueShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.

BibleProject
Jonah's Literary Context – Jonah E2

BibleProject

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 53:49


The Hebrew Bible contains one story of human failure after another, leaving us with no doubt in our minds: humanity desperately needs a leader. In this episode, Tim walks us through the structure of the Hebrew Bible and how it shows us Jonah is an anti-leader, the opposite of what humanity needs, whose failure prepares us for the ultimate leader and Savior, Jesus. This is a sneak peek into our free graduate-level course on Jonah, which will be featured in the new Classroom resource available in 2022.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-19:40)Part two (19:40-27:30)Part three (27:30-42:30)Part four (42:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim's library here.Jonah class session notes, including the handout “How to Read a Text Like the Hebrew Bible” (page 5)Jonah: A Literal-Literary Translation, Tim MackieThe Wisdom of Ben Sira (which Tim mentions in part one) is a deuterocanonical work of biblical theology written shortly before the Maccabean Revolt.Show Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Keep an Open Mind” by Olive MusiqueShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.

BibleProject
Our Assumptions About Jonah – Jonah E1

BibleProject

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 54:05


A stubborn prophet, a wicked nation, a giant fish––the story of Jonah is frequently translated into the popular imagination through TV and movies. But what is it really about? In this episode, learn from Tim about where Jonah fits into the story of the Bible that ultimately points to Jesus. This is a sneak peek into our free graduate-level course on Jonah which will be featured in the new Classroom resource available in 2022.View full show notes from this episode →Timestamps Part one (0:00-18:05)Part two (18:05-28:30)Part three (28:30-37:00)Part four (37:00-44:30)Part five (44:30-end)Referenced ResourcesInterested in more? Check out Tim's library here.Jonah class session notes, including the handout “How to Read a Text Like the Hebrew Bible” (page 5)Jonah: A Literal-Literary Translation, Tim MackieShow Music “Defender (Instrumental)” by TENTS“Keep an Open Mind” by Olive MusiqueShow produced by Cooper Peltz, Dan Gummel, and Zach McKinley. Show notes by Lindsey Ponder. Powered and distributed by Simplecast.