Podcasts about syrophoenician

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Best podcasts about syrophoenician

Latest podcast episodes about syrophoenician

Lutzfamilyministries
Jeremiah 26:1-24 and Mark 7:1-37

Lutzfamilyministries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 10:37


(1) Jeremiah threatened with death. (2) clean and unclean. The faith of the Syrophoenician woman. The healing of the deaf and the mute man.

Cultivate Connection - Christ Centred Meditation

Jesus Was ImpressedThe Miracles of JesusEven in the face of comments such as “get out of here,” “you don't belong here,” “this isn't for you,” the gentile woman's faith was strong enough to keep her focused on Jesus.From there Jesus set out for the vicinity of Tyre. He entered a house there where he didn't think he would be found, but he couldn't escape notice. He was barely inside when a woman who had a disturbed daughter heard where he was. She came and knelt at his feet, begging for help. The woman was Greek, Syro-Phoenician by birth. She asked him to cure her daughter.He said, “Stand in line and take your turn. The children get fed first. If there's any left over, the dogs get it.”She said, “Of course, Master. But don't dogs under the table get scraps dropped by the children?”Jesus was impressed. “You're right! On your way! Your daughter is no longer disturbed. The demonic affliction is gone.” She went home and found her daughter relaxed on the bed, the torment gone for good. - Mark 7:24-30 MSGThis story is also recorded in Matthew 15:21-28 NLTAre you able to worship God in the face of rejection? Blessing your faith to be great enough to impress Jesus.Thank You!Becoming a PatronIf you are one of the many who have been blessed by Cultivate Connection, please consider becoming a monthly patron. Creating space for people to connect with God in this busy world is so vital.As a patron, you empower us to continue producing and developing tools for people to connect with God, discover identity, and awaken purpose for their lives. Learn more on our website at CultivateConnection.comWe Need You!Cultivate Connection is listened to in 129 countries and averages 2,000 listeners a week. Help us reach even more people by sharing this episode on Facebook, Instagram, via email, or whatever other way you prefer.Visit our Facebook page and share your thoughts or ask a question. We read every comment and love responding!Leave a review on iTunes or your favourite podcast app. Your ratings and reviews mean a lot and help this podcast get discovered by others.And lastly, subscribe to Cultivate Collection Weekly, our email providing you with resources and inspiration to help you grow your relationship with God.

Dumb Christian
#44 The Syrophoenician Dog Woman (Double Chair w/John)

Dumb Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 39:43


This week we are taking a break from Genesis and John to make room for a couple of 'Double Chairs'. In Mark 7 we read about an encounter Jesus has with a Gentile (non-Israelite) and as they go back and forth using cultural stereotypes Jesus holds a mirror to the dominant cultures of the day to call out the brokenness in a way that only Jesus could.

Deliverance on SermonAudio
Christ & the Syrophoenician Woman

Deliverance on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 31:00


A new MP3 sermon from Antioch Presbyterian Church (PCA) is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Christ & the Syrophoenician Woman Speaker: Joseph Gehrmann Broadcaster: Antioch Presbyterian Church (PCA) Event: Sunday Service Date: 8/28/2022 Bible: Mark 7:24-30 Length: 31 min.

Demons on SermonAudio
Christ & the Syrophoenician Woman

Demons on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 31:00


A new MP3 sermon from Antioch Presbyterian Church (PCA) is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Christ & the Syrophoenician Woman Speaker: Joseph Gehrmann Broadcaster: Antioch Presbyterian Church (PCA) Event: Sunday Service Date: 8/28/2022 Bible: Mark 7:24-30 Length: 31 min.

Antioch Presbyterian Church Sermon of the Week
"Christ & the Syrophoenician Woman" (Mark 7:24-30) - Mr. Joseph Gehrmann

Antioch Presbyterian Church Sermon of the Week

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 31:23


This sermon was delivered on August 28, 2022 at Antioch Presbyterian Church, a mission work of Calvary Presbytery of the Presbyterian Church in America located in Woodruff, South Carolina. Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary student Joseph Gehrmann delivered this sermon entitled "Christ & the Syrophoenician Woman" on Mark 7:24-30. For more information about Antioch Presbyterian Church, please visit antiochpca.com or contact us at info@antiochpca.com. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antiochpca/message

Scripture for Today
Gospel | Mark 7:24-37 (with Tom Gastil)

Scripture for Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 11:28


Opening Song: Even the Impossible (https://open.spotify.com/track/2fs8rWh1xFcb7ZVcBE18oD?si=edbeaeae17ec41ac) by Mack Brock Lyrics: I think this Stone's getting ready to roll I feel a faith that is starting to rise And I see a world on the edge of revival I think it's only a matter of time So, do what only you can do Move what only you can move Even the impossible is possible for you I see a grave that is hollow of power I see a battle that's already won And I see a church on the verge of revival I see your kingdom has already come So, do what only you can do Move what only you can move Even the impossible is possible for you You can make the chains come loose You can tell the mountains move Even the impossible is possible for you Even the impossible is possible for you You said it, I see it You still do miracles There's power in Jesus name All darkness defeated There's nothing stopping you, my God There's nothing stopping you Passage: 24 And from there he arose and went away to the region of Tyre and Sidon. And he entered a house and did not want anyone to know, yet he could not be hidden. 25 But immediately a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit heard of him and came and fell down at his feet. 26 Now the woman was a Gentile, a Syrophoenician by birth. And she begged him to cast the demon out of her daughter. 27 And he said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not right to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs.” 28 But she answered him, “Yes, Lord; yet even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs.” 29 And he said to her, “For this statement you may go your way; the demon has left your daughter.” 30 And she went home and found the child lying in bed and the demon gone. 31 Then he returned from the region of Tyre and went through Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. 32 And they brought to him a man who was deaf and had a speech impediment, and they begged him to lay his hand on him. 33 And taking him aside from the crowd privately, he put his fingers into his ears, and after spitting touched his tongue. 34 And looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.” 35 And his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. 36 And Jesus charged them to tell no one. But the more he charged them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. 37 And they were astonished beyond measure, saying, “He has done all things well. He even makes the deaf hear and the mute speak.” (Mark 7:24–37 ESV) Musical Reflection: Nothing But The Blood (PLAINFIELD) by Robert Lowry Reflection Notes: Lowry wrote several hymns for his congregation's use in the late nineteenth century. This particular tune is pentatonic (only five notes used per octave) and falls within a small vocal range, which made it accessible for all parishioners to sing and enjoy. Prayer: Grant us, O Lord, to trust in you with all our hearts; for, as you always resist the proud who confide in their own strength, so you never forsake those who make their boast of your mercy; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Two Journeys Sermons
Jesus Drives Out a Legion of Demons (Mark Sermon 22) (Audio)

Two Journeys Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022


Pastor Andy Davis preaches on Mark 5:1-20, and an account about a demon-possessed man freed by Jesus. We see that demons may have power over humans, but no chance against God. - SERMON Transcript - Turn in your Bibles to Mark chapter 5. This morning we have the joy of resuming our study in this awesome gospel of Mark. We're right in the middle of two spectacular miracles back-to-back, the stilling of the storm at the end of Mark chapter 4 and now the driving out of the legion of demons in Mark 5. I said last time, a couple of months ago now, that the stilling of the storm is the most visually spectacular miracle Jesus ever did. How amazing is it then that immediately after that He does his most spectacular exorcism? That's exactly what this account reveals. There is no other account of an exorcism that even comes close to this one, the driving out of demons from a human being. Nothing else even comes close, just for the magnitude of the power that it reveals and the stunning transformation in one man revealed in Mark's gospel and the effect on the pigs, 2,000 of them perishing in one moment. There's no other power encounter with a demonized human being that even comes close. In terms of preaching, oftentimes at the very beginning of a sermon, a preacher has to speak some words of introduction to ensnare or beguile his congregation into being interested in the text. I don't have to do that this time. I would hope you're interested in what you've heard. I would hope you'd realize that all I need to do as a preacher is get out of the way of the text and just point to the Jesus that it reveals. Some time ago, I was meditating on the juxtaposition of Mark 4 and Mark 5, the stealing of the storm and the driving out of the Legion demon in Mark's gospel. The way it's written here, it's really astonishing because you could see Jesus at the end of Mark 4 standing on one side of the Sea of Galilee and perhaps in a visionary sense as a prophet, looking ahead to what's about to happen. He has to go through a hurricane and drive out an army of demons in Mark's Gospel to save one man. That's it. He saves that one man and comes back; He goes over and back for one man. And that's encouraging. Some of you are thinking, in Matthew's Gospel, there's two guys. I'm not talking about the two guys today. In Mark's gospel, there's a focus on that one individual. I think we're supposed to understand, in the Galatians 2:20 sense, that Christ loved me and gave himself for me. He did that for me. He was willing to go through a hurricane and drive out an army of demons to save me. So we need to just step aside and let the text do its work in us. And what is that work? Remember that the theme of the gospel of Mark is stated right from the beginning, Mark 1:1, “the beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ”, the Son of God, that's the theme, Jesus as the Son of God. In the spirit of the Gospel of John, as I've said many times, actually all four gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, they all have this same purpose, though only John's Gospel says it so openly and directly. “These are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the son of God, and that by believing, you may have life in his name.” That's the purpose of the Gospel of John, and it's also the purpose of the Gospel of Mark: to bring you to the point where you can confess that Jesus is the Christ, the Messiah, the Anointed one, the Promised one. That He is more than just that, the Son of the living God, and that by confessing that from your heart, you might receive full forgiveness of sins and live forever in heaven and not die forever in hell. That's the reason this Gospel of Mark was written, and that's the purpose of all of the accounts in it. Not only that, not just that we would be able to make in a slogan sort of sense, “Who is Jesus? the Son of God.” That phrase, that we would have expounded before us, really means the infinite majesty of the second person of the Trinity, the infinite majesty of Jesus. It means that we'll be spending eternity finding out how glorious and majestic Jesus is. We've only just begun the greatness of Jesus, the Son of God. That's what we have before us. It's not enough to just have the slogan, “Who's Jesus? Son of God.” Remember how, when on the way to the villages around Caesarea Philippi, Jesus asked, “Who do people say I am?” and Peter replied, “You are the Messiah,” and then a few minutes later he's taking Jesus aside and rebuking him. Now that's a bad look, friends. Peter was underestimating Jesus, the Son of God, all of us do. The ministry of the word through the power of the Spirit is to get us not to underestimate Jesus and to see the infinite greatness of Christ. The infinite greatness of Jesus is what we're seeing here. The effortless power that Jesus has, that He displays here, power that only almighty God could have, effortless stilling of a hurricane and the turbulent sea immediately after that, effortless, just a word and it's done. And then effortless power over 6,000 demons, saying in Matthew's gospel, a single word, "Go," and they're gone. No effort at all, they instantly obey. "The ministry of the word through the power of the Spirit is to get us not to underestimate Jesus and to see the infinite greatness of Christ. " Sadly in the account that we're studying today, we also see mixed reaction. We see many who saw the effects, even the miracle with their own eyes, and responded in faithless fear, driving Jesus away because they didn't want the implications of what it would mean to have Jesus in their region. The unreasoning unbelief was so strong they would rather have, it seems in the end, this demon-possessed, stark-raving homicidal maniac in their region, rather than Jesus, peaceful Jesus, loving Jesus staying in their region. The gospels all make it clear that many people will see the evidence for Jesus and reject. It ends up dividing people into two categories. I. A Demon-Possessed Maniac Terrorizes a Region Let's walk through the text now. It begins with a demon-possessed maniac who terrorizes a region. What is the context? Jesus and his disciples had left the huge crowds to get away to the other side of the Sea of Galilee. Perhaps the disciples thought a time of R&R was coming, a little bit of relaxation, getting away from all of that. Little did they know what was awaiting them as they got into the boat, this raging hurricane in which they thought they were going to die. Then once that's done, as they land on the other side, they're confronted by a demon-possessed maniac of terrifying power. Look at verse 1-2, “They went across the sea to the region of the Gerasenes” and verse 2, “when Jesus got out of the boat, a man with an evil spirit came from the tombs to meet him.” The region of the Gerasenes or Gadarenes, a little village near there was called Gerasa from which we get Mark's term, Gerasenes. There's a larger city nearby called Gadara, which also gave its name to the region, Gadarene. That's why you end up with two different names in the gospel. The demon-possessed maniac is described in verse 2 as “a man with an unclean spirit”. This is a demon, an unclean spirit is a demon. Demons are angels, spirit beings that rebelled long ago with Satan and were evicted from heaven as described in Revelation 12. They're called unclean because their thoughts and their works were pure evil. The encounter begins with Jesus and his disciples getting out of the boat. The demon-possessed man sees them from a distance and comes from the tombs down to the shoreline. This man is an absolute monster. His human personality has been swallowed alive by the demons inside him. Look at verse 3 through 5, the description of his plight. This man lived in the tombs and no one could bind him anymore, not even with a chain, for he had often been chained hand in foot, but he tore the chains apart and broke the irons on his feet. No one was strong enough to subdue him. Night and day among the tombs and in the hills, he would cry out and cut himself with stones. I believe those words describe the most wretched human being on the surface of the earth in history. I can't imagine a more wretched condition to be in than this, worse than Nebuchadnezzar turned into an animal for seven years eating grass, worse than any tortured individual in a prison, worse than anyone suffering from a malady. This is the most wretched human being ever described in the pages of history, I believe. Look at the text, it says he lived in the tombs. No one in their right mind would live out in the tombs of dead people. These are often caves blocked up with boulders or big stones. At best, they would offer rudimentary protection from the elements, they would be cold, they would be dark, they would be hard, no place in which to live. This man is absolutely severed from all human society. He has a family as we see at the end of the account, but his condition has cut himself off from all interactions with them. It says no one could bind him anymore, not even with a chain.The account gives a sense of history with this man. He had originally been bound, or actually many times been bound with chains and even shackles, maybe fetters or manacles, large flat pieces of iron that would be heated up and then pounded by a blacksmith into curved pieces to fit around his wrists or his ankles. The chains would have large strong links in them, sizable links to restrain a powerful man, but this man had broken every chain ever put on him and shattered every shackle, verse 4, “for he had often been chained hand and foot,” but he tore the chains apart, he broke the irons on his feet. Demons gave this man supernatural power. They are vastly more powerful than we people are, physically. They can do amazing physical things. Remember at the resurrection account after Jesus had risen from the dead and the tomb was empty, a single angel came down and rolled back the boulder that was in front of Jesus's tomb and sat on it. So imagine the kind of supernatural power these evil angels give this man. It says no one could bind him anymore, in verse 4, “no one was strong enough to subdue him.” The Greek word here means “to tame” as if he's a wild beast. This implies many efforts to take this man down, perhaps four or five grown men, or more trying to work with this guy. One grabbing an arm, another grabbing another arm, one grabbing a leg, the other maybe coming up behind him and hitting him on the head to knock him unconscious so they could put the chains on him. It's horrible the circumstance here. Then once he's conscious again, if that's indeed what they did, he then in a rage, tears them off and they're all running for the hills. Finally, the people in that region had given up. He's not chained now. There's nothing they can do. They just stayed away from that area. His lifestyle is stunningly sad. It's a human being created in the image of God, but he's rendered to an almost animal-like existence. Luke tells us that he had, for a long time, gone without clothing. He didn't wear any clothing. He was naked with no shame at all like an animal. But furthermore, he rarely slept and he was immersed in self-harm, verse 5, “night and day among the tombs and in the hills he would cry out and cut himself with stones,” roaming restlessly as demons do, seeking rest but not finding it, yearning for rest, going from tomb to tomb, from hill to hill night and day, crying out as if for deliverance. But who could ever set this man free? The most wretched human being I think in history. He is terrorizing that region. II. The Son of God Terrorizes the Demons Point two, then the Son of God comes to terrorize the demons. That's pretty exciting, isn't it? Now who's afraid of who here? The encounter with Jesus is initiated, this demon-possessed monster sees people landing from a distance and comes down to the shoreline, and what he did is really astonishing. Look at verse 6, “when he saw Jesus from a distance, he ran and fell on his knees in front of him.” Now here's the fascinating thing. The more you study this, the more amazing this gets. These terrified demons, and they are terrified, we're going to make that case plainly in the scripture, they are afraid of Jesus, but instead of running away from him of whom they are terrified, they run to him to get closer to him, that's counterintuitive. Why are the demons running to Jesus? Do they want an encounter with Jesus? Oh no, not at all. They are pure darkness, he is pure light. They hate him with every fiber of their being. They do not want to be near pure light, they who are pure darkness. Why then are they coming closer? Furthermore, they make the man fall down on his knees in a display of humble submission, even of worship before Jesus. Think about that text that says “every knee shall bow and every tongue confess.” So that's what these demons are doing, falling down in front of Jesus. Why do they draw near? It's very obvious, they know exactly who Jesus is. Verse 7, “he shouted at the top of his voice, ‘What do you want with me, Jesus, son of the most high God?’” They are terrified of him, and yet they run toward him. This is my theory on why. What else can they do? They understand Jesus's power in ways we don't. They understand omniscience, omnipotence, omnipresence in ways we don't. And the demons understood, Psalm 1:39, “Where can I go from your spirit? Where can I flee from your presence? If I go up to the heavens, you are there. If I go down to the depths, you are there.” Or again, as God says about his enemies in Amos 9:1-4, these are physical human enemies, but we can apply it here to demons as well, Amos 9, this is God speaking about his enemies, "Not one will get away. None will escape. Though they dig into the depths of the grave, from there my hand will take them. Though they climb up to the heavens, from there I will bring them down. Though they hide themselves at the top of Carmel, there I'll hunt them down and seize them. Though they hide from me at the bottom of the sea, there I will command the serpent to bite them. Though they are driven into exile by their enemies, there I will command the sword to slay them. I will fix my eyes upon them for evil and not for good." Oh, it is a dreadful thing to have God as your enemy. Where can you go? There is nowhere to run to, nowhere to hide for these demons, and they know it in ways we don't. So they come to Jesus and in Mark 7, He drives out the demon of the Syrophoenician, the Canaanite woman from her daughter, and the daughter is not even there, and Jesus says to this Syrophoenician woman, "You may go home. The demon has left your daughter." "When did that happen?" "Oh, a second ago." "You didn't even go, you didn't lay hands on her." "Not needed." "You didn't say anything." "Not needed. I just thought it." And the demon got its eviction notice. That's the power of Jesus and the demons know it. "It is a dreadful thing to have God as your enemy. Where can you go? There is nowhere to run to, nowhere to hide for these demons, and they know it in ways we don't. " They come toward Jesus because they have a request to make of him. The demons come to Jesus, making the man shout at the top of his voice, "What do you want with me, Jesus, son of the most high God?" The demons are utterly unruly, they frequently make their human hosts scream or shriek or foam at the mouth. This one's shouting at the top of his voice, clearly they are terrified of Jesus. The reason for the terror is they did not understand Jesus, the Son of God, the incarnate Son of God invading their dark realm. They literally say, "What business have we with each other, son of the most high God? What business do we have? What are you here to do?" The reason for their terror is the power of almighty God and of his perfect and holy son, Jesus. Now you have to understand, demons have very accurate theology. They got the theological stuff right, better than us. James 2:19 says, “You believe that there's one God, good, even the demons believe that, and they shudder.” They get all the facts right, but they're just in an absolute wrong relationship with the God behind the facts. They hate him, but they know the truth about him. And furthermore, demons know their future. Matthew 25:41, “Jesus, the judge of all the earth, the judge of heaven and earth will say to the goats, ‘Depart from me you who are cursed into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels.’” The lake of fire was made for Satan and demons, and that's where they're going, and there's no salvation plan for them. Also, in Revelation 12:12, the devil is filled with fury because he knows that his time is short. We must imagine the demons know this, but now Jesus, in his incarnation and now in his public ministries which have been going on a year or two, this assault of the son of God on their earthly territory is unprecedented. For all redemptive history, demons have been operating in secret, in the darkness, in the shadows of the spiritual realm, doing absolutely whatever they wanted to make life utterly miserable for human beings and to fight against God at every point. That's what demons do and they're still doing it today. But now Jesus has invaded, the Son of God, the Son of Light, pure light, into this realm of darkness and they're terrified. They want to know, what is the purpose? They want to know about timing. In Matthew 8:29, the demon says, "What do you want with us, son of God? Have you come here to torture us before the appointed time?" They are well aware that there's a pit of torture ready now, before they even get to the lake of fire, there is a place of demon incarceration, short of the lake of fire. As far as I read scripture, there are no demons now in the lake of fires, a not-yet situation. Most of the demons are roaming and causing trouble in a hidden way on earth, but there are some that are incarcerated. They've been arrested by the power of God. It says in Luke 8:31, in the same account, they begged him repeatedly not to order them to go into the “abyss.” It's a Greek word, meaning “bottomless.” It's a pit. But the demons in Matthew 8:29 speak of torture, of torture in the pit, as does our text. Look at verse 7, “Swear to God that you won't torture me.” Do you see now the fear that demons have of him? They are afraid of incarceration and torture now, right now, and they don't want it. They're afraid of it, so they come to Jesus to make this request of him. This torture implies demonic agony of which they're clearly terrified. Peter speaks in his epistle of a temporary place of restraint and torture for demons, [2 Peter 2:4]. God didn't spare angels who sin but threw them down into “Tartarus” that's the Greek word there for “the pit” and delivered them to be kept in chains of darkness until judgment. Those chains cannot break, they're restrained and held. They're very aware that Jesus can instantly do this to them at any moment. He has overwhelming power over all demons. The demons are also afraid of losing their jurisdiction. Look at verse 10, “He begged Jesus again and again not to send them out of the area.” Not only do they not want to lose their freedom, but they want to stay right there in their area. They've got a geographical area that they're working. The Greek says that they're begging him earnestly, or again and again, they're pleading with Jesus because they want to stay there. This demon-possessed man is the greatest nightmare of that entire region, a murderous, powerful maniac who threatens them all. But it is also clear that the Son of the most high God is the demon's greatest nightmare, if we could use that language. They are terrified. They are as terrified of Jesus as that region would've been terrified of that man. III. The Son of God Drives Out the Legion Third point, the Son of God drives out the Legion. Jesus commands him to leave and he will soon. He doesn't leave immediately, but in verse 8 it says, “Jesus had said to him, ‘Come out of this man, you evil spirit.’” I think He stated his intention, "I'm going to drive you out," but they're going to have this conversation first, and Jesus wants to have that conversation with him. He demands the demon's name [verse 9]. “Then Jesus asked him, ‘What is your name?’ ‘My name is Legion,’ he replied, ‘For we are many.’” The demons have no desire to reveal anything about themselves, they want to stay hidden. They want to stay in the darkness just like these days. They don't want to reveal anything, but they have no choice. When Jesus says, "What is your name?" They must give it, they must answer his questions, so He demands their name. Angels have names, we know two of them in the Bible, Michael and Gabriel. Demons must have names as well, but here they use a human term, “legion”. And the reason they gave is, "We are many." Legion was a division of the Roman Empire's world-conquering army, a little bit larger than a modern day brigade, which would be about 3,000 soldiers. A legion is about 5,000 to 6,000 Roman soldiers. They had conquered that part of the world. So first of all, it shows theologically multiple demons can inhabit one person. We get that from this, but it also shows something of the demon's personality and mind. Though the demons might ordinarily have been boastful about their cumulative might, they would never have dreamed of boasting in front of Jesus. We are mighty and we are powerful, they're saying, but they're not doing that in front of Jesus, no way. I want you to picture the spectacle in the spiritual realm, the spectacle of Jesus against an army of demons. In 1960, there was a movie called Spartacus, which was about a slave revolt in the Roman era, and the climactic scene is a battle between the slave army and multiple, multiple Roman Legions. It's really quite a spectacular scene over a wide field. You get a sense of the machine-like efficiency of the Roman legions as they come down in formation and then quickly spread out into battle line and come relentlessly toward the slave army. You know as you're looking, you're going to lose. There's no way you can defeat the legions, they're just that powerful. But picture that, all that's unfolding and one man goes out across the field by himself with no weapons in his hand, and that man is Jesus. As he takes a stand and raises his hand and says, "Begone," they turn and drop their weapons and flee and He's left alone on the battlefield. That's the picture I get. If you didn't see that movie," don't worry about it, just know that it’s a massive army, one man goes forward, and who's afraid of whom. Again, just like the storm, do you not see effortless power? Effortless, that's what we've got. The demons come, they throw themselves in front of Jesus and they make this request, a demonic request. [Verses 11-12], “A large herd of pigs was feeding on the nearby hillside, the demons begged Jesus, ‘Send us among the pigs, allow us to go into them.’” So I would say this clearly shows this is a gentile dominated region. No Jews would be raising pigs, because it was unclean for them to eat. These pig herders are there looking at this and this huge herd of pigs is there, 2,000 in number. The demons continue their begging, their pleading, their groveling to Jesus. In Matthew's Gospel, as I mentioned, it's a single word. Go to Matthew's account, in Matthew 8, you're going to see in the middle of a bunch of black letters, if you have a red letter edition, you're going to see one red 2 letter word. It's all Jesus says in Matthew's account, "Go,” and they go."Go,” and they're gone. One word. It reminds me of Luther's A Mighty Fortress Is Our God. "The prince of darkness grim, we tremble not for him. His rage we can endure, for lo, his doom is sure. One little word shall fell him. That word above all earthly powers, no thanks to them, abideth.” That's the power of Jesus's word. When He says go, they've got to go. Awesome. That's the supreme power of Jesus Christ. He draws out the name Legion so that we can be amazed, because we can't see it. You can't see the demons, but you have a sense of what Legion means. What happens next is a display of the power as well—the death of the pigs [verse 13]. He gave them permission and the evil spirits came out and went into the pigs. The herd, about 2,000 in number, rushed down the steep bank into the sea and were drowned. This is to show visibly the scope of the demonic defeat, to make it obvious in the physical realm what Jesus was dealing with here, the death of the pigs, the sheer destructiveness of these demons. “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy.” That's what these demons do. Some of you have sympathy for the animal owners there, the pig farmers who look like they lost all of that, they didn't lose anything. The harvest came early. They went pig fishing. That's kind of an interesting thing when you think about it. I know the text doesn't say they went pig fishing, but if you're the owner of the pigs, the market price is going to be a little low because there's a big influx of pig meat, but they’ll be fine. So don't think that way economically, et cetera. But again, it wasn't Jesus that destroyed the pigs, it was the demons. Now here's the question, a very significant question. Why does he give permission to the demons to do what they want to do? Why doesn't he send them into the pit? Why doesn't he incarcerate them? We bumped into the same question in the Book of Job, if you remember, why does he allow the demons to roam? Why does he allow them to do damage? It's vital for us to understand what Satan reveals in the Book of Job, that hedge of protection. I look on it as a whole matrix, like a maze of walls of protection that they can't go through. God is controlling the demonic activities, and they're running rough shot where they're permitted to run, and then mysteriously, some gate opens and they flood in like a plague of locusts and do the damage, and then suddenly the gate comes down and they're stopped and that's it. That's what's going on every day by the mysterious purpose of God. They are God's lackeys, though they are not trying to serve God, they are doing his will in some very complex way. When we get to heaven, we'll understand why God let the demons do what they do, et cetera, but that's it. Don't think for a moment it's because he couldn't have stopped them. He could have collected all of the demons in an instant, they'd be in the lake of fire now, but He's using them for his own mysterious purposes. When the time is right, He will send out his angels and they will collect all the demons and they will be in the lake of fire, and there'll be no escape. IV. Two Opposite Human Responses Fourth point, two opposite human responses. The report spreads in the Gadarenes, and the people rejected Jesus. Look at verses 14-17, “Those tending the pigs ran off and reported this in the town and countryside and the people went out to see what had happened. When they came to Jesus, they saw the man who had been possessed by the Legion of demons sitting there dressed and in his right mind and they were afraid. They were afraid. Those who had seen it told the people what had happened to the demon-possessed man and told about the pigs as well. Then the people began to plead with Jesus to leave their region.” This is tragic. Instead of, as they should have done, falling in front of Jesus in wonder and worship, and say as the Philippian jailer said in Act 16, “What must I do to be saved?”, instead they beg him to leave. I suppose it's the same terror that comes on people who really don't understand Jesus's goodness, they're afraid of what he's going to do in their lives, they're afraid of becoming Christians because they don't know what is going to happen. They're afraid, and they drive him out, they don't want him. They're just afraid because they don't understand his goodness. You see how meek and mild Jesus is, He just accedes to their wishes. "Okay, I'll leave." He walks away and gets back in the boat. We need to understand the infinite power of Jesus, but also the incredible gentleness, as we sang earlier, "Come into me, come into me." That's him. He's so gentle. I don't think you ever get a better text juxtaposing the infinite power of Jesus and his gentleness as in Isaiah 40, which talks about how He has all of the stars in the palm of his hand, this kind of thing, the infinite majesty, the nations are a drop in the bucket and dust on the scales and all that. But right in the middle of that, Isaiah 40:11, “He tends his flock like a shepherd. He gathers the lambs in his arms and carries them close to his heart. He gently leads those that have young.” That's who Jesus is. Why do they want him to leave? Along with that, we get the previously possessed man, and he has the exact opposite response. He doesn't ever want to leave Jesus again. He wants to be by Jesus's side forever, forever. Look at verse 18-20, “But as Jesus was getting into the boat, the man who had been demon possessed begged to go with him. Jesus did not let him but said, ‘Go home to your family and tell them how much the Lord has done for you and how he has had mercy on you.’” So the man went away and began to tell in the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him, and all the people were amazed. This formerly demon-possessed man's a different story altogether, isn't he? I believe more things happened than is recorded here. I think once the demons were out, Jesus preached the gospel to him, explained to him about the kingdom of God, the need for repentance so that his sins could be forgiven, and the man listened and believed. The text says in verse 15 that, “they saw him there dressed in his right mind.” Isn't that beautiful? It's kind of like the prodigal son coming to himself. It's like, "What am I doing here? Slopping pigs when I could be in my father's house." This man comes to his right mind, and again, supports that therapeutic view of salvation. He saves you by healing you, healing your mind so that you can see Jesus properly, you can see his beauty and his power and his love and you want him. He's dressed in his right mind, his sins are covered, that's a metaphor, the “dressing”. I think it's just an account, he's dressed now, he's not naked, but also the covering. His sins are forgiven and he's in his right mind and wants to be with Jesus forever. He sees Jesus properly, he loves him, he cherishes him. All he wants is to know him and be with him. He pleads with Jesus to stay with him. "He saves you by ... healing mind so that you can see Jesus properly, you can see his beauty and his power and his love." Now, three entities plead with Jesus for something. The demons begged to not be driven out of the area and stay in the area and go in the pigs. The unbelieving people asked Jesus to leave their area, and He does it. This man says, "I want to go with you." He says no. Isn't it true that God's ways are not our ways? But instead he has a mission for this man. He sends him out with a mission to do, verse 19, "Go home to your family and tell them how much the Lord has done for you and how he has had mercy on you." “Go win your family. You kind of put them through a hard time. Now go home and show them that you've been healed and win them. Tell your family how God has had mercy on you, how much the Lord has done for you and how he has had mercy on you.” I wonder what that was like when he walked through the threshold the first time, it's like, "Uh-oh, here comes trouble." "No, no, I'm different now." His job is to tell them the mercy of Jesus in his life and to win them. So it says in verse 20, “The man went away and began to tell the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him and all the people were amazed.” The Decapolis just literally means 10 cities, it's just a region there of 10 cities together. Apparently this man was effective because Jesus is going to return to the Decapolis in Mark 7:31 and there'll be many people waiting there for him to do healings. It's the fruit of this man's ministry. What a testimony this man must have had. I don't know how it began. How would you begin? "I used to be a demon-possessed raving maniac. And now I'm not. Now I'm healed." Imagine the joy of talking about Jesus that he must have had. V. Lessons What are some lessons and applications? First of all, I just want to ask you a question: Do you think demons are less active in our world than they were in Jesus' world? I hope you're saying no, because if you're saying no, you don't understand how much they have deceived you. They're every bit as active now as they ever were then. We Americans are naturalists, materialists, and I don't mean by that shopaholics, I mean we tend to think of things in a scientific material way. We tend to think of stories about demons and angels as a little weird, almost medieval. We definitely believe in the most high God, and then we believe in science, and we don't tend to do much in that middle realm with angels and demons, but they are every bit as active in 21st century America as they were in first century Palestine. They are deceptive and they're powerful, and they are around us at every moment. We need to be aware of them and understand the destructive power of demons. They are there to steal and kill and destroy. I wonder how many of the convicted serial killers or individuals that are incarcerated in psychiatric hospitals or asylums or prisons, I wonder if anyone is diagnosing them based on this. Or are they trying to get the chemical balances right and talk about their childhood or do other things? I’m not minimizing those sciences, but I'm just saying, is there a whole realm of possibility that's unthinkable in 21st-century treatment of individuals like this? For us Christians, let it not be so. We need to be aware that they're around and they're trying to make our lives miserable. We need to say then that demons are every bit as active. They're still here. They're still powerful. They still hate us, et cetera, but they're still terrified of Jesus. They are terrified of him. His power is infinite. He is far above all rule and authority, power and dominion. They are controlled by him, channeled by him. Hedges of protection and walls of protection everywhere, or else they'd run amok on the surface of the earth. We need to be thankful. We need to be aware of how demons could be assaulting you, annoying you, irritating you, making you susceptible to sin, alluring you, feeding you with depression, feeding you with hopelessness, feeding you with ideas of ways of acting out on the flesh. Put on your spiritual armor. Put it on every day, every moment. Be mindful, be not unaware of his schemes. Beyond that, see that the real issue here is worship Christ. Worship of Jesus. The name that is above every name, worship him, have a sense of his infinite power. Just fall down before him, not like this demon-possessed man did an abject terror, but fall down before him because you love him and want to tell him how much you love him for dying for you and rising again. Finally, what reaction do you have to the Jesus in this account? Like this healed man, do you want to spend the rest of your life with him? Do you want to spend eternity learning him? I do. Friends, it is the greatest honor of my life to stand up in front of you week after week and exalt Jesus. There's nothing in my life with more honor than that. I hope that your esteem of Jesus has gone up because we studied Mark 5:1-20 today. So I'm asking you, is that you? Do you love him? Do you know you're a sinner? His bloodshed for you is sufficient for your sins, are you trusting in that? Or like these townspeople, do you want him to go away? Just leave you alone? That's the question you have to ask. Use your testimony with your family. I want to tell my family how much Jesus has done for me and how He has been kind to me. Can I tell you what the Lord has done for me and how He has had mercy? I mean what a great phrase, “what He has done for me and how He has had mercy. I mean He could have mercy on you too.” Close with me in prayer. Lord, thank you for the time we've had to study in Mark 5:1-20. Thank you for what the text shows us about your infinite power and thank you for your kindness to us, weak sinners. I thank you for your gentleness and meekness and humbly acceding to the wishes of unbelieving townspeople who want you to leave. But I thank you for your wisdom in sending this single man out in Mark's gospel, this single man to go win his family. Lord, give us opportunities to share the gospel this week, help us to be bold, perhaps even tell this story and see what people think. But Lord give us opportunities to win the lost in Jesus name. Amen.

North Ridge Life Church
Book of Mark, Part 25

North Ridge Life Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 52:13


Pastor Marc Sharp continues with Part 21 of the current series that is an epic journey through the New Testament Gospel of Mark, verse by verse. The book of Mark was most likely the first one written, and is generally attributed to John Mark, a close associate of Peter, and also of Paul and Barnabas. The Gospel of Mark is all about Jesus and the good news (Gospel) of the kingdom of God. Who was Jesus really, and why exactly did he come? Last week we looked at the healing of the Syrophoenician woman's daughter. In today's message, Pastor Dave explains the significance of Jesus' healing of the deaf and mute man in the Decapolis. If you would like to view the video of today's service, as well as previous videos, go to: https://www.facebook.com/northridgelife/videos/ (copy and paste into your web browser address bar). For additional information, you may also visit the church website, www.northridgelife.org, and Facebook page, www.facebook.com/northridgelife/.

North Ridge Life Church
Book of Mark, Part 24

North Ridge Life Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 50:30


Pastor Marc Sharp continues with Part 21 of the current series that is an epic journey through the New Testament Gospel of Mark, verse by verse. The book of Mark was most likely the first one written, and is generally attributed to John Mark, a close associate of Peter, and also of Paul and Barnabas. The Gospel of Mark is all about Jesus and the good news (Gospel) of the kingdom of God. Who was Jesus really, and why exactly did he come? Last week we wrapped up a conflict between Jesus and the Pharisees. In today's message, Pastor Gabe walks us through the healing of the Syrophoenician woman's daughter. If you would like to view the video of today's service, as well as previous videos, go to: https://www.facebook.com/northridgelife/videos/ (copy and paste into your web browser address bar). For additional information, you may also visit the church website, www.northridgelife.org, and Facebook page, www.facebook.com/northridgelife/.

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible
August 11: Psalm 9; Judges 21; Jeremiah 37; Mark 7–8:26

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 16:49


Psalms and Wisdom: Psalm 9 Psalm 9 (Listen) I Will Recount Your Wonderful Deeds 1 To the choirmaster: according to Muth-labben.2 A Psalm of David. 9   I will give thanks to the LORD with my whole heart;    I will recount all of your wonderful deeds.2   I will be glad and exult in you;    I will sing praise to your name, O Most High. 3   When my enemies turn back,    they stumble and perish before3 your presence.4   For you have maintained my just cause;    you have sat on the throne, giving righteous judgment. 5   You have rebuked the nations; you have made the wicked perish;    you have blotted out their name forever and ever.6   The enemy came to an end in everlasting ruins;    their cities you rooted out;    the very memory of them has perished. 7   But the LORD sits enthroned forever;    he has established his throne for justice,8   and he judges the world with righteousness;    he judges the peoples with uprightness. 9   The LORD is a stronghold for the oppressed,    a stronghold in times of trouble.10   And those who know your name put their trust in you,    for you, O LORD, have not forsaken those who seek you. 11   Sing praises to the LORD, who sits enthroned in Zion!    Tell among the peoples his deeds!12   For he who avenges blood is mindful of them;    he does not forget the cry of the afflicted. 13   Be gracious to me, O LORD!    See my affliction from those who hate me,    O you who lift me up from the gates of death,14   that I may recount all your praises,    that in the gates of the daughter of Zion    I may rejoice in your salvation. 15   The nations have sunk in the pit that they made;    in the net that they hid, their own foot has been caught.16   The LORD has made himself known; he has executed judgment;    the wicked are snared in the work of their own hands. Higgaion.4 Selah 17   The wicked shall return to Sheol,    all the nations that forget God. 18   For the needy shall not always be forgotten,    and the hope of the poor shall not perish forever. 19   Arise, O LORD! Let not man prevail;    let the nations be judged before you!20   Put them in fear, O LORD!    Let the nations know that they are but men! Selah Footnotes [1] 9:1 Psalms 9 and 10 together follow an acrostic pattern, each stanza beginning with the successive letters of the Hebrew alphabet. In the Septuagint they form one psalm [2] 9:1 Probably a musical or liturgical term [3] 9:3 Or because of [4] 9:16 Probably a musical or liturgical term (ESV) Pentateuch and History: Judges 21 Judges 21 (Listen) Wives Provided for the Tribe of Benjamin 21 Now the men of Israel had sworn at Mizpah, “No one of us shall give his daughter in marriage to Benjamin.” 2 And the people came to Bethel and sat there till evening before God, and they lifted up their voices and wept bitterly. 3 And they said, “O LORD, the God of Israel, why has this happened in Israel, that today there should be one tribe lacking in Israel?” 4 And the next day the people rose early and built there an altar and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings. 5 And the people of Israel said, “Which of all the tribes of Israel did not come up in the assembly to the LORD?” For they had taken a great oath concerning him who did not come up to the LORD to Mizpah, saying, “He shall surely be put to death.” 6 And the people of Israel had compassion for Benjamin their brother and said, “One tribe is cut off from Israel this day. 7 What shall we do for wives for those who are left, since we have sworn by the LORD that we will not give them any of our daughters for wives?” 8 And they said, “What one is there of the tribes of Israel that did not come up to the LORD to Mizpah?” And behold, no one had come to the camp from Jabesh-gilead, to the assembly. 9 For when the people were mustered, behold, not one of the inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead was there. 10 So the congregation sent 12,000 of their bravest men there and commanded them, “Go and strike the inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead with the edge of the sword; also the women and the little ones. 11 This is what you shall do: every male and every woman that has lain with a male you shall devote to destruction.” 12 And they found among the inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead 400 young virgins who had not known a man by lying with him, and they brought them to the camp at Shiloh, which is in the land of Canaan. 13 Then the whole congregation sent word to the people of Benjamin who were at the rock of Rimmon and proclaimed peace to them. 14 And Benjamin returned at that time. And they gave them the women whom they had saved alive of the women of Jabesh-gilead, but they were not enough for them. 15 And the people had compassion on Benjamin because the LORD had made a breach in the tribes of Israel. 16 Then the elders of the congregation said, “What shall we do for wives for those who are left, since the women are destroyed out of Benjamin?” 17 And they said, “There must be an inheritance for the survivors of Benjamin, that a tribe not be blotted out from Israel. 18 Yet we cannot give them wives from our daughters.” For the people of Israel had sworn, “Cursed be he who gives a wife to Benjamin.” 19 So they said, “Behold, there is the yearly feast of the LORD at Shiloh, which is north of Bethel, on the east of the highway that goes up from Bethel to Shechem, and south of Lebonah.” 20 And they commanded the people of Benjamin, saying, “Go and lie in ambush in the vineyards 21 and watch. If the daughters of Shiloh come out to dance in the dances, then come out of the vineyards and snatch each man his wife from the daughters of Shiloh, and go to the land of Benjamin. 22 And when their fathers or their brothers come to complain to us, we will say to them, ‘Grant them graciously to us, because we did not take for each man of them his wife in battle, neither did you give them to them, else you would now be guilty.'” 23 And the people of Benjamin did so and took their wives, according to their number, from the dancers whom they carried off. Then they went and returned to their inheritance and rebuilt the towns and lived in them. 24 And the people of Israel departed from there at that time, every man to his tribe and family, and they went out from there every man to his inheritance. 25 In those days there was no king in Israel. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes. (ESV) Chronicles and Prophets: Jeremiah 37 Jeremiah 37 (Listen) Jeremiah Warns Zedekiah 37 Zedekiah the son of Josiah, whom Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon made king in the land of Judah, reigned instead of Coniah the son of Jehoiakim. 2 But neither he nor his servants nor the people of the land listened to the words of the LORD that he spoke through Jeremiah the prophet. 3 King Zedekiah sent Jehucal the son of Shelemiah, and Zephaniah the priest, the son of Maaseiah, to Jeremiah the prophet, saying, “Please pray for us to the LORD our God.” 4 Now Jeremiah was still going in and out among the people, for he had not yet been put in prison. 5 The army of Pharaoh had come out of Egypt. And when the Chaldeans who were besieging Jerusalem heard news about them, they withdrew from Jerusalem. 6 Then the word of the LORD came to Jeremiah the prophet: 7 “Thus says the LORD, God of Israel: Thus shall you say to the king of Judah who sent you to me to inquire of me, ‘Behold, Pharaoh's army that came to help you is about to return to Egypt, to its own land. 8 And the Chaldeans shall come back and fight against this city. They shall capture it and burn it with fire. 9 Thus says the LORD, Do not deceive yourselves, saying, “The Chaldeans will surely go away from us,” for they will not go away. 10 For even if you should defeat the whole army of Chaldeans who are fighting against you, and there remained of them only wounded men, every man in his tent, they would rise up and burn this city with fire.'” Jeremiah Imprisoned 11 Now when the Chaldean army had withdrawn from Jerusalem at the approach of Pharaoh's army, 12 Jeremiah set out from Jerusalem to go to the land of Benjamin to receive his portion there among the people. 13 When he was at the Benjamin Gate, a sentry there named Irijah the son of Shelemiah, son of Hananiah, seized Jeremiah the prophet, saying, “You are deserting to the Chaldeans.” 14 And Jeremiah said, “It is a lie; I am not deserting to the Chaldeans.” But Irijah would not listen to him, and seized Jeremiah and brought him to the officials. 15 And the officials were enraged at Jeremiah, and they beat him and imprisoned him in the house of Jonathan the secretary, for it had been made a prison. 16 When Jeremiah had come to the dungeon cells and remained there many days, 17 King Zedekiah sent for him and received him. The king questioned him secretly in his house and said, “Is there any word from the LORD?” Jeremiah said, “There is.” Then he said, “You shall be delivered into the hand of the king of Babylon.” 18 Jeremiah also said to King Zedekiah, “What wrong have I done to you or your servants or this people, that you have put me in prison? 19 Where are your prophets who prophesied to you, saying, ‘The king of Babylon will not come against you and against this land'? 20 Now hear, please, O my lord the king: let my humble plea come before you and do not send me back to the house of Jonathan the secretary, lest I die there.” 21 So King Zedekiah gave orders, and they committed Jeremiah to the court of the guard. And a loaf of bread was given him daily from the bakers' street, until all the bread of the city was gone. So Jeremiah remained in the court of the guard. (ESV) Gospels and Epistles: Mark 7–8:26 Mark 7–8:26 (Listen) Traditions and Commandments 7 Now when the Pharisees gathered to him, with some of the scribes who had come from Jerusalem, 2 they saw that some of his disciples ate with hands that were defiled, that is, unwashed. 3 (For the Pharisees and all the Jews do not eat unless they wash their hands properly,1 holding to the tradition of the elders, 4 and when they come from the marketplace, they do not eat unless they wash.2 And there are many other traditions that they observe, such as the washing of cups and pots and copper vessels and dining couches.3) 5 And the Pharisees and the scribes asked him, “Why do your disciples not walk according to the tradition of the elders, but eat with defiled hands?” 6 And he said to them, “Well did Isaiah prophesy of you hypocrites, as it is written,   “‘This people honors me with their lips,    but their heart is far from me;7   in vain do they worship me,    teaching as doctrines the commandments of men.' 8 You leave the commandment of God and hold to the tradition of men.” 9 And he said to them, “You have a fine way of rejecting the commandment of God in order to establish your tradition! 10 For Moses said, ‘Honor your father and your mother'; and, ‘Whoever reviles father or mother must surely die.' 11 But you say, ‘If a man tells his father or his mother, “Whatever you would have gained from me is Corban”' (that is, given to God)4—12 then you no longer permit him to do anything for his father or mother, 13 thus making void the word of God by your tradition that you have handed down. And many such things you do.” What Defiles a Person 14 And he called the people to him again and said to them, “Hear me, all of you, and understand: 15 There is nothing outside a person that by going into him can defile him, but the things that come out of a person are what defile him.”5 17 And when he had entered the house and left the people, his disciples asked him about the parable. 18 And he said to them, “Then are you also without understanding? Do you not see that whatever goes into a person from outside cannot defile him, 19 since it enters not his heart but his stomach, and is expelled?”6 (Thus he declared all foods clean.) 20 And he said, “What comes out of a person is what defiles him. 21 For from within, out of the heart of man, come evil thoughts, sexual immorality, theft, murder, adultery, 22 coveting, wickedness, deceit, sensuality, envy, slander, pride, foolishness. 23 All these evil things come from within, and they defile a person.” The Syrophoenician Woman's Faith 24 And from there he arose and went away to the region of Tyre and Sidon.7 And he entered a house and did not want anyone to know, yet he could not be hidden. 25 But immediately a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit heard of him and came and fell down at his feet. 26 Now the woman was a Gentile, a Syrophoenician by birth. And she begged him to cast the demon out of her daughter. 27 And he said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not right to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs.” 28 But she answered him, “Yes, Lord; yet even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs.” 29 And he said to her, “For this statement you may go your way; the demon has left your daughter.” 30 And she went home and found the child lying in bed and the demon gone. Jesus Heals a Deaf Man 31 Then he returned from the region of Tyre and went through Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. 32 And they brought to him a man who was deaf and had a speech impediment, and they begged him to lay his hand on him. 33 And taking him aside from the crowd privately, he put his fingers into his ears, and after spitting touched his tongue. 34 And looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.” 35 And his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. 36 And Jesus8 charged them to tell no one. But the more he charged them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. 37 And they were astonished beyond measure, saying, “He has done all things well. He even makes the deaf hear and the mute speak.” Jesus Feeds the Four Thousand 8 In those days, when again a great crowd had gathered, and they had nothing to eat, he called his disciples to him and said to them, 2 “I have compassion on the crowd, because they have been with me now three days and have nothing to eat. 3 And if I send them away hungry to their homes, they will faint on the way. And some of them have come from far away.” 4 And his disciples answered him, “How can one feed these people with bread here in this desolate place?” 5 And he asked them, “How many loaves do you have?” They said, “Seven.” 6 And he directed the crowd to sit down on the ground. And he took the seven loaves, and having given thanks, he broke them and gave them to his disciples to set before the people; and they set them before the crowd. 7 And they had a few small fish. And having blessed them, he said that these also should be set before them. 8 And they ate and were satisfied. And they took up the broken pieces left over, seven baskets full. 9 And there were about four thousand people. And he sent them away. 10 And immediately he got into the boat with his disciples and went to the district of Dalmanutha.9 The Pharisees Demand a Sign 11 The Pharisees came and began to argue with him, seeking from him a sign from heaven to test him. 12 And he sighed deeply in his spirit and said, “Why does this generation seek a sign? Truly, I say to you, no sign will be given to this generation.” 13 And he left them, got into the boat again, and went to the other side. The Leaven of the Pharisees and Herod 14 Now they had forgotten to bring bread, and they had only one loaf with them in the boat. 15 And he cautioned them, saying, “Watch out; beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and the leaven of Herod.”10 16 And they began discussing with one another the fact that they had no bread. 17 And Jesus, aware of this, said to them, “Why are you discussing the fact that you have no bread? Do you not yet perceive or understand? Are your hearts hardened? 18 Having eyes do you not see, and having ears do you not hear? And do you not remember? 19 When I broke the five loaves for the five thousand, how many baskets full of broken pieces did you take up?” They said to him, “Twelve.” 20 “And the seven for the four thousand, how many baskets full of broken pieces did you take up?” And they said to him, “Seven.” 21 And he said to them, “Do you not yet understand?” Jesus Heals a Blind Man at Bethsaida 22 And they came to Bethsaida. And some people brought to him a blind man and begged him to touch him. 23 And he took the blind man by the hand and led him out of the village, and when he had spit on his eyes and laid his hands on him, he asked him, “Do you see anything?” 24 And he looked up and said, “I see people, but they look like trees, walking.” 25 Then Jesus11 laid his hands on his eyes again; and he opened his eyes, his sight was restored, and he saw everything clearly. 26 And he sent him to his home, saying, “Do not even enter the village.” Footnotes [1] 7:3 Greek unless they wash the hands with a fist, probably indicating a kind of ceremonial washing [2] 7:4 Greek unless they baptize; some manuscripts unless they purify themselves [3] 7:4 Some manuscripts omit and dining couches [4] 7:11 Or an offering [5] 7:15 Some manuscripts add verse 16: If anyone has ears to hear, let him hear [6] 7:19 Greek goes out into the latrine [7] 7:24 Some manuscripts omit and Sidon [8] 7:36 Greek he [9] 8:10 Some manuscripts Magadan, or Magdala [10] 8:15 Some manuscripts the Herodians [11] 8:25 Greek he (ESV)

White Oak church of Christ
Miracle of the Syro-Phoenician's Daughter - Audio

White Oak church of Christ

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 35:10


Matt. 15:21-28, Mark 7:24-30 Luke Griffin

Fr. Barry Braum - Homilies and Conferences
Therapeutic Fire of Mercy - The Syrophoenician Woman

Fr. Barry Braum - Homilies and Conferences

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 11:39


Therapeutic Fire of Mercy - The Syrophoenician Woman by Fr. Barry Braum

Scotts Hill Podcast
Who's That? | The Syrophoenician Woman | Phil Ortego

Scotts Hill Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 40:16


We continue on in our series "Who's That?" and we hope you'll join us as we look at some of the lesser known characters of the Bible and learn their stories. Church is more than a service. It's about people experiencing life together as we seek to join God in His work of transforming lives. We invite you to come be part of that mission here at Scotts Hill. You can find more resources here on our YouTube Channel or by visiting: https://scottshill.org To connect with us or to learn more about Jesus we invite you to visit: https://www.scottshill.org/nextsteps For information on upcoming events church-wide, visit: https://scottshill.info Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scottshill.org Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/scottshill Website: https://www.scottshill.org

ESV: Through the Bible in a Year
August 1: 2 Chronicles 35–36; Psalm 28; Mark 7

ESV: Through the Bible in a Year

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 14:25


Old Testament: 2 Chronicles 35–36 2 Chronicles 35–36 (Listen) Josiah Keeps the Passover 35 Josiah kept a Passover to the LORD in Jerusalem. And they slaughtered the Passover lamb on the fourteenth day of the first month. 2 He appointed the priests to their offices and encouraged them in the service of the house of the LORD. 3 And he said to the Levites who taught all Israel and who were holy to the LORD, “Put the holy ark in the house that Solomon the son of David, king of Israel, built. You need not carry it on your shoulders. Now serve the LORD your God and his people Israel. 4 Prepare yourselves according to your fathers' houses by your divisions, as prescribed in the writing of David king of Israel and the document of Solomon his son. 5 And stand in the Holy Place according to the groupings of the fathers' houses of your brothers the lay people, and according to the division of the Levites by fathers' household. 6 And slaughter the Passover lamb, and consecrate yourselves, and prepare for your brothers, to do according to the word of the LORD by1 Moses.” 7 Then Josiah contributed to the lay people, as Passover offerings for all who were present, lambs and young goats from the flock to the number of 30,000, and 3,000 bulls; these were from the king's possessions. 8 And his officials contributed willingly to the people, to the priests, and to the Levites. Hilkiah, Zechariah, and Jehiel, the chief officers of the house of God, gave to the priests for the Passover offerings 2,600 Passover lambs and 300 bulls. 9 Conaniah also, and Shemaiah and Nethanel his brothers, and Hashabiah and Jeiel and Jozabad, the chiefs of the Levites, gave to the Levites for the Passover offerings 5,000 lambs and young goats and 500 bulls. 10 When the service had been prepared for, the priests stood in their place, and the Levites in their divisions according to the king's command. 11 And they slaughtered the Passover lamb, and the priests threw the blood that they received from them while the Levites flayed the sacrifices. 12 And they set aside the burnt offerings that they might distribute them according to the groupings of the fathers' houses of the lay people, to offer to the LORD, as it is written in the Book of Moses. And so they did with the bulls. 13 And they roasted the Passover lamb with fire according to the rule; and they boiled the holy offerings in pots, in cauldrons, and in pans, and carried them quickly to all the lay people. 14 And afterward they prepared for themselves and for the priests, because the priests, the sons of Aaron, were offering the burnt offerings and the fat parts until night; so the Levites prepared for themselves and for the priests, the sons of Aaron. 15 The singers, the sons of Asaph, were in their place according to the command of David, and Asaph, and Heman, and Jeduthun the king's seer; and the gatekeepers were at each gate. They did not need to depart from their service, for their brothers the Levites prepared for them. 16 So all the service of the LORD was prepared that day, to keep the Passover and to offer burnt offerings on the altar of the LORD, according to the command of King Josiah. 17 And the people of Israel who were present kept the Passover at that time, and the Feast of Unleavened Bread seven days. 18 No Passover like it had been kept in Israel since the days of Samuel the prophet. None of the kings of Israel had kept such a Passover as was kept by Josiah, and the priests and the Levites, and all Judah and Israel who were present, and the inhabitants of Jerusalem. 19 In the eighteenth year of the reign of Josiah this Passover was kept. Josiah Killed in Battle 20 After all this, when Josiah had prepared the temple, Neco king of Egypt went up to fight at Carchemish on the Euphrates, and Josiah went out to meet him. 21 But he sent envoys to him, saying, “What have we to do with each other, king of Judah? I am not coming against you this day, but against the house with which I am at war. And God has commanded me to hurry. Cease opposing God, who is with me, lest he destroy you.” 22 Nevertheless, Josiah did not turn away from him, but disguised himself in order to fight with him. He did not listen to the words of Neco from the mouth of God, but came to fight in the plain of Megiddo. 23 And the archers shot King Josiah. And the king said to his servants, “Take me away, for I am badly wounded.” 24 So his servants took him out of the chariot and carried him in his second chariot and brought him to Jerusalem. And he died and was buried in the tombs of his fathers. All Judah and Jerusalem mourned for Josiah. 25 Jeremiah also uttered a lament for Josiah; and all the singing men and singing women have spoken of Josiah in their laments to this day. They made these a rule in Israel; behold, they are written in the Laments. 26 Now the rest of the acts of Josiah, and his good deeds according to what is written in the Law of the LORD, 27 and his acts, first and last, behold, they are written in the Book of the Kings of Israel and Judah. Judah's Decline 36 The people of the land took Jehoahaz the son of Josiah and made him king in his father's place in Jerusalem. 2 Jehoahaz was twenty-three years old when he began to reign, and he reigned three months in Jerusalem. 3 Then the king of Egypt deposed him in Jerusalem and laid on the land a tribute of a hundred talents of silver and a talent2 of gold. 4 And the king of Egypt made Eliakim his brother king over Judah and Jerusalem, and changed his name to Jehoiakim. But Neco took Jehoahaz his brother and carried him to Egypt. 5 Jehoiakim was twenty-five years old when he began to reign, and he reigned eleven years in Jerusalem. He did what was evil in the sight of the LORD his God. 6 Against him came up Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and bound him in chains to take him to Babylon. 7 Nebuchadnezzar also carried part of the vessels of the house of the LORD to Babylon and put them in his palace in Babylon. 8 Now the rest of the acts of Jehoiakim, and the abominations that he did, and what was found against him, behold, they are written in the Book of the Kings of Israel and Judah. And Jehoiachin his son reigned in his place. 9 Jehoiachin was eighteen3 years old when he became king, and he reigned three months and ten days in Jerusalem. He did what was evil in the sight of the LORD. 10 In the spring of the year King Nebuchadnezzar sent and brought him to Babylon, with the precious vessels of the house of the LORD, and made his brother Zedekiah king over Judah and Jerusalem. 11 Zedekiah was twenty-one years old when he began to reign, and he reigned eleven years in Jerusalem. 12 He did what was evil in the sight of the LORD his God. He did not humble himself before Jeremiah the prophet, who spoke from the mouth of the LORD. 13 He also rebelled against King Nebuchadnezzar, who had made him swear by God. He stiffened his neck and hardened his heart against turning to the LORD, the God of Israel. 14 All the officers of the priests and the people likewise were exceedingly unfaithful, following all the abominations of the nations. And they polluted the house of the LORD that he had made holy in Jerusalem. 15 The LORD, the God of their fathers, sent persistently to them by his messengers, because he had compassion on his people and on his dwelling place. 16 But they kept mocking the messengers of God, despising his words and scoffing at his prophets, until the wrath of the LORD rose against his people, until there was no remedy. Jerusalem Captured and Burned 17 Therefore he brought up against them the king of the Chaldeans, who killed their young men with the sword in the house of their sanctuary and had no compassion on young man or virgin, old man or aged. He gave them all into his hand. 18 And all the vessels of the house of God, great and small, and the treasures of the house of the LORD, and the treasures of the king and of his princes, all these he brought to Babylon. 19 And they burned the house of God and broke down the wall of Jerusalem and burned all its palaces with fire and destroyed all its precious vessels. 20 He took into exile in Babylon those who had escaped from the sword, and they became servants to him and to his sons until the establishment of the kingdom of Persia, 21 to fulfill the word of the LORD by the mouth of Jeremiah, until the land had enjoyed its Sabbaths. All the days that it lay desolate it kept Sabbath, to fulfill seventy years. The Proclamation of Cyrus 22 Now in the first year of Cyrus king of Persia, that the word of the LORD by the mouth of Jeremiah might be fulfilled, the LORD stirred up the spirit of Cyrus king of Persia, so that he made a proclamation throughout all his kingdom and also put it in writing: 23 “Thus says Cyrus king of Persia, ‘The LORD, the God of heaven, has given me all the kingdoms of the earth, and he has charged me to build him a house at Jerusalem, which is in Judah. Whoever is among you of all his people, may the LORD his God be with him. Let him go up.'” Footnotes [1] 35:6 Hebrew by the hand of [2] 36:3 A talent was about 75 pounds or 34 kilograms [3] 36:9 Septuagint (compare 2 Kings 24:8); most Hebrew manuscripts eight (ESV) Psalm: Psalm 28 Psalm 28 (Listen) The Lord Is My Strength and My Shield Of David. 28   To you, O LORD, I call;    my rock, be not deaf to me,  lest, if you be silent to me,    I become like those who go down to the pit.2   Hear the voice of my pleas for mercy,    when I cry to you for help,  when I lift up my hands    toward your most holy sanctuary.1 3   Do not drag me off with the wicked,    with the workers of evil,  who speak peace with their neighbors    while evil is in their hearts.4   Give to them according to their work    and according to the evil of their deeds;  give to them according to the work of their hands;    render them their due reward.5   Because they do not regard the works of the LORD    or the work of his hands,  he will tear them down and build them up no more. 6   Blessed be the LORD!    For he has heard the voice of my pleas for mercy.7   The LORD is my strength and my shield;    in him my heart trusts, and I am helped;  my heart exults,    and with my song I give thanks to him. 8   The LORD is the strength of his people;2    he is the saving refuge of his anointed.9   Oh, save your people and bless your heritage!    Be their shepherd and carry them forever. Footnotes [1] 28:2 Hebrew your innermost sanctuary [2] 28:8 Some Hebrew manuscripts, Septuagint, Syriac; most Hebrew manuscripts is their strength (ESV) New Testament: Mark 7 Mark 7 (Listen) Traditions and Commandments 7 Now when the Pharisees gathered to him, with some of the scribes who had come from Jerusalem, 2 they saw that some of his disciples ate with hands that were defiled, that is, unwashed. 3 (For the Pharisees and all the Jews do not eat unless they wash their hands properly,1 holding to the tradition of the elders, 4 and when they come from the marketplace, they do not eat unless they wash.2 And there are many other traditions that they observe, such as the washing of cups and pots and copper vessels and dining couches.3) 5 And the Pharisees and the scribes asked him, “Why do your disciples not walk according to the tradition of the elders, but eat with defiled hands?” 6 And he said to them, “Well did Isaiah prophesy of you hypocrites, as it is written,   “‘This people honors me with their lips,    but their heart is far from me;7   in vain do they worship me,    teaching as doctrines the commandments of men.' 8 You leave the commandment of God and hold to the tradition of men.” 9 And he said to them, “You have a fine way of rejecting the commandment of God in order to establish your tradition! 10 For Moses said, ‘Honor your father and your mother'; and, ‘Whoever reviles father or mother must surely die.' 11 But you say, ‘If a man tells his father or his mother, “Whatever you would have gained from me is Corban”' (that is, given to God)4—12 then you no longer permit him to do anything for his father or mother, 13 thus making void the word of God by your tradition that you have handed down. And many such things you do.” What Defiles a Person 14 And he called the people to him again and said to them, “Hear me, all of you, and understand: 15 There is nothing outside a person that by going into him can defile him, but the things that come out of a person are what defile him.”5 17 And when he had entered the house and left the people, his disciples asked him about the parable. 18 And he said to them, “Then are you also without understanding? Do you not see that whatever goes into a person from outside cannot defile him, 19 since it enters not his heart but his stomach, and is expelled?”6 (Thus he declared all foods clean.) 20 And he said, “What comes out of a person is what defiles him. 21 For from within, out of the heart of man, come evil thoughts, sexual immorality, theft, murder, adultery, 22 coveting, wickedness, deceit, sensuality, envy, slander, pride, foolishness. 23 All these evil things come from within, and they defile a person.” The Syrophoenician Woman's Faith 24 And from there he arose and went away to the region of Tyre and Sidon.7 And he entered a house and did not want anyone to know, yet he could not be hidden. 25 But immediately a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit heard of him and came and fell down at his feet. 26 Now the woman was a Gentile, a Syrophoenician by birth. And she begged him to cast the demon out of her daughter. 27 And he said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not right to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs.” 28 But she answered him, “Yes, Lord; yet even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs.” 29 And he said to her, “For this statement you may go your way; the demon has left your daughter.” 30 And she went home and found the child lying in bed and the demon gone. Jesus Heals a Deaf Man 31 Then he returned from the region of Tyre and went through Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. 32 And they brought to him a man who was deaf and had a speech impediment, and they begged him to lay his hand on him. 33 And taking him aside from the crowd privately, he put his fingers into his ears, and after spitting touched his tongue. 34 And looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.” 35 And his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. 36 And Jesus8 charged them to tell no one. But the more he charged them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. 37 And they were astonished beyond measure, saying, “He has done all things well. He even makes the deaf hear and the mute speak.” Footnotes [1] 7:3 Greek unless they wash the hands with a fist, probably indicating a kind of ceremonial washing [2] 7:4 Greek unless they baptize; some manuscripts unless they purify themselves [3] 7:4 Some manuscripts omit and dining couches [4] 7:11 Or an offering [5] 7:15 Some manuscripts add verse 16: If anyone has ears to hear, let him hear [6] 7:19 Greek goes out into the latrine [7] 7:24 Some manuscripts omit and Sidon [8] 7:36 Greek he (ESV)

Faith Bible Church Menifee Sermon Podcast

Mark 7:24–30 (ESV)And from there he arose and went away to the region of Tyre and Sidon. And he entered a house and did not want anyone to know, yet he could not be hidden. 25 But immediately a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit heard of him and came and fell down at his feet. 26 Now the woman was a Gentile, a Syrophoenician by birth. And she begged him to cast the demon out of her daughter. 27 And he said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not right to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs.” 28 But she answered him, “Yes, Lord; yet even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs.” 29 And he said to her, “For this statement you may go your way; the demon has left your daughter.” 30 And she went home and found the child lying in bed and the demon gone.

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
July 25: Judges 8; Acts 12; Jeremiah 21; Mark 7

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 15:49


With family: Judges 8; Acts 12 Judges 8 (Listen) Gideon Defeats Zebah and Zalmunna 8 Then the men of Ephraim said to him, “What is this that you have done to us, not to call us when you went to fight against Midian?” And they accused him fiercely. 2 And he said to them, “What have I done now in comparison with you? Is not the gleaning of the grapes of Ephraim better than the grape harvest of Abiezer? 3 God has given into your hands the princes of Midian, Oreb and Zeeb. What have I been able to do in comparison with you?” Then their anger1 against him subsided when he said this. 4 And Gideon came to the Jordan and crossed over, he and the 300 men who were with him, exhausted yet pursuing. 5 So he said to the men of Succoth, “Please give loaves of bread to the people who follow me, for they are exhausted, and I am pursuing after Zebah and Zalmunna, the kings of Midian.” 6 And the officials of Succoth said, “Are the hands of Zebah and Zalmunna already in your hand, that we should give bread to your army?” 7 So Gideon said, “Well then, when the LORD has given Zebah and Zalmunna into my hand, I will flail your flesh with the thorns of the wilderness and with briers.” 8 And from there he went up to Penuel, and spoke to them in the same way, and the men of Penuel answered him as the men of Succoth had answered. 9 And he said to the men of Penuel, “When I come again in peace, I will break down this tower.” 10 Now Zebah and Zalmunna were in Karkor with their army, about 15,000 men, all who were left of all the army of the people of the East, for there had fallen 120,000 men who drew the sword. 11 And Gideon went up by the way of the tent dwellers east of Nobah and Jogbehah and attacked the army, for the army felt secure. 12 And Zebah and Zalmunna fled, and he pursued them and captured the two kings of Midian, Zebah and Zalmunna, and he threw all the army into a panic. 13 Then Gideon the son of Joash returned from the battle by the ascent of Heres. 14 And he captured a young man of Succoth and questioned him. And he wrote down for him the officials and elders of Succoth, seventy-seven men. 15 And he came to the men of Succoth and said, “Behold Zebah and Zalmunna, about whom you taunted me, saying, ‘Are the hands of Zebah and Zalmunna already in your hand, that we should give bread to your men who are exhausted?'” 16 And he took the elders of the city, and he took thorns of the wilderness and briers and with them taught the men of Succoth a lesson. 17 And he broke down the tower of Penuel and killed the men of the city. 18 Then he said to Zebah and Zalmunna, “Where are the men whom you killed at Tabor?” They answered, “As you are, so were they. Every one of them resembled the son of a king.” 19 And he said, “They were my brothers, the sons of my mother. As the LORD lives, if you had saved them alive, I would not kill you.” 20 So he said to Jether his firstborn, “Rise and kill them!” But the young man did not draw his sword, for he was afraid, because he was still a young man. 21 Then Zebah and Zalmunna said, “Rise yourself and fall upon us, for as the man is, so is his strength.” And Gideon arose and killed Zebah and Zalmunna, and he took the crescent ornaments that were on the necks of their camels. Gideon's Ephod 22 Then the men of Israel said to Gideon, “Rule over us, you and your son and your grandson also, for you have saved us from the hand of Midian.” 23 Gideon said to them, “I will not rule over you, and my son will not rule over you; the LORD will rule over you.” 24 And Gideon said to them, “Let me make a request of you: every one of you give me the earrings from his spoil.” (For they had golden earrings, because they were Ishmaelites.) 25 And they answered, “We will willingly give them.” And they spread a cloak, and every man threw in it the earrings of his spoil. 26 And the weight of the golden earrings that he requested was 1,700 shekels2 of gold, besides the crescent ornaments and the pendants and the purple garments worn by the kings of Midian, and besides the collars that were around the necks of their camels. 27 And Gideon made an ephod of it and put it in his city, in Ophrah. And all Israel whored after it there, and it became a snare to Gideon and to his family. 28 So Midian was subdued before the people of Israel, and they raised their heads no more. And the land had rest forty years in the days of Gideon. The Death of Gideon 29 Jerubbaal the son of Joash went and lived in his own house. 30 Now Gideon had seventy sons, his own offspring,3 for he had many wives. 31 And his concubine who was in Shechem also bore him a son, and he called his name Abimelech. 32 And Gideon the son of Joash died in a good old age and was buried in the tomb of Joash his father, at Ophrah of the Abiezrites. 33 As soon as Gideon died, the people of Israel turned again and whored after the Baals and made Baal-berith their god. 34 And the people of Israel did not remember the LORD their God, who had delivered them from the hand of all their enemies on every side, 35 and they did not show steadfast love to the family of Jerubbaal (that is, Gideon) in return for all the good that he had done to Israel. Footnotes [1] 8:3 Hebrew their spirit [2] 8:26 A shekel was about 2/5 ounce or 11 grams [3] 8:30 Hebrew who came from his own loins (ESV) Acts 12 (Listen) James Killed and Peter Imprisoned 12 About that time Herod the king laid violent hands on some who belonged to the church. 2 He killed James the brother of John with the sword, 3 and when he saw that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to arrest Peter also. This was during the days of Unleavened Bread. 4 And when he had seized him, he put him in prison, delivering him over to four squads of soldiers to guard him, intending after the Passover to bring him out to the people. 5 So Peter was kept in prison, but earnest prayer for him was made to God by the church. Peter Is Rescued 6 Now when Herod was about to bring him out, on that very night, Peter was sleeping between two soldiers, bound with two chains, and sentries before the door were guarding the prison. 7 And behold, an angel of the Lord stood next to him, and a light shone in the cell. He struck Peter on the side and woke him, saying, “Get up quickly.” And the chains fell off his hands. 8 And the angel said to him, “Dress yourself and put on your sandals.” And he did so. And he said to him, “Wrap your cloak around you and follow me.” 9 And he went out and followed him. He did not know that what was being done by the angel was real, but thought he was seeing a vision. 10 When they had passed the first and the second guard, they came to the iron gate leading into the city. It opened for them of its own accord, and they went out and went along one street, and immediately the angel left him. 11 When Peter came to himself, he said, “Now I am sure that the Lord has sent his angel and rescued me from the hand of Herod and from all that the Jewish people were expecting.” 12 When he realized this, he went to the house of Mary, the mother of John whose other name was Mark, where many were gathered together and were praying. 13 And when he knocked at the door of the gateway, a servant girl named Rhoda came to answer. 14 Recognizing Peter's voice, in her joy she did not open the gate but ran in and reported that Peter was standing at the gate. 15 They said to her, “You are out of your mind.” But she kept insisting that it was so, and they kept saying, “It is his angel!” 16 But Peter continued knocking, and when they opened, they saw him and were amazed. 17 But motioning to them with his hand to be silent, he described to them how the Lord had brought him out of the prison. And he said, “Tell these things to James and to the brothers.”1 Then he departed and went to another place. 18 Now when day came, there was no little disturbance among the soldiers over what had become of Peter. 19 And after Herod searched for him and did not find him, he examined the sentries and ordered that they should be put to death. Then he went down from Judea to Caesarea and spent time there. The Death of Herod 20 Now Herod was angry with the people of Tyre and Sidon, and they came to him with one accord, and having persuaded Blastus, the king's chamberlain,2 they asked for peace, because their country depended on the king's country for food. 21 On an appointed day Herod put on his royal robes, took his seat upon the throne, and delivered an oration to them. 22 And the people were shouting, “The voice of a god, and not of a man!” 23 Immediately an angel of the Lord struck him down, because he did not give God the glory, and he was eaten by worms and breathed his last. 24 But the word of God increased and multiplied. 25 And Barnabas and Saul returned from3 Jerusalem when they had completed their service, bringing with them John, whose other name was Mark. Footnotes [1] 12:17 Or brothers and sisters [2] 12:20 That is, trusted personal attendant [3] 12:25 Some manuscripts to (ESV) In private: Jeremiah 21; Mark 7 Jeremiah 21 (Listen) Jerusalem Will Fall to Nebuchadnezzar 21 This is the word that came to Jeremiah from the LORD, when King Zedekiah sent to him Pashhur the son of Malchiah and Zephaniah the priest, the son of Maaseiah, saying, 2 “Inquire of the LORD for us, for Nebuchadnezzar1 king of Babylon is making war against us. Perhaps the LORD will deal with us according to all his wonderful deeds and will make him withdraw from us.” 3 Then Jeremiah said to them: “Thus you shall say to Zedekiah, 4 ‘Thus says the LORD, the God of Israel: Behold, I will turn back the weapons of war that are in your hands and with which you are fighting against the king of Babylon and against the Chaldeans who are besieging you outside the walls. And I will bring them together into the midst of this city. 5 I myself will fight against you with outstretched hand and strong arm, in anger and in fury and in great wrath. 6 And I will strike down the inhabitants of this city, both man and beast. They shall die of a great pestilence. 7 Afterward, declares the LORD, I will give Zedekiah king of Judah and his servants and the people in this city who survive the pestilence, sword, and famine into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and into the hand of their enemies, into the hand of those who seek their lives. He shall strike them down with the edge of the sword. He shall not pity them or spare them or have compassion.' 8 “And to this people you shall say: ‘Thus says the LORD: Behold, I set before you the way of life and the way of death. 9 He who stays in this city shall die by the sword, by famine, and by pestilence, but he who goes out and surrenders to the Chaldeans who are besieging you shall live and shall have his life as a prize of war. 10 For I have set my face against this city for harm and not for good, declares the LORD: it shall be given into the hand of the king of Babylon, and he shall burn it with fire.' Message to the House of David 11 “And to the house of the king of Judah say, ‘Hear the word of the LORD, 12 O house of David! Thus says the LORD:   “‘Execute justice in the morning,    and deliver from the hand of the oppressor    him who has been robbed,  lest my wrath go forth like fire,    and burn with none to quench it,    because of your evil deeds.'” 13   “Behold, I am against you, O inhabitant of the valley,    O rock of the plain,      declares the LORD;  you who say, ‘Who shall come down against us,    or who shall enter our habitations?'14   I will punish you according to the fruit of your deeds,      declares the LORD;    I will kindle a fire in her forest,    and it shall devour all that is around her.” Footnotes [1] 21:2 Hebrew Nebuchadrezzar, an alternate spelling of Nebuchadnezzar (king of Babylon) occurring frequently from Jeremiah 21–52; this latter spelling is used throughout Jeremiah for consistency (ESV) Mark 7 (Listen) Traditions and Commandments 7 Now when the Pharisees gathered to him, with some of the scribes who had come from Jerusalem, 2 they saw that some of his disciples ate with hands that were defiled, that is, unwashed. 3 (For the Pharisees and all the Jews do not eat unless they wash their hands properly,1 holding to the tradition of the elders, 4 and when they come from the marketplace, they do not eat unless they wash.2 And there are many other traditions that they observe, such as the washing of cups and pots and copper vessels and dining couches.3) 5 And the Pharisees and the scribes asked him, “Why do your disciples not walk according to the tradition of the elders, but eat with defiled hands?” 6 And he said to them, “Well did Isaiah prophesy of you hypocrites, as it is written,   “‘This people honors me with their lips,    but their heart is far from me;7   in vain do they worship me,    teaching as doctrines the commandments of men.' 8 You leave the commandment of God and hold to the tradition of men.” 9 And he said to them, “You have a fine way of rejecting the commandment of God in order to establish your tradition! 10 For Moses said, ‘Honor your father and your mother'; and, ‘Whoever reviles father or mother must surely die.' 11 But you say, ‘If a man tells his father or his mother, “Whatever you would have gained from me is Corban”' (that is, given to God)4—12 then you no longer permit him to do anything for his father or mother, 13 thus making void the word of God by your tradition that you have handed down. And many such things you do.” What Defiles a Person 14 And he called the people to him again and said to them, “Hear me, all of you, and understand: 15 There is nothing outside a person that by going into him can defile him, but the things that come out of a person are what defile him.”5 17 And when he had entered the house and left the people, his disciples asked him about the parable. 18 And he said to them, “Then are you also without understanding? Do you not see that whatever goes into a person from outside cannot defile him, 19 since it enters not his heart but his stomach, and is expelled?”6 (Thus he declared all foods clean.) 20 And he said, “What comes out of a person is what defiles him. 21 For from within, out of the heart of man, come evil thoughts, sexual immorality, theft, murder, adultery, 22 coveting, wickedness, deceit, sensuality, envy, slander, pride, foolishness. 23 All these evil things come from within, and they defile a person.” The Syrophoenician Woman's Faith 24 And from there he arose and went away to the region of Tyre and Sidon.7 And he entered a house and did not want anyone to know, yet he could not be hidden. 25 But immediately a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit heard of him and came and fell down at his feet. 26 Now the woman was a Gentile, a Syrophoenician by birth. And she begged him to cast the demon out of her daughter. 27 And he said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not right to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs.” 28 But she answered him, “Yes, Lord; yet even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs.” 29 And he said to her, “For this statement you may go your way; the demon has left your daughter.” 30 And she went home and found the child lying in bed and the demon gone. Jesus Heals a Deaf Man 31 Then he returned from the region of Tyre and went through Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. 32 And they brought to him a man who was deaf and had a speech impediment, and they begged him to lay his hand on him. 33 And taking him aside from the crowd privately, he put his fingers into his ears, and after spitting touched his tongue. 34 And looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.” 35 And his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. 36 And Jesus8 charged them to tell no one. But the more he charged them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. 37 And they were astonished beyond measure, saying, “He has done all things well. He even makes the deaf hear and the mute speak.” Footnotes [1] 7:3 Greek unless they wash the hands with a fist, probably indicating a kind of ceremonial washing [2] 7:4 Greek unless they baptize; some manuscripts unless they purify themselves [3] 7:4 Some manuscripts omit and dining couches [4] 7:11 Or an offering [5] 7:15 Some manuscripts add verse 16: If anyone has ears to hear, let him hear [6] 7:19 Greek goes out into the latrine [7] 7:24 Some manuscripts omit and Sidon [8] 7:36 Greek he (ESV)

Universalism Against the World
Revelation Revisited, Part 2: The Final Invitation

Universalism Against the World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 147:07


Jason joins me as I continue to explore Revelation's implications for biblical universalism. We discuss similar topics as in my conversation with Jon (e.g., hermeneutics, open theism, value theory); however, this time, there is more emphasis on eschatology in the context of the whole Bible. Footnote: Here are some comments that occurred to me upon listening back through this episode: 12:31 That is, it will be an arc (or "U-shaped journey"). 15:57 The low-stakes game would be either: that some will choose Him freely, but not all; or that all will eventually choose Him, but not freely. 1:04:40 John's use of the word "dogs" to describe those outside the city seems inappropriate for people who are (or at least once were) in the image of God. However, if the use of this word was indeed inspired by Our Lord, it cannot but recall Jesus' encounter with the Syro-Phoenician woman, in which He commended the faith of a gentile who dared to believe that the mercy of the Kingdom might extend even to the dogs at the edge of the children's table. 2:25:18 Part of the quotation returns to me but not the source (although it was initially shared by my friend Nate Hile): "... [T]he God who is simultaneously a reflection of one's true self as well as the intimate stranger."

Sermons from Big Creek EPC
Guest Preacher Barry Morgan (Wk: 22-30)

Sermons from Big Creek EPC

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022


Listen: Mark 7:24-30 “But after hearing of Him, a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit immediately came and fell at His feet. Now the woman was a Gentile, of the Syrophoenician race. And she kept asking Him to cast the … Continue reading →

To Know the Love of Christ
S2E15 - Mark 7:24-37

To Know the Love of Christ

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 26:58


A Syrophoenician woman has so many things against her, yet she is willing to cross those barriers to do what it takes to get a piece of Jesus. Her begging provokes a reply from Jesus that seems to be quite insulting. What's more astounding is her reply to Jesus! After traveling for nearly 2 months, Jesus and His disciples are back in an area where He heals a deaf and mute man in a one-on-one encounter that is far different than any of His other healings.

The Listener's Commentary
Mark 7:24-37

The Listener's Commentary

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 19:41


Mark 7:24-37   24 Now Jesus got up and went from there to the region of Tyre. And when He had entered a house, He wanted no one to know about it; and yet He could not escape notice. 25 But after hearing about Him, a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit immediately came and fell at His feet. 26 Now the woman was a Gentile, of Syrophoenician descent. And she repeatedlyasked Him to cast the demon out of her daughter. 27 And He was saying to her, “Let the children be satisfied first, for it is not good to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs.” 28 But she answered and *said to Him, “Yes, Lord, but even the dogs under the table feed on the children's crumbs.”29 And He said to her, “Because of this answer, go; the demon has gone out of your daughter.” 30 And after going back to her home, she found the child lying on the bed, and the demon gone. 31 Again He left the region of Tyre and came through Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, within the region of Decapolis. 32 And they *brought to Him one who was deaf and had difficulty speaking, and they *begged Him to lay His hand on him. 33 And Jesus took him aside from the crowd, by himself, and put His fingers in his ears, and after spitting, He touched his tongue with the saliva;34 and looking up to heaven with a deep sigh, He *said to him, “Ephphatha!”that is, “Be opened!” 35 And his ears were opened, and the impediment of his tongue was removed, and he began speaking plainly. 36 And He gave them orders not to tell anyone; but the more He ordered them, the more widely they continued to proclaim it. 37 And they were utterly astonished, saying, “He has done all things well; He makes even those who are deaf hear, and those who are unable to talk, speak.”   GIVE - The Listener's Commentary is a listener supported Bible teaching ministry made possible by the generosity of people like you. Thank you! Give here:  https://www.listenerscommentary.com/give     STUDY HUB - Want more than the audio? Join the study hub to access articles, maps, charts, pictures, and links to other resources to help you study the Bible for yourself. https://www.listenerscommentary.com/members-sign-up   SUBSCRIBE - to receive updates and resources sent to your inbox, subscribe at https://www.listenerscommentary.com     MORE TEACHING - For more resources and Bible teaching from John visit https://www.johnwhittaker.net  

The Two Cities
Episode #126 - Identity & Religious Enmity with Dr. Sam Perry and Dr. Elizabeth Shively

The Two Cities

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 60:45


In this episode we debrief a recent conference on socio-scientific approaches to religious enmity that Dr. Chris Porter organized at Trinity College, Melbourne. For this conversation we are joined by two keynote speakers from the conference: Dr. Sam Perry, who is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Oklahoma, and Dr. Elizabeth Shively, who is Senior Lecturer in New Testament at St Mary's College at the University of St Andrews (in Scotland). Each of us summarize our respective presentations from the conference, including Dr. Perry's research on White Christian Nationalism and Dr. Shively's research on how stories shape identity, with specific attention given to Jesus' controversial interaction with the Syrophoenician woman in Mark 7. As the conversation progresses, we talk about the importance of interdisciplinary study, the benefits of social-scientific approaches to biblical studies as well as the importance of the humanities for social sciences, and the need to do interdisciplinary work in an ethical way. Team members on the episode from The Two Cities include: Dr. John Anthony Dunne and Dr. Chris Porter.

The Journey Church of Marietta
Mark (Part 25) The Syrophoenician Woman

The Journey Church of Marietta

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022


~The Syrophoenician Woman~ Mark Teaching Series, Part 25

Daily Devotionals for Kids (and Adults)

Mark 7:24-30 (ESV) The Syrophoenician Woman's Faith 24 And from there he arose and went away to the region of Tyre and Sidon. And he entered a house and did not want anyone to know, yet he could not be hidden. 25 But immediately a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit heard of him and came and fell down at his feet. 26 Now the woman was a Gentile, a Syrophoenician by birth. And she begged him to cast the demon out of her daughter. 27 And he said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not right to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs.” 28 But she answered him, “Yes, Lord; yet even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs.” 29 And he said to her, “For this statement you may go your way; the demon has left your daughter.” 30 And she went home and found the child lying in bed and the demon gone. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dailydevosforkids/message

Sault Wesleyan Church
Mother's Day 2022- Syrophoenician Woman

Sault Wesleyan Church

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 30:53


Pastor Brooks shares about Jesus' conversation with a woman in Matthew 15:21-28 (Mark 7:24-30)

Treasure Hunt In The Word
Mothers: the Syrophoenician Woman

Treasure Hunt In The Word

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 5:17


Featuring a Gentile woman who came to Jesus for her daughter's healing in Matthew 15:21-28. Don't forget to check out our website! https://treasurehuntpodcast.wixsite.com/realtreasure --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/treasurehuntintheword/message

East Denver Vineyard
Crumbs of Mercy: Jesus and the Syrophoenician Woman

East Denver Vineyard

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 29:59


Preacher: Johanna Seng Scripture: Mark 7:24-30 24 Jesus left that place and went to the vicinity of Tyre.[g] He entered a house and did not want anyone to know it; yet he could not keep his presence secret. 25 In fact, as soon as she heard about him, a woman whose little daughter was possessed by an impure spirit came and fell at his feet. 26 The woman was a Greek, born in Syrian Phoenicia. She begged Jesus to drive the demon out of her daughter. 27 “First let the children eat all they want,” he told her, “for it is not right to take the children's bread and toss it to the dogs.” 28 “Lord,” she replied, “even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs.” 29 Then he told her, “For such a reply, you may go; the demon has left your daughter.” 30 She went home and found her child lying on the bed, and the demon gone.  

Calgary Free Presbyterian Church
The Syro-Phoenician Mother

Calgary Free Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 61:00


This woman has many aspects of her background revealed to us- culturally she is Greek- ethnically she is Phoenician AND Syrian- religiously she is classed as a Canaanite- and relationally, she is here revealed as a Mother. But her name is not revealed. This nameless woman has a deep need- Her daughter has a serious physical and spiritual problem. And yet she understands that only Christ has the solution- --1- A Mother's Propitious Approach--2- Christ's Apparent Rejection--3- Her Persistent Supplication--4- A Parent's Prayers Answered

Central City Podcast
Encounters - Part 3: Syrophoenician Woman

Central City Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 39:59


ESV: Daily Office Lectionary
March 28: Psalm 89:1–18; Psalm 89:19–52; Genesis 49:1–28; 1 Corinthians 10:14–11:1; Mark 7:24–37

ESV: Daily Office Lectionary

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 13:36


4 Lent First Psalm: Psalm 89:1–18 Psalm 89:1–18 (Listen) I Will Sing of the Steadfast Love of the Lord A Maskil1 of Ethan the Ezrahite. 89   I will sing of the steadfast love of the LORD, forever;    with my mouth I will make known your faithfulness to all generations.2   For I said, “Steadfast love will be built up forever;    in the heavens you will establish your faithfulness.”3   You have said, “I have made a covenant with my chosen one;    I have sworn to David my servant:4   ‘I will establish your offspring forever,    and build your throne for all generations.'” Selah 5   Let the heavens praise your wonders, O LORD,    your faithfulness in the assembly of the holy ones!6   For who in the skies can be compared to the LORD?    Who among the heavenly beings2 is like the LORD,7   a God greatly to be feared in the council of the holy ones,    and awesome above all who are around him?8   O LORD God of hosts,    who is mighty as you are, O LORD,    with your faithfulness all around you?9   You rule the raging of the sea;    when its waves rise, you still them.10   You crushed Rahab like a carcass;    you scattered your enemies with your mighty arm.11   The heavens are yours; the earth also is yours;    the world and all that is in it, you have founded them.12   The north and the south, you have created them;    Tabor and Hermon joyously praise your name.13   You have a mighty arm;    strong is your hand, high your right hand.14   Righteousness and justice are the foundation of your throne;    steadfast love and faithfulness go before you.15   Blessed are the people who know the festal shout,    who walk, O LORD, in the light of your face,16   who exult in your name all the day    and in your righteousness are exalted.17   For you are the glory of their strength;    by your favor our horn is exalted.18   For our shield belongs to the LORD,    our king to the Holy One of Israel. Footnotes [1] 89:1 Probably a musical or liturgical term [2] 89:6 Hebrew the sons of God, or the sons of might (ESV) Second Psalm: Psalm 89:19–52 Psalm 89:19–52 (Listen) 19   Of old you spoke in a vision to your godly one,1 and said:    “I have granted help to one who is mighty;    I have exalted one chosen from the people.20   I have found David, my servant;    with my holy oil I have anointed him,21   so that my hand shall be established with him;    my arm also shall strengthen him.22   The enemy shall not outwit him;    the wicked shall not humble him.23   I will crush his foes before him    and strike down those who hate him.24   My faithfulness and my steadfast love shall be with him,    and in my name shall his horn be exalted.25   I will set his hand on the sea    and his right hand on the rivers.26   He shall cry to me, ‘You are my Father,    my God, and the Rock of my salvation.'27   And I will make him the firstborn,    the highest of the kings of the earth.28   My steadfast love I will keep for him forever,    and my covenant will stand firm2 for him.29   I will establish his offspring forever    and his throne as the days of the heavens.30   If his children forsake my law    and do not walk according to my rules,331   if they violate my statutes    and do not keep my commandments,32   then I will punish their transgression with the rod    and their iniquity with stripes,33   but I will not remove from him my steadfast love    or be false to my faithfulness.34   I will not violate my covenant    or alter the word that went forth from my lips.35   Once for all I have sworn by my holiness;    I will not lie to David.36   His offspring shall endure forever,    his throne as long as the sun before me.37   Like the moon it shall be established forever,    a faithful witness in the skies.” Selah 38   But now you have cast off and rejected;    you are full of wrath against your anointed.39   You have renounced the covenant with your servant;    you have defiled his crown in the dust.40   You have breached all his walls;    you have laid his strongholds in ruins.41   All who pass by plunder him;    he has become the scorn of his neighbors.42   You have exalted the right hand of his foes;    you have made all his enemies rejoice.43   You have also turned back the edge of his sword,    and you have not made him stand in battle.44   You have made his splendor to cease    and cast his throne to the ground.45   You have cut short the days of his youth;    you have covered him with shame. Selah 46   How long, O LORD? Will you hide yourself forever?    How long will your wrath burn like fire?47   Remember how short my time is!    For what vanity you have created all the children of man!48   What man can live and never see death?    Who can deliver his soul from the power of Sheol? Selah 49   Lord, where is your steadfast love of old,    which by your faithfulness you swore to David?50   Remember, O Lord, how your servants are mocked,    and how I bear in my heart the insults4 of all the many nations,51   with which your enemies mock, O LORD,    with which they mock the footsteps of your anointed. 52   Blessed be the LORD forever!      Amen and Amen. Footnotes [1] 89:19 Some Hebrew manuscripts godly ones [2] 89:28 Or will remain faithful [3] 89:30 Or my just decrees [4] 89:50 Hebrew lacks the insults (ESV) Old Testament: Genesis 49:1–28 Genesis 49:1–28 (Listen) Jacob Blesses His Sons 49 Then Jacob called his sons and said, “Gather yourselves together, that I may tell you what shall happen to you in days to come. 2   “Assemble and listen, O sons of Jacob,    listen to Israel your father. 3   “Reuben, you are my firstborn,    my might, and the firstfruits of my strength,    preeminent in dignity and preeminent in power.4   Unstable as water, you shall not have preeminence,    because you went up to your father's bed;    then you defiled it—he went up to my couch! 5   “Simeon and Levi are brothers;    weapons of violence are their swords.6   Let my soul come not into their council;    O my glory, be not joined to their company.  For in their anger they killed men,    and in their willfulness they hamstrung oxen.7   Cursed be their anger, for it is fierce,    and their wrath, for it is cruel!  I will divide them in Jacob    and scatter them in Israel. 8   “Judah, your brothers shall praise you;    your hand shall be on the neck of your enemies;    your father's sons shall bow down before you.9   Judah is a lion's cub;    from the prey, my son, you have gone up.  He stooped down; he crouched as a lion    and as a lioness; who dares rouse him?10   The scepter shall not depart from Judah,    nor the ruler's staff from between his feet,  until tribute comes to him;1    and to him shall be the obedience of the peoples.11   Binding his foal to the vine    and his donkey's colt to the choice vine,  he has washed his garments in wine    and his vesture in the blood of grapes.12   His eyes are darker than wine,    and his teeth whiter than milk. 13   “Zebulun shall dwell at the shore of the sea;    he shall become a haven for ships,    and his border shall be at Sidon. 14   “Issachar is a strong donkey,    crouching between the sheepfolds.215   He saw that a resting place was good,    and that the land was pleasant,  so he bowed his shoulder to bear,    and became a servant at forced labor. 16   “Dan shall judge his people    as one of the tribes of Israel.17   Dan shall be a serpent in the way,    a viper by the path,  that bites the horse's heels    so that his rider falls backward.18   I wait for your salvation, O LORD. 19   “Raiders shall raid Gad,3    but he shall raid at their heels. 20   “Asher's food shall be rich,    and he shall yield royal delicacies. 21   “Naphtali is a doe let loose    that bears beautiful fawns.4 22   “Joseph is a fruitful bough,    a fruitful bough by a spring;    his branches run over the wall.523   The archers bitterly attacked him,    shot at him, and harassed him severely,24   yet his bow remained unmoved;    his arms6 were made agile  by the hands of the Mighty One of Jacob    (from there is the Shepherd,7 the Stone of Israel),25   by the God of your father who will help you,    by the Almighty8 who will bless you    with blessings of heaven above,  blessings of the deep that crouches beneath,    blessings of the breasts and of the womb.26   The blessings of your father    are mighty beyond the blessings of my parents,    up to the bounties of the everlasting hills.9  May they be on the head of Joseph,    and on the brow of him who was set apart from his brothers. 27   “Benjamin is a ravenous wolf,    in the morning devouring the prey    and at evening dividing the spoil.” Jacob's Death and Burial 28 All these are the twelve tribes of Israel. This is what their father said to them as he blessed them, blessing each with the blessing suitable to him. Footnotes [1] 49:10 By a slight revocalization; a slight emendation yields (compare Septuagint, Syriac, Targum) until he comes to whom it belongs; Hebrew until Shiloh comes, or until he comes to Shiloh [2] 49:14 Or between its saddlebags [3] 49:19 Gad sounds like the Hebrew for raiders and raid [4] 49:21 Or he gives beautiful words, or that bears fawns of the fold [5] 49:22 Or Joseph is a wild donkey, a wild donkey beside a spring, his wild colts beside the wall [6] 49:24 Hebrew the arms of his hands [7] 49:24 Or by the name of the Shepherd [8] 49:25 Hebrew Shaddai [9] 49:26 A slight emendation yields (compare Septuagint) the blessings of the eternal mountains, the bounties of the everlasting hills (ESV) New Testament: 1 Corinthians 10:14–11:1 1 Corinthians 10:14–11:1 (Listen) 14 Therefore, my beloved, flee from idolatry. 15 I speak as to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I say. 16 The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ? 17 Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread. 18 Consider the people of Israel:1 are not those who eat the sacrifices participants in the altar? 19 What do I imply then? That food offered to idols is anything, or that an idol is anything? 20 No, I imply that what pagans sacrifice they offer to demons and not to God. I do not want you to be participants with demons. 21 You cannot drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of demons. You cannot partake of the table of the Lord and the table of demons. 22 Shall we provoke the Lord to jealousy? Are we stronger than he? Do All to the Glory of God 23 “All things are lawful,” but not all things are helpful. “All things are lawful,” but not all things build up. 24 Let no one seek his own good, but the good of his neighbor. 25 Eat whatever is sold in the meat market without raising any question on the ground of conscience. 26 For “the earth is the Lord's, and the fullness thereof.” 27 If one of the unbelievers invites you to dinner and you are disposed to go, eat whatever is set before you without raising any question on the ground of conscience. 28 But if someone says to you, “This has been offered in sacrifice,” then do not eat it, for the sake of the one who informed you, and for the sake of conscience—29 I do not mean your conscience, but his. For why should my liberty be determined by someone else's conscience? 30 If I partake with thankfulness, why am I denounced because of that for which I give thanks? 31 So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God. 32 Give no offense to Jews or to Greeks or to the church of God, 33 just as I try to please everyone in everything I do, not seeking my own advantage, but that of many, that they may be saved. &

The Daily Lectionary
Monday, March 28

The Daily Lectionary

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 13:41


Readings for Monday, March 28, 2022 “‘All things are lawful,' but not all things are beneficial. ‘All things are lawful,' but not all things build up.” -- 1 Corinthians 10:23 Morning Psalm 119:73-80 73 Your hands have made and fashioned me; give me understanding that I may learn your commandments. 74 Those who fear you shall see me and rejoice, because I have hoped in your word. 75 I know, O Lord, that your judgments are right, and that in faithfulness you have humbled me. 76 Let your steadfast love become my comfort according to your promise to your servant. 77 Let your mercy come to me, that I may live; for your law is my delight. 78 Let the arrogant be put to shame, because they have subverted me with guile; as for me, I will meditate on your precepts. 79 Let those who fear you turn to me, so that they may know your decrees. 80 May my heart be blameless in your statutes, so that I may not be put to shame. Psalm 145 1 I will extol you, my God and King, and bless your name forever and ever. 2 Every day I will bless you, and praise your name forever and ever. 3 Great is the Lord, and greatly to be praised; his greatness is unsearchable. 4 One generation shall laud your works to another, and shall declare your mighty acts. 5 On the glorious splendor of your majesty, and on your wondrous works, I will meditate. 6 The might of your awesome deeds shall be proclaimed, and I will declare your greatness. 7 They shall celebrate the fame of your abundant goodness, and shall sing aloud of your righteousness. 8 The Lord is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love. 9 The Lord is good to all, and his compassion is over all that he has made. 10 All your works shall give thanks to you, O Lord, and all your faithful shall bless you. 11 They shall speak of the glory of your kingdom, and tell of your power, 12 to make known to all people your mighty deeds, and the glorious splendor of your kingdom. 13 Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom, and your dominion endures throughout all generations. The Lord is faithful in all his words, and gracious in all his deeds. 14 The Lord upholds all who are falling, and raises up all who are bowed down. 15 The eyes of all look to you, and you give them their food in due season. 16 You open your hand, satisfying the desire of every living thing. 17 The Lord is just in all his ways, and kind in all his doings. 18 The Lord is near to all who call on him, to all who call on him in truth. 19 He fulfills the desire of all who fear him; he also hears their cry, and saves them. 20 The Lord watches over all who love him, but all the wicked he will destroy. 21 My mouth will speak the praise of the Lord, and all flesh will bless his holy name forever and ever. Midday Genesis 49:1-28 49 Then Jacob called his sons, and said: “Gather around, that I may tell you what will happen to you in days to come. 2 Assemble and hear, O sons of Jacob; listen to Israel your father. 3 Reuben, you are my firstborn, my might and the first fruits of my vigor, excelling in rank and excelling in power. 4 Unstable as water, you shall no longer excel because you went up onto your father's bed; then you defiled it—you went up onto my couch! 5 Simeon and Levi are brothers; weapons of violence are their swords. 6 May I never come into their council; may I not be joined to their company— for in their anger they killed men, and at their whim they hamstrung oxen. 7 Cursed be their anger, for it is fierce, and their wrath, for it is cruel! I will divide them in Jacob, and scatter them in Israel. 8 Judah, your brothers shall praise you; your hand shall be on the neck of your enemies; your father's sons shall bow down before you. 9 Judah is a lion's whelp; from the prey, my son, you have gone up. He crouches down, he stretches out like a lion, like a lioness—who dares rouse him up? 10 The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor the ruler's staff from between his feet, until tribute comes to him; and the obedience of the peoples is his. 11 Binding his foal to the vine and his donkey's colt to the choice vine, he washes his garments in wine and his robe in the blood of grapes; 12 his eyes are darker than wine, and his teeth whiter than milk. 13 Zebulun shall settle at the shore of the sea; he shall be a haven for ships, and his border shall be at Sidon. 14 Issachar is a strong donkey, lying down between the sheepfolds; 15 he saw that a resting place was good, and that the land was pleasant; so he bowed his shoulder to the burden, and became a slave at forced labor. 16 Dan shall judge his people as one of the tribes of Israel. 17 Dan shall be a snake by the roadside, a viper along the path, that bites the horse's heels so that its rider falls backward. 18 I wait for your salvation, O Lord . 19 Gad shall be raided by raiders, but he shall raid at their heels. 20 Asher's food shall be rich, and he shall provide royal delicacies. 21 Naphtali is a doe let loose that bears lovely fawns. 22 Joseph is a fruitful bough, a fruitful bough by a spring; his branches run over the wall. 23 The archers fiercely attacked him; they shot at him and pressed him hard. 24 Yet his bow remained taut, and his arms were made agile by the hands of the Mighty One of Jacob, by the name of the Shepherd, the Rock of Israel, 25 by the God of your father, who will help you, by the Almighty who will bless you with blessings of heaven above, blessings of the deep that lies beneath, blessings of the breasts and of the womb. 26 The blessings of your father are stronger than the blessings of the eternal mountains, the bounties of the everlasting hills; may they be on the head of Joseph, on the brow of him who was set apart from his brothers. 27 Benjamin is a ravenous wolf, in the morning devouring the prey, and at evening dividing the spoil.” 28 All these are the twelve tribes of Israel, and this is what their father said to them when he blessed them, blessing each one of them with a suitable blessing. 1 Corinthians 10:14-11:1 14 Therefore, my dear friends, flee from the worship of idols. 15 I speak as to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I say. 16 The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a sharing in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a sharing in the body of Christ? 17 Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread. 18 Consider the people of Israel; are not those who eat the sacrifices partners in the altar? 19 What do I imply then? That food sacrificed to idols is anything, or that an idol is anything? 20 No, I imply that what pagans sacrifice, they sacrifice to demons and not to God. I do not want you to be partners with demons. 21 You cannot drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of demons. You cannot partake of the table of the Lord and the table of demons. 22 Or are we provoking the Lord to jealousy? Are we stronger than he? 23 “All things are lawful,” but not all things are beneficial. “All things are lawful,” but not all things build up. 24 Do not seek your own advantage, but that of the other. 25 Eat whatever is sold in the meat market without raising any question on the ground of conscience, 26 for “the earth and its fullness are the Lord's.” 27 If an unbeliever invites you to a meal and you are disposed to go, eat whatever is set before you without raising any question on the ground of conscience. 28 But if someone says to you, “This has been offered in sacrifice,” then do not eat it, out of consideration for the one who informed you, and for the sake of conscience— 29 I mean the other's conscience, not your own. For why should my liberty be subject to the judgment of someone else's conscience? 30 If I partake with thankfulness, why should I be denounced because of that for which I give thanks? 31 So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do everything for the glory of God. 32 Give no offense to Jews or to Greeks or to the church of God, 33 just as I try to please everyone in everything I do, not seeking my own advantage, but that of many, so that they may be saved. 11 Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ. Mark 7:24-37 24 From there he set out and went away to the region of Tyre. He entered a house and did not want anyone to know he was there. Yet he could not escape notice, 25 but a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit immediately heard about him, and she came and bowed down at his feet. 26 Now the woman was a Gentile, of Syrophoenician origin. She begged him to cast the demon out of her daughter. 27 He said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not fair to take the children's food and throw it to the dogs.” 28 But she answered him, “Sir, even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs.” 29 Then he said to her, “For saying that, you may go—the demon has left your daughter.” 30 So she went home, found the child lying on the bed, and the demon gone. 31 Then he returned from the region of Tyre, and went by way of Sidon towards the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. 32 They brought to him a deaf man who had an impediment in his speech; and they begged him to lay his hand on him. 33 He took him aside in private, away from the crowd, and put his fingers into his ears, and he spat and touched his tongue. 34 Then looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.” 35 And immediately his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. 36 Then Jesus ordered them to tell no one; but the more he ordered them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. 37 They were astounded beyond measure, saying, “He has done everything well; he even makes the deaf to hear and the mute to speak.” Evening Psalm 121 1 I lift up my eyes to the hills— from where will my help come? 2 My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth. 3 He will not let your foot be moved; he who keeps you will not slumber. 4 He who keeps Israel will neither slumber nor sleep. 5 The Lord is your keeper; the Lord is your shade at your right hand. 6 The sun shall not strike you by day, nor the moon by night. 7 The Lord will keep you from all evil; he will keep your life. 8 The Lord will keep your going out and your coming in from this time on and forevermore. Psalm 6 1 O Lord, do not rebuke me in your anger, or discipline me in your wrath. 2 Be gracious to me, O Lord, for I am languishing; O Lord, heal me, for my bones are shaking with terror. 3 My soul also is struck with terror, while you, O Lord —how long? 4 Turn, O Lord, save my life; deliver me for the sake of your steadfast love. 5 For in death there is no remembrance of you; in Sheol who can give you praise? 6 I am weary with my moaning; every night I flood my bed with tears; I drench my couch with my weeping. 7 My eyes waste away because of grief; they grow weak because of all my foes. 8 Depart from me, all you workers of evil, for the Lord has heard the sound of my weeping. 9 The Lord has heard my supplication; the Lord accepts my prayer. 10 All my enemies shall be ashamed and struck with terror; they shall turn back, and in a moment be put to shame. You can also find all of today's readings at PCUSA.org. The Daily Lectionary podcast is a ministry of First Presbyterian Church of Plattsburgh, NY, read by Pastor Timothy J. Luoma.

Women Biblical Leadership
The Power of Personal Agency

Women Biblical Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 44:57


Bottoms Up! God does not operate in a top-down down institution of justice, but bottom-up. His justice comes through His mercy, love, and righteousness. Rev. Ajung Sojwal takes us to the public space where the Syrophoenician mother and Bartimaeus engage with Jesus in a conversation revealing their deep sense of personal agency in partnership with God to bring about the work of justice that blesses others. Listen to this episode and see how faith plays a role in opening our imaginations to a world of restorative justice that is bottoms up! Rev. Ajung Sojwal is the rector of St. George's Church, Hempstead, in the Diocese of Long Island. Ajung was ordained in the Episcopal Diocese of NY in 2006. She is particularly interested in understanding what radical hospitality means for the Church today. Her home is open for fellowship with home-cooked meals. Ajung is married to Milind, an ordained minister from India, they have two adult children. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/womenofwonder/support

Wretched Radio
NO, JESUS DID NOT CALL HER THAT

Wretched Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 54:56


A challenging section of scripture – Matthew 15 in the account of the Syrophoenician woman. Bill Maher, culture, and more! Wretched Radio | Air Date: March 14, 2022 https://media-wretched.org/Radio/Podcast/WR2022-0314.mp3 Segment 1 How do Christians talk like Jesus in a culture that’s so acrimonious? Recently Bill Maher was a guest of Ben Shapiro. Maher said “we just […] The post NO, JESUS DID NOT CALL HER THAT appeared first on Wretched.

The Christ the King (Spencer) Podcast
The Second Sunday in Lent, Reminiscere: The Sunday of the Syro-Phoenician Woman, Matins - 3/13/22

The Christ the King (Spencer) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 54:28


Bulletin: https://tinyurl.com/CTK-Lent2Bulletin22   Congregation at Prayer: https://tinyurl.com/CTK-CaP-220313

Two Journeys Sermons
Jesus Has the Authority to Forgive Our Sins (Mark Sermon 8) (Audio)

Two Journeys Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2022


In this passage, we learn that Jesus has the power to forgive our sins and also to heal all our diseases. In Heaven we will realize Jesus’ great power and amazing love! -TRANSCRIPT- Turn in your Bibles to Mark 2, we continue our study in Mark's Gospel with verses 1 through 12. During the Civil War, on the night of August 31, 1861, Private William Scott of Vermont was found sleeping on sentry duty, a very, very serious crime during wartime. The Union Army was determined to make an example of him, and they court martialed him, he was found guilty and he was sentenced to be executed by firing squad on September 9. One man had the power to overturn that ruling, that verdict from the court martial, and that was President Abraham Lincoln. He found out about Private Scott, looked into his case, and intervened. He pardoned him and spared his life and returned him to his unit at the last minute. He had the authority to do that because the Constitution in Article II, Section 2 confers staggering powers to the president of the United States. It designates the president commander in chief of all the armed services. Also in that same paragraph, it gives the president the power to grant pardons for offenses against the United States. That's an amazing power, isn't it? The power to pardon, the power to grant forgiveness. Now, the Constitution somewhat limits the president in that power. For example, he cannot pardon crimes that haven't been committed yet. That makes sense because then that would overturn the laws of our country. As a matter of fact, there's lots of interesting constitutional questions about this separation of powers and the executive and legislative and judicial, and giving the president this kind of power makes some of those things murky. But in our text today, we're going to see someone who has infinitely greater power to forgive than the president of the United States, for in it Jesus Christ looks at a sinner and declares him instantly and completely forgiven of all of his sins, past, present, and future. He has the authority to do that. He has the right, the power to do that. Jesus arises the question of his authority, and He does a mighty miracle to prove that He has the authority on earth to forgive sins. That's what we're going to study in the text today. For all eternity, heaven and hell will be populated by human beings, a vast multitude of people in each, in heaven and in hell. One thing will be common to all those people, every one of them, both in heaven and in hell. Both the inhabitants of heaven and the inhabitants of hell will have been sinners on earth, for Romans 3:23 says, "All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God." The infinite difference between the sinners in heaven and those in hell is this one thing: the forgiveness of sins. The sinners in heaven will be forgiven sinners, and the sinners in hell will be unforgiven sinners. Now, in this amazing account that we're looking at, we learn that Jesus, the savior of the world, has the authority, the power to forgive sins. He also has the power to heal all of our diseases. When He is done saving us and when we are in our eternally glorious home in heaven, only then will we realize how great is Jesus's power, how amazing his love. I believe this is one of the most important miracle accounts in the Bible, in Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, because it directly links the miracle Jesus does to our greatest need; it directly links it right in the text to the forgiveness of sins because the central need that we have is not healthy bodies, but forgiven souls. The Population of the Sick We begin this account with the population of the sick. Look at verses 1 and 2. "A few days later, when Jesus had again entered Capernaum, the people heard that He had come home. So many gathered that there was no room left, not even outside the door, and He preached the word to them." So the context, Jesus has begun his ministry in earnest. His healing ministry has begun. Many people have heard about it. Jesus healed a leper at the very end of Mark 1 and commanded him not to tell anyone, because already this thing is ramping up and everybody's hearing about his healing ministry. However, the man disobeyed, went out and told everyone everywhere, and Mark 1:45 says, "As a result, Jesus could no longer enter town openly, but stayed outside in lonely places. Yet the people still came to Him from everywhere." Jesus then subsequently returned to his home base for his ministry, Capernaum. Huge crowds came to Him, it says. The desperation brought on by disease and death pressed people to come from everywhere to Jesus for these healings. People put absolute top priority on their health. You hear that slogan sometimes, “If you have your health, you have everything.” I think what they probably mean is something opposite. If you don't have your health, you really have nothing. It makes sense. What good is a delicious meal to a man who's in agony and will vomit up everything he eats because he can't keep it down? What good is a skillful musician playing a beautiful piece of music to a woman that's suffering from internal almost unspeakable pain day after day? What good is a mansion or a box of gold coins to parents whose son is dying? People knew this, and they came in huge numbers for these healings. Because Jesus preferred, it seems, normally to heal one at a time and maybe even through personal touch, there's a massive bottleneck at the door. It’s hard to get in. Jesus immediately in his ministry, as He always does, resets their priorities by proclaiming the word to them in verse 2. This is the centerpiece of his ministry, the proclamation of the gospel. Physical health is of little value if you are an unforgiven sinner. You are under the wrath of God. That's the greatest problem you have, not your health. Faith comes by hearing the word of God. Jesus knew that. He knew the true needs of the people. So He's not there to heal every disease and sickness among the people all the time so that people would never get sick again. He's not there to raise every dead person so that they would never die again, not at that point. Jesus has come into the world to address our sin problem, to save us from our sins, and his top priority therefore every day was the preaching of the word. The Persistence of Faith We see now the persistence of faith in the next part of the account. Look at verses 3 and 4. "Some men came, bringing to Him a paralytic carried by four of them. Since they could not get him to Jesus because of the crowd, they made an opening in the roof above Jesus, and after digging through it, lowered the mat the paralyzed man was lying on." This is a remarkable story. This is a picture of genuine friendship. We're introduced to five men here, four of them in good health, but one of them is paralyzed. The paralysis may be caused by a disease or by an injury. Perhaps the paralyzed man had a spinal cord injury, maybe fell from a tree or cliff or was thrown by a horse. Maybe he had a disease, some kind of viral or bacterial infection or neurological disorder. Maybe he had a brain trauma. We have no idea. The four healthy friends are giving a clear display of true friendship. Though they are able to walk, their friend is not, and they care about that. It matters to them that though they're healthy, their friend is not, and they want to help him. They want to do whatever it takes to get him healed. The five of them, it seems, have heard the reports of what this man Jesus can do, and they believe them. Their faith is activated by these testimonies, by these reports. They came, no doubt about it, believing that Jesus could heal their friend. So they carry this man on a pallet, maybe a wooden frame with some leather straps, something like that, and they bring him to Jesus. But when they arrive, they have some massive obstacles to their faith. They are immediately met with that bottleneck I talked about. The crowd is jammed up in the house, they cannot get to Him. They can't see Jesus, they can't hear his teachings. They cannot get their friend near to Him. In Luke's Gospel account of this story, the friends tried to get in through the crowd, but other sick people are just as determined that they would see Jesus and they're not letting this guy through. But their faith will not be deterred. They're not going to give up. The essence of faith is being a spiritual beggar, of knowing you don't have inside yourself the resources to solve this problem and that God does. God has everything that you could ever need or want. That God can do anything, that's the essence of faith. These friends have true faith. If they turn and walk away, their friend will never be healed. They know that. This is it, so they don't give up. True faith overcomes obstacles, as we see so beautifully in Romans 8:37, "In all these things, we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us." A world conquering faith. They're going to overcome obstacles, so they take extraordinary steps. One of them has an idea. “I’ve got a thought here. I know what we could do. We could climb up on the roof.” The roofs back then were flat and you could go out on them, maybe eat a meal or pray or something like that, that kind of a roof. So they're going to climb up and they're going to, as the Greek says, literally, “unroof the roof.” They're going to unroof the roof. They climb up the stairs and they kind of triangulate and calculate where Jesus probably is, and they start unroofing the roof. They start digging through it. Now, this is remarkable. I'm thinking about it from Jesus's point of view. I've led a lot of Bible studies, I've had some distractions I've had to deal with before, but I've never had pieces of the roof falling down. They're digging through and pieces are coming down. Now, I've thought about this and I'm thinking, it's a big opening. I mean, think about it. They don't want to lower him down feet first, that will not work. So they got to open this up big, and this process must have taken a while. I'm thinking, Jesus probably put a hold on much of what was going on while this whole thing is happening. I find it interesting that Jesus takes their faith where it's at. He doesn't stop them. Well, why would He stop him? Their digging wasn't necessary. Jesus could heal from a great distance. The Roman centurion has a paralyzed servant lying at home, and he said, "You don't need to come under my roof, but just say the word and my servant will be healed." Jesus heals him from a distance. He healed the royal official's son from a distance. So why didn't He stop them? He accepted what they were doing and let them do it. So they finished their digging project and they lower the man down on ropes, right in front of Jesus. Now we see the power of Jesus the judge. "When Jesus saw their faith, He said to the paralytic, 'Son, your sins are forgiven.'" The Power of the Judge So the text says Jesus sees their faith. There are two possibilities. Either He saw the fruit of their faith, because James says faith without works is dead, so you can tell the faith by the works, “by the fruit you'll know them,” and he can see the fruit. It's just so obvious. There's clear evidence the friends believe Jesus can heal, no doubt about it. But also, the text gives clear indication that Jesus can read people's minds and hearts. Look at verse 8, "Jesus read the minds and hearts of his enemies." I don't think it's either/or, it's both/and. He knew their hearts, that their hearts believed, and He could see the evidence, the fruit of their faith. But more importantly, I think, theologically more importantly, Jesus saw his faith, and by that I mean the paralyzed man's faith. The text doesn't overtly say that. It just makes it collective, He saw their faith, but Jesus declares to the paralyzed man, "Your sins are forgiven." Jesus speaks to this man the greatest single blessing any of us sinners could ever receive, the forgiveness of sins, full forgiveness, past, present, and future. We know from other texts, from other books of the Bible, that forgiveness of sins equals justification. It's the same thing, and it comes by faith in Christ alone, and no one can believe on behalf of another person. Jesus's friends' faith cannot save his soul from sin. Now, our faith can position unforgiven sinners to a place where they can hear the gospel and trust in Christ. We can do many things, missionaries can, by faith, go to certain places and bring the gospel and proclaim and do many things by faith. But we can't do the final, most important step, giving someone spiritual life that they be born again. We can't do that. That's beyond our power. But our faith can position an unforgiven sinner to the place where they can hear and believe. This man had faith for himself. He had faith for himself, and this is essential. Parents can't believe for their unbelieving children. Wives can't believe for their unbelieving husbands. Friends cannot believe for their unbelieving friends. We have a role to play, but it's limited. We need to play that role, but ultimately the individual has to believe. And he did, because Jesus said, in Matthew's account, so beautifully, “Jesus looks at him and says, ‘Take heart, son. Your sins are forgiven.’” Now, I find this amazing. Just freeze frame right there. Jesus has done nothing for him physically, nothing, but He's done everything for him. If He didn't heal him physically, He still would've given him a gift of infinite value. He's given him a ticket to heaven, and we know in the fullness of time, that will mean full physical healing too. We also know this: this man was a sinner. He had violated the laws of God, for we all have done that. Jesus was saying, "Take heart, son. I will pay your debt for you with my own blood. I'll pay your price for you, so take heart." That's what He was saying. The Poison of Unbelief Next in the text, we see the poison of unbelief. "Some teachers of the law were sitting there thinking to themselves, why does this fellow talk like that? He's blaspheming. Who can forgive sins but God alone?" And Jesus's enemies are constantly there from that point on. The teachers of law, some translations say scribes, they're responsible for copying the scriptures physically. They didn't have printing presses back then, all the things we have today to copy books, et cetera, so they just had to do it by hand. They also had the responsibility of teaching the word of God to the people. They, as Jesus would say, sat in Moses's seat, and so they taught the word of God. Beyond this, they made religious rulings for the people on religious matters. So they're going to be with Jesus constantly, keeping an eye on Him, a suspicious eye, because they already are finding reasons to condemn Him. They are opposed to Him, and now they feel they have one. They're so poisoned by their unbelief, they're so blinded by their unbelief, they're unable to act. Much as the paralyzed man is physically unable to act, so their unbelief poisons them, and so they accuse Jesus of blasphemy. Now, to blaspheme is to speak words against God. It's a speaking sin, blasphemy. It would be to take the name of the Lord in vain, or to say false doctrine about the Lord, something like that. It's one of the most serious sins that a Jewish person could commit. Even higher than those everyday forms of blasphemy, however, would be to arrogate to yourself deity, to claim things for yourself that only God could do. That's the blasphemy of which Jesus will be accused. That's what the high priest and the Sanhedrin are going to hang around Jesus's neck at his trial, blasphemy. That's their charge. Who can forgive sins but God alone? Now, obviously, any human being has a right, even the responsibility, to forgive sins committed by others against us, right? If someone strikes you on the right cheek, but then later comes back and says heartily, "Please forgive me," we're under obligations to say, "I forgive you." But this paralyzed man had, as far as we know, no prior connection with Jesus at all. He didn't sin directly against Jesus in that sense at all. Jesus is effectively going up to a complete stranger and saying, "All your sins of your life are forgiven." Now, at that point, what these teachers of law, these scribes were saying actually is true. Only God has the power to do that. But they never thought that Jesus actually was God in the flesh. That didn't enter their minds that it actually could be true. They were just right in that limited sense. We see the proof of Jesus' authority in verse 8, "Immediately, Jesus knew in his spirit that this is what they were thinking in their hearts, and He said to them, 'Why are you thinking these things?'" So he reads their minds. These scribes did not speak out their opposition, but Jesus could read their minds immediately. He knew what they were thinking, and He challenged their assumption. "Why are you thinking these things? Shouldn't you consider the evidence that's already overwhelming that I actually am who John the Baptist said I was, the Son of God, who God himself said I was at my baptism?" The Proof of Jesus’ Authority They don't consider it, so Jesus puts a test before them. It's an interesting test. Verse 9, "Which is easier, to say to the paralytic, 'Your sins are forgiven,' or to say, 'Get up, take your mat, and walk'?" So I took it, I'm a literalist. So I'm like, “All right, well, which is easier? How many syllables? Your sins are forgiven, rise and walk.” Look, the point is, it is really easy to say the words. The question is, is there any power behind the words? If I went into Duke Hospital where paralyzed people were being treated, and I went from room to room and said, "Rise and walk," and I'm who I am, and the outcome is what I expect. You all know what would happen, I would be arrested shortly, because nothing would be happening and I don't have that power. Only God could heal a paralyzed man like that. In the same way, if I were to go up to a total stranger, somebody I've never met, and just looked at them, read their mind and their heart, and said, "Your sins, all of them past, present and future, are forgiven," it's the same thing. I have no power. I have no authority to make that statement. Only God has that power. The issue is authority, it's power. Jesus then proves his authority, his power by the miracle. Verses 10 through 12, "But you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins. He said to the paralytic, 'I tell you, get up, take your mat, and go home.' He got up, took up his mat, and walked out in full view of them all." How beautiful is this? This stunning miracle, the greatest gift that the human race has ever received, that Jesus came from heaven to earth with this power to look on sinners like you and me and tell us our sins are forgiven. The miracle is enacted. It happens, as we've always said, effortlessly, completely, instantly. These are Jesus's healings. It's the way it always is. So the man gets up. There's no convalescence, there's no atrophied muscles that need to be built up over time, none of that. He's just healed. He picks up the mat that his four friends used to carry him in there and carries it out. This time the crowd got out of the way, I guess. It's easy to get out, hard to get in. The Reaction This miracle, it says, was done in full view of them all. Look at the reaction, verse 12, "This amazed everyone, and they praised God, saying, 'We have never seen anything like this.'" Well, that's the account. What are some lessons, spiritual lessons we can draw from this? First of all, our greatest need is the forgiveness of sins. When I was in college in campus ministry, we had a booklet that we read called, “The Tyranny of the Urgent.” It was written by Charles Hummel, and it gives us a sense of the priority structure. It says that most of the urgent things that we're after all the time really are not truly eternally significant. The things that scream and clamor for our attention are temporal. That includes the pain signals different parts of our body give to our brain. They may seem urgent and eternally significant, but they really aren't, not when compared to this issue of the forgiveness of sins. Jesus understands the true priority structure, that the health of our souls through the forgiveness of sins is infinitely more important than the health of our bodies right now, the temporal health of our bodies. Satan came after Job on this issue. You remember the second phase of Job's sufferings was sickness, and Satan said, "Now we're really going to get serious. Now, I acknowledge that he handled very well the loss of all of his property and even his children, but if You take away his health, he will curse You to your face." That's Job 2, 4, and 5. We tend to think kind of like that. In Jesus's days also, we see this kind of urgency. Nothing was more vital than the healing of the body, so people thought. You look at the attitude, the demeanor of sick people, like parents that are bringing their sick children to Jesus. They're desperate for the healing. Jairus, for example, threw himself down before Jesus and begged Him to come down before his daughter dies. The Syrophoenician woman's going to be the same way. She is absolutely focused on one thing, the healing of her daughter. The royal official in John 4 is the same way. Jesus wants to talk about, "Unless you people see signs and wonders, you'll never believe." The royal official's answer is, "Sir, come down before my child dies," absolute focused on one thing, healing, “Heal my son.” So are we. But in Jesus's priority structure, the soul's need is infinitely more significant than the body, and He's going to make this plain later in Mark 8: 36- 37. He says, "What good would it be for a man if he should gain the whole world and lose his soul? Or what could a man give in exchange for his soul?" The needs of the body are secondary to this one central issue, the salvation of our souls through the forgiveness of sins. If our bodies are perfectly healthy, but if our souls are saturated in unforgiven sin, what good is it? What would it profit us? At some point, our bodies are going to get old and we're going to die. Hebrews 9:27 says, "It is appointed to each one of us to die and after that to face judgment." What good would it be for you to be in the gym day after day, exercising, watching what you eat, you got an excellent BMI, you got all of these things going on for you, and then you die and go to hell? What good would that be? Conversely, if your sins are forgiven through faith in Christ, the present circumstances of your body are what Paul would call light and momentary issues, no matter how dire. Listen to what Paul says, 2 Corinthians 4:16-18, "Therefore we do not lose heart, though outwardly we are wasting away." You may think you’re looking pretty good today. No you're not, you're wasting away. You just don't know it yet. But outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we're being renewed day by day, "for our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, for what is seen is temporary but what is unseen is eternal." Now, this doesn't mean that sick people shouldn't seek to get well, shouldn't seek to get healthy. Jesus did many physical healings. If He didn't care about the health of the body, why would He do that? He did care. It's just a priority structure. There's an infinite gap between the one and the other. There's actually much provision for concern for the body. Jesus is going to say on judgment day, "I was hungry and you gave me something to eat. I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink. I needed clothes and you clothed me." Jesus is going to talk about actual physical ministry done to people's bodies. Or James 2:15-16, it says, "Suppose a brother, a sister is without clothes and daily food. If one of you says to him, 'Go, I wish you well, keep warm and well fed,' but does nothing for his physical needs, what good is it?" Clearly, James wants those physical needs met by faith. Faith needs to move out in that direction. Later in James 5, he says, "Is any one of you sick? He should call the elders of the church to anoint him with oil and pray over him in the name of the Lord, and the prayer offered in faith will make the sick person well. The Lord will raise him up." So no, no, it's not like we don't care about sickness, that we don't seek and pray and yearn for it. The clear priority structure is this: the needs of the soul are infinitely greater than the needs of the body. When Jesus forgave the sins of that paralyzed man, He gave him the keys to heaven itself. Forgiveness of Sins is by Faith in Christ Alone I think it's important for us as Christians to personalize this moment, find yourself as that paralyzed man, feel Jesus looking at you with a look of love on his face and saying to you, "Take heart, son, daughter, your sins are forgiven." Galatians 2:20, Paul says, "I have been crucified with Christ, and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me, and the life I now live in the body. I live by faith in the son of God who loved me and gave himself for me." Not "us." "Us" is true, but Paul didn't say that in Galatians 2:20, he said "me." We have the right to look in and see Jesus looking at us in the midst of all of our sins, and because of our faith in Him, saying, "Take heart. Your sins are forgiven. Your sins are forgiven." Now, if that's true, whatever else is going on in your life, you have reason for joy today. You have reasons for joy and for delight today. You have reasons to take heart and to be encouraged today. "Take heart" means be encouraged. This is grounds for permanent contentment, that your sins are forgiven, all of them past, present, and future. So if you're a Christian, that's true. If you're not a Christian, I just beg you to flee to Christ today while you can, because no matter how well things are going in your life, no matter how prosperous or how healthy you feel, you don't know how long you have, and the greatest issue that there could ever be is still hanging over your head. You're still under the wrath of God. So flee to Christ while you can. It's not hard. The thief on the cross, all he had to do is say, "Remember me when you come in your kingdom." To know that Jesus is a coming king and that He died for sins, that's all it takes. Find forgiveness. Find forgiveness in Christ, and that forgiveness of sins is by faith in Christ alone, that's all. The paralyzed man, what could he do? What could he do? I mean, he is not saved by works. Just like the thief on the cross, he couldn't do anything. It's just simple faith. Unlike the president with his presidential pardon, Jesus actually can forgive future sins, all of your sin, because Jesus knows better than any of us, partial forgiveness or forgiveness of 90% of your sins will not do you any good on Judgment Day. In that beautiful hymn, “It Is Well with My Soul,” it speaks of a comprehensive forgiveness. "My sin, oh, the bliss of this glorious thought. My sin, not in part but the whole, is nailed to the cross and I bear it no more. Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, O my soul. Not the part, but the whole." And so take heart, rejoice. The fundamental concept here is that Jesus has the authority to do this. In John 5, He talks about that. John 5:22-23 says, "The father judges no one, but has entrusted all judgment to the son, that all may honor the son, even as they honor the father." All authority in heaven and earth comes from almighty God, the creator of all things. All authority in heaven and earth emanates from Him, that the right to do this comes from God. And Jesus says in John 5, "The father has given to me the authority to judge." John 5:27, "The father has given Him authority to judge because He is the son of man." If He has the authority to judge, He has the authority to look at you and tell you, "Your sins are forgiven." He has that authority because He said, "All authority in heaven and earth has been given to Me." In the future, Matthew 25 says, "When the son of man comes in his glory and all the angels with Him, He will sit on his throne in heavenly glory and all the nations will be gathered before Him. And he will separate the people one from another, as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats." That's the power and authority Jesus has. He is the judge of all the earth. When He says your sins are forgiven, they are. So take heart. Take heart, rejoice. Philippians 4:4, "Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again, rejoice.” Even if you're sick, even if your body's hurting, even if you're wracked with pain, you're dying even, none of that ultimately matters if your sins are forgiven through faith in Christ. However, isn't it good news to know that part of your salvation package is the total comprehensive healing of the body? Aren't you looking forward to that? The resurrection body will be glorious. There'll be no more death, mourning, crying, or pain. Revelation 22:1-3 says, "The angels showed me the river of the water of life flowing clear as crystal from the throne of God and of the lamb down the middle of the great street of the city. And on each side of the river stood the tree of life bearing 12 crops of fruit, yielding its fruit every month. And the leaves of the tree are for the healing of the nations. No longer will there be any curse." 100% health. What about your body? Well, 1 Corinthians 15:42-44 says, "So will it be with the resurrection of the dead. The body that is sewn is perishable. It is raised imperishable. It is sown in dishonor. It is raised in glory. It is sown in weakness. It is raised in power. It is sown a natural body. It is raised a spiritual body." So your present body that you brought to church today, or that brought you, I don't know, whatever, that body, when it becomes a corpse, it will be sown in the ground. It is described perishable, dishonored, weak and natural, but the resurrection body will be imperishable. That means unable to die. It will be glorious, it will be powerful, and it will be spiritual. And in that glorious body, you'll spend all eternity. So take heart, son and daughter, your sins are forgiven. One final word before I pray. This is a phenomenal story to memorize for evangelism. It's 12 verses long. If you were to memorize this story, I have used this literally dozens of times on airplanes and other places. First of all, it's interesting. The unroofing of the roof is interesting. People are interested in the story, and it gets you quickly to what? The key issue, forgiveness of sins. You'll be able to look someone in the eye and say, "Do you know that your sins are forgiven? Do you know that Jesus actually has the power to forgive sins?" Memorize the story, or just give the gist of it. Just get it right, please, though. If you're going to go gist and not memorization, get it right. But then ask somebody, "Do you know that your sins are forgiven? Jesus has the power to do it." Close with me in prayer. Lord, thank You for this incredible account and thank You for the power of this story. We thank You for how it's true and how Jesus did this actual miracle and He actually did forgive that man's sins, and that man actually is with Jesus in paradise now. We thank You, O Lord, for the power of the gospel. I thank You for each of my brothers and sisters in Christ that are here, who have already received the gift of full forgiveness through faith in Christ. I pray for any that have been here today, who came in as yet unbelievers, who would hear and believe while there's still time, so that they might receive the gift of the forgiveness of sins. In Jesus's name, amen.

Year in the Bible
Mark Chapter 07 Verses 24-37 | Year in the Gospels Week 06b

Year in the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2022 20:11


In this episode Jay Smith, Travis Bruno, and Jimmy Doyle discuss the healing of the Syro-Phoenician woman and the deaf-mute man. 

Faith Bible Church
Genuine Faith Meets Amazing Grace (Mark 7:24-30)

Faith Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 53:40


Mark 7:24-30 (NASB) 24 Jesus got up and went away from there to the region of Tyre . And when He had entered a house, He wanted no one to know of it; yet He could not escape notice. 25 But after hearing of Him, a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit immediately came and fell at His feet. 26 Now the woman was a Gentile, of the Syrophoenician race. And she kept asking Him to cast the demon out of her daughter. 27 And He was saying to her, "Let the children be satisfied first, for it is not good to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs." 28 But she answered and said to Him, "Yes, Lord, but even the dogs under the table feed on the children's crumbs." 29 And He said to her, "Because of this answer go; the demon has gone out of your daughter." 30 And going back to her home, she found the child lying on the bed, the demon having left. Sermon Theme/Outline: Jesus is the object of faith who draws out the genuineness of faith in all who come to Him in truth. Five features of faith in Christ which illustrate what genuine trust in Him looks like. Setting the Scene (7:24) 1) The Person of Genuine Faith (7:25-26a)2) The Persistence of Genuine Faith (7:26b)3) The Testing of Genuine Faith (7:27)4) The Response of Genuine Faith (7:28)5) The Result of Genuine Faith (7:29-30)

South Franklin church of Christ
The Faith of the Syrophoenician Woman

South Franklin church of Christ

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 25:08


For Sermon Outline CLICK HERE The Faith of the Syrophoenician Woman appeared first on South Franklin church of Christ.

The Word with Dale Moore
The Word: Episode 1898 Mark 7:24-26, Matt 15:21-23

The Word with Dale Moore

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 9:55


Syrophoenician woman

Walk Boldly With Jesus
Woman, You Have Great Faith!

Walk Boldly With Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 10:06


Woman, You Have Great Faith!Mark 7:24-30 “From there he set out and went away to the region of Tyre.  He entered a house and did not want anyone to know he was there. Yet he could not escape notice,  but a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit immediately heard about him, and she came and bowed down at his feet.  Now the woman was a Gentile, of Syrophoenician origin. She begged him to cast the demon out of her daughter. He said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not fair to take the children's food and throw it to the dogs.”  But she answered him, “Sir, even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs.” Then he said to her, “For saying that, you may go—the demon has left your daughter.”  So she went home, found the child lying on the bed, and the demon gone.”When I came across this scripture a while back, I avoided it.  I avoided it because I don't think I can explain it as well as it was explained to me.  I avoided it because I think it makes Jesus sound rude and I know He is not.  Listening to it makes me confused.  I always felt like Jesus was very dismissive of this woman and that was confusing as I know that is so out of character for Him.  I have heard it explained several times now and although I'm not sure I can do it justice, I want to try as it is such a powerful verse when properly understood.  I will also put a link for an article in the show notes where is explained really well.  You can also just google meaning of Mark 7:24-30 and I am sure you will come up with some good explanations.  Jesus had just left the Jewish communities and was trying to get some rest.  He entered a Gentile community hoping no one would recognize Him.  It didn't work and a woman who had a child that was possessed saw Him.  She begged Jesus to cast the demon out of her little girl.  What happens next is the part that I was confused at.  Jesus says, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not fair to take the children's food and through it to the dogs.”  Doesn't this sound like an insult?  Doesn't it sound like Jesus is being dismissive of this woman?  I didn't understand why He would say this to her.  Aren't there other ways He could say what He wanted to say? After listening to others explain this time and time again, it is clear that without context and maybe some knowledge on the language back then, it would be hard for anyone to understand.  What Jesus was saying to this woman was not an insult, it was a parable.  He was saying to her that there is a certain order to they way things should be done.  First He came to feed His children.  He wasn't saying that He wouldn't ever help the Gentiles, he was just saying that He was feeding His people first.  What is amazing is that the woman understood what He was saying.  She didn't take offense to it.  This is something that I struggle with daily.  I take things personally and can sometimes get offended easily.  If this was me, I can see how I might have argued with Jesus.  I might have been offended at what He said, and argued that I had just as much right to healing as His people did.  Doesn't this sound like what most of us would say?  It seems we think we are entitled to whatever we want these days.  Especially if we are told we can't have it.This woman was different.  She didn't argue with Jesus, she didn't take offense and try to defend her rightful place at the table.  She wasn't claiming equality.  This is the thing that I think many of us miss.  Or at least I know I missed it.  I had heard people say that she humbled herself but I didn't quite understand what they meant.  After Jesus said that to this woman, she replied, ““Sir, even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs.” Then he said to her, “For saying that, you may go—the demon has left your daughter.”  This made no sense to me.  In Matthew 15:28 it says, “Then Jesus said to her, “Woman, you have great faith! Your request is granted.” And her daughter was healed at that moment.”  How does what she said show that she has great faith?  What did she even say?When this woman said that even the dogs under the table eat the  children's crumbs, she was showing Jesus that she understood His parable.  She was showing Him that gets it, she is not of Jewish decent.  She is not one of the chosen ones that Jesus came to heal.  And instead of arguing that she is just as worthy as they are, she owns that she is different and still asks for His help.  By saying that even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs, she is acknowledging how powerful Jesus is.  She is saying, ok, you aren't here for us and yet you have so much to give that after you feed all of your children, there will still be some left over.  So, I need mine now.  I know it's not the time but my daughter needs you now.  This is why Jesus says that she has great faith.  She not only believed that He would heal and minister to His children, but to others as well.  There is a quote from the book that the article I read was based on that I really liked.  They were talking about the assertiveness of the woman and it said, “She's not saying, “Lord, give me what I deserve on the basis of my goodness.” She's saying, “Give me what I don't deserve on the basis of your goodness—and I need it now.”  This is a quote from Timothy Keller's book Jesus The King.  The article I found it is was titled, Meaning of Mark 7:24-30 by Austin Gentry. (Click Here For Article)Wow, this is something that I think we could all spend some time thinking about.  When we ask God for things are we trying to rely on our goodness?  I know sometimes when I am praying I says things like, please God, she is such a faithful daughter, or she had done so much good and she has so much faith, and so on.  I am explaining to God why this person deserves healing.  I have read in several healing books that we don't need to do this as God knows everything about each one of us.  I don't think I ever really understood until right now that we aren't healed because of our goodness, we are healed because of His goodness.  When I pray for people sometimes I feel as though I need to do something a certain way.  Should I be kneeling?  Should I lay hands on that person?  Should I close my eyes, should I keep them open?  The Holy Spirit is slowly and gently bringing to my attention that I am making it all about me.  It doesn't matter what I do, God doesn't need me to do anything but ask.  The Lord is not healing people or answering prayers because I am doing something.  He is doing it because I asked and because of His goodness.  It's not about me. I hope that this explanation has helped you understand this verse.  I hope you will take a few minutes to read the article because it goes into so much more detail and is explained much more eloquently than I explained it.  I am so glad that I decided to try and explain this verse today as it has really opened my eyes and has me thinking differently about how I pray.  It also reminds me of God's abundance.  He is not a small God, He can do all things.  He has enough power to answer all the prayers from everyone who asks.  He is the God of all people.  He is amazing and I am so very thankful that He is my God too!Dear Heavenly Father, please bless all those listening to this episode today.  Lord, please give everyone listening a better understanding of this verse.  Please open our eyes to all the ways that we are making our prayers about us instead of you.  Open our eyes to any ways that we are trying to rely on our goodness instead of your goodness.  Lord, help us to be unoffended by you.  Help us to see what you want us to see in all that you are doing in our lives.  We love you Lord and we ask all of this in accordance with your will and in Jesus' Holy Name, Amen.Thank you so much for joining me on this journey to walk boldly with Jesus.  I look forward to spending time with you tomorrow.  Have a blessed day!

Cornerstone Brighton Sermons
The Bold Beggar

Cornerstone Brighton Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 34:43


Pastor Matt wraps up the Encountering Jesus series by looking at the story of The Syrophoenician woman from Mark chapter 7.

GBC | Sermons
Lives Changed by Jesus. | The Syrophoenician Woman - Jesus Honours Faith | Mark 7:24-30

GBC | Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 28:30


This week we learn an important lesson about the kind of faith that Jesus honours in the story of the Syrophoenician woman in Mark 7.You can also download a discipleship menu for this sermon. The menus are a selection of activities that you can engage in on your own, with a friend, or even in a small group to put this message into practice in your life. Download the menu from our website gymeabaptist.org.au under the Next Steps tab.The wonderful lesson of this passage is that Jesus honours the faith we bring. Whatever our need, whatever our belief in him might be, when we act on that Jesus meets us, inviting us to a next faithful step.Just before we go, let me invite you to join us for the Big III, a mid-week podcast where Matt, Jess, and I sit down and unpack three big questions that were raised in the sermon. I actually have Matt Willis with me today. Hey, Matt, what's one of the questions we'll be tackling in this week's episode?If that question piqued your curiosity, make sure to download and subscribe to the Big III everywhere you listen to podcasts.We'd love for you to join us for one of our services this weekend. You can join us on Friday at 10:00 am, Sunday mornings at 9:30 or 6:00. Our 9:30 am will continue to be live-streamed and we'd love for you to join us online at www.gbconline.org.au.Also, be sure to follow us on Facebook or Instagram to keep up with all we are doing. God bless.

Two Journeys Sermons
Dragonslayer (Job Sermon 27) (Audio)

Two Journeys Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021


God speaks of two mysterious beasts: the behemoth and the leviathan. He uses them to humble Job, remind him of his limits, and that he can't save himself. - Sermon Transcript - Turn your Bibles to Job 40. We continue our sermon series in the book of Job. As we do, I am mindful of a pretty spectacular moment in the history of Israel. The prophet Elisha and his servant were surrounded by an invading army sent by the king of Syria who was enraged at the prophetic gift of Elisha, and the fact that he was telling military secrets to the king of Israel, so that the king of Syria was consistently thwarted in his efforts, militarily. And the king of Syria was frustrated, and sent a whole army to capture one man who was residing in Dothan. And they went stealthily through the night, snuck up into position, did everything right militarily, surrounded the city, and they're ready to capture this one man. And as the sun rose early in the morning, Elisha's servant went out and suddenly saw the Syrian army surrounding Dothan and figured that the game was up. Terror filled his heart. And he went back to the prophet and he said, "Oh my Lord what shall we do?" And Elijah said these words, "Don't be afraid. Those who are with us are more than those who are with them." And then he prayed this prayer. "Oh Lord, open his eyes that he may see." Then the Lord opened the servant's eyes and he saw hills full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha. So I have that story in mind as I preach this sermon today because I believe that surrounding us every moment of our lives is a spiritual dimension, sometimes in scripture called the heavenly realms. This spiritual dimension cannot, ordinarily, be perceived by our five senses, though occasionally the barrier, whatever it is, between this physical world and the spiritual dimension, the spiritual realms, is occasionally torn open, such as at Jesus's baptism. That's the very word used in Mark's gospel, the heavens were torn open, and the Spirit descended on Jesus. Or again, at Stephen's martyrdom, the heavens were torn open. He saw Jesus standing at the right hand of God. So occasionally, that membrane, or that wall, that barrier is torn open, but usually not. And everything that we know about the spiritual dimensions we learn in scripture. We read words in scripture and find out these truths and believe them, so that we are aware of the spiritual realms, and that within the spiritual realms that surround us at every moment are powerful beings called angels and demons. And these angels and demons are created beings. They have great power and great influence over the unfolding events of Earth and the unfolding events of our lives. They exert an invisible but constant force on the minds and the bodies of people, so the scripture says. Now this morning, this sermon is meant to be a plea to all of us. As Elisha said, "Lord, open our eyes that we may see." I. Open Our Eyes That We May See Now the book of Job, big picture, is addressing the problem of evil and suffering in the world. We have walked through ... We're in the 40th chapter now. We've walked through, again and again, this issue, given to try to explain why it is that there is so much evil and so much suffering and destruction in this world. And specifically for us as followers of Christ, why do bad things happen to God's people? How do we understand that? And I am asserting today that the problem of evil and suffering in the world cannot be fully and rightly explained, understood, without understanding the effect of Satan and his angels called demons. So we come to Job 40 and 41, and these two animals, behemoth and leviathan. And immediately we come, as I have week after week in the book of Job, to the problem of hermeneutics, or Bible interpretation. What shall I do with these two animals? How can we rightly divide the word of truth? My desire is not just to feed you one meal, but to teach you also how to feed yourselves rightly from scripture, so that throughout the week you can read the Bible accurately and rightly for yourselves. So I try to work through that at various moments in the book of Job. And I believe that this issue of spiritual warfare, the opposition of demons and of Satan, is such a significant issue that I plan on spending two weeks on this topic. Originally, this sermon was one sermon called “Dragonslayer.” Isn't that exciting? What a great title. But then I realized the sermon was 23 pages long and getting longer. It was growing at night without me doing anything. It just kept getting longer and longer. And so I said, "All right, I've got to separate them." But separating sermons like that is like separating conjoined twins. And both of those twins have to live, so how do we do this? How do we understand? So I thought let's have two sermons on Jesus as dragonslayer. And it really makes sense because Jesus has been slaying this dragon for 2000 years. It's a long, slow death he has ordained for Satan. And he will, in some sense, instantly put his career to an end, in the future, but not yet. In the meantime, it's a long slow death, and that's pretty exciting. So we get to walk through it for two weeks. And so I have the problem of hermeneutics, of Bible interpretation, with behemoth and leviathan. Who are these mysterious beasts? And they're described only, simply, in beast like terms. So let's understand the context in the book of Job. God has been speaking to his suffering servant Job. Job has had his life shredded by wave upon wave of suffering: the loss of all of his wealth, and the loss of all of his children and then, in phase two, the loss of his health, wave upon wave, and then some ongoing debates and discussions with his friends about the problem of evil, which make up the bulk of the book of Job. And during that time, little by little, by little, more and more of Job's sin came out, emerged where he sinfully accused God of injustice and wrongdoing in his case. To humble Job, God appears and speaks to him out of a storm, a whirlwind. Job 38:2-3, "Who is this that darkens my counsel by speaking words without knowledge? Brace yourself like a man. I will question you and you shall answer me." He then exposes Job's frailty and limitations as a man by rolling out natural theology, what we can learn from God's creation. That's what he confines, that's what God confines his comments to with Job. He walks Job through overwhelming evidence of the attributes of God woven through creation. God's power in creating the universe, the foundations of the Earth, the boundaries of the sea, the clouds, the rhythm of sunrise and sunset, the patterns of weather, snow, hail, lightning, thunder, the path of the east winds, the giving of the right amount of rain and dew to satisfy the grasses on the Earth, the freezing patterns of ice, even up to the distant stars that make up the constellations, and the laws of physics that control their motions. The use of all of these inanimate objects that God made show his great power and his wisdom. And then he brings forth animate creatures, animals, 10 of them, one after the other, animals and birds that God made and controls: the lion, the raven, the mountain goat, the deer, wild donkey, wild ox, the ostrich, the horse, the hawk, and the eagle. He cites their birth, their habits, and habitats, their feeding, their marvelous attributes, the stealthy hunting at night of the lion and the lioness, the mighty strength of the ox, the freedom of the wild donkey, the speed of the ostrich, the bold courage of the horse, the flight of the hawk, the eyesight of the eagle, all of these attributes. But he keeps mixing it in with Job's limited attributes, his limitations. “Job, you are limited in time. I am not. You are limited in wisdom. I am not. You are limited in power. I am not. So how then, Job, can you think to question me? How can you think to challenge me? How can you question my justice?” And by the time this work of natural theology spoken by the Creator of it all is done, Job is humbled. And he says in Job 40:3-5, “Job answered the Lord, ‘I am unworthy. How can I reply to you? I put my hand over my mouth. I spoke once, but I have no answer. Twice, but I will say no more.’” But God, as I said last week, didn't feel that the work was done. Still more humbling work to do. He doesn’t- God doesn't deal lightly with the corruption of his children. And so he probes deep and deeper, even deeper still. And basically just says the same thing again, we've got more to say, verse 6-7, "Brace yourself like a man. I will question you and you shall answer me." We saw last time that God addresses at that part of Job 40, the fundamental disrespect of Job toward God is fundamental unbelief, charging God with injustice. Verse 8, "Would you discredit my justice? Would you condemn me to justify yourself?" Now this is the very thing we must not do when we're suffering afflictions, and that is see God as the enemy. God is not accountable to us. He doesn't owe us any explanation. He's infinitely above the entire human race, and he knows exactly what he's doing. Job is not God. He has no splendor of his own. He has no glory radiating from his being, and he has no mighty voice. Verse 9-10, "Do you [Job] have an arm like God's? Can your voice thunder like his? Then adorn yourself with glory and splendor, and clothe yourself in honor and majesty.” “And restrain the evil doers of the earth. And if you can do all of that, then I will admit, myself, I will admit to you: that your own right hand can save you." So that's exactly where we're at in the Book of Job. So, Job, you're limited in time, limited in knowledge, limited in power, and you cannot save yourself. That's exactly the point we're at in Job. We suffering human beings cannot save ourselves. But from what? Who's the adversary, what's the adversary? How do we understand that adversary? Now we've got these two beasts that come in, behemoth and leviathan. God wants Job to know that his own right hand cannot save himself, and then implies we've got two enemies to talk about, because, unlike the 10 animals, he puts Job in an adversarial relationship with these two animals, behemoth and leviathan. Can you fight them? Can you overcome them? He doesn't do that with the other 10 animals. And basically, the concept you cannot save yourself is, in my mind, expanded to these phrases. With these two beasts, you cannot control them, you cannot capture them, and you cannot kill them. But I can control them, I can capture them, and I can kill them. So that's the simple way of looking at these two beasts. Now, again, with Bible interpretation, we can simply just take them as animals, just two more animals. Should we do that? Should we just take them as literal predators that are just too hard for human beings to conquer, but God has no problem dealing with them? And so the argument, then, is just how then can you challenge God, such a mighty God? He's greater than they are. So if you can't handle them, you certainly can't handle God. And so you got 10 animals, and then Job's repentance, and then you got two more animals, possibly. Some Christian scholars do that. It is safe in one respect. You're just taking the words at face value. Two mighty animals you cannot control, you cannot capture, you cannot kill. God can, so be humble before God. Don't question God. Repent before God. If you can't deal with them, you can't deal with me. That's it. And that fits if you look at chapter 41, the next chapter, verse 10 and 11 in the middle of the leviathan section he basically does this. He says, “No one is fierce enough to rouse leviathan. Who then is able to stand against me? Who has a claim against me that I must pay? Everything under heaven belongs to me.” So that's a simple way of understanding these two animals. How much more argument? If you can't handle these animals, then you certainly can't handle their Creator. And then, what you would do is try your best to identify these animals, which almost certainly all of your Bibles have done in the footnotes. What do you have in your footnotes? “Pastor, we have hippopotamus and crocodile.” Is that what you have? I don't know. Maybe you have a study Bible with more options. I don't know. What are they? But I can tell you right now, no matter what you choose, absolute certainty on the literal interpretation will elude you. We don't know for sure. We don't know what the ... But the point is straightforward. God is mightier than they are, so humble yourself before God. And at that point I could just pray, and we would be done with the sermon. You've heard it. All right. There's nothing more to say. But I personally do not find this satisfying. Seems like a letdown at the end of all these chapters. Ten animals, and now two more animals. I feel like that point's already been made. Job's already repented. And now we're going to circle back with two more animals and make the same point again. But I think the problem of evil and human suffering is far deeper and greater than that. And I think God wants to help us. God wants to give us some answers. And another issue that is openly brought up at the beginning of the book is never addressed again, and that is the role of Satan in human suffering. It's openly brought up for the first two chapters. Satan's one of the main dominant characters in Job 1-2. And then he drops off the account entirely. He's just never mentioned again. So you can go back and look, or just listen, Job 1:6-12, right at the beginning of the book, "One day, the angels came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan also came with them. The Lord said to Satan, 'where have you come from?' Satan answered the Lord, 'From roaming through the Earth and going back and forth in it.' Then the Lord said to Satan, 'Have you considered my servant Job? There is no one on Earth like him. He is blameless and upright. A man who fears God and shuns evil.' 'Does Job fear God for nothing?' Satan replied, 'Have you not put a hedge around him, and his household, and everything he has? You've blessed the work of his hands so that his flocks and his herds spread through the land. But stretch out your hand and strike everything he has, and he will surely curse you to your face.' The Lord said to Satan, 'Very well, then. Everything he has is in your hands.'" It's a key statement, isn't it? "'But on the man himself, do not lay a finger.' Then Satan went out from the presence of the Lord." Then, as the narrative continues in Job 1, the loss of Job's oxen, donkeys, sheep, camels, and even his 10 children, immediately follows Satan going out from the presence of the Lord when God says, “Everything he has is in your hands.” And then look what happens. Satan's direct activity in the rest of Job 1 isn't mentioned. He's not there in the rest of Job 1. But it's just so openly implied that all of those things that happen, happen because of Satan. Then in phase two Satan comes back and God directly ascribes the suffering in Job's life to Satan's accusations and activity. Some might argue Satan was not mentioned, therefore not really involved. If you read the account, it was the Sabeans that took Job's oxen and donkeys, the fire of God, whatever that means, fell from the sky and burned his sheep and his servants. The Caldeans came in and stole his camels. And a mighty wind from the desert destroyed Job's children. But just the way Job 1 reads, Satan's behind all of that, all of it. And then in chapter 2:1-6 it says, "On another day, the angels came to present themselves before the Lord. And Satan also came with them to present himself before him. And the Lord said to Satan, 'Where have you come from?' Satan answered the Lord, 'From roaming through the Earth and going back and forth in it.' Then the Lord said to Satan, 'Have you considered my servant Job? There is no one on Earth like him. He is blameless and upright, a man who fears God and shuns evil. And he still maintains his integrity, though you incited me against him to ruin him without any reason.’ ‘Skin for skin,’ Satan replied. 'A man will give all he has for his own life, but stretch out your hand and strike his flesh and his bones, he will surely curse you to your face.' The Lord said to Satan, 'Very well, then. He is in your hands. But you must spare his life.'" And this time there can be no doubt because it openly says in Job 2:7, "So Satan went out from the presence of the Lord and afflicted Job with painful sores from the souls of his feet to the top of his head." Satan's activity and disease is a deep mystery, isn't it? We'll find out in heaven how active he was in crafting viruses to cause trouble. There's an intelligence behind it. But on that, I'm not going to go any further. It just openly says in Job 2:7 that Job's afflictions, physical afflictions, were directly worked by Satan. It is reasonable, therefore, I think, to see all of the calamities that came on Job as mediated to him directly by Satan. And I think, therefore, any explanation of evil in the world must address the activities of Satan. Yet, Satan's not mentioned again in the book of Job. He never comes up in the debates between Job and his friends. Elihu never mentioned Satan. God never openly mentioned Satan in all of his statements here at the end of the book. But it may well be that behemoth and leviathan represent the demons and the devil, though hidden behind the forms of beasts. Satan appeared first in the Bible as a serpent in the Garden of Eden, so this isn't at all far fetched. And even Peter in I Peter 5 says, "Be self-controlled and alert. Your enemy the devil prowls around like [what?] a roaring lion seeking someone to devour.” He's like an animal. So if behemoth and leviathan represent Satan and demons, then to some degree, I feel that the book of Job has come now full circle. And we're going to come around to, to some degree, the real enemies of the human race. God is saying to the human race, “Evil and suffering in the world is directly worked by the devil and his demons. They use wicked men as their puppets, but they control this evil world. And behemoth, representing demons, and leviathan, representing Satan, are vastly more powerful than you are. You cannot control them. You cannot capture them. You cannot kill them. But I can.” And in the end he will. And that is a consolation to us in the midst of our suffering. So in that sense, it's satisfying. And beyond that, God will continue in a very powerful, wise, infinitely deep way to channel, and control, and block, and reign in, and use demons and Satan to do things in every generation, literally, I would say every day, in ways that we will discover, I think, in the next world. But in the meantime, we just know general principles that God puts hedges of protection, and leashes, and does all of these things to advance his own purposes. So, I am 100% biblically certain that Satan and demons are directly involved in human suffering every single day. I am not so certain that behemoth and leviathan are talking about that at all. So if you are a let's stick to the animals person, you've heard your sermon. For the rest of you, I'm going to go on and say we're going to talk about behemoth as representing demons, and leviathan as representing Satan. II. Leviathan Representing Satan: Job 41 And in taking this symbolic approach, leviathan, I believe, is the key, just in the book of Job. You have to jump ahead to leviathan, though; I'm not going to walk through the leviathan versus today, but next week. He's the key because he shows up in Psalms and he shows up in Isaiah, and especially Isaiah 27:1 is important for me. He, leviathan, is mentioned in Isaiah as an enemy whom God will slay in the future. Isaiah 27:1, "In that day, the Lord will punish with sword his fierce, great, and powerful sword, leviathan the gliding serpent, leviathan the coiling serpent. He will slay the monster of the sea." a direct enemy of God, who God will slay with his sword, his fierce, great, and powerful sword. What a great verse. John Calvin, in commenting on Isaiah 27:1, wrote this. "The word Leviathan is variously interpreted. But in general, it simply denotes either a large serpent, or whale, or sea fishes, which approach the character of monsters on account of their huge size. For my part, I have no doubt that he speaks allegorically of Satan and his whole kingdom, describing him under the figure of some monstrous animal." Calvin hated speculation. That's not the kind of interpreter he was. He's just saying, to me, it's patently obvious in Isaiah 27:1 that leviathan represents Satan. So it seems to me, best to do the same with Job 41. Leviathan represents Satan, the monster whose wickedness is devastating the whole Earth. It's made even stronger when you read Job 41 and the descriptions of leviathan and he seems like a fire-breathing dragon, especially verses 14-17. He says, "Who dares open the doors of his mouth, ringed about with his fearsome teeth. His back has rows of shields tightly sealed together. Each is so close together that no air can pass between. They're joined fast to one another. They cling to together and cannot be parted." And then fire breathing stuff in verses 18-21. "His snorting throws out flashes of light. His eyes are like the rays of dawn. Firebrands stream from his mouth. Sparks of fire shoot out. Smoke pours from his nostrils as from a boiling pot over a fire of reeds. His breath sets coals ablaze, and flames dart from his mouth." Now it's interesting. Many cultures have depictions of dragons, fire breathing dragons, that are very similar. The artistic renditions are very similar to one another, though the countries are thousands of miles apart, like the British Isles and China. And they have similar depictions of dragons. I find that interesting. Ken Ham, in his Answers to Genesis, has done a lot of research on dragon legends, and they have a whole wing of dragons in their creation museum. And so creationists will point to Job 40 and 41 as evidence of aspects of creation as over against evolution. However valuable those insights are, for me, I just am not going to pursue that. I think it's probably true that there were creatures like that, and that's where this analogy comes from. But I think it's better to see the dragon here as Satan. And to me, the clincher is Revelation 12, where Satan is clearly presented as a dragon. Revelation 12:3, it says, "Then another sign appeared in heaven. An enormous red dragon with seven heads, and 10 horns, and seven crowns on his head." And then clearly Revelation 12:9, "The great dragon was hurled down, that ancient serpent called the devil or Satan, who leads the whole world astray. He was hurled to the Earth, and his angels with him." And so, Satan is clearly portrayed in Revelation 12 as a dragon. And then also, in Daniel 7, we have four great beasts that come up out of the turbulent sea, each of them representing a human empire. So the empire of Babylon, Neo-Persia, Greece, and Rome depicted as success of four beasts coming up out of the sea. And so then again in Revelation 13, the final single world ruler called Antichrist in 1 John 2, the man of sin in 2 Thessalonians, to this single world conquering ruler is the beast from the sea, same image as Daniel 7. So all of this representational language of evil and of Satan makes sense to me. III. Behemoth Representing Demons So now let's zero in on behemoth, and then, God willing, next week will look more at leviathan. Behemoth- and I believe behemoth, in this pattern then, would represent demons. Why would I say that? Well, because the Hebrew word means beast, like a beast of the field, like any four footed creature. It's frequently used of cows, but the plural is used here. The O-T-H ending, oth, is a Hebrew plural, behemoth, like beasts. But he's treated in the text as a singular. So it's kind of odd. You've got this plural singular that behaves cohesively in a certain way. The word behemoth is just inevitably brought over as such into the English translations. They don't translate it saying beasts, but it's just behemoth. But it's a plural word. It's interesting. The plural sets us up well to see behemoth as representing demons collectively. Now, who are the demons? Revelation 12 tells us that when the dragon was hurled to the Earth, his tail swept a third of the stars and flung them to the Earth. And this represents angels that joined Satan in this heavenly rebellion against the throne of God. One third of them fell into wickedness, and they are the devil's angels, or we also say demons. It's good to know that more ... there are more on our side than on their side. Praise God. Two thirds, isn't that encouraging? Of course, none of that matters. God is on our side. Amen? If God is for us, who can be against us? Even if he had all the angels, we would still win because of omnipotence. Then Matthew 25, and the sheep and the goats, he says to the wicked who rebels and who never believed in Christ, “Depart from me, you who are cursed into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels." So those are demons. And that's the ultimate end of Satan and of demons, the lake of fire. In Mark 5, when Jesus interacted with the Demoniac of the Gadarenes, the demons, many of them spoke collectively as one entity, and named themselves Legion, for we are many, so behemoth then, a plural word representing many demons acting collectively as one evil force in the world. Now, what does he say about behemoth? Well, he starts in many translations with the word behold, or even more urgently, behold now behemoth. It's like he's unveiling behemoth. I want you to see behemoth. Behold him now. Look at him. Behemoth is hidden from our eyes. We don't see him. But I want to unveil him. I want you to look at him. And then he says, "I made him along with you." So God created every creature that exists. As the Creator, he also sustains every creature that exists. Nothing in the universe has existence apart from the will of God. God continues to will the existence of the devil and his angels. At every moment, he sustains them. If God chose, he could speak them out of existence instantly. They would cease to exist. Of course, that begs a question. Why doesn't he do that? I'll address that briefly at the end of this sermon, and more next week at any rate. Then he says behemoth eats grass like an ox. Well, we know that a beast of the field would do this. So if we're just dealing with a beast, that's what they do. He likes grass. But in a more of an allegorical, or interpretive, or a parable type of ... How do demons eat grass? What is that? Perhaps, I don't know, but that's the whole thing with parables, it's hard to know what every line represents. But it perhaps represents the frailty and mortality of human beings. Because it says in Isaiah 40:6-7, "All men are like grass, and all their glory is like the flowers of the field. The grass withers and the flowers fall." That's speaking of people dying. They die like grass. And I believe that demons are executioners or killers. Satan is a murderer from the beginning. He hates human beings. And so do demons. They don't have any allegiance to any group of human beings. They hate them all. So they're executioners. Remember that God has to tell Satan not to kill Job. He has that power. He has the power to kill. The next statements all speak to the overwhelming power of behemoth. This beast is very strong, much stronger than human power. Look at verses 16-18. "What strength he has in his loins, what power in the muscles of his belly. His tail sways like a cedar. The sinews of his thighs are close knit. His bones or tubes of bronze, his limbs like rods of iron." Well, just speaking of demons, they are vastly more powerful than we are. Vastly more powerful. If you look at the account of the Demoniac of the Gadarenes, it says of him in Mark 5:4, "He had often been chained hand and foot, but he tore the chains apart and broke the irons from his feet. No one was strong enough to subdue him." He was just physically powerful. Remember how God sent a single angel to move the stone from in front of Jesus' tomb. Remember how the women were worried? Who's going to move the stone. Oh, send an angel to take care of it. He just picks up the stone and moves it, and puts it down somewhere. Just no problem for him. So demons are strong, very strong. And then his rank in creation, verse 19, "He ranks first among the works of God." Interesting statement. If it's just an animal, I don't really understand that. Why would a hippopotamus rank first among the creations of God? But in this case, if demons really are ... if we're really talking about fallen angels here, I would think chronologically they may well have been the first things he ever made. The first things he made were spirit beings who then watched him make everything else and celebrated. As it says in Job 38:7, "While all the morning stars sang together and all the angels," or sons of God there, but clearly angels, "shouted for joy." And so originally, they were created good, powerful, glorious, beautiful beings. So they're very, very powerful. Yet God, the creator, retains full power over behemoth to kill him anytime he chooses. Verse 19, "Yet his Maker can approach him with his sword." That's an interesting statement if we're talking about just an animal. He's saying, "You," effectively, "You can't kill him, but I can. I can do it easily." “His Maker can approach him with his sword.” So it's very obvious that while demons are vastly more powerful than humans, God is infinitely more powerful than they are. So let's just keep it simple in terms of the hierarchy. We are, effectively, we are powerless. Demons have much power. God has all power. So that's what we're dealing with here in the problem of suffering and evil. And that is our great hope. Behemoth, representing demons, exists continually under the threat of that fierce, great, and powerful sword with which God is going to kill Leviathan, Isaiah 27:1. So the- Satan and his angels are afraid of God. They're afraid of his judgment, his fierce, great, and powerful sword. And it will be Jesus, at his second coming, who is depicted in Revelation 19 as having a sword coming out of his mouth, also in Revelation 1. There's no literal sword coming out of Jesus' mouth. His word is his weapon. If he says, "Be dead," you're dead, because he's God. And so the demons were terrified of Jesus during his time on Earth. They were clearly afraid of him. And he had zero fear of them at all. There was no doubt in Jesus' mind who has the upper hand in these encounters. First one, in Mark's gospel, Mark, 1:23-24 Jesus is at the synagogue in Capernaum, and suddenly a man with an evil spirit cried out, "What do you want with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are, the holy one of God." Well, who's afraid of who there? They are afraid that Jesus has come to destroy them, and they know he can do it. And then in verse 20, the whole world pays homage to the behemoth: “The hills bring him their produce, and all the wild animals play nearby.” Satan runs the world, and the demons run it with him. And just as Satan wanted Jesus to fall down and worship him, so the demons thrive on worship, the worship given by men. All false religions in the world are demonic. All of them, they're essentially demonic. So demons are god and goddess impersonators. They get behind the false ideas, and they make them supernaturally come alive so that people worship. And so Paul says in I Corinthians 10:20, "The sacrifices of pagans are offered to demons." Thus, the unbelievers of the world are feeding the demons, feeding their demonic egos by this kind of worship. Remember, Satan wanted Jesus to fall down and worship him. The demons are like that. And so the world brings the harvest, the produce, to the behemoth. Behemoth also is portrayed as concealed. Look at verse 21:22, "Under the lotus plants, he lies hidden among the reeds in the marsh. The lotuses conceal him in their shadow, the poplars by the stream surround him." So this is beast like for you literalists. It's like yeah, it's the hippo. He's in the river. You can barely ... You just see his eyes and his nostrils moving through the water like that. He's in the reeds. Okay? But for the spiritual interpretation, saying that demons are hidden from us. We can't see what they do. They're invisible. And they do their attacking from the shadows. And so we have to be told by the apostle Paul in Ephesians 6:12, “Our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities against the powers,” plural, plural, plural, rulers, authorities, powers, “of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.” That's what's opposing us. So these demons do their destructive work in the heavenly realms, concealed from our eyes. They lurk in the shadows and suddenly rise up to attack. And they have no fear of man, none. Verse 23-24, "When the river rages, he is not alarmed. He is secure, though the Jordan should surge against his mouth." Verse 24, "Can anyone capture him by the eyes or trap him and pierce him through the nose?" So that's why I say you can't control them: you can't capture them, you can't kill them. And so that adversarial sense between Job and behemoth is set up. It's even stronger, that adversarial sense, even stronger with leviathan, as we'll see, God willing, next week. IV. Christ the Dragonslayer We're powerless against behemoth. We can't control him. We can't capture him. We can't kill him. And so, like I said, we're going to walk through leviathan next time, but we need a dragonslayer, don't we? Amen? We need a dragonslayer. And that dragonslayer is Jesus Christ. Christ is the dragonslayer. He was predicted in Genesis 3:15 as the one who had crushed the serpent's head, the serpent, Satan in disguise. So God spoke to the serpent and judged the serpent in serpent-like words, “You're going to crawl on the ground on your belly and eat dust.” But we know he's talking to Satan behind the serpent. And so in Genesis 3:15, he says, "I'll put enmity between you and the woman and in between your offspring and hers. He will crush your head and you will strike his heel." That happened at the cross. Jesus died, physically died, to crush the serpent's head. "Christ is the dragonslayer. He was predicted in Genesis 3:15 as the one who had crushed the serpent's head, the serpent, Satan in disguise. " Now, Christ the dragonslayer could not be slain when he was born. Revelation 12, "The dragon stood in front of the woman who was about to give birth so that he might devour her child the moment it was born. She gave birth to a son, a male child who will rule all the nations with an iron scepter." That's Jesus. "And her child was snatched up to God into his throne." So the dragon was ready to devour Jesus the moment that he was born. Read about it in Matthew 2, where King Herod sent soldiers to kill all the boy babies in Bethlehem and its vicinity who were two years old and under, in accordance with the time he had learned from the magi, but they couldn't get him. They killed a lot of babies, but they didn't kill Jesus because Jesus escaped. And then when he began his public ministry, Christ the dragonslayer moved out to destroy Satan's kingdom. God anointed him with the Holy Spirit and with power. And in the power of the Spirit, Jesus drove out demons effortlessly. So again, the Demoniac of the Gadarenes, Mark 5:7, "What do you want with me, Jesus, son of the most high God? Swear to God that you won't torture me." Who's afraid of whom there? 6,000 maybe demons in one man, and who's afraid of whom? “Please don't torture me before the appointed time.” And they begged permission to go into the pigs, and he granted them permission. And that concept of begging permission and permission granted is essential to my understanding of God's sovereign control over this whole thing. So he is absolutely in charge of behemoth. Syrophoenician woman comes with a demon-possessed daughter. She's not even there. She's back home lying in bed, demon possessed. And Jesus said, "First let the children eat all they want. It's not right to take the children's bread and toss it to their dogs." "Yes, Lord," she said. "But even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs." Then he told her, "For such a reply, you may go. The demon is gone. The demon has left your daughter." Like that. Didn't speak any words. He didn't go to the house. He didn't lay hands on her. How did it happen? What was the modality? What was the effective force that made the demon leave the daughter? He just thought it. And the Father sent forth the power of the Spirit. The demon was evicted immediately. Not given a 30 day notice here. He's out. Effortless power. And Jesus spoke about his power over the demons. "If I drive out demons by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God has come upon you." Or again, “How can anyone enter strong man's house and carry off his possessions unless he first ties up the strong man? Then he can rob his house.” So we cannot control them. We cannot capture them. We cannot kill them. But Jesus effortlessly can do whatever he wants with him. And when he wants to plunder Satan's house, he just ties him up and plunders the house. You know what the plunderer is? It's us, dear friends. We were in Satan's dark kingdom. We were rescued, Colossians, from the kingdom of darkness, and we were brought into the kingdom of the beloved Son. And so, if you came here today in an un-converted state, the Bible says that you're Satan's possession, you're in Satan's house. Jesus is more powerful than Satan. He can set you free. He can set you free. The chains, the invisible chains that have been around your soul can just drop off by simple hearing of God's word and believing. And the centerpiece of this gospel is Jesus' death on the cross, to some degree under Satan's power, because Judas betrayed him, and Satan was inside Judas. And Jesus gave himself over to that and didn't fight it, and just went like a lamb to the slaughter. But in his death, Hebrews 2:14 says, "By his death, he destroyed him who holds the power of death- that is the devil- and freed those who all their lives were held in slavery by their fear of death." So maybe you came here today knowing you're a sinner and afraid to die. Well, you should be afraid to die if you're outside of Christ. You should be afraid. But if you come to Christ, you don't need a fear of death anymore. Death will be a doorway into heaven. You'll spend eternity looking at the glory of God. That's what Jesus did. He crushed Satan at the cross by his death. "Jesus is more powerful than Satan. He can set you free. ...The invisible chains that have been around your soul can just drop off by simple hearing of God's word and believing. " And then he gave us the power of the Holy Spirit and the ministry of gospel, the ministry of reconciliation, and told us to go out gradually, 20 centuries of destroying Satan's kingdom. “I will build my church and the gates of hell will not prevail against it.” And so we go forward in the power of the Holy Spirit, and little by little, by little, a long, slow death for Satan's kingdom, a torturously long slow death, because in every generation there are God's people to be rescued. And so it says in Revelation 12:11, concerning the people of God, "They overcame him by the blood of the Lamb and by the word of their testimony. They did not love their lives so much as to shrink from death." And in the end, he will kill Satan for all eternity. And the demons. It says in Revelation 20:10, "The devil who deceived them was thrown into the lake of burning sulfur where the beast and the false prophet had been thrown. And they will be tormented day and night, forever and ever." That is the death of leviathan. V. God’s Goodness in Controlling, Using, and Conquering Evil All right. So as we bring this to conclusion, God willing to look at it again next week, look at God's goodness in controlling, using, and conquering evil. The big picture topic in the book of Job is the issue of suffering and evil in the world. The book of Job, I think, makes it plain from the beginning. And here, I think again at the end, that Satan and demons have a huge role in that. Any theology of evil and suffering that does not deal with that, with Satan and demons, is defective, inadequate. In Job 40 and 41, we've revealed the power of two great beasts, behemoth-representing demons, leviathan- representing Satan. These beasts are too powerful for human beings. But God has them on a leash. To some degree, he uses language like, "They are my pets." He uses them every day for his own purposes. And in the end, he will kill them for eternity. In the meantime, we need to understand how wise and good it is for God to keep them going, to keep them alive. It must be, because he does it, and he could effortlessly speak them out of existence if he didn't want to. But God wants to use them. We may say, "Why? Why not kill them now?" Why does he give the legion of demons permission to go into the pigs? Why doesn't he just kill them? Because he's going to use them. And he is using them. "God uses Satan and the demons as foils, creating a context for him to display his power, his wisdom, and his love. And every single day, God uses evil to bring about good. " Augustine said, "God judged it better to bring good out of evil than not to permit any evil to exist." And so God uses Satan and the demons as foils, creating a context for him to display his power, his wisdom, and his love. And every single day, God uses evil to bring about good. The clearest example of this is the death of his own dear Son, the most singularly evil thing that has ever happened in history. Look at the river of good that's come from it. And so, also the evil of pain, and suffering, and natural disasters, and wars, and all of that create context for us, the servants of God, to show valor, to show self denying love, to lay down our lives for others. That is context for glory that God displays in our lives by enabling us to do courageous, good works. You won't need any courage in heaven, friends. No courage needed in heaven. You won't be sacrificing anything in heaven. Time for that is now. This is the time for courage. This is the time for valor. This is the time for self denial. The time to lay down your life, the time for sacrifice. That's what we're called to do. And behind all of that, are the devil and his angels. And God is controlling them for his own glory. Close with me in prayer. Father, thank you for the time we've had to look today at Isaiah ... or at Job 40, 41, behemoth and leviathan. Lord, give us courage, give us courage. Help us, oh Lord, to not be afraid of what the devil and his angels are doing, but know that you have put us, all of us, behind a beautiful hedge of protection, and that Satan can't tempt us beyond what we can bear, that we can stand firm in the time of temptation. Give us courage to witness to people who are lost and in invisible chains so they can be set free. In Jesus' name. Amen.