Podcasts about holies

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Best podcasts about holies

Latest podcast episodes about holies

Northpark Community Church
EXODUS Week 6: A Am Yahewh - I Am Merciful | Reverend Jim Rossi | October 10, 2021 - Audio

Northpark Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 95:10


The building of the tabernacle included special instructions to the Israelites about the 'Holy of Holies' that included the Ark of the Covenant and the Mercy Seat. How do these things apply to us today? Worship Song: Great Things Worship Song: Raise A Hallelujah Host Moment, Pastor Bob Willis Worship Song: Goodness of God Choir Special: My Hallelujah (The Stand) Baptism Intro Video Baptism - Mackenzie, Tyler, Greg Talk Part 1, Reverend Jim Rossi Worship Song: Build My Life Talk Part 2, Reverend Jim Rossi Worship Song: Champion Get more information, sign up for email updates, send prayer requests, give online and stay connected with us at: www.NorthparkChurch.org

Northpark Community Church
EXODUS Week 6: A Am Yahewh - I Am Merciful | Reverend Jim Rossi | October 10, 2021 - Video

Northpark Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 95:10


The building of the tabernacle included special instructions to the Israelites about the 'Holy of Holies' that included the Ark of the Covenant and the Mercy Seat. How do these things apply to us today? Worship Song: Great Things Worship Song: Raise A Hallelujah Host Moment, Pastor Bob Willis Worship Song: Goodness of God Choir Special: My Hallelujah (The Stand) Baptism Intro Video Baptism - Mackenzie, Tyler, Greg Talk Part 1, Reverend Jim Rossi Worship Song: Build My Life Talk Part 2, Reverend Jim Rossi Worship Song: Champion Get more information, sign up for email updates, send prayer requests, give online and stay connected with us at: www.NorthparkChurch.org

Harbor Rock Tabernacle
Episode 583: Opening Up The Veil

Harbor Rock Tabernacle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 48:24


It's easy to compartmentalize prayer into requests for help and what we need, or interceding for someone. But there is much more--the gift of being able to abide in God's presence. For the Jewish audience in Hebrews, that was an unfamiliar concept, because the Holy of Holies had only been accessible to the High Priest once a year on the Day of Atonement. But Jesus changed that, opening up the veil to the throne of grace, to anyone who trusts in Him. He then invites His children to come in confidently and boldly. As we consistently abide in His presence, humbly overwhelmed by His glory and grateful for HIs mercy, He will shield and strengthen us.

Harvest Community Church (PCA) in Omaha, NE
“The Blood of the Covenant” – Hebrews 9:15-28

Harvest Community Church (PCA) in Omaha, NE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021


If you have bibles with you, I invite you to open them up with me to Hebrews 9:15-28. Hear now the word of the Lord. 15 Therefore he is the mediator of a new covenant, so that those who are called may receive the promised eternal inheritance, since a death has occurred that redeems them from the transgressions committed under the first covenant. 16 For where a will is involved, the death of the one who made it must be established. 17 For a will takes effect only at death, since it is not in force as long as the one who made it is alive. 18 Therefore not even the first covenant was inaugurated without blood. 19 For when every commandment of the law had been declared by Moses to all the people, he took the blood of calves and goats, with water and scarlet wool and hyssop, and sprinkled both the book itself and all the people, 20 saying, “This is the blood of the covenant that God commanded for you.” 21 And in the same way he sprinkled with the blood both the tent and all the vessels used in worship. 22 Indeed, under the law almost everything is purified with blood, and without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins. 23 Thus it was necessary for the copies of the heavenly things to be purified with these rites, but the heavenly things themselves with better sacrifices than these. 24 For Christ has entered, not into holy places made with hands, which are copies of the true things, but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God on our behalf. 25 Nor was it to offer himself repeatedly, as the high priest enters the holy places every year with blood not his own, 26 for then he would have had to suffer repeatedly since the foundation of the world. But as it is, he has appeared once for all at the end of the ages to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself. 27 And just as it is appointed for man to die once, and after that comes judgment, 28 so Christ, having been offered once to bear the sins of many, will appear a second time, not to deal with sin but to save those who are eagerly waiting for him. Hebrews 9:15-28, ESV One of the most precious doctrines, doctrines are referring to theological teachings that the church confesses, a theological teaching that we as Harvest Community profess, that Christians have professed for two thousand years, is a doctrine known as the penal substitutionary view of the atonement. Now you haven't heard that term before, you may assume that lies on the periphery of important Christian doctrine. In fact, the so-called penal substitutionary review of the atonement is no different doctrine of Christianity. In fact, it's the doctrine that lies at the heart of the gospel. So the basic question what are we saying when we refer happily the penal substitutionary view of the atonement? To affirm this doctrine, to break down the phraseology of it, is to say something very specific about the nature of Christ. In the particular it is to claim that when Christ died on the cross 2000 years ago, he first of all voluntarily died in our place. Hence, the word substitution. Then to pay the penalty for our sin by satisfying God's righteous requirements against sinners, hence penal, so that God's sinful people, you and I, could have peace and fellowship with God, hence, atonement. Now understand that this doctrine is predicated on a few assumptions. It's predicated on the assumption that we, as sinners who have rebelled against the holy God of the universe, deserve nothing less than the eternal wrath of God. When Christ entered into human history, he willingly took our place. He died in our place so that the punishment we rightly deserve for our sin was instead poured out to Jesus for all those who trusted him for salvation. This is indispensable. It's a thoroughly biblical doctrine, and we have to confess with every other Bible believing church. Yet, in some quarters over the last few decades, this doctrine of penal substitutionary atonement has sadly come under duress. Not because it's not a biblical doctrine. Again, it's a thorough biblical doctrine, but because it sounds far too harsh for many in our sanitized Western Conference. One theologian about 20 years ago or so who sadly rejects this doctrine, has characterized penal substitution as a teaching rooted in violence that imagines the cross as a form of cosmic child abuse, with the Father pouring out his wrath on the Son. Now there are a legion of problems with that kind of characterization, but the fact of the matter is that this very biblical doctrine that we know as penal substitutionary atonement assumes both a certain view of God, God's character, and a certain view of human sin and humanity, which is simply unpalatable to many people in our western context. You see, when we turn to the Bible, whether we're talking about the Old Testament or the New Testament, one thing we find all over the place is that the shedding of blood is really important and it's really pervasive. Now we could turn to Leviticus, for example, and read all about the various animals that had to be slaughtered. We could turn to Leviticus and read all about all of the various sacrifices that had to be offered, all the animals that had to be slaughtered, and all the blood that had to be poured out at the altar. Or on the other side of the Bible we could turn to Revelation and read about how, after the great harvest of the Earth, a veritable sea of blood as high as a horse's bridle that comprise an area of one hundred and eighty four square miles filled the earth. Now these ideas of sacrifice and the shedding of blood, the pinnacle of which is Christ penal substitutionary death on the cross are frankly a bit difficult for many in our modern world to accept even professing Christians. Yet, even if you rightly profess the doctrine of penal substitutionary atonement as biblical and necessary, which it most certainly is, perhaps all of this imagery of blood and sacrifice in the Bible raises the question for you. Why? Why was it necessary for blood to be spilled in a sacrificial system of the Old Testament? Ultimately, why was it necessary for Christ to die? After all, God is God, and if you wanted to forgive sin, why couldn't he just snap his fingers and forgive our sin? Why does God's wrath need to be satisfied, and why does all of this blood have to be shed? Well, fortunately, our passage this morning addresses many of these questions, and for all of the weedy details that we have to work through, its main point couldn't be simpler. That is Christ Jesus had to die. And that's our big idea this morning, Christ had to die. As we work through a passage, we're going to home in on three specific reasons for why Christ had to die. Now again, we might imagine if we were to answer this question in a vacuum, why did Christ have to die? A number of reasons we could give, but just sticking to the text. What we find are three specific reasons given to us in Hebrews by the author in this text for why Christ had to die. 1. Christ had to Die so that We Could Receive 2. Christ had to Die in Order to Represent Us in Heaven 3. Christ had to Die so that He Could Return Christ had to Die so that We Could Receive So first, Christ had to die so that we could receive. Now notice when our passage opens, our author reminds us of something that we've heard a number of times already in Hebrews, he says, right out of the gate that Christ is the mediator of the new covenant. Now to review because this is an important concept, a mediator is someone who stands between two parties. In this case, Jesus Christ, the eternal son of God, stands between God and mankind in order to represent us, the people of God, before God. So that we could draw boldly near to God, near to the throne of grace, unencumbered by the defilement of our sin. This is exactly the privilege that we have in the new covenant. Through Christ, we are invited as the people of God to draw near to God. We have the promise that when we lift up our prayers to the Lord in the name of Jesus Christ, that he hears our many prayers. Also that we sojourn this world with security and belonging in an otherwise insecure and lonely world, because Christ Jesus in the new covenant claims you and me and the church as his own. For all of these great blessings that we enjoy in the so-called new covenant, we learned that before any of that belong to us, before any of that was ours, that Christ Jesus had to spill his blood. The first thing we learned in our passage is that Christ had to spill his blood specifically for us to receive forgiveness of sins. The forgiveness of sins that all of us so desperately need. In order to give us the forgiveness promised in the new covenant, it was required that the mediator, Jesus Christ, spill his blood. But if you look further down in your text, if you're following along with me beginning in 18, we're going to skip around for just a second. Our author tells us that this concept of shedding of blood, which we read all about in the book of Hebrews, how Christ had to shed his blood. Well, we learned that in one sense, this was nothing new because the shedding of blood was characteristic of the so-called first covenant too. Now we've encountered this language of first covenant elsewhere in Hebrew, so you get that language here in verse 18. When our author talks about the first covenant, well, he doesn't view the covenant that God entered into with Israel all the way back towards the beginning of the Bible, all the way back in the Book of Exodus, which we sometimes call the covenant with Moses. Different names, but same covenant, first covenant, covenant with Moses same deal. In verses 19 through 22 of our passage our author reflects on a few chapters in the book of Exodus that tell us about what happened when this covenant with Moses, this first covenant, was ratified or inaugurated. Now, to give some brief biblical theology, we find that throughout the scripture, as God enters into a series of unified covenants with his people. It's a way of advancing his singular promises over time. A covenant is a way of securing a special relationship with a people, and the Lord enters into a series of these covenants with his people in the Bible. He enters into a special relationship with Abraham and his descendants, all the way back in Genesis chapter 12. He enters into a covenant with Moses and the nation of Israel, and that's the one that our author reflects upon as he looks back a few thousand years from when he writes. Then there was a covenant that came later with King David and his sons. With each of these covenant administrations, as we call them, there were formalizing events that accompanied the start of each of these covenants. In verses 19 through 22 of our passage, our author is reflecting on the formalizing event of the first covenant of the Mosaic covenant. Now, if we were to go back in the Book of Exodus, we would find that the formalization of this covenant when this Mosaic covenant, the first covenant actually began, happened right at the start of Exodus 19. Now, as the story goes, some 50 days after God miraculously delivered his people out of slavery and captivity and Egypt well, he gathered them to a certain place in the desert, a place we know as Mount Sinai. Through Moses, God had some really important things to say to Israel at Mount Sinai. First, he reminded them how he just saved them, 50 days earlier out of Egypt, all by himself. When they were laboring in Egypt for 400 years in slavery, the Lord stepped in when they did nothing to deserve it and pulled them out of slavery and captivity without them contributing a single thing to their salvation. Then he called them as his people, as his treasured possession to be his own and so to walk, according to his law. After the Lord issues these things, the people of Israel respond, This God seems pretty good to us, so all that the Lord has spoken, we're going to do it. We're going to do it, they say in Exodus 9:8. Well, following this enactment of the so-called first covenant, Moses, what does he do? Well, he goes up on a mountain, Mount Sinai, and he meets with God one on one. It's on Sinai that Moses received the Ten Commandments in Exodus 20, followed by a variety of other specific laws in Exodus 21 to 23. Then in Exodus 24, Moses descends down the mountain, he tells Israel all that God commanded for them, and then Israel responds once again with these ominous words. They say, "All the words that the Lord has spoken, we will do." Before the covenant was finally ratified, before it was finally stamped as the start of it, one more thing had to be done. The next morning, Moses wakes up early in the morning and he offers a number of sacrifices to the Lord. He builds an altar at the foot of Sinai. He offers oxen on it. He pours out animal blood on the altar and then he sprinkles blood on God's people and on the book of the law that was just received. Now this is the event that our author reflects upon in our passage in Hebrews and verses 19 through 20. It leaves us with the question I think why all the blood? Why was it necessary that this covenant ratifying ceremony be accompanied by so much blood? Well, the blood symbolized two really important things for God's people to understand. One reason was that the blood symbolized the penalty for breaking the covenant. Understand that God is holy and that God requires those who bear his name, Israel, be holy too. For God to be the perfect God of justice means that he can't just let lawbreaking and unholiness slide under the rug. Otherwise, he just wouldn't be the God of perfect justice. After all, we would never consider a judge to be just in our own day if he gave a criminal a free pass. Now we may quarrel from time to time over what might be a just sentence in any given situation. However if a judge failed to uphold the law at all in view of the clear guilt of a criminal, well, we probably wouldn't consider that person to be a just judge in the slightest. So too, with God. This is why God couldn't just ignore sin. His reputation depended upon it, because perfect justice requires that infractions against an infinitely holy God, be paid with life. This is what all the shed blood so vividly demonstrated. It demonstrated that sin is no light matter. That sin is an infraction against an infinite holy God. That sin requires that blood be shed. On the other hand, just as blood pictured quite potently, the penalty for breaking the covenant. Well, it also foreshadowed it looked forward to a provision, the provision that God would one day make for sinners in the person and work of Jesus Christ. The blood that was spilled at the start of the Covenant with Moses and throughout the long thousand year run of the Covenant of Moses may have been a stark reminder of judgment. It also pointed to the means of our salvation as well. Understand that it wouldn't take long for Israel after twice repeating that they would do everything that God commanded for them to break their end of the bargain. It's a pretty drastic way too. They transgressed God's perfect law, and every one of them as a result deserved to die a sinner's death. Though they violated their end of the deal and friends, though we violate our end of the bargain each and every day too, God wouldn't violate his end of the deal. After all, he bound himself to his people by way of covenant. In the fullness of time, he would send his son to be the perfect sacrifice, to do what the bloody sacrifices under the Mosaic Law could never do. That is bring about true and lasting forgiveness to sinners like you and me. The provision for sin that God's people under the Mosaic Covenant desperately needed and the provision for sin for our sin that we desperately need to be found only in Jesus Christ, our Lord, who died in order that we might live. Christ shed his blood in order to inaugurate a better covenant, the new covenant, a covenant that was better than the first one. In doing so, the sins of all of God's people past, present and future have been completely 100 percent forgiven for all those who put their trust in Jesus Christ. Just as Christ spilled his blood so that God could forgive, well, so too, we learn as we continue in our passage that he also spilled his blood so that he could give. Now, if you look at verses 16 through 17 in our passage and skipping back to the beginning again, our author gives us another important perspective on Christ's death. He relates Christ's death to that of a last will and testament. Now, many of you probably know what a will is. I'm sure some of you probably even have wills as well. In a will, we bequeath property and that property that belongs to us, we bequeathed to other people. Usually, it's other family members. We sometimes call those other family members or people who get some of our inheritance, heirs. They are heirs to the estate when what they will receive eventually one day is called an inheritance. Of course, we also know that heirs don't actually receive their inheritance ordinarily until the one who bequeathed them their inheritance dies. Well, this is the background in verses 16 through 17, when an author tells us that a will takes effect only at death. Only then is the inheritance actually released and distributed to the heirs. When Jesus Christ spilled his blood for you and me, we who belong to Christ, we who, as the Apostle Paul tells us, are heirs according to promise, we received an inheritance, too. That begs the question what is this promised eternal inheritance that we receive as a result of Christ shed blood and broken body? Well, there are various blessings that are part of this inheritance we receive. One theologian, Charles Hodge, mentions things like justification that is being forgiven of our sins and being declared righteous in God's sight. It includes reconciliation with God, that is being put in a right relationship with God once again. It also includes a title to eternal life, the hope of eternal life that we look forward to after death. We could also add to this list things like adoption that is becoming members of God's family as well. Above everything else, the chief blessing that binds all of these other blessings together is Jesus Christ himself. Because every other blessing bequeathed to us in the new covenant flows from the inheritance that is the person of Jesus Christ. Now, as a quick aside, I've been told that there are these certain vacation destinations around the world that are known as all-inclusive. I've never been to one before, but I'm told there are these magical places, typically an exotic or remote locations, where you pay one lump sum and when you arrive, you don't have to pay for anything else. Sounds kind of magical to me. All the food you could ever want is covered. Every activity or excursion you could ever want to do is covered. Transportation is covered, your room is covered. There's nothing, while you're there, that you have to pay for. Nothing that you have to go outside the all- inclusive to get. It's all at your fingertips and you shouldn't have to procure a credit card at any point in your stay. This is how our inheritance in Christ works, too. After all, the Apostle Peter tells us that his divine power has granted us all things, not just some things, not just most things, all things that pertain to life and godliness. The Apostle Paul tells us that in Christ are hidden all the treasures, not some of the treasures, not most of the treasures, all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. Brothers and sisters Christ Jesus, who we receive as covenant members of the new covenant, is the whole package. When we identify with Christ through faith alone, he gives us everything that the God sized hole in the human heart could ever want. He gives us meaning and purpose so that we don't need to frantically look for it in our vocations. He gives us the kind of belonging and security that we could never find, even in our most intimate partners on Earth. He gives us forgiveness and rest from the toil and endlessly trying to make ourselves acceptable or worthy in his eyes or in the eyes of the world. Brothers and sisters Christ had to die so that we could receive and when we place our faith in Jesus Christ, well, that's exactly what happens. Boy, do we receive. The exhortation from this first point, then in one sense, it's quite simple. Put away your idols. Brothers and sisters stop hedging all your bets by claiming Christ on the one hand, but then chasing after so many other lovers, on the other hand. Look to the one who gives, look to the one who gives lavishly, look to the one who shed his blood to give, and who gives without us having to do a single thing other than faith alone to receive it. Look to Jesus Christ friends and be satisfied in the God who gives? Christ had to Die to Represent Us in Heaven So Christ had to die so that we could receive, that's our first point. But as we continue in our passage, we hear of a second reason for why Christ had to spill his blood and die on a cross as well. That is, second, Christ had to die in order to represent us in heaven. Now, there's a particularly powerful scene that unfolds later in the Bible, specifically in Revelation chapter five. There the Apostle John, who's peering into the Heavenly Holy of Holies, he sees the slain lamb, Jesus Christ, make his approach to the throne of God. To give a little bit of context after weeping in heaven, in despair that no one was found worthy in heaven to open this scroll and look into it, his eyes suddenly pivot when he sees the lamb of God, Jesus Christ, standing as a slain sacrifice. This lamb then makes his approach to the throne. He takes the scroll from the hand of God, and then all of the heavens erupt in a chorus of praise. Well, that event that John sees unfold in dramatic, symbolic fashion in heaven is the same event that our author now describes in verses 23 through 26 of our passage, albeit from a slightly different angle. Now, we've already heard in Hebrews that when Christ shed his blood, he ascended into the more perfect tent, that is into heaven itself. Remember, our author has made the argument a number of times in Hebrews already that the tabernacle, this mobile tent of worship in the Mosaic Covenant where all the Leviticus priests ministered and offered sacrifices. It was great, but it was only a copy or a blueprint. As carefully constructed and as outwardly ornate as this thing called the Tabernacle in the Old Covenant was, it was only ever supposed to be a replica of the genuine, heavenly tabernacle made without hands. Even though the earthly tabernacle was a replica, well, it was still a serious matter under the Covenant of Moses to draw near to God in it. If we were to go back to the Pentateuch, Exodus and Leviticus, we would see that the Levitical priests had to offer a lot of blood in this tabernacle. Day after day, year after year, they'd have to offer a blood upon blood upon blood to cover the sins of God's people. Blood was sprinkled everywhere. Even the priest's clothes were sprinkled in blood. By one account, over the entire life of the sacrificial system, which would have been close to about a thousand years, over one million animals were eventually sacrificed. That's a lot of blood. Again, all of this points to the fact that human sin is so serious that drawing near to God, even in a divinely instituted copy, because that's all the tabernacle was, required that all of that blood be spilled. Yet, as necessary as all that blood was to enter the copy, there's no chance in the world that it would have gotten you access into the real deal in heaven itself. This is why our author tells us that it was necessary, it had to happen, that the heavenly things would be purified with better sacrifices than the blood of bulls and goats in the old covenant. So what was this better sacrifice? Well, of course it was Jesus. It was Jesus himself who entered heaven after spilling his blood on the cross. Not by virtue of the blood of bulls and goats, but by virtue of his own sinless, undefined blood. Remember that scene that we just referenced a moment ago in Revelation five were the slain lamb made his approach to throne of God? Well, because of the nature of the sacrifice that Christ offered as the sinless eternal one, he was able to go where no one else, even the most morally upstanding person you could think of would ever dare to go. Yet, remarkably, when Christ entered into heaven after paying the debt that we could never pay, we read in our passage that he didn't do this for his sake alone. Our author tells us that he entered into heaven itself in, verse 24, now to appear in the presence of God. That's literally before the face of God. Here's the important phrase, "on our behalf." Understand that Christ didn't ascend into heaven in order to leave us in the rearview mirror. Christ didn't ascend to get away from us and all of the baggage that we bring to the table. Remember what Christ said in his parting words to his disciples in Matthew, 28? Well, he said, "I am with you always to the end of the age." By his spirit, friends, Christ is with us right now on Earth. In heaven the resurrected and ascended Christ represents us. He advocates for us and he invites us to lay our many prayers at the foot of his throne. There's a story from the Bible, which I think at this point is particularly instructive to illustrate all of this. Earlier in the Bible, in the life of Joseph, this can be found in the latter part of Genesis. We read a story about when Joseph had been unjustly imprisoned, that there was a glimmer of hope at one point during his time in prison when he met two fellow prisoners who were Pharaoh's chief cup bearer on the one hand and Pharaoh's chief baker on the other. Now these two people, the chief cup bearer and the chief baker, they were one day serving in the courts of the King of Egypt, pretty high up, and then, for whatever reason, they were thrown in prison where they were now sharing a cell with Joseph. As the story goes, and many of you probably know the story, is that one evening these two prisoners dreamed a dream, and when they awoke from their dream, they were disturbed and they were confounded by the dream symbolic nature. They had no idea what their dreams meant, but they suspected that they were probably pretty important. So one thing leads to another and in steps Joseph to interpret their dreams. First, he hears the chief cup bearer, relay all the details of his dream, and then Joseph tells him the good news that what his dream looks forward to is something that will happen. In three days' time, he will be released from prison and all things will be back to normal for the chief cup bearer. In just three days, he'd be vindicated. He'd be released from prison. He'd get to go, continue to work in the courts of the King of Egypt, Pharaoh, and all would be well for the good old chief cup bearer. After interpreting his dream, Joseph has a request for the chief cup bearer. You might know what he says. He says this, "Remember me when it is well with you, and please do me the kindness to mention me to Pharaoh and so get me out of this house." The cup bearer is a well-connected man. He some of the closest access that you could get to somebody calling the shots in a kingdom. He's the chief cup bearer. He ministers in the courts of Pharaoh. So Joseph asks that he advocate on his behalf, when in three days' time he gets to go in and minister in Pharaoh's courts once again. What happens? Well, the narrative ends on a dull note when we read that when the chief cup bearer was released, he, "Did not remember Joseph, but forgot him." There was no one to advocate for Joseph's innocence, and as a result, he sat in the despair of prison for another two years. In stark contrast to this, the good news of the gospel is that in our guilt, there is one who has not forgotten us. Brothers and sisters, rest assured that Christ has not forgotten any of his people. Jesus Christ tells us as much in John's 6:39, when he declares to his disciples, "and this is the will of him who sent me that I should lose nothing of all that he has given me but raise it up in the last day." Therefore, we need not be overwhelmed by anxiety when we see the church under duress, possibly concerned with whether or not Jesus' church could ever endure the various onslaughts from the world she faces. We do not fear whether the escalating pool of secularism and worldliness is somehow overpowering Christ's hold on his church. As isolating him as life can sometimes feel for some of you, know that you have not slipped the mind of your advocate. Christ has ascended by virtue of his own perfect blood and from heaven he holds us fast and will by no means relinquish control of any of his saints, any of those who he has already claimed as his own. As we continue our text our author than roots, this security of ours even deeper when he tells us that unlike the Levitical priest who enter the tabernacle repeatedly, they went in and out year after year with bloody sacrifices in tow. Well, Christ, he doesn't need to enter heaven repeatedly. In fact, if this were the case, our author reasons, that would imply that Christ would have to suffer repeatedly since he'd be sacrificing himself over and over again too. Now the Levitical priest they had to offer sacrifices repeatedly, but for Christ, his blood was so effective that it was able to cover the sins of every Old Testament believer, every sin of every believer who has lived in a two thousand years since his first advent, and every sin of every believer yet to be born until the second advent. In heaven, our Lord Jesus sits enthroned. His work is done. Ss a result, he claims us as his own. This is why he had to shed his blood so that he could enter heaven and be our advocate in the heavenly places. That is what he does right now. Christ had to Die so that He Could Return Before we close out our study of this passage, we're then given implicitly one more reason for why Christ had to die. Third, Christ had to die so that he could return. Later in the Bible and this happens in Luke's gospel, when a priest named Zachariah enters the temple one evening to offer incense, well, we learn that there was a crowd while he was ministering in the holy place in the temple, there was a crowd outside the temple praying. Now, Luke doesn't tell us in that narrative what they prayed, and so we can't be certain. Jewish tradition suggests that when a crowd of people gathered outside the temple when the priest was inside, they prayed for God to accept the priest's offering. In the process, they waited expectantly for the priest's return. If the priests offered the right sacrifices, according to the law, that's what would happen. His offering would be accepted and then he would emerge out of the temple to the relief of the crowd of onlookers. In short, the return of the priest was what the people of God hoped for every single day as they waited outside the tabernacle and temple, prayerfully hoping that their sacrifice would be accepted. Likewise, the return of our great high priest, Jesus Christ, is what we anticipate too. Yet for us understand that there's no apprehension or doubt connected with his return. After all, if Christ offered the perfect sacrifice, which the scriptures loudly proclaim that he has, then we can trust that it's inevitable. It's guaranteed that Christ will one day emerge from the heavenly Holy of Holies to the praise of his people too. Now earlier in our text, back in verse 26, our author told us that Christ shed his blood for our salvation. Then he used this phrase, "at the end of the ages." Now that was two thousand years ago, right when Christ shed his blood. According to the New Testament, the time between Christ's first advent and his second is a time that's ubiquitously referred to as the last days. According to the New Testament, we're actually living in the last days right now. Now, of course, that doesn't mean that we know how many 24 hour days we have left until Christ comes again. That's not a call for us to try to wildly calculate when Christ is going to come again. It does mean that there is no more redemptive work that has to happen again until Christ returns. In God's economy the next best thing, the next big thing, rather that we anticipate as the people of God will believe it or not, it's not the next election. It's not the College Football National Championship, especially because Nebraska is not going to be in it. It's not so many of the things that we care so deeply about in this world. Now, of course, it's OK to care about those things. It's not bad to care about those things, but those just aren't the kind of things that should take the lead in shaping the most powerful affections that we have. These aren't the kind of things that that should inform the most important decisions we make in the world. Only Christ, and specifically the hope of Christ's second, advent, the hope of Christ appearing a second time should take pride of place in the life of the church in shaping how we walk in these last days. In summary, the promise that flows from the acceptance of Christ's perfect Blood in heaven is that he is going to come again. As we, as his people are call, we as his people wait for that. The New Testament calls us to wait expectantly for that day to arrive. Application Now on the one hand, implicit in that promise is the urgent call for any of you who really don't know Christ Jesus right now to identify with him by faith alone while there's still time. Now author already told us in verse 27 that you're going to die, you will die. You can't avoid it. After you die, our author tells us, comes judgment. Are you ready for that? If you're not, if you're not trusting in Christ right now, well, that the appeal would be to live expectantly right now by putting your trust in the only one who has done everything necessary to appease the wrath of God for his people. Don't trust in your knowledge to save you. Don't trust in your affluence to save you. Trust in Christ, who alone has the power to save all those he advocates for before the Father in heaven right now. On the other hand, even if you really do identify with Christ by faith alone right now, ask yourself, how am I expectantly waiting for his return right now? Are you harboring grudges and bitterness against your brothers and sisters in Christ or are you learning to forgive one another by pursuing reconciliation as much as it depends on yourself? Are you letting sin fester in your lives and assuming that because no one has seen it in its full ugliness and no one has called you out on it that it must not be a big deal? Or are you constantly learning to put to death that sin that belonged to your former life? The great high priest, Jesus Christ, shed his blood for you and for me. He had to so that we could be saved. He had to so that he could ascend to heaven and he had to so that he could come again. That's what we eagerly anticipate on this side of glory. But are you ready for that day? As we live on this side of glory secured by his blood and yet eagerly awaiting his return, well let me make this final appeal to us in closing. Church learned to be a non-anxious presence in this world. Now, I'm sure I never lived under the Mosaic Covenant so I can't guarantee, but I'm almost certain that it would have been a sight to behold to be an Israelite worshipper during the old covenant. To see the care that was taken in worship and everything from the construction of the place of worship, to all the bells and smells that surrounded the worship ceremony. I can imagine that all of that would have reinforced the gravitas of worship. It would have been hard to avoid that conclusion. Yet I can also imagine a certain level of anxiety accompanying that whole process too. After all, what happened if one of the priests who was supposed to be representing you, what happened if he messed up one of the sacrifices he offered? Well, that happened in Leviticus Chapter 10, Nadab and Abihu were consumed by fire. The whole system, in other words, was marked by care, there were also severe consequences, too. While care and consequences are no less present in a new covenant, we just don't need to worry in Jesus Christ, whether or not our high priest will make a mistake. Because Jesus blood was already offered, it was already accepted. We already have an advocate in heaven. We are already secure in him, and we already have the promise that one day Jesus Christ our Lord will emerge from the heavenly Holy of Holies to save those who are eagerly awaiting his return. So as we live our lives until that day, understand that we have no reason to be overcome with paralyzing anxiety in the present. Sure, there's a lot to be anxious about in this world. There are global anxieties. There are individual anxieties. But while we could so easily lose ourselves down the endless rabbit trails of anxiety that are ubiquitous in our world, our passenger reminds us that because the blood of Jesus Christ has been shed, we have been freed to be a non-anxious presence in this world. We've been freed from proving ourselves before God and others, and instead we take to heart Christ advocacy for us in heaven and the identity he gives us on Earth. We've been freed from anxiously caring so much about our reputation or our own comforts. In Christ we've been freed to love and to look outside of ourselves and begin to serve as a people who have already had every single one of our most deeply felt spiritual needs already met in the perfect shed blood of Jesus Christ our Lord. So whatever the paralyzing fear is, that may have taken root in your heart. Maybe fears that you're bringing into the church with you this morning. Trust in the one who offered his blood on your behalf will in Jesus Christ, hold you fast and he will one day bring you and me and his church into our glorious home. Pray with me. Gracious, Heavenly Father, Lord, we come across these images of blood so often in the scriptures, and we confess that sometimes in our context, that imagery doesn't sit quite well with us. Yet we pray that you would remind us as we continue to encounter that imagery, as we read your word, as we study your words, we hear your word preached and read that you would remind us through it of the seriousness of our sin. The fact that sin is no light matter, but also that you would remind us that we have an advocate. We have one in the heavenly places who's already paid for all of our sin by his precious blood, who holds us fast in heaven, and who will one day bring us home. Lord Jesus, I pray you to remind us of these great benefits that are ours in the new covenant. Benefits that we have not earned, but benefits that we have received through faith alone in Jesus Christ, our Lord. In whose name we pray. Amen.

Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron
The Location of the Holy of Holies

Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 3:00


Archaeologist Leen Ritmeyer is thought to have found the exact location of the Holy of Holies on the Temple Mount. God bless you and thank you for listening! Join us again tomorrow!

ICGC - KHARIS TEMPLE
Minister Rama Antwi - Grace and Oil

ICGC - KHARIS TEMPLE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 44:48


Join us once again as we enter the Holy of Holies, as we bow and worship the one True God. You shall receive an encounter wherever you are. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kharis-temple/support

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio
The Glory of the LORD on the Move

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 54:12


Rev. Gaven Mize, pastor at Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church in Hickory, NC, joins host Rev. Timothy Appel to study Ezekiel 10:1-22. Ezekiel again sees the four living creatures and now recognizes that they are cherubim. They are bearing the throne of the LORD as Ezekiel sees the glory of the LORD move farther away from the Holy of Holies. The LORD's self-imposed exile from His temple, combined with His instruction to the man clothed in linen to scatter burning coals over Jerusalem, is a sign of judgment against the blatant idolatry practiced by His people. At the same time, the movement of the glory of the LORD from a building in Jerusalem points forward to the glory of the LORD revealed in the incarnation of our Lord Jesus Christ. As He comes to be present among His people in Word and Sacrament still today, we see His glory and share in the beautiful vision of Ezekiel. “The Faithful Watchman” is a mini-series on Sharper Iron that goes through the book of Ezekiel. Just when Ezekiel should have begun his service as priest in the temple in Jerusalem, the LORD called him to be a prophet in exile in Babylon. Through fantastic visions and attention-grabbing action prophecies, the prophet Ezekiel is a faithful watchman who proclaims the word of the LORD to bring people to repentance over their sins and to faith in the coming Savior, Jesus Christ, the glory of the LORD made flesh.

Gospel Spice
How did we get here?

Gospel Spice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 62:07


Episode 112 - This season, we beckon you to experience Jesus where heaven meets earth. Have you ever wondered if your relationship with God might deepen, if only you understood how Jesus is portrayed in the Old Testament? Could God be inviting you deeper into intimacy with Him through Moses' Tabernacle? Have you experienced God in the Holy of Holies? Stephanie invites you to experience the Tabernacle like never before, and to fall in love with Jesus at a deeper level by tasting and seeing that He is good. God instructed mankind to build the Tabernacle as His dwelling place among them. As we will study the temporal structure and eternal purpose of the Tabernacle through this in-depth 7-episode Bible study, you will be drawn into deeper, more intimate worship of Christ. You will discover the symbolism and ultimate fulfillment of the Tabernacle in Christ, and in you as His dwelling place. You will experience God's timeline of grace, from Eden past to Heaven future. Come with a heart thirsty for more of Christ and experience Him in fresh new ways! You will leave this series with a deep understanding of the symbolism of the Tabernacle and its fulfillment in Christ, and a renewed awe and passion for God. Our series, titled “Centering on Christ: the Tabernacle”, unveils God's presence with mankind. God invites you to dwell with Him. How will you RSVP? Through the Tabernacle, taste and see that the Lord is good! This might be the most in-depth series yet to release on the Gospel Spice podcast. Yet, its mix of storytelling and insightful illustrations makes it easy-to-understand, approachable, and relatable. As with everything Gospel Spice, it is completely Christ-soaked. If you want to dig deeper, we offer a FREE resource: a 50+ page guidebook available only for those who register for free at gospelspice.com/tabernacle. It will guide you through the podcast series by providing daily readings and activities around your personal time with God this season. Get yours today! --- So today… our question is, how did we get here? What is “Here”? Picture a campsite of about 2 million people (Exodus 12:38-40), including probably over 1 million children. Dry desert. No running water, no electricity. All on foot, with some chariots. A lot of tents, made of Egyptian cloth. Feel the heat, taste the dust on your tongue, feel the sting of both sun and dust on your eyes. It's hot – it's a desert. Rocks and dirt and hills of stone in every direction. Grey is the earth beneath you; blue is the hot sky above you. In front, behind, to your left, to your right – countless men, women, children just like you, camping and making the best of their circumstances. Having just escaped slavery. Free at last. Free? Yes. Free to die, it seems. They don't know it yet, but they will all die in this desert. They will wander for 40 years to reach a destination that is 11 travel days away. All this, because they adamantly refused to follow the God who had delivered them out of slavery. As we meet them today, they are at one of their first stops. Egypt is still fresh on their minds. They will end up camping here for 12 months, under the shadow of Mount Sinai, where Moses is given the ten commandments and they build the Tabernacle. This is our context. Let's now see where God is taking us from here! ---- Every week, Stephanie shares truth from Scripture and invites you to dig deeper in your faith to delight in the glory of God. PLAY IT FORWARD by SHARING the link with friends and family PAY IT FORWARD by supporting us financially PRAY IT FORWARD by praying for us and those you share it with! ------------ DISCOVER THE GOSPEL SPICE MINISTRIES ------------ The Gospel Spice Podcast is part of a larger range of tools given to you by Gospel Spice Ministries. In a nutshell, we exist to inspire Christ-followers to delight in God. In more details: we provide resources to empower Christian leaders across generational, social, ethnic and geographical boundaries towards more intimacy with Jesus Christ and discipleship effectiveness through a Biblical Christocentric foundation. The Gospel-Spice Ministries provide a safe environment for spiritual and community growth empowering people to know Christ more intimately, serve one another more powerfully, and reach the world for Jesus. PAY IT FORWARD!! Would you consider supporting this show today to help others enjoy it for free? It comes to you completely free, but is labor-intensive to produce, and we want to keep putting it in the ears of people! For the price of a cup of coffee, PAY IT FORWARD with $5 or $10 to make a huge difference! Contact us to pay it forward by Credit Card, or donate via PayPal. Gospel Spice Ministries is a non-profit organization registered under the tax-exempt 501c3 status. Your donations are tax-deductible under IRS Section 170. We want to be the best possible stewards of your financial support. All donations above our operating costs go to Christian organizations fighting human trafficking. We do not take a salary, but only seek to cover our operating costs. PLAY IT FORWARD by SHARING the link with friends and family PAY IT FORWARD by supporting us financially PRAY IT FORWARD by praying for us and those you share it with! Support us!

The Parsha Perspective
Seeing ourselves in others, the Yom Kippur Perspective

The Parsha Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 5:20


Seeing ourselves in others, the Yom Kippur perspective The Yom Kippur perspective is in loving memory of Edward Ben Efraim, and Shlomo Ben Edward. May their souls be uplifted and their memories a blessing. The Yom Kippur perspective in honor of the Refuah Shlema of Shaul Ben Berta, Sasson Bezalel Ben Batia & Yirachmiel Daniel Ben Tova Basha. Click here to listen, watch and connect! Parshaperspective.com We are about to begin the holiest time of the year, the day of forgiveness, Yom Kippur. A day that we abstain from physical enjoyment to feel the immense holiness that is obvious during this time. A day that its loftiness alone atones for our sins against G-d. We find out why the Kohen Gadol did not wear gold in the Kodesh HaKodashim, the holy of Holies. We learn the only way to look at others.

Rise on Fire Ministries
╫ The Mystery of the Azazel Goat REVEALED - Day of Atonement 2021 [PODCAST]

Rise on Fire Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 45:37


Episode Notes The Day of Atonement is considered by many as the holiest day of the year. The one day the high priest would enter the Holy of Holies within the Temple. But on this day, procedures are peculiar. It includes the sending of a goat "to Azazel." For centuries, scholars have debated the meaning of this Azazel goat. Who does it represent? Some have said Jesus, some have even said Satan. But the answer is, neither are absolutely right. It's just not that simple. But the answer is way more profound and way more interesting. The answer lies in the Gospel itself! Join me this Day of Atonement as we discuss the relevance of this beautiful feast to our lives today as believers.

MyLife: Chassidus Applied
Ep. 371: Is It Acceptable to Ask Forgiveness via Social Media & Other Intriguing Yom Kippur Questions

MyLife: Chassidus Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 74:21


Rabbi Jacobson will discuss the following topics: Lessons from Vov Tishrei Why is respecting parents such a great mitzvah? What is the connection with the Ten Days of Teshuvah? Why did the Rebbe honor his mother by analyzing and explaining Rashi? What can we learn from 9/11?How crumbling structures lead to greater growth Chassidus applied to Yom Kippur Why is it the holiest day of the year? On the high holidays who serves as our lawyer to defend us in the heavenly court? Can we follow a Yom Kippur service via zoom? What is the connection between Yom Kippur and the golden calf? Why was only the kohen gadol allowed to enter the kodesh kadoshim and only on Yom Kippur? Who cleaned the Holy of Holies, and could they tell us what it looked like inside? How does throwing a goat off a cliff to its death atone for our sins? If Moshiach comes before Yom Kippur will we need to fast? Laws and customs Is it acceptable to ask forgiveness via social media? If all our actions are predetermined, why are we responsible to ask forgiveness for sins? What are the origins of the kapparot ritual? Why did the Rebbe distribute honey cake before Yom Kippur and how can we maintain this tradition after Gimmel Tammuz? Why do we wear a white tunic (kittel) on Yom Kippur? Why do we fast over 25 hours on Yom Kippur, when a day is only 24 hours? Why are marital relations forbidden on Yom Kippur? Is using a caffeine suppository on Yom Kippur cheating? Prayers Why is Al Cheit said in the plural? Why do we read the book of Jonah on Yom Kippur? If singing Napolean's March signifies that we have won the war even before the battle has begun, why don't we sing it at the beginning of the day, before Kol Nidrei? Chassidus question: What is the connection between Yom Kippur and the 15th of Av?

Madlik Podcast – Torah Thoughts on Judaism From a Post-Orthodox Jew

Parshat Vayeilech - We review the septennial Hakhēl convocation where the Torah is read publicly as an opportunity to explore the revolutionary nature of the Hebrew Alphabet from both a social and technological perspective. In so doing, maybe we shed some light on the proliferation of alphabetical acrostics in the Psalms and later liturgy and piyyutim. Sefaria Source Sheet: www.sefaria.org/sheets/346294 Transcript: Geoffrey Stern  00:00 Welcome to Madlik disruptive Torah. We are every Friday at four o'clock here on clubhouse Eastern time. And we go ahead and record this. And then we post it as a podcast called Madlik. And it's available on all of your favorite podcasting channels. And if you like what you hear today, go ahead and listen to it as a podcast and share it with your friends, and give us a few stars and say something nice about us, in any case, this week portion Vayelech. And it's Deuteronomy 31, for the most part. And in Deuteronomy 31, verse nine, it says, "And Moses wrote down this teaching, and he gave it to the priest, sons of Levy, who carried the Ark of the Lord's covenant, and to all the elders of Israel. And Moses instructed them as follows, every seventh year, the year set for shmitah, at the Feast of Booths, which will start in another week or two, when all Israel comes to appear before the Lord your God, in the place that he will choose, you shall read this teaching aloud, in the presence of all Israel, gather the people, men, women, children, and the strangers in your communities that they may hear. And so learn to revere the Lord your God, and to observe faithfully every word of this teaching. Their children too who have not had the experience shall hear and learn to revere the Lord your God, as long as they live in the land that you are about to cross the Jordan to possess." And then a few verses down, it finishes off by saying, "When Moses had put down in writing, the words of this teaching to the very end "ad tumam" , Moses charged the Levites to carry the Ark of the Covenant of the Lord saying, Take this book of teaching and place it beside the Ark of the Covenant of the Lord your God, and let it remain there as a witness against you." So Wow, this is a pretty fundamental law, it touches upon a public reading of the Torah, it touches upon the seventh year, the cycle of the shmita, of the sabbatical year that we are starting as we speak. And it also talks about placing that Torah scroll, if you will, into the ark right next to the 10 commandments. So rabbi, what says this to you?   Adam Mintz  02:47 So I want to go to the end, it's so interesting that the Torah scroll plays a role here, it all seems to be about strengthening our commitment to Torah and to God, and therefore everything has a Torah scroll that is right in the middle of it. And I think that's really, really interesting. At the end of each shmita cycle, they used to gather all the people in Jerusalem, the men, the women, the children, and the king used to read the Torah. So really, even the sabbatical year, is about strengthening our commitment to Torah.   Geoffrey Stern  03:28 I totally agree. But I have to confess that when I tell people, and I've been telling everybody I can, trust me, that this is the sabbatical year, unlike the Sabbath that occurs every seven days. And I'd like to think, we can discuss this on another afternoon. I'd like to think it was one of the Jews greatest contributions to culture and society, a day of rest. It's actually a statement of human rights because you rest your servants rest to animals were at rest, that everybody kind of gets whether they keep the Sabbath on a Saturday or Sunday or a Friday, or they just understand they have to reboot once in a while. But the idea of the seventh year cycle, the sabbatical that has only really survived in academia. And I hope it's still the case where academics take off a year to broaden their horizons, to travel to see other academics and maybe go out into the field. It struck me when I read this portion, that Wow, there actually is a connection because mostly when we think of the sabbatical year, we think of letting the land life fallow, and all of the other things I discussed before, but there is clearly an intellectual aspect of this and that's what you were talking about Rabbi in terms of both faith and understanding The idea was in this sabbatical year, we all have to give ourselves a chance to be exposed to that which is important to us. But it kind of works both ways. Because on the Sabbath, we also read from the Torah publicly, and the rabbi's understood the connection between this because those of you who have been in an orthodox synagogue and know that the first Aliyah, the first calling up to the Torah, is for the Cohen. And the second one is for the Levi The Tom wood learns it literally from this verse, if you will call. It says that, in verse nine, that Moses wrote down this teaching, gave it to the priests the kohanim, sons of Levi. From here, the rabbi's learned that the colon gets the first Aliyah and the Levi gets the second. And then of course, the Israelite gets the third and onward. But I'm much less interested in the law. And I'm more interested in the connection the rabbi's took from this annual reading or the I should say, the seven year cycle of reading it in the sabbatical year, and reading it every week. In both cases, we're kind of doing this amazing public discourse of our most important texts.   Adam Mintz  06:20 Yes. I mean, and I think that's a super interesting thing. The fact that the Torah, even though study is an individual act, we do it by ourselves, we do it with a havruta (study partner), with one other individual. But actually, the reading of the Torah is always a public act. That's something fascinating, isn't it? Geoffrey.  Right, the Torah  is a public act, we read it in the temple, we read it in this Synagogue, it's always public.   Geoffrey Stern  06:50 I totally agree. And we're going to get a little bit more into that in a second. But before we do, the other thing that is kind of interesting to me is that the reading of it is also a conduit into the future. And you see that in two ways. If you recall, in verse 13, it says, and their are children who have not had the experience shall hear and learn. And the idea is, even though they were speaking in the present tense, and as it said, they were crossing the Jordan into the promised land. This was not to be limited to the people in the room, so to speak. This was the vehicle for transmitting this experience into the future, this interactive, maybe immersive reading of our sacred texts in public, placing them in a tactile form on the side of the shattered and full 10 commandments was an amazing, both commentary and commitment to what the written and spoken word can do in terms of transmitting ideas and values into the future.   Adam Mintz  08:05 I couldn't agree more with that. I think that that's a very important thing. And that's why you know, we're kinda not focusing on this, but this is the end of the Torah. This is the third to the last portion in the Torah.  We have Ha'azinu next week, and then on Simchat Torah, we finish the Torah with Zot HaBracha. This is the end Geoffrey. So whatever is going on now is a lesson forever.   Geoffrey Stern  08:32 I love the fact that you say it is the end, this is it got it both gives this statement more importance. But it also raises another fascinating Talmudic discussion. And that is: the last six or eight verses of the Torah are written after, in the narrative, after Moses dies. So the question comes, how can it be in our verses that Moses gives the complete Torah to the priests and the tribe of Levi? If in those last few verses are things that clearly he could not have written? And the Talmud gives two answers. One answer is: You're right. Moses, wrote everything except the last eight verses and Joshua wrote the book under his name, the Book of Joshua, and the last eight verses, but what I find so dramatic and those of you who were with us last week know how much drama there can be in our wonderful Torah. I love the answer. That was Rabbi Shimon's. And he says, Is it possible that the Torah scroll was missing a single letter, but it has said take this Torah scroll. Rather until this point, the Holy One blessed be He dictated and Moses repeated after him and wrote the text, from the point where it says that Moses has died, the Holy One, blessed be he dictated, and Moses wrote with tears", just an unbelievable image of someone waiting their own obituary, so to speak. But again, the reason I bring it up is because it really parallels this concept of having the children who had not experienced listen to it. Even in the ending of the Torah, it is understood that the writing of the Torah either continues in this hand of other people like Joshua, or that we are all part of a narrative, and we can't experience every part that we're in. But by hearing it and listening to it, we become a part of that narrative. And to me, Moses writing and tears streaming down his cheeks, it's just almost too much to bear.   Adam Mintz  11:04 I mean, Geoffrey, you're not so surprised, because as we all know, if you're anybody, The New York Times has your obituary on file, right? famous people get their obituaries written ahead of time. So it's interesting, the whole idea of, you know, writing your own obituary, I'll just tell you that there was a rabbi, his name was the Vilna Gaon, a great Rabbi in Lithuania, in the 1700s. And he says that the word for tears "Dema" can also be translated as the word "demua", which means mixed up. And he says that what happened was that God commanded Moshe, like a Scrabble board to take all of the letters that would appear in the last eight verses at the Torah, but not to arrange them in order. And Joshua was the one who arranged them in order.   Geoffrey Stern  12:01 Wow, that absolutely blows me away. And we are going to come back to it but to give you a little taste of how we're going to come back to that is, so much of the Yom Kippur liturgy has to do with that alphabet that you just described. Whether it's the "Ashamnu"  that is an alphabetic acronym and has our alphabet or whatever. So this story that you just told of the Vilna Gaon explanation of Joshua putting the letters together is something that really resonates with me and we are going to come back to. Michael Posnick welcome to the Bimah.   Michael Posnik  12:45 Pleasure to be here. I just have a question. Is it possible that the word for tears could be from "dom"  from the"demama" that Moses wrote this?   Adam Mintz  12:59 Like in in "Unetaneh Tokef"  "v'Kol demamah daka yishoma"   Michael Posnik  13:04 That's right that he wrote it in silence...   Adam Mintz  13:06 It's nice. Technically speaking, the root of the word dema is Dalet Mem Ayin, the root of the word 'dimama" meaning silence. is Dalet Mem Mem. These are two different words. It's a nice sermon. But technically speaking in terms of language, it's not really the same word.   Geoffrey Stern  13:32 And of course, you have Aaron who after his two sons died, it says "vaYidom", and  normally translated as silent. Is that the word that it should be translated?   Adam Mintz  13:44 The word "dom" is "demama"  We say in Unetana Tokef, We blow the mighty Shofar "vekol demama daka Yishama" But the sound that we hear is a silent or quiet sound.   Geoffrey Stern  14:06 Fantastic. The truth is, and this will also come up in our discussion, that there are those who believe and I think the the most prominent proponents of this theory, were Martin Buber, and Franz Rosenzweig. And their current student who's a professor named Everett Fox, who believes that much of the Torah has to be listened to as much as read. And therefore it gives you a little bit more, I think, flexibility and wiggle room -  poetic license if you will, to make some of these connections. But even if, from a strict grammatical point of view, there are limitations. Then there's also the pun and I think that the biblical text and certainly Talmudic texts We're very sensitive to words that might have been different, but sounded alike that conjure up certain emotions and certain responses. So I think there's no question that the connection that you made Michael is is there at some level.   Adam Mintz  15:14 Yeah, very nice. And especially because it relates to Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur with Unetana Tokef. It really is just right. So thank you so much, Michael.   Geoffrey Stern  15:23 So let's, let's move on a little bit. The title of today's episode, if you will, is the Aleph Beit Revolution. And the reason why it is a revolution is there are scholars...  the one I most recently read is somebody named Joshua Berman, who wrote a book Created Equal - How the Bible Broke with Ancient political thought, who believe that what happened when the Aleph Beit was created in Canaan was as revolutionary as the printing press when it was created in Europe. And we all know what happened when the (Guttenberg) printing press was created. within a very short time, not only did people for the first time get to read their Bible, because that was the first book that was written and popularized publicized. But they were people like Luther, who were able to get out a mimeograph machine, so to speak, and start posting things on the doors of the church. And all of a sudden, our whole revolution occurred within Christianity. And you could even argue maybe the Judeo-Christian tradition, because people were all of a sudden exposed to text in ways that they never were. And these scholars argue that when the Jews, the Israelites were in Canaan, they were surrounded by two empires who pretty much used cuneiform and  hieroglyphics. These are highly intricate ways of expressing whether it's numbers or events, or narratives or stories, using pictures, and the vocabulary was so large, that only the professional scribes could, could master it. So it was something that was never given to the general public. And even when they had, like the Gilgamesh epic, or Homer and Euripides, these were things that were written on stele on stone, they were hidden within the temple, even during the New Year ceremony that we discussed before called Akitu in Babylon. It was literally the king who read these things in private in the Holy of Holies, if you will, and what these scholars are saying about the alphabet, which has 22 symbols, the word that we use for the alphabet in Hebrew is "otiot". And those of you who are sensitive to the Hebrew knows the power of the word "Ot", it is a symbol, but from those symbols, you can ultimately put together any sort of concept. And all of a sudden, the written words of the Torah, were now publicly available to the congregation. And notice here it says, men, women and children who are here and who are not here, it was literally a revolution. As big as the revolution we discussed in prior weeks, where God says, You have no other kings besides me, I'm your only King. You don't worship anybody else here too, you get your information directly from the source, and you can interact with that information. And this was an amazing revolution that is on par with anything else that came out of Canaan and the ancient Israelites and included with Hebrew was Akkadian and Ugaritic, and Phoenician and actually, the Greeks got the 22 letter alphabet, from the Phoenicians, they've said it themselves. When we talk about the Delta virus, we have alpha, beta, delta, there are no words like that in Greek, those are words that come from the Aleph Beit gimel dalet, dalet, is delta, Aleph is alpha. As we approach the new year. This is revolutionary with a capital R.   Adam Mintz  19:56 Yes, I mean, I'm not an expert in alphabet, but yeah, this is all All fascinating material fascinating.   Geoffrey Stern  20:02 And it puts into a totally different perspective, this concept of the public reading of the text.  We think read, you need someone who is literate, who can literally read. But in the Torah, the word that we use is "Li'Kro". And "Li'kro" is similar to what I was saying before, when I talked about Buber and Rosenzweig, it equally applies to reading as it applies to listening or hearing...  to calling out. And so really, I think that the this image of the Torah ending, and it's saying that every seven years, and by extension, every seven days, the Torah is to be read in a vernacular, which literally means a people's language, and can be discussed, really ties into so much that we've been talking about on Madlik in terms of the ability for man to own and introduce and interact with our holy texts.   Adam Mintz  21:19 Michael, You actually began this conversation? With your discussion of the word to my mind? Do you have any thoughts on this?   Michael Posnik  21:30 Just a few come up, I've had the good fortune to be studying Nehemiah. And there, when it's described, when Israel read the Torah, it was read in four different ways. It was read exactly as the text presents it. And then there was someone who did the vernacular so that people could understand that if they didn't know the Hebrew, and then there were two other ways, which are not quite clear what's meant. And on Rosh Hashanna I attended a service of the New Shul, which was outdoors, a couple 100 people in a park in Brooklyn, and, and the Torah was read was held up by two gentlemen, and a 13, or 14 year old girl layned (chanted). And then she layned a couple of pesukim (verses). And then a man, a man with a beautiful voice sang the translation of those pesukim And then Frank London, the trumpeter played the emotional life. On his trumpet. It was very, very, very powerful. So it goes out to the mind, it goes out to the heart, it goes out to the body in the sense that if you listen to it, you might act differently, which would be a great benefit for all of us.   Adam Mintz  22:55 Hey, Geoffrey, that's amazing, because that's really what you said. And that is the experience of reading is actually much deeper than the way we understand reading. But it's about listening. Reading and speaking is where you didn't even discuss the fact that reading is music. And Geoffrey we can actually talk about the fact that the Torah is read in a special tune. And actually on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur that tune is a little different reflective of a more somber kind of Rosh Hashannah and Yom Kippur spirit. I mean, it's extremely striking; the tune for the Torah reading. On Rosha Hashannah and Yom Kippur at least to me is one of the highlights of Rosh Hashanna and Yom Kipper.   Geoffrey Stern  23:40 Absolutely I have to echo what you said, Michael, I went to an African American synagogue in Chicago outside of Chicago. I believe the rabbi's name is Rabbi Capers C. Funnye Jr. (an African-American rabbi, who leads the 200-member Beth Shalom B'nai Zaken Ethiopian Hebrew Congregation of Chicago, Illinois) He's literally a cousin of Michelle Obama. And they read the Torah exactly as you describe. And it's exactly as the Talmud describes it, it was with a "Mitargaminan" with a translator. So the person would read the verses "Bereshit Barah Elohim et aha Shamayim ve'et HaAretz"  And in the same chant, someone would say, "In the beginning, God created the heavens in the earth." And it was such a moving experience because we forget so many times when we read from the Torah publicly, what an empowering spiritual, and I would say, revolutionary, democratizing thing that we are doing in terms of "you need to understand this". This is not something that's hidden. This is not something that we don't want you to understand. We want you to ask every question and to provide your novel explanation. And there's the music, you're absolutely right, you can approach it on every different level.   Michael Posnik  24:56 What you said before, about reading is also listening And the question is for each of us, what are we listening to? While that's going on. What are we hearing? And how deeply does the listening go? In in real terms, what are we actually hearing? or listening to? When we hear the words of the Torah? This is a real question, I think for all of us, and not just the Torah, the davening (praying)  all of it, what are we really, really listening to? What are those words? Really? How deep do those words go? Because they come from a deep place. Do we hear it? how deeply do we go?   Geoffrey Stern  25:42 I totally agree. The only thing that I would add and I want to pick up on Rabbi Adam's earlier comment about the Vilna Gaon saying that when Joshua wrote the last eight verses of the Torah that describe Moses death, Moses had actually scrambled it, Joshua put out the letters, and had the letters combined. And for those of you who know, Hasidic stories, about the High Holidays, you probably have all heard one version or another of the beautiful story.  It's the last service on the holiest day of the year of Yom Kippur. And the name of the service is Ne'ilah, because the gates of prayer are about to close. And everybody is thirsty and hungry, and waiting for those gates to close, and for the shofar to be sounded so they can all go home and eat. And there is the great Hasidic rabbi, whether it's the Ba'al Shem Tov or the Maggid of Mezrich, who knows who is standing and waiting and waiting, and the stars come out, and the sun goes down, and he's waiting, and he's waiting. And finally, 20 minutes after he should have closed the ark, he closes it. And all of the students come and the people say what happened. And he said, there was a little peasant boy in the back, and the peasant boy had never gone to a Cheder, never gone into Hebrew school, never learned anything except the Aleph bet. And all he was doing was repeating over the letters of the alphabet of the Aleph Bet, and saying, God, you put them together into the prayer, and the Ba'al Shem Tov said, we've been here for 24 hours, we've been here for 10 days, we've been here for the whole month of Ellul, and we haven't been able to break through the gates of prayer, and the purity and the intensity of this child's repeating over the Aleph Beit (in the same way that Joshua repeated it over, according to the Vilna Gaon story) is what has opened up the gates of prayer. And I just have always been struck by that question, because yes, Michel, it is the depth of the message. But sometimes, it's just the sound of the letter possibly, or in this case, coming from my kind of research in the last few days. Maybe it's just the revolution of that alphabet, the fact that we all have the right and the ability to portray ourselves and to express ourselves. But I love that story. And I love the fact that yes, it's at every level.   Adam Mintz  28:33 I mean, that story captures really, what, what it means to to appreciate experience. I mean, here, Geoffrey, you're really jumping from reading to experiential. And I think that's probably what Buber meant. You need to experience the text, not just to read it.   Geoffrey Stern  28:54 Yeah, the prayer that we say that really comes to mind is the Ashamnu new prayer. It's the prayer where we confess all of our sins, it's only said on Yom Kippur, and it's in alphabetical order. And according to Buber, who you just mentioned, the reason why the Ba'al Shem Tov explained, is he says, if you're doing your sins, there's no end to it. So luckily, the alphabet has only these 22 letters. So we can we can end somewhere. But again, it just seems throughout the whole day, and I encourage all of you to pay attention to the machzor to the prayer book. There seems to be such an emphasis on the alphabetical acrostics, whether it's in the poems in the Piyuttim, or whether in the Ashamnu prayer, and there's something special there. There's something special about the alphabet and I'm not talking even on a mystical level, just that we revolutionized the world and we were part of that revolution, in giving every Jew and every human being the ability to decode the meaning of past generations and make their contribution into the future. And that's an awesome responsibility, but also an amazing capability that we have   Adam Mintz  30:19 Amazing. So how are we going to bring this back to, to the shmita? and to the Torah that was placed in front of the people. How did how does all this relate to that Geoffrey in our last minute?   Geoffrey Stern  30:33 Well, it just seems to me that the fact that this rule was brought up at the very end of the Torah, almost as the climax, shows how important it is the contribution of our tradition, that the Torah and the words that are written on it, are so so valued. Anybody who comes to a synagogue is so impressed by the fact that there are no images but the ark opens up and we worship our book, we are called the People of the Book. And that's our contribution that the value of the written word and the spoken word and the heard word and the transmission of that word. And the conversation is ultimately one of our most proudest and most awe inspiring contributions to the world. And to me, it's something that we have to rejoice in and also be obligated by   Adam Mintz  31:35 that's a beautiful thought Geoffrey, as we enter Yom Kippur, I want to wish everybody a Shabbat Shalom, thank you, Geoffrey, and g'mar Hatimah Tovah. Everybody should have an easy and meaningful fast and we look forward to next Friday. So on Yom Kippur, you can be looking forward to your Madlik class the following day, that we're going to be talking the parsha of Ha'Azinu next week. Shabbat Shalom, everybody.   Geoffrey Stern  31:58 Shabbat Shalom and an easy fast and a wonderful Shabbat to you all. Look forward to seeing you next week.

Truth of the Spirit
ROS175: Holy Mary God's Blueprint for Mankind

Truth of the Spirit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 24:20


When God created Holy Mary within the womb of her mother Ann, He restored the blueprint of mankind to his original specifications. Truth of the Spirit with Patti Brunner presents TOS175 Holy Mary God's Blueprint for Mankind. The Blessed Mother Mary, like Eve, was created in God's image. Holy of Holies and Hebrews http://www.PatriarchMinistries.com/171 http://www.PatriarchMinistries.com/175  

Truth of the Spirit
TOS171: Holy of Holies and Hebrews - Blueprint of God's Plan

Truth of the Spirit

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 35:54


Truth of the Spirit with Patti Brunner describes God's plan of the Tabernacle, especially the plans for the Holy of Holies and the High Priest, which is revealed in the Old Testament book of Exodus and the New Testament book of Hebrews. TOS171 Holy of Holies & Hebrews - Blueprint of God's Plan helps find God's Plan for you when we look for the combination of the teaching from of old fulfilled in Christ then consider the meaning for each of the members of Christ's Body. Holy of Holies & Hebrews-Blueprint of God's Plan http://PatriarchMinistries.com/171 Tabernacle of the Lord http://PatriarchMinistries.com/83  

The Gottesdienst Crowd
[Gottesblog] Luecke Contra Baptism — Larry Beane

The Gottesdienst Crowd

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 29:57


Luecke Contra Baptism I would like to thank the Rev. Dr. David S. Luecke for providing a stark contrast between his Church Growth Movement (CGM) approach to liturgy and sacraments vs. what Gottesdienst has been not only advocating, but putting into practice for going on thirty years. His undated piece “Avoid Sacramentalism in Ministry” from his What Happened to our Churches? blog is a case in point. This article is a valuable example of why Gottesdienst exists, and why the work of pastors and the laity in the ongoing restoration of biblical theology and reverence in worship is not only needed, but is making a difference. He begins his piece by pointing out that the local Baptist Moody radio station “dropped broadcasts of the Lutheran hour” because of The Lutheran Hour's emphasis on “Baptism as a key to salvation.” He laments this as a “first-class communications problem,” and the fault for this “error” was “with Lutheran preachers.” He accuses Lutheran pastors of holding to an ex opere operato theology of Holy Baptism divorced from the Word and from the Holy Spirit. Luecke sums up his explanation of how salvation works, that the Holy Spirit works through the Word, and the water merely “visualizes” the Word. He never mentions Jesus or the cross in his mini-presentation of the ordo salutis in his own words. In fact, Dr. Luecke has a strange articulation of his confession of the Holy Trinity: All Protestants affirm the Trinity of Three Persons in One God, a concept very hard to understand. Calvinist focus on the First-Person God the Father. Lutherans emphasize the Second-Person God the Son. God the Spirit has been much neglected mostly because his role as Lord and Giver of church life was not needed when lively church life was heavily institutionalized. The rapidly growing Pentecostal movement of the last 100 years features the Third-Person Spirit. For Paul Christ and the Holy Spirit are inter-changeable. He attributes the same function in one place to Christ and another place to the Spirit. For Paul the Spirit is Christ present with us now [emphasis added]. Dr. Luecke's assertion of Lutheran pastors severing faith from Holy Baptism is a straw man argument. He never sites any source of this apparently rampant false doctrine among Lutheran clergy, in which Baptism is treated as a magic ceremony independent of the Holy Spirit, the Word of God, and presumably, our Lord Jesus Christ who told us to “make disciples” by baptizing them in the first place. And Dr. Luecke blames the Lutherans (Walt Kowalsky was right!) and acts as if being removed from the Moody radio station is a bad thing. In reality, The Lutheran Hour deserves kudos for not being afraid to confess our theology. Were a Baptist to read the Small Catechism's seven questions and answers on the Chief Part of Holy Baptism, he would reject it as false doctrine. I was raised in the Baptist Church. I'm grateful for the biblical instruction that I had as a child, as well as learning who Jesus is and why the cross matters. The people of my little Baptist congregation were confessors of the Gospel. That said, Baptists and Lutherans believe entirely different things about Holy Baptism. Moody's doctrinal statement is utterly silent about the sacraments. Dr. Luecke admits that Baptists reject infant baptism, mirroring their snarky tone about “sprinkling water on a baby” having nothing to do with one's “relationship with God.” Dr. Luecke also uses the curious term “water baptism” - a distinction often used among charismatics to distinguish actual baptism from a laying on of hands that accompanies “speaking in tongues” (which they call “baptism of the Spirit”). As an aside, Dr. Luecke says that he doesn't have the “gift of tongues,” but he recognizes modern glossolalia as valid in a response to a person who claims to “speak in tongues”: I did not intend to belittle something that has been a defining feature for millions of enthusiastic believers. I intended just to say that I have not been given that gift. I am appealing to a much broader audience than those who have had the experience of speaking in tongues. I gave my understanding of it as an emotional expression. Many Lutheran pastors have hostility toward charismatics from the conflicts involving charismatics in congregations in the 60s and 70s. I respect charismatics for their energy. Yours is the first expression of your prayer language being very rational. God bless your gift and the Giver. Moody is also to be commended for their faithfulness to their theology. They recognize what Luecke doesn't want to: that neo-Evangelicals and Lutherans have incompatible theologies of baptism, and of the sacraments in general. Dr. Luecke longs for a kind of faux unity by having The Lutheran Hour either compromise our theology, or dishonestly put it under a bushel. Dr. Luecke recognizes the inroads of the liturgical renewal that began in the middle of the twentieth century, as North American Lutherans began to dig out of the Pietist hole that their forbears, trying to fit in with a contemporary Protestant culture, fell into decades earlier - a cultural upheaval when the English language displaced the German during and after World War One. He describes his discomfort with “young pastors” and their “tendency toward sacramentalism” - which he defines as “treating the sacraments as more important than the Word.” Again, this is a straw man. The problem is actually the opposite of Dr. Luecke's complaint. While it is still not uncommon for a Lutheran congregation to have a Service of the Word without Holy Communion, I have never heard of a Service of the Sacrament without the Word. Can Dr. Luecke point to a single example of a Lutheran Divine Service that skips the Bible readings, omits the sermon, and heads right into the Eucharist? But we do see, again and again, especially in non-liturgical “church growth” congregations, the omission of the Sacrament rather than the omission of the Word. In some cases, non-liturgical churches boast about their “seeker sensitive” approach that pushes the Sacrament of the Altar to the fringes, perhaps only celebrating it once a month. I cannot imagine how malnourishing such a bland diet would be. It is a repudiation of our confession that Holy Communion strengthens our faith. And this is why Christians from time immemorial gathered on the Lord's Day for the “breaking of bread” - that is until men of Dr. Luecke's generation and inclination decided that what we needed was less Holy Communion. As to the accusation of “treating the sacraments as more important than the Word,” Gottesdienst's print journal is immersed in the Word of God. I've been the sermons editor for more than a decade. Every issue includes sermons. We insist that preaching be bound by, and centered on, the biblical text, the Word of God, as opposed to anecdotes, cutesy stories, emotional glurge, object lessons, or pop culture commentary. We also have regular columns devoted to the exegesis of Scripture. I have been to many Divine Services and other prayer offices at Gottesdienst events. The Word is always powerfully preached and proclaimed. I have never seen Dr. Luecke in attendance at any of them. This is a common straw man among our critics, that we - as I heard recently - pay more attention to “the proper form of a stole to proclaiming the pure Gospel” - and that this explains the decline of Christianity in our country, in the west, and around the world. This mirrors Dr. Luecke's Theology of Glory, in which he asserts that the number of the butts in the pews is in direct proportion to the faithfulness of the preacher and the correctness of the church's method of worship. The fact of the matter is that the editors and bloggers of Gottesdienst are parish pastors, some having been for decades - not primarily professors, experts in industrial organization, bureaucrats, theorists, academicians, or consultants about how to grow a church. And in the course of years of actual parish ministry, one sees the power of the Word of God, through preaching, through Baptism and the Lord's Supper, through Confession and Absolution, through praying the Psalms, through the liturgy, on deathbeds, in times of personal and family angst, in tragedy, in bringing Christ to bear in the midst of the Culture of Death and a world that is repulsed by the cross. Actual parish pastors baptize the babies - sometimes with an eye dropper. They also bury the babies and console the grieving parents who are comforted by our emphasis on baptism. They also baptize adults, and in some cases, the elderly. They teach the Word in Bible classes, in youth catechesis, and in sermons - week in and week out. They bring both Word and Sacrament to shut-ins and to the hospitalized. They proclaim the Word of God as their parishioners breathe out their final breath on this side of the grave. And in fact, we are so focused on the Word of God, we use the traditional liturgy! Your Lutheran Service Book (LSB) has the biblical references embedded in the liturgy on every page. The Church has used the liturgy for well over 1,500 years precisely because the liturgy is grounded in the living Word of God. In fact, the deviants from the liturgy are those who move away from the Word into the realm of either reason (as many of the Reformed do), emotion (as many neo-Evangelicals do), phony signs and wonders (as many Pentecostals and Charismatics do), or magisterial mysticism (as many Roman Catholics do). Dr. Luecke suffers from the Grass Is Always Greener syndrome - as do many cradle Lutherans who take their treasure for granted. As a convert, I see the futility of lusting after popularity by adopting worship alien to our confessions. I have been there, and done that - with all of its strengths and weaknesses. The reality is that we have the best of both worlds in our Lutheran confession: a rigorous cruciform theology informed not by direct revelation, the magisterium, or by a complex matrix of popes and councils, not by logic and reason, not by ginned up emotion and navel-gazing, but by the Word of God, sola scriptura. And we retain the biblical practice of baptismal regeneration and of the Lord's own words concerning His Supper (as the great I AM proclaims the great THIS IS), as well as retaining the biblical practice of Holy Absolution according to our Lord's institution. Dr. Luecke presents a false either/or dichotomy that offers us only option A) The Word or option B) the sacraments, without an option C) all of the above. And in fact, the real, fully-lived Christian life is not a multiple choice quiz, but rather an essay, a narrative, that is, the Gospel of Jesus Christ: His incarnation, birth, ministry, passion, death, resurrection, ascension, and the consummation of His coming again in glory. I would agree with Dr. Luecke if his critique were a caution against the danger falling into ex opere operato (seeing baptism and all other liturgical acts as a work severed from faith). For this warning is strewn about the Book of Concord. It is one of the chief criticisms of Rome. And where I see it is in the good intention of grandparents whose faithless children will not baptize or raise their own children in the faith. And so pious grandparents, lovingly desperate for the salvation of their grandchildren, will sometimes inquire about bringing their grandchildren to church to baptize them independent of the parents' wishes or intention to raise them as Christians. Sometimes grandparents will ask about doing a sort-of secret emergency baptism themselves (a situation so common that an episode of All in the Family depicted Archie Bunker doing this very thing). Their motivation is love. But we have to gently remind them that baptism is not a silver bullet, that faith matters, that like a seed that is watered, the ongoing life of the seedling requires ongoing care lest it die. Those with any time in the pastoral office has had to encounter this real-world situation. But Dr. Luecke is instead condemning those who worship by means of the liturgy, in “traditional churches,” and especially in “highly liturgical churches” and their pastors who emphasize Holy Baptism in the life of the Christian. Dr. Luecke refers back to Dr. Luther's famous dictum that when he was tormented by the devil, he would made the good confession: “I am baptized.” Dr. Luecke cautions, “This can be taken to mean he relied on the act of water baptism for his identity as a believer.” This shows that Dr. Luecke doesn't understand the Lutheran confession of Holy Baptism. Baptism is our identity as a believer. It is how disciples are made. It is the objective declaration of God of His objective work of regeneration. Otherwise, Dr. Luther would not refer back to it, but would rather exclaim, “I have faith.” The problem is that faith is subjective. It is impossible to quantify. Holy Baptism is objective. It is binary: you either are, or you are not. And Holy Baptism delivers faith. Nowhere in the Scriptures are we taught to sever the two, nor are we to treat baptism as a mere human act publicly acknowledging our faith (as is the Baptist confession). Rather, we confess baptism as “the washing of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit.” To be baptized is to be born again. And in our first birth, we draw our first breath in the world. In our second birth, we draw our first breath in eternity. How can a Lutheran remove baptism from his identity? Baptism and faith are intertwined, but it is baptism that is the objective, extra nos reality to which a person whose faith may be tried and frayed can point. And that reality delivers faith as a gift. The remembrance of baptism strengthens our faith. Faith is not substitute for baptism. This is a theology alien to our Lutheran confession. I remember listening to the radio on a long drive across the entire state of Pennsylvania and the only thing I could pick up was a religious station. A Baptist pastor was preaching a thunderous fire-and-brimstone sermon, but at one point in his preaching, he broke down in tears. He could not determine if his faith were sufficient. He was broken and demoralized, and had no objective means of faith, nothing outside of himself and his own sinful works to which to anchor himself. This is the crabgrass that Dr. Luecke is peering at over the fence, convincing himself that it is greener. And it is, like the “sign” of “speaking in tongues,” a navel-gazing subjective self-validation of one's salvation as opposed to the objective, divinely-focused nature of Holy Baptism as a reality of the New Birth in a Christian's life. Dr. Luecke criticizes the mid twentieth century rediscovery of the liturgy as a blessing to the faith and life of the individual Christian and of the Church, as a “wrong turn.” He creates another straw man that emphasizing “renewing the forms and rituals of public worship” is antithetical to “the Word of God itself” and to “relationships.” This is not only factually untrue, it is a weird display of mental gymnastics. For ritual doesn't take away from relationships. In fact, all forms of relationships involve ritual. For example, I don't know if Dr. Lueke is married or not, but if so, I would be willing to wager that this entrance into a sacred relationship with his wife was accompanied by ritual, and it was probably quite traditional. She probably wore a wedding dress as opposed to a pair of blue jeans. Likewise, he was probably wearing, if not a tuxedo, some form of suit and tie (a form of male vesture dating back to the Pagan French Revolution). The wedding service was likely liturgical, as opposed to being ex corde. Interestingly, in my experience, weddings are an example in which Baptists actually follow a more liturgical form than the usual loosely-liturgical Sunday service. Words are read out of the book, and the couple and the pastor engage in a formal rote recitation. And likewise, married- and family-life involves a lot of rituals. I don't know if Dr. Luecke has children or not, but if so, I would bet that every year on the natal anniversary of his wife and children, the family would gather for a liturgy of sorts, a ritual involving a special meal, candles, and the singing of a particular traditional song. And far from standing in opposition to the idea of relationship, such rituals are like glue that bonds relationships. I wonder what Dr. Lueke thinks of the traditional ritual of celebrating one's baptismal birthday with the lighting of a candle and saying certain prayers. And of course, there are many social liturgies, like the Pledge of Allegiance and the National Anthem, fireworks on the fourth, handshakes, retirement dinners, clinking glasses together in a toast, the seventh-inning stretch, the starting pistol at the beginning of the race, clapping at the conclusion of a recital, eating popcorn at the movie theater, etc. All of these rituals foster relationships. They do not impede them. In the Church, we often refer to the Lord's Supper as “Holy Communion.” It is a “communion,” a ritual act of relationship between believers and God as well as believers to each other. How liturgy is seen in opposition to such relationships beggars belief. Nearly every act of human relationship involves rituals, formal and informal. Social iconoclasm leads only to the breakdown of civilization and the destruction of the faith - not to mention a destruction of relationships through deracination and atomization, creating a vacuum to be filled with a selfish desire for personal entertainment and the treating of “butts in the pews” as an impersonal, ego-driven barometer of faith and faithfulness. Dr. Luecke displays a shocking ignorance of history and of the Bible itself by arguing that “the roots” of our liturgical rituals: go back to the fourth century when the now-official Christian church began adopting special rituals, robes, and parades with incense of pagan worship. Pagan worship was meant to impress the gods, so they would look favorably on human efforts. Quality was important for that purpose. Emphasizing those rituals led to the sacramentalism that forms were more important than the Word of God itself. And herein lies the heart of the matter of Dr. Luecke's iconoclastic rebellion against the liturgy and the sacraments - and to be blunt, his rebellion against the Word of God itself. While some of our specific clerical vestments have their roots in the Greco-Roman world of our Lord, the apostles, and the Pagan (and later Christian) Roman Empire, the idea of liturgical vestments when ministering in the presence of God is an Old Testament idea. That which Dr. Luecke dismissively calls “robes” and other liturgical accoutrements are, per his argument, of Pagan origin to “impress the gods.” If Dr. Luecke were to read Exodus and Leviticus, he would learn what God's preferences are. When He appeared to Moses in the burning bush, God instructed Moses to remove his sandals, as this was a place of holiness - set apart from the ordinary because of the miraculous presence of God. He did not tell Moses “come as you are” or champion casualness as a virtue in the presence of God. And our Lutheran confession of the Lord's Supper is that it is a miracle, that Jesus is truly present in an incarnate, physical form occupying space and time. It is His same body born of the Virgin Mary, the same blood shed on the cross. It is not a symbol. It is not a “spiritual presence.” It is a miraculous manifestation of God in our midst: God in our sanctuary, God on our altar, God given to us to eat and drink and take into ourselves bodily, according to His Word and institution. This is why our churches are called “sanctuaries” - holy places - no less holy than the Holy of Holies in the tabernacle and temple. Why we would treat this most sublime gift and reality with anything less than complete awe and wonder and reverence can only be described by one word: disbelief. When the time came for the Lord to dwell among His people by means of His miraculous presence, the Lord Himself instructed that a beautiful tabernacle be constructed, with specific instructions for top quality items of beauty to be used in a liturgical setting. The priests were to be vested as they carried out their ministry, with fine linen, gems, and colorful cloth of superlative workmanship. God's house was to be adorned in the finest of silver and gold and other metals, with beautiful fabrics and artwork. And there are also liturgical instructions regarding ordinations, daily and weekly worship, and an annual calendric cycle. And it is impossible to read the Lord's worship preferences and not come away convinced that God prefers liturgy, ritual, beauty, reverence, and yes, “quality” when it comes to His presence on earth. There are no examples in Scripture of the miraculous presence of God being accompanied by come-as-you-are casualness and an entertainment emphasis. And there was also incense. Incense is a powerful image, the use of which is mandated in Old Testament worship, is referred to in Psalm 141 as symbolic of prayer, was presented to our Lord by the Magi, was part of our Lord's ritual of His burial, and is also mentioned numerous times in the Book of Revelation. Incense is not of Pagan origin, but Pagans copied it from the worship of the true God. The words “incense” and “frankincense” appear 110 times in the ESV translation, including both God's delight in it, as well as his condemnation of it being offered to false gods, or even to Himself by those who were not called to lead worship. Dr. Luecke's brand of de-emphasis of baptism, his anticlericalism and his innovationism is the real problem in the Church. It must be stamped out by constant and consistent catechesis (including by the teaching that happens by means of ceremonies), by a renewed biblical literacy, by a rediscovery of our Book of Concord and our Church History, by liturgical preaching, by embracing not American sectarianism but our Evangelical Catholic confession of the traditional, unchanging, apostolic faith, and by rejecting the idea that popularity is what determines righteousness. This latter one is the rotten fruits of the Church Growth Movement's libido numerandi and lusting after the ego-stroke of big churches and big budgets. Can you imagine if we raised our children to cultivate a desire to be popular? Would we advise our sons to do drugs? Would we advise our daughters to be promiscuous? Why do CGM advocates embrace worldly popularity as a gage of “church success.” Have they not read our Lord's words? Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many. For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few. These two verses are a repudiation of Dr. Luecke's entire career as a CGM advocate. I would posit that if he has baptized one baby in the course of his ministry, he has done more good for the growth of the kingdom than his entire corpus of books and articles. And when our Lord returns to this decimated, fallen world finding only a remnant of believers, He will not scold us for not being worldly enough, with our churches being too small, with not enough butts in the pews - but will commend His Bride for her faithfulness to His Word, promise, and command: Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.

UBM Unleavened Bread Ministries

Tests Prove Who is the Bride (Audio) David Eells - 7/25/21 Man-child Tests and Choses the Bride Eve Brast - 7/20/21 (David's notes in red)   I dreamed that I (Eve, the bride of the first Adam as a type of the Bride of the last Adam, Jesus.) was in a large convention center where a World Fair of some sort was being held. (The World Fair [which Eve did not know began Friday the 23rd in Japan so this is a confirmation of timing.] with all its events and attractions represents our lives and our walk through Babylon; the distractions and trials that we go through on our way through to conquering our promised land.) My oldest son, Noah, and I were signed up, along with a small group of people, to participate in all the different booths, activities, or “attractions” of the fair. (Noah and his family were the remnant who were saved in the flood. (Representing a time of judgment on the world. Major parts of the world are at this time being flooded by weather warfare and dams are being destroyed. Deep underground DS Military bases and tunnels are being flooded now.) They were a kind of first fruits of God's new creation after the flood. My son Noah was my first born son. (He represents a corporate body of the first fruits of the Bride body. Noah represents the spiritual man of the Bride body of believers and overcomers.)  There were many other groups of people who were also signed up to participate in the different events. Everyone was hoping to receive the grand prize for the successful completion (overcoming in) of all of the events (or tests). There were lesser rewards to be had but, the grand prize was the most desirable reward and the one everyone was going for. (The prize itself was to be chosen as the Bride as we will see. It is important to note that the Church is not the Bride as some simplistically say, but is chosen out of the Church. Esther, the Bride, was chosen out of all the fair virgins of the kingdom to be the Bride of one who was at that time the”King of kings”.  And this after Vashti was rejected because she did not obey the King. Also in SoS, the Shulammite, meaning perfected one, was chosen out of all the women of the kingdom. Son 6:8-9  There are threescore queens, and fourscore concubines, And virgins without number.  9  My dove, my undefiled, is but one; She is the only one of her mother; She is the choice one of her that bare her. The daughters saw her, and called her blessed; Yea, the queens and the concubines, and they praised her. Also in Psa 45 the Bride raised up the virgins to know the Lord. Jesus always taught in His parables the Jewish Marriage ceremony in which everyone was accounted for in the Church. There was the Bride, the virgins who escort her to the grooms home after the marriage feast, the friend of the Bridegroom, and those receiving the invitations. In Revelation 19 the Bride had on a lampros garment, meaning not only white but glowing. There we see that those invited had on a leukos garment meaning white. Of course the Bride does not receive an invitation to her own marriage. (Eve: Not everyone that starts out will finish the race in first place [to receive the crown]. Mat. 22:14  Many are called but few chosen. (Chosen here has more than one meaning depending on the text. There are those chosen to be in the Bride, virgins, Man-child, or to just be saved when many fall away, as in the parable of the sower.) 1 Co 9:24-27 Know ye not that they that run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? Even so run; that ye may attain. 25 And every man that striveth in the games exerciseth self-control in all things. Now they do it to receive a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible. 26 I therefore so run, as not uncertainly; so fight I, as not beating the air: 27 but I buffet my body, and bring it into bondage: lest by any means, after that I have preached to others, I myself should be rejected.) As Noah and I looked around at all the different booths or activities, they all seemed very harrowing, challenging and difficult to endure. (Jesus said, “He that endureth [meaning the trials] to the end shall be saved.")  Noah asked me, “Are you sure that you want to go through all of this? It all looks pretty hard!” (Luke 14:25-33 Now there went with him great multitudes: and he turned, and said unto them, 26 If any man cometh unto me, and hateth not his own father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple. 27 Whosoever doth not bear his own cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple. 28 For which of you, desiring to build a tower, doth not first sit down and count the cost, whether he have wherewith to complete it? 29 Lest haply, when he hath laid a foundation, and is not able to finish, all that behold begin to mock him, 30 saying, This man began to build, and was not able to finish… 33 So therefore whosoever he be of you that renounceth not all that he hath, he cannot be my disciple.) (What tower do we need to build in our lives? It is Jerusalem who John in Rev 21:9 was told by an angel represents the Bride who was being born out of heaven. Mic 4:8  And thou, O tower of the flock, the hill of the daughter of Zion, unto thee shall it come, yea, the former dominion shall come, the kingdom of the daughter of Jerusalem.) I said to Noah, “Well, it's the only way to receive the grand prize; so I guess so." I knew that one had to complete every event or trial successfully in order to win the grand prize. (So be diligent my friends to treat everything as a trial to win the prize. If you fail get up and get it right.) I also understood that there really wasn't a choice. We could either submit ourselves to each of the events or trials and contend for the grand prize or drop out of the competition and be disqualified. (The grand prize is "the high calling of God in Christ".)  (God is sovereign over every trial and hardship we are subjected to in life. If we remember that he has ordained them and tailor made them for each of us out of love and care for our souls to mature and perfect us, then we will spend less time questioning God or being angry at God or wasting a lot of time in anger, resentment, unforgiveness and self-pity. We will be at peace; trusting God and focusing on fighting the good fight of the faith to overcome. Rom 8:28 And we know that to them that love God [whom He said would keep His commandments, which is the trial] all things work together for good, even to them that are called according to his purpose. God is not a liar! Believe what His Word says. 1 Co. 9:27  but I buffet my body, and bring it into bondage: lest by any means, after that I have preached to others, I myself should be rejected.) I wasn't sure, at this point in the dream, what the grand prize was, but I knew it was something that I had always wanted and that it was my heart's desire. (Psalm 37:4-5, Delight thyself also in Jehovah; And he will give thee the desires of thy heart. 5 Commit thy way unto Jehovah; Trust also in him, and he will bring it to pass.) The first event that we came to was called, “Can You Stand the Pressure?”. It was a very large and deep vinyl swimming pool; about 20 feet deep. The participants had to crawl underneath the bottom of the white, vinyl pool liner and withstand the weight and pressure of the water bearing down upon their frame for a certain length of time. (The number 20 can, at times, mean a complete or perfect waiting period. For 20 years Jacob waited to get possession of his wives and property, and to be freed from the control of Laban his father-in-law. For 20 years the children of Israel waited to be freed of Jabin, king of Canaan, who oppressed them. Gods response was to raise up Deborah and Barak, who freed the people from bondage. In the days of Samuel the prophet the Philistines battled and overcame Israel, taking the Ark of the Covenant back to their land. It ended up in the city of Kirjath-jearim, which is several miles west of Jerusalem. Israel had to wait at least 20 years before the Ark would be moved again.  (Enduring the weight of the water in the swimming pool represents enduring the discipline of obeying the washing of the water of the Word. Under the water in our baptism is the place the old life dies and then the prize of the resurrection life of Christ comes at the end. 1Co 10:13  There hath no temptation taken you but such as man can bear: but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation make also the way of escape, that ye may be able to endure it.) 2 Co. 4:7-11  But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, that the exceeding greatness of the power may be of God, and not from ourselves; 8 we are pressed on every side, yet not straitened; perplexed, yet not unto despair; 9 pursued, yet not forsaken; smitten down, yet not destroyed; 10 always bearing about in the body the dying of Jesus, that the life also of Jesus may be manifested in our body. 11 For we who live are always delivered unto death for Jesus'sake, that the life also of Jesus may be manifested in our mortal flesh.) If they succeeded to endure the water, then they were able to continue on to the next event, but many watched from the sidelines and became discouraged and disheartened immediately and refused to even attempt to participate in the event. This automatically disqualified them from the competition. (Many refuse to obey the word through faith to lose their old life by submitting to the washing of the Word as Jesus commanded. Mat. 16:25, For whosoever would save his life shall lose it: and whosoever shall lose his life for my sake shall find it.) (Mat 13:3-4,19  Behold, the sower went forth to sow; 4 and as he sowed, some seeds fell by the way side, and the birds came and devoured them... 19 When any one heareth the word of the kingdom, and understandeth it not, then cometh the evil one , and snatcheth away that which hath been sown in his heart. This is he that was sown by the way side.) The next event took place inside of a large, indoor aquarium tank filled with sharks. This event was called, “Do You Have the Faith?” The participants in this event had to tread water in the shark tank for a certain amount of time. (Like Noah we must stay above the waters of the curse of the word by faith or we die with the rest.) This was the most terrifying event for me because of a life-long fear of the ocean and of Jaws. At first I thought, “Okay, I can do this. I'll just tread water gently as to not excite the sharks and then they won't tear my limbs off.” (Many times we try to reason our way out of situations or think that we can utilize our own strength and ingenuity to get us out of trials or to get us through them. (God says in 1Jn 5:4  For whatsoever is begotten of God overcometh the world: and this is the victory that hath overcome the world, even our faith. The sharks represent the faction and persecutors who try to provoke us to fear but they cannot when we walk by faith in the promises.) I then realized that the shark handlers, who were underneath the water in black scuba gear, were chumming the water all around us and I began to get fearful and panicky. (These shark handlers represent the demons. (Who provoke their human hosts which they possess to devour us like the dragon of Rev.12.) God allows them to bring trials and temptations upon us in order to prove us. (just as satan did Jesus) Chumming the water is when fishermen dump buckets of raw meat and blood into the ocean around their boats to attract fish or sharks on purpose.) This caused several of the people in our group to freak out and swim quickly to get out of the water, at which point they were disqualified from the competition. Heb 3:14 for we are become partakers of Christ, if we hold fast the beginning of our confidence firm unto the end:  Mat 13: 5-6,20-21  5 and others fell upon the rocky places, where they had not much earth: and straightway they sprang up, because they had no deepness of earth [I.e. to feed the plant]: 6 and when the sun was risen, they were scorched; and because they had no root, they withered away... 20 And he that was sown upon the rocky places, this is he that heareth the word, and straightway with joy receiveth it; 21 yet hath he not root in himself, but endureth for a while; and when tribulation or persecution ariseth because of the word, straightway he stumbleth.) I thought, “This might be the end for me.” But I was willing to sacrifice my life, if necessary, to not be disqualified from the competition. I knew I had to stay in that tank until my time was up; there was no going back. I had come this far. (Mat. 16:25, For whosoever would save his life shall lose it (his carnal or fleshly life): and whosoever shall lose his (Carnal) life for my sake shall find it.) So I began to pray and intercede and bind the sharks from attacking me and it worked! (Mat 18:18  Verily I say unto you, What things soever ye shall bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and what things soever ye shall loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.) They never got closer than 5 feet away from me and my son (Fruit), Noah. (If we submit ourselves to the crucified life, God will give us the grace to overcome the trials. James 4:7 Be subject therefore unto God; but resist the devil, and he will flee from you.) I was so glad to have come through that trial unscathed and in one piece! I was praising the Lord for His Divine protection from the sharks and His faith, strength and resolve to endure that trial. (God always reminds us that His power is made perfect in (our) weakness. He will cause the situation to become too big for us so that we will turn to Him and exercise our faith in His ability to save, heal and deliver us.)   The next event was called, “Will You Faint and Fall Away?" This event was like a “Tilt-a-Whirl” at an amusement park where people would go in and stand up against the wall of the ride. It would begin spinning really fast and then the bottom of the floor would drop out from under us. After getting off of this ride, I noticed several of the participants were dizzy and disoriented and they were fainting and falling out. Because of this they were also disqualified from the competition. (Life can go at a dizzying pace and we can become disoriented with the hectic pace and the many temptations and distractions in life. The enemy will take advantage of these times when we haven't stayed in the Word. He will cause us to become discouraged and weary in well doing.  Gal. 6:7-9  Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. (We create our own future this way.) 8 For he that soweth unto his own flesh shall of the flesh reap corruption; but he that soweth unto the Spirit shall of the Spirit reap eternal life. 9 And let us not be weary in well-doing: for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not. Mat. 13:7,22  And others fell upon the thorns; and the thorns grew up and choked them… 22 And he that was sown among the thorns, this is he that heareth the word; and the care of the world, and the deceitfulness of riches, choke the word, and he becometh unfruitful.) The next event, or booth, was a shop filled with many different “lesser rewards” or trinkets and knick-knacks. (Which many people settle for) It was called, “What Will You Choose?” This was the last event or trial of the competition. As Noah and I looked around at all the different choices in the booth, I became overwhelmed. There were so many choices and all seemed very colorful and attractive, but none of it was my style. Nothing seemed like it would match the inside of my house. I said to Noah, “If this is all there is to choose from, then I won't choose any of it.” (The Bride wont settle for any of the things of this world. She only wants what the Holy Spirit of God wants for her. Est 2:15  Now when the turn of Esther, the daughter of Abihail the uncle of Mordecai, who had taken her for his daughter, was come to go in unto the king, she required nothing but what Hegai (representing the Holy Spirit) the king's chamberlain, the keeper of the women, appointed. And Esther obtained favor in the sight of all them that looked upon her.) At the moment when I was about to walk out empty handed, I noticed a figurine that had belonged to my maternal grandmother. I decided to choose it because I had always liked it growing up. (My maternal grandmother represents the ancient paths; the original church and the original church doctrines and teachings. Jer. 6:16 Thus saith Jehovah, Stand ye in the ways and see, and ask for the old paths, where is the good way; and walk therein, and ye shall find rest for your souls:) As I walked out of the booth carrying my grandmother's figurine, I was met by David Eells. (As a type of the David Man-child reformers) I greeted him and said, “Boy, I sure hope I will win the grand prize.” He placed his right arm around my shoulder and shook me a little as he said, “Well, of course you're gonna win it! I'll make sure of that!” (The David Man-child reformers job is to raise up the Bride to be acceptable to the King like Mordecai did Esther. The Kingdom is being restored in the type of David ruling over Jerusalem the Bride.  In Esther, none of the virgins were chosen to be in the Bride because they didn't please the Holy Spirit. And Vashti, who had the position, lost it because of rebellion against the Kings Word.) (Rom 8:28-30 And we know that to them that love God all things work together for good, even to them that are called according to his purpose. 29 For whom he foreknew, he also foreordained to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn (Noah) among many brethren: 30 and whom he foreordained, them he also called: and whom he called, them he also justified: and whom he justified, them he also glorified.) I thought to myself, “How can he be so sure that I'll win?” And then it was revealed to my understanding that David was the coordinator of the event and that he determined who would win the grand prize because he was the judge of all the events. (Jesus, who sat on the throne of David, chose the Bride when he chose His first disciples, who John the Baptist said was the Bride when he said, “He that hath the Bride is the Bridegroom".  (Heb 12:22-23  but ye are come unto mount Zion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to innumerable hosts of angels, 23 to the general assembly and church of the firstborn who are enrolled in heaven, and to God the Judge of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect,) I asked him, “What is the grand prize anyway?” He said, “It's your grandmother's house; bought and paid for!” (Which is the ancient Church's house, which we were never to depart from for man's religions.)  When I heard this I was so happy and wanted to cry because, in real life, I had always admired and wanted to have my grandmother's house since I was a kid. In my opinion this was the best prize I could have received. (Mat. 13:8,23  8 and others fell upon the good ground, and yielded fruit, some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty. 23 And he that was sown upon the good ground, this is he that heareth the word, and understandeth it; who verily beareth fruit, and bringeth forth, some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty.) After this David sent me and Noah over to the administration offices to claim the grand prize of the competition. I had to fill out some paperwork and then the house would belong to me. I would now be the owner. (The marriage ceremony in ancient Israel that Jesus used in his parables so much, included the Ketubah. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ketubah Ketubah - Wikipedia A Ketubah (Hebrew: כְּתוּבָּה ‎) is a Jewish marriage contract. It is considered an integral part of a traditional Jewish marriage, and outlines the rights and responsibilities of the groom, in relation to the bride.In modern practice, the ketubah has no agreed monetary value, and is seldom enforced by civil courts, except in Israel. en.wikipedia.org  - A Ketubah (Hebrew: כְּתוּבָּה ‎) is a Jewish marriage contract. It is considered an integral part of a traditional Jewish marriage, and outlines the rights and responsibilities of the groom, in relation to the bride. In modern practice, the ketubah has no agreed monetary value, and is seldom enforced by civil courts, except in Israel.) Then, I don't know if the scene changed or if it was a separate dream but, the next thing I knew, Michael and I were standing at the doorway of David's master bedroom. The lights were on in the room. We were looking at David lying on a narrow cot with his arms crossed over his chest. (This is the position of death on a cot, which is a temporary resting place. As we know after the death of the David Man-child company comes their resurrection to the throne of God's authority. And then, like Jesus, their example, they chose the Bride as we just saw.) Michael said, “Is he still breathing?” I leaned in and took a closer look at his chest and didn't see his chest rising and falling. Then I said, “No. His chest isn't moving. He's dead!” Then the dream ended. Mat. 13: 3-23. And he spake to them many things in parables, saying, Behold, the sower went forth to sow; 4 and as he sowed, some seeds fell by the way side, and the birds came and devoured them: 5 and others fell upon the rocky places, where they had not much earth: and straightway they sprang up, because they had no deepness of earth: 6 and when the sun was risen, they were scorched; and because they had no root, they withered away. 7 And others fell upon the thorns; and the thorns grew up and choked them: 8 and others fell upon the good ground, and yielded fruit, some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty. 9 He that hath ears, let him hear… (And the fruit of the sower, who was Jesus, is the manifestation of His Word in us. He is the Word made flesh and so must we be.) 18 Hear then ye the parable of the sower. 19 When any one heareth the word of the kingdom, and understandeth it not, then cometh the evil one , and snatcheth away that which hath been sown in his heart. This is he that was sown by the way side. 20 And he that was sown upon the rocky places, this is he that heareth the word, and straightway with joy receiveth it; 21 yet hath he not root in himself, but endureth for a while; and when tribulation or persecution ariseth because of the word, straightway he stumbleth. 22 And he that was sown among the thorns, this is he that heareth the word; and the care of the world, and the deceitfulness of riches, choke the word, and he becometh unfruitful. 23 And he that was sown upon the good ground, this is he that heareth the word, and understandeth it; who verily beareth fruit, and bringeth forth, some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty. How quickly God will forget your past if you repent!! Eze 18:21-24  But if the wicked turn from all his sins that he hath committed, and keep all my statutes, and do that which is lawful and right, he shall surely live, he shall not die.  22  None of his transgressions that he hath committed shall be remembered against him: in his righteousness that he hath done he shall live.  23  Have I any pleasure in the death of the wicked? saith the Lord Jehovah; and not rather that he should return from his way, and live? However  24  But when the righteous turneth away from his righteousness, and committeth iniquity, and doeth according to all the abominations that the wicked man doeth, shall he live? None of his righteous deeds that he hath done shall be remembered: in his trespass that he hath trespassed, and in his sin that he hath sinned, in them shall he die. So what shall we do? Php 3:12-15  Not that I have already obtained, or am already made perfect: but I press on, if so be that I may lay hold on that for which also I was laid hold on by Christ Jesus.  13  Brethren, I count not myself yet to have laid hold: but one thing I do, forgetting the things which are behind, and stretching forward to the things which are before.  14  I press on toward the goal unto the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.  15  Let us therefore, as many as are perfect, be thus minded: and if in anything ye are otherwise minded, this also shall God reveal unto you: What are the advantages of Being in the Bride?   They sit next to the King forever in the highest Holy of Holies like the Bride in Psalm 45. In Joel 2, as righteous Jerusalem, they escaped the beast who captured the rest of God's people in a tribulation. They conquered the Assyrian beast to save God's people. In Esther she had the Love, respect and ear of the King and brought down the beast Haman and his people to save the people of God. In SoS she raised up her little sister, the rest of the people of God, to enter the presence of the King. In the Gospels they raised up the Church and ordained the 5 fold ministries. In Rev. 3, the Philadelphia Church of brotherly love, they escaped the hour of trial that came on the rest of the Church and the whole world. This is not a rapture, she is supernaturally spared for she is not under the curse as we have seen. They were given the name of the New Jerusalem she is born from heaven and God's new name was written upon them. God's Hand Protects the First Fruits  Claire Pienaar - 6/28/21 (David's notes in red) I dreamed my husband Riaan and I, together with some others whom I did not recognize, were standing on the white deck of a boat. (This represents the remnant first fruits who are in God's Ark of safety floating above the waters of the curse.) I saw a hand come out of heaven and I heard the words from our Father say, “My hand covers my people.” (Psalm 91:1-12  He that dwelleth in the secret place of the Most High Shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. 2 I will say of Jehovah, He is my refuge and my fortress; My God, in whom I trust. 3 For he will deliver thee from the snare of the fowler, And from the deadly pestilence. 4 He will cover thee with his pinions, And under his wings shalt thou take refuge: His truth is a shield and a buckler. 5 Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night, Nor for the arrow that flieth by day; 6 For the pestilence that walketh in darkness, Nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday. 7 A thousand shall fall at thy side, And ten thousand at thy right hand; But it shall not come nigh thee. 8 Only with thine eyes shalt thou behold, And see the reward of the wicked. 9 For thou, O Jehovah, art my refuge! Thou hast made the Most High thy habitation; 10 There shall no evil befall thee, Neither shall any plague come nigh thy tent. 11 For he will give his angels charge over thee, To keep thee in all thy ways. 12 They shall bear thee up in their hands, Lest thou dash thy foot against a stone.) There was a tremor, or a push or jolt from somewhere. (Representing the tribulation shakings that are coming upon the world to get the attention of God's elect.) We fell overboard into the water below. (This represents being plunged into the tribulation in order to overcome the curses of this world.)  God's hand literally came into the water with us and became as a glass sheet between us and a giant sea creature. It was black and white like an Orca whale and had really sharp teeth. (This black and white sea creature represents the beast in the sea of this world. The beast is always looking to devour God's people like the dragon of Rev.12. The black and white means It has also been dictating to this world what is true and false and what is right and wrong Rev. 12:13-17 And when the dragon saw that he was cast down to the earth, he persecuted the woman that brought forth the man-child. 14 And there were given to the woman the two wings of the great eagle, that she might fly into the wilderness unto her place, where she is nourished for a time, and times, and half a time, from the face of the serpent. 15 And the serpent cast out of his mouth after the woman water as a river, that he might cause her to be carried away by the stream. [the woman here is the Church but within this larger body is the chosen bride.] 16 And the earth helped the woman, and the earth opened her mouth and swallowed up the river which the dragon cast out of his mouth. 17 And the dragon waxed wroth with the woman, and went away to make war with the rest of her seed, that keep the commandments of God, and hold the testimony of Jesus.) Our skin was glossy or shiny. (Representing the Bride's lampros garments which are the righteous acts of the saints according to Rev.19.) It was like God's hand had emitted some sort of repellent onto us so the sea creature could not devour us. There was no fear or confusion, and we breathed easily underwater.  (Meaning the waters of the curse can not kill them.) We were so small compared to this sea creature; we looked like shrimp. God's hand was over us the whole time. (Isa. 43:1-5 But now thus saith Jehovah that created thee, O Jacob, and he that formed thee, O Israel: Fear not, for I have redeemed thee; I have called thee by thy name, thou art mine. 2 When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee: when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned, neither shall the flame kindle upon thee. 3 For I am Jehovah thy God, the Holy One of Israel, thy Saviour; I have given Egypt as thy ransom, Ethiopia and Seba in thy stead. 4 Since thou hast been precious in my sight, and honorable, and I have loved thee; therefore will I give men in thy stead, and peoples instead of thy life. 5 Fear not; for I am with thee…) I asked the Lord for a word by faith at random and received Ezekiel 18:19 “Yet say ye, Wherefore doth not the son bear the iniquity of the father? When the son hath done that which is lawful and right, and hath kept all my statutes, and hath done them, he shall surely live.” (They are not under the genetic curse of the adamic nature passed down through their parents.) I asked Him for another Word, specifically about His hand, and received Hebrews 3:7, with my finger on Holy Spirit. (In context 7-9) 7 Wherefore, even as the Holy Spirit saith, To-day if ye shall hear his voice, 8 Harden not your hearts, as in the provocation, Like as in the day of the trial in the wilderness (tribulation), 9 Where your fathers tried me by proving me, And saw my works forty years (the number of tribulation).    The False House of Satan  Graham Gelinas - 6/29/21 (David's note in red) Andrew Gelinas said, “My youngest son Graham, who is seven, had this dream. I wrote it down for him and I tried to stay as true to his words as possible.  Graham said, I dreamed I was at the playground, and Daddy was talking to another grown-up nearby, as my sister, and two brothers played. Then a weird guy came up to me. He had long black hair in a topknot, a pointy black beard, and was wearing a long sleeved blue shirt, purple shorts, and shiny black dress shoes. He seemed like a homeless person because his clothes were shredded up, and he walked crooked like someone who was drunk or like he had two broken legs. (This is satan who walks crooked and he is homeless because he is rejected from God's true house.)  He asked me "Do you want a house?” (Andrew: In the natural, we are very thankful and content with being able to rent the house we're in now. But satan has tried and failed many times in the past to try to tempt us to want more. In the same way he did to Jesus in the wilderness. I guess he figured, since he failed at snaring me, he'd try enticing my youngest son. Too bad for him, Graham loves the Lord, and already has more of the Word in him at seven years old, than 90% of the apostate church! (The tempter is always trying to lead the immature into the house of dead religion.) I hesitantly answered “Sure.” But I didn't really feel like I wanted it. (The Spirit says, NO) Then the man answered, "Good! It's right down the street.” So we went to look at it. The house was a blackish-gray colored, creepy looking mansion with two floors and a basement. (Satan has been successful in tempting many to accept a house that is not God's House. This house represents the dead [gray] and dark [black] house of “creepy” false religion. And there is convenient access to them for they are "right down the street”.  Then the sky got dark all of the sudden and it started to rain so we went inside. (The coming storm will tempt many to take shelter in the houses of false religion at first but like many of us they will recognize that something is morally and Biblically wrong there.) There were cobwebs and spiders in all the corners and in the center of the house. (These spiders and their webs represent the demon spirits and their traps that are multiplied in our lives as a result of disobedience.) There were two staircases; one going up, and the other down. I went downstairs into the basement after I heard something fall. I saw that it was a large fruit tree, encircled by seven smaller dead plants. (Many “fall” in these impostor houses and lose their fruit and the divisions of the larger fruit tree that fell come from the seven churches of revelation. The promise in each of these are "to him that overcometh” and they fall because they become convinced there that they dont have to overcome.) The seven plants were wilted in a way that made them appear to be bowing down to the large fallen tree. (This is because they all are part of the corporate fallen tree of dead religion called the harlot because they are unfaithful to the seed of God which is His Word and are instead full of the seed of the world and satan.) The fallen tree was covered in green leaves and had the forbidden fruit all over it. (The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil according to man, which we are not to partake of.) Then, as I was looking at it, it suddenly rose back up, then fell down again. But this time, it stayed down, shriveled up, and died forever. Then the seven little plants encircling it, snapped in half, and fell to the ground. And they died forever too. (Many of the apostates who stay in the apostate organized church system will end up in hell for eternity because they worshipped a false Jesus and will not come out from among them to follow the reformers with the true Word. This is just as it was in Jesus' day.) Then we drove back home. We went home, but it was our true home. (Some who escape the false house will return to their old home which is the original and true home of early discipleship to Christ.) That's when I woke up and I felt shivery. (Yes. It's a cold cruel world among apostate Christianity; living under the curses of sin and rebellion to God's Word and separated from Christ by their own self-works.) (I prayed with Graham, asking the Lord for a verse by faith at random. Then I held out the Bible to Graham, and flipped the pages rapidly as he closed his eyes and stuck his finger down on a page. His finger landed on the word “Hand” in Mark 12:36  David himself said in the Holy Spirit, ‘The Lord said to my Lord, “Sit at my right hand, until I put your enemies beneath your feet.) (The Lord put the sheep on His right and He will put their enemies under their feet.  The goats will be on His left and will be left. 2Co 6:14-18  Be not unequally yoked with unbelievers: for what fellowship have righteousness and iniquity? or what communion hath light with darkness?  15  And what concord hath Christ with Belial? or what portion hath a believer with an unbeliever?  16  And what agreement hath a temple of God with idols? for we are a temple of the living God; even as God said, I will dwell in them, and walk in them; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people.  17  Wherefore Come ye out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, And touch no unclean thing; And I will receive you,  18  And will be to you a Father, And ye shall be to me sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty.   Come out of Man Made Religion Claire Pienaar - 7/5/21 (David's notes in red) I dreamed I was in a really shabby looking resort. (A resort is a self-contained commercial establishment that tries to provide most of a vacationer's wants, such as food, drink, lodging, sports, entertainment, and shopping, on the premises. This shabby resort represents the Babylonish religious system of easy self serving Christianity.) There were many dark people there and I wanted to leave. (They have departed from the Word and into darkness.) The sky was blue and it was sunny outside. However, these people were being lazy and entitled and I did not want to be with them.  (Eph 5:15-16: Look therefore carefully how ye walk, not as unwise, but as wise; 16 redeeming the time, because the days are evil.). (Those who are trapped in Babylon are walking in darkness. They are lazy and entitled having no desire to seek the Lord or sanctification, but the Lord will call His elect and give them spiritual discernment and a desire to want to come out of Babylons religion.) I had no way of traveling, and I was unsure how I'd leave this place. (We must trust God, no matter what our circumstances are). (With all the allure of the easy wide road leaving looks like a wilderness but when the Lord calls His people out He will make a way. Acts 13:17-18 The God of this people Israel chose our fathers, and exalted the people when they sojourned in the land of Egypt, and with a high arm led he them forth out of it. 18 And for about the time of forty years as a nursing-father bare he them in the wilderness.) One of the men there had a self-pedaling car with a black wire frame and a plastic black chair for a seat. This vehicle was horrible, slow, and unbelievably unsafe. I could not believe he used it to travel on a highway, and I was very concerned about using this, especially on a highway. (Our own ways are so unreliable and dangerous; we should be concerned with keeping on the narrow way with the Holy Spirit as the guide for our vehicle at all times). (Trying to please God through self-efforts and self-works, represented by the self-pedaling car, is dangerous to our salvation which is not by man's works as false Christianity is famous for.) I knew I needed to go into a city (Mount Zion) and thought I'd be travelling on a highway. (The Highway of Holiness is the only way to get to Mount Zion.) However, unbeknownst to me, this resort I was staying at was already in the city (Babylon) and only a few blocks from a very swanky department store that I was headed to. (I think this represents the Babylonish way of life that has permeated the Church.) (This department store represents fellowship with the world and its ways through buying and selling instead of giving and receiving. Everyone who is in the world participates in its ways.) It was such hard work to get to the store as this “vehicle” had a bent to only turn left. It took real effort to turn right at any time. (When our “vehicle”, which represents our lives or mobile tabernacles, is self-willed and rebellious it only wants to go left like the goats. This frustrates the spirit man who is always fighting to turn right and get on that Highway of Holiness.) I parked the vehicle and went into the department store. The store had an escalator going down and one going up. I used the one going up and it was supposed to have women's clothes, kids clothes and menswear. (The clothing of Babylonish religion cannot clothe our nakedness representing sin. The lampros clothing of the Bride is her righteous works. Rom 13:14  But put ye on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make not provision for the flesh, to fulfil the lusts thereof.)  Instead the top level only had rows and rows of perfumes. It was a whole floor just of perfumes. The smell was intense and very sweet so I did not stay long. (We received this text today in our morning prayer meeting which speaks of the allure of the harlot religious system. Pro 7:17-23  I have perfumed my bed With myrrh, aloes, and cinnamon. 18  Come, let us take our fill of love until the morning; Let us solace ourselves with loves. 19  For the man is not at home; He is gone a long journey: 20  He hath taken a bag of money with him; He will come home at the full moon.  21  With her much fair speech she causeth him to yield; With the flattering of her lips she forceth him along. 22  He goeth after her straightway, As an ox goeth to the slaughter, Or as one in fetters to the correction of the fool; 23  Till an arrow strike through his liver; As a bird hasteth to the snare, And knoweth not that it is for his life. The world likes to try to make itself appealing by masking its filthy stench with sweet smelling attractions to the flesh, but God's elect, by His grace, will see through it and be repulsed. Rev 3:15-19  I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot. 16 So because thou art lukewarm, and neither hot nor cold, I will spew thee out of my mouth. 17 Because thou sayest, I am rich, and have gotten riches, and have need of nothing; and knowest not that thou art the wretched one and miserable and poor and blind and naked: 18 I counsel thee to buy of me gold refined by fire, that thou mayest become rich; and white garments, that thou mayest clothe thyself, and that the shame of thy nakedness be not made manifest; and eyesalve to anoint thine eyes, that thou mayest see. 19 As many as I love, I reprove and chasten: be zealous therefore, and repent.) I walked out and went down the elevator and hopped on this strange vehicle again and tried to get back to the resort. It was now dark and there were neon lights and lewd images that peaked out of every corner. (Once God's elect have their eyes opened through the Word of God, they are able to see the evil that is all around them. Heb 5:12-14 For when by reason of the time ye ought to be teachers, ye have need again that some one teach you the rudiments of the first principles of the oracles of God; and are become such as have need of milk, and not of solid food. 13 For every one that partaketh of milk is without experience of the word of righteousness; for he is a babe. 14 But solid food is for fullgrown men, even those who by reason of use have their senses exercised to discern good and evil.) When I got back to the resort, my children wanted to swim in the river that went around it, like a moat. It had rapids which got deeper and more dangerous at every turn. Initially, I was distracted and said “Ok” to my children playing in the moat and in the rapids, but then I had a discernment and I went to rescue them just in time from the last rapid that would have killed them. My children were quite young in the dream and were not good swimmers. (When we get distracted by life or the things of the world and we don't stay in the Word then we are in danger of falling under the curses on this life style and of losing our fruit which represents Christ in us.) I asked God for a word by faith at random and put my finger down on “sin”: John 15:22 “If I had not come and spoken unto them, they had not had sin: but now they have no excuse for their sin.” (God has insured that we have His Word, which is Christ. He speaks to us every time we read it and His Word trains our conscience. No one will have any excuse before God when they stand in the judgment. Even ignorance will not be an excuse.)   Select LanguageAfrikaansAlbanianAmharicArabicArmenianAzerbaijaniBasqueBelarusianBengaliBosnianBulgarianCatalanCebuanoChichewaChinese (Simplified)Chinese (Traditional)CorsicanCroatianCzechDanishDutchEsperantoEstonianFilipinoFinnishFrenchFrisianGalicianGeorgianGermanGreekGujaratiHaitian CreoleHausaHawaiianHebrewHindiHmongHungarianIcelandicIgboIndonesianIrishItalianJapaneseJavaneseKannadaKazakhKhmerKinyarwandaKoreanKurdish (Kurmanji)KyrgyzLaoLatinLatvianLithuanianLuxembourgishMacedonianMalagasyMalayMalayalamMalteseMaoriMarathiMongolianMyanmar (Burmese)NepaliNorwegianOdia (Oriya)PashtoPersianPolishPortuguesePunjabiRomanianRussianSamoanScots GaelicSerbianSesothoShonaSindhiSinhalaSlovakSlovenianSomaliSpanishSundaneseSwahiliSwedishTajikTamilTatarTeluguThaiTurkishTurkmenUkrainianUrduUyghurUzbekVietnameseWelshXhosaYiddishYorubaZulu Powered by Translate Printer-friendly version

Rabbi David Lapin's Matmonim Daf Yomi Series
Sukah 12a- Privacy and Tzeniut Protect Kedusha – דפנות להגן על הקדושה

Rabbi David Lapin's Matmonim Daf Yomi Series

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 15:54


The Shechinah and the sanctity it generates needs to be protected from exposure - which dilutes it. Like the Parochet in the Holy of Holies, the walls of the Sucah play this role.Sources

Expedition 44
The Atonement Part 3: The Day of Atonement

Expedition 44

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 72:17


Leviticus 16 The “Sin” offering goat Both goats are called a sin/purification/decontamination offering and the reason is that is that the lots have not been cast yet over these two. So, since we don't know yet which ones going to be the actual sin offering, they're both referred to that way. We don't know which one's going to be for the Lord, which one was to be for azazel. A better way to translate “Atonement” here is to make expiation with it, or to make a purging with it. The whole notion of the sin offering is decontamination and purification Propitiation or Expiation (KPR language) Both words presuppose that there is a barrier that must be removed to overcome sin. We need to look to see what is acted upon in order to translate KPR correctly. As we noted atonement language means to cover or purge but is the issue with humans, God, or sin? Propitiation: means that the barrier lies within God himself; thus, it is usually interpreted as an action to satisfy divine wrath against sinners. This was the pagan concept of sacrifice, but Christians who hold to this say that God's justice must be exercised, and sin must be paid for in order to receive forgiveness and the aversion of God's wrath. Expiation: means that the barrier lies outside of God, within humankind and/or a stain they leave on the world (sacred space), it is often interpreted as an action aimed at removing sin. To cover, wipe, or to purge sin. Mercy Seat Translation-This is a common translation, but this is not a good translation. More literally, if atonement (kapper) means to purge then kapporeth (noun) should be the place of purging. In other words, we would really focus on the location not the result, because calling it the mercy seat is sort of reading the theological result into the word. The place is the cover of the Ark in the Holy of Holies which is the footstool of God's throne. This is a throne room scene. The Scapegoat or the goat for azazel. 3 views on what happens in this action: 1. The propitiation view (punishment). The goat bears the sin and wrath. 2. The azazel refers to the location (the desert) which theologically if the place where sin and evil lives or belongs (not in God's camp) 3. Azazel is a proper name. This was the leader of the fallen angels/demons in 2nd temple Judaism. The goat transports the sin to Azazel. Conclusions on the Day of Atonement The priest is stripped of all his garb and must do this ritual in a plain fashion Goat 1- the purification offering, is to cleanse the temple objects. Blood is not applied to anyone. The scapegoat is sent to Azazel. So, sin, the forces of death, are removed from the camp. This connects a little to last week's episode in that God is rescuing his people from the forces of death. Neither of these goats are punished. It's about expelling or purging God's space (Expiation). The first goat (the one that dies) is more about cleaning the throne room of the stain of sin. The scapegoat doesn't get killed. This is all about resetting sacred space (getting back to Eden)

The Gottesdienst Crowd
[Gottesblog] Argumentum ad Repititium — Larry Beane

The Gottesdienst Crowd

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 17:55


Argumentum ad Repetitium When I get into discussions with people over the liturgy and traditional hymnody (over and against so-called “contemporary worship,”) a lot of the same arguments and assertions pop up. First is the charge that I just want traditional worship because it is “just what I like.” In other words, it's a matter of personal preference and taste. This accusation is more a revelation about what the one making the accusation believes, for “contemporary worship” is typically based on pop-music forms that are, well, popular. People want pop music because it is what they like, not because of its theology or particular confession, not because it reflects what God prefers from the Scriptures, or because it promotes the Word of God. No, people like pop music in worship because they like pop music elsewhere. If it's good enough for listening to while driving to work, it's good enough to listen to in the church service. So the charge that traditional church music is “just what you like” sounds like a projection. For are there any people arguing that they don't really like pop music, but it is the best music for worship? Is there anyone who champions guitars and drums in the chancel who leaves church and turns on the radio to listen to organ music and chorales? Admittedly, this is just a hunch, but I suspect that most proponents of “contemporary worship” actually prefer those music forms, and listen to them outside of the church service as well. In other words, “It's what they like.” One finger pointed at me, three fingers pointing back at thee. To the contrary, my desire to uphold the traditional liturgy and hymnody of the church has nothing to do with my musical tastes. In fact, the vast majority of the music that I listen to is pop music. I like what is today called “classic rock.” I like hard rock and 1980s heavy metal. I do listen to some classical music as well, but the vast majority of my musical tastes are the very types of music that I would loath in the Divine Service, and would consider its use to be blasphemous against the Lord and a degradation to rock and roll. As the cartoon character Hank Hill famously told a Christian rocker, “You're not making Christianity better, you're making rock and roll worse.” I'm a stickler for traditional liturgy and hymnody for several reasons. One of them is that this is what God likes. He is a God of order. He is a God of dignity. He is a God of beauty. He is a God of sacrifice, atonement, and forgiveness. One would be hard-pressed to find the self-serving desire to be entertained in Biblical examples of worship. In fact, after recording God's worship style preferences over the course of seven chapters (Exodus 25-31): the beautiful tabernacle covered in magnificent fabric, an altar of bronze followed by a courtyard also outfitted with beautiful textiles and precious metals, exquisite priestly garments (as well as rubrics for ordination), the altar of incense, the bronze basin for ceremonial washing, the anointing oil and incense, and specific instructions for fine craftsmanship, we come to chapter 32: the rejection of all of this for a more entertaining worship style around the golden calf, “and the people sat down to eat and drink and rose of to play.” They played at their worship. There was no indication that God wanted the priests to “play” in the holy of holies, or that the laity should “play” while sacrificing animals as a type of the Lamb to come. Some believe the word translated as “play” may be a euphemism for erotic overtones in this worship service - something that comes to the fore in many popular “praise and worship” songs, many of which that can be embarrassing to read the lyrics out loud or to watch the gyrations of the often-female performers - or “ministers of music", “worship leaders”, or “worship pastors” as they are sometimes called. By contrast, we see the Israelites who worshiped the true God repeating their ritual and liturgical actions of remembrance each year - and they were commanded to keep various feasts as a memorial. And to be a memorial, there must be continuity, both in ritual, and in the passing along of those rituals through the generations. Every year, a lamb was slaughtered and it was cooked with bitter herbs. It was eaten on the same day each year, and the same ceremony was repeated again and again, century after century. There were readings, there were hymns, there were psalms to be chanted. Why? Because God commanded that it should be done each year. Why should it change, since ultimately, the Passover meal was a type of Christ, pointing us to the Eucharist and to the cross? The message doesn't change, and therefore the rubrics of the meal do not change. For if they were to change even a little every year, in a hundred years it would look nothing like what it was supposed to remember. And when God interacts with mankind, there is a coming of heaven down to earth. Something otherworldly, something holy is happening. “Holy” means “set apart.” So when Jacob saw the vision of the angels ascending and descending on the ladder, he set apart that place as holy, and marked it with a pillar that was anointed with oil. That place was no longer just a spot to bed down for the night, it was the gate of heaven. God is also a God who is concerned with esthetics. He is the author of beauty. He is not indifferent about matters of style. For again, when God tabernacled with the children of Israel, he commanded a tent to be made up to His standards, with magnificent furniture, with gold and silver and fine-twined linen, beautifully woven fabrics of purple and scarlet. His tabernacle, and later his temple, was epitomized by exquisite beauty beyond what one normally had in his house and daily life. God ordered the priests to be vested, also in beautifully crafted textiles, rare jewels, and fine detailed ornamentation. This is not my idea or preference. This was not the preference of the priests or architects of the House of the Lord. This was done according to God's order. And God likes beautiful art - the cherubim above the mercy seat, the intricate carvings of almond flowers, palm trees, and pomegranates. Why? Because God likes this design. It's what He wanted. It is not because the congregation liked it, or the priests, or the leaders. God also likes bells and incense. Why? I don't know. He just does. He likes craftsmanship and high art. And this level of ornateness was not how ordinary people lived in their day to day life. The place where God made Himself present for, and with, mankind, this holy place, was set apart and beautiful. How anyone can actually read the Bible and come away thinking that God prefers people to just “come as you are” and “don't go to any trouble to make things nice” when they come into His presence? Or how can anyone conclude that God's attitude is “do whatever makes you happy, whatever you like,” or “do whatever is cheap.” This is not the God of the Bible. And related to this idea of God becoming present with His people, this is one major difference we have with Protestantism. We, along with the historic communions of Christianity, confess that a miracle happens on our altars when we celebrate the Mass, that Christ, the living God and King and Creator of the Universe, the Man who is perfect, comes to us literally and in incarnate form, as the bread and wine that are blessed by His Word are truly His body and blood. And so, that Presence takes us out of our ordinary, pedestrian existence and places us at the table with God. So is informality called for in times like these? Did Isaiah behave casually when he found himself in the throne-room of God, when the angels purged away his sin by bringing him a coal from the altar and placing it upon his lips? Did Peter, James, and John behave the same as they always did when Jesus transfigured before them on the mountain? Do military men behave differently around an officer than when they are hanging out with their fellow soldiers, sailors, airmen, or marines? What about when a general enters the room? How about the president? Are there different protocols and ways of behaving around one's superiors? And how would it be received if a soldier did not treat officers differently than their friends? Do these rituals and ways of carrying oneself communicate something? Are they for the good of the entire corps, the whole body of men united in service? What if you were invited to a banquet at Buckingham Palace? Would you comport yourself the same as if you were at home in front of the TV with a bucket of KFC? Or would you maybe be more formally dressed, perfectly groomed, more aware of those around you, especially those of high social rank? Would you like to know what the rubrics for such an important meal are? Or would you be content to carry on the same way that you do at home? Our formality in worship as Lutherans is crucial, because it is a confession that we do confess that Christ is miraculously present with us. We do not confess, as do many Protestants, that the Lord's Supper is a symbol, or that our Lord's flesh is far off in the heavens, leaving us with mere tokens that are at best some kind of “spiritual” presence. No, we confess that this is the eternal banquet that Jesus is always talking about, or at least a foretaste of it. The Divine Service is eschatological and brings us into contact with eternity. He is present under our roof, though we are unworthy. He says the Word, and we are healed. The King, God Himself, deigns to dine with us! This is not watching TV with KFC eaten out of a plastic container with a spork. Rather, this is the Holy of Holies, and Christ incarnate is present with us. And we not only eat with Him, but we feed miraculously on the true Passover Lamb, even as His blood is poured into us to mark us as His own, protected and saved from condemnation, from the Angel of Death. And so, our worship is different than our day to day lives. The hymnody comes from our rich tradition and is unbounded by fads or notions of what is popular today, but may well fall out of favor tomorrow. Our hymns not only praise God, but confess our faith rigorously and boldly. Our worship is dignified, and like the liturgical actions of remembrance of the children of Israel, it doesn't change again and again, becoming unrecognizable in just a few years. Nor is it play - whether motivated by a desire for fun, or even tinged with eroticism. Jesus said, “Do this in memory of Me.” He did not order us to change the liturgical action to bend it to our standards of entertainment, or to prevent it from not being “special.” And this is why the Church's liturgy remains the same. It is a remembrance, just as the liturgical actions of the Old Testament Church were. Any changes are not made to reflect theological change, but perhaps to accommodate linguistic or technological shifts. And over the centuries, we have developed a corpus of the very best that the Church has in terms of liturgy and hymnody, not subject to fads and fashions. Our progressive culture routinely gets rid of the old in search of the ever-new. Our church's heritage is a blend of the old and the new, not subject to “chronological snobbery” or Critical Theory that denigrates our own forbears. And as a pastor, I want people to be taught (as ceremonies teach the people what they need to know about Christ, as our confessions teach us). I want my parishioners to have no doubts about what it is that we Lutherans confess about Jesus, and about what He Himself says in Scripture. This is communicated verbally in what is said, and nonverbally in what is done. Research suggests that 60% of what is communicated between people is non-verbal - meaning what we do and how we speak is as important, and perhaps even a bit more, than what is said in words alone. An informal liturgy belies what is really happening: the miracle of heaven meeting earth and of Christ tabernacling with us. Pop music lowers the level of dignity, perhaps to the depths of frivolity and impropriety. And when we have centuries of magnificent hymnody, to settle for what is sung in Pentecostal or non-denominational churches is like choosing to eat cold Vienna sausages instead of the luxurious spread of delectable delicacies that you have been invited to partake of at the feast. So far from being a matter of personal taste, the traditional liturgy and hymnody is what God wants, is a confession of who Jesus is and what He does, and is good pastoral care in terms of teaching and confessing our faith. And this is why our forbears included Article 24. They did not just say, “Do whatever you like.” For while our Roman opponents were lumping us in with radical reformers that abolished the Mass, we vociferously deny such a scurrilous charge. To even suggest it is a gross insult, and resulted in an angry retort by Melanchthon, as well as a master class on what real worship is all about in the Augsburg Confession and the Apology. It all boils down to Jesus, and what you believe about Him. Do you believe the Bible when it confesses that Christ is present with us? Do you take Jesus at His word when He says, “Do this in memory of Me?” Are you humbled at the Lord's miraculous presence with us, like Moses, like Isaiah, like Peter, James, and John? Do you believe, teach, and confess that the presence of Jesus is the fountainhead of holiness, and so our worship in the holy place must itself be holy - as opposed to common and ordinary? Are you willing to sacrifice your own personal tastes and desire to be entertained in the style to which you were accustomed in order to submit to Him and to receive His gifts - and to give Him thanks in return in the setting of His choosing? Do you actually believe what He says, and what the Church says about Him? Or do you hold the faith of another tradition, whose informal and casual worship is more fitting?

The Kingdom Project Podcast
Hebrews 8 - Christ's Ministry Supreme To The Old Covenant

The Kingdom Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 43:10


To understand this more we have to think of this in terms as the Jew would have thought of it.  The temple, the priests, sacrifices, and the Holy of Holies.  Although this was the system, it had to be replaced and was only a type of what and who was to come.  There are some Christians today who try to bring bits and pieces of the Mosaic Law into Christianity. They do not understand that if the Mosaic Law is in force today, Jesus Christ is not qualified to be our priest.  So then, we will see, Christ's ministry is superior to that of the Old Covenant.  One was conditional, the other unconditional. YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCs6iFjfgzzajleMLL2F99Rg/playlists Help Support: https://paypal.me/thekingdomproject Join the group: https://www.facebook.com/thekingdomprojectpodcast Email: thekingdomprojectpodcast@gmail.com

Abiding In Christ Ministries
The Anchor of our soul

Abiding In Christ Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2021 14:26


Air Date: 07 05 21 Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and steadfast, and which enters into that within the veil; Whither the forerunner is for us entered, even Jesus, made an high priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek.    Hebrews 6:19, 20   The hope we have in Jesus Christ is an anchor of our soul.   Acts 17:28  In Him we live and move and have our being  He is our hope. Paul expressed it this way in 1 Timothy.   1 Timothy 1:1—Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ by the commandment of God our Savior, and Lord Jesus Christ, which is our hope;   1 Peter 1:3—Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which according to his abundant mercy hath begotten us again unto a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead,   In the harbors of the Mediterranean Sea, great stones were imbedded in the ground. The rock was called anchoria.  Forerunners would take the anchor on little boats, row into the harbor, and secure it to the rock in the harbor. The reason for this is because some of the boats could not enter the sandy harbors. When the forerunners attached the anchor and secured it, the sailors could slowly pull the ship into the harbor.   Christ is our forerunner (Heb. 6:20). He has gone to the shores of Heaven and has tied the rope of our salvation and faith in Him to His throne. The Holy of Holies represented the place of God's presence. Jesus enables us to draw near to God. Our ship floats upon the seas of this world and our faith is the rope that is attached to the anchor and the solid rock … Jesus Christ. This word “forerunner” is the Greek word prodromos was also a military word used of troops sent out in advance to scout the land and ensure the safety of the army. Herodotus used it of the cavalry sent by the Scythians to test the strength of the Persian forces.     Listen to Abiding in Christ Ministries with radio host Lesha Cantrell Monday through Friday at 6:45am (MT) on AM670, KLTT in Colorado; online at 670kltt.com; or via your mobile device on the free KLTT app. May God richly bless you as you abide in Christ!  

UFC (UFC Sermons)
Hebrews (wk.18)

UFC (UFC Sermons)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021


"We have a High Priest that stands before the throne of God and He advocates for us because we are His children and He has shed His blood on our behalf." Brett continued with our series through the book of Hebrews on Sunday, focusing on Hebrews 10:19-25. He explained how God's sacrificial system of the Old Covenant wasn't intended to solve the problem of sin, it was to highlight the problem of sin, and that our confidence is only in the blood of Jesus. Verse 20 of Chapter 10 references the veil that kept people out of the Holy of Holies; a place that the High Priest could only enter once a year. Brett explained that this verse uses "The body of Jesus that was torn for us on the cross," as a metaphor for the veil, and it gives us the confidence to go before God. Verse 21 goes on to say that the High Priest (Jesus) has done the atoning, but continues with the advocating. For the remainder of the chapter, Brett introduced a four point outline: 1. Draw near (v. 22) - A "sincere heart" means true faith - We have positional satisfaction and practical sanctification 2. Hold fast (v. 23) - Acknowledging that you're a sinner and that Jesus' death on the cross restores us to a right relationship with God 3. Spur on (v. 24) - We are called to consider how to spur on others to love 4. Show up (v. 25) - Don't make it a habit to not assemble together - "We are not created to be independent people"

Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran
Yoma 78 - June 28, 18 Tamuz

Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 44:21


Today's daf is sponsored by Natasha Shabbat in honor of the second yahrtzeit of her father. "My teacher, David ben Shalom haKohen v'Sarah was a brilliant doctor and a lifelong learner and teacher. He would have been very proud of me for taking on the commitment to Daf Yomi and very interested to hear all about it. I still want to call him every day to tell him what I've learned in today's Daf." In the book of Ezekiel there is a description of a stream that will come out of the Holy of Holies in the future and will create a mikveh at the entrance to King David's house. Is it permissible to pass through water on Shabbat wearing shoes or sandals? Does the prohibition of washing include other things that cool people off? Is it related to the action or to the result? On what does it depend? Stories are brought about rabbis who wet a cloth before Yom Kippur or Tisha B'av and used it to wash their face, hands and feet. What was the difference between what they did on Yom Kippur and Tisha b'av and why? Rabbi Elazar is asked about wearing cork shoes on Yom Kippur. Various rabbis are brought who wore shoes made of different materials (not leather) on Yom Kippur. Is it the same for public fast days? Rami Bar Hama raises a difficulty from a source about a prosthetic leg. Abaye and Rava each resolve the difficulty differently. Why is it permitted to bathe and anoint children but not to wear shoes? The mishna that permits certain people to wash or wear shoes is only according to Rabbi Chanania ben Tradiyon as in a braita it appears that the rabbis disagree and do not permit it. Why are those people permitted, according to him?

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

Today's daf is sponsored by Natasha Shabbat in honor of the second yahrtzeit of her father. "My teacher, David ben Shalom haKohen v'Sarah was a brilliant doctor and a lifelong learner and teacher. He would have been very proud of me for taking on the commitment to Daf Yomi and very interested to hear all about it. I still want to call him every day to tell him what I've learned in today's Daf." In the book of Ezekiel there is a description of a stream that will come out of the Holy of Holies in the future and will create a mikveh at the entrance to King David's house. Is it permissible to pass through water on Shabbat wearing shoes or sandals? Does the prohibition of washing include other things that cool people off? Is it related to the action or to the result? On what does it depend? Stories are brought about rabbis who wet a cloth before Yom Kippur or Tisha B'av and used it to wash their face, hands and feet. What was the difference between what they did on Yom Kippur and Tisha b'av and why? Rabbi Elazar is asked about wearing cork shoes on Yom Kippur. Various rabbis are brought who wore shoes made of different materials (not leather) on Yom Kippur. Is it the same for public fast days? Rami Bar Hama raises a difficulty from a source about a prosthetic leg. Abaye and Rava each resolve the difficulty differently. Why is it permitted to bathe and anoint children but not to wear shoes? The mishna that permits certain people to wash or wear shoes is only according to Rabbi Chanania ben Tradiyon as in a braita it appears that the rabbis disagree and do not permit it. Why are those people permitted, according to him?

Take One Daf Yomi
Take One: Yoma 77 and 78

Take One Daf Yomi

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 6:18


Today's Daf Yomi pages, Yoma 77 and 78, give us a dazzling bit of poetic imagery, describing a river that flows forth from the Holy of the Holies, getting stronger and stronger as we go along. Rabbi Dovid Bashevkin joins us to explain this mystical body of water, and the immense meaning it ought to have in the daily life of each and every one of us. How can this river explain the meaning of our relationship with God? Listen and find out.  Like the show? Send us a note at takeone@tabletmag.com. Follow us on Twitter at @takeonedafyomi and join the conversation in the Take One Facebook group. Take One is hosted by Liel Leibovitz and produced by Josh Kross, Sara Fredman Aeder, and Robert Scaramuccia. Check out all of Tablet's podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

Study Guide Yoma 77 Today's daf is sponsored by Elisheva Gray in loving memory of her dear husband Ron, z''l, on his tenth yahrzeit. "Grateful for the 25 years we had together. We never took one moment of it for granted and created so many wonderful memories together. Ron was truly a mensch, a gentleman, a wonderful cook and a sage in his own right. I miss him every day, and I know he would be studying the daf right along with me." And by Shelley and Jerry Gornish "in memory of our עז - our beloved and greatly missed grandson, עז וילצ׳יק, whose fifth Yahrzeit was recently commemorated." The gemara explains the verse in Daniel " and I came on account of your words. " And brings a story about the angels Gabriel and Michael and the sequence of events between them and the prophet Daniel based on verses from Ezekiel. The gemara goes back to bringing a third proof that washing is considered affliction from a  verse, "The people are weary and hungry and thirsty in the wilderness" - tired and bathing. How do you prove that it is not a different kind of fatigue? From where do we know that not wearing shows and refraining from sexual relations is affliction? In what circumstances is washing allowed? If one's hands are full of dirt, one can wash them. Washing hands in the morning is allowed because of an evil spirit. It is permissible to go through the water to go to his rabbi or father or to go to a sermon, but is it permissible to return home? Rabbi Yosef questions: How is it permissible to go through the water on a weekday, since there is danger, as seen from verses in Ezekiel describing a river that will come out of the Holy of Holies in the future.

Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran
Yoma 77 - June 27, 17 Tamuz

Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2021 47:37


Study Guide Yoma 77 Today's daf is sponsored by Elisheva Gray in loving memory of her dear husband Ron, z''l, on his tenth yahrzeit. "Grateful for the 25 years we had together. We never took one moment of it for granted and created so many wonderful memories together. Ron was truly a mensch, a gentleman, a wonderful cook and a sage in his own right. I miss him every day, and I know he would be studying the daf right along with me." And by Shelley and Jerry Gornish "in memory of our עז - our beloved and greatly missed grandson, עז וילצ׳יק, whose fifth Yahrzeit was recently commemorated." The gemara explains the verse in Daniel " and I came on account of your words. " And brings a story about the angels Gabriel and Michael and the sequence of events between them and the prophet Daniel based on verses from Ezekiel. The gemara goes back to bringing a third proof that washing is considered affliction from a  verse, "The people are weary and hungry and thirsty in the wilderness" - tired and bathing. How do you prove that it is not a different kind of fatigue? From where do we know that not wearing shows and refraining from sexual relations is affliction? In what circumstances is washing allowed? If one's hands are full of dirt, one can wash them. Washing hands in the morning is allowed because of an evil spirit. It is permissible to go through the water to go to his rabbi or father or to go to a sermon, but is it permissible to return home? Rabbi Yosef questions: How is it permissible to go through the water on a weekday, since there is danger, as seen from verses in Ezekiel describing a river that will come out of the Holy of Holies in the future.

South Run Baptist Church - Sermons
Sanctuary Series: Holiness unto the Lord

South Run Baptist Church - Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021


The word “sanctuary” in the Hebrew language is a derivation on the word “holy.” This should not come as a surprise really. The tabernacle, or sanctuary, is a holy place. In it is contained the Holy of Holies. It is holy ground in the holy land. It is where the holy people of Israel go to meet the Holy One of Israel. Holiness is everywhere in the Old Testament! So as we continue thinking about what it means to live into our value of sanctuary, we must consider what it means to live into holiness. That is our task today. Let's dig in!

Take One Daf Yomi
Take One: Yoma 70 and 71

Take One Daf Yomi

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 9:10


Today's Daf Yomi pages, Yoma 70 and 71, point out an unlikely discrepancy: The Yom Kippur services performed by the High Priest actually diverge from their biblical description in one small but important way. Rabbi Dovid Bashevkin returns to explain why the Talmud, usually so meticulous in following the teachings of the Torah to the letter, admits this one change, and what it can teach us about worship and teshuva. When exactly may the High Priest enter the Holy of the Holies? Listen and find out.  Like the show? Send us a note at takeone@tabletmag.com. Follow us on Twitter at @takeonedafyomi and join the conversation in the Take One Facebook group. Take One is hosted by Liel Leibovitz and produced by Josh Kross, Sara Fredman Aeder, and Robert Scaramuccia. Check out all of Tablet's podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Freedom Ministries
Part 2 - The Throne of David - You can free yourself and others from any perceived physical limitation

Freedom Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2021 49:11


It is the Father's good pleasure to give us the Kingdom. We are also given the keys to the Kingdom. What you are seeing yourself bound to in your thoughts, you will be bound to in the physical. If you see yourself entwined, or bound with abundance, your physical world will mold and shape and bring you abundance. When you see yourself within as free from any physical limitation, again the physical world will mold, bend and shape to make that a reality for you. This is God's divine plan. We are told in Romans 8 that His Divine Plan is for all of us to obtain the glorious liberty of Sons of God. King David is not just an Old Testament story in history. All these stories are stories of good things that happen in the hearts and minds of men. As we shared last week, Isaiah 9 tells us there will be no end to the throne of David. We are not waiting for something in the future. The anointing of the Old Testament Kings, Prophets and Priests are all stories pointing to the anointing that all mankind possesses. These are all wonderful stories about you and I carrying the Arc of the Covenant on our shoulders right now. This is the mind of Christ, or the anointed mind. What we do between the two creative cherubs of our mind is the anointing of God, our thoughts release the creative power of God. This is not you trying to make it happen by “doing it right” or “praying right” or working up His presence and anointing. You are One with Him and can't lose the anointing or His presence if you tried. What you see within, what thoughts you dwell on and picture in your mind, IS the creative power of God. This is operating face to face with God in the Holiest of Holies, this is operating in His likeness. What you do within your mind is the throne of David. Begin to envision life as you desire it to be. Act it out in your mind as if it is happening right now. What you see within is more real than what you see in the physical. If you continue to envision your life how you desire it to be, even though “the facts of life” contradict it right now, you will be amazed that all of heaven and earth move, shape and bend to make it a physical reality in your life. Most of us have only been taught to operate within the limits of what we see with our physical senses. Operating in the likeness of God is quantum, it is spiritual, it is the anointed life. It bypasses all time, space and physical limitations. It is the most Holy way to live. It is living like God.

Take One Daf Yomi
Take One: Yoma 66

Take One Daf Yomi

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 12:21


Today's Daf Yomi page, Yoma 66, reminds us of the sheer power of language, a power on full display when the Kohen Gadol entered the Holy of Holies and uttered the explicit name of God. To reflect on what words can do, we bring you a conversation with poet Christian Wiman that aired on our podcast Unorthodox, where he discussed how some words, when written or said in just the right way, can move us in ways we didn't think possible. How and why does language connect us to the divine? Listen and find out. Like the show? Send us a note at takeone@tabletmag.com. Follow us on Twitter at @takeonedafyomi and join the conversation in the Take One Facebook group. Take One is hosted by Liel Leibovitz and produced by Josh Kross, Sara Fredman Aeder, and Robert Scaramuccia. Check out all of Tablet's podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing
NTEB RADIO BIBLE STUDY: As Israel Forms New Government, Are They Also Preparing To Make A Covenant With 'Death And Hell' As Isaiah Tells Us?

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 113:00


On this episode of Rightly Dividing, we are looking at the momentous change underway in the nation of Israel right now, changes that will bring the Jews to the doorstep of the start of the time of Jacob's trouble. The bible is very clear, the Jews having rejected Jesus Christ will receive with open arms Antichrist, and will follow him right up to the moment he sits down on the throne in the Holy of Holies in the rebuilt Temple in Jerusalem. Get ready for a Two State Solution, get ready for the 'days of vengeance' that will devour Israel, but most of all, get ready for Flight #777 on Titus213 Airlines to take off first. This world is heading to an eye-popping prophetical date with destiny, and as always, we look to Israel as the centerpiece of God's end times timeclock. Tonight we pay a visit to the new government in Israel, and compare what we see to what is written in the scripture of truth.

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English
Yoma 61 - Rosh Chodesh Tamuz, June 11, 1 Tamuz

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 45:22


Study Guide Yoma 61 The month of Tamuz is sponsored by Rabbi Fredda Cohen and Eric Nussbaum in memory of Fredda's beloved father, Mitchell Cohen, Michael ben Shraga Faivel haLevi, whose 27th yahrzeit falls on 16 Tammuz. "He was so kind, sweet and funny. He had a big open heart for klal Yisrael v'chol yoshvei teivel. He would never have categorized himself as a Torah and Talmud scholar, but indeed he was. The father of three girls, he gave all of us a Jewish education. He was a loving husband who adored our mom. There was no one I missed more on the day I received s'micha as he was my inspiration and ballast. He would be delighted to know that he has nine grandchildren, two of whom carry his name, and two great-grandchildren. He was truly an ish neeman. The month is also dedicated for Refua of Pesha Ethel bat Sarah." Today's daf is sponsored by Ilana Friedman, in memory of her dear cousin Dvora Ita bat Harav Azriel Zeev on her yahrtzeit.  "Dvora was a brilliant woman with a strong sense of justice and integrity who loved to learn and who would have been my biggest Daf cheerleader.  She is loved and missed.  May she be a melitzat yosher for her family and women everywhere dedicated to Torah learning." Ulla said: If the Kohen Gadol slaughtered the goat before sprinkling the blood of the bull in the Holy of Holies, he should start the process from the beginning. Does this contradict what is written in the mishna? For what are all the different parts of the sprinkling of the blood intended to atone? Do Rabbi Meir and Rabbi Elazar and Rabbi Shimon disagree both on the matter of blood (if the blood is spilled, where do we start) and on the guilt offering of a leper (if the oil is spilled)?

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English
Yoma 60 - Rosh Chodesh Tamuz, June 10, 30 Sivan

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 43:35


Study Guide Yoma 60 A week of learning is sponsored by Sivya and Nahum Twersky in honor of Shoshana Baker's milestone birthday. "May Hashem grant her arichut yamim in good health with her beautiful family. There is so much nachat left to come. We are so very proud of her commitment to Torah, Avodah v.Gemilut Chasadim. Hamaevin Yavin. All of our love and admiration, Mom and Abba." Today's daf is sponsored by Mark Baker in honor of his wife's Shoshana's birthday. Wishing her the happiest birthday to his beautiful wife. And by Gitta Jaroslawicz-Neufeld for the refuah sheleima of David ben Adel and all that need health. Is it really true always that once the mitzva is complete, there are no laws on misuse of consecrated property? After all, there are exceptions like the trumat hadeshen, removal of the ashes – once there are placed in the pile, they remain there and can’t be used. How is this issue resolved? Why was it necessary to bring 3 different drashot excluding it from laws of misuse of consecrated property? Each word comes to exclude a different law. Why is there no need for a verse to exclude laws of pigul by blood? Every act of Yom Kippur must be done in order. Does this really mean everything? There is a dispute between Rabbi Yehuda and Rabbi Nehemiah - does it only apply to what is done in white clothes inside the Holy of Holies or to everything that is done in white clothes? The gemara discusses their opinions. What happens if the blood is spilled in the middle of the sprinklings? From what point does the Kohen Gadol need to start with a new animal?

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

Study Guide Yoma 57 If the sprinklings of the bull and goat are derived by a hekesh, juxtaposition, how can we derive a further juxtaposition from the sprinklings in the Holy of Holies to the sprinklings in the Sanctuary – rules don’t allow for a juxtaposition on a juxtaposition in the realm of the Temple. The gemara offers several answers. Are the sprinklings in the Sanctuary done on the parochet or in front of the parochet, on the floor? What does one do if the bloods get mixed together before the Kohen Gadol sprinkles the blood in the Holy of Holies? What if they mix after sprinkling upward but before the downward sprinklings? What if the Kohen got confused and doesn’t know which blood is in each cup? If some of the bloods mixed together but some remained separate, is what’s mixed up considered the remainder, or is it considered “rejected”? The mishna explains that the last stage of the blood sprinklings is to mix them together and place them on the four corners of the golden altar. That is a subject of debate as according to one opinion, they are placed separately on the corners of the altar. Is it clear that there is a tannaitic debate on this topic? Perhaps they both agree?

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

Study Guide Yoma 56 This week's learning is sponsored by Robert and Paula Cohen in memory of Paula’s father, Chaim Avraham ben Alter Gershon HaKohen. And by Elana Storch in honor of the birth of her granddaughter, Reut Noa, born to our children Julianna and Reuben Habousha Cohen. Reut Noa is named for women of strength and courage. One day she will know that a week of learning was dedicated to her arrival and I will share the great achievements of Rabbanit Farber and the beautiful community of Hadran.  What is the reason why Rabbi Yehuda thinks there was only one pedestal for the bloods of the bull and the goat? Was it because the Kohen Gadol may not read the signs and may confuse between the bloods? Apparently, that is the issue, even though in the case of the shofarot in Shekalim, that was not the issue. In Shekalim the issue was a concern that someone may have died after their money went in and there would be no way to fix the situation as Rabbi Yehuda doesn't hold by laws of breira, retroactive designation. From where do we know that Rabbi Yehuda doesn't hold by breira? Why would Rabbi Yehuda think in the case of the Kohen Gadol, we cannot rely on the fact that he will read the signs but in the case of the shofarot, we can? A case is brought of a chazan who described the service of the Kohen Gadol in a way that was both according to Rabbi Yehuda and the rabbis and Rava corrected him. From where do we derive that the blood is sprinkled in the Sanctuary onto the parochet in the same order and the same amount as was done inside the Holy of Holies?  

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

Pictures The Kohen Gadol first sprinkles the blood of the bull in the Holy of Holies. Then he slaughters the goat and sprinkles its blood. How is the sprinkling done – where? How many? In what direction? Is it the same for the bull and the goat? How is this all derived from the verses? The counting is done by also mentioning the one sparkling that was upwards at the time he is counting the downward ones. Why? Are there two stands or just one for the bloods of the bull and goat? Rabbi Yehuda disagrees with Tana Kama. The gemara brings the Mishna Shekalim 6:4 to try to understand why Rabbi Yehuda holds that there was only one stand – is it because people may not read what is written and may make a mistake? The gemara rejects this possibility and explains the reason in Shekalim differently and as such, it does not teach us anything about our mishna.

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

Study Guide Yoma 53 Pictures Today's daf is sponsored by Dodi Lee Lamm in memory of her beloved father, Rabbi Maurice Lamm, Moshe ben Meir Shmuel. "My father lived his life with joy, purpose, and an absolute abundance of love for his family. He was patient, kind, and wise. It is because of my father that I learn the daf, and I feel his presence in every word of Torah I read. May our learning give him pride and his neshama have an aliya." What is the source of the Pharisees / Sadducees' controversy regarding the incense on Yom Kippur? How does the Kohen Gadol walk out of the Holy of Holies? We learn from this about how to part from one’s rabbi and how to walk at the end of the Shmoneh Esre, the silent prayer. What prayer does the Kohen Gadol say after leaving the Holy of Holies. A story is told of Rabbi Hanina ben Dosa who was able to very easily influence the bringing and stopping of rain in a way that no Kohen Gadol was able to do. It is said of one Kohen Gadol that extended his prayer and caused great worry among the people who were concerned that he had died. The mishna describes the sprinklings of blood that the Kohen Gadol from the bloods of the bull and the goat inside the Holy of Holies and outside on the parcohet. In what order? How many sprinklings?  

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

Study Guide Yoma 52 Pictures Today's daf is sponsored by Judy Shapiro for the upcoming birthdays of her grandchildren: Matan and Yakira in Baltimore, 2nd birthday; and Adin Abraham in Jerusalem, 1st birthday. What exactly was the question regarding the status of the one cubit partition between the Sanctuary and the Holy of Holies? Ravina explains it and the gemara brings Rabbi Yochanan who quotes a question raised by Yosef Ish Hutzal about two possibilities to reading a verse regarding the partition to prove his reading. The gemara questions this as it is said in a braita that Isi ben Yehuda said there are five verses in the Torah that can be read in two different ways and this verse is not one of them and it is said that Yosef Ish Hutzal is the same person as Isi ben Yehuda. The mishna continues to describe the path the Kohen Gadol takes after reaching the parochet, partition between the Sanctuary and the Holy of Holies. Then it describes how he offered the incense in the Holy of Holies and the path he took to leave when he finished. In the Sanctuary, on the way out, he would recite a short prayer – short, so as not to worry the people outside that were concerned the Kohen Gadol may die upon entering the Holy of Holies. The mishna is confusing as the parochet was only in the Second Temple, but the Ark was only in the First Temple as it was hidden. Why was it hidden and by whom? What else was hidden with it? How can it be explained? There is a debate regarding how the incense is placed on the coals – all at once or gradually. There is also a debate regarding where on the coal pile – closer to the Ark or closer to where the Kohen Gadol is standing?

Talking Talmud
Yoma 52: Entering the Holy of Holies

Talking Talmud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 24:52


How the kohen gadol needs to take a circuitous route to get to the Kodesh Kodashim... Or not. An the implications thereof. Also, that "amah" that at one time was a divider between the Sanctuary and the Holy of Holies, and what kind of kedushah, and how we measure the space. Plus, verses of unresolved ambiguity, and Yossi ish Hotzal's take on this (his own identity ambiguous, given the number of names that are his). Also, the route of the kohen gadol from the Sanctuary to the Kodesh Kodashim, and his way back. Including his short (!) prayer on his way out. Plus: King Yoshiyahu and the burual of the ark, which was in the First Temple, and not the Second Temple.

Talking Talmud
Yoma 51: Inside/Outside

Talking Talmud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 17:00


On the kohen gadol's sin-offering - to what extent us it a communal offering and to what extent is it his own? With implications for whether temurah would work, among others. Also, a piece of architecture that defines and divides the Temples from each other and the Mishkan. Namely, there was an amah-wide space between the Sanctuary and the Holy of Holies. Which raises the question of the degree of sanctity of that spot, whether it follows the inner or outer kedushah.

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

Study Guide Yoma 51 Pictures The gemara had brought a braita that compared sacrifices to temura, substitution. What was the case of sacrifices that were mentioned? Was it specifically the bull of Yom Kippur, in which case we can learn from this source the answer to Rabbi Elazar's question about whether or not laws of substitution apply to that sacrifice? Or was it referring to the ram of Yom Kippur? The gemara raises some questions against Rav Sheshet's reading that it was referring to the ram of Yom Kippur - why couldn't it be referring to the Pesach or Pesach Sheni sacrifice? In referring back to a mishna and braita in which Rabbi Meir and Rabbi Yaakov's arguments against the Tana Kama were brought and in which they listed a few communal and individual offerings, the gemara questions why if Chagiga is communal, shouldn't Pesach be, as well. The gemara answers that it is referring to Pesach Sheni which is clearly individual. But if so, does it really override impurities? A debate regarding this issue is explained. A question is raised against Rabbi Elazar's question regarding whether substitution is effective for the bull offering on Yom Kippur - from drashot in the verses, it seems to be clear that it is considered an individual offering! The gemara resolves the difficulty. The mishna brings two opinions regarding the separation between the Sanctuary and the Holy of Holies - in the Second Temple was it made of two parochets or one? What is the basis for each opinion? Three approaches are brought regarding the path the Kohen Gadol takes through the sanctuary to get to the Holy of Holies. What is the reason behind each approach?

Take One Daf Yomi
Take One: Yoma 51

Take One Daf Yomi

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 6:50


Today’s Daf Yomi page, Yoma 51, contains a delightful discussion of the Parochet, or the curtain separating the Holy of the Holies from the rest of the Temple. Rabbi Dovid Bashevkin returns to discuss the meaning of this sacred curtain, and what it can teach us about finding holiness even in boundaries and limitations. How does the Parochet continue to inspire contemporary synagogue architecture and design? Listen and find out.  Like the show? Send us a note at takeone@tabletmag.com. Follow us on Twitter at @takeonedafyomi and join the conversation in the Take One Facebook group. Take One is hosted by Liel Leibovitz and produced by Josh Kross, Sara Fredman Aeder, and Robert Scaramuccia. Check out all of Tablet’s podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Take One Daf Yomi
Take One: Yoma 49 and 50

Take One Daf Yomi

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 8:12


Today’s Daf Yomi pages, Yoma 49 and 50, describe, in great detail, how the Kohen Gadol, or High Priest, dispensed the incense on the one day a year he was allowed into the Holy of the Holies. What if we took such care with everything we did? What would happen if we paid as much attention to detail when, say, we made our daily cup of coffee? Listen and find out.  Like the show? Send us a note at takeone@tabletmag.com. Follow us on Twitter at @takeonedafyomi and join the conversation in the Take One Facebook group. Take One is hosted by Liel Leibovitz and produced by Josh Kross, Sara Fredman Aeder, and Robert Scaramuccia. Check out all of Tablet’s podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

Study Guide Yoma 49 Pictures Questions are raised against Rav Sheshet's opinion who held that carrying the blood to be sprinkled could be performed with the left hand. An additional question is brought by Rav Papa (continuation from the previous pages) regarding the handful of the incense. Rabbi Yehushua ben Levi asks a question about the handful - if a Kohen Gadol took the handful and died, would his replacement be able to take that handful or would he need to take his own? Rabbi Chanina's reaction to his question spurs a whole discussion in and of itself regarding when Rabbi Yehoshua ben Levi was born - in the generation before or after Rabbi Chanina? How does his question relate to the debate regarding what happens if the Kohen Gadol dies after slaughtering the bull - does his replacement need to slaughter a new one? What is the answer to Rabbi Yehoshua ben Levi's question? The gemara brings two different answers. Does the Kohen Gadol take the incense in his hands again when he is inside the Holy of Holies? If so, how is it done, technically? If the Kohen Gadol dies after slaughtering but before sprinkling the bull's blood, does his replacement need to slaughter a new bull? Two sides of the debate are brought and analyzed.

The Gottesdienst Crowd
[Gottesblog] Pop Goes the Liturgy — Larry Beane

The Gottesdienst Crowd

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2021 11:27


Pop Goes the Liturgy “it [sic] think it would be awesome to hear rap in [the] worship service, especially if the context calls for it and it communicates the Gospel in a way the community will hear it.” — COMMENTER AT THE LCMS FACEBOOK PAGE “I agree 100%. It would be awesome in a worship service. It's communicating the gospel incarnationally in the cultural context of the community. However, it would need to be in the right context, because some congregations have shallow, exclusive, self-focused worship where their faith is a compartmentalized part of their life outside of the culture to which they belong.” — REPLY TO THE ABOVE COMMENT Modern pop music arguably began with jazz in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Jazz gave way to rock and roll in the 1950s. Rock music evolved quickly into many subgenres over the next few decades. Today's pop music is dominated by rap. But one thing that remains constant is the fact that there are those who desire to bring pop music into the Divine Service. Here in Louisiana, Jazz Masses (and even funerals) are popular among Roman Catholics. Among Lutherans in the Wisconsin, there are Lutheran churches that conduct Polka Services. And who can forget the pinnacle of Boomer Worship: the Chicago Folk Service? Rumor has it that the CIA had been using it to interrogate suspected terrorists. I don't believe it, though. Not even the CIA would violate the Geneva Convention so brashly. Kyrie eleison, indeed! And then there are the Episcopalians leading the way with the Beatles Mass (complete with John Lennon's ode to Communism and Atheism: “Imagine.” The Beatles Mass was championed by an ELCA “pastor” named Megan Rohrer, who has recently made headlines by being the first transgender “bishop.” He was formerly one of the pastors at Ebenezer Lutheran Church (Herchurch) in San Francisco, where God is addressed as the goddess, and where the Lord's Prayer begins “Our Mother.” For fans of U2, Episcopalian priestess Sarah Dylan Breuer has created a U2charist. An Episcopal congregation, St. Mary's - headed up by Mother Kim Culp, lists other services that they have done, including the above-mentioned U2charist and Beatles Mass, a Blue Grass Mass, Coldplay Mass, CASH Mass (featuring Johnny Cash music), and a Stevie Wonder Mass. Of course, it goes without saying - which means I have to say it because there are always readers looking to tilt at straw men - that pop music is not in and of itself evil. Some of it is, some of it isn't. It is what it is: entertainment. And it is entertainment that can indeed be thoughtful and intellectually stimulating. I remember many years ago one of our Gottesdienst editors - who is known for his intensity and excitability - waxing eloquent on how Led Zeppelin's song “No Quarter” reflected themes related to the office of the holy ministry. Some of the early songs by the band Evanescence confessed Christian themes - as the former writer for the band was a Christian. The band Kansas's Kerry Livgren is a Christian, and many of his compositions reflect the faith. He even fooled the unbeliever and dabbling Satanist Ronnie James Dio to record two songs with him in which the Christian confession is hard to miss: “To Live For the King” and “Mask of the Great Deceiver.” The Christian rock band Skillet gets airplay on secular stations as well. The list goes on. There is nothing wrong with entertainment. It is a gift of God that brings families and friends closer together and brings joy to our lives. But our sinful flesh often corrupts things that are good, turning them into idols. Satan's most effective tactics are those which blur the line between good and evil, or perhaps more accurately, introduce the leaven of the common into the loaf of the holy. Holiness means separation. Holiness is a wall that divides the divine from the ordinary. Christian worship is holy according to Scripture - that is, unless we have removed Exodus and Leviticus from the canon. God Himself teaches us about worship, how He would fill out His PIF if He were on the LCMS roster. There is indeed time in our daily lives for singing the glory of God “with trumpet sound… with lute and harp…. with tambourine and dance… with strings and pipe… with sounding cymbals” and “with loud clashing cymbals” - as we sing in Psalm 150. But then there are those times when God comes to us in His most holy presence, such as when Moses found himself at the burning bush, or Isaiah stood in the throne-room of God, the high priest's entry into the Holy of Holies, and our Lord's miraculous presence with us in His body and blood. Can you imagine Moses holding up a lighter and screaming “Freebird!” when God revealed His name to him and told him to remove his sandals? Can you imagine Isaiah freestyling a hip-hop beat when the seraph approached him “having in his hand a burning coal that he had taken with tongs from the altar”? Can you imagine the high priest cheerfully whistling a hippy folk song while coming into proximity with the Ark of the Covenant on the Day of Atonement? The reality is that we have lost touch with what holiness means. Most people would probably say that it means “being good” - however that is defined, whether by not drinking or dancing or playing cards, or by being appropriately politically-correct, sensitive, and concerned with “social justice.” And how often do we Lutherans take the Sacrament of the Altar for granted? How often do we fail to appreciate that a miracle happens at our altars? Of course, when pastors conduct the liturgy in a pedestrian or even slovenly way, when they behave like stand-up comedians or clowns, and when our churches schedule Sundays to not have the sacrament and then justify it because “it's a lot of work for the volunteers” (I actually heard that as an explanation for deviating from our confessional standard of every-Sunday communion) - who can blame our laity for not considering the Divine Service to be a miracle? And if it isn't a real manifestation of God coming to us, why bother? Or to put it in the words of Flannery O'Connor, “If it's only a symbol, to hell with it.” And when the people lose faith in what the plain Words of Institution teach us, that is when pastors and congregations (and even some in our hierarchy) turn to gimmicks, to rock and roll, rap, dancing, and other entertainments to hold the attention of the parishioners, to gin up emotion, and to “get the butts in the pews” with the kinds of things that draws a crowd in a stadium or concert hall. We must not discount the power of entertainment, especially pop music. I have had several parishioners leave my congregation and join one of our local non-denominational churches that has a pop band and a stage instead of hymns and an altar. These former parishioners outright told me that they like the music better. There were no theological considerations driving them, no crisis of whether or not what we teach is true. One said, “I gotta have a beat to move my feet.” One parishioner - whom I had baptized along with her daughter - said that her daughter enjoyed “fun church” instead of our Divine Service. But in gaining entertainment, what did they give up? In other words, what was the cost of this Sunday morning rock show? These churches do not confess Baptismal regeneration. And for them, the Lord's Supper (so-called) is indeed only a symbol. There is no confession and absolution. The giving up of these means through which God works miraculously in our lives was, to them, a price worth paying for a beat to move one's feet. In our culture, entertainment is king. It is our drug of choice. It is our 24-7 companion. It gives us the dopamine we need to get through life in these gray and latter days. It is as addictive as crack cocaine, but even easier to acquire. Even our news programs are entertainment. Our schools are entertainment. TV screens adorn the walls of our doctor's offices, airports, banks, restaurants, auto-repair shops, and our phones. Why shouldn't our churches likewise have screens on the sanctuary walls? Why shouldn't our church services also be entertainment? If we are entertained 24-7, 365, why should there be a single hour on Sunday morning in which we aren't being entertained? At the heart of the matter, this is a First Commandment issue. As George Thorogood famously posed the question - albeit with bad grammar: “Who do you love?”

Parsha Podcast - By Rabbi Yaakov Wolbe
Behaaloscha – Kindle Fire

Parsha Podcast - By Rabbi Yaakov Wolbe

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 34:44


Aaron the High Priest held a critical leadership role in the nation. A partial list of his jobs: he offered sacrifices, he did the Yom Kippur services which included the annual trip to the Holy of Holies, and he blessed the people. But there was one job that he was excluded for: When the princes […]

Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart
The Minor Prophets #27 - Zechariah

Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 28:17


I find myself constantly fascinated at the way the prophets in the Bible interlace with one another. You wouldn’t know this on a single read. You wouldn’t know it by reading a chapter here a chapter there or by reading somebody’s argument that has proof-texts drawn in from everywhere. You have to read the Bible—all of it—again and again and sooner or later the relationships begin to emerge. If you never read the Bible for yourself all the way through, get a copy of The One Year Bible. It’s easy to read and is laid out to help you complete the whole book in about 15 minutes a day, over one year. Make the Bible a part of your life and you will always be glad you did. All the bad stuff you heard about religion will fade into obscurity when you know what the Bible really says. And you won’t be suckered by some slick-talking preacher either, trust me. Every time I read back through the prophecy of Zechariah 1 see something there I have not seen before. Zechariah is complicated. For example, his vision beginning in chapter four, verse one: And the angel that talked with me came again, and waked me, as a man that is wakened out of his sleep, and said unto me, What see you? And I said, I have looked, and behold a lampstand all of gold, with a bowl upon the top of it, and its seven lamps on it, and seven pipes to the seven lamps, which are upon its top[.] Zechariah 4:1–2 KJ2000 We are a long way short of candles at this point in history—this is not a candlestick, it is a lamp-stand. It is fueled by olive oil that runs down through pipes for each of the bowls, which have wicks in them to burn the olive oil. When you go back and look at how they were made, each of the seven lamps is fashioned like an almond blossom (the almond tree was the first tree to bloom in spring). In Hebrew, this lamp-stand is the menorah; you have probably heard of that. It was the only light in the Holy of Holies. Spring time, of course, is Passover time, and this whole thing is suggestive of Christ, our Passover, who is the light of the world. God only knows what other meaning are hidden within this particular type of lamp-stand that he was looking at. It’s worth your time to grab a concordance and make your way through the Bible looking up all the places where it occurs, because it is both an interesting thing and has become the symbol of Judaism—that seven-branched menorah.

The Caldwell Commentaries Podcast
Life of Christ Lesson 160a: The Lord's High Priestly Prayer - Part I

The Caldwell Commentaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 73:19


John 17:1-5 The seventeenth chapter of the gospel of John is what many great men of God have considered to be "the Holy of Holies" of the Word of God.  In this sacred chapter, the veil before the Most Holy Place is pulled aside and we are allowed to listen to inter-Trinitarian communication.  The Lord Jesus spoke audibly, in the presence of His disciples, to His Heavenly Father after He concluded His "Farewell Discourse" (John 14 to 16).  His special prayer is the longest recorded prayer of the Son of God. In the first part of His prayer, the Lord Jesus prayed for Himself.  We discuss three aspects of this part of His prayer (see also Lesson 160b): (1) the purpose for His prayer, (2) the posture of His prayer, and (3) the petitions of His prayer.

Catholic Answers Live
#10013 Open Forum - Jimmy Akin

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021


Questions Covered: 4:26 – We know that the devil tempted Jesus. Is there evidence that the devil tempted Mary?  08:24 – I am being received in the Church this Easter. I was raised with the teaching that Jesus said divorce is unacceptable except when adultery is committed. I think the Catholic Church says it is never permissible. What is the reason for this?  19:13 – During a Catholic marriage, is it permissible for the betrothed to prostrate themselves, like the priests do when they are ordained?  22:24 – When you pray, is there any limit of prayer intentions that you can attach to your prayers?  30:24 – How many angels did God make originally? Does he still make angels now? Is there a finite number of demons?  34:04 – For the Passover meal, would the Jewish people take the lamb into their house to sacrifice it, or would they sacrifice it outside and then cook it inside?  36:52 – In the Old Testament, they talk about the Holy of Holies in the Temple and in the Mass, the Real Presence. I thought God was everywhere. How can I understand him being everywhere but more so in one place?  43:38 – Why does the Old Testament canon differ in content, depending on which codex it was?  47:53 – A number of parishioners have approached me about the validity of the writings of Luisa Picaretta and the Divine Will. It is not approved by the Church at this time. How should I guide them?  52:55 – What can one do when researching an issue, but finding that two orthodox moral theologians disagree on that issue? How can one find the correct view?  …