Podcasts about partly

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Best podcasts about partly

Latest podcast episodes about partly

Ad Law Access Podcast
New California Law Governing Commercial Co-Ventures Now (Partly) In Effect

Ad Law Access Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 3:44


Consumers increasingly want to feel good about their buying decisions and like-minded companies often look for ways to communicate how they align with consumers through “cause marketing” campaigns. One popular type of campaign – commonly called a “commercial co-venture” or “CCV” campaign – involves a for-profit company advertising that a portion of a purchase will benefit a charity. https://www.adlawaccess.com/2023/01/articles/new-california-law-governing-commercial-co-ventures-now-partly-in-effect/ Christie Grymes Thompson cgthompson@kelleydrye.com (202) 342-8633 Bio - https://www.kelleydrye.com/Our-People/Christie-Grymes-Thompson Gonzalo Mon gmon@kelleydrye.com (202) 342-8576 Bio - https://www.kelleydrye.com/Our-People/Gonzalo-E-Mon Subscribe to the Ad Law Access blog - www.adlawaccess.com/subscribe/ Subscribe to the Ad Law News Newsletter - https://www.kelleydrye.com/News-Events/Publications/Newsletters/Ad-Law-News-and-Views?dlg=1 View the Advertising and Privacy Law Resource Center - https://www.kelleydrye.com/Advertising-and-Privacy-Law-Resource-Center Find all of our links here linktr.ee/KelleyDryeAdLaw Hosted by Simone Roach

Radio Chicken
Video Chicken Live: Ordering Baby Chicks - 1.13.2023

Radio Chicken

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 97:07


Live from Creedmoor, NC, Video Chicken Live is a fun and informative show about all things chickens and coops. Matt, Kristen, and Ingrid answer your questions. We specialize in chickens and chicken coop construction. This first episode of Season 3 talks about the price of eggs and different factors that are affecting the high price of eggs. We then discuss ordering baby chicks online from some of our favorite hatcheries and go through the steps with you. BUT, we discover many hatcheries are already sold out on popular female chicken breeds. Partly due to the avian flu from last year and perhaps from the increased demand due to the rising egg prices.  Disappointed but undeterred, we will try to find out what's going on and where to get our baby chicks this year in time for chick season.  Plus we answer your questions on chicken keeping and coop building.  Favorite Hatcheries:

Ebenezer Baptist Church Sermons

Hebrews 10 1 For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually make the comers thereunto perfect. 2 For then would they not have ceased to be offered? because that the worshippers once purged should have had no more conscience of sins. 3 But in those sacrifices there is a remembrance again made of sins every year. 4 For it is not possible that the blood of bulls and of goats should take away sins. 5 Wherefore when he cometh into the world, he saith, Sacrifice and offering thou wouldest not, but a body hast thou prepared me: 6 In burnt offerings and sacrifices for sin thou hast had no pleasure. 7 Then said I, Lo, I come (in the volume of the book it is written of me,) to do thy will, O God. 8 Above when he said, Sacrifice and offering and burnt offerings and offering for sin thou wouldest not, neither hadst pleasure therein; which are offered by the law; 9 Then said he, Lo, I come to do thy will, O God. He taketh away the first, that he may establish the second. 10 By the which will we are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all. 11 And every priest standeth daily ministering and offering oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins: 12 But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God; 13 From henceforth expecting till his enemies be made his footstool. 14 For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. 15 Whereof the Holy Ghost also is a witness to us: for after that he had said before, 16 This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them; 17 And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more. 18 Now where remission of these is, there is no more offering for sin. 19 Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, 20 By a new and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh; 21 And having an high priest over the house of God; 22 Let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience, and our bodies washed with pure water. 23 Let us hold fast the profession of our faith without wavering; (for he is faithful that promised;) 24 And let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works: 25 Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting one another: and so much the more, as ye see the day approaching. 26 For if we sin wilfully after that we have received the knowledge of the truth, there remaineth no more sacrifice for sins, 27 But a certain fearful looking for of judgment and fiery indignation, which shall devour the adversaries. 28 He that despised Moses' law died without mercy under two or three witnesses: 29 Of how much sorer punishment, suppose ye, shall he be thought worthy, who hath trodden under foot the Son of God, and hath counted the blood of the covenant, wherewith he was sanctified, an unholy thing, and hath done despite unto the Spirit of grace? 30 For we know him that hath said, Vengeance belongeth unto me, I will recompense, saith the Lord. And again, The Lord shall judge his people. 31 It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God. 32 But call to remembrance the former days, in which, after ye were illuminated, ye endured a great fight of afflictions; 33 Partly, whilst ye were made a gazingstock both by reproaches and afflictions; and partly, whilst ye became companions of them that were so used. 34 For ye had compassion of me in my bonds, and took joyfully the spoiling of your goods, knowing in yourselves that ye have in heaven a better and an enduring substance. 35 Cast not away therefore your confidence, which hath great recompence of reward. 36 For ye have need of patience, that, after ye have done the will of God, ye might receive the promise. 37 For yet a little while, and he that shall come will come, and will not tarry. 38 Now the just shall live by faith: but if any man draw back, my soul shall have no pleasure in him. 39 But we are not of them who draw back unto perdition; but of them that believe to the saving of the soul.

Spanish Loops
Ep : 65. Chocolate and Churros. What else?

Spanish Loops

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 21:17


It's winter. It's cold. You are outdoors doing chores. Suddenly, you smell something familiar... OMG, Churros! Where are them? And there you go for a comforting cup of hot chocolate with that delicacy made since hundreds of years ago. Partly, is tradition, sometimes a must that you are craving for. It is inevitable to fall into it. Enjoy with Jorge and Francisco this virtual and delicious snack and hopefully you finish listening before running to the nearest Churros stand! Cheers!

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 179 Part 1: How Drawing Helps Inesa Kovalova Create Architectural Jewels

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 18:09


What you'll learn in this episode:   How Ukraine's built landscape has inspired Inesa's designs Why sketching jewels and gemstones is uniquely challenging, and which techniques can make this process easier What Inesa's students learn through Draw Me a Jewel classes Why technical and material innovation is essential for any jewelry brand that wants to last How the ability to draw jewelry can help a designer expand and communicate their ideas   About Inesa Kovalova   Coming from the architectural background, Inesa Kovalova started her career in jewelry with an internship in Van Cleef and Arpels and then worked for international fine and high jewelry companies. Driven by the recent challenges of the luxury industry, Inesa moves on to create jewelry reflecting our life today.   Art, design and architecture inspired, Inesa's jewelry explores the relationships between material, craftsmanship and design. Her pieces range from re-defined precious classics to contemporary 3d printed art jewels.   She is also the founder of Draw Me a Jewel, a jewelry illustration school and community for professionals and jewelry enthusiasts. Since launching online in 2020, more than 500 students all over the world have taken her courses. Inesa also teaches at Central Saint Martins, the Victoria and Albert museum in London and DiVA museum in Antwerpen. Additional Resources: Inesa's Website Inesa's Linker.ee Inesa's Instagram   Photos Available on TheJewelryJourney.com   Transcript: A jewelry designer doesn't have to draw to create beautiful jewels—but it certainly doesn't hurt. The ability to render gems and jewelry before creating them can help designers communicate ideas, market their brand, and show clients one-of-a-kind pieces before they're finalized. That's the idea behind Draw Me a Jewel, a jewelry illustration school founded by designer Inesa Kovalova. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about jewelry illustration techniques; why the definition of high jewelry should expand; and how her Ukrainian heritage inspires her architectural designs. Read the episode transcript here.    Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is the first part of a two-part episode. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it's released later this week.    Today, I'm pleased to welcome Ukrainian jewelry designer Inesa Kovalova. In addition to her innovative designs, which clearly demonstrate her training as an architect, she's also the founder of Draw Me a Jewel, a school that teaches jewelry illustration. She has worked and studied at some of the most well-known names in jewelry around the world. Inesa, we're so glad to have you today.   Inesa: Thank you, Sharon. It's a pleasure to talk to you. I love your podcast a lot. That's the complete truth.   Sharon: This is a little different today, but we're managing. Tell us about your jewelry journey.   Inesa: I feel like I'm still in a journey. It's still a process. I'm Ukrainian, and I was born and raised in a small town in the eastern part of Ukraine, Kramatorsk. It's far away from where I've been. When I think about my jewelry journey, it feels like a time lapse. I'm remembering some moments, like me working in a small jewelry enterprise in Kramatorsk. Then five years goes in a blink, and I remember myself being in Paris. Then I have another blink that brings me to London. In a few blinks, I arrive where I am now.   Sharon: Does everybody ask you about the fact that you're Ukrainian? How do you feel about that?   Inesa: Nowadays, I'm asked a lot about this. Of course, I am Ukrainian, and I have my family and friends there. I'm constantly following the news and trying to help as much as I can these days.   Sharon: When did you know you wanted to become a jeweler? Were you artistic when you were younger? You're young now, but—   Inesa: I started in art school. It's a funny story. I definitely had no talent in music, so my parents brought me to drawing school to study art. I grew up drawing since I was very young. I didn't know that a professional jewelry designer existed, but I was always curious. I remember myself drawing elaborate garnets, with attention to earrings or necklaces. I clearly had this interest always.   Sharon: Could you see any of this around you? Was there a Tiffany or a Van Cleef?   Inesa: No, there was no Tiffany or Van Cleef. I didn't know these names, but luckily in my city, there were a few jewelry enterprises. They were basically small manufacturers producing mass market jewelry. That's actually how I started. My first experience working in jewelry was as a sales assistant in one of the small shops in Kramatorsk during the summer. The owner, who was also the manufacturer of a little jewelry brand, knew I studied architecture and I liked drawing. My mom is a lovely lady and suggested that I try to design something. I was clearly very keen to design something.    Then the director of design for this small enterprise gave me a bag with a few sapphires and said, “Come back in a week and bring some sketches for them.” I was shocked, but I tried to do some things. In a couple of weeks, I arrived back with a number of sketches. When she looked through them, 70% she chewed up. Then she picked up the others and said, “Yes, this can be done. Our jewelry designer will explain to you what to adjust, how to put things together, which details to add.” That's how I was taught.    Then I joined this company working for about a year. It was the place where I learned everything. For Kramatorsk, for the Ukrainian scale, it was quite a decent sized company. It was like 100 people working, and they had a full cycle of production. There were people who were working with 3D models. There were jewelers who were working on a piece from casting to setting everything. I didn't know anything about gemstones or production at that point, so I was really lucky to learn how the jewelry enterprise operates as a cycle.    I read as many books as I could. I think the books in the library influenced me a lot, and I still have this passion. There was this book of modern design from a French jewelry brand. It was really one of the first books I got enchanted with. I started learning about high jewelry, the history of jewelry, how it caused a sensation in Paris.    Sharon: Do you think architecture influenced the fact that you could draw?   Inesa: Yes, obviously. Of course, I have quite a good drawing background. I went to art school and was taught still lifes and drawing portraits. Ukrainian education in the field of architecture, when I started, was pretty based on construction and drawings. So, we had extensive training in drawing every week up to about week eight. We had 12 hours of drawing every week as well during the first years. So, the ability to draw and to synch dimensionally is something that is always helpful to have when it comes to designing anything.   Sharon: You started an illustration school to teach people how to illustrate the designs they have in mind. You have several courses. I'm looking at some of the things you have. If you wanted to design an engagement ring but you don't know how to express it, you could learn that. Did you find that people had trouble learning to draw?   Inesa: Yes, I definitely found that people have trouble learning to draw. I myself, knowing how to draw and having a very good foundation of drawing, when it comes to jewelry drawing, it's a specific technique. Partly it's a technique, and another part is an understanding of the volume. That's actually what I try to teach through my courses. Everything is based on understanding volume and thinking about light and shadow, how these volumes interact with the light and how we can depict them. It's actually a sequence of logical facts, like here have a shadow; here we have the light, and when we place them here and here, we will see it's a sphere or it's cube.    Of course, jewelry is a different plane, but you can always break every complex object into simple ones. That's definitely something I take from architecture, from constructive, three-dimensional drawing, from this architectural background and understanding the volumes and how they're placed in space. It helps me teach and helps people clarify for themselves what they're drawing and why they need to do this or that.    I'm a big fan of the question “why.” Answering a question and making everything reasonable actually places me in illustration. You can have different types of illustration and a lot of thinking about it strategically. Which technique do we need to choose to draw a certain type of jewel? It also depends on what we want to tell, to whom we want to show it. I see illustration as a really important tool for communication in jewelry.   Sharon: I like that, communicating. That's very interesting. That's the problem. Do you find that people come to you—let's say they have an idea, but they say, “O.K., forget it. I can't do it. You do it. You make the item or draw it”? Do you make the item?   Inesa: The school is more about illustration, not the design. Clearly, we are not designing for our students, and the students come to learn from our templates. We have templates to practice gemstones. We have certain volumes, like when it comes to painting metals. There are templates to draw bowls, cylinders and everything. It's definitely not about designing a piece the students want to design, because design is a separate process.    I cannot create a volume for a person who wants to design, but when they come with certain questions like, “I have this design and I need to illustrate it,” then of course we can talk about it. When we have a course going on live, we have webinars. Students can come with their questions, and we can review what they need to do. I don't draw it for them, but I do explain how to approach it sometimes. I can help break the piece into smaller details and help a person see their volume. It helps them to proceed further. Then they can say, “Ah, understood. Yes, indeed. There is a cylinder, and then there's a line going there. It's bent.” That's how we are communicating about it.    Sharon: Let me ask you. I personally do not have any background in drawing human forms or architectural forms or designing jewelry or anything. Could you teach me? What happens? Who attends your school?   Inesa: We have students from different levels. There are indeed many people who have no background in drawing. Therefore, when it comes to very specific illustration, I try to simplify everything step by step. I would say it's a 90% chance that you will do everything good enough to evolve if you follow the step-by-step instructions. That's how the process is organized. We have step-by-step videos. At first comes the theoretical part, so you understand what is happening here and why we are drawing the shadow here. I quite enjoy breaking the diamond into two simple volumes and then analyzing the transparency and how the light shines through it. Then as a practical exercise, you would also need to learn which materials we use, how we use the brush. Most people succeed, and it's always a pleasure to see sterling examples. Our students' drawings are really good.   Sharon: Are they mostly young people? Are they people who work in the business? Do they come with different kinds of jewelry?   Inesa: I would say the audience is quite different. We have a very small percentage of professional designers who work in the industry. They come with very practical questions, and it's always a pleasure to teach them. You can go further with them. You can explain more, and you also enjoy their progress a lot. We also have a lot of people working around the jewelry business. It might be a gemologist; it might be a jeweler, but not all jewelers draw. Many jewelers come to learn to draw. Among these people, some have some experience but very little, or some of them start from the beginning. That is about learning tips and tricks. What would be the most useful for you in your business? Why do you need these drawings? Some of them need to illustrate their process to create social media content to communicate with their clients. It actually becomes very helpful to them. They can communicate more clearly, and there is always a certain magic attached to something created by hand by yourself.   You asked about age. They are all ages. The youngest participant I remember, it was years ago. She wanted to draw, and she found this course. I don't know if I was helpful to the parents, but she was keen to learn. She has a wonderful Instagram with many books she has already created at this age. We help many older people. I would probably say the same age as me. We have people about 50, 60. Recently we had a student who was 63. She talked openly about her age, so I think I can mention it.   Sharon: You mentioned gouache. Is everything done that way, or do you have different kinds of paint for different kinds of stones?   Inesa: We have two major courses. It's also about answering the question of what we need to draw. When we need to draw simple jewels with volumes and perspective, then there is a sketching course. In the sketching course, we work with markers. It's all about volumes, like how to sketch jewels in perspective.   Sharon: Which kind of course?    Inesa: Sketching jewelry.   Sharon: Sketching.   Inesa: Yeah.   Sharon: We will have photos posted on the website. Please head to the JewelryJourney.com to check them out.

Quick weather today
Season 4 Episode 01

Quick weather today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 0:28


Partly cloudy-unseasonable H:45 January 10, 2023 #QuickWeatherToday #Season4

RowAlong - Indoor Rowing Workouts for Concept2 and other rowing machines
January Motivation 5 - 30 minute low intensity

RowAlong - Indoor Rowing Workouts for Concept2 and other rowing machines

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 47:40


There's nothing standard about this standard row, as I look into a major change in technique for steady state rowing.

The Buresh Daily Discussion

This morning we are tracking areas of dense fog across NE Florida and SE Georgia. You will really have to slow down in some spots. A dense fog advisory is in effect until 8 am. After the fog burns off, we will turn mostly sunny by this afternoon. Highs will reach the upper 70s to lower 80s. Overnight, we won't see as much fog develop. Tomorrow, we will rise to the lower 80s in the afternoon. Our first cold front of 2023 arrives tomorrow night into Thursday. A few showers and storms will arrive ahead of that front Wednesday afternoon/evening and linger into Thursday. The weekend looks great for the JAGS game on SATURDAY NIGHT! Temperatures will be in the 50s for game. TODAY: AM dense fog. Partly sunny & mild. High: 81 TONIGHT: Mostly Cloudy. Low: 61 WED: Partly Sunny & Warm, Showers/A Few Storms Late. 61/83 THU: Mostly Cloudy, A Few AM Showers. 60/74 FRI: Mostly Sunny, Cooler. 46/63 SAT: Mostly Sunny. 40/65 SUN: Partly Sunny. 45/70 MON: Partly Sunny. 50/69

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook
Weather Forecast for Jackson WI Issued at 7am Jan 02 2023 by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 3:06


AUTOMATED GRAPHIC FORECAST LINK   Weather Forecast for Jackson, WI, by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting   Monday (Jan 2): Cloudy. Relatively mild. High 41. Wind north-northeast around 4 mph in the morning, becoming east-northeast in the afternoon.   Monday night: Cloudy. An 80% chance of rain. Relatively mild. Low 33, but temperatures rising after midnight. Wind east-northeast around 7 mph in the evening, becoming 11 mph, gusting to 18 mph, after midnight.   Tuesday (Jan 3): Cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy in the afternoon. Patchy light fog in the morning, then light to moderate fog in the afternoon. A 70% chance of rain. Unusually mild. High 45. Wind east-northeast around 9 mph, gusting to 18 mph, in the morning, becoming 3 mph in the afternoon.   Tuesday night: Cloudy. Patchy light fog. A 40% chance of rain. Relatively mild. Low 37. Wind east around 3 mph in the evening, becoming south after midnight.   Wednesday (Jan 4): Cloudy. Patchy light fog in the morning. A 50% chance of rain in the morning, then a mix of rain and snow in the afternoon. Relatively mild. High 43. Wind south-southwest around 5 mph in the morning, becoming southeast in the afternoon. No snow accumulation expected.   Wednesday night: Cloudy. Patchy light fog. A 50% chance of a mix of snow and rain in the evening, then of snow after midnight. Relatively mild. Low 30. Wind chill ranging from 25 to 31. Wind northeast around 7 mph, gusting to 15 mph. Little or no snow accumulation expected.   Thursday (Jan 5): Cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy in the afternoon. Patchy light fog. A 40% chance of snow. High 34, but temperatures falling in the afternoon. Wind chill ranging from 20 to 25. Wind north-northeast around 9 mph, gusting to 17 mph. Snow accumulation about a quarter inch.   Thursday night: Clear to partly cloudy. Light to moderate fog. Low 21. Wind northwest around 5 mph.   Friday (Jan 6): Partly cloudy in the morning, becoming sunny in the afternoon. Patchy light fog in the morning. Relatively mild. High 34. Wind chill ranging from 16 to 28. Wind west-northwest around 5 mph.   Friday night: Clear. Low 18. Wind west-northwest around 4 mph in the evening, becoming north-northwest after midnight.   Saturday (Jan 7): Sunny. High 33. Wind chill ranging from 13 to 27. Wind north around 5 mph.   Saturday night: Clear to partly cloudy in the evening, becoming clear after midnight. Low 20. Wind east-northeast around 3 mph.   KASICA

Daybreak Insider Podcast
December 29, 2022 - White House Announces: Negative Covid Test Required to Enter US from China

Daybreak Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 16:11


The White House Announces that Negative Covid Tests are Required to Enter US from China. The Social Media App TikTok is No Longer Allowed on House-Issued Devices. Southwest Airlines says that “Outdated” Scheduling Software is Partly to Blame for Travel DebacleSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook
Weather Forecast for Jackson WI Issued at 7am Dec 27 2022 by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 3:30


AUTOMATED GRAPHIC FORECAST LINK   Weather Forecast for Jackson, WI, by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting   Tuesday (Dec 27): Partly to mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy in the afternoon. Breezy. High 22. Wind chill ranging from 2 to 9. Wind south-southwest around 11 mph, gusting to 21 mph.   Tuesday night: Cloudy in the evening, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy after midnight. Breezy. Low 21, but temperatures rising after midnight. Wind chill ranging from 8 to 17. Wind south-southwest around 13 mph, gusting to 21 mph.   Wednesday (Dec 28): Mostly cloudy to cloudy. Breezy and relatively mild. High 39. Wind chill ranging from 17 to 30. Wind south-southwest around 13 mph, gusting to 18 mph.   Wednesday night: Cloudy. Breezy and relatively mild. Low 37, but temperatures rising after midnight. Wind south-southwest around 13 mph, gusting to 18 mph.   Thursday (Dec 29): Cloudy. Patchy light fog in the afternoon. A 60% chance of rain. Breezy and relatively mild. High 47. Wind south-southwest around 11 mph, gusting to 16 mph.   Thursday night: Cloudy. Patchy light fog in the evening. A 50% chance of rain. Breezy and relatively mild. Low 35. Wind south-southwest around 11 mph, gusting to 18 mph.   Friday (Dec 30): Mostly cloudy to cloudy in the morning, becoming partly to mostly cloudy in the afternoon. Patchy light fog in the morning. Relatively mild. High 40. Wind west-southwest around 7 mph in the morning, becoming 4 mph in the afternoon.   Friday night: Partly to mostly cloudy in the evening, becoming partly cloudy after midnight. Relatively mild. Low 29. Wind south-southwest around 2 mph.   Saturday (Dec 31): Partly cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy in the afternoon. Light to moderate fog in the afternoon. Relatively mild. High 41. Wind southeast around 4 mph.   Saturday night: Mostly cloudy to cloudy in the evening, becoming cloudy after midnight. Light to moderate fog in the evening. A 30% chance of rain. Relatively mild. Low 35. Wind east around 3 mph.   Sunday (Jan 1): Cloudy. Patchy light fog. A 70% chance of rain. Relatively mild. High 40. Wind northwest around 4 mph in the morning, becoming 7 mph in the afternoon.   Sunday night: Mostly cloudy to cloudy. Patchy light fog. Relatively mild. Low 33. Wind northwest around 7 mph in the evening, becoming 3 mph after midnight.   Monday (Jan 2): Cloudy. A 40% chance of rain. Relatively mild. High 42. Wind southeast around 3 mph in the morning, becoming 8 mph in the afternoon.   Monday night: Cloudy. Patchy light fog. An 80% chance of rain. Relatively mild. Low 40, but temperatures rising after midnight. Wind southeast around 9 mph in the evening, becoming 6 mph after midnight.   KASICA

Motivation Made Easy: Body Respect, True Health
Working With Your Inner Critic To Build Healthy Habits

Motivation Made Easy: Body Respect, True Health

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 43:36


Episode 84. Karen was spiraling. She had been doing so well. She was eating well, walking daily and feeling great. But for some reason today she felt off. She ate more than usual at lunch, maybe because she was scrolling mindlessly on her phone and saw a few upsetting posts about someone she went to high school with who is battling cancer. She kept scrolling, and before she knew it, she had eaten too much. She felt stuffed. Not super stuffed, but enough to feel uncomfortable. She got mildly frustrated with herself after this, but doesn't totally spiral out... yet. She told herself, (somewhat subconsciously), "it's fine, it's one meal, you can get back on track immediately. Relax." But she moves on with her day and doesn't acknowledge the actual thoughts that were going through her mind in the moment. Partly, because she's ashamed of them. She shouldn't feel so self-critical and she knows it isn't helpful. She needs to be kinder to herself, she knows this. She just tries to think of something else instead. If she were really honest with herself, that simple act of eating more at lunch and feeling overfull triggered thoughts like: "I can't believe you did that, you feel sick now, that's what you get." "You were feeling so good, and now you're going to fall back in old habits." And if we dig to the core thought, it was: "You're going to fail again." She continued to feel off all day, and before she knew it she had an extra snack in the afternoon even though she definitely wasn't hungry. By the time dinner came, she felt tired (physically and emotionally), mad at herself, and it was all she could do to heat up leftovers and have dinner in front of the TV. And why not pull out the ice cream, she clearly blew it for the day. All because she didn't fully address what we really bothering her. That hidden sentence that popped up right after she ate a bit extra at lunch. Ready to Stop Going it Alone? One of my biggest regrets in life is not seeking good therapy sooner. You deserve to feel truly guided on your relationship with food and your body. MindBodyHealth is an incredible practice led by my great friend and colleague Dr. Sapna Dosh. This wonderful group of psychologists and dietitians provide evidence-based therapy in person in Washington DC and Arlington VA, and via teletherapy in over 30 states across the United States. Go to MindBodyVA.com to set up your free consultation call and get matched with an excellent and totally vetted therapist today! Be sure to let them know the Motivation Made Easy podcast sent you. Your future self will thank you. How Our Hidden Sentences Hold Us Back You see, our brains avoid the truth of what we are really saying to ourselves about our eating, because it's painful. And a big part of us knows that that inner critic in us can be incredibly unhelpful. Karen's logical attempts to reassure herself were well intentioned. But her brain was still triggered by all the hidden critical thoughts she wasn't acknowledging. The ones exacerbating the pain and silently keeping us stuck. The Power of Mindset Most of us have many unhelpful hidden sentences all the time. And until we learn to unpack them and really examine them, and even look for the positive intention behind that part of us, they will continue to silently impact us, without our control. Confession: I Used to Hate CBT I have a confession to make. I used to really hate mindset work (aka cognitive behavioral therapy or CBT, in grad school). Even still the term mindset kind of annoys me, because it makes me think about all the things I learned that felt so invalidating. Like, just notice you are doing "all or nothing thinking" and shift it. It's that simple, right? Wrong. I had so much unaddressed pain that felt unseen. Changing my mindset in that way felt completely impossible to me. I just wanted to yell, "It isn't that simple!

Media Path Podcast
Women at the Mic & Best Friends in Comedy featuring Shawn Pelofsky and Vicki Barbolak

Media Path Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 60:58


Shawn Pelofsky and Vicki Barbolak are fellow standup comedy besties who are taking their friendship to the next level. Yes, they would like to announce their podcast.Shawn and Vicki host Trailer Park Diaries. Partly truth, mostly make believe, as if Prairie Home Companion moved into a double wide.We go behind the trailer with Shawn and Vicki to learn just how much of their diary stories are true and how much is merely aspirational. We're also talking about the spine strength either required or acquired by women in comedy. We discuss crowd work, improv rules and knowing your audience.And Shawn confesses that she is as hooked on The Real Housewives as they appear to be on wine. Weezy's reality drug of choice is The Bachelor. We've all watched Harry and Meghan and we have opinions!Plus, Fritz and Weezy recommend The Order of Myths and Descendant on Netflix, HBO's Pelosi in the House and 'Mercury Pictures Presents' by Anthony Marra.Path Points of Interest:Trailer Park DiariesTrailer Park Diaries on YoutubeShawn PelofskySocial Media MeltdownsVicki BarbolakVicki Barbolak on YoutubeThe Order of Myths - Netflix Descendant - Netflix Mercury Pictures Presents by Anthony MarraPelosi in the House

Mornings with Eric and Brigitte
Unwrapping The Names of Jesus for Kids - with Asheritah Ciuciu

Mornings with Eric and Brigitte

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 12:18


Most Christians agree that Christmas is all about Jesus, yet most of us spend little time preparing our hearts to celebrate Him. Why is this? Partly because we don’t know how. Unwrapping the Names of Jesus for Kids helps you journey through the stories of Jesus's life as told by a mother and then shared with her children. It helps us see things through the eyes of a child, but teaches us important promises of God. On Monday's Mornings with Eric and Brigitte, author Asheritah Ciuciu joins us to share how storytelling is the key to connecting to our children's hearts and imaginations and will allow us to share our Jesus-stories with our kids.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Midnight Ride
The Midnight Ride Ep. 065 - Teacher's Unions--Public Enemy Number 1

The Midnight Ride

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 53:33


Great empires tend to die due to internal rot, rather than external enemies. 21st Century America is in steep decline, partly due to an education system that is uncompetitive against other nations. Partly to blame are teacher's unions, who worked to shut down schools over the past two years and are hyperpartisan. Connor and Paul break down the National Education Association's political contributions--which are alarming. Plus, Ron DeSantis takes on the transgender threat to Florida's kids, and another release of Twitter Files shows substantial FBI involvement in censorship. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Survival Podcast
Jack’s Cooking Hacks & Techniques – Epi-3220

The Survival Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 94:51


I decided to do one more “new” episode for 2022 and just woke up thinking about cooking and different techniques.  Partly due to my episode last week with Texas Slim when we talked about “cattleman feats”.  Also due to the … Continue reading →

The Nonlinear Library
EA - How my thinking about doing good changed over the years by Quadratic Reciprocity

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 7:42


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: How my thinking about doing good changed over the years, published by Quadratic Reciprocity on December 18, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. This is a Draft Amnesty Day draft. That means it's not polished, it's probably not up to my standards, the ideas are not thought out, and I haven't checked everything. I was explicitly encouraged to post something unfinished! Commenting and feedback guidelines: I'm going with the default — please be nice. But constructive feedback is appreciated; please let me know what you think is wrong. Feedback on the structure of the post is also appreciated. I first came across effective altruism as a teenager a few years ago, and the core idea instantly clicked for me after reading one post about it. In this post, I will talk about some ways in which my thinking around doing good has evolved over the years as a young person with a strong interest in making the world better. The emotions I feel when thinking about others' suffering are less intense. I don't know if teenage-me would have predicted this. As a child, I remember crying a lot when watching videos on animal suffering, when I first confronted the idea of infinite hell I was depressed for an entire summer, I wanted to give all the money I received on my birthday to people who were less fortunate because I knew they needed it more. I think the change is partly from just getting used to it. The first time you confront the horrors of factory farming it is awful but by the hundredth time, it's hard for my brain to naturally feel the same powerful emotions of sadness and anger. Partly, the change is from starting to believe that it isn't actually that virtuous to feel strong emotions at others' suffering. Some of that is from having been in the effective altruism community, where it is easy to feel that what matters are the results of what you do and not the emotions behind what you do. I still feel strong emotions of empathy for those who are suffering some of the time when I am feeling particularly introspective and emotional. However, and this is because of being in the effective altruism community, I am much more aware of my own ranking of what the biggest problems are and it is harder for me to direct a lot of empathy towards causes that feel less “big” compared to factory farming, extreme poverty, and existential risk - even though, in absolute terms, the suffering of people living in terrible conditions in rich countries is still massive. At the same time, my ability to live according to my values has increased. I haven't eaten meat in a couple of years whereas as a child and young teenager, this was really difficult for me to do even though I really wanted to be vegetarian. I have more tools now to do what I think is right, and the biggest of them all is having a social community where there are others who take their beliefs seriously and try to do good. I am much less willing to try to hack my brain in order to force myself to do and feel things I endorse. I used to be much more ashamed of some of my feelings and actions and felt a strong desire to figure out how to trick my brain into being more willing to sacrifice myself for others, into working all the time and being more ambitious. This involved doing things adjacent to self-deception. This was a really bad idea and caused me lots of pain and frustration. Instead, the thing that worked for me is acknowledging that I have “selfish” desires, that sometimes I take actions that actively hurt others, and that I have things that I deeply care about besides just maximising the good. Having a better picture of myself and what I actually value allowed me to work with the “altruist” and “selfish” sides of me to do things like be able to enjoy spending money and time on things that make me happy without feeling guilty and then ...

Roll With The Punches
Who Cares? | Tiff Cook - 482

Roll With The Punches

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 12:13


I had a nice experience this week... Thought I'd yak it out over one of our #SelfieSaturday pods. Partly to encourage others to pay it forward but really, if I'm honest, to solidify the intention in my own mind to pay it forward in my own life. Can I give more generously of my words, thoughts and ideas? I bet I can...   TIFFANEE COOK Linktree:  https://linktr.ee/rollwiththepunches/ Website: www.rollwiththepunches.com.au LinkedIn:  www.linkedin.com/in/tiffaneecook/ Facebook:  www.facebook.com/rollwiththepunchespodcast/ Instagram:  www.instagram.com/rollwiththepunches_podcast/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/tiffaneeandco  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Living Clutter Free Forever
#030 It Doesn't Have To Be Perfect

Living Clutter Free Forever

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 12:35


It's 9 days until Christmas Eve. Partly exciting, partly terrifying. Why does it always manage to creep up on me so quickly, despite the best preparations? It got me thinking about the pressure we put on ourselves for everything to be perfect, so I thought that would be a great podcast topic at this time of year. The last couple of years, because of Covid, we didn't have any visitors over Christmas, and I secretly loved it. I was of course sad not to get to see the people, but the rest of it I can live without. I didn't have to clean the guest bedroom, or make exciting desserts, or worry if the table decorations looked amazing. I didn't even have to worry about getting out of my pyjamas. It was so liberating, that I have decided to adopt a similar attitude this year. Have a listen to what I've got organized! If you want to leave me an early Christmas present in the form of a review please do so here:https://podcasts.apple.com/de/podcast/living-clutter-free-forever/id1625676674?l=enhttps://www.stitcher.com/podcast/living-clutter-free-foreverhttps://open.spotify.com/show/1SWqONdhPZBLIo4AOAxS7A?si=c57d7d2c2e8f4e38https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/16c3f95c-ef00-4771-808f-5fc69ed97e8a/living-clutter-free-foreverThanks for listening! For more organizational motivation, support and free resources visit my website www.caroline-thor.com/explore, or come and say 'hi' on Instagram @caro.thor, or on Facebook @carolineorganizer

This Week in America with Ric Bratton
Episode 2580: HEALING: MY PILGRAMAGE WITH TAGORE by Linda L. George Ph. D.

This Week in America with Ric Bratton

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 23:15


Healing: MY PILGRIMAGE WITH TAGORE, INDIA'S REVERED TEACHER by Linda L. George Ph. D.A retired clergyperson, with over 30 years of experience in civilian and military chaplaincy, explores her own grief experiences, including the deaths of two husbands, as well as reflections on myriad other losses everyone suffers. The author shares how we can easily relate to the sorrows of the Nobel-prize-winning poet Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941). His life and writings are strikingly relevant today and offer heartfelt messages of hope and strength.Linda George served as a US Army Chaplain for 24 years, and served in civilian chaplaincy for 8 years. She continues to preach and teach regularly for several different congregations. She is a classically trained pianist and vocalist who frequently shares her musical talents with others. At age 72, she works out with a personal trainer at the gym four times a week, and she's exceedingly grateful that she can do that! She has traveled extensively in the last few years, visiting such places as Iceland, the Galapagos Islands, nothern and southern India, Egypt, and Africa. She loves to read history, biographies and autobiographies, and she loves learning about different spiritual traditions. Linda never expected to publish her writings from some post-graduate work she did on healing from grief. Partly the writing was therapy for her as she cared for her husband who was dying from cancer. After thirty years of doing pastoral care with hurting folks,she thought her reflections and scholarship about suffering and loss might help others. Linda shares her home with an old rescued coonhound and several mostly feral cats. Linda has been widowed twice, at age 42, and again at age 63. Linda's parents both died twenty years ago. She and her two sisters have a wonderful relationship.   Linda is so grateful for all the people who have helped her become the person she is today. Among those are the mentally and physically challenged folks in a large residential facility where she served for ten years as a music therapist and as a chaplain. Also, it was her honor to have provided emotional and spiritual support to so many Soldiers, their families, and government employees during her career in the US Army. Linda's consistent mantra and prayer is simple: Thank You!   https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/healing-linda-l-george-phd/1139442024https://gothambooksinc.com/http://www.bluefunkbroadcasting.com/root/twia/121522gotham.mp3

Sharing Her Journey
Avoid the Holiday Drama by Enneagram Type

Sharing Her Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 17:08


Today Kirsten is joined by her NEW co-host and Enneagram expert Gina Gomez. They talk about tips to thrive through the Holidays by your enneagram type. Gina takes us through each number by Triad Centers. {Body is 8, 9, 1} {Heart is 2, 3, 4} {Mind is 5, 6, 7}  Gina and Kirsten share some details on their upcoming Power of Intention Enneagram Workshop. "DESIGN YOUR YEAR BY TYPE" This event will be held in Boise Saturday January 21st from 1:00-4:00pm. Link and more details to register to come!  If you are wondering what your Enneagram Number is the test Gina suggests taking: Enneagram Test Tips when taking the FREE test: 1. Answer only YES or NO - choose "Partly" no more than3 times. 2. Answer the questions with how you've been most of your life, starting as early as you can remember, not from a place of how you are now, after all you've learned and worked on. ____________________________________ If you enjoyed the podcast we would really appreciate it if you would rate and review HERE   Follow Sharing Her Journey podcast on Instagram and Facebook for a place of Overcoming and Growth for your whole HOME, HEAD, and HEART.    Find KIRSTEN on each episode, with Interior Design tips the fourth week of each month. Follow her over HERE    Find JEN's episodes here the first of every month talking about all things Life Coaching from personal growth, enoughness, & lifelong learning. Follow her HERE    Find GINA's episodes the second week of each month talking all about using the Enneagram as a tool in relationships, healing from breakups, and more. Find her HERE   Find MONIQUE the third week of each month recording from France talking all things French, travel, culture, arts, and midlife joy. Find her textile company HERE  

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Car parts start up hoping to become our biggest NZ tech company

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 9:13


Finding the right car part to fit the right vehicle is actually a really difficult problem globally. Now a new New Zealand company called Partly, is busying itself to create a solution. The company has big plans to become the largest NZ-based tech firm within five years. Partly co-founder and CEO Levi Fawcett talks to Jesse.

Wow! I Didn't Know That! (or maybe I just forgot)
Dec 13th - Life is Partly What We Make It - w/Tennessee Williams

Wow! I Didn't Know That! (or maybe I just forgot)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 2:43


Fred discusses the life and career of American playwright and screen writer, Tennessee Williams. www.rockysealemusic.com https://rockysealemusic.com/wow-i-didn-t-know-that-or-maybe-i-just-forgot https://www.facebook.com/150wordspodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rocky-seale7/message

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener
News24 investigations find that President Cyril Ramaphosa's former Phala Phala lodge manager now works at a lodge partly owned by Arthur Fraser's niece, Nothando Moleketi-Williams.

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 5:22


Guest: Kyle Cowan, Investigative journalist at News24See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook
Weather Forecast for Jackson WI Issued at 7am Dec 08 2022 by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 4:07


AUTOMATED GRAPHIC FORECAST LINK   Weather Forecast for Jackson, WI by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting   Thursday (Dec 8): Partly to mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming partly cloudy in the afternoon. Relatively mild. High 40. Wind east-northeast around 5 mph.   Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the evening, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy after midnight. Low 28, but temperatures rising after midnight. Wind east around 6 mph in the evening, becoming 9 mph, gusting to 18 mph, after midnight.   Friday (Dec 9): Cloudy. An 80% chance of a mix of snow, sleet, and rain in the morning, then a chance of a mix of rain and snow in the afternoon. Breezy. High 36. Wind chill around 25. Wind east around 13 mph, gusting to 22 mph. Snow or ice (on ground) accumulation around 2 inches.   Friday night: Cloudy. Patchy light fog after midnight. A 40% chance of a mix of rain and snow Relatively mild. Low 33. Wind chill as low as 26. Wind east around 11 mph, gusting to 19 mph, in the evening, becoming 8 mph, gusting to 17 mph, after midnight. No snow accumulation expected.   Saturday (Dec 10): Cloudy. Patchy light fog in the morning, then light to moderate fog in the afternoon. A 40% chance of a mix of rain and snow in the morning, then rain in the afternoon. High 39. Wind east around 6 mph. No snow accumulation expected.   Saturday night: Cloudy. Patchy light fog in the evening, then light to moderate fog after midnight. A 30% chance of a mix of rain and snow in. Relatively mild. Low 32. Wind southeast around 3 mph in the evening, becoming west-northwest after midnight. No snow accumulation expected.   Sunday (Dec 11): Cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy in the afternoon. Light to moderate fog. A 30% chance of snow in the morning, then rain in the afternoon. Relatively mild. High 39. Wind northwest around 4 mph. No snow accumulation expected.   Sunday night: Cloudy. Patchy light fog in the evening. Relatively mild. Low 30. Wind north-northwest around 4 mph.   Monday (Dec 12): Cloudy. High 39. Wind east-northeast around 6 mph.   Monday night: Cloudy. Low 32. Wind chill as low as 24. Wind east-southeast around 9 mph, gusting to 17 mph, in the evening, becoming 12 mph, gusting to 21 mph, after midnight.   Tuesday (Dec 13): Cloudy. A 40% chance of rain. Windy. High 40. Wind chill ranging from 25 to 30. Wind east-southeast around 16 mph, gusting to 25 mph.   Tuesday night: Cloudy. An 80% chance of a mix of rain, sleet, and snow in the evening. Windy. Low 32. Wind chill ranging from 21 to 26. Wind east-southeast around 21 mph, gusting to 32 mph. Snow or ice (on ground) accumulation about an inch.   Wednesday (Dec 14): Cloudy. Light to moderate fog in the afternoon. A 60% chance of a mix of rain, sleet, and snow in the morning, then rain in the afternoon. Breezy and relatively mild. High 40. Wind southeast around 19 mph, gusting to 32 mph, in the morning, becoming 8 mph, gusting to 19 mph, in the afternoon. No snow or ice (on ground) accumulation expected.   Wednesday night: Cloudy. Light to moderate fog. A 30% chance of rain. Relatively mild. Low 35. Wind southeast around 5 mph.   KASICA

80,000 Hours Podcast with Rob Wiblin
My experience with imposter syndrome — and how to (partly) overcome it (Article)

80,000 Hours Podcast with Rob Wiblin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 44:04


Today's release is a reading of our article called My experience with imposter syndrome — and how to (partly) overcome it, written and narrated by Luisa Rodriguez. If you want to check out the links, footnotes and figures in today's article, you can find those here. And if you like this article, you'll probably enjoy episode #100 of this show: Having a successful career with depression, anxiety, and imposter syndrome Get this episode by subscribing to our podcast on the world's most pressing problems and how to solve them: type ‘80,000 Hours' into your podcasting app. Producer: Keiran Harris Audio mastering and editing for this episode: Milo McGuire

Too Peas In A Podcast
Turnto Jess for CP research, treatments and community

Too Peas In A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 52:44


Mandy and Kate talk to Jess, CEO + Founder of Turnto and Pea mum to twin boys with cerebral palsy. Turnto is a tech platform and online CP community that uses AI to translate academic medical literature on CP in real-time. Turnto offers people a rich source of specific treatment information from the medical literature, medical experts and people with lived experience. Jess shares her story about her pregnancy, the twins' births, very challenging times in NICU, the boys' unfolding diagnoses and all the early intervention required. Jess and her husband took the boys on a big adventure prior to them starting school, travelling around New Zealand living on a bus, embracing life and taking back control of their choices.Jess started Turnto to fill the information gaps, help people review treatment options, learn from other people's lived experience and stay on top of all the latest research and insights. Many leading CP researchers are involved, giving their support and guidance to the Turnto team to offer the very best service possible. The growing site is a fantastic resource for parents, peafessionals and adults with lived experience happy to share their learnings and insights.Thanks for sharing your amazing story with us Jess!Visit the Turnto websiteFollow Turnto on Instagram Plus:Buy our book The Invisible Life Of Us!Listen to our Spotify playlist –Too Peas: Songs Our Guest Peas LoveMelbourne forecast for Thursday December 1 –Partly cloudy, 20 degreesJoin our Facebook HangoutFind us on YouTubeThank you for supporting Too Peas In A Podcast! Don't forget to rate and reviewContact us here:Website: www.toopeasinapodcast.com.auEmail: toopeaspodcast@gmail.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook
Weather Forecast for Jackson WI Issued at 7am Dec 06 2022 by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 3:02


AUTOMATED GRAPHIC FORECAST LINK   Weather Forecast for Jackson, WI by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting   Monday (Dec 5): Cloudy. Patchy light fog in the morning. Relatively mild. High 42. Wind east-northeast around 4 mph.   Monday night: Mostly cloudy in the evening, becoming partly to mostly cloudy after midnight. Relatively mild. Low 29. Wind northwest around 2 mph.   Wednesday (Dec 7): Partly to mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming partly cloudy in the afternoon. Relatively mild. High 46. Wind west-northwest around 2 mph.   Wednesday night: Partly cloudy. Low 28. Wind northeast around 2 mph in the evening, becoming 6 mph after midnight.   Thursday (Dec 8): Mostly cloudy to cloudy in the morning, becoming cloudy in the afternoon. Relatively mild. High 42. Wind east-northeast around 9 mph, gusting to 17 mph.   Thursday night: Cloudy. A 70% chance of a mix of rain, snow, and sleet in the evening, then a mix of rain and snow after midnight. Breezy and relatively mild. Low 35. Wind east-northeast around 12 mph, gusting to 23 mph. No snow or ice (on ground) accumulation expected.   Friday (Dec 9): Cloudy. Patchy light fog in the afternoon. An 80% of a mix of rain and snow. Breezy. High 40. Wind chill around 29. Wind east-northeast around 14 mph, gusting to 23 mph. No snow accumulation expected.   Friday night: Cloudy. Patchy light fog. A 50% chance of rain in the evening, then a mix of rain and snow after midnight. Relatively mild. Low 35. Wind east-northeast around 9 mph, gusting to 20 mph..No snow accumulation expected.   Saturday (Dec 10): Mostly cloudy to cloudy. Light to moderate fog. A 30% chance of rain. Relatively mild. High 41. Wind east-northeast around 5 mph.   Saturday night: Mostly cloudy to cloudy. Light to moderate fog. A 40% chance of rain. Relatively mild. Low 34. Wind north-northwest around 5 mph.   Sunday (Dec 11): Mostly cloudy to cloudy. Light to moderate fog in the morning. Relatively mild. High 44. Wind north-northwest around 3 mph in the morning, becoming northeast in the afternoon.   Sunday night: Partly to mostly cloudy in the evening, becoming mostly cloudy after midnight. Patchy light fog. Relatively mild. Low 32. Wind east-southeast around 6 mph.   Monday (Dec 12): Partly to mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy in the afternoon. Patchy light fog in the morning. Breezy and relatively mild. High 45. Wind east-southeast around 9 mph, gusting to 19 mph, in the morning, becoming 13 mph, gusting to 20 mph, in the afternoon.   Monday night: Cloudy. A 70% chance of rain. Breezy and relatively mild. Low 40. Wind east-southeast around 15 mph, gusting to 21 mph.   KASICA

GOODBYE HEARTBREAK, HELLO PURPOSE THE PODCAST -- Wholeness, Overcome Heartbreak, Grow in Faith, Discover Identity, Walk in Pu

Hey Sis! So, my husband and I just celebrated 6 years of marriage in November. Things aren't perfect, but we're in a much better place now than where we were at the beginning of our marriage. Partly because of the things I had to learn as a new wife. There was a point in my single season that I was so desperate to be married. I placed that desire above the desire for anything else. But can I say it was a selfish desire back then. The reasons I wanted to get married were not good enough to make a marriage last. So as you can imagine, I had a lot of lessons to learn. You may be in that place of having a very strong desire to be married, but marriage is not for the faint at heart. I'm not, by any means, trying to discourage you from desiring marriage. Instead, I'm sharing just a few things I wish I knew before I got married. Maybe it will give you some wisdom to consider and decide if you need to work on any of these things in your single season.  So get ready to do a little examination of your own behaviors and desires on today. You may want to journal through some of these things or bring them to God in prayer if you know you struggle with any of these things. You may even realize you have things to work on that I didn't mention. Let's do this, Sis! And if you would like to give me an anniversary gift

Bridging the Gap With Pastor Lloyd Pulley

Many people in the hostile culture of 2022, view God as some sort of cosmic kill joy. The reality is quite the opposite. He has a wonderful and exciting plan for our lives. A plan that includes a glorious future and a real hope. So why are too few experiencing all that God has for them? Partly because they're seeking out man's wisdom rather than God's! We'll talk about that today as we head back into First Corinthians chapter two.

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook
Weather Forecast for Jackson WI Issued at 7am Dec 05 2022 by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 3:06


AUTOMATED GRAPHIC FORECAST LINK   Weather Forecast for Jackson, WI by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting   Monday (Dec 5): Cloudy. Relatively mild. High 42. Wind southwest around 9 mph, gusting to 17 mph, in the morning, becoming 6 mph, gusting to 16 mph, in the afternoon.   Monday night: Mostly cloudy to cloudy in the evening, becoming mostly cloudy after midnight. Low 28. Wind chill ranging from 22 to 32. Wind north-northwest around 6 mph.   Tuesday (Dec 6): Cloudy. Relatively mild. High 40. Wind northeast around 5 mph.   Tuesday night: Cloudy in the evening, becoming partly to mostly cloudy after midnight. Low 29. Wind north-northeast around 3 mph in the evening, becoming north-northwest after midnight.   Wednesday (Dec 7): Mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming partly cloudy in the afternoon. Relatively mild. High 45. Wind northeast around 4 mph.   Wednesday night: Partly to mostly cloudy in the evening, becoming cloudy after midnight. Patchy light fog after midnight. A 20% chance of a mix of rain, snow, and sleet after midnight. Relatively mild. Low 32. Wind northeast around 5 mph. No snow or ice (on ground) accumulation expected.   Thursday (Dec 8): Cloudy. Patchy light fog. A 70% chance of rain. Relatively mild. High 44. Wind northeast around 7 mph, gusting to 15 mph.   Thursday night: Cloudy. Patchy light fog. A 30% chance of rain. Relatively mild. Low 34. Wind northeast around 11 mph, gusting to 20 mph.   Friday (Dec 9): Cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy in the afternoon. Patchy light fog in the morning, then light to moderate fog in the afternoon. High 40. Wind northeast around 12 mph, gusting to 20 mph, in the morning, becoming 9 mph, gusting to 18 mph, in the afternoon.   Friday night: Mostly cloudy to cloudy. Light to moderate fog. Relatively mild. Low 34. Wind northeast around 6 mph.   Saturday (Dec 10): Cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy in the afternoon. Light to moderate fog. Relatively mild. High 39. Wind east-northeast around 4 mph.   Saturday night: Cloudy in the evening, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy after midnight. Relatively mild. Low 30. Wind east-northeast around 2 mph.   Sunday (Dec 11): Mostly cloudy to cloudy in the morning, becoming partly to mostly cloudy in the afternoon. Relatively mild. High 41. Wind east-southeast around 5 mph.   KASICA

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook
Weather Forecast for Jackson WI Issued at 7am Dec 02 2022 by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 2:00


AUTOMATED GRAPHIC FORECAST LINK   Weather Forecast for Jackson, WI by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting   Friday (Dec 2): Mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming cloudy in the afternoon. Breezy and relatively mild. High 49. Wind south around 11 mph, gusting to 23 mph, in the morning, becoming 15 mph, gusting to 24 mph, in the afternoon.   Friday night: Cloudy in the evening, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy after midnight. A 40% chance of rain in the evening, then a mix of snow, rain, and sleet after midnight. Breezy. Low 21. Wind chill ranging from 11 to 40. Wind south-southwest around 13 mph, gusting to 22 mph, in the evening, becoming west around 18 mph, gusting to 27 mph, after midnight. Little or no snow or ice (on ground) accumulation expected.   Saturday (Dec 3): Partly to mostly sunny in the morning, becoming mostly sunny in the afternoon. Breezy. High 29. Wind chill ranging from 9 to 16. Wind west around 17 mph, gusting to 26 mph, in the morning, becoming 13 mph, gusting to 24 mph, in the afternoon.   Saturday night: Clear in the evening, becoming partly cloudy after midnight. Low 18. Wind chill ranging from 8 to 13. Wind west around 9 mph, gusting to 17 mph.   Sunday (Dec 4): Mostly sunny in the morning, becoming sunny in the afternoon. High 38. Wind chill ranging from 8 to 30. Wind southwest around 13 mph, gusting to 21 mph, in the morning, becoming 9 mph, gusting to 20 mph, in the afternoon.   Sunday night: Clear in the evening, becoming partly to mostly cloudy after midnight. Low 26. Wind chill ranging from 17 to 23. Wind southwest around 10 mph, gusting to 16 mph.   Monday (Dec 5): Mostly cloudy to cloudy in the morning, becoming cloudy in the afternoon. A 50% chance of a mix of sleet, rain, and snow in the morning, then a mix of rain and snow in the afternoon. High 41. Wind southwest around 8 mph, gusting to 16 mph. No snow or ice (on ground) accumulation expected.   Monday night: Partly to mostly cloudy in the evening, becoming partly cloudy after midnight. Low 25. Wind chill ranging from 18 to 30. Wind northwest around 7 mph.   Tuesday (Dec 6): Mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming partly to mostly cloudy in the afternoon. High 40. Wind north-northwest around 6 mph in the morning, becoming northeast in the afternoon.   Tuesday night: Mostly cloudy in the evening, becoming cloudy after midnight. A 40% chance of snow. Low 26. Wind northeast around 7 mph. Snow accumulation about half an inch.   Wednesday (Dec 7): Cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy in the afternoon. High 37. Wind chill ranging from 20 to 31. Wind east around 6 mph in the morning, becoming west-southwest in the afternoon.   Wednesday night: Clear to partly cloudy in the evening, becoming partly cloudy after midnight. Low 16. Wind chill ranging from 7 to 21. Wind northwest around 9 mph, gusting to 15 mph.   Thursday (Dec 8): Partly to mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy in the afternoon. High 33. Wind chill ranging from 8 to 24. Wind east-northeast around 9 mph, gusting to 16 mph.   Thursday night: Cloudy. A 59% chance of a mix of snow and sleet in the evening, then snow after midnight. Low 26. Wind chill ranging from 17 to 22. Wind east around 8 mph. Snow or ice (on ground) accumulation about an inch.   KASICA

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook
Weather Forecast for Jackson WI Issued at 7am Dec 01 2022 by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 2:52


AUTOMATED GRAPHIC FORECAST LINK   Weather Forecast for Jackson, WI by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting   Thursday (Dec 1): Partly cloudy in the morning, becoming partly to mostly sunny in the afternoon. High 35. Wind chill ranging from 10 to 26. Wind south-southwest around 5 mph in the morning, becoming 9 mph, gusting to 19 mph, in the afternoon.   Thursday night: Clear to partly cloudy in the evening, becoming partly cloudy after midnight. Breezy. Low 26. Wind chill as low as 16. Wind south-southwest around 13 mph, gusting to 20 mph.   Friday (Dec 2): Mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming cloudy in the afternoon. Breezy and relatively mild. High 47. Wind south-southwest around 15 mph, gusting to 25 mph.   Friday night: Cloudy in the evening, becoming mostly cloudy after midnight. A 40% chance of rain in the evening, then a of a mix of snow and rain after midnight. Windy. Low 20. Wind chill ranging from 7 to 38. Wind south-southwest around 15 mph, gusting to 23 mph, in the evening, becoming west around 21 mph, gusting to 31 mph, after midnight. Snow accumulation about a quarter inch.   Saturday (Dec 3): Sunny. Breezy. High 28. Wind chill ranging from 6 to 16. Wind west around 19 mph, gusting to 27 mph, in the morning, becoming 12 mph, gusting to 25 mph, in the afternoon.   Saturday night: Clear in the evening, becoming partly cloudy after midnight. Low 18. Wind chill ranging from 9 to 14. Wind west-southwest around 7 mph in the evening, becoming 10 mph, gusting to 20 mph, after midnight.   Sunday (Dec 4): Mostly sunny in the morning, becoming sunny in the afternoon. Breezy. High 40. Wind chill ranging from 9 to 30. Wind southwest around 14 mph, gusting to 26 mph.    Sunday night: Clear in the evening, becoming partly to mostly cloudy after midnight. Low 22. Wind west around 5 mph.   Monday (Dec 5): Mostly cloudy to cloudy. A 30% chance of a mix of snow, sleet, and rain in the morning, then a mix of rain and snow in the afternoon. High 42. Wind south around 8 mph, gusting to 16 mph. No snow or ice (on ground) accumulation expected.   Monday night: Cloudy. Low 26. Wind chill ranging from 19 to 31. Wind west around 6 mph in the evening, becoming northwest after midnight.   Tuesday (Dec 6): Cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy in the afternoon. A 30% chance of snow. High 33. Wind chill ranging from 18 to 24. Wind north around 9 mph. Snow accumulation about a quarter inch.   Tuesday night: Mostly cloudy in the evening, becoming clear after midnight. Low 16. Wind chill ranging from 11 to 18. Wind north around 7 mph.   Wednesday (Dec 7): Partly to mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming cloudy in the afternoon. A 20% chance of snow in the afternoon. High 31. Wind chill ranging from 10 to 22. Wind north-northeast around 7 mph in the morning, becoming east-southeast in the afternoon.  Little or no snow accumulation expected.   Wednesday night: Cloudy in the evening, becoming partly cloudy after midnight. A 50% chance of a mix of snow and rain. Low 20. Wind chill ranging from 15 to 22. Wind south around 6 mph in the evening, becoming west-northwest after midnight. Snow accumulation about half an inch.   KASICA

Too Peas In A Podcast
G-Pea Jennie shares her story

Too Peas In A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 118:30


Kate (Mandy's taking the day off!) chats to Jennie, both a peafessional GP (G-Pea!) and pea mum to two peashoots and their brother. She is originally from Scotland, married to a South African, and now lives in Brisbane.Jennie's eldest is almost 11 and has autism, ADHD, severe anxiety and is twice exceptional. She has an almost 8 year old pealing with anxiety and a 4 year old who has KCNQ2 encephalopathy, a rare and devastating genetic epileptic encephalopathy, and has severe and complex medical needs.Jennie works part time as a GP and has a special interest in child development thanks to her experiences as a Pea. She counts herself lucky to have supportive colleagues and small, loyal patient base that understand her family's challenges. Jennie talks about her children's births, health challenges, diagnoses and the trickiness and load of managing a busy life as a pea mum and a GP. Thank you for Jennie for sharing your remarkable story with us! Plus: Buy our book The Invisible Life Of Us!Listen to our Spotify playlist –Too Peas: Songs Our Guest Peas LoveMelbourne forecast for Thursday December 1 –Partly cloudy, 20 degreesJoin our Facebook HangoutFind us on YouTubeThank you for supporting Too Peas In A Podcast! Don't forget to rate and reviewContact us here:Website: www.toopeasinapodcast.com.auEmail: toopeaspodcast@gmail.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

VO BOSS Podcast
Bossing through the Holidays

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 23:07


It's the holidays! The time of year when we all get to relax, catch up on our tasks, and spend time with friends and family. But what if you've been so busy working that you didn't even realize it was the holidays? Or what if you're stuck in the booth and can't take a break? If you're going to take time for the holidays, be sure to book out with agents & clients. This way you don't have to worry about missing out on new business opportunities. For all the workaholics out there, the holidays can be a peaceful time to catch up on work. And don't be afraid to take time away! You'll come back from this little vacation refreshed & ready to tackle anything the new year brings. And don't forget that this is a great time for planting seeds for 2023. Send out thank-you cards, small gifts, and mementos to those who have helped make 2022 amazing for you! Still feel like the holidays are a stressful time filled with family obligations, work commitments, and personal commitments that all need to be balanced? Don't worry: we've got some tips for how to BOSS through the season… Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host, Anne Ganguzza, and I am here with my very, very special guest, cohost Lau Lapides. Hey Lau. Lau: Hey everyone. Hey Anne. Good to see ya. Anne: Here we are for our business superpower series, which is one of my favorite series, The Business Superpowers. And speaking of business superpowers, the holiday season is upon us and there's a lot of things that go on during the holidays. And so I thought it would be a good opportunity to talk about how we can still be the biggest, best BOSSes throughout the holiday season because there are changes that happen. Sometimes things slow down, and we get nervous. Sometimes we have a lot of work and it's tough when you're trying to celebrate the holidays with your family. So let's talk about how we can have BOSSness for the holidays. Lau: I love BOSSness through the holidays, and everyone has their own ebb and flow. Some people, as you said, get super busy. They can't even think straight, and others are dead in the water and they don't know where the work is and everything in between. I do think one of the things you just mentioned, Anne, which is so important, is the celebration factor. So whether it's within the work itself that you're celebrating -- it could be the copy itself is holiday copy. It could be your clients that maybe your handpicking particular clients that you wanna send gifts of gratitude to -- whatever the case may be, you are celebrating. There's a celebratory tone and feel and mood. So you wanna make sure that you balance that to some degree, that you not only have time to celebrate with yourself and your family, but you also celebrate that you have a business, you're running a business. And how do you pay attention to all the many celebrations that are happening around you? Right? Anne: That's an excellent point. I think that it almost comes to like, what's the balance, right? That family, friends, holiday balance with work. If you're crazy busy doing a bunch of work -- now, the one thing that's good about the holidays is I find advertising agencies like to, to get ahead. Right? So, I mean, I'm already like towards the end of the summer starting to record things for the holidays, and so it starts early. Kinda like when they put the Christmas or the holiday, Hanukkah stuff out when it's like August or September in the stores. Lau: Yeah. Retail is like retail two, three seasons ahead. Anne: They are way ahead. So I think that with some planning, right, with strategic planning, BOSSes can really, I think, continue to do wonderful things throughout the holiday season and get the opportunity to spend a good amount of time with their friends and family. I mean, I like to book myself out between, for me, it's Christmas and New Year's. I like, I book myself out and I, I find that to be a relatively safe time for what I end up doing in my genres of work that I typically work in. Usually works well for me. What about you, Lau? Lau: Actually, it's so funny you say that. I don't know if I've ever really formally booked myself out. I feel like I've always, and this is my choice, I have a lot of colleagues that don't do this at all. I'm always kind of available for clients. Partly because, and I'll be honest with you, Anne, I'm like a workaholic. Okay, let me just get that out there right now. So I, I love what I do and I'm sort of addicted to it, and I always do it, you know, so it's like -- Anne: I'm right there with you. Lau: Yeah. I mean arguably so yes, a lot of folks are taking their vacations and booking out and doing all of that, but I always find there's work to do. There's catch-up work, there's my planning for the new year, what I wanna get done in quarter one, quarter two. So always find tons of stuff that I wanna be working on. And I have a different mindset during the holiday season. It actually for me isn't as stressful as when we're outside of holiday season. Because I know everyone's off and running and doing their thing. I get to catch up. So that's really exciting for me. But yeah, to steal some time and make sure that you're relaxing and getting enough rest and taking care of yourself and exercising, you know, all of that is great during the holiday season. Anne: I love that. And I identify, I identify with you, and I don't know if this is something to be proud of, but I mean I am a workaholic and I have been for a long time. And I think one of the reasons why I make it a pact with myself to try and book out as much as possible -- right, it's not that I won't read my email right during those days. However, I try to make sure that I'm not doing any necessary recordings for my clients, but my brain, my brain is never off, right? So there are times though, because I work so hard during the year that when I decide to say I'm off, thankfully I can shut the majority of that off. The good thing about me is that I not only work hard, but I play hard. And so when I decide that I'm going to take that time for reflection and refreshing my energy, I make it work for me because I know that after I take that break, I'm going to be better for it. Lau: Yes, I agree. I think just from the health and wellbeing of your mindset, you do need to have downtime that's scheduled in. Holidays are easy because most people are taking some sort of downtime. So you almost get permission to do it because so many people are doing it as well. I also find too, it's a great time for me to think about how I wanna connect, reconnect, and confirm and thank all the folks that I've worked with throughout the year. So it's a time where I'm sending out maybe gifts or letters or emails or e-cards or whatever it is, saying this has been amazing, love the experience. Let's do this next quarter. So I'm planting seeds. I find I'm planting seeds with people that I've either worked with or haven't worked with of what I'd like to do for next year. And they may not get to it for a month. They may not get to it right away, but it's there. It's like sitting there, it's like a little seed that I know is gonna sprout in a couple months. Anne: Mm-Hmm. For me, yeah, people would always say, well what do you send out gifts? What do you do for your clients over the holidays? And I like to send out e-cards, uh, notes, especially wishing a new year of happiness and prosperity and health and that kind of thing so it doesn't land during the holidays, which I think is a very busy part of the holidays for a lot of my clients. They're probably getting a lot of notes, a lot of gifts. And so I always like to say, well, let me stand out a little bit and I'll send something for the new year. And that way it'll come at a time that maybe they'll be able to spend more time and and see it and not be inundated with other emails, cards, gifts, that sort of thing. So I like the whole celebrate the new year, looking forward to working with you again in the new year, and that sort of a thing. So for me, my attention towards my clients is from a new year perspective and a happy holidays because that would encompass all of the holidays, we hope, that people celebrate 'cause there's just so many of them. Lau: So true. And actually we would think you and I would think 'cause we're from that timeframe where everyone would get gifts, the casting, the agents, whatever -- but you know what I've noticed in the last five or 10 years, Anne, many of them don't get as many as we think. And I know this because they'll write back to me, they'll say, oh my goodness, that was so thoughtful of you. That was incredible. If I send, let's say I send an edible arrangement. And they say, our office is gonna love this, Lau. It's just so thoughtful. You know, we don't see many of these, you know, whatever. Anne: Not like it used to be. Lau: Not like it used to be. No. It's very different now. You know? Anne: And in the corporate world too. I mean it used to be very, very different. And I think the pandemic might have had a lot to do with that as well and the economy. And so I think for me it turned into what can I do that's more meaningful? Right? I think before it used to be like, let's send a gift, let's send this and then what would you send? And is it a personal gift? Does it showcase thought or is it just -- for me, I really try to think about the relationship that I have with my clients and make it something special, something personal. And again, it doesn't have to cost a lot of money. I think that even just a personalized note, or a lot of times I'm a decent baker. Lau: Ooh. Anne: I can bake. I know everybody knows Jerry can cook, but I can bake. And I did when we were first dating, by the way, I did bake him something to impress him, and little did I know at that time he was like a gourmet chef. But I was like, here, I need you a carrot cake muffin for Valentine's Day. I mean carrot cake muffins in a basket. And, and I was like, ooh. I think 'cause it's a really great recipe. And little did I know that he's like a gourmet chef, but I'm like, here have a muffin that I baked. Lau: Oh my God. So you are actually like Kristin Wiig in Bridesmaids, remember that? Where she baked her boyfriend that carrot cake, and it was in the shape of a carrot and then the raccoon ate it? Remember that? Anne: I did, I, I baked a carrot cake. Lau: I was gonna ask you what your favorite gifts are. Like what's your favorite gift that you've either received or that you've sent out? Any come to mind? Anne: So for me it's handmade. It's gotta be handmade because so much of my life with my husband is revolved around his gourmet foodiness. There's lots of things, like every year we give out handmade this or that. And like last year it was handmade salad dressing. And that's really cool. I mean, I buy the bottle, I designed the label. My husband, we make Sicilian lemon olive of oil and that kind of thing, dressing. And we give that out. And that's something that I don't hesitate sending to my clients and that it's handmade, because if they know me at all, which I try to make sure that they do, they know that I come from that background, and that my husband is pretty much a, a gourmet anything. So I find that that makes a really nice gift. And it's something that is not gonna cost a ton for me. And I do, I have to say, I do love Amazon gift certificates. Lau: Oh, totally. Anne: Because yeah, that just takes care of everything for let's say, I have a lot of people that I hire, my assistants, and I feel like I wanna give them something as a gift and not something that's just, of course money is always appreciated, right, a bonus, that kind of thing? So I do that. Or if they do something that's special, and this is at any time, I might give them a gift certificate to Amazon. Lau: That's a good thing. Anne: That really tends to be my favorite thing or anything that's special. So for example, another one of my clients who I share love of animals, you know, my cats or my dogs -- it will be a gift for their cat and it's so funny -- or a gift for their dog because they almost appreciate it more, right, because it shows like a deeper connection. Lau: Yes. Anne: If I get a gift for their dog. Like wouldn't it be cute to get matching sweaters, like, oh, dog sweater and sweater? But again, it has to be specific to the client. What about you? I'm excited to hear your, your favorites. Lau: Yeah. Well, I mean there's standard stuff that whether you know this or not know this -- I mean, most people would know about Edible Arrangements. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. Lau: I really like Sherry's Berries too. So if you don't know about Sherry's Berries, that's really fun. Like hand dipped berries and fruit. That's awesome stuff. Anne: Yep. Lau: But we've done some interesting things in the past. I mean, my daughter is a visual artist, so she could draw like nobody's business. Anne: Oh, that's nice. Lau: Through the years, there were times -- I didn't wanna impose on her because it can take time to create art -- but there were times where we would have a, a special relationship with a casting or an agent, what have you, she would either draw them or she would draw something in the industry and send it to them. And that was like an incredible gift. Anne: Sure. Lau: You can also do promotional items that represent you or your company. And then give it a little personal twist. Like for instance, you know, we have some books that we published and then we'll, you know, add some photos to it or sign them or what have you. So you've got your promotional in there, and then you've got the personalized twist, and you've got a little note in there, a little gift card in there, a little something in there. Those have been some of my favorites. Another regular thing that I used to do with in studio events, when I hold events, I would do gifts, like literal gifts, not as much for the men. If I did anything for the men, it would be a gift card. But for women, I would literally get them jewelry. And I almost never went wrong with jewelry. Almost never. They loved it. And you don't have to spend a lot of money on it either. Like you can get beautiful jewelry, and sometimes they would be thoughtful for what that person is. Like for instance, if I knew their birthdate or if I knew something about what they were celebrating, I would take the color of the stone or I would take their name or something like that and I would put it right into the jewelry. Right into the gift. They love that. They love that stuff. Anne: Personalization. Lau: Yeah, personalization. Anne: Absolutely. And I was actually noticing your earrings earlier, and I was like, I really like those earrings . See, you can't go wrong with jewelry, I don't think for a lot of women, but that's me, of course. But yeah, I think that however you can personalize, it really makes just like any gift that you give to someone, right? However you can personalize it makes it really nice. And I also think in terms of promotional gifts, I try not to do just a promotional gift. You know what I mean? Even if I'm sending a card. Lau: Oh yeah. Anne: It's not gonna be like -- I'll say, I'm grateful, thank you so much. I loved working with you this year. But it's not gonna be all about like a big branded gift. It's really just gonna be thanks so much. And even if I got them a present for their dog, I'm not gonna brand it. Lau: Right. Anne: Because I think that it's similar to like the VO BOSS podcast where I'm always telling people, it doesn't have to be -- like, for me it is about voiceover. But my primary purpose with this podcast was to, I wanted to educate. I wanted to give back, right? And if people get value from it, then it's a gift, right? It's a gift that I wanna give from me to the community. And I feel like that's the way it should be for your gifts, really. And that's why it doesn't have to be like, oh, it's all about my voiceover business, when you're trying to connect with a client and give them a gift for the holidays. It really, I know just the simple fact that you're showing a personalized, something that's deeper than just a, oh, here, I did this job for you and you paid me for it -- I think if you show thoughtfulness behind that, you do not have to brand that thoughtfulness. Lau: Not at all. Anne: In order to be effective at all. Lau: No, because remember, you're a person first. You're a human being first. Anne: Yeah, exactly. Lau: And it doesn't always have to be around the business. Anne: And I think it's more memorable, to be honest with you. Right? It's gonna be more memorable if I get somebody a present for their cat than a branded pen. And I could throw that branded pen with the the cat gift as well. Lau: That would be funny. Anne: It wouldn't be be all about the branded gift, because I know before it used to be like, oh, what should I get? I'm gonna brand it with my logo. I don't think it's about that anymore. I mean, it used to be a thing where people, that's what they did. But I think these days, it's gotta be more meaningful. And I kinda like that trend. I really like that trend. I think the last few years that have been a little tough on us as a society, I'm hoping that things get back to more meaningful, simpler, thoughtful gifts for celebrating. Lau: Yeah. I think the days of extreme swag are kind of gone where you gotta have a t-shirt, you gotta have a pen, you gotta have a -- Anne: Right. Lau: I think that's passé now. But you know, I have to tell you one time -- Anne: I do like a pen. I do like a good pen though. Lau: I like a good pen and I like a good pencil. I actually have a bunch of branded pencils, but I have a talent who's in MCVO and he's a working guy and he's wonderful. One year around Christmas time, he sent me his cup, his travel cup. And it had his business on it. Right? So it was clearly promotional. Right? But the thing when I, I looked at it, and it was so heavy and so well made and so intense, like the metal was so thick. Yes. And it came from one of the nicer stores in New York City. Right? I was like so impressed by that, that he would send that to me. I'm sure he is sending out a bunch of those to other people as well. I was like, my God, he probably spent 25, $30 on this cup. Anne: Yeah. Yeah. Lau: So I'm not telling people to do that. You don't need to do that. I'm just saying, it took me aback that he valued our relationship so much. Anne: Right, to give you one of those. Yes. Lau: And at that time, I hadn't even booked him. I hadn't booked him on anything. It was just he was valuing and faithful about, you know, what was to come and excited about the future and this and that, and I thought gee, that was a lot to invest in a gift for someone, you know, who's new. I never forgot it. . Anne: I'm a big proponent about swag in not making it cheap swag. I think that no swag is better than cheap swag that is not useful. And so for me, like I say, I like a good pen right. Now, recently I had, and I don't have one in here to showcase, but I recently got, you know, the multicolor pens that have the green, the blue, the black -- Lau: Oh yeah, I love those. Anne: -- and the red? Okay. Yeah. So I just got pens, multicolor pens with Anne Ganguzza Voice Productions on it. So I send it to everybody that orders from me, that orders like my vocal spray. And I'll take it to every conference. And more than likely when I send out gifts, they're gonna get a pen just because they're fun. I mean, who doesn't love writing with different colors? Lau: Right, I'm with you. Anne: That kind of thing. But I think if you make a substantial investment, and I'm a big one about cups too, right? This was actually, so this Miir cup, when my husband went to a conference, he got one that was white and it was from one of the companies, and it was made from Miir. And we love that cup so much that I went and bought another one because it was such a good quality cup, like you said. So I feel like if you're going to create swag, make sure it's a good quality swag. And I always like to really think about, is it going to be useful? Lau: Yes. Anne: Not just trendy, but is it going to be useful for the person that you're going to give it to? Otherwise, I don't know if it's worth the investment. Lau: That's exactly it, Anne, and I actually thought I thought of one more that I used to love and give out. I don't know where they are these days, but I'm sure you can find them. I love these. They were the pens, thick pens that light up. And I love them because I was a director for many years. And so I would be in a dark room, a dark theater or a dark studio, and I just love the fact that I could write and light it up. Anne: Yeah. Mm-hmm, mm-hmm. Lau: Oh my goodness. That was like, I gave that out for years. I gave those pens out for years. So things that are utilitarian and very useful I think are so important if you can find them. Anne: So yeah, I think BOSSes, when it comes to gift giving and the holidays, I think the more thoughtful, right, the more personal, the better. Obviously you don't have to spend a ton of money, but if you're gonna make it swag, I say make an investment into decent swag. And then also let's talk about, are you busy? Are you not busy during the holidays? Should BOSSes worry if they're not busy during the holidays, Lau? Lau: No. No, not at all. I would never worry about that. I always say, you know, if you work in advertising agencies, if you work with talent agencies, if you work in casting, you would know this, that there are really down times. There are dead times, there are down times. You know, it's like a ghost town. And you have to just accept that. That's true in every single business, in every industry. You're just not gonna be making money every day. You're not gonna be making profit every day. You're not gonna be booking in closing every day. You just have to accept that. That was hard on me, you and I as addicted people to our work, it was really hard to be like, is something wrong? I went four days and I haven't booked anything. Oh yeah, because there's an ebb and flow. And each quarter is different and every year is different. So you just have to pay attention to that. Anne: That little piece of valuable, like that was just so valuable, Lau, that you said that as well. I say that a lot to my students and just, there is an ebb and flow. And as freelancers, this is something that is probably one of the hardest things to get used to when you come from, let's say, a corporate background and you're used to getting that paycheck on a consistent basis. Now all of a sudden there could be days that go by when you don't have a job. And it's okay, even for the veterans in this industry, right? Even for those people that are posting on social media where they booked 20 jobs this week, I want you guys to know that it's , it's an ebb and a flow. And so the times that you might see somebody post that they got a ton of jobs that week, well, maybe the following week, they aren't getting as many jobs. I don't know one person, unless you're on a roster or you're on a consistent basis or contract with someone that gets work every single day, it's very tough being that consistent, unless maybe you're doing promos and you know, you're under contract for doing -- you're on a roster, you're doing these specific jobs on a daily basis, but getting new jobs every single day, mm, I don't know anybody. . Lau: No, it's not a realistic. No, no, no. Anne: It's not realistic. Lau: You just have to pay attention to your, your stats. You just have to pay attention to those long ways. I mean, that's not to say you may not be working every day. Anne: Exactly. Lau: You may be working with clients every day catching up, do this, adding on, upselling, whatever you're doing. But when you're talking about closing or booking -- Anne: Yeah, right, booking, that's a different job every single -- Yeah. Yeah. That's just, yeah. And during the holidays is no exception really I would say a lot of times. I think it becomes even more unpredictable during the holidays, unless you're very used to doing particular jobs for the holidays and then in between the holidays. So yeah. BOSSes, it's okay. I think that we should all take the time to enjoy your holidays with your families and friends. On that downtime, if you want to work, well, maybe just take some time to reflect on what are the great new things that are gonna happen in the new year? How -- strategize what you're going to be doing in the new year, and take that time to re-energize. Lau: Mm. Absolutely. If you can, re-energize, rejuvenate, and re-envision everything that you're doing and just enjoy, like enjoy that time of year. Enjoy the weather, enjoy the family, enjoy, and inspire your business in a new way as you go into the new year. Inspire yourself. Anne: Love that. Love that. So yeah, BOSSes, happy holidays, BOSSes. Go and refresh and get inspired, and hope you have the most wonderful holiday season, from the BOSSes to the BOSSes. Great big shout-out to our sponsor, ipDTL. You too can connect and network like BOSSes. Find out more at ipDTL.com. And also 100voiceswhocare.org, you can use your voice to make an immediate difference in the world and give back to the communities that give to you. So find out more at 100voiceswhocare.org. You guys, have a great week and we'll see you next year. Bye! Lau: Bye. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voBOSS.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Ideas Untrapped
PRODUCTIVITY, EXPORTING, AND DEVELOPMENT

Ideas Untrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 48:53


We often speak of economic development as a phenomenon of sovereign national countries, but the process by which that happens is through what happens at individual firms in the economy. The decisions by firms to upgrade their products (services), export, and adopt new technology are the most important determinants of economic development. The incentives and conditions that shape these decisions are the subjects of my conversation with my guest on this episode. Eric Verhoogen is a professor of economics at Columbia University school of international and public affairs. He is one of the leading thinkers and researchers on industrial development.TRANSCRIPT (edited slightly for context and clarity)Tobi; Usually, in the development literature, I know things have changed quite a bit in the last few years. But there is a lot of emphasis on cross-country comparisons and looking at aggregate data, and a lot less focus, at least as represented in the popular media on firms. And we know that, really, the drivers of growth and employment and the source of prosperity usually are the firms. The firms in an economy, firms are the ones creating jobs, they are the ones investing in technology, and doing innovation. So firms are really important. One of the things you often hear a lot is that one of the reasons poor countries are poor is that the firms are not productive enough. So that's sort of my first question to you, how exactly do we define and also measure productivity, you know, for us to be able to distinguish why firms in the developed countries are more productive than the lower income countries?Eric; Yeah, this is a big important question. So I agree, in principle, that firm productivity is very key. So countries that are going to be doing well are countries that are populated by firms that are being very innovative, and their productivity is rising, they're learning how to do new stuff, they're producing new products, etc. And so there's a reason why people are very focused on this conversation about firm productivity. The sort of, I would say, dirty secret of economics is that it's very hard to measure productivity well, right? And so the productivity measures we have, I think, are very noisy, and most likely fairly biased. But basically, the way you estimate productivity is you run a regression of like sales on inputs, okay, so on how much you're spending on labour and how much you're spending on materials, and then the part that's left over, we call that productivity. So it's like unexplained sales, you know, sales that can't be explained by the fact that you're just purchasing inputs and purchasing workers. But that is actually a very noisy measure of productivity. And so I've been working on a review paper, and a separate research paper kind of pointing out some of the issues with productivity estimation. So in principle, it's exactly what we want to know; in practice, it's very hard to measure. So one argument I was making in that paper is we should go to things that we can actually directly observe. Okay, so sometimes like technology adoption, we can often directly observe whether the firm has adopted this particular new technology, or if they're producing new products, we can directly observe that. Sometimes we can observe the quality of products that can be measured. Now, the standard datasets that we have typically don't have those things. It is possible now, in many countries, to follow manufacturing firms or even other sorts of firms, [to] follow them over time, which is great, at a micro level. But those that have the technology, they don't have quality, they do it now increasingly have like what products they're producing, often they don't have the product people are producing and so it's harder, you have to go out and you have to talk to people, you have to access new sorts of data, there's a lot more work, a lot more shoe leather - we'd say you wear out your shoe is going to talk to people trying to get access to other datasets in order to have these measures that you can observe directly. But I think there's a big advantage to that. Just in terms of measurement. Like, can we measure these things, and record that technology quality and product innovation together? I'm not sure that's answering your question. But, you know, I mean, I totally agree that what firms are doing, that's crucial, right? So the big macro question is, why are some countries rich and some countries poor and how can we make poor ones richer? That's the big question. I think that's kind of too big to be able to say much about. The much more concrete thing, which we need to be focusing on is how can you make firms in countries more innovative and productive. That's the absolutely right question. But that's just hard. There are challenges and research about, you know, how you actually analyze that, and it has to do with these issues of measurement.Tobi; I understand the measurement problem, and of course, TFP, the residual, and so many things like that. But practically, I want to ask you, what can you say, maybe if you have a handy checklist or something? what distinguishes firms in rich countries from firms in poorer nations? Eric; Yeah. So let me say what I don't think first, and then I'll say what I think. So it's become increasingly common to say that firms in poor countries are just poorly managed. The firms in rich countries have better management, and the firms in poor countries have poor management, right? And partly that's coming from the influential paper by Nicholas - Nick Bloom - and others, and David McKenzie and John Roberts. You know, they had consultants go to some factories in India. In some they camped out for four months, some they were there for only one month, and the ones where they camped out for four months ended up doing better, right? And they say that that's because these consultants improve the management of the firms and management matters. And I do agree that sometimes these management practices matter, but I don't think... sort of, one kind of implication of that line of work is somehow, like, the firms in a developing country are just making mistakes. They haven't gone to business school in the United States, and so, therefore, they don't know what they're doing. And I think that's incorrect. I think that's incorrect. I think the problem is, firms in developing countries face many, many constraints that firms in rich countries don't face. Right. So often, for instance, gaining access to high-quality inputs can be very difficult, right? That you just don't have the supply chains domestically producing high-quality inputs. Often skilled workers are very expensive relative to unskilled workers, and even relative to the price that you might pay in rich countries. Having skilled workers, including skilled managers, is very expensive. In addition, you have all these frictions on trying to get your goods to market or trying to, you know, trying to access export markets, often there are, you know, their costs involved in that. In addition, being productive requires know-how and often firms lack that know-how, right and so the question is, how do you get that know-how, you know, like, the distinction I'm trying to make is, it's not that they're making mistakes, it's just that they're doing the best they can given know-how they have, and given the constraints that they face. And so in that sense, I would sort of point to those constraints, right, those constraints both in know-how and both in the input and output markets, rather than just failure of management. So now, one of the constraints I should say, actually, so is often, you know, legal and regulatory institutions are much weaker in many countries. It is true in Nigeria, and it's true in many places, right? And so then that does create a complicating factor also when you're trying to do business with somebody, but you don't have the legal recourse of going to court to enforce whatever contract you write down. And so that creates friction. So then you have to do things differently in part because of that. And so you're likely to be much more based on, like, networks of various types. It might be ethnic networks, or it might be people that you know or that you have long-term relationships with. But then that means you can't necessarily just find the best supplier of something, you actually have to find someone that you trust, and that can complicate your life, basically, if you're trying to do business and develop.Tobi; So one thing I want us to discuss is the issue of firm upgrading. I mean, one of the things that have helped me in reading your work and taking this firm-level view of development is that, okay, on the one hand, if you look at a country like Korea, we can say the average income, the income per capita for Korea 40 years ago versus now and compare with say Nigeria, but also we can look at Korean firms 40 years ago versus where they are today. Today, Korea have global firms that are at the very frontier of technology. Companies like Samsung are innovating and making chips and making electronics and making smartphones and you compare with firms in Nigeria who have not been able to upgrade their products over that same period. And now what I want to ask you is how important is a firm's ability to upgrade productivity. I take your point on the measurement but controlling for that, how important is a firm's ability to upgrade its output? Its products on its productivity?Eric; No, no, I think upgrading is crucial. And upgrading in various ways, you know, more specifically technology, producing higher quality products, producing new products, new innovative products, you know, you might be reducing costs, right, all those things. I do think that's crucial. I think that's crucial to the development process. I mean, much of the conversation in development economics has often been not about firms. It's about, you know, social policy, or it's about education. It's about human capital accumulation. But I'm with you on that, the firm-level upgrading is totally crucial. You know, the question of like, why isn't it happening? Or how could you promote upgrading? That's a very difficult question. There are lots of papers that are sort of speaking to that subject. And this review article I was trying to write was basically all about that. So Alexander Gerschenkron way back in 1962, is a historian writing about late industrialization had this phrase, not very politically correct phrase, but basically, advantages of backwardness. So in principle, if you're a developing country, you should benefit from the fact that technologies have been developed in rich countries, and you should be able to go and adopt them off the shelf. But for some reason, that's difficult, right? It's hard to do. Partly, it's difficult because of, you know, know-how reasons. So I'd say that often, much of the knowledge that you need in order to implement these technologies is not written down anywhere, it's not really in the manual, right? You have to kind of talk to people who know it, rather than just downloading the instruction sheet. That's one reason. It's also true that many times, machines or processes, actually, may be context specific. So like the picker machine, in a very humid environment, they operate differently than in a non-humid environment. And so, you know, there are things that you need to learn. So I'd say that kind of like gaining the know-how is an important kind of constraint on upgrading. And partly that happens through networks or through... there's a ... Juan Carlos Hallak, who's in Buenos Aires (who would be a good person for you to have on your show, actually, I think that he'd be an interesting person to interview) as a very interesting paper. It's basically on like Argentina, looking at industries that have done well, they've been able to upgrade essentially and looking at what was it about them that made it possible, and especially the leading firms, what were the leading firms doing? And what we're basically finding is that often the key person in the firm, like, had been embedded in markets in rich countries, maybe in the US or in Europe or someplace. So they understood very much how those markets work and what consumers want. So one was like making boats, sailboats, or motorboats right, that was one of the interesting things he focused on. But knowing sort of what the people who are buying those boats really want to see in their boats ended up being important for what they're doing. And so that's an important part of the know-how. It's like, yeah, understanding the customer understanding also how if there are firms that are producing there, understand what the competition is. And so that's know-how that often has to be sort of gained in person rather than, you know, just reading a book or talking to somebody on the phone. And so when I think about... I don't know Nigeria very well, but when I imagine, you know, Nigerian producers, I think, partly what might be holding back is, sort of, maybe not having the understanding of what are the requirements, what are the expectations of consumers in the export markets, right, in the rich countries that they may be selling to?We've talked about the barrier, we can talk about the driver of upgrading. So then, like, gaining know-how would be a driver. So that's one. I think, and part of a lot of my work has been about quality upgrading, you know, producing higher quality. And I think that's in part driven by who you're selling to, right? So Mexican firms, you know, if they're selling to Mexican consumers, they produce different products than if they're selling to us consumers, which is their main export market, right? And so, you know, and if you're selling to Mexican consumers who have a certain willingness to pay for quality, we would say, right, they have a certain level of, you know, demand for certain characteristics, the optimal thing to do is keep producing that kind of lower quality stuff, right, rather than producing the higher quality. So I had this famous example of a big Volkswagen factory in Puebla, Mexico, which for a long time, it stopped in 2003, but for a long time been producing the old beetle. The old beetle that had first been produced in 1940, or certainly the 1950s. But for a long time, in the Mexican market, that was the main car that people were buying, and they were happy with that because it was cheaper. It was like, you know, it's very reliable. But that same factory started producing the New Beetle, basically, for the US market, right, for the US and European market, which is much more sophisticated, but also much more expensive. So it depends a little bit on which market you're selling into and whether you're going to upgrade or not. And so accessing export market can, in some sense, like pull the upgrading process, you know, once they access these export markets, they'll start producing higher quality stuff for these consumers. And that I think, actually, generates some learning, and I can talk about one paper that shows that a bit. But it seems to be that by gaining access to markets and producing high quality, then firms learn how to do stuff better. And so that can be an important driver of upgrading. And conversely, not having access to export markets or having a hard time breaking into export [markets] can be a reason why firms failed to upgrade. Let me tell you about one paper that, you know, demand effects can drive learning. Tobi; Yeah. Go ahead.Eric; Okay. It's a paper by David Atkin, Amit Khandelwal and Adam Osman. It's in Egypt. Okay, it's an RCT experiment, a randomized controlled trial. And it's among rug producers, producing rugs. What they did is they randomly allocated initial export contracts, right? So if they work with an intermediary, like a buyer of rugs, you know, among several hundred rug producers, they say, Okay, some guys are gonna get an initial contract, and some guys not. And so that was a way, this is a way of investigating basically what's the effect of exporting on the decisions and in a very clean way, and they found a couple of things. So one is those guys who had the export contracts and started producing higher quality stuff. So that's sort of consistent with my Volkswagen story, too, right? So increasingly, export markets produce higher quality and they did lots of measures of, you know, how thickly packed the rugs were and how straight the edges were - the very dimensions of quality of rugs. That was one thing. And then the other thing that they found which is very interesting is that you know, these weavers of rugs got to be better at producing rugs, basically. So then, when they took them into a laboratory, and they say, okay, produce this identical rug to a whole bunch of producers, both in their treatment group, and in their control group to produce this identical rug, and they found that the guys who had gotten the export contracts were better at producing that rug, they produce sort of higher quality rugs than the other guys. This suggests that demand can drive upgrading, right, in the sense that it induces firms to produce higher quality, but there's also learning involved in that process. These Egyptian rug producers became more productive as a result of having access to these export countries. Tobi; Yeah, I mean, listening to you, I can think of a few things that click in place. When I look at, say, a country like Nigeria, I think about the way the central bank has been running the exchange rate policy, which is messing seriously with the way firms actually source inputs. Some firms actually don't have access to the foreign exchange quota to actually source quality inputs. I mean, from manufacturing firms to agribusinesses who want to buy high-quality seeds overseas, I see how that can be a constraint. But two things I want to get at. Also, if you look at Nigeria whose industrial policy is really about domestic self-sufficiency, you could see that there isn't really an incentive for upgrading, and therein lies my question. If we talk about upgrading and how important it is, even though it's not really discussed as it should, what role do you think industrial or state-directed policies can play in this? Why because industrial policy is back in fashion, you know, it's being discussed everywhere... but usually, at least in my experience and in my opinion, what most scholars and advocates are focused on are [things like] state investments, you know, how the state can put money in one sector or the other. There really isn't so much focus on this sort of micro-level detail and what happens at firms, which your work is about. So for practical purposes, do you see industrial policy as something that can really, really, play a role and incentivize domestic firms to upgrade? For example, something like export quotas, you know, for firms?Eric; I mean, in terms of your question, do I think industrial policy can be helpful? I do. I do think that industrial policy can be helpful. Basically, I think that learning generates spillovers that firms themselves can't fully capture. And so I think there is a role for government to promote learning, basically, in a way. To subsidise learning such that - the socially optimal, or - the best sort of amount of investment in learning for society is more than individual firms to do on their own. And so there's a role for industrial policy. But I agree that it's got to be smart industrial policy, it's not just any old industrial policy. And so many countries have this idea...it's a little bit of nostalgia for import substitute industrialization, or it's very much like inwardly focused industrial policy. We're going to try and guarantee a domestic market for our producers, something like that, right? I'm not a fan. I'm not a fan of imports substitute industrialization or these very inward-focused strategies because then you get to the point where there's just not a lot of pressure on domestic firms to be more productive. They become kind of in a comfortable situation where they have kind of protected markets, not very competitive, they have a lot of market power in that market, and so that is a recipe for stagnation over the long term. So I think the crucial thing is that the targets for industrial policy be export-oriented, you know, outwardly oriented. You want your firms to be successful in world markets, right? I think that should be the key, rather than domestic self-sufficiency. Or rather than just the government investing in well, okay, so I don't have a problem with the government investing in infrastructure, investing in things as long as the aim is always ''what's going to facilitate our firms being successful in world markets'', right, I think that's a good target. Because those world markets are competitive [and] for firms to be able to be successful there, they're going to have to up their game and be more productive and be more innovative, subject to the measurement constraints we talked about, right and to upgrade. And so I think that the smart industrial policies are going to be things that sort of push firms to learn and to be more innovative and to be successful as exporters. Now, the other thing we have to keep in mind in thinking about industrial policy, is that [for] the governments, it's just very hard to [know] in the future what are the sectors that are going to be successful. What are the activities that are likely to have a future? It's just very hard, it's very hard for people who are, you know, private equity firms embedded in the sector... it's very hard to know, it's gonna be even harder for a government official or someone making government policy to do that. So I think we need to think about policies that have this effect of promoting learning or subsidizing innovative activities, but that, you know, don't require too much knowledge and understanding of the future on the part of the people setting the policy. Right. So things like collaborations between universities and firms for, you know, how to train workers to have the skills that the higher tech firms in your country need. That's something that seems like a good idea that's probably going to promote upgrading without having to pick and say, I think this product or this sector is the future of the Nigerian economy and therefore we're going to subsidize that thing. And you also want policies that are somewhat flexible, right, so that if something happens... so I'm working on a project in Tunisia, where the Tunisian Government was trying to promote exports. But the issue that they've had, and it's a matching grant program where sort of half of the costs of exporting of a certain category of costs of exporting will be paid by the government. The problem with that program, though, has been that it was somewhat inflexible. So basically, if something happened, you know, there's a big shock, and in fact, COVID shock, you know, and that changes what firms want to do. And it's very hard for them to switch gears and say, now I want to spend money on something else, can you please subsidize this other thing, and there were a lot of frictions in the program. And so that's often the case for government programs. The government sets a policy and then the world changes, firms want to do something else, but the policy is still stuck, you know, in the old world. So we need to think about how to build in, you know, flexibility into the programs so that if firms decide, actually, the market is moving in this direction, rather than this direction that we were expecting, that the support that they receive could move in the same direction.Tobi; Yeah, I agree. And I don't mean export quotas as hard targets. So I'll give you an example. Nigeria has this policy that we've been running for about six to seven years now, where there are multiple exchange rate windows for different parts of the economy or sectors that the government deems should have priority, you know, to import. And I recall a paper where Korea had a similar arrangement, but it was focused on firms that export. Firms that export to world markets sort of get priorities so that they can source inputs at a very low cost and seamlessly, you know, but it's not just something that we really think about in Nigeria, because we are so focused on the domestic market and how large the population is not minding, you know, how much of that population is poor.Eric; Yes, no, absolutely. So, certainly, Korea did this. But the Korean model, a key part of it, and they definitely picked sectors in a way that, you know, it's, there's a little bit of tension with what I just said about, you know, the government officials are not going to be very knowledgeable, there they seem to have done a good job of picking sectors to advance. But the key part was it really was oriented towards success in export markets. And the industries that were not successful on the export markets, they pulled the plug, they removed the, you know, they removed the support, which is politically hard to do, you need a fairly insulated, like, secure government in order to be able to do that. Because, otherwise, you start providing support, and then the industry lobbies a lot to maintain that support, you know, and so then it becomes politically very difficult to remove it. But I think if the government is committed to ''if these industries are not successful, we're gonna pull the plug on the support'', then this can work. Right. But you're absolutely right, in the Korean model, the key thing is the export orientation rather than the import orientation. And what you mentioned about exchange rates, I didn't comment on that. But I think it is an issue, you know, especially for a resource-rich economy, that the exchange rate can be, you know, highly valued, arguably overvalued, which makes it hard to develop the domestic industry. And so I think that's a real issue that, you know, some countries seem to be able to handle that, you know, ''what do we do with the natural resource wealth a little better than others'', if you just let it accumulate and people are going to spend and that leads to devalues your currency to increase that's going to make it harder to achieve export success in export markets for manufacturing goods or other exporting services. And so that is something that needs to be a focus of thinking about how to upgrade.Tobi; Yeah, I want to talk about technology for a bit. You had this very, very, an interesting paper on the soccer ball, we call it football, the soccer ball producers in Pakistan. And in a bit, you're going to tell me some of the interesting things you learned about that study. But first, Dani Rodrik and Margaret McMillan had this interesting paper about industrialization in Africa, and how domestic manufacturing firms are now shifting more towards capital-intensive technology. So hence, manufacturing firms are not creating jobs as much as historical patterns should suggest, do you see this as sort of a problem? I know so many other people have this worry about automation and how this technology can be exported everywhere, which is really a concern for maybe a continent like Africa with a large, jobless, and young population. So do you see this as a trend that we should worry about, you know, more capital-intensive technologies, or are there opportunities?Eric; Yeah. So I do see it as a trend. I do think it is something to be worried about. You know, Dani Rodrik recently organized a panel with the International Economics Association I participated in, along with Daron Acemoglu and Fabrizio Zilibotti and Francis Stewart from Oxford. And I sort of had two points there. One point was, yes, I think this diagnosis is correct. Basically, economists refer to it as appropriate technology. But the idea is that many technologies are developed in rich countries, you know, given factor proportions, we would say in those rich countries, so basically, skilled workers are more abundant, unskilled workers are less abundant, and so people develop machines that kind of conserve on unskilled workers. That's, in part, the background to the story that Dani Rodrik and Margaret McMillan are saying that in Africa, many firms are using this technology that's been developed in rich countries, that's very skill intensive, but it's not generating a lot of them. Right. So I think the diagnosis there is correct that that happens, right? And so the technology often is inappropriate for poor countries given, you know, their supply of unskilled labour, given how many workers they have that could use employment. On the other hand, the other question, though, was, what do you do about it? And so I was less convinced. So my worry about that. There are two versions of that concern about what you do about it. One is, given the set of existing technologies, you could try to encourage firms to use more labour-intensive technologies. Okay. But the problem is that you may encourage them to be less productive. Maybe they might generate more employment, but they'll be less productive, right? There was an interesting paper that I cited in Brazil by Gustavo D'Souza, which was sort of saying the Brazilian government basically put a tax on international technology licensing. And he shows that sure enough, firms were less likely to use International Technology. They're more like to use domestic technology. They actually generated employment, but they were less productive. Right, and they overall did worse. So there's a worry that you're gonna make firms less productive in an immediate sense. The other worry is that, like, if the Nigerian government starts encouraging Nigerian firms to develop new technologies, which are more labour intensitive, you know, then they'll generate more employment, the worries that you're gonna get sort of fall behind the world technology trajectory, I'll call it that. Like, you can think about the world frontiers moving in whatever, pick an industry, and the world frontier is moving at a particular place, and then, you know, firms are competing with each other and they're, you know, someone gets a patent, someone comes up with a new idea and sort of technology moves in a certain direction. And then Nigeria says, no, no, we want to be on a different trajectory that generates more employment, right? The problem is, you're going to be permanently behind where the technology curve is, right? Where the world frontier is. And I feel like that's worrisome, right, you're likely to have less learning, right, there's gonna be a gap between where the Nigerian firms are and where, you know, the world frontier is that it's gonna be hard for them to catch up afterwards. So in the short term, you might generate more employment, but you're gonna have a less dynamic industry as a result. And so I think, my own view, and this is, it's a feeling rather than something that's very research based at this point. But my own view is, even though it means that firms are not going to generate that much employment, they have to try and stick as close to the technology frontier as possible, or, you know, catch up as quickly as possible to where the world technology frontier is.Tobi; And so talk to me a bit about lessons from your walk with the Pakistani soccer ball manufacturers. What did you learn from that particular experiment, especially on the role of appropriate technology and technology use and the incentives that surround it for firms and investors? Eric; Yeah, so it was a study of technology adoption, what are the factors that encourage technology adoption? And what made it possible was that the football producers, I'll use that word football instead of the soccer ball, these football producers, there are a lot of producers using the same simple technology, right? And this football design is, you know, 85 or 90% are just these hexagons and pentagons. If you can imagine a, you know, a football, it's got hexagons and pentagons. And so the simple technology involves cutting out hexagons and pentagons and then stitching them together. And there were a lot of those and what made the project possible is we came up with a new improved technology, which is basically a way of cutting pentagons from these sheets. The main costs, you know, 50% of the cost are the sheets, they call it rexine. It's like artificial leather, that's the exterior of the ball. But they were cutting pentagons in a way that was wasting some material. Wasting more than they need to and so the new technology is a way of cutting these pentagons so that you can fit more into a given sheet so that you can get basically 8% more pentagons which ended up being about a 1% reduction in total costs. Which wasn't enormous but on the other hand, it's a pretty competitive industry, profit margins are about 8% so we felt like they shouldn't have been paying the 1%. And actually, when we started out, we thought we were gonna be studying technology diffusion, right, which is, you know, one person adopts, then is that their neighbours who adopt or is it their cousins? Or is it the, you know, people who share suppliers, and what are the channels of diffusion, right, and we're trying to keep everything secret, and we thought, okay, when we let it out, it's obviously the people we give it to who are gonna adopt right away, and then it's gonna spread. And so then we gave out this technology, for free, we gave it to 135 firms. And then, you know, we had a few firms adopt, and they started using it, and including one big firm that was producing - I can tell you the name later, but basically had like 2000 employees and is producing for Nike, and as a big producer adopted this technology, and, you know, is basically cutting all of its pentagons using our design and our die for cutting rather than the old one. So after, you know, 15 months, there were six total firms that had adopted. And that was puzzling and thought, you know, why is that? So then we started asking firms, we started talking to people and basically, it was revealed that the reason was that the guys doing the cutting... so the cutters are basically paid piece rates, they're paid per pentagon or per hexagon, or essentially per ball like, which is, you know, 20 hexagons and 12 pentagons they're paid. That was what their salaries were based on. And they didn't have the incentive to reduce waste, like, they weren't penalized if they wasted the material, right? And so they just wanted to go fast. And our die was slowing them down, right, made them go more slowly because they had to be more careful how they placed it and also, it was a different design, it was the design that they were used to. Now, it turns out that within about a month, they could get back up to speed, to the speed they were at before but they didn't know that, and in any case, for that month, their salaries would be way down, they'd just be slower and knowing that if the firm didn't change the contracts, their salaries would be lower. And the workers were figuring this out, the cutters are figuring this out, they said, this is not good for me, right, that my salary is gonna go down if I use this thing, I have no incentive to use this new technology. And so then they started telling their firms, you know, this is bad, bad technology, it doesn't work, it's dangerous, it has all these issues. Okay, so then we realized that this was happening and we said that we were going to do a second experiment. So, you know, half of the people we originally gave the technology to who hadn't yet adopted, we did a second experiment where we said to workers, we're gonna give you a month's bonus, which is not very much it is about $150 US dollar. So these guys are not paid very much we said ''a month's bonus if you can demonstrate to us and the owner of the factory that the technology works.'' And actually, that was enough. The workers were excited about that, you know, they got paid for doing this. Everybody who did it then subsequently passed the tests. So they demonstrated that the technology is working, and then a statistically significant share of the firms that they worked at ended up adopting the technology as a result. So those were the two experiments, those were the facts. What are we learning from that? I think we're learning that, basically, the lack of information flow from workers to their owners, to their managers, was what was getting in the way of technology adoption in this case. Like, the workers knew that the technology was working, but the owners didn't know because they sort of delegated the process of cutting the pentagons to the workers, and given the contracts, the workers didn't have the incentive to share the information. Right. So I think those sorts of, like, information flows or barriers to information flows are actually very important in the learning process. And kind of what our second experiment did when we did this bonus of a month's pay, which induced the workers to share the information and that was sufficient to make the technology be adopted. And so I think the punch line or the one-sentence version of this is, workers need to see that they're going to benefit from the adoption of new technology or from upgrading generally in order for the process to work well. They have to buy into the process. And they have to see that they have the incentive to do so. One recommendation coming out of that would be some sort of profit sharing, or some sort of gain sharing between workers and firms would actually be very useful. And will it help there be more innovation?Tobi; It brings me in a way to another very interesting paper of yours which [they] also had a summary essay about, I think, in VOX or something, which is about wages in poor countries. And I mean, thinking about the soccer ball story and the lesson. One issue and this has generated quite a number of debates between I think Rodrik and a bunch of other scholars who are thinking about Africa, is that the reason Africa is not really industrializing, or firms are not creating jobs is because wages are too high relative to the level of income. But what I learned from your paper, and you can correct me if I'm wrong, is that paying higher wages in poorer countries is not really a disincentive to creating employment and even generating productivity and profit. Tell me a little bit about how that works. Because, usually, we've gotten familiar with this logic that for you to be able to industrialize, if you think about China, and so many other countries, you need to have access to low-wage workers, you know, you need to be able to do very cheaply, and labour is where you can really cut a lot of your costs. And then it becomes a problem if your domestic wages are too high for the level of your income or what firms and investors are willing to pay. So tell me this high-wage, low-wage dynamics, especially... I remember the famous Paul Krugman was it article defending sweatshops in Bangladesh, where if you force firms who are outsourcing to pay higher wages or impose certain conditions, poor people in those countries will lose jobs, and they will lose their livelihoods. And so you should not mess with that process. What are your thoughts on these [issues]?Eric; Yeah, very interesting. So I think the article you were thinking of, it's related to the specific case of the football producers and seal coats. In Pakistan. Tobi; Yeah. Eric; There was a very interesting thing that happened. I mentioned that one firm adopted this new technology. And you know, one very large firm and it was producing for Nike, it's called Silver Star. The interesting thing about that firm is that because they're producing for Nike, which had had sweatshop scandals in the past, Nike required them to do a bunch of things, basically, so that Nike wouldn't be vulnerable to a further scandal, right? And among the things that they had to do was make sure they were paying the minimum wage in Pakistan. And the only way this firm could guarantee that they were paying the minimum wage in Pakistan, which many firms were violating basically, the only way they could is to say, we're not going to pay a piece rate, we're going to pay a fixed wage. Right. So this firm was paying a fixed wage rather than a piece rate. And actually, we talked to them about when they first won the Nike contract. They said their labour costs went up 20 to 30%. So they did a bunch of things. They had this fixed wage, there was a medical clinic on the factory grounds. They had sickness pay, they had some retirement benefits. So a bunch of things, they did raise wages. But the advantage of that was that the workers were much less likely to block the adoption of this new technology. Because in a specific way, they did not have a disincentive, you know, their wage was going to be their wage no matter what happened, rather than in other firms [where] what was happening is that the worker can see if they adopt this technology, their wage would go down. And so we believe, and I wrote this in an article that you saw in the Harvard Business Review, I think that's where it was, that those wages, you know, higher wage payments and fixed wage payments, which were imposed by Nike actually contributed to the process of innovation. The title of the article is how labour standards can be good for growth, and also in the process of upgrading. So that's an example of how having higher wages can actually be good for this upgrading process. Now, there are factors going in both directions, right? On the one hand, you know, the 20 or 30% higher labour costs, I think they did contribute to innovation. On the other hand, 20 or 30% higher labour costs may mean that firms will hire fewer workers or that the industry will be less competitive. So it's not that, you know, this innovation effect is all powerful and it's going to overwhelm anything that's about labour costs. But I think it is something that we need to take into account. And so, you know, labour market institutions that, you know, maybe promote profit sharing with workers, that promote longer-term employment so you have people who are around for longer, that have some job security, the sorts of things that often labour unions want to negotiate, can actually be good for this innovation process. And that's one factor that should be weighed against this issue of, you know, how higher labour costs and how competitive is the sector going to be. You often hear, like, the World Bank or the USAID, the development agencies will often say, you just have to be cheap. Like, you know, the competitive advantage of Nigeria is cheap labour and therefore, you should be focusing on having low wages and producing, you know, garments and textiles and toys and low-end manufacturing. But I think that's kind of a low-road model. You know, and I think that there are viable high road models, which would involve somewhat higher wages, some sort of gain sharing or profit sharing, and being more innovative at the same time. I can't tell you I have it all worked out exactly what that model would look like, I think it's going to vary by country. But I think we need to try to think about and push in that direction of where you can have, it may not be high wage, but it's gonna be higher wage than the market by itself maybe would bring about. So I am optimistic that that can happen. But again, the devil's in the details, you know. So Nigeria needs to think about what are we relatively good at doing right now and let's think about how can we be more innovative and move up to the quality ladder, the technology ladder in those industries. And then how can we get our workers on board to the process of moving up that ladder? And that will probably involve paying those workers more, rather than just trying to cut wages to the extent possible.Tobi; Before I let you go, let me... I know you're a relatively quiet person so let me draw you in a little bit... yeah, I know you're not active on Twitter or anything like that. Let me draw you into a little bit of professional controversy. And one of the things that I admire most about your work, I should confess, is that it's methodologically diverse. You know, you do structural econometrics, you do RCT, you do regular modelling and so many things. So there's this huge debate currently that I think, a lot of my colleagues may not think so but I think has important consequences for the policymaking process on development, which is that - is development research right now focused on the right things? You know, RCTs are like the standard tool for the investigation of development questions. Empirics have sort of taken over the field. But on the other hand, you have folks like Lant Pritchett who are constantly pushing back that this is encouraging researchers to think too small, they are researching cash transfers, and so many other key interventions, whereas we really should be focused on the big questions. And in my experience, these have real-life implications, especially in poor countries where they have budgetary constraints. We might say this is due to corruption, and that will be true, but sometimes they have a real balance of payment crisis, because a lot of these countries are resource-dependent, and it's often cyclical. So a policymaker may really want to know where to spend the most resources to have the maximum benefit for the citizen. So I find these questions very important. What do you think about this debate? As someone who transverses the field very often in your work, how have you been able to navigate this debate? And what do you think is the, maybe right is not the right word here...what do you think is the useful approach going forward?Eric; Yeah, good question. Yeah, in my own work, I've been very question driven rather than methods driven. Right. So I've always thought, you know, I'm interested in this question of from upgrading, what are the barriers to upgrading? What drives upgrading? How can we, you know, learn about that, and if we can learn about that using an experiment, that's great. If we're in about that using other methods, that's great, too. So I, sort of, don't have a dog in the hunt, as Bill Clinton would say about, you know, the methodology. And I'm kind of in the middle of the road, I think, in terms of this debate between, you know, J-PAL and Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee and Lant Pritchett or others on the other side. I think, you know, in situations where you can run an experiment, I think that is the most credible source of information. Okay, so I'd rather have a randomized experiment than do a correlation and put some causal interpretation on a correlation. At the same time, I do think that there are many questions, either that can't be answered with an experiment, or that are just very, very costly to answer with an experiment, right? And so it's very hard to run, you know, it's running experiments on firms. I've tried to do it, but it takes a long time. It can be very costly. You have to give much bigger shocks to firms to get them to react, etc. And so, I've heard Abhijit Banerjee articulate that, like, we should never do a policy that hasn't first been evaluated by random experiment, I think that's too strong. Because we're gonna be waiting years and years and years to get the experiments and with a huge investment of resources in order to get the experiments that would then inform the policy. So we're going to have to make policy and, you know, make decisions based on other sorts of information. And so there, I do think we need to be like small ''c'' Catholic, allow for lots of different types of methods, quasi-experimental methods, you know, even structural methods, and then also experiments. There's this famous joke about the drunk guy with a streetlight, you know, he's looking for his keys, and he's looking under the streetlight, because that's where the light is, maybe not where the keys have been lost. And so I take that point, like, maybe we really care about these big questions about, you know, what's going to drive growth, then in that sense, I'm sympathetic to the sort of the Lant Pritchett view. On the other hand, under the lamppost, we actually are learning stuff, right, I feel like we're more confident that we're making progress by looking under the lamppost. And so I think the, you know, the trick, the art here is to sort of stay near the edge of the lights and we're getting closer to the big questions, but in a way that's still credible, and that we're still, you know, we can believe the answers that we're actually given. To sort of counter the Lant Pritchett view, you can post these big questions, and you can, you know, think big thoughts. But at the end of the day, you have to be able to convince, you know, you have to show us the data, right, you have to show that this is really correct. And that's just very hard to do for many of these big questions. So we need to incrementally build up based on this work. That's why I kind of like this work on firms, we're getting towards these big questions about growth, but in a way that you can actually have some confidence that you understand what's going on.Tobi; In your experience doing this work, what are misconceptions that you have encountered in the field that either the professional development industry, so I'm talking about aid and the think-tank and all the other folks, or it may even be your academic colleagues, what are the common misconceptions that you have encountered? Eric; Yeah. I mean, so one big thought [is] I think that the of field development agencies, right, it's like, how are we going to spend aid dollars in a way that's going to have a positive effect? And I think there's value to that. All right. I'm all in favour of spending, you know, aid dollars, in the most effective way. But I think that you know, a set of questions does limit to some extent the impact of the field of development on the development process. So I actually think we could spend every aid dollar in an optimal way, and would it have a meaningful effect on the material standard of living of people in poor countries? I'm not sure. I mean, maybe a little bit, maybe marginal, right? I think what's really going to matter is, do these countries start getting industrialization happening? Are they getting upgrading? Are they growing? And so in that sense, I sometimes get a little bit frustrated with the development discussions, it's all about this, you know, how do we spend aid dollars, and let's do RCTs to figure out how to spend the aid dollars, rather than these bigger questions, which are going to have a longer-term effect on people's living standards. You know, that's changing a little bit. I'm encouraged. There are more and more people talking about firms, there are more and more people taking sort of industrial policy ideas seriously. They're talking about bigger-picture questions in a kind of micro-founded way. So there are some encouraging signs. But I think a lot of development is still about that issue of like, what's the right way to do social policy? What's the right way to do, you know, aid spending, rather than trying to understand deeply why is it that Korea was able to make this transition from a poor country to a rich country, essentially, in a generation? And why is it that many countries in Africa are not? What is it that's actually getting in the way? And for that, that's not really like how to spend aid dollars question that's more about how firms behave. What are the factors that constrain them? And those sorts of things.Tobi; This is a show about ideas. So I want to ask you, what's the one idea? Just one. One idea that you think everybody should think about and adopt, that you would like to see spread everywhere. What's that idea? It may be from your work, or it may be from other things that inspire you. What's that one idea?Eric; I think the one idea I would choose is, uh, workers have a brain. This goes back to the soccer ball study, that there's knowledge and information that, like, workers have or people who are lower down in the hierarchy have, which is not being taken advantage of. Right, the soccer ball thing was an example. The workers were understanding the technology, but because of the way they were paid, and because of the, you know, institutional arrangements, they didn't have the incentive to share that. And I think the world, including the economics profession, tends to undervalue the intelligence that people have. Even the people who are actually, you know, on the frontlines doing the work. And if we can figure out ways to harness that knowledge and give people incentives to share it and give people incentives to develop their own intellectual thinking about whatever it is they're doing, I think that'll have a big payoff. And so I'm interested in sort of investigating what are the sorts of arrangements, what are the sorts of policies that can lead that to happen more?Tobi; Yeah. Thank you so much, Eric. I mean, tell me a little bit about what you're working on right now.Eric; What am I working on right now? I mean, so one thing related to what we've been talking about that I'm excited about is, again, a paper on technology adoption. This is in Bangladesh, with an energy-efficient motor like sewing machines. They're different sorts of motors that the traditional ones they're kind of spinning all the time. And then people have the foot pedal they like to press the foot pedal and then the needle comes down and stitches right but they're actually wasting a lot of energy because these motors are spinning all the time. And so there's a new type of motor called a servo motor which spins Only when the needle is moving, right, so it's energy efficient, energy efficient motor, but it can just replace the old motor, you don't have to change anything else about the machine, you just put this new servo motor to replace the old clutch motor. And we're studying when new managers or when new owners, when do they make those decisions. And so we're trying to track we're giving them information in different intensities, like including installing the machines in their factory one is just showing a video when it's just providing information, but one is actually installing their machines. And we're seeing how they react to that information. So I think that's a big topic. It's like what's getting in the way of the adoption of energy-efficient technology? These are the people who are making mistakes, or they just don't have good information. Or that basically, maybe if they have the right information, they actually will adapt very quickly. So that's one thing I'm thinking about.Tobi; It's been fascinating talking to you, Eric. I enjoyed it so much.Eric; Thank you, Tobi. Good questions. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.ideasuntrapped.com/subscribe

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook
Weather Forecast for Jackson WI Issued at 7am Nov 28 2022 by George Kasica - Netwrx Consulting

Local Jackson WI Weather Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 3:02


AUTOMATED GRAPHIC FORECAST LINK   Monday (Nov 28): Partly to mostly sunny in the morning, becoming partly cloudy in the afternoon. Patchy light fog in the morning. High 44. Wind south-southeast around 4 mph in the morning, becoming 10 mph, gusting to 17 mph, in the afternoon.   Monday night: Mostly cloudy. Low 34. Wind south-southeast around 10 mph, gusting to 16 mph.   Tuesday (Nov 29): Cloudy. A 30% chance of rain. Breezy and relatively mild. High 51. Wind south-southeast around 13 mph, gusting to 22 mph.   Tuesday night: Cloudy. Patchy light fog in the evening. A 60% chance of rain in the evening, then a mix of snow and rain after midnight. Breezy. Low 25. Wind chill ranging from 14 to 45. Wind southwest around 14 mph, gusting to 24 mph, in the evening, becoming west-northwest around 18 mph, gusting to 26 mph, after midnight. Snow accumulation about a quarter inch.   Wednesday (Nov 30): Mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming partly cloudy in the afternoon. Windy. High 30. Wind chill around 12. Wind west-northwest around 20 mph, gusting to 30 mph.   Wednesday night: Clear. Breezy. Low 18. Wind chill as low as 7. Wind west-northwest around 17 mph, gusting to 25 mph, in the evening, becoming 13 mph, gusting to 23 mph, after midnight.   Thursday (Dec 1): Sunny in the morning, becoming partly cloudy in the afternoon. High 36. Wind chill ranging from 9 to 29. Wind west-northwest around 8 mph in the morning, becoming south-southwest in the afternoon.   Thursday night: Partly cloudy. Breezy. Low 26. Wind chill as low as 17. Wind south around 12 mph, gusting to 19 mph.   Friday (Dec 2): Partly cloudy in the morning, becoming mostly cloudy to cloudy in the afternoon. Breezy and relatively mild. High 44. Wind south around 12 mph, gusting to 21 mph.   Friday night: Cloudy. A 20% chance of a mix of sleet, rain, and snow after midnight. Breezy. Low 26. Wind chill ranging from 20 to 32. Wind southwest around 10 mph, gusting to 18 mph, in the evening, becoming 14 mph, gusting to 22 mph, after midnight. Little or no snow or ice (on ground) accumulation expected.   Saturday (Dec 3): Partly cloudy in the morning, becoming sunny in the afternoon. Windy. High 34. Wind chill ranging from 15 to 22. Wind west-southwest around 16 mph, gusting to 25 mph.   Saturday night: Cloudy. Low 23, but temperatures rising after midnight. Wind chill ranging from 14 to 21. Wind west-southwest around 6 mph, gusting to 17 mph.   Sunday (Dec 4): Mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming partly to mostly cloudy in the afternoon. High 40. Wind southwest around 6 mph, gusting to 16 mph.   KASICA  

Mornings with Eric and Brigitte
Unwrapping The Names of Jesus for Kids - with Asheritah Ciuciu

Mornings with Eric and Brigitte

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 12:48


Most Christians agree that Christmas is all about Jesus, yet most of us spend little time preparing our hearts to celebrate Him. Why is this? Partly because we don’t know how. Unwrapping the Names of Jesus for Kids helps you journey through the stories of Jesus's life as told by a mother and then shared with her children. It helps us see things through the eyes of a child, but teaches us important promises of God. On Monday's Mornings with Eric and Brigitte, author Asheritah Ciuciu joins us to share how storytelling is the key to connecting to our children's hearts and imaginations and will allow us to share our Jesus-stories with our kids.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Madness Madness!
Episode 73: 40 Elephants, a Sci-Fi Convention, and Thou

Madness Madness!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 104:24


You know what's awesome? VICTORIAN LADY THIEVES. You know what else is awesome? Science Fiction! Mostly! Partly. It's complicated. Today we hear tales of both things!

Kerry Today
Hopes Listowel Centre May Partly Reopen – November 25th, 2022

Kerry Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022


General manager of Listowel Community Centre, Tony Duggan, speaks to Jerry about the fire that broke out in the building in the early hours of Wednesday morning.

Too Peas In A Podcast
Get Disability Royal Commission help from Your Story Disability Legal Support

Too Peas In A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 59:54


Mandy and Kate talk to Michelle and Jane, peas and lawyers from Your Story Disability Legal Support. Your Story Disability Legal Support offers free, independent, confidential legal support to make submissions to the Disability Royal Commission, which is currently open until 31 December 2022. The Commission wants to hear from people with disabilities, carers, families, support workers, peafessionals – anyone with lived experience that has feedback and a contribution to make. Michelle and Jane encourage Peas to particularly get in touch with their service if they'd like legal advice and support prior to making a submission. It's not compulsory to do so, but could be useful if you're concerned about privacy and confidentiality, or naming a service provider or other agency that you need to maintain a relationship with, such as a school or an employer. The service can also advise you if you have existing legal concerns such as current court proceedings, non-disclosure agreements, other contracts and more. Michelle and Jane outline some of the common issues they're finding in submissions - discrimination and exclusion, barriers to accessing community services, issues with NDIS, children and young people being excluded from school, discrimination and lack of support in the workplace and the disproportional impact of family violence for women with a disability The service can also link you to free counselling and support, interpreting and Auslan services and specific support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Peas, you're encouraged to contact Michelle, Jane and their colleagues at Your Story Disability Legal Support to make a submission or assist your child to make a submission and take the opportunity to make an important contribution to positive change through the Disability Royal Commission. Contact Your Story Disability Legal Support via their website Learn more about the Disability Royal Commission Plus: Buy our book The Invisible Life Of Us!Listen to our Spotify playlist –Too Peas: Songs Our Guest Peas LoveMelbourne forecast for Thursday November 24 –Partly cloudy, 19 degreesJoin our Facebook HangoutFind us on YouTubeThank you for supporting Too Peas In A Podcast! Don't forget to rate and reviewContact us here:Website: www.toopeasinapodcast.com.auEmail: toopeaspodcast@gmail.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

ThePrint
ThePrintPod: Gujarat BJP is facing unprecedented rebellion. Its ‘winnability' formula is partly to blame

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 12:47


The BJP's list of candidates excludes many sitting MLAs and includes numerous ‘fresh faces' and Congress turncoats, leading to rebellion brewing in at least 12 seats.

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus
Episode #77: The LOBO (Light Out Barks Out) Initiative/Kink Community, Living With Mitochondrial Disease, Chosen Family & Kick Ass Grandmas, With Jake Didinsky, Host Of The LOBO Podcast, Music Producer & Touring DJ

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 70:34


INTRODUCTION: Let's start withthe basics I am 29 and identify as non-binary, pansexual and demisexual. I amon the spectrum and neurodivergent. I also have mitochondrial disease, ADHD,associated mood disorder, anxiety, depression and more. I am however an openbook on everything.  I am deeply engrained in the kink community and alsothe furry community. So I was born and diagnosed with mitochondrialdisease when I was young. Over the course of my life my single mother did herbest but like most parents of those with chronic illnesses she protected me wayto much. When my brothers were born they also were diagnosed with mitochondrialdisease I often joke that my mother hit the lottery 3 boys with mito with notrace of it anywhere else in our family.Having mitochondrial disease has posed manychallenges in my life from school where I had an IEP all the way intoadulthood. I have always known I was different from everyone else and growingup with that knowledge has made life hard for sure. I also decided however whenI was 24 that I was going to stop feeling sorry for myself and not let mycondition define me. It was at this point that I launched Lights Out, BarksOut! Or LOBO! for short. LOBO is a night club event that focuses on beingsex positive, kink positive, body positive, gender inclusive, and creating asafe space for all. When we started we were mostly a party in dc for pups andfurries but we have grown now to be in 8 cities and to include a wide anddiverse group of patrons. LOBO has changed my life and the lives of many otherswho have found their community and safe space through us. We actually as of afew days ago launched our non-profit wing called the LOBO Initiative whichfocuses on LGBTQ+ youth and adults and those with disabilities who need ahelping hand to achieve their dreams. In addition to LOBO I am a full time professionalDJ and producer and I get the opportunity to play all over the world at circuitparties. This however is at great expense to my overall health.  Havingthe Mito and being on the road 24/7 working late hours into the 3-5 am timeslot isn't good for someone with a mitochondrial cell deficiency. As I saidthough I made the decision that I wanted to live my life my way and if thatmeans taking a few years off so be it. IN SHORT:- Professional touring DJ and Music Producer aswell as event promoter (including events geared for kinksters, furries, andthose with sensory issues)  - Non-binary, Pansexual, Neruodivergant (High Functioning Autism), ADHD, Associated Mood Disorder, GAD-Reporter for Switch the Pitch Soccer Covering the USMNT-Founder and COO of The LOBO Initiative Non-ProfitINCLUDED IN THISEPISODE (But not limited to):·     An Explanation Of Mitochondrial Disease·      Jake'sTotally Kick Ass Grandma·      YAYCHOSEN FAMILY!!!·      Jake'sPath To Becoming A DJ·      ABreakdown Of LOBO (Lights Out Barks Out)·      HowJake Helps Other Rise In The Music Industry·      DifficultiesFor Creatives To Get Their Break·      NightClub Events For People With Sensory Concerns·      PupPlay & Furry Community ·      KetamineTestimonial  CONNECT WITH JAKE: Website: https://jakemaxwellproductions.comMixCloud: https://www.mixcloud.com/live/jakeMaxwell/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LightsOutBarksOutFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/DjJakeMaxwellInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/lightsoutbarksoutdc/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/djjakemaxwell/Twitter: https://twitter.com/LightsOutDCTwitter: https://twitter.com/DJJakeMaxwell   CONNECT WITH DE'VANNON: Website: https://www.SexDrugsAndJesus.comWebsite: https://www.DownUnderApparel.comYouTube: https://bit.ly/3daTqCMFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/SexDrugsAndJesus/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sexdrugsandjesuspodcast/Twitter: https://twitter.com/TabooTopixLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/devannonPinterest: https://www.pinterest.es/SexDrugsAndJesus/_saved/Email: DeVannon@SexDrugsAndJesus.com  DE'VANNON'SRECOMMENDATIONS: ·      PrayAway Documentary (NETFLIX)o  https://www.netflix.com/title/81040370o  TRAILER:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tk_CqGVfxEs ·     OverviewBible (Jeffrey Kranz)o  https://overviewbible.como  https://www.youtube.com/c/OverviewBible ·     Hillsong: A Megachurch Exposed (Documentary)o  https://press.discoveryplus.com/lifestyle/discovery-announces-key-participants-featured-in-upcoming-expose-of-the-hillsong-church-controversy-hillsong-a-megachurch-exposed/ ·     Leaving Hillsong Podcast With Tanya Levino  https://leavinghillsong.podbean.com  ·      Upwork:https://www.upwork.com·      FreeUp: https://freeup.net VETERAN'SSERVICE ORGANIZATIONS ·      DisabledAmerican Veterans (DAV): https://www.dav.org·      AmericanLegion: https://www.legion.org ·      What TheWorld Needs Now (Dionne Warwick): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfHAs9cdTqg  INTERESTED INPODCASTING OR BEING A GUEST?: ·     PodMatch is awesome! This applicationstreamlines the process of finding guests for your show and also helps you findshows to be a guest on. The PodMatch Community is a part of this and that iswhere you can ask questions and get help from an entire network of people sothat you save both money and time on your podcasting journey.https://podmatch.com/signup/devannon  TRANSCRIPT: [00:00:00] You're listening to the sex drugs and Jesus podcast, where wediscuss whatever the fuck we want to! And yes, we can put sex and drugs andJesus all in the same bed and still be all right at the end of the day. My nameis De'Vannon and I'll be interviewing guests from every corner of this world aswe dig into topics that are too risqué for the morning show, as we strive tohelp you understand what's really going on in your life.There is nothing off the table and we've got a lot to talkabout. So let's dive right into this episode.De'Vannon: JakeDidinsky is the host of the Lobo, which stands for Lights Out Barks Outpodcast. He runs Lobo nightclub events all across the country, and most of all,he lives his life out and proud. Y'all listen and learn about Jake'scontributions to the kink community, and Jake is particularly interested in PupPlay the Fur Community, which is super cute, super awesome.Learn about Jake's path to becoming a [00:01:00]dj. The ways Jake helps others rise in the music industry and Jake's tips forthose living with mitochondrial disease, which is something that Jake has livedwith all his life. That disease cannot be overstated as many people living withit are not expected to live very long. ,but Jake has defied the odds. He is still alive And he is sohere to help everyone in any way that he can. Please listen and fall in love.with Jake, just as I have. Hello, you beautiful souls out there and welcomeback to the Sex Drugs in Jesus podcast. I hope you all are doing fan fucking taskas myself and my guest Jake Denki are doing. Jake, how are Jake: you? I'm good.I am just happy to have another day on this earth and, you know living thedream one day at a time De'Vannon: hall.Love you Tabernacle and praise. And so y'all is he Lobo which [00:02:00] stands for Lights Out, Bark Out, I believeLights Out Barks Out, I believe is what that stands for. He runs the Lobopodcast and as well, he is a dj, an event promoter and a music producer, and sohe. Living a high energy life, . And today on this we're gonna be talking abouthis medical history.He has something that's called mitochondrial disease, which I'dnever heard from before. He's gonna be telling us about his low boatinitiative, what his nonprofit does, and what it can do for you. So let's startwith your own history. Like what is it you would like to tell us Jake: about yourself?Yeah. So the first thing people will notice about me, I'm surethey're in this podcast and just listen to me, is I'm severely adhd. So if Ijump around a lot, I apologize. In addition to that, I'm also on the spectrumvery proudly actually. So those are two of like my badges of honor, adhd, verymuch so neuro [00:03:00] divergent.As you mentioned, I have the MET Disease that was diagnosedwhen I was I think four. Both me and my two brothers have it with no othertrace of it. And my family, I like to often joke that my mom had three boys andhit the lottery. All three boys have a condition that it's only passed throughthe mother that she doesn't have.So go figure. You know, that's always often the joke. I am adj, I'm a producer. I run light top, barks out the event all over the country.In addition to our logo initiative, nonprofit as well as I am a soccerjournalist have previously worked in politics. I've kind of been all over theplace you know, run an e-sports team.I, if it exists, I will do it. My whole thing is that basicallyI don't know how much time I have on this earth because people of my conditionsdon't typically live to be my age. And so I'm trying to take full advantage ofit and live as much of a life to the fullest as I. I De'Vannon: admire youand encourage [00:04:00] your, your strengththat you have there, that you keep going.So, so you're saying people with your disease don't usuallylive to your age. How old are you as of today? Jake: I am 29. I willturn 30 in in April. April 16th. Yes. I can do this. April 16th, I will turn30. I will be officially gay dead as the kids say. But I am very excited to bein my thirties and looking forward to that chapter.You De'Vannon: should belooking forward to it. Thirties are wonderful. That's when we really solidifywho we are. So how long do people typically live with this disease if, if 29 isso far out? Jake: So it's one ofthose things where it's, it's really like with the mitochondria disease, it'skind of hard to, to put a number on it, right?Because the way I explain it is mitochondria cells are ineverything in the body, right? So when your mitochondria don't work, That meansnothing in your body works the way it's supposed to. And when you have adeficiency where certain things in your body might work and other things maynot, it's very hard to follow a [00:05:00] pathof how that condition may go.So there's really not one person who has my condition, it hasthe exact same symptoms as anybody else. I often compare it to, if you take abag of a million jelly bean and try to pick out the same one twice, the odds ofdoing that are slim to none. So on the one hand you have people like me who areless affected but could go immediately plummeting like I was in the hospitalthree weeks ago out of the blue.Or you have people on the other end who are very, very, veryseverely affected who don't make it to V3 or four. And there's a whole bunch ofsub conditions. And as we learn more and more about it with geneticconditioning and genetic testing, like we are able to start to pinpoint itmore. But essentially it's one of those things where, It's really kind of acrapshoot because you just don't know.You just, it, it's, I was hospitalized with a minor virus thatspread, that nearly took me out and that was terrifying. And it's somethingthat, you know, it's one of those [00:06:00]things where you just kind of, you never really know with my condition, andthat is something that weighs on you a lot as a.Hmm. De'Vannon: Okay. Sotell us like, you know, scientifically, you said that the, the mitochondriadon't work or there's not enough of 'em. Tell us exactly like your definitionof mitochondrial Jake: disease. Yeah,so with the mitochondrial disease, the scientific definition is essentially ifyou have a deficiency within your mitochondria cell, the mitochondria cellitself, then you have a mitochondrial disease.Within that, there is a much broader spectrum of which one youhave. It can go, It is a very wide ranging spectrum. I think there's like 67,68 different sub conditions of mitochondrial disease. With myself, essentiallythe, the most common thing that almost everyone of a MIT deficiency has is anenergy deficiency, right?So right out the gate mitochondria produced like 96, 90 7% ofthe body's. So if they're not working right, you're already starting off of alow energy. And having a [00:07:00] low energycan lead to other things like having a weak immune system. And then you getinto things, like I said, every single organ, every single part of your bodyhas mitochondrial cells in it.So if your cell mitochondrial cells aren't working the way theyshould be you're gonna have deficiencies in those org organs. So as an example,I had a feeding tube from the time I was like 13 to the time I was 22. I, whenI was 13, 14 years old, I was like 56 pounds and four feet tall. I wasdiagnosed failure to thrive.They had tried everything and I was eating like a machine, butI was metabolizing things so quickly that the food wouldn't like do anything.It would just go right through. Right? So I had a feeding tube, and because ofthat, that's a lot of where my ADHD and my autism comes from. The mitochondriaGIS use, gastritis, gastroparesis, kidney stones since I was 13.All, all this bumped up, all stems traditionally from themitochondria disease as a baseline. Well that's De'Vannon: like,that's like a lot. That's like fucking a lot. Like fuck. [00:08:00] I looked up real quick and I saw thatabout one in 5,000 people both in the United States and globally have thisdisease. Jake: Yeah. And a lotof times it goes undiagnosed because a lot of doctors don't know what it is.So like most doctors, when I say mitochondrial disease, thinkI'm talking about multiple sclerosis, which are two very, very, very, verydifferent conditions. I mean, they couldn't be further apart. One is very muchso brain related and one is very much so body oriented. You know also I'veheard people say, Oh my, that must be muscular dystrophy.That's another one. Closer. But not exactly the same. I havebeen guilty myself of walking into the ER and being like, Yeah, I just havemuscular dystrophy because if I say me disease, I've had doctors look at melike I'm making something up. That has happened to me in the ER multiple times.I went in to actually.But I was admitted to the hospital the first after I saw, thoughtI was just there to get opioids because I was making up something that he'dnever [00:09:00] heard of. And that was a wholewonderful experience where I was like, Dude, no, I'm here because I'm in painand don't wanna be on opioids. Please don't gimme opioids.This is a real thing. You should know this. You're a medicalprofessional. I'm like that. A son of a bitch, , right? Like there's nothingmore infuriating than walking in. Hospital and them being like, Yeah, we don'tthink this is a legitimate thing. This is like, we've never heard of it can, orlike, having you, I don't mind having you explain to a doctor my condition.I usually just walk in with a binder now that I just like handthem. I'm like, Here's everything you need to know about my condition from likemedical specialists in my, in my hoop, Specialize in medo. Just read this andcall them if you have any questions. Because at this point, like I'm so tiredof giving the spiel to these doctors that it's just, it's frustrating andoftentimes they just don't want to hear it.I had to tell the when they were giving me my scope in thehospital to check my stomach. I'm like, You gotta make sure you don't gimmelactic ringers. I will have a reaction. And the nurse looked at me like I hadthree heads because most [00:10:00] patientsdon't tell on theirs that they can't have lactic ringers or even know whatlactic ringers are.So the fact that that was mentioned is just kind of one of thethings that I've been doing for so long. It doesn't phase me anymore. Okay. De'Vannon: And then Iread where you have an had an IEP all the way through adulthood. Yes.Adulthood. And I'm assuming that stands for an individualized education Jake: plan. Yes.So one of the things that is actually very dear and important tomy heart is special education. I intend to run for school board at some pointin my life. I think that people with disabilities need more representation onschool boards from those who have gone through the special education program.I had an iep originally, they wanted to give me a 5 0 4 plan, Ibelieve which is the alternative. But my mother made sure was an IEP cuz shewas a lawyer and knew the system, which is unfortunately something that a lotof kids don't have access to. But that is part of the reason I wanna getinvolved.We'll come back around to that. But I was on an iep originallythey wanted to hold me back in third grade cuz I couldn't write [00:11:00] cursive and that was a whole thing. Theygave me a bunch of. They came back and they said we can't hold this kid back.He's reading at a college level. He's writing at a college level.We should actually skip him ahead of grade. And that was like acomplete whirlwind. So yeah, but the IEP was literally one of the things thathelped me get through school. I actually had to go to three to three differenthigh schools before they finally figured out a system that worked for me.When I was at my first high school, I was getting like D's andF's, but they couldn't figure out why, because I was getting perfect scores onthe state test in Virginia and I was getting like, perfect scores on all myexams. And the reason was I wasn't doing the homework cuz it bored me. Itwasn't challenging enough.And so I just was like, I'm not gonna do it. Like it doesn't, Idon't get anything from this. So I would just like do the exams and then notbother up the homework cuz I knew most of the material. Then they moved me to asecond school where I had a teacher tell me that I couldn't go on a field tripwith my journalism class because she didn't wanna be [00:12:00]responsible for a medical condition.Because she didn't think I could ride the metro for an hourwith kidney stones, which was a whole thing. And my mom said, Uhuh, we're notdoing this. Like we're gonna, we're gonna find a different place cuz this isnot like, acceptable. And then finally I arrived at Falls Church High School inVirginia which is where I ended up graduating from and will always have aspecial place in my heart, which is why I continue to go back there and visitand get back to the school.But there they kind of realized that they had to create almostthis alternative like, plan to help me, I guess, or I guess make it moreaccessible for me, right? Because what ended up happening was I was doing allthese classes and I was, I was getting, like I said, perfect scores and I waseventually they came up with the quantity or quality versus quantity.Which meant that if I could prove that I was getting thematerial, it wasn't how much work I was doing versus the qual, the quality ofthe work I was doing. So at one point [00:13:00]during my senior year, we ended up with the situation because I started inMaryland that I had to take world history. I, and in Virginia, that is afreshman class in Maryland, that is a senior class.I at that point did not want to spend an entire school yearsurrounded by freshmen. Not that I had any problem with it, it was just thatfor me, with being on the spectrum of a bunch of other issues, I was having areally hard time connecting with the freshmen, being older. And also I hadalways had a hard time kind of in school connecting with people my own age.I often spent most of my lunch periods hanging out with thestaff and teachers. So they allowed me to spend that period with my teacherfrom the previous year in us. And, you know, helping him with grading papersand teaching US history and whatever world history had a test, I would takethat test and I would pass it.And that was kind of how they allowed me to navigate my senioryear. Most schools wouldn't have been okay with that, but in this situation,they realized [00:14:00] that if they weregonna fail me because of this, it would've, it would've made no sense becauseat the end of the year, I got a perfect score on the state test, which issomething that should be eliminated altogether because state testing is a jokeand a massive fraud.And realistically, is it the way we should be measuringpeople's success? But that's a whole nother story. Mm-hmm. . De'Vannon: Wow. Thankyou for going into such great detail with that. I appreciate it because thoseare the sort of the, that's the sort of information that helps people. So in myresearch of you, I, I came across where you felt like your mom protected youway too much because of this chronic illness.I got the sense that. Maybe other parents do the same sort ofmaybe like overprotection thing. So I wanna know like what advice you wouldgive both to young people who have this disease and also to the parents ofyoung people who have this Jake: disease. Yeah.So I think first and foremost I should acknowledge that [00:15:00] while my mom and I don't have the world's bestrelationship, I acknowledge that she did the best that she could, right?She had three boys, all of a chronic illness that she had noexperience with as a single mother. And I respect the hell out of the fact thatshe did the best that she could in the circumstances that she could. And welived a relatively comfortable life growing up. And I will always have thatrespect for her, right?That that's never gonna go anywhere regardless of how strainedour relationship is. That being said, I think that it's important not just forparents of people with mito, but for parents. I'll start their parents,especially of kids with chronic illnesses, to understand that. You know, at acertain point in time, you're not gonna be there for your child anymore, right?Like, at a certain point in time, your child's gonna have to goout into the world in theory and figure it out on their own. And if you protectthem to a point where they get there and they're so used to people doing thingsfor them that they don't know how to handle themselves, it can create massiveroadblocks and relearning experiences that [00:16:00]put them behind the eight fall.Like I had never borrowed taxes previously up until a coupleyears ago because I had always been claimed as a dependent, and then all of asudden I wasn't a dependent and I had no idea how to do it. And it was likeincredibly overwhelming and incredibly alarming for me. And that was somethingthat I legitimately had to teach myself because I just had never even occurredto me.I think that the, the instinct just for parents in general isto protect, right? Because this is, this is someone, this is your child, right?Like you want the best for them, and you're afraid sometimes to take your handsoff the wheel. . But I think that you have to trust and find the balance ofletting your kid going, go out and fail and learn from that experience.But also being there to pick them back up when they do. Becausewhat I'm not saying to do is just push 'em out the nest and say, Okay, figureit out. But I'm also not saying like, to protect them to a point where theyhave no idea and think the world is this perfectly welcoming place to peoplewith disabilities because the reality is the world is really hard for peoplewith [00:17:00] disabilities.It just is. It is not a nice world out there at times. Andthat's something that I think a lot of kids with chronic illnesses, when theybecome into adulthood, find out the hard way. As for children and those teens,especially young adults going through this trying to find their independenceand expressed that they can do things, You know, the way I finally got my momto get it was just by demonstrating that I was capable of doing things.And eventually, if she really was adamantly against somethingand I really thought I could do it, I would just do it. And. At the end of theday, it may have led to some strain, but ultimately in the end, she understoodafterwards that I was just trying to show that I could, I could complete what Iwas trying to set my mind to.You know, she was pretty adamant against me becoming a DJbecause she didn't think it would be good for me with my medical condition. Andso because of that and because of my dad previously being a DJ and [00:18:00] thinking it would be a really hard worldto navigate for someone on the spectrum and all these other things, she did notwant to get me DJ equipment when I was younger.So I went on and bought my own. And then three years later shecame to see me play. She was like, Wow, you're really good at this. Like, youshould be doing this professionally. I'm like, I am, should. I've been tryingto tell you for the last three years is that I, I'm good at what I do and I'mokay with the trade off that it affects me medically because I make a bunch of peoplehappy and that's okay with me.But I think that not everybody has the ability to advocate likethat, Right? So, I would just say if you are a, a teen or a young adult outthere and you're saying, Man, I really wish my mom or my dad would like justget, get this point through their head. Just sit them down and be like, Look,at a certain point, there's gonna come a time when you just can't protect meanymore and I need to know how to navigate the world.And I think having that come to Jesus moment with them willreally, really help [00:19:00] open their eyes.So De'Vannon: the, thestrain that you spoke of between you and your mother was, is that the primaryreason there was strain because, you know, you were getting away from hercontrol and it sounds like she wanted what she thought was best and you had adifferent point of view and maybe she took that personally.Is that what, Was there something else that strange y'all evenfurther? Jake: I think a lotof it came down to the fact that she ultimately, Wanted to, wanted what wasbest for me in her eyes. And I wanted what was best for me in my eyes. And Iwas the oldest, right? I was her first born. So automatically she's gonna bethe most protective because she hadn't done it before.And traditionally parents who have multiple children, the firstborn is often told like, No, no, no. Like very protected. But then the secondand third or however many kids come after are often allowed to do things thatthe first born may not have been allowed to. Like I wanted to play in middleschool.I was told no, but my brothers both joined band in middleschool. And unfortunately growing up, it's [00:20:00]not as big of an issue now, but growing up there was a lot of resentment therebecause, well, why are you allowing my brothers to do the things you told me Icouldn't? But as I grow older, I kind of understand and try to piece togetherthose decisions and it starts to make more sense to me.But in the moment it created a lot of heat and strife. But alot of it, I think, did come down to the fact that yes, she. Wanted a lot ofcontrol, wanted to kind of in her mind, this is what's best. You know, I knowwhat's best, like I've done it. And a lot of it came down to me feeling like Iwas never quite good enough to live up to her expectations.And that kind of created a lot of headbutting where you know,being on the spectrum, a lot of these ideas kind of started fill in my head andwhether they were true or not, that's what became the image of my mother in mymind. Now we have come a long way since then. She is very supportive of mycareer now.She is very supportive of me now. She really does the best thatshe can, but as my fiance says, I think that she [00:21:00]is at the point where she just wants to be my, like, best friend and sometimesnot as much of like that's a point of mother figure, if that makes sense. WhichDe'Vannon: one wouldyou prefer? The best Jake: mother, or doyou want both?I mean, every kid wants to have that relationship with theirmother, Right? Where it was like you know, where. It's mom, right? Like I cancall mom and have her do cartwheels because I'm playing in New York City like Iwas last week. And you know, the reaction I got was, yeah, that's kind of cool.Okay. As opposed to like this overwhelming beaming of pride.For me that was a very big moment. And so I think there'salways a part of me that will want that relationship. But to understand thatyou have to go back to the relationship I had with her mother, my grandmother,which was, she was my best friend. She was absolutely, without a doubt theperson I was closest to on this earth.I came out to her first when I was like 16 and she's like,Yeah, okay, let me take you to the sex shop. Like let me help you. [00:22:00] Like if you need a place to, you know, doextracurriculars with people that's not your house, that's fine. You can do ithere. Like Grandma was the shit, like grandma used to have gay parties at herhouse all the time when she was younger.Grandma used to have all the kids in her neighborhood, but mymom and my uncle were younger, come over and party in her basement so that ifthey wanted to do drugs or something, they could do it under the supervision ofa, of a adult. And if they, something happened, she would rather to thehospital and all the parents in the neighborhood were fine with this cuz they'drather them be doing it under the supervision of somebody than doing it out onthe streets.And so these underground parties would just happen at mygrandma's house back, back in the day. And so she was literally everything Iaspired to be. She would give you the shirt off her back. I mean I very much soam my grandmother's child. And I think a lot of that bugs my mother in a waythat we are not as close as I was with, with my grandmother.But that was just because, you know, [00:23:00]grandmother, we call her, my mom and I were just incredibly close. We went toflyers games since I was a kid. We would talk sports. We often joked about theeulogies we would give at each other's funeral because that's how close wewere. If whichever one of us passed away first, like we had a very, very strongdynamic.She would not date somebody without my approval. Like it wasjust, she was like, Okay, like I, she's like, I need you to meet my grandsonand if he doesn't like you, then like, it's not gonna work. Like we were justthat close. It was that kind of a strong bond that some people just couldn'tunderstand.And I truly believe that even though she's no longer here in inperson, she's always with me in spirit. In fact, I always like to tell the. Andwhen she passed away, everybody assumed I would be devastated. I figured I'd bedevastated. But I went to the hospital, she just come outta surgery. She was ina coma, and I, I held her hand and I was like, Listen, like you've been througha lot in your life, girl.Like, you know, it, it's, it's okay. Like you don't gotta keepbiting this if you don't want to. Like, I will be okay. You will, you will be [00:24:00] okay. Like, I trust, I trust that we'regonna be fine, but if you feel like it's your time to go, then you know I'll beokay. And she squeezed my hand and I saw a tear come down her eye and I waslike, Okay.I knew that that's what we were doing. And I looked at her andI said, Just wait till I get back to your house before, before like anythinghappens because I can't be in the hospital. If you passed away, I will, I willhave a breakdown. And I drove back to her house and then I got the call that asI walked in the door, she had passed away.And then that. I had a dream where I, where she was there andwe spoke and we just spoke for hours and hours and hours. And she explainedlike, Look, I just want you to keep living your life. I don't want you toderail everything. Like, you know, this is what I need from you is to not stopliving because I'm never gonna not be there.I'll always be watching you. And then I was fine the next dayand I went about my life. Yeah, I was, I video1709663557: was De'Vannon: gonna askyou if you ever see her in your dreams because, you know, I see my grandmotherand my dreams, particularly in times of [00:25:00]stress and trouble and I had that strong relationship with my grandmother too.She, when I was a little crossdresser, running around at aboutfour or five years old in my, in an oversized shirt, one of my mom's belt andmy mom's little two inch pumps. You know, Granny would let me do that and she'dkeep a lookout in case my parents came back and give the signals I can get backin my boy clothes.And so, I'm here for the Grannys who watch out for the littlegay grandkids running around when the parents are too fucking stiff to get withthe fucking program. So you, it's just the most mindboggling thing. You know,grannys are born like the twenties and thirties and you would think people bornmore recently would be the more open minded ones, but they're just not.And so, so then your siblings don't necessarily have thisstrained relationship with your mom because she was more lenient on Jake: them. Yeah. Somy siblings actually both live out in California with my mother currently. I donot, I live about as geographically far away as I can [00:26:00]be on the East Coast.And you know, I think that, yeah, there, there, there's somestrain there, but not nearly as much as on that as we have. I actually don'thave the world's greatest relationship with my brothers either. In a lot ofways I explain that my brothers are very much like my mother. They're very typeA, they're very materialistic.Which is not, you know, you know, a bad thing in itself. Ifthat's what they are, that's what they are. Whereas I'm very much like mygrandmother, which is very type C. There is more than one right way to dosomething. Like if there's a start line and the finish line, how you get theredoesn't matter as long as you get there.My mother and my brothers, there's a start line and the finishline is really only one correct way to get to the finish line is how I kind oflike describe it. You know, to me my life has been a, a struggling journey,right? Like it's been, get knocked down, climb back up, get back down, climbback up. But the point is I always get back up and manage to get across thefinish line.Whereas, you know, in I think my mother and my brother's eyes,it's get back, get knocked down, but then go this way [00:27:00]as opposed to, you know, I'm like, you know, dude, a bunch of circles fall downa bunch of times, but I got there. But yeah, my brothers and I are starting todevelop a better relationship now.It. Great. I'm one of them is better than the other. They'reactually twins. So you know, there was always that to contend with. But yeah,I, I really am actually not close with a lot of people in my biological family.I do have a very close chosen family which, you know, we, in this community,very much so value, but as far as my biological family, I'm very close with mybiological father, but like not anybody else.De'Vannon: I am herefor all of the chosen family. Fuck this blood relative Jake: trauma andfamily . De'Vannon: The bloodrelatives can be very, very bad for your health. Y'all pick you a betterfamily. Do not have to contend with them. Blood relatives. Congratulations on the engagement. I heard you mentionedfiance. Jake: So actually funstory about that.[00:28:00] We actually had todo it twice. The first time I decided to do it at a pride party at Lobo. Wewere planning to do it the following month, but my mom actually got very upsetthat we didn't call and get her permission to get engaged and that she wasn'tthere. So she flew in the following month to Lobo and we did it all again sothat she could be a part of it.That is literally what we're dealing with which is not a badthing in itself. I get that she wanted to feel like she was involved, and I getthat it was a big deal for her. Her oldest was getting engaged. She's verytraditionalist in that way. I, you know, to me, I didn't really think it was abig deal in 2022 to have to call and be like, Hey, I'm getting engaged, youknow?But. I guess she felt she should have been informed and that'sfine. You know, And her, when she was my age, that was kind of the way it was.You know, Talk to your mother, talk to your father. Me. I'm like, Screw it. I'mjust gonna do this. Like, it was an auto whim decision at four in the morning.So like, you know yeah.But she did fly in the following month and we did it all againat Lobo in front of 400 people. Yeah. I mean, De'Vannon: [00:29:00] that's cute and all, but you lost me atpermission. Jake: Yeah, yeah. Itwas, it was a choice. It was a. De'Vannon: No, wedon't. We don't need nobody's permission to do the fucks we want to do. Butsee, that's why I'm always preaching for people to get over this addiction tofamily because inherent in blood family is a lot of control and a lot ofassuming that this person in the family or that person in the family cannot dothis unless we all agree it's good or something, some kind of bullshit likethat, that I tuned out years ago.I was like, Oh, hell no. . I observed my family. I'm like, Youknow what? All y'all's fucked up each and every fucking last one of y'all don'treally know how to live your damn life, so you not about to try to tell me howto live mine. Even though I am the youngest child. I got better sense than mostpeople in my family, if not them all.you know? So, mm. There there'll be no permission beinggranted. None of [00:30:00] this. I never cameout. I was like, If y'all can't figure it out, then shame on you. I'm doing myfucking life. Deal with it. . I mean, that's it myself Jake: to you bitches.That that's it. Like that, that's a hundred percent. It's, there's a ton ofcontrol.That's why I distanced myself from a lot of them. De'Vannon: Yeah. So Ijust wanted to point out we've been using the word chronic with this disease,y'all. And so what that means is that it's not like, and the opposite of thatis acute, meaning that it would go away over time or through treatment. Chronicmeans that, in this particular case, that there's really no like set cure forthe mitochondrial diseases.Well, so what they were treated with is like vitamins, physicaltherapy, I mean, not any kind of therapy to help the patient feel better, tohave a more comfortable life. They'll treat the symptom as they come up withvarious medications and stuff like that. But like with hiv, which is what, youknow, I have a history of.There's no way to like just say get rid of it. You manage thesymptoms and then you just promote an overall healthy [00:31:00]life. So when we say chronic, that's what we mean exactly. And so his websitey'all is jake maxwell productions.com. Of course that will go in the show notesand then the social media and all of that will be there too.So I bring up the website because this, I want you to tellpeople about that website and about how it all got started. I read where whenyou were 24 that you decided that you were gonna stop feeling sorry foryourself and stop letting your condition define you. So I want you to talk tome about this turning point that happened when you were 24.I want to hear about how your mind was before, cuz it soundslike you were in some. Pity party or a state of low self-esteem or feelingsorry for yourself or something like that, which can happen to us when we getsick or, or you know, we, or when we're fighting these uphill battles. So talkto me your mindset before you have this revelation at 24 and then Jake: after.Yeah. So, you know, [00:32:00]to understand that you kind of gotta go back to like when I was 18, it's alittle bit of a journey, right? So I had all these aspirations as a kid of allthe things I would be doing with my life. And, you know, a lot of them I hadachieved, like, I worked, started working in politics when I was 16.I was on a presidential campaign, I was on a senate campaign, Iwas on a congressional campaign. Like I had done all this stuff by the time Iwas 22. In fact, in 2016 I worked as a presidential and was like the youngestone as a field director in Virginia. So without a college degree. So I had, Ihad like accomplished that I did what I wanted to do on that front.And then, you know, 2016 happened and the whole world justkinda. Got flipped upside down. And I was not happy with the state of the worldand I was unhappy with where I was at with my life. I was going through thissituation where my grandmother had just passed away. And even though I was notreally affected by it as much as I was there, there was some lingering effects,obviously from losing that [00:33:00] strongconnection that I had.And I kind of, you know, was doing this DJ thing. I had, youknow, actually I've been in a kink relationship, not a, not a dating one, but akink one that it just ended and it ended very, very, very badly. And I was justlike, you know, I'm unhappy. I have this condition that's gonna kill me. Like Ihave, this is what was going through my mind, not currently, but at this timeit was like, I have this condition that's gonna kill me.I'm running into a wall. Like I'm, I don't know how to set pathforward. I haven't gone to college. Like, what, what am I doing? Like, what'sthe point? And. Eventually, like literally I was just lying in bed and one ofmy other friends called me and invited me out to a kink club, ironically, whichis how this story starts.And I was like, I wasn't gonna go, but he didn't really give mea choice. He said, You're coming or we're gonna come pick you up and take youregardless. So it's like, all right, I'll go, you know, what have I got tolose? And I went and at this party I met someone named David Merrill. [00:34:00] And this person was the catalyst for my DJcareer.Over time me and who would eventually become my chosen brother,best friend, and all around, like biggest support for me in my life. Corey, akaPhoenix. He, we would do kink demos at David's party. Corey would like flog me,right? And that, that's how my career started. And then one day I went to Davidwas like, David, can I like just dj?I was like, The DJ's not here. Do you mind if. Just try. And hewas like, Yeah, I mean, you know, it can't be any worse than we've ever had, sogo for it. And I went up there and I'm jamming and I'm having the time of mylife and I get done and I'm like, Man, that was awesome. And he's like, No, no,it wasn't, but you have potential and I can see it in you and I can teach youbecause you have something I can't teach, which is drive.You have drive and determination and I think you can get thereif you get someone in your corner to give you the support and the skills thatyou need. And I'm gonna do that for you. So sure enough, every day for like ayear, I'd go over to David's house and [00:35:00]I'd work on DJing and he'd show me things. And then eventually he startedbooking me at his parties.And then the next thing you know, I'm doing more of his events,not just the one. We moved to another event at another event, and I'm startingto get a little bit of a following, and then we kind of hit the turning pointmoment for me, which is when I get reached out to by a bigger promot. and they'relike, We would really like to book you.We think you're great. We think you're talented, but we don'tlike that you're non-binary and we don't like that. You don't really look likewhat a traditional circuit party DJ should look like. Mm-hmm. because I don'treally have the AB and I'm not like ripped and I'm not, all these other thingsthat traditional circuit parties, DJs at that time looked like and I'm like,Excuse the fuck outta me.The hell does that mean? And they were just like, Well, youknow, we just don't think you'll like, react well of the, probably will connectwith you like some of our other DJs. I'm like, Oh, okay, cool. Holding my beer.So I I looked at Corey and, and my friend piloted time and we start, we startedLobo and [00:36:00] that that's what it was.We, we basically started it because we wanted a safe space foreverybody else who wasn't welcome at these, these circuit parties. So wedescribe Lobo really as like a diverse circuit party. You're, you're not gonnawalk in the LOBO and see a bunch of cookie cutter gs, you're gonna see theeverybody else.And that's what we describe it as. You're gonna see the bears,the kinks stirs, the pups, the furries, you know, your big guys, your littleguys. Everything in between except for that traditional, you know, Abercrombieand Fit case, so to speak is how I describe it. And they come too, but in thiscase, they're not the majority.They're in the minority. And the looks on their faces when theywalk in is what makes it like just that much more special because they, it, itdawns that this is a party for everyone and always will be. But that turningpoint really for me, essentially be, it happened on a whim because I was justlike, you know, I need to stop trying to be what my mother wants.I have to stop trying to be what everybody else wants me to be.And if I really. [00:37:00] To be happy andDJing makes me happy. Why not? Like I am not beholden to anybody else'sexpectations of me. I am not beholden to anybody else's what they want me tobe. I basically was like, this is my life. And yeah, I may have all theseconditions and whatever, and this, that, and the other, but you know what?There are people far worse off in the world than me who aredoing far greater things. And sure, I could sit around and be sorry for myselfand sit in my room and just cry and do all these things, or I can go out and dosomething about it. And by doing something about it, it has now gotten to thepoint where we could start the nonprofit, where we can get back to others whomay need that quote unquote kick in the butt supporting shoulder to get themgoing.Going De'Vannon: Talk tome. I commend your ambition here and for fighting to maintain a positiveattitude, making decisions. I appreciate the mentor who helped to mentor youand groom you into DJing. So talk to me about how you give back. You mentionedlike you go back to your high [00:38:00] schoolfrom time to time to give out.I know Lobo has some sort of youth initiative. So tell me aboutall the ways that you give back. Jake: Yeah, so thefirst and easiest way to say how Lobo gives back is Lobo has a policy that we willnever price anybody out of a party. If you can't afford to come to our party,you just shoot us a message saying, Hey, I need a ticket.And we give you a ticket. It's a no question to ask policy,like we will never tell somebody that you cannot come to a community event. Andthe reason for that is no one should be told, Oh, well, we know how much thismeans to you and we know that you have friends in your community here, butsorry, if you can't afford the $15, you just can't come.It is a literally no question to ask policy. We will give you aticket. Now, if that starts happening every single month, we may have a talk,but essentially the way it is is we buy a block of tickets every month as Loboto just give out the people. We don't ask why we don't ask the policy. I need aticket done.Here you go. Like, that's it. And again, the main reason forthat is because we know the impact this has on people. We made that decision atday one that we were never gonna be the party that was so full of itself that wewere gonna tell people if you can't afford to go too, too [00:39:00] bad. So that's, that's the first thing.And that happens in every city we go to all across the country.At every party we do that is like a non-negotiable. So do we lose money on itsometimes, But it's worth it for us because Community first, that's what ourevents always been about. Recently we also launched the nonprofit which is theLOBO initiative.I believe we officially now have finally, finally gotten ourletter from the irs. I have to check. It's supposedly in the mail, but it'staken them like eight months to officially get back to us cuz they were sobacklogged. But that's why we've been like more quiet about it saying that it'sbeen approved.And so we're starting to roll it out. And the main, the mainfocus of the non-profit essentially is like to focus on LGBTQ specificallyyouth. Adults and adolescents and with a key focus on those with disabilitieswho wanna chase their dreams, but just don't have the financial support or theemotional support to get there.The easiest way I describe it is, you know, one of our [00:40:00] programs is a mentorship scholarshipprogram. You tell us I wanna be a dj, we buy you equipment and give you amentor in that field who will help you. And it's too pronged for this reason.One, getting the equipment is great, but you also need someone to help opendoors for you, right?Because that's how all fields work. It's all aboutcommunication and networking, and you can be really, really talented, but ifyou don't have somebody to sometimes help get you in, that can be half thebattle. If you don't have someone you can call like, Hey, I just got offeredthis opportunity, do you think it's legitimate?That can be a huge thing. So we pair you with a mentor to helpteach you your craft, but then also continually be there to help you along yourjourney. And that's one, when we explain it, what we don't do is give out cashvalue. We give out equipment, we give out classes, we give out basic thingsthat can help people go after their dreams.Because that was the big thing for me. Had I had that supportearlier, who knows where I would be now. Wow. De'Vannon: There wasa time that I wanted to become a DJ and I did go and research it. I would go tolike the Guitar [00:41:00] Center and justdifferent places and try to Google it and find it out. But it is so you, it isnot as simple as it, you know, getting turntables or now, you know, like aMacBook, you know, and putting an app on it and then just going, Hey, I'm gonnathrow a party , you know?You know, it was so, it was so, such a struggle to figure outwhere the fuck do I get started? Okay. So I get the equipment, I startpracticing at home, then where do I go? Do I go knock on doors? You know? Youknow. So the fact that you streamlined this process and. And, and to at leastgive people a chance and they're gonna be those who start, who won't keep downthe path.But at least they could say that, you know, they were given anopportunity, right? In being willing to open doors or people in the industry,you're trying to give them what you got, which is somebody to help to vouch foryou. You know, I, you know, when you started DJing, I wish to the heavens, youknow, to God that we had that in every industry, you know, because there is somuch good talent out there, but it's [00:42:00]so much of it to this day.It's about who you know is like that in the author industry.You know, I'm a good writer, you know, but, you know, and I have a lot of goodstories to tell, but trying to get it out there is difficult because there's nolike, you know, mentor for, you know, for me to do that. So I appreciate thefuck outta that.Oh my God. Like, who knows? Maybe I'll, I'll go to DC orsomething and join your initiative and become a DJ at Laugh . Jake: So, so one ofthe cool things about it is we actually have mentors in all fields. We havepeople who work in the author industry. We have people who are writers,artists, DJs. Like I use DJ as the example, cause that's the easiest way tosay, but we, some of 'em reaches out to us like, Hey, I wanna be a film adirector.We have film editors who do YouTube, who are big YouTube starsand all these other things who will help, you know, teach them and we'll sendthem a camera and we'll be like, Hey, you know, here you go. Here's who youreach out to, you know, talk to them. Our whole thing is basically, if you tellus what you wanna do, we will find somebody who can help you and get you whatyou need.It's, it's really [00:43:00]that simple. And that is why, you know, we believe that it's so important tohave this because it's one of those things where you. There are so many people,like you said, there's so many fields who are ridiculously freaking talented atwhat they do, but they just don't have the monetary support, they don't havethe equipment support, they don't have the mentor to open doors.And so because of that, they fall through the cracks. And thatis what we want to pick up the pieces in because especially in the disabilitycommunity, but across the LGBTQ and really all communities in general, youknow, people slip through the cracks and that's when we have this opportunitywhere we miss so many great, talented people.Hallelujah. Jesus. De'Vannon: It does.Well then we'll talk after the show about what you might or might not do forme. You know, I can't lose anything by asking you know, so I don't like howthey were trying to change you. You know, that [00:44:00]opposition you met for being who? Are, you know, because the only reason that,that, that production company would've reached out to you and told you all ofthis would've been because they had in mind the way that they could change youand make you into a different person.You know? Other than that, there's no reason to reach out andbe like, We love everything about you except for who you actually are. Sochange that and then, you know, we could make this work. I come up against thatin the writing industry because I write very like real, you know, if we'retalking about getting fucked in the ass and come spraying the place andshooting up meth and blood on the ceiling, and then that's what the fuck we'regonna say.We're not, there's no other way to say it cuz of what happenedhappened. But a lot of people are very conservative who hold a lot of power ina lot of different industries, especially in the music industry and it peoplewho, who create very polarizing art, you know? You know, it sucks when yourwork lands on the desk of that conservative bitch, you know, you know, in thepublishing house or in the, you know, be it music [00:45:00]or you know, literary or whatever.Because that person, I've seen them take like an adversereaction to work, whereas had had more liberal person gotten ahold of it, theywould've gotten a point as opposed to clutching their pearls and shit andcutting off their circulation. Now they can't fucking think straight, you know,about what's in front of 'em.So what cities is low in, because when I looked it up, onething, you know, like just what cities? I know you're at least in dc, Columbus,Ohio, Virginia Beach, Norfolk area, Jake: where else?Yeah, so our website is a little bit behind because we're growing much quickerthan one person could keep up of it. But currently we are in Norfolk, VirginiaBeach.That's one. Columbus, DC, Pittsburgh, New York with, have acouple other cities on the, on the way. In addition to some other ones thatwe'll be returning to, but those are the big ones that we're at regularly. Wealso have Richmond coming soon. [00:46:00] Inaddition to Lobo the party, we also have Lobo, the drag show slash drag brunch,which is in New York, Norfolk, and DC as well.Which we do to elevate Queens who just wanna get experience andalso those who are incredibly talented. So we do that. And those, that's wherewe are currently. I can't say some of the other cities we haven't announcedofficially yet, but we do have some more in the wings coming soon. De'Vannon: Okay. I'mtaking a note on that logo drag show.I'll be in New York in November. Jake: Well, weshould, we should talk, we should talk De'Vannon: just thefirst in November, so we'll see. What's going on for sure. So, so the circuitparties, you know, they're only like, The prices I saw were like 10, $15.That's not super expensive to begin with. For what a circuit party could cost.Yeah. . So I thought the pricing was very, very humble and I'mso pleased to hear that you're really going out of your way to reach [00:47:00] for PE people. Do you have like a story ofsomeone who came, came to one of your events or one of your locations? Like abefore I get before and after story. Jake: Oh yeah, I gotplenty.We get, we get messages from people all the time who haveliterally said that our event has changed their life. And that's one of thethings that actually I'm gonna pull one up right now. Sorry. I gotta find itcuz there's one I do like to tell like at the very onset because it was someaningful.That's fine. While De'Vannon: you'relooking for that, I have another question. So in all of these cities, do youhave like an office? Do you have people who work for your organization? Andthen congratulations on officially becoming a nonprofit. Yes. So, so do youhave a physical location? Cuz these parties don't happen like, say every Jake: weekend.So the easiest way to explain it is Lobo, the party is forprofit and the LOBO initiative [00:48:00] isnon-profit. Okay. So Lobo the party, which is where we are in multiple citiesofficially, we don't have offices, but we do have people on the ground in allthose cities who, and we have telegram chats for every city we're in.So people can come and join and find that sets of community forthe city that they're, they're going to. So there's a Lobo Columbus chat, aLobo DC chat, a Lobo Norfolk chat. And these are like just telegrams andmessages that pups use. And what it is, is it's just another way to create thesets of community where people can just kind of come and express themselves.We also have the one community shared for Lobo as all citiesshare it. It is the Lobo Horny Jail chat. You can probably figure out what happenedin that chat. But that is because we don't believe in people being restrictedand expressing themselves. We've never been about that. Like, go on, expressyourself, like, you know, do your thing.So that is a chat for all the cities to come and do theirextracurricular horny stuff with. But that one's always fun to just kind of popin and see what's going on. But yes, we do have people and admins and all those[00:49:00] chats. We also have a communitydiscord where people can go. So that is how we connect with everybody.I'm always reachable. That's partly why I'm so tired is becauseI respond to messages like 24 7. But yeah. One of the things we tell people iswhen we go to a city, we don't just wanna be the party that comes and takesyour money and leaves until we come back. We are all about celebrating andlaying down community roots.And a lot of these cities already have community organizationsoutside of us. So we work with them, with those local organizations to helpthem get funding or whatever we can do. To help elevate their events because wedon't need to have a monopoly on this type of an event that doesn't helpanybody. If they're succeeding, we're succeeding, and that's what we're allabout.De'Vannon: Okay.That's pretty kick ass. So basically since you have a network of people canjust, they do like meetups and stuff like that, they can still physically reachout and text somebody in these various cities if need be. So can find all ofthis at the Jake: website. [00:50:00] All the telegram chats are on the website.We also have a general announcement channel on Telegram, whichhas all this info. We put it out on twitterer regularly and rotation how tojoin the chats. But basically on all of our socials, you can usually find yourway to whatever chat you're looking for. Or if you have the wrong end up in thewrong chat, someone will immediately get you to the right oneBut oftentimes what we see is that people join all the LOBOchats because they just want to, even if they're not anywhere near that city.Oh, how fun. Okay. Do you have that before? I do. So one of the messages we gota couple actually January of this year was from a friend of mine who's becomevery close to me, and the message kind of went something like this.It says real talk. I have to say straight to you. I can't tellyou how grateful I am for Lobo. I only found out about it around a month ago,and it became genuinely one of the best months of my life, arguably the best.I've had a very long history of depression and loneliness. I wasn't exactlypopular in school growing up, being a nerdy, painfully shy, weird kid, and I [00:51:00] was really nose diving this year.Then I ended up being introduced to this community and havedone a total 180 as far as my mental health goes. For the first time in mylife, I felt like I've had a true friend group, and I can't describe howamazing that felt. Put it this way, the day after the December lo, I feltreally strange, and it took a few hours into that day to realize that thatstrange feeling was because it was the first time and I couldn't begin to guesshow long that I woke up about a black cloud on my mind.The sun seemed brighter, My vision was. The world just felt somuch more alive to me as I've reflected on my past what's happened for me, thispath, I realize how much I was doing mentally in 2021, and the conscious of howamazing this December's been like for me, I've come to swear, Lobo has prettymuch saved my life.It was getting that bad for me. I really don't think I couldthank you enough for making Lobo a thing. De'Vannon: Well, I'mhere for all of that. Let me go on ahead and give you a clap and Jake: yes, , and youget messages like that and just like it hits you so deep. Like, I mean, I crysometimes when I get messages like this [00:52:00]because one of the things that is sometimes hard for me to realize is thatwe've created something and I, I often get credited for, but it's me and myentire team and my co-owner and best friend and brother by choice Phoenix.Like we have built this thing from the DC Eagle distinct littleparty in DC into something so much bigger than we could have ever imagined. Andsometimes I especially kind of live in this bubble where I'm not aware how manypeople it's impacting or the impact it's having. And so when we get that memessages like that, it's like, oh my goodness.And at the end of the day, you know, people are always like,Well, why? Like, why even bother keep doing it? And I always tell them thefollowing, which is that, yes, doing Lobo and being on the road every weekendand traveling is terrible for me medically and will probably take a coupleyears off my, off my life.And I'm okay with that. I'm okay with that trade off. And thereason for that is very simple. I am making people's lives better. My team ismaking people's lives better. We are creating a community event [00:53:00] that is impacting the world. And that'sall I've ever wanted. If I was to die tomorrow, I, I could leave a legacy thatwe've changed some people's lives and that's all I've ever wanted to do.And so for me, if you're telling me that I would lose a coupleyears in exchange for saving a couple. Then that's fine. If you're telling methat I can leave the world in this, a legacy in this event that basically willhelp to create, find people of their chosen family, I'm okay with that at theend of the day because that is what I've always wanted to do, is basically livelife like my grandmother and leave the world in a better place than I found it.And right now there's a lot of people leaving the world in amuch fi place than they found it. But if I can just impact one person, then itwas worth it for me. Amen. Everything De'Vannon: you justsaid. I mean, and you mentioned having, you know, fighting the disease andtraveling and you know, and I know DJs don't exactly get off work at 5:00 PM soI know, I know you're worthy for the wee hours.So is there any sort of special thing that you do to keep yougoing? Because [00:54:00] I know you mentionedfatigue, it can be one of the symptoms. So how are, how do you manage thedisease and do all that? You do Jake: Red Bull, ,lots and lots of Red Bull. No the DJ answer is Red Bull and Caffeine pills, butthe actual answer is basically from Monday to really, like Thursday it's sleepand recovery, and then starting on Thursday night it's travel, and Friday andSaturday it's go, and then we start the process over again.That's really what it is. It is draining. It is hard. It isrough. It is not easy with the mito, but at the end of the day, like I alwayssay, it's, you know, the look on people's faces at Lobo and the messages thatkeep me going. It's, it's knowing that we're doing something and. Thatultimately I get to live a life that many people wish they could.And I'm very appreciative for that. But I'm also not mistakenon how many people sacrifice for me along the way to get me here. You are a De'Vannon: gratefulmotherfucker. I [00:55:00] love it. So, toexplain, Jake I read where you do like, you create events for people withsensory issues. I wanna know what sort of sensory issues you speak of and howyou tailor Jake: it.Yeah, so that's something new we are still laying thegroundwork for, but that we have done. And what we are trying to do isbasically create nightclub events for people who, who have sensory issues,sensory overload, loud noises, lights like, you know, we can do. One of thethings that people often say is, and this is especially true in kink andnightlife just for the record, is I can.Make this accessible? Well, sure you can. You just don't wantto, you don't wanna put any extra legwork to get it there. There are times whenyou can't make something accessible. Like if there's only a stairway up, I getthat. But, you know, don't tell me you can't play the music at a lower level ona, on a certain night and not do a bunch of flashing lights.Like that's, that's an easy fix. That's an incredibly easy fix.It's just the fear of alienating your ongoing base is what is preventing people[00:56:00] in a lot of ways with a lot ofdisability accessibility. It's fear of alienating those who might not wantthat. And you can hear I think some of the passion in my voice when we talkabout this, because as someone with a disability, I never want someone to feellike they can't go somewhere because of something that may trigger somethingfor them.So one of

Tales from Sacred Texts
Supplemental: (Partly) Iron Man

Tales from Sacred Texts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 8:44


An ancient world ruler's dream sends the kingdom into upheaval as the king erratically decides that he's going to torture his soothsayers to death for no good reason at all. Daniel shows up at the last moment and lets the king know that his dream was actually prophetic—but the king HATES the interpretation. Of course, his reaction is to build a 90-foot tall middle finger to God. This supplemental sets the stage for our next episode, in which our heroes are thrust into the middle of this king's war against Yahweh. VIOLENCE: 2/5 SEXUALITY: 0/5 DISCRIMINATORY THEMES: 0/5 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/talesfromsacredtexts/support

Worthfull Project
EP 186 // The Long Game // Christine Baird

Worthfull Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 16:00


“It is inevitable that we will be impacting people so much more than we will ever realize over the long haul.”   I have been thinking about impact over the long haul lately. Partly because it's coming to the end of the year and I'm thinking about what I contributed and made this year, and partly because I always feel the responsibility to make a good impact through my work in media production. I read two quotes recently that put me in a good perspective on this -- because there's actually no way to fully understand the impact our work has. It's a long game, so let's play it full of worth.   Links mentioned: Alex Steele newsletter Amila Dulic quote Sister Joan Chittister

Too Peas In A Podcast
Paralympian Karni encourages Peas to drop the fight

Too Peas In A Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 84:00


Kate and Mandy talk to Karni, a Paralympian swimmer, TV presenter, mum to a four-year-old son and a social worker specialising in family violence experienced by people with disabilities. Karni was born with a neuromuscular wasting disease called congenital titonpathy and uses a wheelchair. Karni started swimming for Australia as a Paralympian when she was only twelve years old, and loved finding a community where she felt ‘in the majority' with the opportunity to feel completely herself for the very first time. Karni talks about the many intrusive and inappropriate questions she received while pregnant with her son, and way she adapted to caring for her baby and the enjoyment she gained by finally experiencing motherhood – despite still receiving intrusive questions about her capabilities. Karni discusses her experience of being ordered off a Dreamworld ride due to a medical clearance issue, forcing her to leave her 3-year- old son alone on the ride. She talks about the ‘misconception of risk' that people with disabilities are often beholden to in unfair and discriminatory ways. The three talk about the exhaustion of the ‘fight mode'. Karni encourages all Peas to ‘turn the fight switch off' where they can, and be present with their peashoots, rather than worrying about all the many future fights ahead. On the other hand, Karni encourages all abled-bodied people to ‘turn the fight switch up' and play a greater role in challenging ableist behavior when they see it. Karni also reflects on the ‘just a healthy baby' line, which she begun to hear regularly in her 30s when her friends were having babies. Watch the Ted Talk she did on the topic! Other Pea Business · Buy our book The Invisible Life Of Us to keep it on the bookshelves so all the other Peas can find it!· Get a signed copy and deck yourself out in some excellent Too Peas merch here!· Listen to our Spotify playlist – Too Peas: Songs Our Guest Peas Love· Melbourne forecast for Thursday September 16 – Partly cloudy, 18 degrees Thank you for supporting Too Peas In A Podcast! Don't forget to rate and review. Contact us here:Website: www.toopeasinapodcast.com.auEmail: toopeaspodcast@gmail.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Slate Star Codex Podcast
From The Mailbag

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 15:57


Answers to the questions I get most often at meetup Q&As https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/from-the-mailbag DEAR SCOTT: When are you going to publish Unsong? — Erik from Uruk Dear Erik, Aaargh. I have an offer from a publisher to publish it if I run it by their editor who will ask me to edit lots of things, and I've been so stressed about this that I've spent a year putting it off. I could self-publish, but that also sounds like work and what if this is the only book I ever write and I lose the opportunity to say I have a real published book because I was too lazy? The only answer I can give you is that you're not missing anything and this is nobody's fault but my own. Maybe at some point I will make up my mind and something will happen here, sorry. DEAR SCOTT: How is your Lorien Psychiatry business going? — Letitia from Lutetia Dear Letitia, As far as I can tell, patients are getting the treatments they need and are generally happy with the service. In terms of financials, it's going okay, but I'm not scaling it enough to be sure. I originally calculated that if I charged patients $35/month and worked forty hours a week, I could make a normal psychiatrist's salary of about $200K. I must have underestimated something, because I was only making about two-thirds what I expected, so I increased the price to $50/month. But also, it turns out I don't want to work forty hours a week on psychiatry! Psychiatry pays much less per hour than blogging and is much more stressful! So in the end, I found that I was only doing psychiatry work ten hours a week, and spending the rest of the time doing blogging or blogging-related activities. Seeing patients about ten hours a week, three patients per hour, at $50/patient/month, multiplies out to $75,000/year. I'm actually making more like $40,000/year. Why? Partly because the 10 hours of work includes some unpaid documentation, arguing with insurance companies, and answering patient emails. Partly because patients keep missing appointments and I don't have the heart to charge them no-show fees. And partly because some people pay less than $50/month, either because I gave them a discount for financial need, or because they signed up at the original $35/month rate and I grandfathered them in. At my current workload, if I worked 40 hours a week at Lorien I could make $160,000. But if I worked 40 hours/week and was stricter about making patients pay me, I could probably get that up to $200,000. But also, if I quadrupled my patient load, that would mean a lot more documention, arguing with insurance companies, emergencies, and stress. So I can't say for sure that I could actually handle that. Plus forcing patients to pay me is some extra work and could make some patients leave or make the model harder somehow. So I can't say for sure that I could do that either.

Locked On LSU
Why Jayden Daniels performance against Ole Miss was so much bigger than vs Florida Gators

Locked On LSU

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 30:08


The LSU Tigers defeated the then-number 7 ranked Ole Miss Rebels on Saturday handing them their first loss of the season and catapulting the Tigers to the top spot in the SEC West. So how was LSU able to pull off a 45-20 win over a top ten ranked team in college football? Partly because of the breakthrough we have seen from Jayden Daniels. In the beginning of the season, Jayden Daniels looked like a quarterback too timid to take risky shots downfield and would rather elect to carry the ball himself. This limited LSU's offense immensely and a wide receiver room that could stack up against any in SEC football was not getting utilized. But we saw a different Jayden Daniels against the Florida Gators last week. Daniels scored six total touchdowns in The Swamp and repeated the performance at home against Lane Kiffin's squad. But what makes those two performances different? Plus, Locked On LSU host Caroline Fenton breaks down the most impressive defensive performances from the Ole Miss win. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock If you or someone you love is experiencing embarrassing sweat or odor try Sweatblock. Save 20% with promo codeLocked On at sweatblock.com. Also available on Amazon. LinkedIn LinkedIn jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at Linkedin.com/lockedoncollege Terms and conditions apply. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Underdog Fantasy Sign up on underdogfantasy.com with the promo code LOCKED ON and get your first deposit doubled up to $100! SimpliSafe With Fast Protect™️ Technology, exclusively from SimpliSafe, 24/7 monitoring agents capture evidence to accurately verify a threat for faster police response. There's No Safe Like SimpliSafe. Visit SimpliSafe.com/LockedOnCollege to learn more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Bitcoin Audible (previously the cryptoconomy)
Read_667 - The Final Bubble is Bursting [Myrmikan Research]

Bitcoin Audible (previously the cryptoconomy)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 75:17


"One might ask: if much of the U.K. pension money was about to vanish, where was it going? Partly to the bankers, of course, but mostly, as with any bubble, the value was simply illusory. In 2001, Argentina forced private pension funds to purchase $2.3 billion in government bonds so that the government could meet external debt Payments. The following day, the funds listed the bonds as an asset, but the value was already gone (Argentina would later confiscate the whole pension system officially). Western countries have done effectively the same thing, only with much more subtlety, without even the players knowing. The pension capital is gone, spent, consumed by the state, all that remains is the realization that it is gone." - Daniel Oliver, Myrmikan Capital Check out the original paper with some very eye opening charts to super charge the point made in this excellent work. Plus don't forget to explore more from Myrmikan Research if this work is any indication of the work they publish: https://www.myrmikan.com/pub/Myrmikan_Research_2022_10_18.pdf Check out our amazing sponsors and the products that Guy uses most in the space: • Gets sats back every time you dump fiat at a store, to pay your bills, everything in your fiat life pays you sats with the Fold Debit Card and FoldApp. 5,000 FREE SATS at (guyswann.com/fold) • Join us and the Swan Bitcoin team at the Pacific Bitcoin Conference in November! Get your tickets now, 20% off with code BITCOINAUDIBLE (https://www.pacificbitcoin.com/) • The best place to onboard a true Bitcoiner - Stack sats automatically, withdraw automatically, and learn or get help from the best team of Bitcoiners out there with Swan Bitcoin. (swanbitcoin.com/guy) • Dive into the Bitcoin only wallet, the cypherpunk calculator, and a company that has built secure Bitcoin products for nearly a decade. Code BITCOINAUDIBLE gets 5% off everything in the store! (guyswann.com/coldcard) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Focus Group with Sarah Longwell
Georgia: Ticket-Splitting On Our Mind (with Molly Ball)

The Focus Group with Sarah Longwell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 20:04


This is a free preview of a paid episode. To hear more, visit thefocusgroup.thebulwark.comGeorgia is a closely divided state, but we're likely to see a lot of ticket splitters there this year - specifically a lot of people voting for arch-conservative Gov. Brian Kemp and Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock. Partly because they think Kemp is doing a good job, and partly because Warnock's opponent, Herschel Walker, is a total mess. TIME Magazine national political correspondent Molly Ball joins Sarah to discuss her reporting out of Georgia and listen to a group of Georgia swing voters. The Focus Group is now exclusively part of Bulwark+. To listen to this episode in full and to get future editions, upgrade to a Bulwark+ membership now and the next two weeks are on us—Free. Go to TheBulwark.com/FocusGroup to claim this free trial offer.