Podcast appearances and mentions of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Current Affairs
What's Useful and Correct About Critical Race Theory? (w/ Randall Kennedy)

Current Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 69:20


Harvard Law School professor Randall Kennedy has been known for decades as a critic of Critical Race Theory, which was developed in part by his late colleague Derrick Bell. But Kennedy's critiques come from a position of intellectual respect, and over the years he has become more sympathetic to some of the central claims CRT makes about the pervasive and intractable nature of American racism. His new book Say It Loud! On Race, Law, History, and Culture collects his essays from the past several decades, many of which deal with the question of how American racism has functioned historically, how it has morphed over time, and what a rational way to think about it is. In this wide-ranging conversation, he and Current Affairs editor in chief Nathan J. Robinson discuss:- The way Black intellectual thought has long had "optimistic" and "pessimistic" camps, and CRT fits squarely in with a long tradition of Black pessimism about racial progress- Why Prof. Kennedy thinks there are ample factual grounds for holding that pessimistic perspective, even as someone born in the Jim Crow South who has witnessed certain kinds of major progress during his lifetime- Why Donald Trump's birtherism was a sign of a deep ugly undercurrent of lingering racism that Kennedy does not expect to see disappear, and the disturbing ways that Republicans are rolling back important democratic gains- How law professors foolishly pretend the Supreme Court is politically independent and why we need to acknowledge that it is a powerful unaccountable institution seized by reactionaries- Why Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer have had completely delusional views of the role of politics on the court- The greatness of Thurgood Marshall, for whom Prof. Kennedy once clerked, and why Marshall was no more "political" than other justices - Why Prof. Kennedy has developed a deep respect for CRT scholar Derrick Bell in the years since Bell's death and why Bell was an impressive example of someone who mixed great scholarship with uncompromising activism Say It Loud! is available from Pantheon Books. Kennedy's essay on Derrick Bell is available on SSRN.  Nathan's essay on Ginsburg's decision not to retire and the illusion of the apolitical court is here, and his essay on critical race theory is here. The Manhattan Institute panel on CRT that Prof. Kennedy was on is here.

The Kirk Minihane Show
If You See Me, Leave Me Alone

The Kirk Minihane Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 118:49


Please don't bother Kirk when he's out (00:00:10). Linda Marks honors Ruth Bader Ginsburg's husband with song (00:19:30). USA Today shares that pedophilia is complicated (00:33:50). Warthog returns to 'At A Theater Near Me' and speaks for a combined thirty-seven seconds (00:45:01). Chris brings back a similar game, 'What Was America Watching' (01:08:30) & more.

Advisory Opinions
Revisiting the Electoral Count Act

Advisory Opinions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 61:18


On today's episode, David and Sarah start with a husband-of-the-pod update, debate a federal district court judge's ruling temporarily granting more than two dozen Navy SEALs a religious exemption from the Navy's COVID vaccine mandate, and spend the lion's share of their time talking about the infernal Electoral Count Act and saving America from electoral chaos. Show Notes:-U.S. Navy SEALs 1-26 v. Joseph R. Biden, Jr.-French Press: “Stop Screwing Around and Reform the Electoral Count Act”-Reason: “How Justices Scalia, Sotomayor, and Breyer Inscribed Books to RBG”

CCIRA Literacy Conversations
Marc Tyler Nobleman: Finding and Writing Untold Stories

CCIRA Literacy Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 43:37


00:00:00 Molly RauhHello and welcome back to this CCIRA Literacy Conversations podcast. I'm your host Molly Rauh with my co-host Jessica Rickert. Today's podcast features, Marc Tyler Nobleman.00:00:14 Jessica RickertMarc's work centers around writing fiction and nonfiction books for young people, Mark shares how he writes books that grab an interest people will welcome. Mark we're so excited to chat with you tonight. Could you start by telling us a little bit about your background?00:00:34 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, thanks for having me. And I am very excited to be making my return to CCIRA. It's either my third or my fourth; I can double check that before I get there. So I am an author of books for young people. I've been doing this for most of my adult life. I've written both nonfiction and fiction. My main criteria is I want to write books that grab your attention. I want to tell....If it's nonfiction, I want to tell an Untold Story, or at least what I hope will be an untold story to most readers. And if it's fiction, I just want to surprise you. I wanted to be funny, or just feel fresh to you in some way, and something that you that might grab you just from a quick, quick little glimpse, or a quick initial explanation, not a deep dive. But just I want to grab people right away.00:01:25 Jessica RickertSo when did this start? When did you start writing?00:01:29 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, same time as everybody when I was a tiny person, but I liked it at the time, unlike a lot of my peers. And so I would write short stories. I know I did that in high school, so that might be the earliest I can say definitively. And in college, I knew I wanted to become some kind of a professional writer. It didn't know what. And I got out of school, and I stumbled into being a children's book author that was not on my agenda. Not that I was against it. I just didn't think of it. And here I am. All these years later, I'm very happy with that. I mean, it's expanded into a variety of types of writing, but that is my that is, my focus really is writing for young people. And and there are adults, their loved ones who are adults, their parents, their teachers.00:02:15 Molly RauhWell, and you and I have already... So people who can't see, he and I share the love of comics. And so I'm kind of curious. One of your more nonfiction stories is about the sort of originally unknown second co-creator of Batman. How did you get into that story?00:02:42 Marc Tyler NoblemanYes.00:02:42 Molly RauhHow do you spell across that? Where does that come from?00:02:45 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, do we do? Should I explain to who our listeners who Batman is, or do you think they already know? They probably...00:02:53 Molly RauhI hope they know00:02:54 Marc Tyler NoblemanThey probably know. Let's give them that benefit of the doubt. So that is my big story. I will be talking about that in person. I don't want to spill the beans too much on that. But I'll answer your question, which doesn't spill the beans, which is that I was a comic book reader since I was in, again, a tiny person. And back then it wasn't cool. Now it's cool now anyone can do it, now, there's no judgment, but back then it was not exactly mainstream, or, you know, widely accepted. In fact, you know, when I was in, when I was in grade school to high school, I think there were only two or three mainstream superhero movies in that entire 10 or 12 year stretch. Now there's two or three a week, just to put it in perspective. You know, there were the Superman movies. And then at the very end of high school, the Batman movie came out. Those are the main ones. And then there was a couple lesser ones. So it really wasn't something that was, you know, widely accepted. And I, as a as a person who became a writer, I started to pay attention not only to the fictional side, but to who created these characters. And I, I remember that on my 16th birthday. The cover of Time Magazine was Superman's 50th birthday, and it talked about his creators. So I was a sixteen-year-old reading Time magazine in my school library, you know, having an epiphany that yeah, these characters came from somewhere, and I was interested in that. So I don't know exactly when I learned about the story behind Batman, but I know it was not in college. It was after that. Because in college, I proof that I did not know about The Unsung co-creator, because there's not my proudest moment, but I'm just gonna be honest with you, because you're all adults, some of my friends and I would crank call each other each other, not strangers. And this is back in the answering machine days. So our goal was to just fill out the tape. Just talk until we got cut off. So I would just ram- We would all just ramble. You know, I would just pick up a book and start reading. I would tell some story from my childhood. I am. One of the stories I told was this story began Batman, and all I mentioned was Bob Kane, the artist, the man who was credited on Batman at the time, the only person. I didn't mention Bill Finger. So as as late as college, I had never heard of this man who then end up becoming the subject of my most, I think, my most popular book and a huge part of my life, which is, again, a story that I'll tell in great detail at the conference. But you know, just the point being that, you know, you can't, as we I'll say, as adults, and as teachers and Educators can't believe everything you read. Got to look further, you might be even if it's something as huge as Batman, maybe even, especially if it's something as huge as Batman, you've got to know your source. You've got a double check. Make sure you're getting the true story you might be, you know, pulling the wool over your eyes.00:05:39 Molly RauhNow, you just made me more curious. There's no answer.00:05:41 Marc Tyler NoblemanThat's the goal right? 00:05:42 Molly RauhI'm gonna have to come see you at the conference, so I can get more info.00:05:44 Marc Tyler NoblemanPlease, do. That's what I want. I want a big group on a big, huge attendance.00:05:50 Molly RauhOkay, so, thinking more about because, you know, we have teachers here. And so they're trying to inspire their own next generation of authors. In terms of process, how do you go about writing a book? Like what? What steps do you work through?00:06:11 Marc Tyler NoblemanSo if it's fiction, I like to try to sketch out the arc of the story in advance. Now you're not locked in, but it helps me to have guideposts. And when I teach creative writing to kids in the summer and at various times during the year and I always tell them that you, I recommend that you do that, but don't feel beholden to it. You know, if your writing and your story goes in another Direction, that's okay, you're not breaking a law or a rule, but it does help to have that outline, especially, I think, the ending, because I really think with fiction, it's and I think it's important at least it helps me to have some sense of your destination so that you get there and an exciting way. I talk about it with kids by saying, if you know, there's let's say it's a Sunday, and your family is all hanging out, looking for something to do. Someone in your family might say, let's go get ice cream, but you know, we're not going to go straight there. We're going to take the scenic route. Another person might say, let's just get in the car and drive, and who knows where we'll end up. So in one, in case you've got a destination which you might get excited about, and then you take a roundabout way to get there, because that's fun in another, you're excited because you don't know what at all where you're going. So it's just one of the two, but I just prefer knowing that we're going to get ice cream at the end. That's how I like to write that I know that's where we're going. Now with nonfiction. It just starts with just the, the, the, you know, the spark of the electricity running up my spine. I mean, I read something, I hear something that I feel is so enticing and even better again, if it hasn't been done before, and it's own book. So most of my nonfiction in recent years, it's that category. Its if given my know some of the story, of course, but it hasn't been the focus of its own book. And so I love that I love feeling like I'm walking through the forest by myself. No one else is looking for mushrooms or whatever you're foraging for. You're the only one you're going to get all the best spoils. And I also just love the excitement that I see on faces of both kids and adults want to telling a story that that is new for them. So, you know, with all no love loss to Rosa Parks and Babe Ruth. And, you know, any number of other textbook names that get tons of picture books about them all deserve it. Muhammad, Ali. And, well, a lot of the presidents are falling out of favor these days. But, you know, you know who I'm talking to. Ruth Bader Ginsburg. All these people have multiple picture books by now, and they deserve them. But I want to I want to be one of the people that writes about someone that you don't really know. So that, to me, is just it's a little riskier as some some publisher. Some editors don't want to work on books that aren't pre-sold. But for me, it's the only way forward. I just want to be fulfilled by the read, the process. So with fiction, I have to sketch it out a bit with nonfiction. I just have that spark, and I just download as much as I can about the topic. And then I go through and it's fun, because then you go through and pick out the kid-friendly parts. The parts that you know are going to excite kids. It might not be them. You know, the linear story from. I mean, it will be linear when it's done, but, you know, you might be missing big moments that are not appropriate or interesting for kids. You still have to make it, you know, a cohesive whole. So that's finest. Yet. What are the pieces of this that work best for my audience? 00:09:36 Jessica RickertAnd how, like, what resources, do you have "go to" resources when you're researching for those non-fiction books?00:09:45 Marc Tyler NoblemanYeah, I just use Wikipedia exclusively. I basically just rewrite Wikipedia articles and act like its original. Wait. You're going to share this with other people. (Jessica laughs) Good? Yeah. Now, well, because I'm trying to do these stories that are more or less Untold. Oftentimes I can't rely on just the internet or books, because again, there's stuff out there that's never been documented. So a lot of the work I've done has been about people that are either still alive, or people who died recently enough that there are people still alive who knew them. So I get original interviews with those people, and sometimes original documents, you know, private documents letters, or, you know, Vital Records or so on that helped fill in the story, never been published in. If they're on the Internet, it's often because I put them there. Now, after, after I do the book, I put some of the research online share the wealth, and you know, for the next person who might want to write about that. Of course, I do use the internet, and I do use books as well, but I'm more excited about these, you know, these Quests for the things that aren't as easy to find, and sometimes you don't get some anywhere. I mean, right now, I'm working on a book where there are two main true story, two main character, two main figures. They're both still alive. The story happened in the 70s. One of them gave me a lovely two hour interview so far. And the other one I I just reached out today to this person's family, but I've been told, don't expect this person to participate for reasons that will become clear when this, when the topic is revealed, but so I may not get that, but I'm going to carry anyways and just write based on what's already been documented, maybe without family. But again, some of the stuff I've written is by about people that are long dead. So I'm never. There's not any opportunity to talk to those people. So it can be done without talking to the people involved. It's just sweeter for me if I can get their buy-in and get there on, you know, the previously Untold Story. 00:11:43 Molly RauhThinking about just interviewing in general, I know that sometimes that's a challenge to ask kids to do. So, what are some of your tips for reaching out to someone and kind of asking for their time and their story and their information?00:11:59 Marc Tyler NoblemanYeah, well, I wish I was a little kid asking because who said, can say no to a little kid, right? That would that would be an advantage, but I get it. Yeah, it is an important skill, even if you don't become a writer. It's just important to know how to ask questions of other people. being appropriate, but, you know, getting the story, you know, and how to handle people that are difficult or mysterious, or whatever. So that is a great skill. I mean, for kids that are doing that for school, I mean, I did will depend on the assignment. But let's say they don't have a specific number of questions to ask, maybe just start with five something that seems manageable and not overwhelming. And if you can ask them to, don't think of it like an assignment. But think of it like, you're just curious, what do you? What do you? What would you want to know about? Someone kids are not. They're very curious. But, I mean, I have two kids of my own, and sometimes they just don't, you know, the they don't articulate what they want to know, and just they just they give up before they even start. So if you tell them just, you know, think about what something you want to ask someone that you think that person is never talked about, or wouldn't tell you without you asking, or just try to make it a little bit more of a game and a mystery like can you be the one to crack the code? Can you get this person to tell you about his childhood when she never talked about before? I don't know, make it a little bit more of a challenge. I haven't done that specifically with kids, but, you know, working on interview techniques. But you know, you never, you just have to keep trying. If someone's I don't know if I would emphasize this with kids. But when people say no to me, I don't, I don't hear the word no when it comes to asking for an interview that's not talking about other types of consent, but I will keep trying to get the story. And I actually put a bit of a burden on their shoulders saying, you might be the only person who can share this information. So for the you know, for posterity, for scholarship, I hope that you'll you'll talk about it, and that doesn't always work, but I am not gonna let it go without trying. It's just too important. I've had people that have died that I know know interesting things about my topics, but they wouldn't tell me. So I, you know, I don't want I want to limit, mitigate that as much as possible. So basically, like we tell kids, you know, there's no such thing as a dumb question. Ask whatever is of interest to you. 00:14:10 Molly RauhSo a little perseverance is valuable there too. Let's see, there's so so many different directions I could go. So I'm also curious, you know, just about. Obviously comic books have been a passion that informed a couple books. But what are some of your interests outside of writing outside of, you know, that career path that inspire you as a writer, or just help you kind of feel well-rounded and give you that energy and inspiration to keep writing?00:14:52 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, I mean, it's nothing original to say that I love reading, and I do. And I love running, and I can't say that it has a direct correlation to writing. But there are a lot of people that would compare writing to running because they're both typically solitary. And I also, you know, as a writer, I don't want to be the person of a person who's just at a desk in a room all day, even before covid. I wanted to get out and get some air. And so that that's a happy place for me. I. There's a trail that picks up right around the corner from our house. And it's might like it's like a second home for me to go there and listen to music and not, you know, a lot of people listen to podcasts when they run or commut or all that. But I'm so much with words all the time when I'm working, that when I run, I listen to music. I give myself a chance, because I don't have a commute. I don't drive anywhere everyday guaranteed. So that's my time to just listen to music and relax and get some, some fresh air. And I've actually got a couple book ideas while I've been running; nothing that's sold yet. But I don't know if the running is a help or a hindrance. But yeah, when you're out there, your head clears, and you can think of things and... And I have, as I mentioned, two kids. I love spending time with my family. They're both teenagers now. So it's not always my choice anymore. Spend time with them. I have to be penciled in or well, you know, typed in. And as I mentioned, I love music I love especially 80s music. I could do a whole talk on that, but I don't think anybody would show up. Maybe that's another conference. So those are my things running, music, family.00:16:36 Molly RauhAll right, I get that like running, I think, is I don't know, it's cathartic. It just helps you, you know, I, yeah, I think it's stimulating for ideas. Yeah. So no, no podcast, no words, music only.00:16:51 Marc Tyler NoblemanOkay, yeah, they're, we're a dying breed or so much so much pressure to listen to podcasts these days.00:16:58 Molly RauhI know. Well, I did the podcasting for a while, but even on my commute, I don't listen to podcasts anymore. I do listen to audio books. My commute is for audiobooks. So since you said reading which, you know, you said, not unique, which is true. Every time we talk to authors, they always have books that they love. So what are some of your favorite authors, or favorite books, especially when you were younger, that have kind of led you to have the passion you have for reading and writing?00:17:28 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, some of these may not be so original either, but Where the Wild Things Are, which each, when I revisited it as an adult, reading it to my own kids, I was really blown away about how beautifully written is. It's not just this memorable visual journey, but the way he wrote it was so so wonderful. And it's only 10 sentences, which is a weird thing to realize as an adult, I love a novel called the mouse in the motorcycle. By Beverly Cleary, who just passed away. I think it was last year. And I loved a book that is not well-known. It's called David and the Phoenix. Have you heard of that? By any chance? It wasn't a big, you know, classic book, although since I've been to, I mean, over the years I've blogged about it and talked about it in various ways. And I know a lot of people come out of the woodwork and say, I totally remember that book. That was a big favorite of mine. But again, it never became a classic. So that was a novel written in 1957 by a man named Edward Ormondroyd, who's still alive at 96 and he's a friend, I guess you could say, I did reach out to him at one point, interview him for my blog. And I met him in person. So that was a really fulfilling moment, to meet someone that inspired me as it, not only as a fan to an author, but as peers. I mean, because I do that now too. And he was very gracious and very interesting, and that he had never met. You'd never done anything that authors today do. He'd never spoken at a conference. He'd never done a book signing. He never did a school visit, they just didn't he his that this book was published in 1957. It wasn't - those things were in all standard at. Certainly not school visits, I would imagine. So that was interesting, meet an author who has a totally different experience as a children's author than I have. So those are three of my favorites as a kid. Yeah, those are three of my favorites.00:19:21 Jessica RickertWhat about for your own books that you've written? Do you have some favorites, both fiction and nonfiction that you love more than other book, your other books?00:19:33 Marc Tyler NoblemanWell, everything I've done in the last ten or twelve years totally overrides everything I did before that not that they weren't books of Merit of some kind. I mean, I put my heart into those two, but what I've been doing recently are all things that topics that I hand pick. And before that, I was sometimes doing books based on other people's suggestions, or, you know, not not coming to it on my own. So, of all my books, and I mean my Batman book is my favorite in the sense that it became more than a book. And again, I don't want to teach just enough to get people to show up. It's it started off as a book, and it became a mission. And it became a very big mission that lasted many years, so that that's a category unto itself. And then, you know, the others I love in different ways too, they all like, with everything that we do, they have their, you know, they conjure different, you know, moments of your life, or in my case, I think about some of the struggles that each one involved, and what I had to try to overcome to get the book published, because nothing's come easy for me with writing, which is fine. If it's easy, it's it's boring. But it isn't like I've written a book and then the next day, someone says, I want that like it's taken a while for me, a lot of my work. And but again, because it's I'm, I think it's because I'm choosing topics that they feel are going to be a harder sell. And I tell them, well, that's what I'm here for. I'm not just going to write it and then go on a run and never come back. I'm going to help you sell it and promote it, and that's why I do conferences. That's why I go to schools. I want people to, you know, enjoy the story the way I did I wouldn't do all this work, and then let it float off, you know, on its own. So yeah, the Batman book would take first place. And then a lot of the recent ones would be in a tie for second.00:21:27 Molly RauhSo, thinking about that, you like comics? So we've asked about books, but what are some of your favorite Comics? Or even graphic novels? Because like you and I have mentioned there, you know, once upon a time, it wasn't cool to be into comics. But now, like there's not that stigma around that. So maybe share some of your favorites, some newer things that are being printed and published that kids might get their hands on, or that teachers might get hands on, because I certainly like some adult comics that I would never give to kids. And I've also had some comics that, like as soon as I'm done reading, I bring into the classroom to a particular kid. And I'm like, you have to read this. Here's the next one. What are some of your favorite? Well, a couple of graphic novels I've read recently that I loved were "Flamer" by Mike Curato, which is biographical and "New kid". Of course, I by Jerry Craft. I really liked. I don't read tons of graphic novels by you know, it's not I'm not. I don't specifically gravitate towards those. I just gravitate towards a good book, whether it's graphic novel, you know, pros or whatnot. Another one I read this summer that I thought was great was "Kent State." It's a new. It's 00:22:47 Molly Rauhthe newest book by a guy named Derf Backderf And it's, it's, it's his telling of the Kent State, the Ohio, you know, the, the Four Dead in Ohio story. And I knew almost nothing about that, even though I knew, ooh, that I know. I mean, I know of the song I know of the incident, but I couldn't have told you what it was about. And he just does a masterful job of weaving these four individuals stories into one tragic, overarching story. And then as far as traditional comics I mean, I grew up on I mean, being a huge fan of I'm a DC guy. As you can imagine, based on Batman. My favorites were Justice League because I like groups. I like to see how groups work together, like to see how groups split up to tackle different issues, both in superhero comics and in life. I also liked it a team-up comic called "The Brave and the Bold," which was Batman, plus somebody else every issue. And there was another one of DC Comics presents, which was Superman, plus someone else. And there are there are there are collected editions of those. I would recommend them for teachers with kids, because comics these days, the the there are still comics produced for elementary age kids. But a lot of the main characters are quite dark. Even Superman. I mean, a lot of the stories are quite sophisticated, quite dark. So not the same way when we were kids, where it was all kind of for everybody. So if you go back to the stuff that was done in the 70s and 80s, it's you know, it's a bit dated a little. It's a little dated. But I think for kids that like superheroes, they might really like it. You know, that sometimes it's a one-and-done story. It's you not to read 20 issues to get a full story. You can read one, which I think for reluctant readers is a little bit more accessible. Nowadays, you know, everything's an arc. You know, it's a it's 8 issue Arc, or a ten issue arc because they want to. They're creating these stories to be bound and sold as graphic novel so they can sell them online and easier with, you know, the newsstand business of buying this individual issue is, unfortunately, I don't think going to be around for much longer. Once people our age phase-out, they're not going to do it for the next generation. They're not buying comics generally. So, and then, of course, there's all the, you know, the ones that don't need my help. You know, there's there's the Raina, you know, Telgemeier books to Cece Bell, and they're doing great things, and kids know them already. So they don't need, you know, like them. But those are great too. 00:25:19 Jessica RickertI have a question not being a connoisseur of comic books, and only just watching the movies which I know is probably horrible for you two. Do you have a favorite superhero?00:25:32 Marc Tyler NoblemanSuperman. So it's again, it's there's this dichotomy throughout my whole childhood, you know, cool and uncool. So Superman uncool, Batman cool. DC uncool, Marvel cool. Han Solo cool, Luke Skywalker, uncool. You know, Fonzie, cool, Richie Cunningham uncool. I always like the uncle ones, except I did like Han Solo better than Luke. But for the most of the most of, those examples I was on the less cool side. So yeah.00:26:09 Molly RauhAll right, you're going to have to explain that one 'cause I have my reasons why I would pick Batman over Superman. So why Superman? Because, no I hardcore disagree with you on that one.00:26:20 Marc Tyler NoblemanSo do most kids. I I think it's, so I mean, a lot of it is just, you know, who you meet first. And he, I remember being introduced to Superman. It feels like first. But I also like, I mean, hit, you know, the Superman that I fell in love with is doesn't exist anymore. In a way. You know, he was good for good sake. There wasn't. There was no complexity to it. Of course, you know, our culture at the moment, and probably forever more is is just much more sensitive to all kinds of Injustice and differences, and, you know, sent being sensitive to as much as possible in every direction which those are certainly greatness there. Superman, you know, used to just you just you just had you just trusted the guy to do the right thing no matter what. And now it's just not as not as black and white. So I still love him, but I think it's just getting more complicated to be Superman than it used to be. And I love Batman too, obviously I spent a whole bunch of my life on him too. But I like Superman, just seems they both seem like loners. And I think I always was I always was drawn to that. Now they both have, well now they're both. It's not good. You know, things evolve. Now, they're - Superman's married with a son. And Batman has Catwoman. But you know, when I was growing up, they were loners and I that appealed to me to that they would do the right thing not to get tons of friends and to get paid or praise, but just because it was the right thing and that really resonated with me as a kid and helped inspire me to write Boys of Steel, my Superman book. That notion of just do the right thing, even if you don't get all this attention for it, or jobs and money, or your name on a big, you know, sign or plaque, or, you know, something like that. You're just doing it because, you know, in your heart, that's what you should do. And I like that about Superman. And Batman did it too. But it was just that was Superman's whole whole essence. 00:28:21 Molly RauhAll right, that's a fair argument. That's maybe the best argument for Superman I've ever heard. So, yeah, I might, I might like him a little better than I did a minute ago.00:28:31 Marc Tyler NoblemanWhat's your Batman take?00:28:33 Molly RauhWell, for me, it's it's a very simple piece of superpowers and not having superpowers. I like Batman because theoretically, like he is a regular human being. Yes, he's empowered by, you know, money and access to this technology. But, you know, I kind of liked that he was an ordinary human being. Who just, you know, used innovations, and you know his own personal sort of drive to become a superhero.00:29:07 Marc Tyler NoblemanI want to see if I can find. I saved this tweet that for me, really summarized Superman in a new way. But probably I knew it all along innately. So I love this. Superman stories aren't a fantasy about how good it would be to have power. they're a fantasy about what it would be like if someone with power was good. So giving credit where credit's due. This is I don't even know who this is. But the it's a someone on Twitter named Ian McIntyre. So I just love that that he could do whatever he wants. I mean, talk people talk about Batman that you know, look what he's doing with no power. But there's a flip side. Look what Superman is not doing with power. 00:29:50 Molly RauhI like that take that's kind of cool, that almost like I might have to pull that into an essential question, because I teach history and like, you know, we just finished some industrial like Gilded Age, Progressive Era, kind of stuff. And a big piece of that was looking at corruption. And so thinking about, like people with power, you know, do they do they always abuse it? Or are there people who use it for good? And so thinking of, yeah, yeah, well, I can send that to you. 00:30:25 Jessica RickertI just never really, like, you guys have opened my eyes to there's deeper and more complex things than just like the movies that I go to like looking. I'm definitely going to look at superheroes differently now. At a deep audio cuts out.00:30:43 Marc Tyler NoblemanThey're not for everybody.00:30:45 Molly RauhYeah, they're not for everybody, but I, you know, anybody I think, who's into comics, realizes that the majority of your comics, whether it's super hero stories or anything else, they're really human stories. They're looking at the human condition and looking at human motivations. And so the social scientist in me always loves them, because they're really just kind of who are we at our core? And, you know, what are we capable of in good and bad ways?00:31:14 Marc Tyler NoblemanYeah. 00:31:18 Jessica RickertWell. Are there any other books that you want to highlight for teachers that might be listening, that you think would be good for them to share with their students? I know you have a lot of books, but a couple that, oh, you should try this one or try this one00:31:33 Marc Tyler NoblemanSure. So I wrote a book called "Fairy Spell," which is a true story about two girls in World War One era England who went into the woods one day with a camera. And this was, again, World War 1 era. So this was not camera like anything we've seen. And they came back with only one photo, which one of their fathers developed in the dark room in their house. And that photo revealed one of the two girls with what they said were for fairies. And this kicked off a mystery that lasted for the rest of their lives. So they were one of them was only nine, and one was 16 and they didn't reveal the full truth about what really happened that day in the woods until they were in their 80s. So what I love about this story level out of things about I love it. It's about two girls. I love that it's about two girls that have agency. They're driving the story I love. I can't reveal it because it would spoil the book. But when they end up telling more of what happened later in life, I love their reason for not telling it sooner. So at first I thought maybe there'd be some. Maybe I'd get some pushback that I'm writing a book about liars. I don't want to say what they said that was true and not true. They said things that - I'm going to say this so I don't spoil the whole thing. At the end, there's they have a different -they say something different than each other. Their story was the same for most of those years. But then at the end, they diverge. So there is some. There is some untruth in it. But there's also some truth. And I love how it's just a new way of looking at the truth. And what isn't what we, how we classify truth and what we, how we judge people that don't tell the truth. You know, it's not, they don't lie for the same reason with the same effect. So I love that. And it also it's become, you know, very relevant with respect to fake news. I didn't write it because of that, but it is a great book to use to help children start to discern, you know, the importance of, again, not believing everything you read on at face value and learning how to verify things on the especially on the internet, whether they're true or not, or whether they need more, you know, more investigation. So that's a great book for that. And apparently, that's what a lot of people use it for. And there are a lot of lessons these days about that which is so important, teaching our kids how to be internet savvy, and how to not question everything to the point that you are a conspiracy theorist. But just you have a healthy skepticism about things so that you use your brain. And when I say in the book, you know, some people decry the internet saying that it makes us think less. I think it has to, really, it's making us think more. You really need to, like, I just said, don't take the first- and I, you know, I tell my kids, we all tell kids. Now, you know, the last couple of years, when you Google something, Google has a little box at the very top. It's in a box the to make you think like that's the definitive be-all-end-all answer. So I tell my kids, well, view, are you even looking at the source of that? And just because Google says it's true doesn't mean it is. So that book is helpful, I think with that topic. And then I wrote another book that's called "Thirty Minutes Over Oregon," so closer to your side of the country. And that's a true story out of WWII about a Japanese pilot named Nobuo who did something that no one before him, or since luckily has done. He became the only person in history to bomb the United States mainland from a plane. And the reason that most people have never heard this is because those bombs did not kill anyone, didn't even hurt anyone. They hit the forest outside of a town called Brookings. So maybe a couple squirrels bit it, but no humans. And because of that, it's not a World War. Two story that we teach it wasn't a turning point, but that's why I love it. It's a smaller story with a great famous first that is not really famous. And then this emotional core about this pilot, how this act impacted him later in life. So it's a great story about how enemies can become friends. I don't want to say too much, but he does come back to America after the war. And it's about something that you don't see in picture books. Too much least. I haven't seen it in non-fiction picture books, and that is redemption. This the idea of redemption, most picture books, that folk that are biographical. They follow the same arc. They start in someone's childhood. The child has a dream. The child tries and fails multiple times. And eventually the book ends with this person becoming the famous person that we all know. Again, the you know, with Bader Ginsburg or Babe Ruth, who met those I don't need to name famous people, you all know them, but that's and that's fine. But I don't. I prefer different kinds of stories. So I prefer story that's not quite as predictable where maybe they mean the Batman story is about a guy that basically opposite success. And then the ending is that he failed. So it's kind of a bummer, but that's life sometimes, and people we need to tell kids that you did a great thing. We shouldn't. He should be honored for it. But in the end, he didn't really benefit from it. And it was a sad story. And that's okay. It's okay to have a sad story. So the 30 minutes of Oregon book is a great story about Redemption about how I mean. Now it's especially, I think, a topic in the news and in life is about second chances. I mean, people are, you know, I see a lot of people that are not given a second chance. They misspeak. They something comes up from their past from sometimes even as young as being a teenager. And that completely changes the entire trajectory of their adult life. And there are times where, you know, second chances are definitely less viable. But I think for a lot of these cases, they're not in. This is a story about that. In today's world, you know, this man's story would he would have not been given a second chance, and he would have been a villain for the rest of his life. So I love this idea of, you know, seeing them at a human level. In this case, he was doing something during war, and you don't excuse that. But it was a war, and everyone was doing things that they would prefer not to be doing. And he did spend a lot of years trying to atone for that and show his true nature, and so reconciliation, redemption, very powerful, very powerful ideas. That, again, you don't see that often in - at least, I don't see them in picture books. I hope they're out there. I just haven't seen them myself. So those two, I think, really help with a lot of different levels of lessons in classrooms character development. And of course, the news thing is more, you know, practical skill.00:38:23 Molly RauhI love that. I think I know what books I'm picking up next, and hopefully I can get through them before. Maybe I hit some units where I could use those in my classes, because, you know, again, I'm a history teacher. I can totally use those.00:38:40 Marc Tyler NoblemanThank you.00:38:41 Molly RauhSo we're at that point where we're some of your heroes00:38:49 Marc Tyler NoblemanHeroes in general. Or...00:38:51 Molly RauhWell, certainly educational heroes, if you have them. But if you want to go a different route and just focus on anybody who's inspired you, who is your hero in what you do, you can go broader if that suits you better. Sure, well, I can do a two-in-one. I can do a personal hero and an educator here, which is my mom, who was a teacher before I was born. So I ruin that. She gave up when I came along, but she is just she's had a really, really challenging life for different reasons. But you turned out to be the sweetest mom. I mean, except for your two moms of all time. And with no, with no guidance, she, you know, she didn't have a loving upbringing where she had something 00:39:40 Molly Rauhto learn from. I don't know where she gets it from. And and she was also someone that you know, helped shape my creative side When We Were Young, my sister and I, my mother would not give us coloring books, because she felt we should start with a blank page that we should create from nothing. And so after a while, I think we wore down a bit, and as long as we still Drew on blank pages as well, but she didn't want us to be given someone else's work and then fill it in. And she also nudged me to be that she saw that I could be a writer before I did, which is typical mom. You know, she knew that I what I was good at, or what I had an aptitude for, and probably what I like, even though I didn't realize it. And she nudged me that way. And then again, as this is going to be no surprise about a guy who liked Superman Richie Cunningham, DC Comics better than there are opposite, which is that I have a lot of teachers that not only were inspirational for me, I'm still in touch with. I mean, most people I know if they're in touch with anyone, it's just one teacher I'm in touch with. I mean, not regular touch, but I have emails and reach out on, and I would say, on a, you know, somewhat regular basis to say hi to a number of teachers. So and you know, sometimes it's very vague why they resonate with me, but they must they must have helped shape me. I can't always figure out why I'm so drawn to them still, but a couple in particular are you no, are you know were formidable, or not formidable, formative, or probably formidable too, formative for me. And I love that because they are so that such a thankless job for so many and I it just three. It's very gratifying to, you know, all these years later, to just have this relationship so that they know that they mattered to me and probably to others that don't don't don't all right, as you know, aren't as obsessive about these things as I am, reaching out keeping in touch. So that means a lot to me for teachers that I had that had an impact for them to know that they did even your in my old age.00:41:47 Jessica RickertI love that. Well, thank you so much for joining us. We're all definitely going to have to check out so many more books. I loved your cliffhangers. And if you have not registered for Marc Tyler, Nobleman's sessions yet, now you got to go find out about the Batman story too. So thank you for joining us. And we look forward to seeing you in February at CCIRA.00:42:13 Marc Tyler NoblemanI can't wait. Thank you so much for your time. And I look forward to seeing you both in person. 00:42:19 Molly RauhThanks for listening to CCIRA Literacy Conversations podcast. To find out more about CCIRA go to CCIRA.org. On CCIRA.org, you can join as a member, or find great resources like our professional development blog, which posts every Tuesday and has a variety of guest writers on an awesome selection of topics. CCIRA is a professional organization of educators and community members is dedicated to the promotion and advancement of literacy. We also have a Twitter account @ColoradoReading. You can find us on Instagram at CCIRA_ColoradReading. Or you can find us on Facebook, where we also have a members only group that we're trying to build. And our Facebook account is CCIRA Colorado Reading. We'd love to hear more from you. And again, if you're looking for new content, please send any questions or things you'd be interested in seeing from ccir a to ccir a video at gmailcom. Thanks for listening and have a great week.

Night Light Stories
Episode 84: The Cloud, Chapter 24

Night Light Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 28:33


Last episode, we brought you Chapter 23, where The Cloud prepared to present their new project. Mr. Ginsburg, the Technology Resource Teacher, had set up the event and reviewed the interactive voting system. Mrs. Young, the Assistant Principal, introduced each group to come to the center table to present their project to the audience. Melvin continued to make snide comments about the validity of The Cloud's data. Finally, The Cloud was called to the center of the gymnasium as the last group to present.  

The Buck Sexton Show
Best Of Buck: CNN Lied About Ivermectin to Mock the Right

The Buck Sexton Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 28:13


Joe Rogan gets Dr Sanjay Gupta of CNN to admit that calling Ivermectin “horse dewormer” was a willful and malicious lie- and as we know, CNN has no ethics. Fauci says COVID will be around forever- what a shock! Katie Couric “protected” Ruth Bader Ginsburg from her own criticism of kneeling, anti-patriotic athletes by editing her comments in an interview, because Couric is a propagandist. And Netflix gets more heat over Dave Chappelle, but they won't cancel him- we discuss why.  Please subscribe to the podcast! And get more exclusive content from Buck at BuckSexton.com. Find Buck on: Twitter @BuckSexton   Facebook @BuckSexton  Instagram @BuckSexton  Email the Podcast: TeamBuck@IHeartMedia.com Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

中廣流行網
2021.12.30 蘭萱時間 專訪【「我反對!」不恐龍大法官RBG第一手珍貴訪談錄】林志潔

中廣流行網

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 41:06


露絲‧拜德‧金斯伯格(Ruth Bader Ginsburg) 不僅是美國史上,首位民主黨兼猶太裔女性身分的聯邦最高法院大法官, 也是最受人民歡迎的一位大法官。 她在美國家喻戶曉,並因其直率敢言的作風, 被年輕人暱稱為「聲名狼藉的RBG」。 《「我反對!」不恐龍大法官RBG第一手珍貴訪談錄》 作者傑佛瑞‧羅森為美國國家憲法中心主任兼執行長,也是她的好友, 藉由13篇珍貴訪談,分享了她對各種事務的看法。 節目邀請到 國立陽明交通大學科技法律研究所 特聘教授 林志潔,來分享這本書。 < 「我反對!」不恐龍大法官RBG第一手珍貴訪談錄:橫跨近30年,13場關於愛、自由、人生及法律的對話 > 作者: 傑佛瑞‧羅森 Jeffrey Rosen 譯者: 朱怡康 出版社:麥田 出版日期:2021/07/011 歡迎收聽!

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More
Notorious RBG The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 11:48


The name “Ginsburg” is now fixed in the public consciousness. She was the second woman, the first Jewish woman, to serve on the United States Supreme Court. After her death due to cancer on September 18, 2020, the White House lowered its flag at half-mast in her honor. Before Ginsburg became a pop-culture icon, some liberals had called her out because of her advancing age and urged her to retire, hoping that Obama could appoint a younger liberal successor. However, Ginsburg refused to step down. Already in her eighties and after surviving two cancer diagnoses, she had become more gaunt than ever. However, she insisted on keeping her clothing and hair meticulous. The eyes under her glasses looked as steely and composed as ever. She never shyed away from boldly voicing her dissent whenever the court ruled in the conservatives' favour. She fought for equal citizenship privileges for minorities until the last moments of her life. Ginsburg's integrity, kindness, strength and courage have energized many. Ginsburg's fans affectionately called her “The Notorious R.B.G” as an homage to deceased rapper Christopher George Latore Wallace, better known as The Notorious B.I.G..

Partnering Leadership
[BEST OF] Leadership lessons from billionaire philanthropist David Rubenstein | Greater Washington DC DMV Changemaker

Partnering Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 41:24


In this episode of Partnering Leadership, David Rubenstein, co-founder & co-chairman of Carlyle Group & President of the Economic Club of Washington DC, shares his journey from working at the White House to starting one of the largest private equity investment firms globally. He also talks about his leadership lessons, philanthropy, Peer-to-Peer interviewing for the Economic Club of Washington DC and Bloomberg TV, and the legacy he plans to leave behind. Some highlights:- David Rubenstein's childhood and how he became an avid reader- David's experience at the White House working for former U.S. President Jimmy Carter- The story behind David Rubenstein helping co-found the Carlyle Group- On becoming Carlyle Group's fundraiser and how David increased its visibility - David Rubenstein's leadership practices and values- ‘Patriotic Philanthropy' and David Rubenstein's signing of the giving pledge- David Rubenstein on the value of family and the importance of raising successful children- Why David Rubenstein accepted to become the President of The Economic Club of Washington DC and then decided to change the format. - Becoming a Peer-to-Peer interviewer: on self-deprecating humor, being a good listener, and more- Leadership lessons from David Rubenstein's book, How to Lead- On his passion for capturing the ‘American experiment' and his opinion on America today- David Rubenstein's desire for impact as he ‘sprints' to leave a legacy - Why David Rubenstein reads over 100 books a year and encourages others to read more- On moving forward post-COVID with ongoing transformation and change Mentioned in this episode:-Ted Sorensen, lawyer, and advisor to former President John F. Kennedy-Birch Bayh, former senator-Jimmy Carter, 39th U.S. President-Alfred E. Kahn, economic advisor-William E. Simon, businessman, philanthropist, and 63rd United States Secretary of the Treasury-James Baker III, former United States Secretary of State-George H. W. Bush, 41st U.S. President-Frank Carlucci, former U.S. Secretary of Defense-John Major, former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom-Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, former First Lady of the United States-Vernon Jordan, business executive, and civil rights activist-Oprah Winfrey, talk show host, television producer, actress, author, and philanthropist-Ruth Bader Ginsburg, former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States-Indra Nooyi, CEO of of Pepsico-Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft-Tim Cook, CEO of Apple-Marc Andreessen, entrepreneur, investor, and software engineer-Andrew Grove, businessman, engineer, and former CEO of Intel CorporationBook Recommendations:-Patriots of Two Nations by Spencer Critchley -How to Lead by David Rubenstein Connect with David Rubenstein:David Rubenstein WebsiteThe Carlyle Group WebsiteThe David Rubenstein Show: Peer-to-PeerThe Economic Club of Washington D.C. Website Connect with Mahan Tavakoli:MahanTavakoli.com More information and resources are available at the Partnering Leadership Podcast website: PartneringLeadership.com

You're Making It Worse

Kevin Zak, actor, playwright and maker of memes, details his journey from the stage to the 'gram, where he pays tribute to Murder She Wrote, Disney villains, and Nicole Kidman's accent in the funniest way possible: with Photoshop! Plus, is professional wrestling gayer than ever? And with the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg adorning Christmas tree ornaments everywhere in the shadow of her passing, now seems to be as good a time as any for Brent to get really, really mad about it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pitcher List Fantasy Baseball Podcast
RBG 1 - Stepping Outside The Batter's Box w/ Tahnaj Thomas

Pitcher List Fantasy Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 30:57


The Red Black Green Baseball Podcast - The guest of the first episode is Tahnaj Thomas, a twenty-two-year-old starting pitcher who is a top prospect in the Pittsburgh Pirates farm system from Freeport, The Bahamas. The former shortstop was one of the top Bahamian prospects who was eligible to be signed during the 2016 J2 Signing Period for international amateur prospects, but his path completely changed when a Cleveland Guardians scout named Koby Perez convinced Thomas that his future as a professional baseball player involved toeing the rubber. This is Tahnaj Thomas's story through his own words.  0:00-5:15 - Growing Up In The Bahamas 5:15-17:20 - The Transition From Being A Shortstop to Pitching 17:30-20:10 - Leading By Example, Hosting Pitching Camps, etc. 20:10-24:00 - Finding His Swagger As A Black Pitcher 24:00-30:57 - Just Be Yourself Pat's Twitter: @tangible_uno Tahnaj's Twitter: @jbythomaskid Podcast Twitter: @rbgbaseball Tahnaj's clothing brand: https://www.jbyclothing.com Get PL+ and join our Discord: https://pitcherlist.com/plus

Passing Judgment
"Justice on the Brink" (Guest - Linda Greenhouse)

Passing Judgment

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 27:39


Linda Greenhouse joins us to discuss her fascinating new book - Justice on the Brink: The Death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Rise of Amy Coney Barrett, and Twelve Months that Transformed the Supreme Court This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

WFUV's Cityscape
Welcome to Lilyville

WFUV's Cityscape

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 30:01


Celebrated actress Tovah Feldshuh has played some big names, including Golda Meir, Katherine Hepburn and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. But in her first book, Tovah introduces us to perhaps the biggest character in her life: her mother, Lily. In her memoir, “Lilyville: Mother, Daughter, and Other Roles I've Played,” Tova explores the bond between mother and daughter, and how we grow to understand our parents better as we age. Tovah joins us this week to talk about her new book and her latest show, "Becoming Dr. Ruth." The limited-run show runs through Sunday, January 2, 2022 at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in Battery Park City.

Cityscape
Welcome to Lilyville

Cityscape

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 30:01


Celebrated actress Tovah Feldshuh has played some big names, including Golda Meir, Katherine Hepburn and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. But in her first book, Tovah introduces us to perhaps the biggest character in her life: her mother, Lily. In her memoir, “Lilyville: Mother, Daughter, and Other Roles I've Played,” Tova explores the bond between mother and daughter, and how we grow to understand our parents better as we age. Tovah joins us this week to talk about her new book and her latest show, "Becoming Dr. Ruth." The limited-run show runs through Sunday, January 2, 2022 at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in Battery Park City.

City Visions
Slow Streets/ Supervisors' Rejection of Stevenson St. Project/ Phil Ginsburg of SF Parks & Rec

City Visions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 59:51


Slow Streets, Dissecting the SF Supervisors' rejection of the Stevenson Street Complex, and Phil Ginsburg of SF Parks & Rec

Life Matters
265: Roe v. Wade May Soon Be Overturned - But Few Understand What It Does

Life Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 27:58


Roe v. Wade didn't give women anything. What it did do is give doctors the right to kill babies. “Roe really isn't about the woman's choice... It's about the doctor's freedom to practice his profession as he thinks best.It was not woman centered. It was physician centered.” - Ruth Bader Ginsburg, University of Chicago lecture May 10, 2013 The media doesn't tell you this. Very few people understand Roe. It is in fact an amalgam of two separate decisions that were then ‘conjoined' by the Court. Roe v. Wade addressed a Texas law. Doe v. Bolton dismissed the abortion laws of Georgia. On Jan 22nd, 1973, they were both handed down simultaneously and “conjoined” by the Court as one ruling. Many now call this conjoined action “Roe” or “the Roe regime.” Though they dealt with two different states, and each has very different tone, the net effect of the combined decision was to strike down not only those two states' laws, but the laws of every other state as well! In the Doe portion of the decision, the author, Justice Blackmun, inserted a special ‘health exception.' He intentionally defined it in the broadest possible terms. The reasons need not be written down, but only exist, ‘in the judgement of the doctor.' If the abortionist felt there may be any sociological or psychological implications for that woman's motherhood, “all of these things may be considered health. (Roe and Doe @183).  A physically healthy child could be killed inside of a physically healthy mother – throughout pregnancy – if his judgement called for it. In dissent, Justice White summed up this late term, ‘psychobabble' exception: “… for anyone of such reasons, or no reason at all, and without asserting or claiming any threat to life or health… [it was now to be legal for] any medical advisor willing to take up the procedure…. I dissent.” (Roe and Doe dissent @221).  It's funny how media analysts avoid any discussion of this ‘little' exception.  Since then, the media narrative has reduced the debate, and simply summed all this up as, ‘a woman's choice.' The media is intent on simplifying issues for consumption. But such simplicity often comes at the cost of stultifying its consumers as well. That's us. If you examine her statement carefully, Justice Ginsburg was right: the conjoined, twin decisions of Roe and Doe are clear. The choice and decision are the abortionist's alone. The woman, even if ‘uncomfortable,' simply needs to go along with what ‘the doctor' has in mind. A killing profession was pulled from centuries of shadows. It was given license and legitimacy on that day.  For millennia, the Hippocratic Oath had unequivocally condemned this killing of vulnerable children. And legally, abortion has always been frowned on by the law since at least Common Law times and in many cases long before that. But Blackmun and his fellows declared the healing profession turned on its head. Doctors were now free to be fully licensed killers. Their personal thoughts and judgments considered supreme in life or death. The Oath and its centuries of influence on law and society were pronounced dead via Roe and Doe. ‘If babies are to be killed, then a professional will do it.'   Today's USSC In the oral arguments of this December 1st, Justice Kavanaugh very politely complimented abortion advocates, but summed up the challenge in contemplating Roe. There are two competing interests and legal principles at stake, he said. The one, “the liberty interest,” (or ‘right to choose') was forcefully and effectively presented by the Solicitor General of the United States, who was arguing the case. He gave her a ‘hat tip.' But the other competing interest is the right to life which is at stake. These two interests exist in direct variance. We cannot ‘split the difference': either one or the other will dominate. They cannot,“both win.” The other five pro-life Justices who are oft-times silent, also offered questions and comments - yes, each spoke – and confirmed their pro-life positions.  The three, abortion-supporting Justices: Kagan, Sotomayor, and Breyer, not only commented, but with acerbic resignation seemed to ooze bitterness.  Their jibes about contrary ‘political decisions,' and the ‘danger to the court;' their affection for ‘court precedence' all seemed to aim directly at influencing the Chief Justice. Their implications: 'If you do this, our Democrat Party may need to change the structure of this Court. We will pack it.' Chief Justice Roberts, known to be very susceptible to pressure regarding the image and nature of the Court, made statements that seemed to be supportive of the Mississippi law and of its 15-week limit. But this desire to ‘split the difference,' while seeming to ‘cross the line' that Roe had drawn, is in fact in direct variance with Justice Kavanaugh's open statement that you can't somehow cut the baby in two' and ‘allow both the liberty interest and the right to life be given equal weight.' While there are six openly pro-life votes on the Court, I urge you not to use the simplistic media analysis: ‘It's a black and white, apolitical-head count.'  Yes, the hearing bodes well for life. But I sat with colleagues in 1992 as we read the result of the Casey decision. Remember, that Pennsylvania law was, “going to bring down Roe.” But Casey itself was, as they say in boxing, a split decision.  Few of the judges really agreed. The result was that Casey had to be ‘cobbled together.' At the end of the day, Roe was in fact still upheld! Each of the justices had gone in different, nuanced directions.  This became what the court officially calls a “joint decision.”  Some judges upheld portions of the Pennsylvania law yet insisted on striking others.  There was no clear majority.  Justice Blackmun, Roe's author, was still on the court in 1992. Predictably, his decision in Casey proudly upheld Roe. Back in Casey, then Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist voted with a plurality - Scalia, White, and Thomas, to ‘adjust' Roe ( he did not have the votes to overturn.) But he attempted to continue to dismantle it. The Court jettisoned the false and deceptive ‘trimester' framework, (Has the media EVER told you that the trimester system was long-ago ruled meaningless and arbitrary? The Court also conceded that there was not in fact, a‘fundamental right' to abortion. Does ANY local, or even national reporter ever comment on that? Nope. The actual status of abortion law is continually misrepresented by a simplistic media.) But after Casey, and despite loss of credibility, Roe still stood. But in a simplistically meaningless salute to ‘choice' and the legal folly of stare decisis (the legal insistence that a ‘previous decision continue to stand'). Chief Justice Rehnquist stated in his ruling, “Roe continues to exist, but only in the way that a storefront on a western movie set exists: a mere façade to give the illusion of reality... Behind the façade an entirely new method of analysis without any roots in constitutional law…”   Casey Joint Decision, 1992 For us today, the question for 2022 is: What will this Court now do? You just read that Chief Justices will throw their decisions in surprisingly unlikely corners - this to help frame and ‘craft' the final decisions their colleagues may be offering.  Will Justice Roberts, widely known for such politicking, try that? Will he attempt to ‘split the difference' yet again? But with five other solid lifers, could he? I fully expect the old façade known as Roe to topple. This diseased tree will indeed fall. But in which direction?   A bigger issue, that is almost never addressed, undergirds this entire debate: “Will doctors be free to continue in their now 50-year-old license to do what they want, even to kill? Justice Ginsburg, and a handful of others, knew this issue just never gets discussed.  Whatever happens in the coming decision, you can expect the major media to enjoy the controversy. Just don't expect them to get it right. ----- Here's a nice thought: the media has stopped talking about the Texas abortion law heard by the court two weeks earlier. But that law is powerful. The Court has allowed it to remain in effect.  Abortions have come to a halt in Texas.  So, the media has joined in the terrified silence of the abortion industry regarding that law.  Wouldn't it be nice if the Court decided to rule on Texas as well? Then, as they did in 1973, perhaps issue a conjoined decision, but this time protecting the right of unborn children to be protected and honored under the law?    Brian Johnston is the author of Evil Twins - Roe and Doe: How the Supreme Court Unleashed Medical Killing available on Amazon and wherever fine books are sold.

The co-lab career stories
Libby Gluck - Leads Marketing for Nickel & Suede

The co-lab career stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 16:17


A brand marketer with more than a decade of experience in fashion and community-building, Libby leads marketing for Nickel & Suede, an accessories brand dedicated to inspiring confidence in women. Previously, she oversaw PR, Partnerships, and Social Impact at Stella & Dot, a global lifestyle brand known for accessorizing everyone from Selena Gomez to RBG. In 2019, Libby launched her own consulting business helping brands engage new audiences and build brand loyalists. Libby also leads the Co-Lab's monthly Marketing Lunch Hour covering everything from green-washing to brand evangelism. Join us as Libby describes her winding path of a career, from finance to jewelry to fashion, and the lessons she learned from those experiences about career mobility and not being pigeonholed.

Progressive Voices
Free Forum LInda Greenhouse 12-11-2021

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 60:00


The current Supreme Court is the achieved goal of a decades long project on the Right. Though the 6-3 conservative majority refused to help Trump steal the election, they aid and abet GOP voter suppression and minority rule. Arguments in the Mississippi abortion case indicate their readiness to overrule Roe v Wade. LINDA GREENHOUSE begins her new book, JUSTICE ON THE BRINK, shortly before Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death and McConnell's rush to confirm Amy Coney Barrett, and then covers each month through the end of the term in June 2021. We talk about that term and the beginning of the highly consequential new one.

FedSoc Events
13th Annual Rosenkranz Debate & Luncheon

FedSoc Events

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 78:07


The 2021 National Lawyers Convention took place November 11-13, 2021 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC. The topic of the conference was "Public and Private Power: Preserving Freedom or Preventing Harm?". The final day of the conference featured the thirteenth annual Rosenkranz Debate.RESOLVED: Concentrated corporate power is a greater threat to individual freedom than government powerFeaturing:Mr. John Allison, Executive in Residence, Wake Forest University School of Business; Former President and CEO, Cato Institute; Former President and CEO, BB&TMr. Ashley Keller, Partner, Keller Lenkner LLCModerator: Hon. Douglas H. Ginsburg, U.S. Court of Appeals, D.C. Circuit

Blamo! | Exploring Fashion with the People Who Shape It

Drew Ginsburg of Dylanlex is always just a bit ahead of everyone – whether it was early to social media for fashion or design.She's a quintessential example of a designer/entrepreneur who is constantly evolving her brand.Her work has been worn by, (ahem...)BEYONCE, MADONNA, GIGI HADID, RIHANNA, KENDALL JENNER, USHER, JESSICA ALBA, DUA LIPA, CARDI B, LADY GAGA...And that's just a few...Drew and I discuss how social media has democratized fashion, how her pieces found their way to Rihanna, the androgyny of jewelry, and what band she listens to cry.Dylanlex on Instagram**Sponsored by Standard & Strange – Get the facts on denim

Bread and Circuses
B&C 130: Weekend At RBG's

Bread and Circuses

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 59:33


Caleb & Nick talk Caleb's latest COVID battle, the scummiest politicians of all time, the worst question you can ask a Minneapolis police officer, and much more in this week's episode of Bread & Circuses/ Use the promo code BREAD for $3 off tickets to Harmful Content Comedy: Greatest Hits on Saturday January 8th at Wired Pub & Grill: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/harmful-content-comedy-greatest-hits-tickets-226351672947 Please donate to help this podcast continue to grow on Anchor and support the audio version of this podcast and donate funds at: https://anchor.fm/big-bill-media If you are interested in becoming a guest, or have any other booking inquiries, please contact: breadncircusespodcast@gmail.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BreadAndCirc... Twitter: @CircusesBread Instagram: Breadncircusespodcast Redbubble: https://www.redbubble.com/people/bigb... Caleb's Social Media: Twitter: @CalebIsntFunny Instagram: @CalebIsntFunny Snapchat: @DelonteEast Minds.com: @CalebSalvatore Clubhouse: @calebisntfunny YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEmT... Tik Tok: @CalebSalvatoreComedy (With the exception of the Bread & Circuses podcast logo & Big Bill Media logo, all visual art used in the cover image of this video is property of neither Bread & Circuses, Big Bill Media, nor any of its affiliates) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/big-bill-media/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/big-bill-media/support

Ironweeds
125 - Non-Fungible RBG

Ironweeds

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 91:04


For our last show of 2021, we talk about the latest school shooter and the unique culpability of the parents. Also in the news is the danger Roe v. Wade is in after recent Supreme Court arguments. With Ghislaine Maxwell on trial, we share a bizarre and compelling conspiracy theory that she is a Master Poster. Rod Dreher is very upset that our elites are into butt stuff. And… Steve McLaughlin got arrested. Amazing. We love you so much, and we'll see you next year!   https://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/hiney-lickers-of-princeton-decadence/   https://www.reddit.com/r/conspiracy/comments/ocbgl6/today_is_the_one_year_anniversary_of_ghislaine/

Too Jewish
Too Jewish - 12/5/21 - Aimee Ginsburg Bikel

Too Jewish

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 54:58


Aimee Ginsburg Bikel, author of "Theodore Bikel's City of Light"

The United States of Anxiety
The Supreme Court v. Our Rights

The United States of Anxiety

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 50:29


Another year of The Supreme Court of the United States is coming to a close. But can we still trust our nine appointed justices to be the final arbiters of the law? Could we ever? Co-hosts of the Boom! Lawyered podcast, Jessica Mason Pieklo and Imani Gandy, join Kai Wright to answer those questions and more from our listeners about Dobbs v. Jackson and the impact of abortion rights on the U.S. Plus, results from our audience experiment to see how platforms on the Internet shape the content we consume. Companion Listening: Dissent, Dissent, Dissent (9/20/2020) In this special episode, we reflect on the life and legacy of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, following her passing. Kai is joined by Emily Bazelon (Staff Writer at The New York Times Magazine and Co-Host of “Political Gabfest” at Slate), WNYC's own Brian Lehrer and callers like you to talk about the impact of the “Notorious RBG” on the nation and its citizens. “The United States of Anxiety” airs live on Sunday evenings at 6pm ET. The podcast episodes are lightly edited from our live broadcasts. To catch all the action, tune into the show on Sunday nights via the stream on WNYC.org/anxiety or tell your smart speakers to play WNYC.  We want to hear from you! Connect with us on Twitter @WNYC using the hashtag #USofAnxiety or email us at anxiety@wnyc.org.

I Just Gotta Say Something...
Overturning Roe v Wade

I Just Gotta Say Something...

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 64:42


CNN fires Chris Cuomo. Joy Reid and Rick Wilson make of "Red State Americans." The truth about Roe v Wade and what Ruth Bader Ginsburg really thought. Matt Walsh become a #1 Best Selling LGBT Children's Author! Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/gottasaysomething21 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lauren-smart3/support

Free Forum with Terrence McNally
Episode 535: LINDA GREENHOUSE - JUSTICE ON THE BRINK - 12 months that transformed the Supreme Court.

Free Forum with Terrence McNally

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 60:00


The current Supreme Court is the achieved goal of a decades long project on the Right and in the Republican party. Though the 6-3 conservative majority refused to help Trump steal the election, they consistently aid and abet GOP voter suppression and minority rule. Arguments in the Mississippi abortion case indicate their readiness to overrule Roe v Wade. LINDA GREENHOUSE begins her new book, JUSTICE ON THE BRINK, in July 2020, shortly before Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death, covers McConnell's unseemly rush to confirm Amy Coney Barrett, and then reports and analyzes each month through the end of the term in June 2021 - providing history and context along the way, gathered in her 30 years covering the Court for the New York Times. We talk about that term and the beginning of the highly consequential new one.Linda Greenhouse - New York Timeshttps://www.nytimes.com/by/linda-greenhouseLinda Greenhouse - Yale Lawhttps://law.yale.edu/linda-greenhouse

AwardsWatch Oscar and Emmy Podcasts
AwardsWatch Oscar Podcast #82: 'West Side Story,' crowdpleasers and the case for late breakers

AwardsWatch Oscar and Emmy Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 55:51


On today's Oscar podcast, recorded November 30, I'm joined by Ryan McQuade where we talk about the Gotham Awards and their potential impact on the awards race with The Lost Daughter sweep and Steven Spielberg's adaptation of West Side Story, which both of us had just seen the night before. This takes us to a conversation about 'crowdpleasers' as potential Best Picture frontrunners with contenders like Belfast and King Richard winning festival audience awards and how West Side Story could factor into that as well. That opens the door for how the several late-breakers and non-festival films this season - WSS, Licorice Pizza, House of Gucci, Nightmare Alley and Don't Look Up - could win or lose the race with other films already establishing buzz and momentum. Today's podcast is supported by Amazon Studios presenting A HERO, from Asghar Farhadi, writer/director of the Academy Award®-winning films A Separation and The Salesman, and winner of the Grand Prix at Cannes Film Festival. A HERO is Iran's selection for Best International Feature Film. The Hollywood Reporter calls it "one of the best films of the year." For your consideration in all categories including Best International Feature Film. A HERO is in theaters January 7th, and streaming January 21st on Prime Video. Today's podcast is also supported by Amazon Studios presenting MY NAME IS PAULI MURRAY, from the directors of RBG. A documentary chronicling both the personal path and tireless advocacy of the social justice warrior whose work foreshadowed some of the most politically consequential issues of our time. The San Francisco Chronicle calls the film "Jaw-dropping...an extraordinary documentary.” For your consideration in all categories including Best Documentary Feature. MY NAME IS PAULI MURRAY is streaming now on Prime Video. And finally, today's podcast is also supported by Amazon Studios presenting VAL. For over 40 years, Val Kilmer documented his own life and craft through thousands of hours of footage, from 16mm home movies to time spent in iconic roles for blockbuster movies. Winner of 3 Critics' Choice Documentary Association Awards and praised by the Associated Press as "a remarkably intimate film a lifetime in the making." For your consideration in all categories including Best Documentary Feature. VAL is streaming now on Prime Video.  This podcast runs 55m 50s with intros, music and sponsored content.

The Tommy Show
Breaking DC Charity Records, Baseball Lockout, Light Up The Season at the Four Seasons Benefiting Children's National, The Queen Gets RBG Award, National Christmas Tree Lit

The Tommy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 25:21


The Catalogue for Philanthropy, reports a 6% increase ($1.17 million) in donations on GivingTuesday. Last year, local charities received $1.1 million on GivingTuesday. Donations were collected via Give Local Together. The MLB lockout is on. Players can't communicate or train with the team. Kelly also explains why the Nats are still paying Max Scherzer? Plus what are the odds this affects Spring Training? Deck the halls with holiday shopping to benefit Children's National. The annual designer tree auction has become a swanky holiday market. Last night at the Library of Congress the 2nd Ruth Bader Ginsburg Women of Leadership Awards, was give to Queen Elizabeth. British Ambassador to the U.S. Dame Karen Pierce, DCMG accepted the 2021 award on behalf the Queen. Guests included Martha Stewart, Nicky Hilton, David M. Rubenstein, Saudi Arabia's Ambassador to the United States and Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) That beautiful Pennsylvania Tree at Presidents Park! The National Tree Lighting special will air on CBS. We relived the iconic moment from the 90's of Patti LaBelle waiting for her backup singers to join her on stage. LINKS: Giving Together Local: www.givelocaltogether.org Catalogue for Philanthropy: http://www.cfp-dc.org/ Patti Labelle Youtube Christmas Tree Lighting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z84QdJlPpHE From Real.Fun.DC. “The Tommy and Kelly Show” is produced in Washington, DC providing news, culture, playful conversation, positive energy, and a dose of morning fun any time. Download the Real.Fun.DC. APP to check out our wide array of programming app.RealFunDC.com Follow Kelly Collis Twitter: https://twitter.com/cityshopgirl Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cityshopgirl/ LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kellycollis/ Follow Tommy McFLY Twitter: https://twitter.com/tommymcfly Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mrtommymcfly/ LinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tommymcfly/

Advisory Opinions
The End of Roe and Casey?

Advisory Opinions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 69:57


It's an almost-all-Dobbs podcast, as David and Sarah discuss the oral argument that surprised the nation. Could Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey actually fall? David and Sarah talk about the court's decision-making process from here and the history of judge-flipping post-argument, and they identify the key moments in yesterday's argument. Also, they give their listeners a vital challenge--and if they can meet that challenge, then Advisory Opinions will be the indisputable flagship of the Dispatch podcast fleet. Listen to learn what the challenge is. Show Notes:-Dobbs v. Jackson oral argument transcript-Ginsburg's remarks on Roe-David in The Atlantic: “How Roe Undermined Itself”-Washington Post: “Justice Kennedy's Flip”

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Linda Greenhouse: The Supreme Court at the Brink

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 57:42


Over the past four years, the United States Supreme Court has seen drastic changes to its members, from the death of Ruth Bader Ginsberg to the appointment of Amy Coney Barrett. At the end of the 2019–20 term, followers of the Supreme Court noted that a new "center" of the court was holding under the leadership of Chief Justice John Roberts. By the end of the 2020–21 term, much about the nation's highest court had changed, reflecting a conservative supermajority enabled by jurors nominated by President Donald Trump. Many observers of the court expect these shifts to continue and deepen, making this past year a critical pivot point in the history of the Supreme Court, and American politics as a whole. In her new book, Linda Greenhouse, a Pulitizer Prize winner and one of the best-known chroniclers of the Supreme Court of her generation, explores the end of the 2020–21 term for the court, the changes that have occurred in the past year, and what the future holds for the court in these increasingly partisan times. Greenhouse covers everything from the death of Justice Ginsburg to the rise of Justice Comey Barrett, from the pandemic to the disputed 2020 election, putting the happenings around the Supreme Court at the center of the country's partisan political disputes. Please join us for an important conversation on the U.S. Supreme Court and its increasing role in American society with a writer who knows the court and its politics as well as anyone in America. SPEAKERS Linda Greenhouse Contributing Op-Ed Writer, The New York Times; Clinical Lecturer in Law, Senior Research Scholar in Law, Yale Law School; Author, Justice on the Brink In Conversation with Lara Bazelon Professor of Law and Director of Criminal Juvenile Justice and Racial Justice Clinical Programs, University of San Francisco In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on November 30th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Todd Herman Show
Hour 3: RBG was not 100% Committed to the Roe v Wade Case

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 38:44


Women wanted RBG to be 100% committed to their right to choice but she was not, nothing with this Supreme Court decision will affect each state because they have their own laws, // TEXTS & WRAP // PERSONAL NOTE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 139: Part 2 - The “Ambassador of Wearable Art” Shares Her Insights from Two Decades in the Business with Lisa M. Berman, Owner of Sculpture to Wear Gallery.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 23:53


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of Sculpture to Wear and how Lisa maintains its legacy Why editorial and media coverage is crucial for getting art jewelry recognized as a fine art What the role of a jewelry gallery is Why Lisa always advises artists to keep good records of their work How the bold brooches of the 80s paved the way for today's art jewelry About Lisa M. Berman Lisa M. Berman is an internationally recognized “Ambassador of Wearable Art.” Based in Southern California, her expertise extends to major manufacturing and retail markets, museums and corporations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Asia and Europe. Lisa is the owner of the iconic gallery Sculpture to Wear, which was instrumental in launching the studio jewelry movement in the United States. The gallery offers an eclectic array of art, jewelry and unique objects to discerning collectors, media producers and institutions, which have been featured in film, television and publications. Her recently launched Berman Arts Agency offers artist representation, career management, corporate acquisition, sponsorship advisement, museum placement, exhibition curation and education services on the disciplines of fine art, jewelry, design and fashion. Lisa holds degrees in Plastics Manufacturing Technology from California State University Long Beach, Product & Jewelry Design from Otis College of Art & Design and Merchandising/Marketing from Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising (FIDM). She has served on the Board of Governors for OTIS College of Art & Design; as Public Relations Chair for the Textile and Costume Council at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA); and on the Museum Collection Board at FIDM. She volunteers for Free Arts for Abused Children, STEAM projects and Art & Fashion Councils. Additional Resources: Sculpture To Wear Website Sculpture To Wear Instagram Sculpture To Wear Facebook Berman Arts Agency Instagram Photos: Lisa M. Berman wearing Archival 18k gold plate PEBBLES Necklace by Robert Lee Morris, her own sterling silver pendant by K. Lamberti, Issey Miyake coat and holding a signed ARTWEAR Catalog (RLM). Photo by Daniel Oropeza NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Model Neva Cole, Photo by Daniel Oropeza  ICE Collar by Greg Orloff, 2018, $15,000 Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Feature article "Powerful Woman of Dissent" from the "Feel the Frill" Exhibition honoring RBG curated by L.M. Berman.  Sculpture: LUX MAXIMUS, Winner of ARTPRIZE 2017 by Daniel Oropeza $350,000.  Model Neva Cole wears Emancipation Collar by 2Roses, 2020, $1,500.  Photo by Daniel Oropeza  Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  Cover of IONA Magazine  Model wears Beaded Galaxy by 3 Tribes, from our Timeless Measures Exhibition 2006, curated by Lisa M. Berman & Pamela McNeil  1 year collaboration with women from 3 tribes in Africa - elders teaching the younger generation how to bead.  Cuffs (sterling Silver & Copper) by Tana Action  IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: “REVEALED” Collar $50,000 (worn to the EMMY Television Academy's Governors Ball) and “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 - both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine, 2001. IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: Earrings - 18k gold & aqamarine (NFS), “TRANSITION” Collar, 18k gold, Onyx, Aquamarine $20,000  and “GOLDEN” Cuff, 18k gold, $10,000, made in 2001. Niche Magazine - TOP RETAILER SPIKED, red collar (Collection of Myra Gassman) & Cuffs on left side by Michelle Ritter  “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 -  both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine. Bouquet Ring, Stainless steel & garnet by Wendy Gwen Hacker $800 Collaboration with Sculpture To  Wear Designer Gina Pankowski & MOEN Facet manufacturer. Utlilitary into Wearable Art Cover of W Magazine  - January Jones wears LATTICE necklace (oxidized Sterling Silver) by Gina Pankowski, $4,000 And Bridge Bracelet sterling silver by Sergey Jivetin, SOLD in Private Collection    The images below are from a PHOTO shoot based in the music video Rico Mejia Photography Fashion Beauty Celebrity Lifestyle Mobile number: 323-370-0555 https://www.behance.net/ricomejia https://twitter.com/RicoMejiaFoto https://www.instagram.com/ricomejiaphoto/ Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes bResin and Diamond Bangle by Cara Croninger from 24K Show, 1979, $4,000 Citrus Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $650, and Bracelet $300 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry  Vintage Earrings- acrylic, one of a kind by Frank & Anne Vigneri, 1984, $350 Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  Resin DROP earrings by Cara Croninger $200 REGINA Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $800 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Bracelet by Genos, NFS in collection of Julie Laughton Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  BLUE DROP earrings Teri Brudnak $98 HEDGEHOG Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $850 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Clear CUFF by Cara Croninger, NFS collection of L.M. Berman        Cover of Vogue with Cherize Theron     Transcript: Lisa Berman, owner of art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear, has been a figure in the art jewelry world for over 20 years, and she has a wealth of insight to share with fellow jewelry lovers. For her second appearance on the Jewelry Journey Podcast, she talked about how she's maintained relationships with hundreds of designers and collectors over the years, what advice she offers the designers she works with, and why art jewelry is coming into its own as a fine art collected by museums. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Lisa Berman. Although we share the same last name, I'm not related to Lisa; however, over the years she has become a friend and a trusted dealer. Lisa has been a guest on the show before. Today, we'll have a wide-ranging discussion with less of a focus on a particular piece, more talking about her experience in the jewelry and fashion world. Per our practice, the podcast is audio only. We will be posting photos of many of the pieces Lisa mentions today on our website, which is JewelryJourney.com. This is also a two-part podcast, so please keep your eyes open for our second episode which will air later this week. Please make sure you're a member of our jewelry community by subscribing to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. That way you can listen to both episodes hot of the presses, so to speak. With that, I'd like to welcome Lisa to the program.   Sharon: When you say editorial—you talked about editorial versus advertorial—what do you mean?   Lisa: Years ago, we had magazines like W and Vogue and Vanity Fair, and the word advertorial did not exist. You had true editorial, where you were a new designer, you were creating something different, you had a new statement necklace, and they wanted to feature it. By the way, the vernacular “statement jewelry” wasn't in vogue 25 years ago. We talked about it. Now you see something on the cover and people talk about. From a marketing and selling point, it's a statement piece. That's something we were using in studio jewelry decades ago.    Let's see, we were talking about editorial, working with creative directors of publications. You have a timeline that's three months in advance because you didn't have digital. You had film; you had slides; you had all these timelines that were completely different. Then publications changed. They had to find a way to stay afloat, to stay in business, and like any other business they said, “Look, if you buy an ad, we'll promote you in an editorial article.” That's why you have some galleries now charging artists to physically have their work on the walls, which is something we didn't do, of course.   Sharon: That's interesting. Then you have people like me who walk into a gallery—I didn't know a lot—but depending on the gallery, they might pay to have their work on the wall. Having come from public relations, I immediately look at something to see whether they paid for that article or if it was chosen. I think it's important to point out—people might say, “Well, it sounds dated to be talking about all this print stuff,” but that goes immediately online. All the print is immediately online. There may be some things that never make print that are online, but it's important because whatever you see in print is going to be online.    Lisa: Well, I'll tell you why it's important and relevant. It actually goes back to catalogues and museums. I will get to museums in a second. As much as we want to save the planet and save paper and all of that, museums still demand catalogues for their major exhibitions. That's an important part of collecting. An important part of an artist's career is to have that physical catalogue, that tangible item that can be placed on a bookshelf, or talked about, or brought to a dinner party or a lecture series or whatever it may be. That's really important. An editorial and a printed editorial are the same. Obviously, there are more online publications and it's literally just flipping through the images.    For example, we just filmed a music video with Linda Hikel. We used a number of pieces from Sculpture to Wear in the music video. People loved it. They will use it for promotion, but she called me and said, “We want to capitalize on the fact that you brought such extraordinary work to the video. We want to capture those for editorial.” Then she called me and said, “We actually want to take it a step further. We're thinking about a book,” so these are the conversations. Printed materials are not a thing of the past, thankfully; they're an important element of documentation. That's why I tell artists, when I'm on an artist's tour or in their studio or we're having a conversation, “Please, if you're not a good note taker or you're not good about keeping files, literally keep a box on your desk, and anything—a summary or a note or something in regard to that project—keep it in there. This is so important for telling the story for an exhibition in a museum or just a gallery or online show.”   Sharon: Lisa, you mentioned that makers, jewelers, artists don't understand the role of a gallery. They think, “What am I paying you for?” in a sense. Tell us what your response to that is.   Lisa: I no longer have a physical, permanent location, but I do curate exhibitions. I will collaborate with fine art galleries or other locations to host exhibitions within their space. Even if a show is online, you still get the attachment of being in an exhibition that is part of Sculpture to Wear history and legacy. You have the exposure that I bring to that particular artist, whether it be through my website, through the newsletters I send out, through Art Jewelry Forum, through Indelible, which is my new column for older jewels. That's under the umbrella of Artistar Jewels.   Sharon: Artistar Jewels?   Lisa: Artistar Jewels; I'll tell you about that. Also, there's the collector base. A lot of artists think they pick up the phone and it just happens. Well, it does in some instances. It happens because I've cultivated a relationship for five to eight to 10 years. Yes, I can ask for a favor. Yes, I can propose an idea and I will be taken seriously because there's a track record of credibility. That's important for artists to understand. I think a lot of them coming from major schools do understand that. That is something that's part of their curriculum.    Sharon: You mentioned the importance of keeping all your sketches and notes and everything like that because it helps the gallerist tell a story.   Lisa: Right. In my garage, I literally have over two decades of artists' submissions. I know it sounds crazy. I have artists' submissions that were done on slides and then zip drives. I don't even know how I will convert those images, but I was so afraid of throwing away some of the most magnificent images I've ever seen and shown. Then each one of my exhibitions is in chronological order in a binder with the title and if there's any traveling accompanying that exhibition. I think I learned that from my days in the fashion industry, because you had to document, document, document. That has served me well, because if you don't document it, it never happened. So, you've got the documentation of the visuals and the notes and the advertising, and those are really important. Of course, now artists are saving all of that online, but hopefully there's still something tactile to incorporate.   Sharon: It's so important for credibility, whether it's online or not. Ideally, it's legitimizing it. I know for me, when I'm considering a piece of jewelry, if I know the artist has been in this museum or that museum or it's in the writeup, that makes a difference to me. It weighs more in favor of purchasing something, that credibility.   Lisa: Yes, and that's a whole round robin of a conversation. For example, the pieces I placed in LACMA on behalf Lynn Altman—unfortunately, Lynn is deceased. She was one of my favorite and dearest people on the planet. The three pieces that LACMA acquired were actually owned by me first, so it tells me I have a good eye, and it will also tell a collector I have a good eye. I know the process; I know what museums might be interested in. Mostly whatever I thought was interesting or fascinating, that's what I would collect, but it does matter. It plays a role in credibility in the conversation, if I'm going to be working with a client for consulting, either with a one-on-one client, with an artist or with a company or museum. By the way, one of the misnomers with museums and donations is that people think, “Oh, I have these amazing pieces and I want to donate them.” That's a very long process.   Sharon: From what I've heard, it's a challenge.   Lisa: It's a challenge because good museums will only accept pieces they can properly store. Of course, everyone wants them to be on display 100 percent of the time, but you can't do it. That's a conversation as well. You've got museums looking to acquire pieces, but they need funding for it. There's a whole program with their donors and collectors; “How do we buy this?” Then there are pieces they want that are being donated to them, but maybe they're going under renovation. Whatever the story may be, they want to make sure they're going to acquire them and be able to sort them, so that during their downtime another museum doesn't take them. It's really testing out there.   Sharon: When I've heard of collectors who have donated their collections, it sounds like it's been a long process. It's been something that took years before they even decided to do it. They were being wooed, or they would ask the museum, “What should I buy? What would you like to see in the collection?” that sort of thing. It doesn't sound like you just drive up and unload your station wagon.   Lisa: Oh, no.   Sharon: Do people have station wagons anymore?   Lisa: I don't know. They're called SUVs.   Sharon: Yes, SUVs.   Lisa: At least at a reputable location, that is definitely not the case. I think it's a very exciting time because you have people creating these secondary market pieces, people auctioning them, collecting them, and then you have some of the most dynamic makers. What's interesting to me is also the variations of ages from very young, 19 to 20, and then you have some jewelers I've met that were famous. They were architects or sculptors, and they wanted to change direction.    I've also talked to some of them in regards to ageism. They can't apply for certain grants because they're too old for one at 66. There are a lot of new conversations, like how we've had to learn to communicate with this new technology in Zoom. Life throws us curve balls and we go with it, and there are different trends, too. Brooches were so important probably 20 years ago and they still are, but you had it peak with the “Brooching it Diplomatically” book and Madeline Albright. For many years, large-scale collars were important. You have the Susan Lewin book that just came out and the exhibition book about rings. It's exciting. This field is constantly growing, constantly renewing itself, and I'm always inspired by it.    Sharon: I think we had a conversation once where you told me that brooches helped people segue to art jewelry. People could understand those and wear an avant garde brooch before they would wear something in their hair or an earring or something like that.   Lisa: Yes. People won't believe this, but fashion also played a role in that. For example, 25, 30 years ago, you had women entering the workforce—I know I'm going to get backlash on this—but they were wearing these blazers. So, they can't wear a large collar, plus they're downplaying it. They still want to make a nonverbal statement, and the easiest thing is to put a large-scale piece on a lapel. The ideal wall to place a brooch was on a blazer. For example, I'm wearing a Miyake shirt today. You can't put anything heavy through that. These blazers and large-scale shoulders, that was a perfect wall space to wear these pieces. For makers, these are the easiest way for them to literally make sculpture to wear. It was in a format that made sense to them, a smaller-scale sculpture that was on the left shoulder most often, but there are no rules now. Literally everything goes.    I happen to personally enjoy large-scale collars, just because I like to be hands free and my hands are always moving when I'm talking. I don't wear a lot of rings. When I had much shorter hair, I wore giant earrings. Now I don't, but it's all about personal preference. It was also interesting with the gallery. Someone would see a necklace or a piece in a feature editorial in the Los Angeles Times or W or whatever it may be, and they would call and say, “That's the piece I want.” Then, ultimately, they would come to the gallery and try it on, and they thought, “You know what? This just doesn't sit right on me. I want to look at something else,” or we would specifically have the artist there to meet with them and talk with them.   Sharon: You've talked about the fact that relationships are so important. I know what you mean. It's not just a matter of calling up Sally Smith who you've never talked to before and doesn't know you from Adam, versus calling somebody you've worked with or who knows you always bring her great pieces or something interesting. I want people to understand what you do and why they should call you, because you have your fingers in so many different areas.   Lisa: You know what's interesting about your statement, Sharon, is that I do. I am that person who will call anyone. I have the zero-fear factor.   Sharon: That's great.   Lisa: Completely, because the fact is the worst they can say is no. I'm on a phone call and I present the idea. I think it makes sense, otherwise I wouldn't call them or present them with the idea or exhibition or whatever it may be. I literally will pick up the phone, or I have a crazy idea and I will create a way to connect the dots. Most people think, “Oh my gosh! I would have never thought about that.” Often it's thinking about who's in that particular trade industry, how can we possibly get sponsorships, what's a different avenue. Let's think out of the box. We always hear that: let's think out of the box. I like to be creative, and I like communication. I literally will pick up the phone, and I always like to have a conversation.    So many people hide behind this little mouse on their computer or Facebook or Instagram or private messages. I say if we're going to work together or any of this, I have to have a conversation. Let's go on WhatsApp. If you're in a different time zone, a different county—it doesn't matter if they're speaking Latvian and they're mumbling through a translator, you just get their essence. That's really important, especially now with the lack of human interaction. I'm always an advocate for having a conversation because you never know where it's going to lead, that next step, that next unturned stone. You learn so much more when you have the conversation with the person.   Sharon: I always envy you people who have zero fear factor. I don't fall in that category, so I think it's great. Why should people call you today? To curate an exhibition?   Lisa: Thank you. I do a number of things. Obviously, first and foremost, I do represent certain artists' careers on an ongoing basis, whether it's curating exhibitions for their particular body of work. I can also host a show where we would sell work, because that's the fuel that makes the engine go: selling artists' work, curating exhibitions, connecting them to editorial, getting them placement for exposure. I would say 50 percent of what I do is a PR agency. That is the bulk of most of my day. It's writing articles, sending out newsletters, Instagram, Facebook posts, calling institutions or perhaps sponsors who are creating an exhibition, and creating those business alignments to further these ideas. Whenever I'm on Zoom conferences, I'm taking notes. Editorial, promotional, selling—it's like an ad agency as well.   Sharon: And when you say artists, that's bench jewelers, retailers, makers and fine artists.   Lisa: Yes, now I have branched out with the Berman Art Agency. That umbrella encompasses the very few select sculptors and photographers I've worked with throughout the years. For example, Bonnie Schiffman, she's a very well-known, iconic photographer in 16 museums worldwide. She came to me to make a commission piece in a gallery with Claudia Endler. That was an heirloom piece, and she wears it every day. Now we have this relationship where I'm working with her photographs. We've done shows throughout LA. I picked up the phone and created a museum exhibition for her back east. Some of these artists have had a rich career, and then they either hit a lull or they're on hiatus. How do I resurrect this? It's looking at those types of people. Like Marc Cohen—   Sharon: We just had Marc Cohen on the podcast with his box jewelry, which is so unique.   Lisa: I've known Marc for almost 35 years. I'm working with him on his 40 years of archives to make sense of them and understand how to present wearable art box sculptures, which are little, unique maquettes of a stage, like a Broadway stage. He incorporates iconic photography, and each of those tells a story. I'll be wearing one, and from across the room, someone will point at me and say, “That's the box man.” He's done a lot of much larger installations at the Museum of Jerusalem and some other work. So, presenting that work, how do we package that? How do we package it for a museum exhibition, for a gallery exhibition? Of course, we want to do a book.   Then I was working with Teri Brudnak. She was Karen McCreary's partner for Star Trek. We met 35 years ago in a plastics technology class. She and Karen were making work for Star Trek: The Next Generation, the television show. We were the only three women in this class, and people were making fun of us until they would see their pieces on television within the two-week period. They stopped the teasing and said, “O.K., this is something.” For example, the Skirball Museum has a Star Trek exhibition. How do we incorporate the legacy of what Terry and Karen created with their jewelry? It's always about peeking around the curve and finding a placement that makes sense. It is in alignment in an authentic way with their artist's voice and what they've created; not necessarily a stretch, but completely in alignment with their work and their creativity.   Sharon: Lisa, thank you so much. I learned so much today about how an artist has to sell their work. I know that's where so many get caught. Thank you so much for being here today.   Lisa: I appreciate the opportunity to tell your audience about this. It's very important. Thank you, Sharon.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Another case of the Omicron variant and it may have made its way through NYC; A residence hall at Rutgers University Newark will be renamed after the late justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg; A fire on the barge of a pier left four people injured

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 4:16


The All Local noon 12/2/21 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Just the Right Book with Roxanne Coady
Who Does the Supreme Court Belong to Now?

Just the Right Book with Roxanne Coady

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 59:15


In this week's episode, Roxanne Coady talks with Linda Greenhouse about her recent book, Justice on the Brink: The Death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, The Rise of Amy Coney Barrett, and Twelve Months That Transformed the Supreme Court. Linda Greenhouse has reported on and written about the Supreme Court for The New York Times for more than four decades, earning numerous accolades, including a Pulitzer Prize. She currently writes an opinion column on the court and teaches at Yale Law School. She lives in New Haven, Connecticut, and Stockbridge, Massachusetts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Creative Distribution 101
New Season - The Power of Fandom

Creative Distribution 101

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 0:44


Welcome to the new season on the power of fandom. We obsess over films, shows, etc., and were wondering, how does that translate to filmmaking and film distribution? What can we learn about audience engagement, community building, and impact from fandom? This season features many incredible guests and will dive into the Venom franchise, the Supernatural tv show, fan activism, documentaries like RBG, and much more.   Tune in every week for a new episode and tell us what you think on social media, @creativedistribution on Instagram & FB, and 101distribution on Twitter! thank you!

Lady Justice: Women of the Court
Episode 13: Women and Law Conference - Live from Charleston, West Virginia

Lady Justice: Women of the Court

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 51:05


Craving even more insight on career opportunities in the legal field? The women recently spoke at the When There are Nine conference at the University of Charleston in West Virginia, an event designed as a ‘for women, by women' conversation for those considering a career in the law. Listen in as the justices discuss formative experiences that inspired them to enter the legal profession, including being a witness to domestic violence. The women also discuss the diverse career possibilities for lawyers that go beyond the typical courtroom scenario we often see on television. This episode marks the first time that the justices, who are from different states, have recorded the podcast together in person. The conference title is a tribute to the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who famously said, 'When I'm sometimes asked 'When will there be enough [women on the Supreme Court]?' and I say 'When there are nine,' people are shocked. But there'd been nine men, and nobody's ever raised a question about that." So come along with us to the conference and take a seat. We're glad you're here!

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
November 30, 2021:  John Rothmann - Roe v, Wade on trial

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 39:22


Mississippi The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on Wednesday in the most significant abortion case it has considered since it established the constitutional right to the procedure in the 1973 decision Roe v. Wade. The case, Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, centers on a Mississippi law that bans nearly all abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy—a direct challenge to the central holding of Roe v. Wade. The outcome of the case could redefine the right to abortion in the United States and have profound implications not just for reproductive rights, but for nearly every sector of American society, from health care and criminal justice to workforce participation and the economy. The stakes are especially high because the Supreme Court has grown more conservative in recent years. When Mississippi officials asked the high court to take the case in 2020, conservative justices outnumbered liberals 5-4. But after Ruth Bader Ginsburg died and Trump-nominee Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed, the Court lurched further right. It now has a 6-3 conservative majority.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Life Matters
264: Marxist Idealogy Coming to the Forefront of Our Culture

Life Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 27:58


In this episode of Life  Matters Commissioner Johnston explores the statements and teachings of radical-feminist theory, specifically as expressed by Ruth Bader Ginsberg.  He repeats her quotes from the bench and shares her comments from later interviews.    Ruth Bader Ginsberg openly quoted Marx from from the bench of the United States Supreme Court. But does not give him attribution. Very few I have read Marx nor do they understand the sweeping cultural dictates of the Marxist philosophy. They are therefore ignorant of these ideas when couched in progressive culture and then placed directly into the laws of our nation by the highest court of land.     When Justice Blackmun reviewed the various feminist arguments submitted in the amicus briefs for Roe v. Wade in Doe v Bolton, he did not recognize those assertions as coming directly from the statements of Karl Marx. But they did.    There is only one political philosophy in the history of mankind that has asserted the idea that unlimited abortions are an essential premise of political success. That political philosophy is Marxism.   Brian shares portions from his book “Evil Twins- Roe and Doe: How the Supreme Court Unleashed Medical Killing.” In embracing abortion on demand, the twin decisions also instructed and authorize the medical profession to do what he has always sworn to never do, intentionally kill human beings.   Brian explains how this dramatic embrace of Marxist ideology, the dismissal of a governments duty towards human lives, and the companion distraction of the medical professions ethical standards has left us in America vulnerable to government use of medicine against the most vulnerable individuals of our society.    This can only be resolved through the intentional restoration of the right to life.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 139: Part 1 - The “Ambassador of Wearable Art” Shares Her Insights from Two Decades in the Business with Lisa M. Berman, Owner of Sculpture to Wear Gallery.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 22:50


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of Sculpture to Wear and how Lisa maintains its legacy Why editorial and media coverage is crucial for getting art jewelry recognized as a fine art What the role of a jewelry gallery is Why Lisa always advises artists to keep good records of their work How the bold brooches of the 80s paved the way for today's art jewelry About Lisa M. Berman Lisa M. Berman is an internationally recognized “Ambassador of Wearable Art.” Based in Southern California, her expertise extends to major manufacturing and retail markets, museums and corporations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Asia and Europe. Lisa is the owner of the iconic gallery Sculpture to Wear, which was instrumental in launching the studio jewelry movement in the United States. The gallery offers an eclectic array of art, jewelry and unique objects to discerning collectors, media producers and institutions, which have been featured in film, television and publications. Her recently launched Berman Arts Agency offers artist representation, career management, corporate acquisition, sponsorship advisement, museum placement, exhibition curation and education services on the disciplines of fine art, jewelry, design and fashion. Lisa holds degrees in Plastics Manufacturing Technology from California State University Long Beach, Product & Jewelry Design from Otis College of Art & Design and Merchandising/Marketing from Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising (FIDM). She has served on the Board of Governors for OTIS College of Art & Design; as Public Relations Chair for the Textile and Costume Council at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA); and on the Museum Collection Board at FIDM. She volunteers for Free Arts for Abused Children, STEAM projects and Art & Fashion Councils. Additional Resources: Sculpture To Wear Website Sculpture To Wear Instagram Sculpture To Wear Facebook Lisa Berman Instagram Photos: Lisa M. Berman wearing Archival 18k gold plate PEBBLES Necklace by Robert Lee Morris, her own sterling silver pendant by K. Lamberti, Issey Miyake coat and holding a signed ARTWEAR Catalog (RLM). Photo by Daniel Oropeza NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Model Neva Cole, Photo by Daniel Oropeza  ICE Collar by Greg Orloff, 2018, $15,000 Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Feature article "Powerful Woman of Dissent" from the "Feel the Frill" Exhibition honoring RBG curated by L.M. Berman.  Sculpture: LUX MAXIMUS, Winner of ARTPRIZE 2017 by Daniel Oropeza $350,000.  Model Neva Cole wears Emancipation Collar by 2Roses, 2020, $1,500.  Photo by Daniel Oropeza  Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  Cover of IONA Magazine  Model wears Beaded Galaxy by 3 Tribes, from our Timeless Measures Exhibition 2006, curated by Lisa M. Berman & Pamela McNeil  1 year collaboration with women from 3 tribes in Africa - elders teaching the younger generation how to bead.  Cuffs (sterling Silver & Copper) by Tana Action  IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: “REVEALED” Collar $50,000 (worn to the EMMY Television Academy's Governors Ball) and “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 - both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine, 2001. IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: Earrings - 18k gold & aqamarine (NFS), “TRANSITION” Collar, 18k gold, Onyx, Aquamarine $20,000  and “GOLDEN” Cuff, 18k gold, $10,000, made in 2001. Niche Magazine - TOP RETAILER SPIKED, red collar (Collection of Myra Gassman) & Cuffs on left side by Michelle Ritter  “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 -  both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine. Bouquet Ring, Stainless steel & garnet by Wendy Gwen Hacker $800 Collaboration with Sculpture To  Wear Designer Gina Pankowski & MOEN Facet manufacturer. Utlilitary into Wearable Art Cover of W Magazine  - January Jones wears LATTICE necklace (oxidized Sterling Silver) by Gina Pankowski, $4,000 And Bridge Bracelet sterling silver by Sergey Jivetin, SOLD in Private Collection    The images below are from a PHOTO shoot based in the music video Rico Mejia Photography Fashion Beauty Celebrity Lifestyle Mobile number: 323-370-0555 https://www.behance.net/ricomejia https://twitter.com/RicoMejiaFoto https://www.instagram.com/ricomejiaphoto/ Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes bResin and Diamond Bangle by Cara Croninger from 24K Show, 1979, $4,000 Citrus Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $650, and Bracelet $300 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry  Vintage Earrings- acrylic, one of a kind by Frank & Anne Vigneri, 1984, $350 Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  Resin DROP earrings by Cara Croninger $200 REGINA Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $800 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Bracelet by Genos, NFS in collection of Julie Laughton Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  BLUE DROP earrings Teri Brudnak $98 HEDGEHOG Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $850 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Clear CUFF by Cara Croninger, NFS collection of L.M. Berman        Cover of Vogue with Cherize Theron     Transcript: Lisa Berman, owner of art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear, has been a figure in the art jewelry world for over 20 years, and she has a wealth of insight to share with fellow jewelry lovers. For her second appearance on the Jewelry Journey Podcast, she talked about how she's maintained relationships with hundreds of designers and collectors over the years, what advice she offers the designers she works with, and why art jewelry is coming into its own as a fine art collected by museums. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Lisa Berman. Although we share the same last name, I'm not related to Lisa; however, over the years she has become a friend and a trusted dealer. Lisa has been a guest on the show before. Today, we'll have a wide-ranging discussion with less of a focus on a particular piece, more talking about her experience in the jewelry and fashion world. Per our practice, the podcast is audio only. We will be posting photos of many of the pieces Lisa mentions today on our website, which is JewelryJourney.com. This is also a two-part podcast, so please keep your eyes open for our second episode which will air later this week. Please make sure you're a member of our jewelry community by subscribing to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. That way you can listen to both episodes hot of the presses, so to speak. With that, I'd like to welcome Lisa to the program. Lisa: Thank you, Sharon. I'm so delighted to be back here again. Sharon: It's great to have you. For those who don't know your background, can you give us a brief overview of your background? Lisa: Of course. I grew up in the fashion industry and had a career in fashion design. I had an accessory business for many, many years, and then I acquired the name of Sculpture to Wear Gallery in 1998. Of course, that was originally launched in 1973 in New York City in the Park Plaza Hotel. I launched my first exhibition at Bergamot Station Art Center, which I'll tell you about in a second, on January 16, 1999. I'm proud to be the second owner of Sculpture to Wear Gallery. Now, location is important. Location, location, location, you've heard a million times in real estate. Bergamot Station Art Center is in Santa Monica, California, Southern California, and it was formerly the home to 25 thriving contemporary galleries and the Santa Monica Museum of Art. It was, I believe, a five-acre complex. Now the Red Line runs through it. Sharon: The Red Line being the Metro. Lisa: Yes, the metro. Anyway, that's where I started my journey. I actually met my former husband, Robert Berman, there as well. It was the heyday. It was like Soho. It was the happening place on the West Side; it was a lot of fun. Every Thursday, Friday and Saturday night for 10 years, there were gallery openings. There was constant influx of artists and jewelers and collectors and educators and writers, so it was definitely the place to be. Sharon: What was groundbreaking about—first, it was groundbreaking that Sculpture to Wear was on the West Coast, but what was groundbreaking about the original Sculpture to Wear? Lisa: The owner, Joan Sonnabend, was basically located in Boston, but she had a tiny, little, postage-stamp gallery. Robert Lee Morris told me it was only about 400 square feet. The delineation was that she only showed work by signed artists. For example, you had Alexander Calder making jewelry, and he actually made his jewelry. There were pieces by Picasso; those were in addition to the series and those were made by other craftsmen. Of course, you have people like Robert Lee Morris, whose entire career was launched at the original Sculpture to Wear. The idea was that she was selling one-of-a-kind, sculptural jewelry made by fine artists, not by jewelry artists. That was the idea. Sharon: From what I've heard, nobody else was doing that then. This was unusual. Lisa: It was extremely unusual. The only person that was doing something similar was in Philadelphia. That's our beloved Helen Drutt, who is about to turn 91. She was also very monumental and important in bringing studio jewelry and wearable art to the United States, but she worked with jewelers and makers, mostly in Europe. Sharon: How did you know the Sculpture to Wear license was available? How did you find out about that? Lisa: I was introduced to the idea through Cindy Forbes, who's now Cindy Brown. She ultimately ended up being my gallery manager. We had a conversation, one thing led to another, and that was kind of it. It was available, so I capitalized on that and the domain and the name. When I acquired the name, I felt it was very important that every decision I made was legacy-driven, because it was a very important part of history. This is not something I just launched; they had an important history and legacy on the East Coast. That's why for my business card, I purposely selected the title of “visionary proprietor,” because it kept me on point and on target. At first, I got a little flak from it, but as I explained, that kept me on point to do my best. That was it. Sharon: Flak because people said, “Oh my gosh—”  Lisa: A lot of gumption that I would profess to be this visionary proprietor. Now, everyone on social media is a visionary and all the museum collectors' groups are visionaries. I don't know; I guess I was ahead of the curve. Sharon: You are a visionary. Lisa: This was 23 years ago. There you go.  Sharon: So, you opened at Bergamot Station and then you moved the gallery to Montana Avenue in Santa Monica? Well, they're both in Santa Monica. Lisa: I was in Bergamot Station from 1999 until 2003. In Bergamot Station, I had two separate little locations. In 2003, I moved to a much larger location. That was on Montana Avenue at the cross street of 11th Street. I moved there knowing I was a destination, that I had built a brand with Sculpture to Wear and with the artists through a number of different ideologies and media and exposure. We'll get into that in a second, but I knew I was a destination. I was not going to rely on walk-in traffic on Montana Avenue, like so many of the other stores did. That was really important, that I had built up that mailing list, the collector base. People would be traveling, or friends would be coming in from out of town and our collectors would pick them up at the airport and say, “We have to take you to Sculpture to Wear first.” It was those kinds of relationships we had built there. Sharon: Did people stumble on your gallery in Bergamot Station? How did they find you? Lisa: Bergamot had 25 galleries, so at any given day at any given moment, you had tons of people walking around. It's completely different than it is today; of course during the pandemic, but completely different. There was no problem reaching collectors, and I was the complete anomaly. You have this sculptural jewelry, and it was an education to a new audience. A lot of these people weren't necessarily open to the idea of jewelry not having diamonds or gold. People that had an educated eye in regard to design, like architects, were some of our first clients because they understood the design. It literally was a small-scale sculpture.  I think my passion for that and some of the artists were also incorporated into that conversation. I made a request of any artists that were local to the gallery that they do three things: they had to work in the gallery, they had to come and help set up an exhibition that wasn't theirs, and they had to attend an opening that wasn't theirs. I wanted them to understand the role of a gallery and what we did. At first it was, “Well, why I would give you 50 percent of the retail price?” This was a demonstration for them to learn why. There wasn't any artist who partook in those three requests that came to me and said, “No, this isn't right.” They all were shocked at what we did on a daily basis. Robert Lee Morris, I told him about that, and he was shocked. He said, “You did that?”  Sharon: You mentioned Robert Lee Morris. A lot of people will know who he is, especially New Yorkers or fashionistas, but tell us who he is and why he's important. Lisa: Robert Lee Morris is an icon. He's been designing jewelry for over 50 years. He's the only designer to earn the Coty Award for his jewelry design an unprecedented three times. He was the designer who made the big, bold, gold jewelry in conjunction with Donna Karan's black cashmere new work uniform in the late 80s, early 90s. Digressing to understand why he's important in my world, our world of art jewelry, is that he was one of the most important and prolific designers at the original Sculpture to Wear in New York.  He was self-taught. He was literally found at a tiny, little show in an offbeat path. He was immersed in this incredible work from Alexander Calder, Salvador Dalí, Louise Nevelson—amazing artists who already had these incredible careers, and as it turns out, people loved Robert's work. He outsold all the other artists combined at Sculpture to Wear. Then he launched his own gallery. After Sculpture to Wear closed, he launched Artwear. That launched a number of careers from a lot of famous artists, jewelers, studio jewelers, some of whom are still with us and some are not. That's his legacy; first at Sculpture to Wear, then Artwear. He has these amazing archives, and we'll talk about how editorial and prior images play a role in the secondary market. That might be a good place to talk about that. Sharon: O.K., please. Lisa: What's a phenomenon for me is that when I started and someone would ask if I sold jewelry, I knew the context. They would immediately think of CZ or— Sharon: Engagement rings. Lisa: Engagement rings. I said, “No, that's not at all what I do,” and I would always be wearing a piece. I was always wearing largescale pieces of jewelry. At that time when I first opened my gallery, I had very short hair; I think it was two inches long. People may not have remembered my name, but they would point at me from across the room and say, “Oh, that's the jewelry lady. That's the Sculpture to Wear lady,” and that was just fine.  This type of work, like photography 80 or 60 years ago, was not accepted in the realm of a fine art museum. Now you see photography auctioned at over $1 million, and some of the most incredible collections in the world are simply photography. Art jewelry is now collected in some specific fine art institutions, and that is for a number of reasons. First of all, it's because of exposure from editorial and media, and also because of the stewardship of specific collectors and designers like Helen Drutt, who bequeathed her collection to the Houston Fine Art Museum. I think it was almost a decade ago, and there's an incredible book. It's on my bookshelf. I can see it from here; it's very orange and large. She wanted her collection to be viewed at a fine arts museum versus a craft museum, and that started that conversation.  Lois Boardman on the West Coast donated her collection to LACMA, LA County Museum of Art, I believe five years ago. Also, for example, the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian has been collecting this work for a lot longer. For example, Jen Mandel and I were there for her induction into the Smithsonian. That was incredible. We were standing right next to a piece made by Alexander Calder, and that's where her vitrine was placed. It's really about this conversation, and I think it's a conversation of education.  As for the secondary market, we were just attending the Bonhams preview for the Crawford Collection. That's an unprecedented phenomenon, to have a collection of that level, of that stature, being auctioned by Bonhams without diamonds, without gold. There are a few elements and pieces to that, but you're looking at Art Smith pieces, modernists, studio jewelers. This is a very exciting and fertile time to be involved in studio and art jewelry. This is what I've been doing for the last 22, 25 years. We're at a very exciting place and there are a number of forums, especially with Covid and Zoom, with Art Jewelry Forum having open conversations about this, introducing collectors to artists and, of course, your podcast. There are a lot of variations and factors for the secondary market. Sharon: Lisa, because your jewelry and art jewelry in general is still avant garde—although it's coming into its own—do you think collectors or people like you are going to say, “O.K., what's next? What's on the horizon now? That's become old hat.” It hasn't, but do you think people are going to move on? Lisa: Sharon, I hope not. Within the genre of studio jewelry and wearable art, it has progressed and become so sophisticated. There are so many different makers out there, especially with the internet connecting us. When I first started in 1999, we didn't really have the internet; we barely had email, and now that's how everyone communicates. I think that people's creativity, the way people wear pieces and where they wear them—the reality is that we're not going anyplace right now during the pandemic, and I'm looking at different generations and how to include that next generation in collecting. For example, some of my first clients were in their 60s and 70s when they started collecting, and some are no longer with us. So, how do we engage their family members? You're our most recent convert to art jewelry. My gallery was so close to your house, yet you would have had no interest in what we did. I think it's a journey. Can you say someone's going to have a different trend? No.  I also think technology has played an important role not only in studio jewelry and the exposure, but also the techniques. People are using laser cutting, 3D printing. Technology has also been accepted into fine arts institutions and it has blurred the lines of the conversation of craft and fine art. Even five years ago, there was a delineation that was very distinct. There are still institutions that are not interested in immersion, but I think technology has been a friend, not a foe, to studio jewelers and the paths they can cross. Sharon: I do have to tell a story. Lisa and I were laughing because I lived close to where her gallery used to be. I lived not so far in the Valley, 10 miles away. I was never in your gallery, but I remember seeing an ad one day and thinking, “Who is going to wear this stuff?”  Lisa: And now the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Sharon: It was way out. When you say that people who were older started collecting it, that's the sort of people who don't automatically say, “Wow, that's so new and so cool.” Lisa: My collectors—and I'm sure a number of the gallerists across the United States who have been around for decades would say the same—our clientele, they're not interested in trends. If they open a Vogue, they might see a dress they like, but they're not going to buy it because it's on trend or in fashion. All my clientele, they're well-traveled; they're well-heeled; they're generally educated. They're willing to be avant garde. They don't want to wear the same thing everyone else is wearing, so it's a little bit different. The whole conversation now is that there are younger generations. I just met an incredible student at USC at the Bonhams preview. She's running this entire magazine department in her off time while she's full-time at USC. That's to reach a new collector base and new makers, but that's exciting. That's what makes it viable. Sharon: Yes, it keeps on going. Lisa: Right. That was one of the things I wanted to talk about in regards to when I first started in 1999: it was not only the relationships we built with the artists and the collectors, but we also had our version of social media, which was just printed publications. We didn't have social media, so building relationships with well-known stylists, who were either Emmy award winners or high-profile people that worked with celebrities, that was really important. We got to the point where they would literally call me up with the theme, tell me what it was, and I would already pull the pieces and have a box ready for them. We had a shorthand. That was, again, a relationship that would have to be cultivated. It was very exciting, and that's part of building the legacy of why this work is important. For example, Robert Lee Morris is pulling out his archives. Part of the excitement of these presentations is showing some of the editorial, these great magazine covers and shows that these pieces were included in. I have two decades of binders of images. So, that's very exciting, to show the relevance 20 years ago to now.

Effwhatuheard Radio
Episode 76: RBG Stole Half of Our Show From The Grave!

Effwhatuheard Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 89:49


This is a half show due to technical issues most likely caused by now deceased Ruth Bader Ginsburg( she got us from the grave). The missing part of the show was our breakdown of her comments on Colin Kaepernick's protest and her record of hiring black clerks. We will revisit that conversation at some point. Show Topics: How Wolf missed Big Daddy Kane vrs KRS-1 while a block away, celebrating The Score, Death Certificate, ATLiens, and Low End Theory.Mix: DJ Tay Ferg

Sports Curious
How To Survive The Awkward Holiday Moments

Sports Curious

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:15


Steer clear from a flare-up at the Thanksgiving table by avoiding these conversation minefields and diverting to a safer (and dare we say sportier?) one. 1. For any conversation involving politics Plenty of political and Hollywood icons once ran the sidelines. Samuel L. Jackson, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Meryl Streep and four former U.S.A. Presidents (Eisenhower, Roosevelt, Reagan and George W. Bush) all had spirit. We'd be remiss if we didn't mention the marching band. In college, you would've found Halle Berry, Steven Spielberg, Alan Greenspan and Lionel Richie entertaining you in formation at halftime. Much safer than venturing into the political minefield at the dinner table.   2. When grandma asks you why you're not married…for the 10th time—that day. Tell grandma that a long-lasting marriage isn't a sure bet, but you know what is? The Detroit Lions and Dallas Cowboys (NFL - National Football League) taking the field on Thanksgiving. The Thanksgiving tradition started for the Lions in 1934 and 1966 for the Cowboys. So regardless of whether you're cheering for the winless Lions or the first-place Cowboys, one thing you can count on is these teams to play while you nap off your meal.   3. Your dog-obsessed aunt joins you for Thanksgiving lunch and brings her dog that she feeds from the table. For the dog who doesn't earn the title of best showing at the table, there's still hope to claim the title of "Best in Show." Thanksgiving also doubles as the date of the National Dog Show. And just like your uncle, who avoids anything with Cheez-Whiz, the judges have high standards too. They're not only looking for a dog with defined features, correct gait and fitness level but a happy dog that enjoys the competition, so each dog's expression and general demeanor receive extra scrutiny. 4. Your little sister keeps taking selfies, and all you can think about is how full you are. Be thankful you don't have to pass a post-meal jiggle test. Some NFL team's cheer coaches conduct "jiggle tests" to assess the firmness of the cheerleaders' bodies during the season, and if they don't pass the test, they're benched. During a regular-season many make, on average less than $10/hour. With practices, appearances and games, they put in 30-40 hour weeks during the season, but most are required to have a full-time job elsewhere. 5. When your sibling throws a dinner roll at you (You know it's going to happen no matter how old you are). Don't get caught up in the heat of the moment, unlike Kelly Stafford. Kelly Stafford and her QB husband, Matt, are new additions to the LA Rams roster this year. Matt and his team took a beating in last week's Monday Night Football game against the San Francisco 49ers. During the game, Kelly threw a pretzel at a taunting opposing fan. A neighboring Rams fan called her out on it, and she later apologized for her bad behavior on Instagram. Links: Five things you never knew about NFL cheerleaders: https://lastnightsgame.com/podcast/2019/11-nfl-cheerleaders

Prosecco Theory
78 - Dinner With Friends

Prosecco Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 28:08


Megan and Michelle plan fantasy dinner parties and laugh about first date vibes, the Krunts, shots with RBG, 90s crush fests, and Barack (with or without Michelle).

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari
IFH 521: How to Create a Compelling Documentary with Julie Cohen & Betsy West

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 55:05


Today on the show we have Oscar® nominated documentarians Betsy West & Julie Cohen.Betsy West (Director/Producer) is an Academy Award®-nominated Emmy winning director/producer of RBG (Magnolia, Participant, CNN Films, 2018), along with Julie Cohen. Most recently, she and Cohen directed My Name is Pauli Murray (Participant/Amazon Studios), which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2021.Betsy was executive producer of the MAKERS PBS/AOL documentary and digital series about the modern women's movement, and the feature documentary The Lavender Scare (PBS, 2019). As an ABC News producer and executive producer of the documentary series Turning Point, she won 21 Emmy awards. Betsy is the Fred W. Friendly Professor Emerita at Columbia Journalism School.Julie Cohen (Director/Producer) is the Academy Award® nominated, Emmy winning director and producer of RBG (Magnolia, Participant, CNN Films, 2018) along with Betsy West. Her film My Name is Pauli Murray, also directed with West, premiered at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival.Previous films she's directed include The Sturgeon Queens (7th Art Releasing; Berlinale, 2015; Best of the Fest, San Francisco Jewish Film Festival), and Ndiphilela Ukucula: I Live to Sing (2014 New York Emmy Award for Best Arts Program).Before she started making documentaries, Julie was a longtime staff producer for NBC News. She's been an enthusiastic amateur cook and baker ever since her parents bought her a Cuisinart for her bat mitzvah in the 1970s.Their current film is called JULIA. The film tells the remarkable story of the groundbreaking cookbook author and television superstar who forever changed the way Americans think about food, about television, and even about women.Using a treasure trove of never-before-seen archival video, personal still photos, first-person narratives, and cutting-edge, mouth-watering food cinematography, the documentary will trace Julia Child's surprising path, from her struggles to create and publish the revolutionary ‘instant' classic Mastering the Art of French Cooking (1961, Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group), to her empowering personal story of a woman in her 50s, finding her calling as an unlikely television sensation.[presto_player id=50611]This is the first feature-length documentary solely devoted to Julia Child, and will illuminate her casual upheaval of the male-dominated culinary and television worlds.Almost single-handedly, Julia Child upended the mythology that women could not hold their own at the highest levels of creative gastronomy, and that the only women Americans wanted to see on TV were young, submissive, and conventionally beautiful.JULIA is produced with the full cooperation of Julia Child's friends, family, and the Julia Child Foundation.  It follows the highly-acclaimed documentary, RBG, executive produced by CNN Films, directed and produced by West and Cohen through their company Storyville Films, and edited by Carla Gutierrez, who will also edit JULIA.The film comes out Nov 12 in-theatres NY/LA followed by nationwide expansion.In this episode we not only discuss the making of Julia and RBG but also cover how they approach documentary, the craft of tell stories and much more. Enjoy my conversation with Betsy West & Julie Cohen.

National Day Calendar
November 18, 2021 - World Pancreatic Cancer Day | Mickey Mouse Birthday

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 3:00


Welcome to November 18, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we remember a celebrity host and a mighty mouse.  Just over a year ago we lost one of our most beloved game show hosts: Alex Trebek. While he is best known for his 30 plus years hosting Jeopardy, this was not his first show. Canadian born Trebek began his American career with a show called the Wizard of Odds. Sadly, the odds were not in his favor when he began his battle with stage 4 pancreatic cancer. Anyone facing the 8 percent survival rate knows, this disease is about time. That time is often measured in months and while the odds haven't changed in more than 40 years, today there is a reason to celebrate. The folks at PancOne are dedicated to research that gives patients more time through something called personalized medicine.   Marlo: What is an organoid?  John: Yeah, what is an organoid?  Anna: Visit PancOne.org to find out more and do your part by donating to this groundbreaking research. On World Pancreatic Cancer Day we come together to find a cure. It's about time!   Marlo: I miss Alex Trebek, I've already donated. Anna: Me too. I miss Ruth Bader Ginsberg. John: What's that website again?  Anna: PancOne.org. We give a shout out today to the world's most popular cartoon character: Mickey Mouse. Here are a few facts about Walt Disney's loveable rodent, that you might not have heard. His original name was Mortimer, but Disney's wife made him change it. His first appearance was in the 1928 silent cartoon, Steamboat Willie. Mickey didn't speak until the following year's animated feature The Carnival Kid, in which he worked as a food vendor. His first words were “Hot dog! Hot dog!” He was the first animated character to get a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1978. Today we celebrate the birthday of this little mouse who's made a big impact. I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Life Matters
263: What's Happened to the Hippocratic Oath?

Life Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:58


In this episode of Life Matters, Commissioner Johnston examines the vital importance of the Hippocratic Oath for retaining the values of Western Civilization - respect for the vulnerable innocent. Reading portions from his book, Evil Twins - Roe and Doe: How the Supreme Court Unleashed Medical Killing, Brian underscores the incredible significance of these decisions in assaulting and redefining the healing role of the medical profession. Astoundingly, even Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg openly condemned the Roe and Doe decisions for licensing doctors to kill as they saw fit, but not actually giving women any rights at all!  The program includes extensive commentary on the importance of re-establishing the Oath and proclamation of the Rome declaration of ethical doctors who are calling the medical profession back to its roots, and reaffirming the Hippocratic Oath.

The Briefing - AlbertMohler.com
Friday, October 22, 2021

The Briefing - AlbertMohler.com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 26:32


DOCUMENTATION AND ADDITIONAL READING PART 1 (0:0 - 9:25): ────────────────── Lessons In The Symbiotic Relationship Of Press and Political Elite — Lesson One: Katie Couric Apologizes For Protecting Ruth Bader Ginsberg Over 2016 Interview WASHINGTON POST (ERIK WEMPLE) Katie Couric Admits She Was Wrong to ‘Protect' Ruth Bader Ginsburg PART 2 (9:26 - 11:22): ────────────────── The Symbiotic Relationship Of Press and Political Elite — Lesson Two: The Book Business and Big Media PART 3 (11:23 - 15:28): ────────────────── The Symbiotic Relationship Of Press and Political Elite — Lesson Three: Press Positively Covers Fashion Shift As Politics NEW YORK TIMES (VANESSA FRIEDMAN) Kyrsten Sinema's Style Keeps Us Guessing PART 4 (15:29 - 19:35): ────────────────── ‘Gender Agnosticism' On The Runway As Fashion Synthesizes With The Moral Revolution NEW YORK TIMES (VANESSA FRIEDMAN AND GUY TREBAY) The End of Gender PART 5 (19:36 - 21:49): ────────────────── Why Are Cities More Liberal than Rural Areas? — Dr. Mohler RespondsTo Letters From Listeners Of The Briefing PART 6 (21:50 - 23:17): ────────────────── Can The Supreme Court Overturn Texas Heartbeat Law But Still Overturn Roe v. Wade? — Dr. Mohler Responds To Letters From Listeners Of The Briefing PART 7 (23:18 - 26:32): ────────────────── How Should Young Women Pursue Education and Careers Without Succumbing To The Cultural Imperative Of ‘Career First, Babies Second'? — Dr. Mohler Responds To Letters From Listeners Of The Briefing

Son of a Boy Dad
Son of a Boy Dad: Ep. 24 - This Time Actually ft. Dave Portnoy

Son of a Boy Dad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 86:43


-- (0:00-30:20) Interview with Dave: his thoughts on the podcast, numbies, tiktok, SNL, getting arrested at the super bowl, & his plans for a stand-up special -- (30:20-1:26:44) Sas & Rone discuss parenting methods, Rone's trip to DC, conspiracy theories, thrifting, Sas' body re-comp, plans for more live shows, Ruth Bader Ginsberg, our plans to monetize war, & much more -- Tickets for our show at Laugh Boston on 11/3 will be on sale this week, new merch coming soon as well!

The Megyn Kelly Show
Dave Rubin on Vaccine Choice, Media Narratives, and Trump in 2024 | Ep. 1 81

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 86:57


Megyn Kelly is joined by Dave Rubin, host of "The Rubin Report," to talk about Kyrie Irving and vaccine choice, what polls show for Trump in 2024 and whether he should run again, Katie Couric's RBG interview and media narratives, the push to cancel Dave Chappelle, Jon Gruden's offensive comments, gender, sexuality and pronouns, VP Harris's space video, and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow

The Dan Bongino Show
Stop What You're Doing And Listen To This Doctor (Ep 1626)

The Dan Bongino Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 58:33


I interviewed a doctor on my radio show yesterday and it changed everything. I was floored by what he said. In this episode I address the interview. I also discuss the Biden Trojan Horse plan to “solve” the supply crisis.  News Picks: Is inflation about to explode?  Studies say the Biden tax hikes will crush the recovery.  Were some of the world's deadliest viruses shipped to China? Leaked Border Patrol documents show massive numbers of illegal immigrants released into the United States.  Katie Couric edits an interview with the late RBG in order to “protect her.” Copyright Bongino Inc All Rights Reserved