Podcast appearances and mentions of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

  • 4,737PODCASTS
  • 6,813EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 16, 2021LATEST
Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Best podcasts about Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Latest podcast episodes about Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Bloggingheads.tv
Donald Trump and Dave Chappelle Walk into a Bar … (Robert Wright & Mickey Kaus)

Bloggingheads.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 60:00


Trump finally crosses the line for Mickey (again) ... Why is Trump threatening to undermine Republicans in the midterms? ... Mickey: It's smart politics to dump the child tax credit ... Are some of Dave Chappelle's jokes antisemitic? ... Ruth Bader Ginsburg's less-than-flattering appraisal of Colin Kaepernick ... Is Steve Bannon going to jail? ... Bob: “The jury is out” on the possibility of democracy in China ... Parrot Room preview: Supply chains, Michael Wolff's account of Jeffrey Epstein's theory of Trump, Walgreens closes stores over crime, Nick Kristof's possible gubernatorial run, more evidence of Ben Rhodes's blobishness, David Shor, Terry McAuliffe's chances in Virginia, a roadblock to Mickey's coup theory, the new Velvet Underground doc, Steven Pinker and the left, a genitalia joke face-off, Facebook's thought policing, and help for boomers ...

The Wright Show
Donald Trump and Dave Chappelle Walk into a Bar … (Robert Wright & Mickey Kaus)

The Wright Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 60:00


Trump finally crosses the line for Mickey (again) ... Why is Trump threatening to undermine Republicans in the midterms? ... Mickey: It's smart politics to dump the child tax credit ... Are some of Dave Chappelle's jokes antisemitic? ... Ruth Bader Ginsburg's less-than-flattering appraisal of Colin Kaepernick ... Is Steve Bannon going to jail? ... Bob: “The jury is out” on the possibility of democracy in China ... Parrot Room preview: Supply chains, Michael Wolff's account of Jeffrey Epstein's theory of Trump, Walgreens closes stores over crime, Nick Kristof's possible gubernatorial run, more evidence of Ben Rhodes's blobishness, David Shor, Terry McAuliffe's chances in Virginia, a roadblock to Mickey's coup theory, the new Velvet Underground doc, Steven Pinker and the left, a genitalia joke face-off, Facebook's thought policing, and help for boomers ...

The Pete Kaliner Show
Pete Kaliner: Is Katie Couric Pulling Quotes Out Of Her Ruth Bader Ginsburg Interview The Standard Now? (Hour 2)

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:24


In Hour 2 of the program, Pete talks about Katie Couric admitting that she omitted a quote from an interview with former Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg about athletes kneeling - a quote that could have forced Ginsburg to step down from her seat.  Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/petekalinershow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris
The Left Goes After Rogan But Praises Couric. Inflation Is Seen Has A Minor Setback For Biden. Shatner and Bezos Attacked For Wasting Money In Space.

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 123:21


The Left has their eye on Joe Rogan and must go after his beliefs. Meanwhile Katie Couric deliberately changed the words of Ruth Bader Ginsburg! Inflation is still on the rise but it is all part of Biden's plan! William Shatner and Jeff Bezos attacked for venturing into space rather than spending Earth money.

Even More News
Worker Strikes, Shatner in Space, and EVEN MORE Supply Chain Issues

Even More News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 65:52


Hi. On this week's episode, "Some More News" director Will Gordh (@will_gordh) joins Katy and Cody to talk about the strengthening U.S. labor movement, Katie Couric's confusing RBG decision, and why it's more than just demand driving up the price of bacon. Check out writing from Will's father, Bob Gordh! https://www.laprogressive.com/racist-ideology/https://bgordh.medium.com/ https://bgordh.medium.com/ Support SOME MORE NEWS: http://www.patreon.com/SomeMoreNews We now have a MERCH STORE! Check it out here: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/somemorenews Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/some-more-news/id1364825229 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6ebqegozpFt9hY2WJ7TDiA?si=5keGjCe5SxejFN1XkQlZ3w&dl_branch=1 Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/even-more-news Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/somemorenews Go to http://idtech.com/morenews right now and use code morenews to save $150 dollars on weekly, small-group Semesters! Go to http://bambee.com/morenews to schedule your FREE HR audit. Visit to http://Stamps.com, click on the microphone at the TOP of the homepage and type in MORENEWS and you'll get a special offer that includes a 4-week trial PLUS free postage and a digital scale. No long-term commitments or contracts.  Follow us on social media!  Twitter: https://twitter.com/SomeMoreNews  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/SomeMoreNews/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SomeMoreNews/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@somemorenews     Support the show!: http://patreon.com.com/somemorenews See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The RELEVANT Podcast
NEEDTOBREATHE

The RELEVANT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 57:34


Bear Reinhart from NEEDTOBREATHE joins us on today's episode. Plus, we discuss the shocking news of Katie Couric editing Ruth Bader Ginsberg's comments on RELEVANT News, the need for a rescuing duck boat and more. Stick around to the end to hear last week's responses to our question about Hell Houses. Things get pretty wild! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/relevant-podcast/message

Higher Learning with Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay
The Democratic Honeymoon Is Over and Prayers for Jelani Day 

Higher Learning with Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 83:28


Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay react to Kyrie Irving's IG Live regarding his COVID vaccine choice (4:22), discuss Joe Biden's presidential performance thus far (28:36), and ask an unexpected question about Ruth Bader Ginsburg (39:59). Also, 25-year-old Jelani Day is remembered amid rampant rumors following his mysterious death (48:45).  Hosts: Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay Producers: Trudy Joseph and Donnie Beacham Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ink Stained Wretches
Where's the Le Boeuf?

Ink Stained Wretches

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:48


Gruesome Gruden coverage, Katie Couric takes a knee for RBG, and alternative media sources pick up the MSM slack on wokeism Times 03:26 - Segment: Front Page 03:35 - Jon Gruden's horrific emails 10:19 - Katie Couric's admits to editing an interview with the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg 14:40 - The New York Times' critical race theory coverage 20:08 - Sanjay Gupta on why he likes to be famous 21:50 - WaPo's fake French food critic 25:35 - Tucker Carlson and Fox News' vaccine mandate 27:34 - WaPo's article on quitting Facebook 30:23 - Segment: Obsessions 30:32 - Jonah Goldberg's article on the populist GOP (Chris) 33:35 - Bari Weiss's coverage of the excesses of wokeism 39:04 - Segment: Favorite Item of the Week 39:28 - Reid Epstein's tear jerker of a story (Chris) 41:02 - Conan O'brien's Podcasting network (Eliana) Links The other Katie Couric edit, as reported by the Washington Free Beacon The Atlantic article on Gannett Jonah Goldberg's article on the "Trumpified" GOP Cancelled MIT professor Dorian Abbot and suspended UCLA professor Gordon Klein share their stories on Bari Weiss's Substack

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 2: Couple finds their luggage is overweight because of stowaway dog

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:48


Sully: Getting to Climate Pledge Arena 101: Prepare to ditch the car // Amid crew shortages, Washington State Ferries to cut sailings on some routes by half - AUDIO  // Netflix Employee Group Calls for Walkout Amid Tensions Over Dave Chappelle Show - AUDIO  // Professor Not Teaching After Blackface ‘Othello' Showing // George Takei Slams William Shatner as ‘Unfit' 90 Year Old ‘Guinea Pig' After His Space Flight // RBG Criticized National-Anthem Protests, and Katie Couric Covered It Up // Here's the original piece that Couric did publish: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Trump, Kaepernick and her lifelong love of the law - AUDIO  // ESPN's Schefter faces criticism over sending story to NFL exec // Travelers, Welcome to the Revolution in Overhead Bin Size // Couple finds their luggage is overweight because of stowaway dog   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
Hillary Clinton's Election Double Standard, Katie Couric Admits to Editing RBG Interview, and Previewing O'Reilly's Interview with President Trump

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 46:08


Tonight's rundown: How much longer can the media ignore and cover up President Biden's failures? Bill heads to Florida to interview Former President Donald Trump Let's turn back time – remember when Hillary Clinton claimed the 2016 election was stolen from her and we had an investigation for two years into Russia collusion?! Katie Couric admits to editing out negative comments by Ruth Bader Ginsburg about those who kneel during the National Anthem Chicago Police plan legal action against the mayor's vaccine mandate for city workers The Rolling Stones have officially retired one of their songs, ‘Brown Sugar,' after complaints that the song is offensive to black women Seattle school cancels Halloween parade because it ‘marginalizes students of color' This Day in History, 1964: Martin Luther King Jr. wins the Nobel Peace Prize Final Thought: The media desperately needs Donald Trump back! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 2: Katie Couric covered for RBG on athletes kneeling

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 33:37


Fastest 15 N Seattle parents regret unarming resource officers after AR-15 threatsChargers coach on Gruden // Katie Couric covered for RBG on athletes kneeling //  Biden on Covid this morning // Rogan calls out Sanjay Gupta on CNN lies See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Guy Benson Show
Guy Benson Show - 10-14-2021

Guy Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 109:25


Guy Benson Show - 10-14-2021 [00:00:00] 3:06 pm - CBS News Dishonest Headline Aims To Discredit FL Gov. DeSanctis on Covid [00:12:44] 3:24 pm - Katie Couric blasted over stunning admission about Ruth Bader Ginsburg interview [00:18:13] 3:35 pm - Peter Doocy, Fox News Channel's White House Correspondent [00:34:19] 3:55 pm - Trump Urges Republicans to Sit Out Coming Elections [00:36:15] 4:06 pm - Andrew McCarthy, Fox News Contributor, Former Assistant U.S. Attorney For Southern District Of NY, [00:52:22] 4:27 pm - Top White House official retweets post calling inflation, supply chain issues ‘high class problems' [00:54:27] 4:35 pm - The Art Institute of Chicago fires all 122 of its (unpaid and volunteer) docents because they aren't sufficiently “diverse” [01:02:28] 4:47 pm - Kennedy, Host of Kennedy on the Fox Business Network [01:12:41] 5:06 pm - Will Cain, co-host of Fox & Friends weekend 6-10amET & Host of The Will Cain Podcast [01:28:24] 5:27 pm - Quite Wyatt does a good deed [01:31:03] 5:35 pm - REPLAY: Peter Doocy [01:34:30] 5:42 pm - Homestretch: Guy goes to Greece

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Erick Erickson Show: S10 EP173: Hour 2 – Katie Couric: Another Reason You Can't Trust the Press

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Supposed journalist Katie Couric engaged in what can only be described as activism when editing RBG’s answers in order to “protect” her plus the bubble democrats have created for themselves with the media is causing them election heartache.

Good Morning Liberty
Government Is Never Really Here to Help || EP 563

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 36:06


Senators aim to block tech giants from prioritizing their own products over rivals' https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2021/10/14/klobuchar-grassley-antitrust-bill/?utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most&carta-url=https%3A%2F%2Fs2.washingtonpost.com%2Fcar-ln-tr%2F34f9839%2F61684d069d2fda9d410ee9f7%2F61149a97ade4e221cc13c15c%2F11%2F68%2F61684d069d2fda9d410ee9f7 Psaki says Biden wants to make a 'fundamental change' to the American economy and that 'coming out of the pandemic' is the perfect time to do it https://www.theblaze.com/news/psaki-admits-biden-wants-to-use-covid-pandemic-to-usher-in-fundamental-change-to-america?utm_source=theblaze-dailyAM&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily-Newsletter__AM%202021-10-14&utm_term=ACTIVE%20LIST%20-%20TheBlaze%20Daily%20AM Amazon Abandons Warehouse Plan Because San Diego Is Considering Worker Protection Law https://www.vice.com/en/article/wx5w8x/amazon-abandons-warehouse-plan-because-san-diego-is-considering-worker-protection-law Katie Couric covered up RBG's dislike for taking the knee: Anchor says she edited 2016 interview to 'protect' the justice after she said people who kneel are showing 'contempt for a government that made a decent life possible' https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10088027/Katie-Couric-admits-editing-Ruth-Bader-Ginsburg-interview-protect-late-justice.html A record number of workers are quitting their jobs, empowered by new leverage https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2021/10/12/jolts-workers-quitting-august-pandemic/ The Nomad Network is the #1 community for liberty minded people just like you, who want to create freeom in their lifetime by focusing on entrepreneurship, investment and income mobility. http://www.nomadnetwork.app/gml Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fearless with Jason Whitlock
Ep 71 | Couric Is a FRAUD for Censoring Ginsburg's Kaepernick Critique | ESPN's Fake Kyrie Coverage

Fearless with Jason Whitlock

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 80:43


Whitlock blasts Katie Couric and ESPN with both barrels in back-to-back segments. Reacting to Couric's admission that she covered up late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's negative comments about Colin Kaepernick, the big man explains why it's indicative of a larger issue in media and society. Former ESPN writer Steve Kim weighs in on Jay Williams' surprising defense of unvaccinated Brooklyn Nets star Kyrie Irving. Why does Stephen A. Smith's and Molly Qerim Rose's reaction show a conspiracy to silence real discussion about COVID? Plus, “Keep It Naked” author Shemeka Michelle destroys Meek Mill and Lizzo in one of her patented epic musical rants.   ​​Today's Sponsor: Try the Cattleman or Ranchers Classic bundles from Good Ranchers! It will provide a great meal for everyone in your family. Visit https://GoodRanchers.com/FEARLESS to get $20 OFF and FREE express shipping. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Erick Erickson Show
S10 EP173: Hour 2 - Katie Couric: Another Reason You Can't Trust the Press

The Erick Erickson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 37:31


Supposed journalist Katie Couric engaged in what can only be described as activism when editing RBG's answers in order to "protect" her plus the bubble democrats have created for themselves with the media is causing them election heartache.

The View
Thursday, Oct. 14: Tamera Mowry-Housley

The View

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 41:28


Actress Tamera Mowry-Housley shares what she taught her kids during quarantine, co-hosting her new show “Bakers Dozen” and how she reacted to being rejected for a teen magazine cover because she was Black. In Hot Topics, Sherri Shepherd and Ana Navarro join. The panel discusses Katie Couric editing Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's comments in an interview, and more.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H2 – Oct 14 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 45:13


Biden's politics spark crisis in supply chain, inflation. Price for kids' shoes skyrockets as Biden claims he fixed it. Katie Couric admits doctoring video of interview with RBG to cut out her comments critical of anti-American kneeling at football games. Look for more panic, hoarding thanks to Biden telling people to buy everything they need now. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Megyn Kelly Show
Dave Rubin on Vaccine Choice, Media Narratives, and Trump in 2024 | Ep. 1 81

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 86:57


Megyn Kelly is joined by Dave Rubin, host of "The Rubin Report," to talk about Kyrie Irving and vaccine choice, what polls show for Trump in 2024 and whether he should run again, Katie Couric's RBG interview and media narratives, the push to cancel Dave Chappelle, Jon Gruden's offensive comments, gender, sexuality and pronouns, VP Harris's space video, and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Thursday October 14 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 107:36


President Biden says ports will open 24/7 to help resolve the supply chain issues. Energy prices are expected to skyrocket over the winter. Holiday traditions may need to be altered due to product shortage. Dana explains how the expansion of IRS oversight should be the biggest story right now. Prince William slams the space race. Australia is arresting people for sunbathing on the beach. Dr. Fauci admits COVID is endemic. Katie Couric selectively edited out portions of an interview with Ruth Bader Ginsburg to make her look better.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaStand with Patriot Mobile. Free activations with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comStart your day a new way and receive a 30-day supply of SuperBeets Heart Chews with your first purchase.Bonner Winehttps://conservativewines.comDana listeners now receive 50% wine and 50% shipping only at www.Conservativewines.com.Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Tommy Johnhttps://tommyjohns.com/DanaGet your extra comfy Loungewear today and receive 205 off your first order.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Thursday October 14 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 107:36


President Biden says ports will open 24/7 to help resolve the supply chain issues. Energy prices are expected to skyrocket over the winter. Holiday traditions may need to be altered due to product shortage. Dana explains how the expansion of IRS oversight should be the biggest story right now. Prince William slams the space race. Australia is arresting people for sunbathing on the beach. Dr. Fauci admits COVID is endemic. Katie Couric selectively edited out portions of an interview with Ruth Bader Ginsburg to make her look better.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaStand with Patriot Mobile. Free activations with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comStart your day a new way and receive a 30-day supply of SuperBeets Heart Chews with your first purchase.Bonner Winehttps://conservativewines.comDana listeners now receive 50% wine and 50% shipping only at www.Conservativewines.com.Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Tommy Johnhttps://tommyjohns.com/DanaGet your extra comfy Loungewear today and receive 205 off your first order.

Armstrong & Getty Podcast
October 14, 2021 - The Rock, 2024?

Armstrong & Getty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:21


Thursday's A&G features Katie Couric's professionalism, and the late justice RBG's thoughts on protests. Joe Rogan calls out CNN, and more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Kevin Jackson Show
Ep. 21-398 - SWA

The Kevin Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:40


In this episode, Southwest CEO leads the charge against the vaccine mandate. Vaccine related deaths only if within 14 days. Robber barons at the highest level of industry with the government.

The Buck Sexton Show
CNN Lied About Ivermectin to Mock the Right

The Buck Sexton Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 25:38


Joe Rogan gets Dr Sanjay Gupta of CNN to admit that calling Ivermectin “horse dewormer” was a willful and malicious lie- and as we know, CNN has no ethics. Fauci says COVID will be around forever- what a shock! Katie Couric “protected” Ruth Bader Ginsburg from her own criticism of kneeling, anti-patriotic athletes by editing her comments in an interview, because Couric is a propagandist. And Netflix gets more heat over Dave Chappelle, but they won't cancel him- we discuss why.  Please subscribe to the podcast! And get more exclusive content from Buck at BuckSexton.com. Find Buck on: Twitter @BuckSexton   Facebook @BuckSexton  Instagram @BuckSexton  Email the Podcast: TeamBuck@IHeartMedia.com Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Three Martini Lunch: Dem Agenda Unpopular, Biden vs. Reality on Energy, Couric & Ginsburg

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Join Jim and Greg as they welcome a new CNN poll showing more and more Americans want nothing to do with the Democrats’ big spending plans on terrible programs. They also unload on President Biden for begging for help on energy prices from oil and gas companies after his policies to kill fossil fuels predictably […]

The Dan Bongino Show
Stop What You're Doing And Listen To This Doctor (Ep 1626)

The Dan Bongino Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 58:33


I interviewed a doctor on my radio show yesterday and it changed everything. I was floored by what he said. In this episode I address the interview. I also discuss the Biden Trojan Horse plan to “solve” the supply crisis.  News Picks: Is inflation about to explode?  Studies say the Biden tax hikes will crush the recovery.  Were some of the world's deadliest viruses shipped to China? Leaked Border Patrol documents show massive numbers of illegal immigrants released into the United States.  Katie Couric edits an interview with the late RBG in order to “protect her.” Copyright Bongino Inc All Rights Reserved

Armstrong and Getty
The Rock, 2024?

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 45:42


Thursday's A&G features Katie Couric's professionalism, and the late justice RBG's thoughts on protests. Joe Rogan calls out CNN, and more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Pat Gray Unleashed
The Promiscuous Quail | 10/14/21

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 94:55


The majority of Americans now say Dr. Anthony Fauci has lost credibility with the American people. President Joe Biden's approval polls continue to drop all the way around, even among Democrats. Fentanyl has overtaken car crashes as the leading cause of death among teenagers along the border. The U.S. funded a study to see if quail are more promiscuous when on crack? Joe Rogan questions CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta about his network's lies and asks why kids should be getting vaccinated. Warning for the West. What are the communists planning next? Thankfully, they told us back in 1963. Ruth Bader Ginsburg didn't like people kneeling for the flag? Kyrie Irving speaks out about the NBA's decision. Bill de Blasio is removing Thomas Jefferson from the city council room. Australia only continues to tighten its lockdowns and imposes the strictest vaccine mandate in the world. How's the murder rate going since Australia confiscated guns? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hard Factor
10/14/21: N. Korean Soldiers Self Defense Demo: Greatest Content Ever 

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 73:12


Katie Couric is spilling the tea on RBG's 2016 takes on Colin Kaepernick and kneeling during the national anthem ahead of her new book she's selling. Some sad news where a very young child shot his mother because his father left his gun in his Paw Patrol Bag. Also sadly it has been confirmed that cartel leaders, police chiefs and allegedly the army in Mexico teamed up to capture and kill 43 students back in 2014. A new product that looks like it might not work is being marketed as an anti cocaine spray. In quite possibly the greatest video ever elite North Korean soldiers put on a live display for Kim Jung Un (00:51:34) (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:06:00) - Fun Fact - 197 out of the 330 million Americans have heard of podcasts (00:07:20) - Holidays: Be Bald Day, National FRUMP Day, Spider Man Day and World Sight Day (00:09:10) - This Day in History: 1066 the Battle of Hastings and the Norman Invasion; 1322 Robert the Bruce of Scotland defeated Edward II of England (00:14:06) - Trending Mentions: NHL season started; There was a horrible bow and arrow attack in Norway where five people were killed; Adam Schefter in trouble from NFL emails to WFT execs too (00:19:41) - #3 - William Shatner went to outer space in a Blue Origin spacecraft, becoming the oldest man in space ever (00:22:14) - #2 - Kevin James trended after a fake graphic of the most searched for pornhub topics by state listed him as Tennessee's top search (00:23:55) - Cream of the Crop: Katie Couric admits she withheld Ruth Bader Ginsberg's comments about Colin Kaepernick and kneeling during the national anthem in 2016 (00:32:50) - Child shoots and kills his Mother by accident after father leaves gun in Paw Patrol bag (00:35:25) - Brett Favre and the Million Dollar Men might owe the state of Mississippi millions of dollars TikTok International Moment (00:40:35) - Newly released text messages prove that the cartel the police and the army in Mexico teamed up to capture and murder 43 students in Mexico in 2014 (00:45:50) - An Australian man stormed an animal shelter at gunpoint to retrieve his cat (00:51:34) - North Korean special forces put on the demonstration of a lifetime, breaking block and brick over their heads as a starter (01:02:59) - A company comes up with anti coke spray and markets to pub owners These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: Talkspace - Match with a licensed therapist when you go to https://www.talkspace.com/ and get $100 off your first month with the promo code HARDFACTOR. Lightstream - Take control of your credit card debt with a consolidation loan from Lightstream. Get a special interest rate discount by going to https://www.lightstream.com/Factor Raycon - Everyday earbuds that look, feel, and sound better than ever. Get 15% off you Raycon order at https://buyraycon.com/hardfactor Go to store.hardfactor.com and patreon.com/hardfactor to support the pod with incredible merch and bonus podcasts Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480, send us a voice memo to hardfactorvoicemail@gmail.com, and/or leave a 5-Star review on Apple Podcasts to hear it on Friday's show Other Places to Listen: Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Lots More... Watch Full Episodes on YouTube Follow @HardFactorNews on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, and Facebook

The Daily Zeitgeist
To The Trendow, To The Wall 10/13: William Shatner, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Jamie Costa, Herschel Walker, LaVar Ball, Goth Hospital

The Daily Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 23:27


In this edition of To Trendow, To The Wall, Jack and Miles discuss Captain Kirk finally going to space, Katie Couric admitting to editing out negative comments in RBG interview, Jamie Costa's incredible Robin Williams impersonation, Herschel Walker cancelling fundraiser with supporter who had swastika in her Twitter profile, LaVar Ball's embarassingly ugly and expensive sneakers, and Pornhub's porn search map. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 132: Every Box Tells a Story: Marc Cohen's Box Art Jewelry with Art Jeweler, Marc Cohen- Part 2

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:23


What you'll learn in this episode: Why Marc's box art jewelry was inspired by his time working in the theater industry How Marc went from selling his work on the streets of New York City to selling them to Hollywood's biggest celebrities Why artists have always borrowed from each other's work Why box art is a conversation starter that breaks down barriers How every box tells a story Additional Resources: Instagram Photos: Museum of Israel Exhibition  Currently on view at SFO Airport  Marc Cohen and Lisa Berman (no relation)  About Marc Cohen: Marc Cohen is a highly regarded artist known for his wearable box art. As a former actor, stage manager and set designer, Cohen's two-inch-square boxes resemble stage sets with three-dimensional figures and images. His one-of-a-kind pieces sit on the shelves of numerous celebrities and can be worn like a brooch or pin. The archive of Cohen's work is housed at California art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear. Transcript: Inspired by his time in theater and created to resemble a stage, Marc Cohen's box art pieces are well-known among rare jewelry lovers and Hollywood's most famous artists, actors and producers. Part three-dimensional art, part jewelry, the two-by-two boxes feature images and tiny figures that reflect our world. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about his process for creating box art; what it was like to work with theater greats like Tom O'Horgan and Paula Wagner; and why his pieces are more than just shadow boxes. Read the episode transcript for part 2 below.  Sharon: You've arrived, it sounds like. Marc: It's kind of an affirmation. Sharon: Absolutely. Do you think the boxes would be as effective if you hadn't had this experience as a set designer or stage manager in the theater? If I sat down and made a box, I could just stick some figures in it. Do you think that really impacted your work? Marc: To answer you in an honest way, I think if I hadn't done those things—all I did before was put little seashells in boxes. I'm skirting away from your answer, so excuse me. I think because I already was someone who had been traveling around the world and already had experiences that were theatrical, because I was meeting people and talking to people standing in the middle of the street in Paris, I was already getting the idea. It was being planted. When I got involved in theater—I also did film—I saw what that was about and how everything was in a frame. A stage in a theater on Broadway, it's in a box. Sharon: That's true. Marc: It all made a lot of sense to me. There are also ironies about it for me. For example, when I talked about when I was going to high school and people would look at me and think I'm an artist, what they were doing was putting me in a box. I like to think the boxes I create are about that, but they're beyond. Once someone engages themselves in looking at it and then they end up talking to somebody, it opens up a whole other kind of thing. It breaks down that barrier that a lot of us have with each other. It came from working in theater with someone like Tom O'Horgan, who was way ahead of his time as a Broadway theater director. He did a lot of avant garde, off-off Broadway stuff. He's no longer alive. He was my best friend in the entire world. There's not a moment I don't have gratitude about that friendship, but since then I've married. I have a beautiful wife.  My wife is a filmmaker, and she and I are developing another kind of box art. I know; we don't make jewelry. I'm doing video with her. We have a series called Traveler's Ball. It's on YouTube. People can watch it if they want. It's very cutting edge. She was inspired by what I do, where I do images layered in a box. A lot of our videos have layered images. Along those lines, I have always wanted to create a box video on a small scale. A long time ago, when I first started making these things—I'm a man with a lot of information and ideas in my brain—the technology wasn't there yet. The nanos and the microscopic things, images on the head of a pin, that wasn't around when I first started. For example, I made three-dimensional, two-inch-square watches on a band. I don't have one to show you—Lisa might have one—but I made these. When I was selling on the street, I would wear one and boxes on my lapel. People would see this thing on my wrist and go, “What is that?” I would show them, and they would all go, “Wow, that's unreal! It's big, but that's amazing! When are you going to sell these?” I said, “I'm not ready to sell them yet.” I did eventually sell some. I only made two dozen of them in my life.  If you look at an Apple Watch, they finally did what I was thinking about doing in 1985. The only difference is theirs is a one-dimensional object you wear on your wrist. It is amazing to see somebody with an Apple Watch and all the different things it does, but for me, there's a missing ingredient. The missing ingredient is a point of view. A point of view is putting characters in front of something, like we are in real life; people standing on the street corner talking, meanwhile the bus is going by. I always wanted to take that idea and put it on a small scale and add the element of art to it. I didn't want it to be cookie cutter, we're making five million Apple Watches and everybody's going to have one. Not everyone's going to have a Marc Cohen version of that, and I want to keep it that way. I'm famous for a lot of things, but I'm also famous for the fact that I never like to make any of these things more than once or twice. There's something about that I only made one-of-a-kind images.  In the beginning, I used other people's images—the fine art of appropriation. There's a guy who's no longer alive who I learned a lot about; his name was Joseph Cornell. Joseph Cornell is probably the grandfather of appropriation art. Rauschenberg and Warhol, when they talk about their own art and their influences, they always bring up the name Joseph Cornell. Joseph Cornell made boxes. He handmade them himself. He was an eccentric guy who lived in Utopia, New York. Think about that: Utopia, New York. Joseph Cornell was this rather interesting guy. He was a poet. He was curious. He made all these different boxes, and you can't buy one. They're incredibly expensive. But I've had people along the way say, “You're like a modern-day Joseph Cornell.” I don't know what that exactly means. I'm a modern-day Joseph Cornell? But they talk about what I've done and what I've accomplished. It's an interesting thing for me that has followed me in this jewelry story. What else could I tell you? Sharon: I'm curious. Do people commission you and say, “It's my husband's anniversary. I want a box with us and our wedding picture with it.” Marc: Exactly. For example, Lisa Berman has a relative whose name is Virginia Apgar. Virginia Apgar is famous because she created the Apgar Score. I don't know if your viewers know what that is, but they can look it up. There was an event Lisa was going to be doing. Lisa, being an old friend of mine, I felt like I wanted to give her a memento. There's a forever stamp, and this is Virginia Apgar. Sharon: A frame with the brooch. Marc: A frame with the brooch in the middle, and all around are these images of Virginia. Warhol and Hockney did this thing where they took a person's face—I don't know if you've ever seen any of those silkscreens that Warhol used to do. I'm influenced by that too. That's how I came up with this idea of making Lisa a one-of-a-kind, object of art concept.  Sharon, I want to tell you another thing: how the box art thing really started. Originally, when I first started doing things, I started a company called Still Life. Still Life was the early stages of box art, but it wasn't in a box. It was a flat piece of plastic, circular most of the time, and it was either blue or white or green. On top of that, I would marry other things. I had little three-dimensional palm trees, and I would glue them to the surface of this round, circular piece of plastic, and then I would glue those figures I'm telling you about. I would have people at the beach. If it was a travel map, I would have people with suitcases. I had a whole series. I had like Still Life Creations Beach, Still Life Creations Travel, on and on. Still Life creation stages is how it evolved to the boxes. The point is that when I was doing Still Life, one night, I came across the idea of taking a little box and turning it into something you wear. That doorway I was speaking about earlier opened me up even further into where I am to this day. I'm still very fertile with a lot of ideas. You live in this visual world. Sharon: Right, absolutely. I love the idea that they're door openers and conversation starters that break down barriers. It's not easy to do in New York or anywhere, but I don't think New York is the conversation-starting capital of the world, let's say. Marc: Right. All the world's a stage, and all of us are players on that stage. Some people have the ability to get on that stage and act and do, while other people are off on the side watching. They're not as easily going to jump in. Ruth Bader Ginsberg whom we all love—who didn't love Ruth Bader Ginsberg? What an incredibly magnificent woman. When she was out of being a Supreme Court justice, Lisa had this idea for a show. She invited all her wearable art friends to come up with a collar idea. She mentioned it to me, and I was trying to figure out what I could do with boxes to make a collar. I'm going to try to do this carefully. Behind me— Sharon: We'll show a picture of this when we post the podcast so people can see it. Marc: Right, behind me is this. This is a series of 18 boxes in a square. I mounted it on leather. I made it in such a way that you could take this off and wear it around your neck as a necklace. My wife, who is very gorgeous—she used to be a model, among other things in her life—she wore it. Lisa has a picture of her wearing it. It's one of those objects that, if you wear it among the other incredible collars that all of Lisa's artists made, this is even more of a conversation piece because of the image of Ruth. In each box I put her most-known rulings, the titles of them. Wearing that, going to an opening somewhere, it's going to draw people's attention. That's why I keep on saying the same thing over again: every box tells a story. Sharon: Where do you get the little figures? Do you buy them at doll stores where people make doll houses, or do you go to the toy store? Marc: It used to be a trade secret. I tried in the beginning to keep everything I did very secret, but if you're a creative person and you buy one of my boxes, if you really want to know how I made it, you can take it all apart and figure it out. If they're really curious, they could look at the figures, and now that we Google everything, they could find out that the figures are made in Europe. When I first started, I bought the figures at a model train store. Model train stores have everything for making dioramas.  Sharon: They're too large for what you're doing, but I was thinking about the little plastic toy soldiers my brother used to have. Marc: Exactly. I have made boxes bigger than two inches square to be worn. That's easy to wear, but suddenly six inches to wear—that's a major statement. I used to take top hats and other hats and make a whole diorama around the hat, one-of-a-kind. I made a whole bunch of those, and I sold those pretty quickly. I made sunglasses that had a whole scene in the rim of the sunglasses. They didn't last very long because they're fragile; the wrong windstorm and they break. That's why the box, in the end, became the most utilitarian object to protect what was inside, the image and the little characters. There's meaning in that, protecting ourselves. Sharon: Where are you getting your ideas from? Are you walking down the street and seeing the World Trade Center and saying, “Oh, that would be great”? Marc: That's interesting, too. I don't live in New York City anymore. I really wish I was living in New York City. I can't afford it right now, but in the early days when I first was doing this, the mid-80s, early 90s when I was selling on the street, I would walk up and down all the fashion streets where all the storefronts are, a million different shops. There are boxes, but they have mannequins inside them. They are large versions of what I was doing on a small scale, and I would get inspired just by seeing what other window display people were doing. I would go to Barney's. Barney's uptown was amazing, the designers of the windows there. So were the windows in Tiffany. Because I'm a box artist, I see these things and they inspire me. I'd hear political news of the day, and then I'd try to match something with what was happening in the world with an image, either one I would create or one I would find and appropriate. Sharon: Do you call yourself a box artist if people ask, “What do you do?” Do you say you're an artist or a maker of jewelry? What do you call yourself? Marc: I call myself a box artist.  Sharon: A box artist. Marc: I want to call myself a box artist. First of all, I like to think I created that name. Let's put it another way. When I was doing what I was doing, people used to say, “Oh, it's a shadow box,” because that's how people can connect with the idea. Shadow boxes, if you know what they are, are mostly that. They are cardboard most of the time, and people put things in them and they create shadows against the inside of the box. When I first started making these things, everybody was asking, “What is it? What do you call it?” and I would say, “It's a box and it has a little bit of art inside of it. It's box art.” The name stuck, and every time people would come up to me, they'd say, “What's your latest box art?” When you could get on the internet and Google things, I never saw the word box art in relationship to what I do, but I also never saw the word box art in relationship to anything. Once I started using the name, and when I would make my business cards and they would say, “Marc Cohen, Box Art,” then people would have that. You know how it is. The buzz gets out, so the word eventually stuck. So, I claim box art and I claim myself as a box artist. I claim myself as a lot of other things too, but some of them I can't mention.  It's a funny journey, all of this. Now, it's Box Art Dreams. What is Box Art Dreams? Box Art Dreams is video, because that's the next level. I want to get even more intimate. I'd like the store to be even bigger in its depth and in its message. One image can do that on a certain level. For the person that's looking at it, one image can stimulate a lot of images in their head, but think about on top of it. If I have a two-inch square box and it has a little video screen inside of it, and there's a little movie in there and there are characters standing in front of it looking at it, I don't think I'm going to be able to make them fast enough. Sharon: It's an interesting idea.  Marc: That's the goal. Now, I can't do that alone. My wife is a video maker and editor. I'm plugging Julia Danielle—she's a genius at video. One of our goals is to take the wearable art idea and give it even more of an attraction. It's not just on your lapel; there's something flickering in the box. Sharon: That would be really cool, yes. Marc: If it lights up, God almighty, what people would think. That's where I'm at. Once I do that, I don't know. Then, the next is large-scale exhibition. Starting with little boxes and leading me on a journey of jewelry and art. Sharon: I do want to mention, for those who are interested, that your boxes at this stage are with Lisa at Sculpture to Wear. We'll also be posting a link and a lot of other information about today. It'll be with the podcast. Marc, thank you so much. That was just so interesting. Marc: I appreciate it. Thank you. I want to tell you I'm honored for what you're doing. Sharon: Thank you very much. I appreciate that. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

The Psychology of Copywriting
055: Inception Series | How To Overcome Imposter Syndrome

The Psychology of Copywriting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 32:29


In today's episode – which concludes our INCEPTION Series – we discuss the feeling of imposter syndrome as copywriters. The study we dive into reveals how imposter syndrome in doctors and healthcare professionals negatively impacts their career trajectory. As copywriters, we may also experience imposter syndrome which can be a self-fulfilling prophecy that leads us to produce work of reduced quality. Listen in to hear my own experiences with imposter syndrome and my tips on how to overcome this feeling.    What To Look For In This Episode: 4 tips on how to overcome imposter syndrome. My personal experiences with imposter syndrome. How you can use the ACTION framework in your copy.    Journal Article: “Rising to the Level of Your Incompetence”: What Physicians' Self-Assessment of Their Performance Reveals About the Imposter Syndrome in Medicine. https://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Fulltext/2018/05000/_Rising_to_the_Level_of_Your_Incompetence___What.41.aspx   LaDonna, K. A., Ginsburg, S., & Watling, C. (2018). "Rising to the Level of Your Incompetence": What Physicians' Self-Assessment of Their Performance Reveals About the Imposter Syndrome in Medicine. Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 93(5), 763–768. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000002046   Resources:   Sign-up for the Inception Training Webinar and download the Inception series Resources (FREE) – geoffkullman.com/inception     Got a question you want answered on the podcast? Awesome! Go to geoffkullman.com/questions   Connect with Geoff: Instagram: instagram.com/geoffkullman Twitter: twitter.com/geoffkullman Inquiries: geoffkullman.com    Subscribe To The Podcast Here: Do you have friends, colleagues, or clients who would find The Psychology of Copywriting podcast valuable? Spread the word!

NancyG and CorryG
Q&A Interview with Cinque Northern, 'My name is Pauli Murray'

NancyG and CorryG

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 7:32


Cinque Northern talks about working on the documentary 'My name is Pauli Murray'. The film takes a look at the life of often unsung Civil Rights hero Pauli Murray, and the behind-the-scenes of her private life. Though she was not openly LGBTQIA+, at a time when that was frowned upon and dangerous, it informed some of her work. https://www.amazon.com/My-Name-Pauli-Murray/dp/B09DMPMWCP From Wikipedia: "My Name Is Pauli Murray is an 2021 American documentary film, directed by #BetsyWest and #JulieCohen, written by West, Cohen, #TalleahBridgesMcMahon and #CinqueNorthern. It follows the life of lawyer and activist Pauli Murray... who was instrumental in arguing the equal protection clause of the fourteenth amendment outlawed discrimination based on sex. Several scholars of Murray's work are featured in the film including Brittney Cooper and Rosalind Rosenberg. Rosenberg's research for the book Jane Crow: The Life of Pauli Murray is also highlighted. The film includes significant coverage of Murray's papers housed at the Schlesinger library. Murray's influence on Ruth Bader Ginsburg is covered in detail throughout the film." . . . . #paulimurray #paulimurrayproject #civilrights #womensrights #womensrightsmovement #lgbtq #lgbtqallies #amazonprime #documentaries #documentary #blackwomen #blackwomencivilrights #civilrightsleaders #paulimurraycenter --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nancygandcorryg/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nancygandcorryg/support

The Leader Assistant Podcast
#136: Nick Ginsburg on Authenticity and Community

The Leader Assistant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 36:55


Nick Ginsburg is a passionate and innovative Executive Assistant and mental health advocate. By day he is the Executive Assistant to the Provost and Senior Vice-President at Monash University and by night he is the host of The Open Drive Podcast and Founder of The Collective, a judgment-free community for administrative professionals worldwide.Nick and I talk about authenticity, building and cultivating a community, and more! Note: this is Nick's second appearance on the show, so be sure to check out our first conversation in Episode 18 of The Leader Assistant Podcast at leaderassistant.com/18. Show Notes -> leaderassistant.com/136Premium Membership -> leaderassistant.com/membershipBook -> leaderassistantbook.comEvents -> leaderassistantlive.comFree Community -> leaderassistant.com/community

The Ross Kaminsky Show
10-07-21 Judge Douglas Ginsburg Civics Fundamentals

The Ross Kaminsky Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 13:46


Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST: 10.06 - Politics with Dee Wampler

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 38:54


Local attorney Dee Wampler joins Nick Reed this morning. Here's what they cover: Ernest Johnson was put to death Tuesday for killing three workers while robbing a convenience store in 1994. Sarah studied criminology and talks about methods of execution. The ACLU botched a quote from RBG. Renaming Fort Hood. State Rep. Craig Fishel filed a Sunshine Law request demanding that Springfield's public schools turn over three years' worth of staff emails and other documents with references to critical race theory. In response, the school district is demanding a deposit of at least $170,000 to get started. Dee shares his weight loss update.

Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq.
Newsome Jabs The Kids, Naperville Firefighters Fight Mandates, WTW Show Updates and Open Talk

Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 129:54


Gavin Newsom rolls out vaccine mandates in schools for children prior to FDA approval and the Supreme Court refuses to stop a New York school mandate for taking effect. Naperville Firefights sue the city and the governor over vaccine mandates and we review the complaint. Show news, a review of the metrics, a thank you, and open forum. ​

Pat Oates is Sad
POS: Brandon Smith

Pat Oates is Sad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 82:40


Topics include ACLU gender neutralizing an RBG quote, name of area in UK banned from Facebook for supposedly being hateful and sexual, man gets caught with meth and chicken fingers and so much more. Brandon Smith from morelawsmoreproblems.com joins us.

The Briefing - AlbertMohler.com
Wednesday, September 29, 2021

The Briefing - AlbertMohler.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 24:29


DOCUMENTATION AND ADDITIONAL READING PART 1 (0:0 - 11:14): ────────────────── ACLU Changes Ruth Bader Ginsberg Quote To Include Gender-Neutral Language — Less Than One Year After Her Death, Is RBG Already ‘On the Wrong Side of History?' NEW YORK TIMES (MICHELLE GOLDBERG) The A.C.L.U. Errs on R.B.G. PART 2 (11:15 - 18:51): ────────────────── ‘It Was Not A Mistake Without A Thought': Even As ACLU Apologizes, The Left Rethinks Ruth Bader Ginsberg and Second Wave Feminism in Light of LGBTQ Issues NEW YORK TIMES (MICHAEL POWELL) A.C.L.U. Apologizes for Tweet That Altered Quote by Justice Ginsburg PART 3 (18:52 - 24:29): ────────────────── Getting Rid of ‘Balanced' News Coverage: GLAAD Calls for Silencing Voices That Counter LGBTQ Movement USA TODAY (SAMMY GIBBONS, PETRUCE JEAN-CHARLES, AND CLAIRE THORNTON) 'At the Whim of Misinformation': New Report Calls Out Southern Media Coverage of LGBTQ Issues

All Of It
Julie Cohen and Betsy West on 'My Name is Pauli Murray'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 21:53


A new documentary, “My Name is Pauli Murray,” chronicles the life of Pauli Murray, a civil rights lawyer, poet, and priest who challenged racial and gender lines and influenced legal icons like Ruth Bader Ginsberg and Thurgood Marshall. But Murray has remained largely unknown. Directors Julie Cohen and Betsy West join to discuss Murray's impact on the American legal system.  The film will be streaming on Amazon Prime, starting October 1. 

Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove
I'm Speaking: Diane Janosek, Women in CyberSecurity.

Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 44:53


CyberSecurity, Confidence, and Charisma.In this episode of The Outspoken Podcast, host Shana Cosgrove talks to Diane Janosek, Training Director for The National Cryptologic School at The National Security Agency. Diane talks about her journey from practicing law to loving cybersecurity. She also discusses her involvement in nation-shaping moments such as the Bill Clinton impeachment and the Snowden disclosures. Finally, we learn how Diane's drive has compelled her to take the CISSP, grow Women in Cybersecurity (WiCyS), and read voraciously about what will affect her nation next. QUOTES “You gotta have confidence, and if you don't have it you gotta fake it because otherwise you're gonna be eaten alive. So, it is a learned behavior. Even for an introvert, it's all about just knowing who you are, what you have to offer, and you're not gonna compromise. ”– Diane Janosek [21:40] “There's so many things that you can make a lifetime out of, so just find what you're interested in, find your passion, meet people that are doing it, and just network as much as you can.”– Diane Janosek [39:44] “Everybody wants to [...] have sense of belonging, a sense of purpose, that they're contributing to something bigger than themselves - and having a professional organization of camaraderie and a sense of community in your area of discipline is really important.”– Diane Janosek [32:19]   TIMESTAMPS  [00:04] Intro [04:12] Getting to Know Diane [05:17] Fitting into People's Expectations [07:48] Journey From Law to Cybersecurity [11:18] Working with Janet Reno [12:40] Impeachment of Bill Clinton [13:59] Starting with the NSA [16:34] Becoming Chief Legal Officer of Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board [18:58] Gaining a Passion for Cybersecurity [20:35] Charisma of Powerful People [23:40] Skill Set Needed for Network and Information Security [24:32] Taking the CISSP [28:03] Why Technical Competency Matters as a Woman [29:30] Diane's Family [30:55] Women in Cybersecurity [34:42] Books that Influenced Diane [36:07] Diane's Reading Habits [39:14] Advice to Younger Professionals [40:36] Diane's Creative Outlet [44:31] Outro RESOURCES https://www.wicys.org/ (Women in Cybersecurity (WiCyS)) https://www.cybher.org/cybher-warrior-awards/ (CybHER Warrior Awards) https://www.mdcyber.com/ (Cybersecurity Association of Maryland) https://dreamport.tech/ (Dreamport) https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/presidents/ronald-reagan/ (Former President Ronald Reagan) https://www.history.com/topics/us-government/checks-and-balances (Checks and Balances) https://www.justice.gov/ (Department of Justice) https://www.justice.gov/ag/bio/reno-janet (Janet Reno) https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/president-clinton-impeached (Impeachment of Bill Clinton) https://www.cnn.com/ALLPOLITICS/stories/1999/01/19/transcripts/ (Chuck Ruff) https://www.defense.gov/Our-Story/Biographies/Biography/Article/1531067/general-paul-m-nakasone/ (General Paul M Nakasone) https://schar.gmu.edu/profiles/rdeitz (Robert Deitz) https://www.pclob.gov/ (Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board) https://www.law.nyu.edu/centers/ija-oral-history/wald (Judge Patricia Wald) https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/presidents/barack-obama/ (Former President Barack Obama) https://www.cgap.org/about/people/david-medine (David Medine) https://www.c-span.org/person/?1017594/RachelLBrand (Rachel Brand) https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/presidents/donald-j-trump/ (Former President Donald Trump) https://www.theguardian.com/world/interactive/2013/nov/01/snowden-nsa-files-surveillance-revelations-decoded (Snowden Disclosures) https://ni-u.edu/wp/ (National Intelligence University) https://www.supremecourt.gov/about/biographyginsburg.aspx (Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg) https://www.brennancenter.org/sites/default/files/analysis/Government%20Surveillance%20Factsheet.pdf (Section 702 and Section 215)...

Swan Dive
Jullie Miller Torres -- "Follow Your Love" - Lawyer turned artist exhibits at The MET

Swan Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 45:20


Artist, Julie Miller Torres, specializes in printmaking. Trained as a lawyer, from a family of lawyers, Torres practiced law for seven years. She was good at her job and enjoyed her clients. But something was missing. At 34, she left her law career to start over in fine art at the prestigious, Savannah College of Art and Design ("SCAD"), where she earned a BFA in Printmaking. A few years out of art school, her career was beginning to get traction, when Covid hit. Undaunted, she turned to social media to promote her work. Five years after leaving art school, Torres created a series of screen prints of Supreme Court Justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg. A New York collector saw one of these works on Instagram and purchased it. This collector had connections to the Metropolitan Museum of Art who then reached out to Torres and purchased another of the RBG pieces for its permanent collection. That piece, titled "Superdiva" is currently on exhibition at The Met thru next year in an exhibit called “Revolution, Resistance and Activism.” Share your Swan Dive at www.swandive.us

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E35 - Casandra on Food Preserveration

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 58:35


Episode Notes Margaret talks to Casandra about canning, drying, and other means by which to preserve food. The host Margaret Killjoy can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. You can support her and this show on Patreon at patreon.com/margaretkilljoy. Transcript Margaret Hello and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the End Times. I'm your host, Margaret Killjoy. And this episode we're going to be talking about food preservation and specifically canning and dried food storage and some other things. This podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero Network of anarchist podcasts and here's a jingle from another show on the network. Duh daaaaa. Jingle One two, one two. Tune in for another episode of MaroonCast. MaroonCast is a down to earth Black radical podcast for the people. Our hosts, hip hop anarchist Sima Lee, the RBG and sex educator and crochet artists KLC, share their reflections on Maroons, rebellion, womanism, life, culture, community, trapped liberation, and everyday ratchet. They deliver fresh commentary with the queer, transgender, non-conforming, fierce, funny, Southern guls, anti-imperialist, anti-oppression approach. Poly ad and bullshit. Check out episodes of MaroonCast on Channel Zero National, Buzzsprout, SoundCloud, Google, Apple, and Spotify. All power to the people, all pleasure. Margaret Okay, if you could introduce yourself with your name, your pronouns, and then maybe a little bit about your experience with prepping, like, I don't know, if you like work for any prepping podcasts that people might like, if you want to shout them out, but also your experience a little bit about what we're going to be talking about today. Casandra Yeah, my name is Casandra and I use they or she pronouns. Um, I don't know, I've always been interested in foraging and gardening and preserving food and I happen to work for this really cool prepping podcast called Live Like the World is Dying. Margaret Casandra is our transcriptionist and we've been talking—I've been bugging them more and more about food preservation. And finally I was like, can I just have you on the podcast? And then you have to listen to the sound of your own voice as you transcribe it. And they said yes, which was nice of them. So okay, so most of your experience in terms of food preservation is canning, is that right? Salem Speaker 2 Yeah, that's—I think the two things that I do most are drying and canning, but I also do some fermenting and, like, salt preserving. Margaret Cool. Okay, well, let's talk about all of it. Do you want to talk about the different methods of food preservation and which ones are appropriate for which foods and what you like the most? Casandra Yes, I think there, there are two things that I think about when I'm deciding how to preserve something and one is, drying, for instance, is good for like really long-term storage. But—and it's also good because the food is lightweight, right? So it's very portable. But in my day to day life, I'm much more likely to use like canned food. So ease of use is another consideration when I'm deciding how to preserve something. And different food is best preserved in different ways. And that's something we can talk about when we get into canning especially a little bit later. Like acidity, how juicy something is, those things all come into play. Margaret Okay. Why preserve food? I mean, like, obviously, you could just go to the supermarket and buy the food instead of canning it or preserving in other ways. Like, I mean, that sort of—that part's sort of a joke. But what is it that appeals to you about DIY preservation of food, like what got you into it? Casandra Um, I live in the Pacific Northwest, and there are certain times of year where food is really abundant and accessible. And it just at a certain point seems silly to me to not take advantage of that if I could. You know, so if I have access to, you know, dozens of pounds of green beans once a year, why not can it instead of going out and buying it in the winter? Margaret Okay, so what are the methods of preserving food? You've mentioned some of them, but is it possible that we could get a list of just, like, what—there's canning, salting, pickling, drying, what am I missing? Smoking? Curing? Is that what you would call that? Casandra Yeah, I guess smoking and curing could—smoking is like a form of curing I think. Freezing. What else? Did we say fermenting already? Margaret No, we haven't put that one yet. Casandra Fermenting. Margaret Okay, should we just go through them and talk about why each one's great? Casandra Yes, yeah, we can definitely do that. It's hard to like, it's hard to talk about them all at once because they're all so different so... Margaret Yeah. Casandra Yeah. Margaret Well, so if possible, I mean, like—one of the things I'm really curious about is that, like, when you look at green beans, you're like, okay, green beans belong in a can. And then when you look at something else, you're like, oh, that belongs fermented. You know, hops, obviously. But what, um—is it just the different methods just work for different foods, if you like are working with meats you're mostly interested in curing them or freezing them or something? Like, how does all this work? How do you how do you decide? Casandra I decide based on what I like to eat most. So like, which preservation method I'm most likely to use because I'm not interested in wasting food. And then also just like, which is the most accessible to me. So for something like green beans, I don't know, I guess you could dry them, but I don't think that would taste particularly. good. So I want to preserve them in a way that tastes really good that I'm actually likely to use throughout the year. And then also space, I think space is a huge issue. So my pantry is only so large so there are certain things that it makes more sense for me to dry like nuts, right? I'm not going to can walnuts, though I suppose you could. I'm just going to dry them and store them in a bin. Margaret Does it just take up less space because there's like fewer individual jars taking up space. Casandra Mm hmm. Yeah, yeah. Definitely. Margaret Okay. What, um, what's like the easiest to get into and/or what's cheapest? Casandra Probably drying? Drying probably or salt curing because, you know, all you need to salt preserve something is salt. Margaret Okay. Casandra Um, but the drying as well. You know, you can sun dry or you can, like, create some trays for yourself and some airflow, you don't need a particular tool to dry something effectively. Margaret Okay, what, uh—you said that drying tends to make things last longest. Like, what's the kind of like, scale there? Okay, so like, because you were saying how, okay, so you're saying how it's hard to talk about all of them at once because each one has like all these different pros and cons. So I'm trying to, like get you to talk about the pros and cons of different ones. But so like, what's the, like, you know, hierarchy of how long food can last. Like I know, for example, in my own limited research into this, I'm like, oh, I can store dried beans, dried rice, etc., for like, 30 years, right? But I'm under the impression that canning has a shorter shelf life than that. And in my head, of course, like it would be, like, freezing, there's a long shelf life as long as you have electricity, and then like cured food, it's like maybe not as lonh. But this might be my, like, my my weird, like, obviously, like, storing meat isn't as good or something. You know, my own non-meat-eating bias which I will attempt to not bring into this particular episode of the show because everyone's gonna make up their own minds about what they want to eat. But so what, um, so if drying last longest, what last least long and what—where is everything else in the middle? Casandra Um, yes. I don't even know if drying last longest, honestly, because you hear about like, fermented or cured eggs that are found that are, you know, hundreds of years old and stuff—or like kimchi, like jars of kimchi that are still good after hundreds of years. So. Margaret Oh lord, okay. Casandra Yeah, yeah, so, you know, fermenting can be very long lived as well. But, but yeah, drying, as long as the thing stays dry and like bugs and mice don't get to it, as long as it's properly sealed, that's probably the longest—longest-term. And then the shortest—what would be the shortest? I think it's probably either canned or frozen. Like, food can be frozen for a long time—sorry—food can't be frozen for a long time but, like, it starts to taste like freezer at a certain point. So that's like my least favorite method, personally. Margaret What does that mean? Is that, like, I've heard that like if you store things in the freezer for a long time it starts to like take on the taste of everything around it. Or is there like a specific, like, just as the cell walls burst of frozenness and whatever—I don't know anything about the science of any of this. Casandra I don't know about the science of freezing. I'm not sure. I just know that, like, you know, if I lose a bag of green beans in the back of the freezer, a year and a half later the green beans don't really taste like green beans anymore. They kind of tastes like freezer. Margaret Okay. Casandra Which is gross. I don't want freezer beans. I'm also very anti-freezer just because we had—we had a, I guess a climate event here in February that knocked out power at my house for about 10 days. And so everything in the fridge in the freezer was compromised. And it sucked, and I lost a lot of food, and it was very stressful. But all of my canned goods and all of my dry goods were perfectly fine. Margaret That's a really important point. Casandra Yeah. Margaret I know that's, like, classic prepper style is to have the deep freeze in your garage full of, like, you know, ideally some deer or something like that. But it always seems like it just requires so much electricity to maintain. Casandra Yeah, and if, yeah. It's also—I mean, I think when we're talking about preparing for disasters, there's the preparing in place versus preparing to move. Um, and so something like freezing makes sense for preparing in place, but—and canning as well. But if you're preparing to move, then something like dried or cured makes more sense. Margaret Yeah. Casandra But even with freezing, like, when our power was out, I didn't thaw out frozen food and try to cook it over my wood stove, you know. It was much easier for me to just like open a can of soup that I had canned from the year before and warm it up. So even if I'm thinking about preparing in place, things like canning make more sense to me. Margaret Yeah. No, such a—being in place versus going—I don't really have anything deep to say about that, I just, I think about that a lot. And there's a reason that all the, like, food you put in your, like, go bag is usually, you know, dried backpacker meals where you add water or whatever, you know. Casandra Yeah. Which is good, in an emergency, but it's not super sustainable. So yeah. Margaret Yeah. At the beginning of the COVID crisis when I was, like, alone all the time and I didn't know what's happening so I just didn't go into town and I just, like, ate through my—ate through my own food stores. You know, I definitely was very reliant on canned goods, canned soups in particular. And then also, like, when I lived out of a backpack and traveled I did rely on cans then but I relied on cans, like, you know, I don't like carry two or three or something like cans of chili or something. This wasn't a DIY canning. This was, you know, Amy's chili. Casandra Right. And that's the other thing too is, like, Amy's chili in a tin can is—it's heavier than dried food, but it's sturdy. But I'm not gonna, like, put glass jars of food in a go bag, right? Margaret Yeah. Casandra That would be catastrophe waiting to happen. Margaret Yeah, I learned the hard way that, like, several times I tried, when I lived out of a backpack I always like want it to travel with, like, this jar of almond butter, but it was glass. Or for a while I decided I was gonna be that asshole who lived out of a backpack and had a brandy snifter. And when I say for a while I mean, like, 24 hours? Casandra 'Til it broke? Margaret Yeah. The jar of almond butter didn't last as long as that, and that was a little bit more of a desperate thing, because when I dropped it I was like, that's all the calories that I have on me. Casandra Oh, God. Yeah. Margaret And I genuinely don't remember—I remember looking at it and staring at it and being like, do I pull out shards of glass? Or do I just not eat? Oh, yeah, I'm just I don't remember which one I picked. Casandra Oh no. Margaret I'm alive so I probably picked not eating the almond butter. Okay, so that's a good point. So is it possible to can and non-glass jars? Like okay, my head like canning requires mason jars. Which people buy in bulk. And they're, like, not crazy cheap, but I haven't looked in a long time. Casandra I know that historically people have used tin cans, but maybe this is a conversation we could get into right now. But, like, modern food safety guidelines, everything I've read is glass jars. But the good news is, once you purchase the jar, this isn't—this isn't prepping like, you know, storing something away for 30 years and like stocking in bulk. This is, like, something that you do yearly and you're rotating through your food so you're reusing your supplies. Margaret Okay. Casandra Yeah. Margaret Which actually, probably—and now I'm just purely conjecturing—is like a better way to do any kind of prepping anyways, like, it's like reminding yourself that it's very rarely for the long haul. It's usually for situations like what you had happen where, you know, you lost power for 10 days. Casandra I mean even just part of your daily life. Like I'm—the main purpose of me doing things like canning and saving dry food is to eat throughout the year, not to prepare for disaster. But, you know, when there is a disaster I'm already prepared so, because it's just part of my daily life. Margaret Well and I guess that's like the yearly cycle that I mean, I grew up completely alienated from, you know, I ate the same things every season of the year. But that's not really the way that humanity evolved. Casandra Yeah. I mean, the nice thing about preserving food is that you don't have to eat the same things because you've preserved them for a different season. But it is cyclical, because, like, right now it's green bean season. So my weekends are canning green beans or tomatoes. And in a few months, it'll be nut season, so that's what I'm focusing on. But it gives me what I need for the rest of the year. Margaret Okay, so I'm going to try and make this a pun but it's not going to work very well. Let's get into the nuts and bolts—but there's no bolts and food—of this. And let's talk about canning. Let's talk about, like, how do you get started canning? What is canning? Like, you know, I mean, if—clearly it's not just the can of Amy's chili, it's something else. Casandra Yeah, so canning is preserving food in a glass jar, in liquid. And you're doing that by using heat and pressure to cook the food inside of it. Like, you're raising it to a particular temperature to destroy microbes and bacteria and things like that. And then it's also creating a vacuum seal. And that's what makes it shelf-stable. Margaret Okay. How do you do it? Casandra Hooray for shelf-stable food. There are different ways. So um, let's see. I think maybe I want to give my food safety spiel first before— Margaret Yeah. Okay, cool. Casandra So, yeah, so I worked in the food industry for a long time and I feel really comfortable with food safety. But I think that it's wise, if someone doesn't feel comfortable with food safety to, you know, do some research or learn from someone or take a class or something because botulism is fatal. However, canning is really safe if it's done properly. And so as long as you understand what properly mean, you're gonna be fine. And then the anecdote I like to give is that—Let's see—my my grandpa's mom—when I was learning to cat I was really nervous about food safety. And my grandpa was, like, don't worry about it because his mom used to can everything they ate in a two-tiered steam canter, which is just, like, outlandish. And she would do it on a wood stove, like, manually regulating the heat. And she would can everything from like meat to vegetables to fruit, which we'll learn in a second why that's absolutely insane. And, you know, she had 18 kids and none of them died of botulism. So— Margaret That's—I mean, by that number, one of them would have died of botulism. Even if someone—anyway, yeah. Casandra So I'm not saying like not to be safe, but just to know that, like, statistically you'll be okay, especially if you do what you're supposed to do. So. Margaret Okay, so take the warning seriously, is what your— Casandra Yeah, I think it was important for me to hear that like, no, really, you're gonna be okay. Because if you look at like the USDA website, or the like national—what's it called?—National Center for Home Food Preservation website. I swear, it's like every other paragraph, they're trying to scare you about botulism. Anyway, it feels like every other paragraph they're trying to warn you about botulism. And it feels really, like, anxiety-inducing. So it's something to be aware of but not to be afraid of, if that makes sense. Margaret What is botulism actually, do you know? Casandra Um, let's see. I think it's it's a bacteria that produces a toxin that is fatal. And the reason it's so scary is because most food spoilage you can see or smell, but botulism, you can't. Margaret Okay. Casandra Um, and it can even be fatal just with, like, skin contact. Margaret Oh, wow. Casandra Yeah, so it's it's very scary, but it—I don't know. I don't want to terrify people. Margaret Well, how do you not make it? Casandra Right. Margaret I was reading something that's like has something to do with, like, whether or not there's oxygen or something? Casandra Yep, yep. So it—botulism grows in an anaerobic environment, which means no oxygen. I think that's correct. I—so I learned from my grandma. That's the other part of the disclaimer. So the science is not something that I know a ton of out, which is fine. But the point is that if you follow proper, like, sterilization and follow recipes that are approved, you'll be fine. So you asked like three times what canning is and how to do it. So maybe— Margaret Yeah yeah yeah. Casandra Okay, so there are two different—there are three different types of canners. And they're used are different acidities. So the acidity of a food is important because the microorganisms in acidic food are killed at a lower temperature than non-acidic food. So for acidic food—and that means, like, fruits, pickled things that have like a vinegar brine—those are canned in a water bath canner or a steam canner. And then non-acidic foods like vegetables, meats, things like that are canned in a pressure canner because it helps them get to higher heat. Margaret Where do tomatoes fall in, are they acidic are they— Casandra So tomatoes are tricky because you—they're right on the edge of acidic and non-acidic. So if you add an acid to them, like lemon juice or citric acid, you can can them as if they're acidic, but if you don't, you have to put them in a pressure canner. And for a long time, whoever regulates canning shit, said that steam canning was not safe. Margaret Okay. Casandra But recently—I think it was Wisconsin University—some school in Wisconsin did a study and found that it is safe, which is great because I prefer it to waterbath canning, and it's how I learned to can. Margaret And it also, I mean was this, was the test subjects just all 18 of your great grandmother's children, or? Because I think that's a large enough sample size. Casandra I think so too. They also used the wood stove. No, so the difference between water bath canning and steam canning is water bath canning, you're just taking a big ass pot, and you're submerging your jars and water, and that's what creates the heat and the pressure and the vacuum seal. But it's really unwieldly because you're having to, like, deal with a big ass pot of boiling water. So steam canning is creating the same effect, but just with steam, so the amount of water you need is much smaller. So that's how I learned and that's what I prefer. It's very quick. And then pressure canning takes a special tool called a pressure canner. Margaret You can't just put it in a pressure cooker. Casandra No, but you can use your pressure canner for pressure cooking, if that makes sense. Margaret Okay. Casandra But pressure canners have—there are two different types, and don't ask me to explain the difference in detail because I won't be able to—but there's a weighted gauge canner and a dial gauge canner. And I believe what I use is a dial gauge. So it has this special gauge on top that tells you how much pressure you're creating within the canner. Margaret So is the basic idea that all this food goes into a jar, the lid goes on the jar, and then you're trying to create enough pressure and heat to both cook the food and seal it? How does it seal it? Like is it, like, creating like a pressure difference inside and outside? That's like sucking the lid down onto it, or? Casandra Yeah, yeah, that's my understanding. And it gets sciency especially with pressure canning because altitude impacts— Margaret Of course it does. Casandra Impacts the pressure in canning time. But that's why it's—so that's one of the benefits of following—let's talk about this actually, this will be useful. So, what makes a good canning recipe? Because it's important to follow good canning recipes. And they'll include things like how to make sure your food is acidic enough. They'll included chart based on altitude telling you what pressure you need, and also how long to can things. They'll tell you how and whether that changes depending on your jar size. So they'll outline everything like that in the recipe. So it's not, like, an equation you have to figure out every time you can a thing—unless you're changing altitude constantly, which would be, I don't know, adventurous. Margaret Would you say it would be jarring? Casandra Yes. Yes, it would be jarring. Yeah, once you know your altitude, it's very easy. And they're, like, companies like Bell jars put out entire books full of charts and recipes and things like that. Margaret Okay, is there something special about like—like, I've never canned anything, but at various points I've looked at how to do basically everything. And I remember when I was looking at canning and a long time ago, I think I got shy—I think I got scared away by the botulism thing, honestly. And it was like something about, like, if you use the spatula—you use like a rubber spatula when you put the food in the jar, and if you don't do it right then you like murder everyone you know. Casandra Yeah, so there are some basic safety considerations. So maybe let's, like, pretend we're canning something. Margaret Okay. Is it green beans? Casandra Yeah, let's can some green beans and we'll walk through the steps. So. So we're just canning plain green beans, which means that they're not acidic. So we're doing them in a pressure canner. So first you prep your food. So if we're prepping green beans, that means I'm snapping all the ends off. And I'm washing them and I'm, you know, I'm making sure none of them are, like, moldy or anything like that. And then I'm getting a pot going to prep my jars and my lids. The thing about jars is that they're glass. And the thing about glass is that if you put a hot thing into a cold glass thing, the glass thing will shatter, right? Margaret Yeah. Which is why you don't drink coffee out of mason jars. Well, people do, but why? Casandra But then they make the ones with the handles as if you're supposed to, you know? Margaret Yeah, that's a good point. Casandra Yeah, that's sketchy. Anyway, so sterilizing your jars and heating them up is sort of all done in the same step, you just toss everything in a big pot and put water in it, and you boil it for 10 minutes. Margaret Okay, and that's not the pressure canner, that's just a pot of water on the stove. Casandra Yep. And, you know, if you were to read like a canning website or something, they—people have all different methods for heating up and sterilizing their jars. I just think that that's like the quickest and the thing that I do because then they're both warm and sterile. So we're doing green beans. So, let's see, what I'm going to do next is take the jars out of the sterilized water. And I'm going to pack them full of these green beans. So we're putting all of our green beans in a jar, and we're doing something called raw packing, which means that the green beans are raw when I put them in the jar as opposed to cooked. And differrent recipes will tell you, you know what you should be doing. And then I pour warm liquid over them—in this case, it's just water—because if there are air gaps in the jar, that means that there's a chance air will get trapped, which you know, botulism and spoilage and things like that. But it also means there's a chance that the jars won't seal properly. Margaret Okay. Casandra Recipes, use something called headspace. So your recipe will specify how much headspace to leave in a jar. And that means the space between the top of your food and liquid and the top of the jar. And so they've timed their recipe based on the headspace. So if the recipe says 1/2in headspace but I leave, you know, an inch and a half, it probably won't seal because it's not in the canner long enough to like vacuum all have that air out. Does that make sense? Margaret Yeah. And then you murder everyone, you know? Casandra Hopefully they just won't seal and you try again. Botulism comes after the jar has sealed, and that's when things go poorly. Yeah, so anyway, so we've got our beans and our liquid in a jar. We wipe the rims of the jar because that's where the seal happens. So we want to make sure there's nothing like impeding that. Margaret Okay. Oh, like a little piece of dirt or something that would keep it from—or like a green bean stem. Casandra Yes, exactly. For things that are, like, chunkier, that's when your spatula technique comes in because you want to make sure there's there aren't any air pockets. Then you put your lids and your rings on. And then everything's really hot, so you make sure you use gloves and appropriate tools and load everything into your pressure canner with, I don't know, I think it's an inch of water. It depends on your canner. And then you seal it up and you start your canning. Margaret Are those, like, electric systems or they like stovetop, Casandra Stovetop, I've never seen an electric one, but I wouldn't be shocked if that existed. Margaret No I just didn't—I've never seen one of these things, so I struggle to visualize it. Okay, so it's in the pressure canner and we start, and then you leave it for some length of time that is specified in the recipe? Casandra Yep, yep. And, you know, different canners come with specific instructions to make sure that your weight is correct and your pressure is correct and things like that. So I won't, like, try to detail that out because it depends on the tool you're using. But assuming your weight and your pressure are correct, then you just set your timer once it's up to pressure and leave it in. Margaret Okay. Is this, like, are they usually like around an hour, or is this like three days? Or what's— Casandra It depends on the food and how acidic it is. So something like meat takes, let's see, like the the bone broth recipe I use—the canning recipe—takes like an hour and a half in the pressure. But something like tomato sauce takes 15 minutes. Margaret Oh, because it's so acidic? Casandra Yep. Margaret Okay. Cool. Casandra You know, that means that, like, on tomato day, I can get through a bunch of batches but on broth canning day I can't, so. Margaret Yeah. What about tomato bone broth canning? Nevermind. Okay. Casandra The lesson is not to—not to combine recipes. Margaret See, I think that this is, like—you know, I've never been like a baker. I've technically baked things, but I'm not very good at following directions specifically. My mom isn't any good at this either. I hope my mom isn't—I have no idea if my mom's listening to the podcast. You know, it's like, I'll start a recipe and then somewhere along the way, maybe halfway, three quarters of the way through, I'm just going to do something different. I don't know why. And so I've always been a terrible baker. So maybe canning isn't the food preservation method that I'm specifically going to get into. Casandra I'm in the same way though. Margaret Okay. Okay. Casandra And here's the thing. So like, with—there are so many fancy canning recipes. Like bourbon peach preserves, and—you know, like, people get ridiculously fancy. And those are never the recipes I use because I would be tempted to experiment. So when I—personally when I'm canning, I'm just canning, like, the most basic ingredients so that—like plain, just in water, I don't even use salt. So when it's time for me to cook later in the year, I can experiment because I haven't, you know, I haven't, like, made all of my beans into different like fancy bean recipes already. They're just plain beans. I don't know if that makes sense, but... Margaret No, no, no, that makes sense. Okay, I think you've sold me on canning—this is—I mean, clearly our job is to sell me on each of these things, one after the other. Okay, so canning is good for something that you're going to cycle through at home. And so that's something that you grow or get access to at one time of year, so you can have access to it at another time of year. And you said you can also, like, can soups—is like the next level up of like the classic bachelor thing where you make a whole bunch of soup on Sunday and put it in the freezer and then just, like, eat that soup all week. Casandra I mean, I do that. So I—soup is why I can, because my kid loves soup and that's just like what we eat during the winter. So I'll get off work and forget to have planned anything. So I'll just open a jar of broth and a jar of stew meat and a jar of potato—you know, I just throw it all into a pot. But that's like seven quarts of food into a single pot, so I think I'm doing both. Margaret Okay. Casandra So we have soup for a week, but it's from pre-canned food. Margaret There's—I really wish I was on my puns and jokes better today. But somewhere there's a soup for our family joke. Casandra I'm sure there is. Margaret Hopefully someone will just tell it to me later on Twitter in a way that is either very charming or very annoying. Casandra You'll have to send it to me. Margaret Okay, so that kind of covers canning. Now everyone who's listened is capable of making up their own recipes and so let's move on from there to—what's next? What do you like the most after canning? Casandra Drying. Margaret Drying. Okay. Casandra What do you want to know about drying, Margaret? Margaret Well, I mean, okay, so like, I feel like there's two parts to it. And maybe I'm totally wrong about this, but there's both the, like, drying of the food and then the storing of the dried food. Does that seem like? Casandra And then the preparing of the dried food. Margaret Oh, yeah, no cooking is totally beyond anything. Casandra It's not like a can where you can just open it and heat it up. Margaret Yeah, you're right. Yeah, I mean, it's like—oh, so that means I should probably just make canned beans. I've always felt like a terrible prepper because I'm, like, I have all these like dried beans. Then I'm like, I hate soaking beans. I definitely just eat canned beans. Casandra See, that's why I do both. So I get my, like, 50 pound bags of black beans, right? And I keep them in five gallon buckets. But then I rotate through them. So I will can large batches of them. So I'm only having to think about soaking them once, right? And then the cans and then I buy more dry beans to replace the ones I used, and then I have cans. Does that make sense? Margaret Yeah. So you can soaked beans, not dried beans, right? Casandra Yeah, well, they're dried and then you soak them so—and it's actually, going through the soaking process and then pressure cooking, essentially, makes them more digestible. So, I don't know. It's my favorite. Margaret Okay. Yeah. Cuz like, it's like, one of the reasons I've given—it's really, I mean, people have probably noticed that I haven't done a lot of episodes about food. And it's not because I, like, think that like this other stuff is cooler. It's because, like, food growing, preservation, and preparation, like, intimidate the hell out of me. And, you know, I'm convinced that I can't grow anything because—I said this in like one of the last episodes—because I tried to plant a pine tree when I was a kid and I failed or whatever, you know. And I'm really excited to get to talk about this, basically, even though it's very embarrassing that I'm, like, in my mind I'm like, oh, yeah, when you soak beans overnight they always—you soak them forever and they always end up still just a little bit, a little bit crunchy. Casandra Because you still have to cook them. Margaret Well, yeah. But—ah, and then the pressure cooker being the way to—okay. Casandra But we were talking about drying food. Margaret Yes. Right. Okay, so yeah, so okay. So there's three different parts to it, there's the drying of the food, the storing of the dried food, and the the preparation of the dried food. Let's not too much get into the preparation of the dried food today. But let's talk about the, like, the drying and the storing. And I'm really sad about this storing because it's the only thing that I've, like, done any of at all and done some research about. So. Casandra You probably know much more than me about the storage, but— Margaret Only in that I took a lot of notes like last week. Casandra Oh Good! Margaret But okay, how do you dry food? Casandra Um, so I use just a really cheap food dehydrator, like the cheapest one I could find on Amazon. There are really fancy dehydrators you can get. You don't have to buy a dehydrator at all, you can just, you know, set things out on trays and rotate them and, like, put a fan near them so there's airflow. Margaret When you say set things out, you mean like in the sun? Casandra Um, I guess if you want it sun dried, but I—in general, if I'm preserving food, I try to keep it out of sunlight. Margaret Okay, that makes sense. Casandra That's maybe—we didn't talk about canning and how long things are shelf stable, but generally, if food is exposed to sunlight, it affects its shelf stability. So. Margaret Okay. Casandra Um, but yeah, airflow is the—temperature and airflow are the major factors for drying food. So, especially if something's very juicy, you want it to be lower temperature with lots of airflow because if the outside of it dries before the inside, it's bad news. I guess it can cause mold for whatever's on the inside if it doesn't fully dry, but if it does fully dry, it means that like, say you're drying cranberries or something, they're rockhard instead of that, like, nice, tender, dryness. I can speak. So yeah, most of hydrators will come with like settings for different types of food. And you can look those up online as well. Like which foods need more heat, which foods want less heat. Margaret How much does humidity affect this? Like I—where I live it's basically I live inside a cloud. All of the South is just a cloud for all of the summer and so, like, I can't even dry clothes on the line unless they're in the direct sunlight. So I assume I would have to use—I would have to use one of these, like, what are they, electric? The ones that you're talking about? Casandra Yeah, I imagine so. I live in a not humid place. So I haven't had to think about that. Also storage, I imagine that you probably have more trouble with food storage. Margaret I do. Casandra Yeah. But, you know, then there are things that apparently great if you have a higher humidity, like—what I'm sure you're super interested in—salt curing meat is, apparently a higher humidity is better so— Margaret Oh, really? Casandra There's that. Margaret I wonder what I can salt cure. Casandra Right? Margaret Just slabs of seitan. It sounds terrible. Okay. Casandra The things that that I mostly dry are nuts and seeds because I grow a lot of sunflowers and also I live in the Pacific Northwest. So it's, like, filbert and walnut territory, acorn territory. Margaret Do you have to prepare—the only one of these things I know anything about is acorns. And I know that you have to do a lot of work to get the tannins out of acorns. You do that before you drive them in this case? Casandra You know, I've actually heard—and I'm planning to try this this year—but I've heard that it's actually quicker to get the tannins out if you dry them first because then, when you introduce water to flush the tannins out, it can, like, fully saturate the nut meat. Margaret Okay. Casandra Does that make sense? So you're getting rid of all the moisture first, and then when you introduce fresh water to the nuts, it can penetrate into the like flesh. Margaret Okay. Because yeah, it takes forever to flush acorns. Casandra It does. If you—I mean, you have a stream, so that would be much, much less time intensive. For folks who don't know, acorns are delicious, but only if they're not full of tannins. Margaret Which is like, what, a natural preservative or something that's in them that, in order to human edible, you have to get rid of. Casandra Yeah, I mean, there are tannins and lots of food. It's the thing that makes sour food sour or like astringent food astringent, but, you know, the amount that's in the average acorn can give you a tummy ache. Margaret Okay, so is this, like, is this one of the ways that you would—because I assume basically all the nuts I eat in my life are, like, dried nuts, right? Because I'm not going around eating fresh nuts. So this is like one of the main ways, if you wanted to make the nuts that you grow taste like the nuts people are used to eating, you would dry them first in this way, right? Casandra Like acorns or just? Margaret Oh sorry. I was going back to like, you know, the other nuts? Casandra Yeah, yeah. Margaret Cashews. I don't know. You didn't say cashews, I was just thinking about cashews. Because I like cashews. Casandra I think cashews are actually way different. Have you seen a cashew plant? Margaret All of the nuts look really weird in the wild. I struggle to understand them. This is the most embarrassing episode I'll ever put out. It's just like, I'm this crazy person who lives in the woods. And I don't know anything about plants. Casandra Because cashew is part of a fruit, right? It's not, like, in a hard shell like a walnut. Anyway. Let's not talk about cashews. Margaret Let's not talk about cashews. I'll pretend like I know what filberts are and talk about them. Casandra A filter is just—I think it's actually a different species than a hazelnut, but it's what we call hazelnuts here. Margaret Okay, cool. Casandra So like filberts and walnuts, things that have a hard shell that you crack the shell open, and then—you can eat it fresh. It's delicious, fresh. But if you want to store it, you just dry it. Margaret Okay. Casandra And some nuts you dry in the shell like walnuts, but some you don't have to. Margaret Okay. And so drying is like a little bit simpler. It's like— Casandra Yeah. Margaret If you're drying walnuts, you look at the article that says "this is how you dry walnuts," and you put them in your dryer and you dry them. Casandra I mean, I don't even put nuts in a dryer, because they're already so dry. Margaret You just leave them out. Casandra Yeah, I just—like, I put a blanket on the floor in front of my fireplace in the winter and just have a, like, mound of nuts that I— Margaret Cool. Casandra Like, rotate. So, but if you're doing something that's, like, quicker to spoil, I guess, like fruit or vegetables, than a dehydrator might be the solution for you. Margaret Okay, how long—like, what are some of the advantages of drying food? I mean, obviously, like, certain foods, like nuts and things, like that's like almost, like, the way that you you store them, right? But it's like, I don't know a ton about, like, dried fruits—I suppose I know fruits a bit—but like dried vegetables, and, you know, is this, uh, like, how long do they last? Like, what is good about this method? Casandra I think it's good because it's smaller so it's easier to store, right? It's also lighter. So that goes back to our conversation about, you know, preparing to be on the move as opposed to being stationary. For things that are snackable it's nice to have snacks, so like dried fruits, dried seeds, things like that. Um, I—there are a few vegetables that I routinely dry because I routinely use them. Garlic is one. I guess alliums. Can we call the allium family of vegetable? Garlic and onions are two of them because I don't really can them. You could ferment them, especially fermented garlic is really popular, I just don't do it. Um, but, like, the number of times I've gone to make soup in the winter and not had garlic or onions is embarrassing. But if I have them dried, I can just toss in a handful and it's delicious. Margaret Okay, but like, so if you dry—how long does dried fruit last? How long do dried vegetables last? Like, is it, like, good enough to last you—kike most of these food preservation methods are sort of, like, meant to kind of get you until—set you up so that the next time—until the next harvest of the same thing. Is that kind of the general idea, like, so that you have this thing that lasts, like, hopefully almost a year, or? Casandra Oh, they can last—I mean, I have like dried onions, dried plums in my pantry that have been there for two years and are perfectly good. The thing about, like, everything other than canning, is that if something goes bad, you can see it or smell it. So it's good until it, you know, it's good until you can see or smell that it isn't good anymore. And that depends on, you know, how you've stored it. Do you put—is it in direct sunlight? Is it totally dry? Is it in a hot place? A cool place? Things like that. But it lasts a long time. That's a really vague answer. I think you were looking for something more specific. Margaret I mean, it's fine. We don't have to have, like, a chart—an audio chart of, like, you know, column A, the fruit, column B, how long it lasts with each different method. Okay, that's how you would organize the data anyway. Casandra It seems like there should be more to it, right? Like, there should be more to talk about with dried food. But it's so simple. You just— Margaret Yeah. Casandra But storage you wanted to talk about and I feel like you probably know more about storage can I do. Margaret Well, only because, like, I came into this with this "I don't know how to make food" thing, right? And, you know, I just remember a couple years ago a food scientist friend of mine was like—this was maybe like four or five years ago—was like, hey, I'm not saying it's gonna happen, but the supply chain on food is looking a little bit precarious this year, or whatever. So I was like, okay, I'm gonna just start having some, like, five gallon buckets of like beans and rice around. And that was probably what started me on the journey that you're all along for with me today. And so I just would go and buy, you know, basically prepper food, right? Ideally, the ones with like the least markup or whatever, but just, you know, five gallon buckets or huge cans of stuff that's like freeze dried or whatever and it's like meant to last 30 to 50 years on a shelf. And so I was doing that. And—but then I realized as I started to kind of, like, scale this, and more people are asking me for my recommendation. And I don't want to just be like, oh, go to Amazon, because that's the main place to buy Augason Farm stuff, you know—ans go for this company I don't know anything about. And instead realized, was like, well, there has to be a way to just, like, put rice in a five gallon bucket. It's like not quite as easy as that. You can do that and that'll last for a fairly long time, again, depending on your conditions, especially humidity and sunlight, as you mentioned, and oxygen is actually one of the biggest ways that, like, long shelf life foods go bad. And so the thing I've been researching, and I'll probably make a YouTube video about in the next week or so, is how to store dried goods for like long term storage, which is less the like—I feel like, in my head, there's like two tiers of food storage. And there's the more important one, which is what you're talking about and the, like, the things that you can cycle through and to get you through any given interruption. And then there's the sort of deep storage stuff where, I don't know, I don't see a reason for most people not to have, like, a month or two of food sitting in five gallon buckets in their basement, you know, that just sit there and you can pass them on to your kids. And—who will be like, really? Why are you giving this to me? But—actually, that's very optimistic to think that they won't immediately understand the need for such things. Casandra Right. Margaret And I like to imagine that will be around for 30 to 50 years from now. That seems optimistic, but I like it. So long term food storage, you can make beans and rice and many other things last 30-50 years. And the main way going at the moment—there's a lot of different ways to do it—but basically it's like the main way that people are doing right now and in prepper world, and it's mostly, I think pioneered by the Mormons. A lot of the information you can get about this—and if you live in Utah, apparently there're these stores will they'll just sell you really cheap beans and rice, and some of them are open to people who aren't in the church. But you basically, you put them into mylar bags, which are plastic bags with like an aluminum layer—which isn't technically the definition of mylar but, like, when you say mylar bag, it's what you mean—and you heat seal the bags. You put in the dried food, and then you put in oxygen absorbers. I always thought you put in desiccant because I think that humidity all of the time. The instruments that I built last year, some of them aren't even playable right now because the warping because the stupid humidity. I don't understand how a mountain dulcimer was invented in Appalachia and has such a thin soundboard. Anyway. So, but you don't put in desiccants necessarily—actually, in general, you don't. It actually seems to be contraindicated. But instead you put in oxygen absorbers that are sized to the size of bag, and you got to do it kind of quick, because obviously when you open up the oxygen absorber starts absorbing oxygen. And what it is is like little iron fillings that are absorbing that are oxidizing and making rust, I think, and they're in little sealed packets that air can go in, but rust pellets can't come out. You drop it in, you heat seal the bag, you can either get like a little flash sealer for like 25 bucks, or you can use a household iron, or you can use a hair—you know, it's like, I have a feeling that people making these things don't actually do this because I've seen people say straightening iron or curling iron. But um, you can seal it with heat. And then it is sealed. And then that doesn't keep like animals and stuff out, so then you put it in a bucket. So really, long story short, you take a mylar bag, at least five mil thick—mil is not millimeter, it's, I don't know, .001 or something, I don't remember. Millionth of an inch or 1,000th of an inch or something. You put in the oxygen absorber, you heat seal it, you put it in the bucket, and you're good. And it seems kind of simple. And it's a lot cheaper per five gallon bucket of beans and rice then going and getting the pre made stuff. Casandra Yeah. Margaret But being able to do it with stuff that you dry yourself—again, like, different things are gonna last different lengths of time. And oh, and you can only do this with stuff that's, like, less than 10% water content. You know, it has to be like way more dried. So you can't just like put in your, like, dried fruit and stuff. It's like almost all like rice and beans and oats and other things. And then there's like weird stuff where like brown rice is actually harder to preserve than white rice because brown rice has, like—which is much better, of course, in general—has more stuff, like more oils in it that can go bad. That's what I've learned, but you should correct me if that's what you're about to do. Casandra No, no, I was just gonna say I've heard of people—or I've seen something called dry canning. I haven't actually tried it. But it's something similar, except you're using jars and you're using an oven to, yeah, create a seal—a hot seal on the jars. And it's supposed to make dried food last longer. I've never personally understood the purpose of things like that just because I rotate. So it's just like a part of my life and routine. But yeah. Margaret Just having some deep storage, you know, like—but okay, this actually makes me—why are mason jars clear? Because isn't sunlight the enemy of, like, all food preservation? Casandra Yeah, I guess so I honestly—I have no idea. They make fancy, like, tinted jars, but they're much more expensive. I imagine it's just because it's more expensive to make tinted glass. But like traditionally you're not keeping your jars on a shelf in direct sunlight. You're keeping them, like, in your basement or your root cellar or something like that. Margaret Okay, so we've been talking almost an hour, and obviously there's still several methods of food preservation left, but maybe we won't go into the details about any of the other ones—unless, is, like, is there like one more that you want to like quick like shout out? Like hey, look how great salting is, or pickling, or, I don't know. Casandra Yeah. I mean, fermenting and pickling is amazing. And that's, like, an episode in and of itself. And I think that it's really like trendy right now, so probably accessible for people to find information on. And then salt preserving and sugar—I can't eat sugar, so I don't do sugar preserving. But those two methods are surprisingly simple. And I'm just beginning to experiment with salt preserving, but I love it. So, I dunno. Check it out. Margaret Is it just like you take the thing and you pack it in salt and then you're like, it's good. Casandra Kinda, yeah. Kinda, yeah. Margaret That's cool. Casandra I mean, there's more to it than that, but basically. Margaret Okay, well, I don't know. You've sold me on far more food preservation instead of just looking at it from this, like—you know, as much as I want to like try and sell you on deep storage, I think that that's like the far and away least useful aspect and like the one that ties most into, like, the bunker mentality that I supposedly shit talk all the time. You know, and so this, like, this—these methods of cycling through appeal quite a bit to me. Is there any—are there any like last thoughts on food preservation or anything else about any of this that you want to you want to bring up? Casandra Just that once you start digging into it, you'll probably be shocked by how many things you can can from, you know, butter to water. So. Margaret Wait, really? Casandra To whole chickens. So it's pretty flexible and pretty fun once you get the basic down. Canned water. Margaret I'm laughing about the canned chicken because I'm imagining, like, the chicken like coming out and running away when you opening up the can 15 years later. Alright, well, thanks so much for coming on the podcast. And also, you know, thanks for helping make the show accessible. And, I don't know, I really appreciate that, and I appreciate all the work that you've done with that. Casandra You're welcome. I'm dreading transcribing this, but I will do it. So. Margaret I appreciate it. Thank you so much for listening. I hope you got out of this as much as I did. I didn't know anything. I mean, well I didn't know anything compared to what I now know. And I'm excited to eat green beans, I mean, prepare green beans. No, I'm mostly just excited to eat green beans. I really like green beans. I'm really glad that was the example food we used. If you liked this episode or this podcast, you should tell people about it and tell people about it on the internet. Well, tell about it in real life. But if you tell people about it on the internet, all the like weird algorithms will like make other people know about it if you like, and comment, and subscribe, and do all the stuff. And you can also support me directly on Patreon. My Patreon is patreon.com/margaretkilljoy. And there's a bunch of like zines and other things up there. And they're behind a paywall, but if you live off of less money than we make off of the Patreon, then you should just message us and—or me, I guess, on any social media platform, and I will give you access to all the content for free because the main point is to put out content and I really just appreciate everyone's support helps me do that. And in particular, I want to thank Sean and Hugh and Dana, Chelsea, Eleanor, Mike, Starro, Cat J, the Compound, Shane, Christopher, Sam, Natalie, Willow, Kirk, Hoss the dog, and Nora. And also I would be remiss not to tell you that I have a book available for pre-order. AK Press is republishing a new edition of my book, A Country of Ghosts, which is an anarchist utopian book. And if you're listening to this podcast, you probably have like a vague idea of what I'm talking about when I talk about anarchy like that. But if you don't, or if you do, you might like this book, A Country of Ghosts. And if you hate the government and capitalism, you might like it. And if you hate the government but like capitalism, or if you like capitalism but hate the government, then I would challenge you to read this book anyway, because you might learn that both of those are very interrelated things and you're kind of only doing it halfway and you have to destroy the Ring of Power and it must be—don't be a Boromir. You should throw the Ring of Power into the—into the fires of Mount Doom. Anyway, you should tell me about the fun foods that you all prepare, because I will be jealous. Or I'll start canning my own foods and I'll talk to you all soon. Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: September 23, 2021 – Hour 2

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 51:09


The ACLU botches Twitter tribute to RBG. Half Of Vaccinated Americans Might Not Spend The Holidays With Unvaccinated Family And Friends, Poll Finds. 1 in 7 people have dropped friends over whether they would or would not get the vaccine. Mary – How do I talk to my adult children about God? They seem to […] All show notes at The Patrick Madrid Show: September 23, 2021 – Hour 2 - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 2 - Trump combines golf with bashing Biden

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 33:10


1PM - Fastest 15 - Response from Rep Johnson's office on Auburn murder/Garth Brooks will replace stadium tour with dive bars/WWE announces its new woke wrestler/ACLU changes a RBG quote a year after she died/Trump combines golf with bashing Biden/Maxine Waters is angry at Biden/GUEST:  Joe Kent, congressional candidate, vet and gold star husband on the Afghans charges with awful crimes in Wisconsin/Univ will punish students of they use the wrong pronouns See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Megyn Kelly Show
Gabby Petito's Death, Theranos Fraud Trial, and Britney Spears with Brian Entin, Mark Eiglarsh and Arthur Aidala | Ep. 166

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 93:40


Megyn Kelly is joined by NewsNation Now correspondent, Brian Entin, to discuss the latest in the Gabby Petito case and his perspective from reporting on the ground in front of the Laundrie home in Florida. Megyn is also joined by criminal defense attorney Mark Eiglarsh and trial attorney Arthur Aidala to dive even deeper into the Petito case, Elizabeth Holmes defense in the Theranos fraud trial, Don Lemon's upcoming assault trial, updates on Britney Spears' conservatorship, why a man dressed as Michael Myers was arrested on a beach in Galveston, outrage over the ACLU altering a Ruth Bader Ginsburg quote, and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H3 - Sep 23 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 44:44


PODCAST SUMMARY HOUR 3: Clay and Buck expand on how the Defund the Police movement led to a record murder rate. Stalinist leftists replace word "women" in RBG quote. Psaki gets snarky over question about pregnant illegals. What would you pay for a Hunter Biden painting? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Matt Walsh Show
Ep. 803 - The ACLU Rewrites History And Erases Women At The Same Time 

The Matt Walsh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 58:27


Today on the Matt Walsh Show, the ACLU honors the anniversary of Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death by erasing women. Also, whip-gate enters its fourth day, with the Democrats and the media sticking to the false narrative, no matter how many times it is debunked. And several late night hosts all teamed up last night to bring our attention to the alleged climate crisis. It was hilarious comedy, as always from that group. Plus, Kim Kardashian is leading the charge to free another murderer from prison. And Vice publishes an article claiming that natural immunity doesn't exist at all. Isn't that medical misinformation?   You petitioned, and we heard you. Made for Sweet Babies everywhere: get the official Sweet Baby Gang t-shirt here: https://utm.io/udIX3 Subscribe to Morning Wire, Daily Wire's new morning news podcast, and get the facts first on the news you need to know: https://utm.io/udyIF Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: September 23, 2021 – Hour 2

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 51:09


The ACLU botches Twitter tribute to RBG. Half of Vaccinated Americans Might Not Spend the Holidays With Unvaccinated Family And Friends, Poll Finds. 1 in 7 people have dropped friends over whether they would or would not get the vaccine. Mary – How do I talk to my adult children about God? They seem to […] All show notes at The Patrick Madrid Show: September 23, 2021 – Hour 2 - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

Hardball with Chris Matthews
Rep. Ilhan Omar slams federal response to Haitian immigrants gathered at southern border

Hardball with Chris Matthews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 43:59


Joy Reid leads this episode of The ReidOut with two Americas--a nation with vaccinated and unvaccinated spaces with sharply competing values. Joy and her panel of doctors discuss America's path forward as these spaces continue to diverge on many levels. Plus, video from over the weekend shows a horse patrol for U.S. Customs and Border Protection trying to corral human beings like cattle, chasing after Haitian immigrants trying to cross back into the United States. Congresswoman Ilhan Omar of Minnesota joins Joy Reid to discuss. Then, it goes without saying that no family should ever have to endure what the family of missing young woman Gabby Petito is enduring. But, the way this story has captivated the nation has many wondering where is the same level of media attention when people of color go missing? Joy Reid and her panel of experts explore this phenomenon. And, Saturday marked one year since the great Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away. Now, the very things she fought so tirelessly for are being threatened by the same Supreme Court that she served on for 27 years. Finally, in tonight's "Absolute Worst," Joy drives home why Democrats need to protect free and fair elections so the rest of us can continue to live in a democracy. All this and more in this edition of The ReidOut on MSNBC.