Podcasts about National Security Law

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Best podcasts about National Security Law

Latest podcast episodes about National Security Law

National Security Law Today
A Conversation with the Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 57:36


This week we are honored to host Avril Haines, Director of National Intelligence. As the first woman to serve as DNI, Avril Haines has an extraordinary perspective and the experience to match. She discusses her current role and the path that led her there, diversity in the intelligence field, how to be an effective leader, challenges facing the intelligence community, and so much more. Avril Haines is the Director of National Intelligence: https://www.dni.gov/index.php/who-we-are/leadership/director-of-national-intelligence This conversation features opening remarks by Mary DeRosa, Chair of the Advisory Committee and Professor from Practice and Co-Director, Global Law Scholars Program, Georgetown University Law Center: https://www.law.georgetown.edu/faculty/mary-b-derosa/ This conversation is moderated by Jennifer O'Connor, Chair of Women in National Security Law and Vice President at Northrop Grumman: https://www.asdnews.com/news/defense/2017/04/28/ngc-appoints-jennifer-m-oconnor-as-mission-systems-sector-counsel

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Heritage Events: Hong Kong: Debating the National Security Law's Impact on Business

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


It has been over a year since the signing of the National Security Law in Hong Kong, effectively ending Hong Kong's autonomy. While much of the focus has been on the diplomatic and political implications, there is very little analysis on the law's impact on the business community in Hong Kong. Has the law impacted […]

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第五季*【EP. 207】#585 經濟學人導讀 feat. 國際時事 feat. 新聞評論【疫苗民族主義 vs. 人命關天;香港壹傳媒 vs. 國家安全法;衣索比亞的提格雷戰爭;9/11 恐攻事件二十週年】

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 28:50


Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone
Ep 164 - Secrets of the Master Debaters

Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 91:26


Everyone knows we're “more divided than ever,” and everyone's arguing these days, but nobody seems to be GOOD at it. We all seem to suck at convincing people that we're right. Well, except for Neal Katyal, former acting Solicitor General, who's here to instruct us on the lost art of persuasion. And speaking of persuasion, “Eat, Pray, Love” tries to win us over — does it succeed? And then it's our turn to go a-wooing, as we attempt to win back the love of the Czech Republic. GUEST Neal Katyal Paul and Patricia Saunders Professor of National Security Law, Georgetown University Law Center Former Acting Solicitor General of the United States Partner at Hogan Lovells HOUSE BAND Michael Kelly Fiddle Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

National Security Law Today
Women in Cyber: Navigating the Changing Landscape

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 29:20


Aspiring cyber professionals listen up! In this week's episode, we hear from an all-female panel of cyber experts whose experience spans across both public and private sectors. We hear how they kick-started their careers, what types of security threats they're focused on right now, and advice they have for law students interested in diving into the world of cybersecurity. This panel features opening remarks by Jennifer O'Connor, Chair of Women in National Security Law, and moderated by Maureen Kelly, Co-Chair of the Cybersecurity Legal Task Force. Speakers: Mieke Eoyang is the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Cyber Policy at DOD: https://www.defense.gov/Our-Story/Biographies/Biography/Article/2505290/mieke-eoyang/ Hilary Hageman is a former SVP and General Counsel at the Cubic Corporation and currently at Terran Orbital Corporation: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hilary-hageman-12b4326 Kim Peretti is a partner at Alston & Bird: https://www.alston.com/en/professionals/p/peretti-kimberly-kiefer/ Kemba Walden is the Assistant General Counsel of the Digital Crimes Unit at Microsoft: https://gufaculty360.georgetown.edu/s/contact/00336000015bTHQAA2/kemba-walden To view the full webinar: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/law_national_security/

National Security Law Today
The Centaur's Dilemma with Judge James Baker (Part 1)

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 30:32


Artificial Intelligence (AI) is not a single piece of hardware or software, but rather a constellation of technologies. This week, hosts Elisa and Yvette are joined by James Baker, an expert in national security law and process, to discuss his recent book, The Centaur's Dilemma: National Security Law for the Coming AI Revolution. Together, they break down the risks and benefits of AI application. Will AI increase the likelihood of conflict? And how can we reap the benefits of AI for broader national security purposes without losing control of the consequences? Hon. James E Baker is the Director of the Institute of Security Policy and Law at Syracuse University: law.syr.edu/profile/the-hon.-james-e.-baker More on The Centaur's Dilemma: National Security Law for the Coming AI Revolution: https://www.brookings.edu/book/the-centaurs-dilemma/ To order The Centaur's Dilemma directly: https://www.amazon.com/Centaurs-Dilemma-National-Security-Revolution/dp/0815737998 References: NSLT Ep. 167, Artificial Intelligence, National Security Law and Ethics: https://soundcloud.com/nsltoday/artificial-intelligence-national-security-law-and-ethics

Front Burner
Encore: The end of Hong Kong?

Front Burner

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 30:56


The first Hong Konger to be charged under China's National Security Law has been found guilty. Today on Front Burner, two pro-democracy activists from the city-state reflect on China's tightening grip on Hong Kong.

Global News Podcast
Hong Kong man guilty in first national security law trial

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 29:53


The 24-year-old had flown a flag with a protest slogan while riding a motorcycle into police officers in Hong Kong. Also: Vatican cardinal on trial in $142m fraud case, and do you like and appreciate insects?

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Guilty verdict in first National Security Law case in Hong Kong

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 8:10


The first person to be tried under Hong Kong's sweeping national security law was found guilty of secessionism and terrorism by three high court judges . Tong Ying-kit was arrested last year just hours after the legislation came into effect, his arrest came after driving a motorbike into a group of police officers while flying a protest flag that read "Liberate Hong Kong, Revolution of our Times". He faces a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.

Astro Awani
Consider This: Hong Kong (Part 1) -- City Of Protest Silenced?

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 13:17


About a year ago, on the 23rd of June 2020, Beijing introduced a National Security Law in Hong Kong -- in response to the mass pro-democracy protests that had turned violent. The law had essentially reduced Hong Kong's judicial autonomy, and made it easier to punish demonstrators and activists. It criminalises secession, subversion, and collusion with foreign forces -- with the maximum sentence life in prison. In the year since the law was enacted, more than 100 people have been arrested under its provisions. Why exactly is Beijing bent on crushing dissent in Hong Kong? Melisa Idris and Sharaad Kuttan speak to Victoria Hui, Associate Professor in Political Science at the University of Notre Dame. 

Astro Awani
Consider This: Hong Kong (Part 2) -- Can Democracy Be Saved?

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 14:32


About a year ago, on the 23rd of June 2020, Beijing introduced a National Security Law in Hong Kong -- in response to the mass pro-democracy protests that had turned violent. The law had essentially reduced Hong Kong's judicial autonomy, and made it easier to punish demonstrators and activists. It criminalises secession, subversion, and collusion with foreign forces -- with the maximum sentence life in prison. Can international pressure or domestic dissent save Hong Kong from sliding into authoritarian rule like the rest of China? Melisa Idris and Sharaad Kuttan speak to Victoria Hui, Associate Professor in Political Science at the University of Notre Dame.

CBS This Morning
Hong Kong pro-democracy artist and activist one year since China imposed the National Security Law

CBS This Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 30:44


This week marks the first anniversary of China's central government imposing a controversial new National Security Law (NSL) on the once-semiautonomous region of Hong Kong. The NSL empowers Hong Kong's authorities to arrest and prosecute anyone they deem to be criticizing government leaders, whether in Hong Kong, Beijing or China's Communist Party at large. CBS News Asia correspondent Ramy Inocencio visited Hong Kong political artist Kacey Wong to speak about the impact the NSL has had on him and his city.Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
The Chinese Communist Party and me, Part 1

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 29:46


Two years ago, the world watched as millions of people in Hong Kong marched in the streets to call for autonomy from China. Beijing responded by passing a national security law last summer that broadly defined acts of subversion, foreign collusion and terrorism. Critics say the law crushed civil liberties. Since it was enacted, many people have fled Hong Kong — some to neighboring Taiwan. Yet Taiwan, a self-governing island that China claims as its territory, is at risk as well. Today, we start a two-part series on the Chinese Communist Party's ambitions as it celebrates its 100th anniversary. This episode gets into the continued crackdown on freedom and democracy in Hong Kong, where authorities have arrested thousands of pro-democracy activists and shut down a major daily newspaper. We'll also discuss China's growing threats to absorb Taiwan. Tomorrow, how the Chinese Communist Party is rewriting China's history.More ReadingBeleaguered pro-democracy Hong Kong newspaper Apple Daily says it's closing downAs democracy fades, Hong Kong's political opposition become political prisonersThe most important company you've never heard of is being dragged into the U.S.-China rivalry

Backchat
Anniversary of the national security law; Chinese medicine hospital

Backchat

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 62:00


Spectator Radio
Chinese Whispers: Hong Kong's National Security Law, one year on

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 34:46


In the 12 months since the enactment of the National Security Law on Hong Kong, opposition leaders, journalists and activists have been arrested; reforms on education and elections begun; and last week saw the emotional closure of the pro-democracy tabloid Apple Daily. On this episode, I speak to Jennifer Creery, who works for the Financial Times in Hong Kong, about the situation on the ground; and Professor Jeff Wasserstrom, a historian of China at the University of California, about the last year and the city's future. We reflect on the strategic erosion over time of Hong Kong's autonomy, the importance of education that the CCP places on its Hong Kong policy, and whether the 2019 protests actually expedited the choking off of the city.

Chinese Whispers
Hong Kong's National Security Law, one year on

Chinese Whispers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 34:46


In the 12 months since the enactment of the National Security Law on Hong Kong, opposition leaders, journalists and activists have been arrested; reforms on education and elections begun; and last week saw the emotional closure of the pro-democracy tabloid Apple Daily. On this episode, I speak to Jennifer Creery, who works for the Financial Times in Hong Kong, about the situation on the ground; and Professor Jeff Wasserstrom, a historian of China at the University of California, about the last year and the city's future. We reflect on the strategic erosion over time of Hong Kong's autonomy, the importance of education that the CCP places on its Hong Kong policy, and whether the 2019 protests actually expedited the choking off of the city.

World Review
Hong Kong: Apple Daily, democracy and the National Security Law

World Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 28:32


It's nearly one year since China imposed the Hong Kong National Security Law which has been the focus of intense protests. In this episode, Louisa Lim joins Jeremy and Emily to discuss Hong Kong's relationship with Beijing, and what impact the law has had on democracy in the region - including the recent closure of pro-democracy newspaper Apple Daily.Louisa Lim is the author of The People's Republic of Amnesia, a Senior Lecturer in Audio-Visual Journalism at the University of Melbourne, and co-host of the Little Red Podcast.To submit a question for You Ask Us, please email podcasts@newstatesman.co.ukRead more:Jeremy Cliffe: How the Chinese Communist Party's foundation determines Xi Jinping's leadership todayEmily Tamkin: How the US and Russia are 'trapped in the cold web' See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Straits Times Audio Features
Apple Daily bids farewell as first trial under national security law begins: Inside Hong Kong Ep 1

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 8:54


Inside Hong Kong Ep 1: Apple Daily bids farewell as first trial under national security law begins 8:53 mins Synopsis: Every week, The Straits Times analyses developments in Hong Kong. ST's Hong Kong correspondent Claire Huang chats with Money FM 89.3's Rachel Kelly about the following points: Apple Daily closes its doors after 26 years (0:40) How a 24-year-old Hong Kong man became the first defendant to be tried under the city's nearly one-year-old national security law (5:01) Produced by: The Breakfast Huddle, Money FM 89.3, Ernest Luis and Aleemah Basirah Edited by: Dan Koh Subscribe to our Asian Insider Podcast channel to follow our various shows each week and rate us on your favourite audio apps: Channel: https://str.sg/JWa7 Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWa8 Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/Ju4h  Spotify: https://str.sg/JWaX Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Read Claire Huang's stories: https://www.straitstimes.com/authors/claire-huang Asian Insider newsletter: https://www.straitstimes.com/tags/asian-insider Discover Asian Insider videos: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLnK3VE4BKduMSOntUoS6ALNp21jMmgfBX --- Discover more ST podcast series: Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Life Weekend Picks Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa2 #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts:  http://bt.sg/podcasts Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Squawk Box Europe Express
SQUAWK BOX, THURSDAY 24TH JUNE, 2021

Squawk Box Europe Express

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 28:39


There's a mixed picture in the U.S. markets as the Nasdaq hits a new record high but the Dow and S&P 500 snap two-day winning streaks on the back of continuing inflation fears. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, however, says that price pressures should abate later in the year. U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken has begun a European tour, first meeting German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin to discuss strategies on containing China. There are reports that Washington may sanction solar products made in China's Xinjiang province over alleged human rights abuses in the Muslim-majority region. Hong Kong's last remaining pro-democracy newspaper, Apple Daily, prints its last ever edition after its assets were frozen by Beijing and a series of journalists' arrests were made under the SAR's new National Security Law. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Take
How China is censoring Hong Kong's schools

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 20:49


It's been just about one year since Beijing's National Security Law for Hong Kong took effect. It criminalizes secession, sedition and collusion with foreign forces. Dozens of activists and journalists have been arrested under the decree, and now, changes in the schools mean teachers' jobs and students' learning are also at risk.In this episode: “Steve,” a secondary school teacher in Hong KongConnect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

Lowy Institute: Live Events
In conversation with Ted Hui, the Hong Kong legislator-in-exile

Lowy Institute: Live Events

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 62:30


A conversation with Ted Hui, the pro-democracy politician who made the tough call to abandon Hong Kong and seek refuge in Australia. How did the crackdown on the city's democratic freedoms affect him and his family? What happens to Hong Kong now? How will he fight for his city's freedoms from his home in Adelaide? Ben Bland, Director of the Lowy Institute's Southeast Asia Program and author of Generation HK: Seeking Identity in China's Shadow, moderated this conversation with Ted Hui. Ted Hui is a Hong Kong politician in exile. He served in the Hong Kong Legislature for four years and the District Council for ten years before fleeing to Australia in 2021. Hui is an advocate for Hong Kong's freedom, initiated the 2021 Hong Kong Charter, and has been placed on a wanted list in Hong Kong for allegedly breaching the National Security Law.

Across the States
88: The Rise of Communist China w/ Newt Gingrich

Across the States

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 29:39


Join former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Newt Gingrich and ALEC CEO Lisa B. Nelson on a special episode of Across the State as they discuss the emergence of China as a global power. In a conversation about China’s aggressive ambitions to America’s flawed approach to Beijing in the past, find out what the United States can do to counter Xi Jinping and the Chinese Communist Party in the future. ALEC Article on China’s Belt and Road Initiative: https://www.alec.org/article/chinas-belt-and-road-initiative-undermines-partner-countries-democratic-governance/ ALEC Article on China’s National Security Law on Hong Kong: https://www.alec.org/article/china-implements-national-security-law-that-threatens-to-violate-hong-kongs-sovereignty/ Newt Gingrich Op-Ed in Fox News “China’s secret campaign to spy on US and buy influence is exposed”: https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/china-universities-spying-newt-gingrich Newt Gingrich Op-Ed in Newsweek: “The Fantasy of a Benevolent China Is Over. Fortunately, America Has Trump” https://www.newsweek.com/newt-gingrich-fantasy-benevolent-china-over-fortunately-america-has-trump-opinion-1467509 Link to Purchase Newt Gingrich’s Book “Trump vs. China”: https://www.amazon.com/Trump-China-Americas-Greatest-Challenge/dp/1546099883

China Unscripted
#118 Hong Kong’s War on the Press | Epoch Times Reporter Attacked!

China Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 59:45


China's crackdown on Hong Kong intensifies as the National Security Law gives Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam and Hong Kong police powers to go after freedom of the press. And when that doesn't work, the CCP uses thugs to attacks journalists. Epoch Times reporter Sarah Liang joins us to talk about the man who assaulted her with a bat in broad daylight.

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Sam Faddis, Baggio Leung and Lance Crayon

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 43:32


SAM FADDIS, former Clandestine Operations Officer, CIA, former Congressional Candidate, Editor, ANDMagazine.com, Author, "Beyond Repair: The Decline and Fall of the CIA," @RealSamFaddis Part 1:  Sam Faddis comments on the ongoing competition between the "base" and "establishment" in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania over the state's election laws Why some are calling for the immediate repeal of Act 77  Part 2:  Ground Zero For The Revolution Faddis delves into Anthony Fauci's "gain of function" research in Wuhan, China BAGGIO LEUNG, former Member, Hong Kong Legislative Council (LegCo), Convenor, Youngspiration Hong Kong's National Security Law can prevent individuals from fleeing the region Baggio Leung: Beijing's objective ambitions pose a threat not only to East Asia but the entire international community Is the Chinese Communist Party using the Hong Kong Dollar to further their own dubious aspirations? LANCE CRAYON, former Senior News Editor, Global Times (US edition), former Video Journalist, China Radio International, former Senior Editor, People's Daily English News app Lance Crayon talks about China's Thousand Talent Program and how some Chinese national may be using the initiative to steal U.S. intellectual property Crayon expands on China's Confucius Institutes' K-12 initiatives in the U.S. Chloé Zhao's, winner of Best Director at the 2021 Oscars, upcoming film "The Eternals," which features an openly gay protagonist, may be banned in China

National Security Law Today
Critical Issues in National Security Law

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 25:02


In partnership with the ABA Law Student podcast, host Meg Steenburgh sits down with national security expert, Standing Committee on Law and National Security Chair, and Syracuse University professor William Banks, as he sheds light on how current events interact with our nation’s security and the law. William Banks is a professor at Syracuse Law School and the Chair of the ABA Standing Committee on Law and National Security: http://law.syr.edu/profile/william-banks1 ABA Law Student Podcast: https://abaforlawstudents.com/stay-informed/law-student-podcast/ ABA Law Student Division: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/law_students/

ABA Law Student Podcast
Critical Issues in National Security Law

ABA Law Student Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 26:58


In the daily onslaught of news from all corners of the globe, it is sometimes difficult to decipher the implications of current events within our own country. From the pandemic, to cybersecurity, to international relationships, linking current events and national security interests to law helps us understand our country’s responses to the things we see in the media. ABA Law Student Podcast host Meg Steenburgh talks with Professor William Banks of Syracuse University about the most critical national security issues facing our nation both at home and abroad, including China tensions, nuclear weapons concerns worldwide, the Jan. 6 Capitol riots, and more. William C. Banks is a Syracuse University College of Law Board of Advisors Distinguished Professor and Emeritus Professor at the College of Law and the Maxwell School as Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs. Thank you to our sponsor NBI.

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
ABA Law Student Podcast : Critical Issues in National Security Law

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 26:58


In the daily onslaught of news from all corners of the globe, it is sometimes difficult to decipher the implications of current events within our own country. From the pandemic, to cybersecurity, to international relationships, linking current events and national security interests to law helps us understand our country's responses to the things we see in the media. ABA Law Student Podcast host Meg Steenburgh talks with Professor William Banks of Syracuse University about the most critical national security issues facing our nation both at home and abroad, including China tensions, nuclear weapons concerns worldwide, the Jan. 6 Capitol riots, and more. William C. Banks is a Syracuse University College of Law Board of Advisors Distinguished Professor and Emeritus Professor at the College of Law and the Maxwell School as Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs. Thank you to our sponsor NBI.

National Security Law Today
Leadership, Ethics and COVID-19

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2021 47:34


Most security issues in government present leadership challenges and might in the first instance, best be addressed with effective leadership. In the next instance, such issues present process challenges; getting the process right leads to better policy and to better results. Only in the third instance are issues resolved through law, in part because you cannot legislate leadership. National security lawyers play an essential role in all three areas: Leadership, process, and law. COVID-19 has presented new and unparalleled leadership, process, and legal challenges at the federal, state, and local level, for lawyers, as well as public health officials. COVID-19 has also given lawyers renewed opportunity to consider and understand what it means to be a national security lawyer and to swear an oath to uphold and defend the Constitution. Judge James Baker and Amy Jeffress lead a discussion of the role of ethics and leadership in defining the role of today’s national security lawyers. Amy Jeffress is a partner at Arnold & Porter, and co-chairs the White Collar Defense & Investigations practice: https://www.arnoldporter.com/en/people/j/jeffress-amy Hon. James E Baker is the Director of the Institute of Security Policy and Law at Syracuse University: http://law.syr.edu/profile/the-hon.-james-e.-baker References: James E. Baker, "Leadership in a Time of Pandemic: Act Well the Given Part." Journal of National Security Law and Policy, Volume 11, Issue 1. October 2020. https://jnslp.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Leadership-in-a-Time-of-Pandemic_2.pdf

Congressional Dish
CD230: Pacific Deterrence Initiative

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 95:45


The 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) and the Coronabus both enacted laws aiming to stop China from advancing their Belt and Road economic system that may soon be able to compete with the "rules based international order", which the United States has been leading the implementation of since the end of WWII. In this episode, learn about the NDAA's most significant changes, including a new U.S. military build up in China's neighborhood: The Pacific Deterrence Initiative. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Click here to contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Click here to support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank’s online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536 Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Recommended Episodes CD218: Minerals are the New Oil CD187: Combating China Bills National Defense Authorization Act for 2021 Bill Text Sec. 158: Expansion of Economic Order Quantity Contracting Authority for F-35 Aircraft Program Doubles the amount of money allowed to be spent on longer term contracts from $574 million to over $1 billion TITLE VII - ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND RELATED MATTERS Subtitle D - Industrial Base Matters Sec. 841: Additional Requirements Pertaining to Printed Circuit Boards Beginning January 1, 2023, the Defense Department will be prohibited from buying printed circuit boards that are either fully or partially manufactured in North Korea, China, Russia, or Iran. The Defense Secretary has the ability to waive these restrictions TITLE X - GENERAL PROVISIONS Subtitle E - Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations Sec. 1052: Expenditure of Funds for Department of Defense Clandestine Activities that Support Operational Preparation of the Environment Authorizes the Secretary of Defense to spend up to $15 million from the Operations and Maintenance account "in any fiscal year for clandestine activities for any purpose the Secretary determines to be proper for preparation of the environment for operations of a confidential nature." Intelligence activities are excluded. This authority can be delegated for expenses up to $250,000. The Defense Secretary has to tell Congress about these expenditures in a report due once per year at the end of the year. Sec. 1053: Sale or Donation of Excess Department of Defense Personal Property for Law Enforcement Activities Prohibits the military from transferring free bayonets, grenades (but they can still transfer stun and flash bang grenades), weaponized tanks, and weaponized drones to domestic law enforcement. Sec. 1062: Limitation on Provision of Funds to Institutions of Higher Education Hosting Confucius Institutes Beginning in 2023, Defense Department funding - except for funding given directly to students - can be given to an college or university that hosts a Confucius Institute. "Confucius Institute" is defined as "a cultural institute directly or indirectly funded" by the Chinese government. The Defense Secretary has the ability to waive this prohibition. This was based on a bill co-authored by Rep. Anthony Gonzalez of Ohio and Rep. Donna Shalala of Fl Sec. 1064: Requirements for Use of Federal Law Enforcement Personnel, Active Duty Members of the Armed Forces, and National Guard Personnel in Support of Federal Authorities to Respond to Civil Disturbances Whenever a member of the armed forces, including the National Guard, respond to a civil disturbance, each individual has to display their name and the name of the Federal entity they are representing. This won't apply to individuals who don't wear uniforms when performing their regular duties or who are performing undercover operations. TITLE XII - MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS Subtitle B - Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan Sec. 1215: Limitation on Use of Funds to Reduce Deployment to Afghanistan Prohibits troop levels in Afghanistan from being reduced below 2,000 until the Defense Secretary submits a report Subtitle C - Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran Sec. 1221: Extension and Modification of Authority to Provide Assistance to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria Reauthorizes the Department of Defense military assistance for training, equipment, supplies, and support for the Government of Iraq and "other local security forces" for combatting ISIL and security the territory of Iraq until December 31, 2021 but cuts the funding to $322.5 million, down from $645 million. The original funding amount t was over $1.6 billion in 2016. Sec. 1222: Extension and Modification of Authority to Provide Assistance to Vetted Syrian Groups and Individuals Reauthorizes the Department of Defense assistance for training, equipment, supplies, support, stipends, and facilities for "vetted elements of the Syrian opposition and other appropriately vetted Syrian groups and individuals" until December 31, 2021 Subtitle E - Matters Relating to Europe and NATO Sec. 1241: Determination and Imposition of Sanctions with Respect to Turkey's Acquisition of the S-400 Air Defense System In response to Turkey's decision to buy an air defense system from Russia on July 12, 2019, the President "shall" impose five or more sanctions on each person who participated in buying that system. The sanctions were required to be implemented by the end of January 2021. The sanctions are allowed to be removed after one year if the S-400 air defense system has been removed from Turkey Sec. 1246: Report on United States Military Force Posture in Southeastern Europe By the end of 2021, the Secretary of Defense has to submit a classified report with an unclassified summary describing the military postures of Russia and China in southeastern Europe and assess the cost, feasibility, and infrastructure requirements of increasing US Armed Forces in Greece, Romania, Bulgaria, and other locations. Subtitle F - Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region Sec. 1251: Pacific Deterrence initiative Requires the Secretary of Defense to create a Pacific Deterrence Initiative to improve the force posture in the Indo-Pacific region, primarily west of the International Date Line The purpose is to... Strengthen the presence of the US Armed Forces in the region Pre-position equipment, weapons, and fuel. Perform exercises, training, and experiments Build the militaries of allies and partners and enhance cooperation with them Authorizes over $2.2 billion Sec. 1252: Extension and Modification of Prohibition on Commercial Export of Certain Covered Munitions Items to the Hong Kong Police Force Extends the prohibition on export licenses being issued to send weapons to the Hong Kong police force that was enacted on November 27, 2019 until December 31, 2021 and expands the prohibition on exports to include "crime control items". Sec. 1260: Statement of Policy and Sense of Congress on the Taiwan Relations Act 'The Taiwan Relations Act and the Six Assurances provided by the United States to Taiwan in July 1982 are the foundation for United States-Taiwan relations" "Any effort to determine the future of Taiwan by other than peaceful means, including boycotts and embargoes, is a threat to the peace and security of the Western Pacific area and of grave concern to the United States." We will "resist any resort to force or other forms of coercion that would jeopardize the security, or the social or economic system of the people of Taiwan" It is US policy to continue selling weapons to Taiwan, including weapons for air defense, undersea warfare, intelligence, surveillance, anti-armor, anti-ship, and coastal defense systems. US policy is to perform joint military exercises with Taiwan. Sec. 1260E: Sense of Congress on the Aggression of the Government of China Along the Border with India and its Growing Territorial Claims Congress says that... "continued military aggression by the Government of China along the border with India is a significant concern" "attempts by the Government of China to advance baseless territorial claims, including those in the South China Sea, the East China Sea, and with respect to Bhutan, are destabilizing and inconsistent with international law." Subtitle G: Sudan Democratic Transition, Accountability, and Fiscal Transparency Act of 2020 Sec. 1263: Statement of Policy It is United States policy to... "support a civilian-led political transition in Sudan that results in a democratic government..." "support the implementation of Sudan's constitutional charter for the transitional period" (which began on August 17, 2019 and is effective for 39 months, which would be November 17, 2022) Part of our strategy is "promoting economic reform, private sector engagement, and inclusive economic development..." and "supporting improved development outcomes, domestic resource mobilization, and catalyzing market-based solutions to improve access to health, education, water and sanitations, and livelihoods..." Sec. 1264: Support for Democratic Governance, Rule of Law, Human Rights, and Fundamental Freedoms Authorizes the President to "provide assistance" authorized by the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, which allows him to use money from the State Department's Economic Support Fund, and development assistance in agriculture, health, education, housing, counter-drug operations, disaster relief, energy, technology, natural resources, and technical assistance for the government and/or central bank. Authorizes $20 million per year in 2021 and 2022 Sec. 1265: Support for Development Programs Authorizes the President to "provide assistance" using the same authorities from Section 1264 and the Better Utilization of Investments Leading to Development Act of 2018 (BUILD Act) ,which created the United States International Development Finance Corporation, to "promote economic growth, increase private sector productivity and advance market-based solutions to address development challenges" Authorizes $80 million per year for 2021 and 2022 Sec. 1266: Support for Conflict Mitigation Authorizes the President to "provide assistance" using the same authorities from Section 1264 and money for international military education and training and money for peacekeeping operations to "support civil society and other organizations", for "professional training of security force personnel", and to support provisions of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement of 2005 and Abyei protocol. Authorizes $20 million per year for 2021 and 2022 Sec. 1267: Support for Accountability for War Crimes, Crimes Against Humanity, and Genocide in Sudan Authorizes the President to "provide assistance" using the same authorities from Section 1264 to assist investigators to document violations of human rights committed by the former President Omar al-Bashir and the Transitional Military Council since June 30, 1989. Authorizes $10 million per year for 2021 and 2022. Sec. 1270E: Repeal of Sudan Peace Act and the Comprehensive Peace in Sudan Act Effective January 1, 2020 (backdated), repeals the Sudan Peace Act and the Comprehensive Peace in Sudan Act Subtitle H - United States Israel Security Assistance Authorization Act of 2020 Sec. 1273: Security Assistance for Israel The United States will give Israel at least $3.3 billion per year from the Foreign Military Financing Program from 2021 through 2028 (at least $26.4 billion). The amount used to be capped; this law changed it so that is a minimum payment. Sec. 1275: Rules Governing the Transfer of Precision-Guided Munitions to Israel Above the Annual Restriction Authorizes the President to transfer precision-guided missiles from our reserves to Israel The authority to transfer our missiles to Israel will expire at the beginning of 2024 TITLE LVXXXIV - MISCELLANEOUS Subtitle C - Arctic Sec. 8421: Coast Guard Arctic Prioritization Congress is concerned that "Russia and China have conducted military exercises together in the Arctic, have agreed to connect the Northern Sea Route, claimed by Russia, with China's Maritime Silk Road, and are working together in developing natural gas resources in the Arctic." TITLE XCIV - SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY MATTERS Subtitle B - Other Matters Sec. 9414: Study on Chinese Policies and Influence in the Development of International Standards for Emerging Technologies The Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology will conduct a study that can include... How China's role in international standards setting organizations has grown over the last 10 years China's standardization strategy outlined in "Chinese Standard 2035" An examination of whether international standards for technology are being designed to promote Chinese interests outlined in the "Made in China 2025" plan Recommendations on how the United States can "mitigate" China's influence in setting standards and increase the United States public and private sector participation in the standards setting institutions TITLE XCVII - FINANCIAL SERVICES MATTERS Subtitle C - Other Matters Sec. 9723: Accountability for World Bank Loans to China Makes it the policy of the United States to disqualify China from receiving World Bank loans designed for low and middle income countries. This was a bill written by Rep. Anthony Gonzalez of Ohio TITLE XCIX - CREATING HELPFUL INCENTIVES TO PRODUCE SEMICONDUCTORS FOR AMERICA Sec. 9902: Semiconductor Incentives The Secretary of Commerce has to create a program that provides tax money to "a private entity, a consortium of private entities,, or a consortium of public and private entities..." to incentivize them to invest in creating, assembling, testing, packaging, or researching semiconductors in the United States. The money can not be given to "a foreign entity of concern" Tax money for any individual project is capped at $3 billion, but that limit can be waived with the recommendation of the Defense Secretary, the Director of National Intelligence, and the President. Sec. 9905: Funding for Development and Adoption of Measurably Secure Semiconductors and Measurably Secure Semiconductors Supply Chains Authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to create a "Multilateral Semiconductors Security Fund" The fund would be used to create "measurably secure semiconductor supply chains" The Secretary of State can use money in the fund to give to foreign governments on the condition that those countries enact restrictions on exports to China. The Secretary of State is encouraged, but not required, to establish transparency requirements for subsidies or other financial benefits given to semiconductors inside or outside the participating countries and "promote harmonized treatment and verification processes for items being exported to a country considered a national security risk by a country participating". Coronabus Outline Bill Text DIVISION B - COMMERCE, JUSTICE, SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2021 TITLE V - GENERAL PROVISIONS Sec. 526: Prohibits NASA, the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), or the National Space Council (NSC) from working with, contracting from, or coordinating "in any way with China or any Chinese-owned company" unless the activities are "specifically authorized" by a law enacted after the Coronabus. This can be waived if NASA, the OSTP, or NSC consults with the FBI and finds that the cooperation would "pose no risk of resulting in the transfer of technology, data, or other information with national security or economic security implications to China or a Chinese-owned company." DIVISION K - DEPARTMENT OF STATE, FOREIGN OPERATIONS, AND RELATED PROGRAMS APPROPRIATIONS ACT TITLE VII: GENERAL PROVISIONS Insecure Communications Networks Sec. 7030: State Department funds must be used to advance the adoption of 5G in countries receiving our tax money and prevent the creation of communications networks, including 5G, promoted by China "and other state-backed enterprises that are subject to undue or extrajudicial control by their country of origin." East Asia and the Pacific $1.482 billion must be spent implementing the Indo-Pacific Strategy and the Asia Reassurance Initiative of 2018. Requires at least $300 million in additional money to be spent on a new Countering Chinese Influence Fund Sec. 7043: Funding for China's neighbors... Almost $135 million was appropriated for the government of Burma before the military coup. At least $85 million is appropriated for the government of Cambodia, conditioned on Cambodia "verifiably maintaining the neutrality of Ream Naval Base, other military installations in Cambodia, and dual use facilities such as the Dara Sakor development project. There is no certification required for "democracy, health, education, and environment programs, programs to strengthen the sovereignty of Cambodia, and programs to educate and inform the people of Cambodia of the influence activities of the People's Republic of China in Cambodia." At least $80 million will be given to Laos At least $3 million from the "Democracy Fund" will be given to Hong Kong for "democracy and internet freedom programs for Hong Kong, including legal and other support for democracy activists" as long as none of this money goes to the Chinese government. Prohibits counter-drug money for the Philippines, "except for drug demand reduction, maritime law enforcement, or transnational interdiction." At least $170 million will be given to Vietnam Europe and Eurasia Requires at least $290 million to be spent on the Countering Russian Influence Fund Latin America and the Caribbean Sec. 7045: Requires over $500 million to be available for "assistance" for Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama, which can be spent on the Central America Regional Security Initiative. Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras can only get 50% of their allotted funding unless the Secretary of State certifies that the governments are taking actions against corruption, enacting reforms, informing their citizens that it’s dangerous to come to the United States, enhancing border security, and “resolving disputes involving the confiscation of real property of United States entities.” Those three countries are also ineligible for foreign military financing. The Caribbean Requires at least $74.8 million to be spent on the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative Venezuela Requires at least $33 million to be spent on "democracy programs" in Venezuela Bilateral Economic Assistance Adds an additional $700 million to the Economic Support Fund, available until September 30, 2022 for Sudan. DIVISION Z - ENERGY ACT OF 2020 Sec. 7003: Monitoring Mineral Investments Under Belt and Road Initiative of People's Republic of China The Director of National Intelligence, starting in the beginning of 2022 and every year after, will have to conduct a detailed report on China's investments in minerals and if their investments have increased their control over the global supply of those minerals. DIVISION FF - OTHER MATTER TITLE III - FOREIGN RELATIONS AND DEPARTMENT OF STATE PROVISIONS Subtitle B - Taiwan Assurance Act of 2020 Sec. 314: Taiwan's Inclusion in International Organizations Congress finds that... "China's attempts to dictate the terms of Taiwan's participation in international organizations has, in many cases, resulted in Taiwan's exclusion from such organizations even when statehood is not a requirement..." Makes it US policy to advocate for Taiwans inclusion in international organizations that do not require statehood, including the United Nations, World Health Assembly, and others. Subtitle F - The United States Northern Triangle Enhanced Engagement Act Sec. 352: By the beginning of July, the Secretary of State has to submit a five year strategy to Congress for changing the governing, economic, and security structures of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. Economically, the priorities must include: "Supporting market-based solutions to eliminate constraints to inclusive economic growth" "Identifying... a role for relevant United States agencies and United States private sector in supporting efforts to increase private sector investment..." Security priorities must include: "Implementing the Central America Regional Security Initiative" The strategy can be created in partnership with "civil society and the private sector in the United States, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras." The strategy will have to be posed on the State Department's website, but it is allowed to be partially classified. Sec. 353: By the beginning of July, President Biden has to submit a list of people who will be sanctioned for their actions in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. Sanctions will prohibit the targets from traveling to the United States. The authority to impose these sanctions will expire at the beginning of 2024. https://www.congress.gov/116/cprt/HPRT42770/CPRT-116HPRT42770.pdf#page= National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 Bill Text Sec. 1251: Authorized the “Indo-Asia-Pacific Stability Initiative” to “increase the presence and capabilities” of the United States Armed Forces in the region by building new infrastructure, “enhance the storage and pre-positioning in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region of equipment of the United States Forces”, and with military training and exercises with allies. John S. McCain National Defense Authorization for Fiscal Year 2019 Bill Text Sec. 1252: Amends the NDAA for 2016, which authorized the South China Sea Initiative providing military equipment and training to Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam, to change the name of the program to the “Indo-Pacific Maritime Security Initiative” and expands the authorization to include the Indian Ocean in addition to the South China Sea and the countries of Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Adds India to the list of countries allowed to be paid for expenses, along with Brunei, Singapore, and Taiwan. Extends the expiration date from September 30, 2020 to December 31, 2025. Sec. 1253: Changes the name of the military build-up authorized in NDAA 2018 from the “Indo-Asia-Pacific Stability Initiative” to the “Indo-Pacific Stability Initiative”. Changes the activities authorized to include an increase in “rotational and forward presence” of the US Armed Forces and adds the prepositioning of “munitions” in addition to equipment. Expands the options for funding by removing the requirement that funding come “only” from a section 1001 transfer authority. Section 1001 transfer authority allows the shifting of up to $4.5 billion. Requires a 5 year plan be submitted to Congress by the Secretary of Defense by March 1, 2019. Asia Reassurance Initiative Act of 2018 Outline [Bill Text](https://www.congress.gov/115/plaws/publ409/PLAW-115publ409.pdf Sec. 2: Findings The "United States-backed international system" is being challenged by: China constructing islands in the South China Sea and challenging US economic interests North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile capabilities ISIS "Without strong leadership from the United States, the international system, fundamentally rooted in the rule of law, may wither, to the detriment of the United States, regional, and global interests." TITLE I: UNITED STATES POLICY AND DIPLOMATIC STRATEGY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION Sec. 101: Policy The United States policy for the region... "Promotes American prosperity and economic interests by advancing economic growth and development of a rules-based Indo-Pacific economic community" Sec. 102: Diplomatic Strategy We will support... The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation East Asia Summit We want... Freedom of navigation under international law Expansions of security and defense cooperation with allies and partners Denuclearization of North Korea "To develop and grow the economy through private sector partnerships between the United States and Indo-Pacific partners" To pursue trade agreements and "build a network of partners in the Indo-Pacific committed to free markets" TITLE II - PROMOTING UNITED STATES SECURITY INTERESTS IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION Sec 201: Authorization of Appropriations $1.5 billion per year from 2019 through 2023 ($7.5 billion total) The money can be used for... Foreign military financing Foreign military education and training Counterterrorism partnership programs "To encourage responsible natural resource management in partner countries, which is closely associated with economic growth" Military and Coast Guard training exercises Expanding cooperation with Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka "Multilateral engagements" with Japan, Australia, and India Intelligence The goal is to counter "China's influence to undermine the international system" Sec. 205: United States-ASEAN Strategic Partnership The goal of our commitment to ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) is to "build a strong, stable politically cohesive, economically integrated, and socially responsible community of nations that has common rules, norms, procedures, and standards which are consistent with international law and the principles of a rules-based Indo-Pacific community." Sec. 209: Commitment to Taiwan To enforce all existing commitments to Taiwan made by the Taiwan Relations Act of 1979 and the 3 joint communiques and the Six Assurances agreed to by President Reagan in July 1982 The United States "should" regularly transfer weapons to Taiwan "that are tailored to meet the existing and likely future threats from the People's Republic of China." TITLE III: PROMOTING UNITED STATES ECONOMIC INTERESTS IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION Sec. 301: Findings By 2030, 66% of the global middle class will be living in Asia and 59% of middle class consumption will take place in Asia The United States has free trade agreements in effect with Australia, Singapore, and Korea The member states of ASEAN represent the fifth largest economy in the world Sec. 302: Indo-Pacific Trade Negotiations, Multilateral Agreements, and Regional Economic Summits Congress supports "full implementation of the World Trade Organization's Trade Facilitation Agreement by Indo-Pacific countries" Sec. 304: Trade Capacity Building and Trade Facilitation Authorizes "such sums as may be necessary" for the President to produce a trade facilitation strategy that levels the playing field for American companies competing in the Indo-Pacific region. TITLE IV - PROMOTING UNITED STATES VALUES IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION Sec. 409: Authorization of Appropriations Authorizes $210 million per year from 2019 through 2025 (over $1 billion total) to "promote democracy, strengthen civil society... etc" in the Indo-Pacific region. This money can be used to promote democracy and the "rule of law" inside of China. Articles/Documents Article: The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor—Hard Reality Greets BRI’s Signature Initiative, By David Sacks, Council on Foreign Relations, March 30, 2021 Article: An Alliance of Autocracies? China Wants to Lead a New World Order., By Steven Lee Myers, The New York Times, March 29, 2021 Article: China and Russia Agree to Explore the Moon Together, By Steven Lee Myers, The New York Times, March 10, 2021 Article: Russia, Belarus ink five-year strategic military partnership plan for first time, By Tass, March 2, 2021 Article: The U.S. Air Force Just Admitted The F-35 Stealth Fighter Has Failed, By David Axe, Forbes, February 23, 2021 Article: Chip Crisis Flummoxes Congress in a World Where U.S. Output Lags, By Laura Davison and Jarrell Dillard, MSN, Bloomberg, February 21, 2021 Article: Cambodia-China Golden Dragon Military Exercise postponed, By Chea Vanyuth, Khmer Times, February 2, 2021 Document: China’s “One Belt, One Road” Initiative: Economic Issues, By Karen M. Sutter, Andres B. Schwarzenberg, and Michael D. Sutherland, The Congressional Research Service, January 21, 2021 Article: Defense Bill Includes Two Landmark Transparency Provisions, By Tim Stretton, POGO, January 21, 2021 Article: NicaNotes: Unelectable coup mongers, By Fabrizio Casari, Alliance for Global Justice, January 14, 2021 Document: Taiwan: Political and Security Issues, By Susan V. Lawrence, The Congressional Research Service, January 4, 2021 News Release: Cambodia: Hun Sen and His Abusive Generals, Human Rights Watch, October 22, 2020 Article: Cambodian PM Says Ream Naval Base Not Just for China, By The Defense Spot, October 7, 2020 Article: The Real F-35 Problem We Need to Solve, By Scott Cooper, Defense One, September 29, 2020 Article: Russia, China launch massive 'Caucasus 2020' military exercises, By Jan van der Made, Rfi, September 21, 2020 Article: China says it will join Russian military exercises this month along with Iran, Belarus and others, By CBS News, September 10, 2020 Document: China’s National Security Law for Hong Kong: Issues for Congress, By Susan V. Lawrence and Michael F. Martin, The Congressional Research Service, August 3, 2020 Article: India-China border standoff turns deadly for first time in decades, By Arshad R. Zargar, CBS News, June 16, 2020 Article: Chinese troops challenge India at multiple locations in eastern Ladakh, standoff continues, By Snehesh Alex Philip, The Print, May 24, 2020 Article: When It Comes to Supersonic Flight, the F-35’s Wings Are Clipped, By Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, April 29, 2020 Article: Cambodia, China kick off Golden Dragon exercise despite coronavirus, Vietnam News, March 15, 2020 Article: Joint Cambodia-China ‘Golden Dragon’ Military Drills to Proceed, Despite Threat of Coronavirus, Reported by RFA’s Khmer Service, Translated by Sovannarith Keo, Written in English by Joshua Lipes, Radio Free Asia, March, 2020 Press Release: Gonzalez introduces new bill to curb World Bank funding to China, Anthony Gonzalez, November 13, 2019 Article: Deal for Naval Outpost in Cambodia Furthers China’s Quest for Military Network, By Jeremy Page, Gordon Lubold and Rob Taylor, The Wall Street Journal, July 22, 2019 Document: Cambodia: Background and U.S. Relations, By Thomas Lum, The Congressional Research Service, January 28, 2019 Document: Taiwan: Issues for Congress, By Susan V. Lawrence and Wayne M. Morrison, The Congressional Research Service, October 30, 2017 Additional Resources Hun Sen, Britannica Aegis Ashore Lockheed Martin Sound Clip Sources Hearing: Secretary Blinken: The Biden Administration’s Priorities for U.S. Foreign Policy, House Committee on Foreign Affairs, March 10, 2021 Watch on YouTube Watch on C-SPAN Transcript: 40:53 Antony Blinken: So on Nord Stream II, a couple of things at the outset, just to be very, very clear, President Biden thinks it's a bad idea. He said so repeatedly, I share his his view. It violates the European Union's own energy security principles. It jeopardizes the economic and strategic situation for Ukraine, for Poland as well. And so he opposes it. We oppose it will continue to do so. I've been on the job, I think, five weeks. The pipeline is 95% complete. It started construction started in 2018. So I wish we didn't find ourselves in a situation with a pipeline that's virtually complete. 1:06:17 Antony Blinken: We have to deal with the drivers of migration, to your point. And I think there is real opportunity there to do that. When President Biden was Vice President, as you may remember, he led an effort, very successful effort, a bipartisan effort with Congress to secure significantly more resources to help Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador deal with some of these drivers, whether it came to security, whether it came to corruption, whether it came to economic opportunity, and we did this in a way that was simply not simply throwing money at the problem, but demanding concrete reforms from these countries, that actually materially improved the situation for people there and took away some of the incentives for them to come to the United States. We now have a proposal with additional resources over four years to do that, and to do that in a, I think, potentially effective way. 1:10:35 Antony Blinken: First we have in President Biden, as you know, someone who believes strongly in NATO, in the Alliance, the most successful alliance in history and something as he see that he sees as the glue that joins us to to Europe and so this is something as you know, he spent a lot of time on himself in the past and he's doing so now as well. 1:12:37 Antony Blinken: When we see democracy being challenged by China or by Russia, one of the things that they're trying to do constantly, is not just to divide us from other democracies, but of course, to divide us from ourselves, and in particular, to try to make the case that the system that we all believe in and are dedicating our lives to professionally doesn't work and that their systems are better. 1:13:09 Antony Blinken: Demonstrate together, that democracy actually delivers for our people and for other democracies. That is the single best answer and response to this effort by autocratic countries around the world to try to make the case that democracy doesn't deliver an autocracy does. So I hope we can work on that together because that's the path to success. 1:13:43 Rep. Joe Wilson (SC): The International Criminal Court has taken actions leading to the unjustified prosecution of American Israeli nationals despite neither country being a member of the court. Most recently, the ICC issued a ruling that had jurisdiction to try Israelis for alleged war crimes in Palestine. I appreciate your statement opposing the recent moves by the ICC. What are the steps the State Department are taking to counter these recent actions? And how will you work to prevent ICC prosecutions of Americans or Israelis?Antony Blinken: Thank you for the question. I appreciate it. We of course share the goal, the broad goal of accountability for international atrocity crimes. That's not the issue. In the case that you raise, as well as the attempt to assert jurisdiction over American troops in Afghanistan, we have strongly opposed those assertions of jurisdiction. It's been our view, it remains our view that jurisdiction is reserved when a state consents to it or if there's a referral by the United Nations Security Council. Neither is true in the case of of Israel and the Palestinian matter that you just mentioned, or is it true in the case of Afghanistan, we have the capacity ourselves to provide accountability when those issues arise. And so we will continue to make clear our opposition, I think the question for us, and it's an appropriate one is how can we most effectively do that and that's something that we're looking at right now. 1:15:37 Rep. Joe Wilson (SC): My youngest son served in Afghanistan. So identify as a family member of the threats of ICC what they could mean to the American people. 1:16:30 Antony Blinken: We applaud the steps that have been taken toward normalization with Israel by a number of countries including the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Sudan, Morocco. These are very important and we want to build on them. 1:16:50 Rep. Joe Wilson (SC): But unfortunately then we go to Nordstrom, too. And that is a Do you agree that Nord Stream II pipeline is a Russian malign influence project, if completed, that would threaten European and US security? Antony Blinken: Yes, I think as we've we were discussing a little bit earlier, we we oppose the president opposes Nordstrom, who has been clear about this for some time. So have I, and unfortunately, the pipeline is, you know, is 95% complete. But we are making clear that we, we stand against its completion. We issued an initial report and sanctioned the the leading pipeline, ship, and we continue to review other possibilities for sanctions going forward.Rep. Joe Wilson (SC): And I appreciate you actually referenced the threat to Poland. What about threat is already on with the aggression in Ukraine.Antony Blinken: There are two and this is something that I worked on a lot when I was last in, in the Obama administration. We strongly stand against Russia's attempted annexation of Crimea, we stand strongly against its aggression in the Donbass in eastern Ukraine, and we are strongly in support of Ukraine, we intend to strengthen that support, whether its security, economic, or its efforts to strengthen its own democracy, which are vitally important because one of the challenges as you know, for Ukraine is it has to face aggression from the outside from from Russia, but it also has to deal on the inside with its own challenges, including the problem of corruption. We're determined to work on all of that.Rep. Joe Wilson (SC): Another alternative would be as Azerbaijan to Bulgaria, the Black Sea with pipelines that I urge you to make every effort on that. I yield back. 2:54:30 Antony Blinken: First when it comes to the the Houthis, just to be very clear, we we see them as a bad actor that has tried to overrun Yemen, interrupted a peace, effort and led by the United Nations, committed acts of aggression against Saudi Arabia, as well as atrocities of one kind or another, in Yemen itself, and of course, have helped create an environment where we have the worst humanitarian crisis in the world right now. And that's precisely why we took the action we did in terms of lifting the designation on the entity itself. We continue to have designations against individual who the leaders, including some that we've imposed recently, but we wanted to make sure that nothing that the United States was doing, made the provision of humanitarian assistance to Yemen even more difficult than it already is. And it was our judgment, that was those designations, that designation of the group was having that effect, but we stand strongly for the proposition that we have to deal with the Houthis and also try to advance current efforts to end the war. Hearing: The State of Democracy Around the World, Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, March 10, 2021 Watch on YouTube Speakers: Madeleine K. Albright, former Secretary of State Paula J. Dobriansky, former Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs Peter Biar Ajak, National Endowment for Democracy, all of Washington, D.C.; Wai Hnin Pwint Thon, Burma Campaign UK, Geneva, Switzerland Nathan Law, former Hong Kong Legislative Council Member, London, United Kingdom. Transcript: 35:54 Ambassador Paula J Dobriansky: Venezuela is a flashpoint for Chinese and Russian investment and malign influence. both nations have invested billions into Venezuela taking advantage of its economic and political weakness, its vast petroleum resources and their close relationships with a corrupt Maduro regime. Russian arms manufacturers sold $4 billion worth of weapons to Venezuela over the last 10 years, and China has invested some 67 billion in Venezuela since 2007. These instruments have propped up an illegitimate government and have undermined prospects for democracy. 37:07 Ambassador Paula J Dobriansky: Russia and China have expanded investments in Africa as well. In 2003, annual Chinese direct investment in Africa was just 75 million, but by 2009, it reached 2.7 billion. Through its One Belt One Road Initiative. China is offering fragile democracies in Africa, new rail lines, highways and other infrastructure projects. African nations are finding that these projects have left them with massive debt and a lack of control. Russia is also increasing its investments in Africa to especially its military presence. It's striving to create a Red Sea naval logistics facility in Sudan. 40:49 Madeleine Albright: And I do think that there's no question that China is our biggest problem, and that they are out there, hustling in every single way. And I have made very clear that with the Belt and Road policies that they are undertaking, the Chinese must be getting very fat because the belt keeps getting larger and larger. And some of it does have to do with the fact that we have been absent and they are filling a vacuum and so we need to make clear that we need to be back and really do need to make clear in so many ways that we are a leader in restoring and building democracy in other countries. 1:13:46 Sen. Chris Coons (DE): Senator Cornyn and I have a bipartisan bill about strengthening civics education within the United States. In recent surveys, there's as many young Americans who support and believe in socialism as believe in capitalism. There's profound doubts about democracy, particularly after the events of January 6th, and the disinformation, about the value and legitimacy of free and open societies that we've lived through. It's my hope that on a bipartisan basis, we can move a renewed investment in civics education to strengthen our own democracies, you've both spoken to. 1:48:30 Peter Biar Ajak: The United States need to send a clear message to here, there is repression of our people will no longer be tolerated, nor any further delay of elections. We should sanction perpetrators of gross human rights violations like which, while urging the African Union to urgently set up the hybrid court on South Sudan to end impunity. If Kiran doesn't hold the election on time, he's already illegitimate regime will have expired since he was never elected by our people. This will necessitate a new political paradigm to ensure a successful transition to democracy. Despite severe depression, our people made it clear in the recently concluded national dialogue that Kiran Machar must exit the political scene. I hope the United States, this committee will stand with our people. Hearing: National Security Challenges and U.S. Military Activities in the Indo-Pacific, House Committee on Armed Services, March 10, 2021 Watch on YouTube Speakers: David F. Helvey, Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Indo-Pacific Affairs, Department of Defense Admiral Philip S. Davidson, U.S. Navy, Commander, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command General Robert B. Abrams, U.S. Army, Commander, United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command/U.S. Forces Korea Transcript: 31:54 Admiral Philip S. Davidson: The threat as it's developed in the western Pacific has moved in a way in which we need to have better integrated air and missile defense capability on Guam in order to defend it. What you have in place right now is fad radar, which only has 120 degree wide look at threats in the region and in fact, it's oriented on North Korea. And it's meant to defend against rogue shot of intermediate range from North Korea. We supplement that with an Aegis destroyer. As we look at the expanse of Chinese weapon systems, and their employment of air and maritime forces in the region. We need a 360 degree defense now of Guam, and must be able to meet the ballistic missile threat that can come from PRC land as well as PRC ships. But it also should meet the 360 degree threat around Guam that comes from circumnavigations of Guam by PRC naval assets, including submarines that could shoot land attack cruise missiles, for example. As well as bomber approaches, and its ability to shoot land attack cruise missiles as well. We have to be able to defend against all those threats. Aegis Ashore is a proven technology that you have today at sea and you have it ashore in Romania and Poland to help in the defense of Europe. That system would enable all the capabilities that you have today and begin to meet the threats in the future. As China develops hypersonic weapons during the course of this decade., clearly there's going to be a need to have space sensing associated with that. You're still gonna have to have an interceptor to meet the threat. In my view, that's going to rectify that by bridging Aegis Ashore with our space capability that is to come. 49:14 David F. Helvey: And the reality is that we're not asking nations to choose between the United States or China. In fact, we welcome and encourage all nations across the Indo Pacific to maintain peaceful, productive relations with all of their neighbors, China included. Framing the strategic competition that we find ourselves in with China, as a choice between us or China, or as a choice between nations is really a false choice. The choice that our allies and our partners and everyone in the region faces is between supporting the existing international order, the existing system that's free and open. It's the system that we helped to create that we've supported, and that we believe has benefited everybody in the region, including in particular, including China. And the alternative now that China is presenting, which is a closed system in a more authoritarian governance model. So it's a competition between systems, that's a choice between systems. Do you want to choose a free and open system? Or do you want to choose a closed and authoritarian one? And so we're only asking countries to do their part to uphold the international laws, rules and norms, which support their interests, which they've benefited from, and helped to provide for security and prosperity for all of us. And so that's that's the ask that we've got our allies and our partners. 57:27 Rep. Joe Courtney (CT): Admiral Davidson on page 35 of your testimony you set forth China's sort of brazen, repeated violations of the Law of the Sea treaty. And mentioned the fact that at South China Sea geographic features were renamed with, I guess, Chinese names. Can you flesh that out a little bit what that means in terms of, you know, maritime territorial claims, and the impact in terms of freedom of navigation? Admiral Philip S. Davidson: Well, the Chinese are trying to basically impose Chinese national law on the international regime that provides for the freedom of navigation and freedom of the seas. We've spoken quite a bit about the Chinese use of lawfare. This is, one of the methodologies in which they do it. It's not just the naming, or renaming of features that have had long standing names in the region. It's the redefinition of what they might be. Because, rocks, is slits, islands all have very specific navigational rights associated with them, as well as their continued militarization of the features that they built out early in the last decade. Their continued militarization is to frankly, deter not only the United States, but truly cow, all of our allies and partners in the region, and certainly the South China Sea claimants from their absolute rights to operate and those rights that they enjoy for economic resource extraction of freedom of the seas, freedom of the airways, etc.Rep. Joe Courtney (CT): Well, thank you for that answer. Because, again, as you point out, this isn't just about sort of names. It's also about sort of territorial claims and what that means to the rules based system that has been so successful over the last 75 years. 1:29:46 Rep. Scott DesJarlais (IA): Admiral Davidson What do you consider the most likely potential target of Chinese aggression or military action in the next five to 10 years? Admiral Philip S. Davidson: Given what they've said both publicly and over time, and certainly during the tenure of Chairman Xi Jinping. I would say Taiwan is the first. Hearing: United States Indo-Pacific Command, Senate Committee on Armed Services, March 9, 2021 Transcript: 4:23 Sen. Jack Reed (RI): At his confirmation hearing Secretary Austin accurately described china as the pacing threat for the department of defense under president Xi Jinping china has moved away from greater integration with the liberal world order and instead created a style of authoritarian capitalism that it now seeks to explore throughout the region and the world additionally China seeks to co op international institutions or create parallel organization to support its strategic interest. 8:23 Sen. Roger Wicker (MS): China invested in military capabilities many americans naively assumed that China's entry into the WTO and the global integration of its economy would somehow make the Chinese communist party more friendly and open to the west. The result now is america's military advantage and the credibility of our deterrent is eroding that is why the 2021 NDAA was the toughest bill on china ever with several national security committees involved and that is specifically why this committee put the Pacific Deterrence Initiative or PDI into last year's NDAA to stop aggression from the Chinese Communist Party. 18:50 Admiral Philip S. Davidson: I think the Pacific deterrence initiative funded in FY21 for about $2.2 billion was a good first start. I recognize that the committee has put a cap of $5.5 billion on the fund going forward. 22:45 Admiral Philip S. Davidson: i'm quite encouraged by the potential power of an organization like the quad my brain in my view India Japan Australia in the United States that's a diamond of democracies that could bring so much more not only to the region but to the globe not not in terms of security alone, but in terms of how we might approach you know the global economy, critical technologies like telecommunications and 5G, collaboration on the international order, just much to be done diplomatically and economically and I have great hope that our ministerial level meetings with the clot as it's known and returned we'll build into something much bigger for the sake of the globe. 24:24 Sen. Roger Wicker (MS): With regard to the projected 2025. It shows that at that point, China will have three aircraft carriers to our one in the region. Is that correct? Admiral Philip S. Davidson: Yes, sir. Sen. Roger Wicker (MS): And then with regard to amphibious assault ships, it's projected in 2025, that we'll have six to our two. Admiral Philip S. Davidson:* Yes, sir. **Sen. Roger Wicker (MS): And then with regard to modern multi warfare, combatant ships 50 for two hours, six, is that correct? Admiral Philip S. Davidson:* Yes, sir. **Sen. Roger Wicker (MS): And what is the significance of that last figure Admiral? Admiral Philip S. Davidson: Really, the three charts work together, Senator, one to show the change in capability and capacity that the Chinese have undertaken during the course of the 21st century. And the relatively static nature of our own forward positioned forces. As I described, our effort to do a deterrence to sustain a deterrence posture and the reason it's so important on our ability to respond in time and without question, you know, is this an old novel in the 70s is to say, the importance of us presence forward is incredibly important, perfect speed is being there. And it's to show that if we don't make changes in our posture forward, that that it will demonstrate that the Chinese have much greater capacity than we have. 26:42 Admiral Philip S. Davidson: But the important factor here is time. It takes almost three weeks to respond from the west coast of the United States and 17 days to respond from Alaska to get all the way to the first island chain and to conduct operations within the second islands. 28:26 Admiral Philip S. Davidson: Certainly advocating for Aegis Ashore and Guam the mission partner environment as well as the Pentek. That the Pacific Range Improvements that I seek for our structure in Alaska, Hawaii, Guam, and so forth. 35:43 Sen. Deb Fisher (NE): Last year, the strategic forces subcommittee authorized and additional $77 million to begin fielding a persistent air and missile defense system on Guam. Unfortunately, this funding was removed in conference and replaced with language requiring the department to study the issue. Can you walk us through the need for this system? 38:24 Admiral Philip S. Davidson: In partnership with the Missile Defense Agency we believe that the aegis assures system as is being put to sea right now and has been constructed previously in Romania and Poland delivers the kind of capabilities that would meet the threat that's excellent here by mid decade and we'll help us pace the threat into the future. 1:03:35 Admiral Philip S. Davidson: I worry that they're accelerating their ambitions to supplant the United States and our leadership role in the rules based international order which they've long said that they want to do that by 2050, I'm worried about them moving that target closer. Taiwan is clearly one of their ambitions before then and i think the threat is manifest during this decade in fact in the next six years. 1:05:58 Sen. Maizie Hirono (HI): I noticed that you significantly increased the requested amount from last year's PDI report to this year's report to strengthen our allies and partners over the next five years in the region from over $300 million to about $2.8 billion, can you discuss your rationale for the significant increase and what that additional funding is intended to do or where will it go?Admiral Philip S. Davidson: Well you hope you highlighted the key aspects ma'am it's to enhance and make improvements in our joint exercise program and that's principally because not only the united states but our key allies and partners Japan, Korea, Australia is just three examples are buying important capabilities that match ours integrated air missile defense for example fifth generation fighters like the F35 they're being actually delivered in the theater we've got to advance our exercise capabilities or excuse me our exercise program in a way that allows us to exercise those capabilities deliberately. 1:34:07 Sen. Tim Scott (SC): My first question is about Taiwan. I think you agree that it we've got to prevent Communist China from Controlling taiwan is a strategic necessity for the united states and the loss would devastate our ability and and the ability of japan to counter china's aggression does you agree with that and rightAdmiral Philip S. Davidson: As a combatant commander out there in the Indo-Pacific I have an obligation to you know support the Taiwan Relations Act and and in a geostrategic sense i think it's critically important to the united states global status, yes. 1:44:04 Admiral Philip S. Davidson: The Aegis Ashore is a system that's in fact already been developed we we have built and are employing one actually already in Romania and there's one building and imminently operational in Poland as well and it's to help nato with the defense of Europe it is essentially a radar the command and control the information technology communications conductivity and the interceptors missiles that are capable of defeating ballistic missile cruise missile threats in and around today you know an aegis ashore system on Guam fixed site on Guam would enable 360 degree defense of Guam from any military attacks from china whether they come by sea by air or by ballistic missile in the future it is technology that is available today we've built it ashore we've built it at sea and it's our you know it's our number one priority for funding in Guam. 2:13:13 Sen. Mark Kelly (NJ): You know a couple of questions here about command and control, communications. And we rely heavily on satellites to do that. And in in January of 2007, China conducted an anti anti satellite test against one of their own non operational weather satellites, with a kinetic Kill vehicle. And it's been reported that in the year since China has an operational capability that can attack satellites in low Earth orbit and that they're developing the capability that goes all the way out to geosynchronous orbit. So how does this affect the strategic balance of power in the region from your perspective?Admiral Philip S. Davidson: Thanks for that, Senator. Yes, both China and Russia have demonstrated capability to disrupt satellites, testing capabilities on their own assets in the past, as you've articulated, it clearly, I think demonstrates that space which we've long considered a domain and which would be unthreatened for the United States. The potential is there actually, for it to be threatened. We have to build resiliency into our space apparatus that happens with other space assets. It happens with creating airborne and other terrestrial alternatives to fulfill that. And it changes the calculus in space as well. We have to recognize that again, this goes back to some earlier comments I made about to turn theory we were not going to be able to play defense alone, in this particular regard. If we can't demonstrate to others, that their capabilities and space might be at risk, then, you know, we run the risk of a deterrence failure. That's that the space layer is critically important to how we sense in the strategic nuclear deterrent, how we communicate across the Joint Force, and even how we sense and distribute information to the conventional forces as well. Its resiliency is incredibly important to us. Hearing: Global Security Challenges and Strategy, Senate Committee on Armed Services, March 2, 2021 Speakers: Thomas Wright, The Brookings Institution Lieutenant General H.R. McMaster, USA (Ret.), former United States National Security Advisor, Stanford University Hoover Institution, both of Washington, D.C. Transcript: Lieutenant General H.R. McMaster: The most significant flashpoint now that that could lead to a large scale war is Taiwan. And I think that has to do with really Xi Jinping's belief that he has a fleeting window of opportunity that's closing. And he wants to his view, make China whole again, you see this with the extension of the party's repressive arm into Hong Kong. And this horrible genocidal campaign in Shinjang, Taiwan is the next big prize. And so I think what we have to be able to do is have four position capable forces. Because what Xi Jinping wants to do with what would be the largest land grabs, so to speak in history, if he succeeds in the South China Sea, is to weaponize the South China Sea and just make it too difficult for us to be able to employ forces inside of that inner island chain. So you know, if you have four position forces there, that automatically transforms denied space with China with the PLA, The People's Liberation Army when it comes to deny space. Twitter Update: Ned Price rattle off a regime change rant revamping Trump's policy on Venezuela, Anya Parampil February 3, 2021 Hearing: Secretary of State Confirmation Hearing, Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, January 19, 2021 Watch on C-SPAN Transcript: 24:50 Sen. Jim Risch (OH): After our conversations earlier today and after hearing our opening statements, Senator Menendez's input net regard, as you can see here and a whole lot of daylight between us on most of these issues, certainly, almost none whatsoever when it comes to objectives, strategy and how to get there. 34:06 Antony Blinken: Both the President Elect and I believe that we have to restore Congress's traditional role as a partner in our foreign policy making, in recent years, across administration's of both parties, Congress's voice and foreign policy has been diluted and diminished. That doesn't make the executive branch stronger. It makes our country weaker. President Elect Biden believes and I share his conviction that no foreign policy can be sustained without the informed consent of the American people. You are the representatives of the American people. You provide that advice and consent. 39:20 Antony Blinken: First President Elect Biden is committed to the proposition that Iran will not acquire a nuclear weapon. And we share I know that goal across this committee. An Iran with a nuclear weapon, or on the threshold of having one with the capacity to build one on short order would be in Iran that is even more dangerous than it already is, when it comes to all of the other malicious activities that's engaged in, whether it is support for terrorism, whether it is fueling and feeding it's proxies, whether it is destabilizing the region. An Iran with a nuclear weapon, or with a threshold capacity to build one is in Iran that would act potentially with even greater impunity than it already is. So I think we have an urgent responsibility to do whatever we can to prevent Iran from acquiring or getting a weapon or getting close to the capacity to having the fissile material to break out on short notice. In my judgment, the JCPOA, for whatever its limitations, was succeeding on its own terms in blocking Iran's pathways to producing fissile material for a nuclear weapon on short order. It also featured and a feature that continues the most intrusive inspections and monitoring regime in the history of arms control. The challenge we face now is that we pulled out of the agreement, Iran is now taking steps to undo the various constraints that were imposed on it by the agreement. And so it has increased his stockpile of low enriched uranium, it is now enriching at a higher level. It is deploying centrifuges in ways that were prohibited under the agreement. The result is based on public reporting. The breakout time, the time it would take Iran to produce enough fissile material for one weapon has gone from beyond a year as it was under the JCPOA to about three or four months based at least on public reporting. And that potentially brings us right back to the crisis point that we were reaching before the deal was negotiated. And so the President Elect believes that if Iran comes back into compliance, we would too. But we would use that as a platform with our allies and partners who would once again be on the same side with us to seek a longer and stronger agreement. And also, as you and the chairman have rightly pointed out, to capture these other issues, particularly with regard to missiles and Iran's destabilizing activities. That would be the objective. 53:46 Sen. Ron Johnson (WI): Okay, one of the things that Congress did unanimously is we approved $300 million of lethal defensive weaponry for Ukraine. The Obama administration never implemented, the Trump administration did. Do you still disagree with providing that lethal defensive weaponry or do you think and, over time now, that's been proven to be the correct decision by Congress and the Trump administration? Antony Blinken: Senator, I support providing that lethal defensive assistance to Ukraine. In fact, I had the opportunity to write exactly that in the New York Times about three years ago. 1:14:09 Antony Blinken: There's been a strong and long bipartisan commitment to Taiwan. Taiwan Relations Act, also that communicates with China, and part of that commitment is making sure that Taiwan has the ability to defend itself against aggression. And that is a commitment that will absolutely endure. In a Biden administration, we will make sure that Taiwan has the ability to do that. I would also like to see Taiwan playing a greater role around the world, including in international organizations. When those organizations don't require the status of a country to be a member, they should become members. When it does, there are other ways that they can participate. 1:35:15 Sen. Marco Rubio (FL): Is it your view that our stance towards Venezuela should change in essence, that we should no longer recognize Juan Guido and an intern in negotiations with Maduro? Antony Blinken: No, it does not. I very much agree with you, Senator, first of all, with regard to a number of the steps that were taken toward Venezuela in recent years, including recognizing Mr. Guido, recognizing the National Assembly as the only democratically elected institution in Venezuela, seeking to increase pressure on the regime, led by a brutal dictator in Maduro. 1:46:21 Antony Blinken: First senator, we need to be clear eyed about the Houthis. They overthrew a government in Yemen. They engaged in a path of aggression through the country. They directed aggression toward Saudi Arabia, they've committed atrocities and human rights abuses. And that is a fact. What's also a fact though is that the the Saudi led campaign in Yemen, pushback against the Houthi aggression, has contributed to what is by most accounts, the worst humanitarian situation that we face, anywhere in the world. And one aspect of that situation is that about 80% of the Yemeni population right now is in areas controlled by the Houthis. And whether we like it or not, we have to find ways to get assistance to them, if we're going to do anything about addressing this situation. And so my concern, deep concern about the the designation that was made is that, at least on its surface, it seems to achieve nothing particularly practical in advancing the efforts against the Houthis. And to bring them back to the negotiating table, while making it even more difficult than it already is to provide humanitarian assistance to people who desperately need it. So I think we would propose to review that immediately, to make sure that what we are doing is not impeding the provision of humanitarian assistance, even under these difficult circumstances, I recognize that some have talked about carve outs for American providers of humanitarian assistance. The problem there is that if the ca

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National Security Law Today
Artificial Intelligence, National Security Law and Ethics

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2021 45:27


The National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence has said, “the development of AI will shape the future of power.” AI is coming and coming hard. The meaningful application of law and ethics will help determine whether we maximize the opportunities and minimize and mitigate the risks. Law and ethics will, or could and should, distinguish democratic and American AI from authoritarian applications of AI. Law and ethics will bind like-minded alliances in the AI field and it will help to build and sustain public trust and support for appropriate AI applications. The converse is also likely. If, for example, the public does not trust the government’s use of AI because of certain facial recognition applications, it may not trust the government with using AI to facilitate contact tracing amidst a pandemic. This session will consider the ethical use of AI in national security decision-making including: (1) The use of predictive algorithms; (2) Potential AI decision-making redlines and permits; and (3) What is it national security lawyers should know and should ask about AI before it is used to inform and execute national security decisions. Corin Stone is a Scholar-in-Residence at American University's Washington College of Law: https://www.wcl.american.edu/community/faculty/profile/cstone/bio Hon. James E. Baker is the Director of the Institute of Security Policy and Law at Syracuse University: http://law.syr.edu/profile/the-hon.-james-e.-baker References: - James E. Baker, The Centaur's Dilemma: National Security Law for the Coming AI Revolution. Brookings Institution Press, 2020. Introduction: https://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/law_national_security/centaurs-dilemma-introduction.pdf Chapter 10: https://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/law_national_security/centaurs-dilemma-chapter-10.pdf - Department of National Intelligence, "Artificial Intelligence Ethics Framework for the Intelligence Community." June, 2020. https://www.dni.gov/files/ODNI/documents/AI_Ethics_Framework_for_the_Intelligence_Community_10.pdf - Ashley Deeks, “Predicting Enemies,” 104 Virginia Law Review 1529 (2018). https://www.virginialawreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/104VaLRev-2.pdf - Department of Defense Ethical Principles for Artificial Intelligence: https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Releases/Release/Article/2091996/dod-adopts-ethical-principles-for-artificial-intelligence/ -ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and Comments: https://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/law_national_security/model-rules-ai-webinar.pdf - "Principled Artificial Intelligence – Mapping Consensus in Ethical and Rights-Based Approaches to Principles for AI." Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. Jan. 2020: https://cyber.harvard.edu/publication/2020/principled-ai

Pacific Council on International Policy
Edgerton Series: Human Rights in China

Pacific Council on International Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 61:12


An installment of the Edgerton Series on Responding to a Rising China, on the state of human rights in China. Featuring: Kenneth Roth, Executive Director, Human Rights Watch Kenneth Roth is the executive director of Human Rights Watch, one of the world's leading international human rights organizations, which operates in more than 90 countries. He has written extensively on a wide range of human rights abuses, devoting special attention to issues of international justice, counterterrorism, the foreign policies of the major powers, and the work of the United Nations. Moderator: Kimberly Marteau Emerson, Board Member, Human Rights Watch Kimberly Marteau Emerson is a lawyer, civic leader, and human rights advocate. She worked in the Clinton administration as a senior political appointee and spokesperson for the U.S. Information Agency, now part of the State Department. She serves on the Board of Directors of Human Rights Watch, the Advisory Board of the USC Center on Public Diplomacy, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Pacific Council on International Policy. Opening remarks: Alicia Miñana, CEO, Law Offices of Alicia Miñana Background: According to the Human Rights Watch World Report 2021, "the Chinese government’s authoritarianism was on full display in 2020 as it grappled with the deadly coronavirus outbreak first reported in Wuhan province. Authorities initially covered up news about the virus, then adopted harsh quarantine measures in Wuhan and other parts of China. The government has rejected international calls for independent, unfettered investigations into Chinese authorities’ handling of the outbreak, and surveilled and harassed families of those who died of the virus. "Beijing’s repression—insisting on political loyalty to the Chinese Communist Party—deepened across the country. In Hong Kong, following six months of large-scale protests in 2019, the Chinese government imposed a draconian “National Security Law” on June 30—its most aggressive assault on Hong Kong people’s freedoms since the transfer of sovereignty in 1997. In Xinjiang, Turkic Muslims continue to be arbitrarily detained on the basis of their identity, while others are subjected to forced labor, mass surveillance, and political indoctrination. In Inner Mongolia, protests broke out in September when education authorities decided to replace Mongolian with Mandarin Chinese in a number of classes in the region’s schools. "Chinese authorities’ silencing of human rights defenders, journalists, and activists, and restrictions on the internet, also make it difficult to obtain accurate information about Chinese government policies and actions." Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch, will speak on these issues and more during the next installment of the Edgerton Series on Responding to a Rising China. The Edgerton Series on Responding to a Rising China aims to provide proactive and forward-looking solutions to some of the most complex local, regional, and global issues facing the United States and China today, through regular engagement in debates and discussions with the foremost experts in Chinese affairs. The Edgerton Series is made possible by generous support from the Edgerton Foundation. We thank Dr. Bradford and Ms. Louise Edgerton for their continued support and dedication to the Pacific Council.

National Security Law Today
Shifting the Great Power Competition: Emerging and Continuing Threats with China with Jim Steinberg

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021 47:26


The Georgetown Journal of National Security Law & Policy (JNSLP) hosted it's 2021 annual symposium this week, featuring a keynote discussion with Jim Steinberg, former U.S. Deputy Secretary of State. For this week's episode, Jim Steinberg, along with James Feinerman, Professor of Law at Georgetown University, sit down to discuss U.S.-China relations, managing differences, and the ongoing power struggle between both nations. The interview taps Jim Steinberg’s wealth of experience with China to address the biggest challenges facing the Biden Administration and his recommendations for the way ahead. Professor William Banks, Chair of the ABA Standing Committee on Law and National Security and Editor-in-Chief of the JNSLP provides opening remarks. Jim Steinberg is University Professor of Social Science, International Affairs and Law at Syracuse University: https://www.maxwell.syr.edu/Steinberg,_James_B_/ James Feinerman is the James and Catherine Denny Chair in Democratic Capitalism, James M. Morita Professor of Asian Legal Studies, and Co-Director of Georgetown Law Asia at Georgetown University Law Center: https://www.law.georgetown.edu/faculty/james-v-feinerman/ Journal of National Security Law & Policy: https://jnslp.com/

historicly
Privatized War with Tim Shorrock

historicly

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2021 58:14


Today we interview journalist Tim Shorrock to talk to us about privatized military intelligence, US counter-insurgency methods and his article in The Baffler called Making COIN: The Modern History of an Unstoppable Bad IdeaExamples of COINTim talks about his Cold-War upbringing in Japan and Korea during the aftermath of World War II, the Korean war and through Vietnam, explaining how it gave him an honest “introduction to American politics and American foreign policy” which led him to a career in freelance journalism with a focus on Asian Studies.Show Notes4:25-8:15Private companies are profiting at every level from military spending. In recent years we have seen an unprecedented merging of the military and private finance, “the integration of national security and business.”“The privatizing of intelligence took off in the 1990’s.”The Peace DividendFollowing the Cold War, as austerity and neoliberal budget-cuts were implemented, a wave of people previously employed in intelligence went on to work in the private sector with government contractors.In the latter years of the Clinton administration, we began to see an increase of private military contractors being used to collect intelligence in places like Bosnia and Serbia.Tim explains that after 9/11, under the false pretense of national security, billions were spent on increased military budgets, making contractors “essential parts of US military and intelligence operations”. As the Bush doctrine continued, the Washington consensus increasingly encouraged “the contracting of strategic operations.”8:15-13:05COINCounter-insurgency methods of the US:  “the people become the enemy.”Tim illustrates how a Vietnamese uprising against the US backed Diem dictatorship resulted in massive gains for the National Liberation Front (Viet Cong) and how the liberal Kennedy administration’s “hearts and minds” approach, cloaked in the language of evil, only made the violence worse: “part of the idea began to be to separate the people from the guerillas and they would build these camps for the villagers that became, essentially, concentration camps (strategic hamlets)”Many of these violent counter-insurgency methods being used by the Americans were inherited from British Imperialists who had developed these strategies in earlier suppression campaigns against Communists in Malaya in the 1950’s. Related: Listen to our interview with Stuart Schrader on the History of the Modern Police13:05 - 19:26In the first year of the Obama administration, they tried the “hearts and minds” strategy in Afghanistan. “When McMaster was a General in Iraq, he got key press from liberals”The US and their personally-picked government provides neoliberal and privatized “social services”American contractors never built the project that they were supposed to build.Inspector General nominated by congress in regards to contractors. That group has done multiple reports about corruption. “Counter-insurgency is a form of warfare where you adopt various economic and political programs in addition to going after and killing people”. 19:26 – 24:46David Kilcullen’s used to work for Australian special forces. He assisted in the “Jakarta Method” and the death squads Suharto dictatorship in Indonesia. Kilcullen’s called the death squads “armed social work.” He advocated for “global counter-insurgency” (massive death squads of people opposing US corporate theft)Counter-insurgency is death squads under the larger guise of “winning the hearts and minds.”Michelle Flournoy saw counter-insurgency as, “a way that Democrats can be tough, and be hawkish and look smart.”Just another form of warfare. 25:36-29:00Mehdi Hassan from the Intercepted had David Kilcullen on as a guest within the last year. 29:00-34:32The intercept sent the original document to the NSA which got her caught.David Kilcullen’s private contract in Iraq. Tim received leaked documents from Caerus Global Solutions. Kilcullen even wrote the civilian training manual the USAID gives out to civilians. 34:32-38:54Tim confronted Kilcullen in an event. His company is under investigation for the security clearances. Kilcullen’s “100-year war” The Cold-War notion of the “third way” of being non-communist and non-colonial but it always has failed. They put together death squads in Iraq and these were the same people who did the death squads in El Salvador. Read about El Mozote38:54 - 42:27The Death Squads in El Salvador killed 10s of thousands. The real opposition comes from the more conservative people.“We are not into nation-building” is a code word for counter-insurgency.42:43-48:01History of US intervention in Korea.Myths and lies about the US role in the Korean war. How the US dissolved the people’s committee. 48:01-53:00“South Korea, until the late 1980’s, was an authoritarian police state. I was there under this general who took over, Chun Doo-hwah, and it was a scary place. A very repressive place, it was a police state.”“They fought against US backed dictators that held them back for years”. Koreans were being tortured by a US allied regime. The uprising of 1987 only happened after the “death by water torture of a south Korean student” led a mass of Koreans to take to the streets and demand independence from US influence.  The legacy of US counter-insurgency continues in Korea. For example, South Korea’s draconian National Security Law that has been used to silent dissenters even to this day. 53:00-58:00The change in South Korea and their vibrant Democracy.To learn more, visit Tim’s website timshorrock.com Get full access to Historic.ly at historicly.substack.com/subscribe

The Lawfare Podcast
The National Security Law Guys Talk War Powers, Islamic State Detainees and Much More

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2021 36:24


Lawfare founder Bobby Chesney and Lawfare contributing editor Steve Vladeck host the weekly National Security Law Podcast from the University of Texas Law School, a discussion of current national security law developments. In their most recent episode, Bobby and Steve discuss a range of topics that we thought would be of interest to listeners, so we are bringing you a distilled version of their conversation. Bobby and Steve talk about recent U.S. air strikes and the Biden administration's war powers report, updated reporting on Islamic State detainees in Iraq and Syria, the report on the murder of Jamal Khashoggi and a collection of other national security law issues.

Law To Fact
California v. Texas

Law To Fact

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2021 42:25


In this episode...Professor Alexander Greenawalt discusses shares his thoughts, and predictions about California v. Texas, a case pending before the Supreme Court. Among other noteworthy issues, Professor Greenawalt discusses whether Congress has the power under the US Constitution to pass the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”)? Why is the constitutionality of the ACA back for the Supreme Court this term? and How is the Supreme Court likely to resolve the dispute?About our guest...Alexander Greenawalt is a Professor of Law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University. He was previously a clerk for the Honorable Stephen F. Williams of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Professor Greenawalt is a graduate of Columbia Law School, where he was a James Kent Scholar and Articles Editor of the Columbia Law Review.Professor Greenawalt’s research focuses on criminal law, international law, and the laws of war. He has taught Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, International Law, Administrative Law, International Criminal Law, United States Foreign Relations Law, and National Security Law. He is a two-time recipient of Pace's Goettel Prize for Faculty Scholarship, and a recipient of the Law School's Richard Ottinger Faculty Achievement Award Law to Fact is a podcast about law school for law school students. As always if you if you have any suggestions for an episode topic concerning any matter related to law school, please let us know! You can email us at leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet to @lawtofact. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@lawtofact) and to like us on FaceBook! And finally, your ratings and reviews matter! Please leave us a review on your favorite podcast platform.This episode is sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review. Getting ready for the bar exam means you’ll need to choose the study program that’s right for you. Kaplan Bar Review will get you ready to take on test day with confidence by offering $100 off live and on-demand Bar Review with offer code Leslie100. Visit kaplanbarreview.com today to sign up.

National Security Law Today
Critical Issues in National Security Law, The Future – a conversation with Dr. John Hamre

National Security Law Today

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2021 27:01


We are entering into the next epoch of U.S. foreign policy. In this week's episode, host Harvey Rishikoff and guest Dr. John Hamre discuss a handful of critical issues - from industrial competition with China, to the growing polarization of America - and the role national security law will play in this next policy chapter. Dr. John Hamre is president and CEO of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). He notably served as US deputy secretary of defense from 1997 to 1999 and undersecretary of defense from 1993 to 1997. Before his tenure at the Department of Defense, Hamre was professional staff member to the Senate Armed Services Committee and deputy assistant director at the Congressional Budget Office. This episode references: - Sherman Antitrust Act: https://fraser.stlouisfed.org/title/antitrust-laws-amendments-1890-1956-1136/sherman-antitrust-act-1513 - The Safe Tech Act: https://www.warner.senate.gov/public/_cache/files/4/f/4fa9c9ba-2b34-4854-8c19-59a0a9676a31/66DECFBC0D6E6958C2520C3A6A69EAF6.safe-tech-act---final.pdf - Section 230, Communication Decency Act: https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/47/230 - "Intelligence Analysts Use U.S. Smartphone Location Data Without Warrants, Memo Says." New York Times, Jan. 22, 2021. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/22/us/politics/dia-surveillance-data.html?smid=em-share - "Biden Voting Counties Equal 70% of America's Economy. What Does This Mean for the Nation's Political-Economic Divide?" The Brookings Institution, Nov. 10, 2020: https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-avenue/2020/11/09/biden-voting-counties-equal-70-of-americas-economy-what-does-this-mean-for-the-nations-political-economic-divide/

Hopkins Podcast on Foreign Affairs
Up to Speed: The Story of Hong Kong

Hopkins Podcast on Foreign Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2021


What is the story of Hong Kong? In our first episode for our new NARRATIVE series, Up to Speed, POFA tells the story of Hong Kong’s rise, its earth-shaking protests, and its future under the newly imposed National Security Law.  Up to Speed: The Story of Hong Kong If you liked this narrative style, or … Continue reading Up to Speed: The Story of Hong Kong

SBS World News Radio
Sharp rise in the number of permanent residency visas granted to Hongkongers

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2021 2:29


More visas for Australia granted to Hongkongers in the five months following the introduction of Beijing's National Security Law in Hong Kong, with skilled visa grants doubling.

A Podcast Called INTREPID
Ep 148 Review Review! Evaluating the First Reports from NSIRA and the Office of the Information Commissioner

A Podcast Called INTREPID

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2021 58:41


In this episode, Stephanie and Leah sit down with Bill Robinson, Citizen Lab Fellow and one of Canada's leading national security researchers, to discuss the first reports by two of Canada's new intelligence review and oversight bodies, the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) and the Intelligence Commissioner (IC). The three make comparisons to prior reports produced by their predecessors (the Security and Intelligence Review Committee and the Office of the Commissioner of the Communications Security Establishment respectively). In some cases, they are left wanting for some of the detail of previous reports. While the trio sometimes dig into the weedy details in these reports, they do so in the context of an important question: Bill C-59 augmented the powers of the national security agencies on the understanding that this would be balanced by an enhanced review process – is that expectation being met here? Resources: NSIRA, 2019 Annual ReportICO, 2019 Annual ReportCheck out Bill Robinson's blog on the NSIRA report here: https://luxexumbra.blogspot.com/2020/12/first-nsira-annual-report-released.htmlFor more information on some of the concepts in this episode, see Forcese and West, National Security Law, Safeguarding Information: Chapters 12-13; Review: Chapter 18Online Course at a University Called INTREPID: National Security Law Primer, Module: Accountability; Module: Search 1 and 2; Module: Screen

A Podcast Called INTREPID
Ep 147 Respect My Authorities?

A Podcast Called INTREPID

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2021 51:21


This episode of Intrepid Podcast examines some recent developments with regards to CSIS. First, Stephanie and Jessica discuss the public speech that the CSIS Director gave on Tuesday February 9 at the Centre for International Governance Innovation. Next, Stephanie sits down with Leah and the long-lost Craig Forcese to discuss to recent Federal Court Decisions about CSIS foreign intelligence authorities. Once again, the Court has reaffirmed a very strict interpretation of what it means to collect intelligence “within” Canada. But where does this leave the Service in terms of the expectations that it can monitor an increasingly complex array of threats? And is this a problem that can be fixed without creating a foreign intelligence service? Finally, as a bonus, we're happy to introduce A University Called INTREPID – a free mini-course on national security law for all of our listeners. Hey, it's easier than hosting your own podcast. https://www.intrepidpodcast.com/university References:CSIS Director's 2018 Speech to the Economic Club of Canada: https://www.canada.ca/en/security-intelligence-service/news/2018/12/remarks-by-director-david-vigneault-at-the-economic-club-of-canada.html CSIS Director's 2021 Speech at the Centre for International Governance Innovation: https://www.canada.ca/en/security-intelligence-service/news/2021/02/remarks-by-director-david-vigneault-to-the-centre-for-international-governance-innovation.html References to Forcese and West, National Security Law (2d Ed 2021): International law and sovereignty: p. 263-66 International law and espionage: p. 277-278 CSIS's foreign intelligence mandate: p. 455Bob From Mordor's first appearance (Justice Noel's decision) – Episode 48Federal Court decisions:2018 FC 738 (“Within Canada” Case, Justice Noel)2020 FC 697 (Justice O'Reilly)2020 FC 757 (Justice Gleeson)

China Unscripted
#103 The Fight for Hong Kong That Will NOT End

China Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2021 37:59


The fight for Hong Kong is far from over. The China's National Security Law may have led to the arrest of pro-democracy legislators and activists like Joshua Wong, and harassment of Jimmy Lai and Apple Daily, but Hong Kong protesters haven't given up. Joining us today is Joyce Ho, the founder and director of Project Black Mask. Follow Project Black Mask on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/projectblackmaskhk/ YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsupVYYBZaGSNv5vyhcM5eA Twitter @projblackmask And Joyce Ho on her Instagram https://www.instagram.com/joycemho

New Books Network
James E. Baker, "The Centaur's Dilemma: US National Security Law for the Coming AI Revolution" (Brookings, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 80:49


From facial recognition to online shopping, artificial intelligence has become the backbone of the internet and has led to an unprecedented extraction and utilization of personal data. As a result, AI has rapidly outpaced existing free speech, privacy, and national security law. In The Centaur’s Dilemma: National Security Law for the Coming AI Revolution (Brookings Institute Press, 2020), Judge James E. Baker deploys his extensive experience in national security law to argue for AI regulation through legislation. By first tackling the creation of a precise definition of artificial intelligence, Judge Baker then vividly explains the national security applications and implications of AI. In part two, he goes about suggesting a purposeful, legal framework for addressing those national security applications and implications while exploring legal arguments in the absence of clear laws. This timely and insightful work provides an accessible primer of AI for legal generalists while demonstrating how technologists can thoroughly think about the safety and ethics of artificial intelligence. Kyle Beadle is a recent graduate of Louisiana State University, where he studied International Studies and Spanish. He is now seeking a master’s in International Relations and Security. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Warden's Watch
TGL010 Christina Bobb

Warden's Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2021 62:52


Christina Bobb is a news reporter for One America News focused on news from Washington DC and the current Administration. Christina was the Executive Secretary for Homeland Security, served as a Judge Advocate in the United States Marine Corps, and was a civil litigation attorney in the San Diego area. In addition, Ms Bobb holds a B.A. from Arizona State University, an M.B.A. from San Diego State University, a J.D. from California Western School of Law, and an L.L.M. in National Security Law from Georgetown University Law Center. Christina reported from Washington as the riots unfolded in recent weeks at the nation's Capitol. To Get the Video Version of this Podcast Please Visit Us Here: https://www.patreon.com/wwtglpodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thin Green Line
TGL010 Christina Bobb

Thin Green Line

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2021 61:08


Christina Bobb is a news reporter for One America News focused on news from Washington DC and the current Administration.  Christina was the Executive Secretary for Homeland Security, served as a Judge Advocate in the United States Marine Corps, and was a civil litigation attorney in the San Diego area.  In addition, Ms Bobb holds a B.A. from Arizona State University, an M.B.A. from San Diego State University, a J.D. from California Western School of Law, and an L.L.M. in National Security Law from Georgetown University Law Center.  Christina reported from Washington as the riots unfolded in recent weeks at the nation's Capitol. To Get the Video Version of this Podcast Please Visit Us Here: www.Patreon.com/thingreenlinepodcast

Stanford Legal
National Security Law and Homegrown Terrorism in the Wake of the Siege of the U.S. Capitol Building with Shirin Sinnar

Stanford Legal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2021 27:59


After the siege of the Capitol building on January 6, Americans have been left stunned by the breach of security and concerned about new threats from hate groups and the angry mob. National security law expert Shirin Sinnar joins Pam and Joe to discuss critical legal questions about homegrown terrorism—and those accountable for the insurrection.

Things That Go Boom
S4 E6 - Saving the World With 50-Year-Old IT

Things That Go Boom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2021 23:20


In December 2020, the company FireEye noticed that it had been the victim of a cyber intrusion. And it wasn’t the only one. About 18,000 companies and government agencies were breached, everything from the agency that controls America's nuclear weapons to the agency that regulates the electric grid, to a company whose products you probably use every day: Microsoft. So, what did they have in common? They were all using the same software monitoring service: a platform called Orion, from the company SolarWinds. The breach leaves the US open to nightmare scenario after nightmare scenario. So how did we get here, and how can we prevent similar attacks in the future? GUESTS: Mieke Eoyang, Senior Vice President for the National Security Program and Chairperson of the Cyber Enforcement Initiative, Third Way; Juliet Okafor, Founder and CEO, Revolution Cyber ADDITIONAL READING: Cybercrime vs. Cyberwar: Paradigms for Addressing Malicious Cyber Activity, Journal of National Security Law and Policy. To Catch a Hacker. A Moment of Reckoning: The Need for a Strong and Global Cybersecurity Response, Microsoft.

ChinaPower
China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 2

ChinaPower

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2021 73:20


This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the second of five featuring the audio from the China Power Project's fifth annual conference, which comprises five live online debates. The second debate took place on November 24, 2020 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: “One country, two systems” in Hong Kong is dead.   When Hong Kong was handed over to China in 1997​, its people were promised that they would continue to enjoy a high degree of autonomy under the “one country, two systems” formula for at least 50 years. However, the Chinese government passed a National Security Law for Hong Kong in June 2020, which granted Beijing unprecedented powers over the city. The passing of this law has led some to question whether “one country, two systems” remains intact.   Daniel Russel, Vice President for International Security and Diplomacy at the Asia Society Policy Institute (ASPI) and former Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, argued that “one country, two systems” in Hong Kong is dead. Regina Ip, legislator and member of Hong Kong's Executive Council, argued that “one country, two systems” in Hong Kong is still alive.   This event was made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Gordon Chang, Dan Celia, Michael Rectenwald and Stephen Coughlin

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2021 43:31


GORDON CHANG, Contributor, Daily Beast, Author, “The Coming Collapse of China,” “Nuclear Showdown: North Korea Takes the World” and “Losing South Korea,” Twitter: @Gordongchang Beijing worked very hard to ensure Joe Biden would be elected the next President of the United States - inciting violence, spreading rumors, disinformation campaigns on social media, etc. Gordon Chang breaks down Xi Jinping’s recent call for China’s military to be ready for war at “any minute” 53 people were rounded up and charged under the new Beijing imposed National Security Law yesterday in Hong Kong DAN CELIA, President and CEO, Financial Issues Stewardship Ministries, Twitter/Parler: @financialissues Dan Celia contends that this election was not stolen but instead “given away”  Wall Street’s only enemy is the one who can do nothing for them The on again, off again, on again listing of the three Chinese military-linked companies on the New York Stock Exchange DR. MICHAEL RECTENWALD, Author, “Thought Criminal,” “Google Archipelago: The Digital Gulag and the Simulation of Freedom” and “Beyond Woke,” former New York University Professor, Liberal Studies, Twitter: @TheAntiPCProf The Marxists' agenda for America has been given the green light after the events on Capitol Hill yesterday  Capitalism with Chinese Characteristics: Shareholder Capitalism to Stakeholder Capitalism to Corporate Socialism and Actual Socialism Woke culture is an ideological component to the “Great Reset” Stephen Coughlin, Attorney, former Intelligence Officer, Director for Intelligence, Joint Chief’s of Staff, Senior Fellow, Center for Security Police, Author, “Catastrophic Failure: Blindfolding America in the Face of Jihad,” Twitter: @S_Coughlin_DC Stephen Coughlin puts yesterday's events in DC at the US Capitol and beyond in context The controlled opposition has adopted a "divide and conquer" strategy  Why are some Republicans branding the protestors as "insurgents" 

Newshour
Hong Kong tycoon Jimmy Lai charged under national security law

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2020 48:34


Hong Kong pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai has been charged under the territory's new national security law. He is accused of conspiring with foreign forces to endanger national security. He is the most high-profile person charged under the new law and could face a lengthy jail sentence. Also on the programme: the UK looks close to leaving the European Union without a trade deal; and Argentina gets closer to legalising abortion. (Picture: Jimmy Lai was originally detained under the national security law in August. Credit: Getty)

Hell & High Water with John Heilemann

Neal Katyal is the former Acting Solicitor General of the United States under Barack Obama, a distinguished lawyer who has argued 41 cases before the Supreme Court and the Paul Saunders Professor of National Security Law at Georgetown University. In this episode, Heilemann and Katyal explore all things SCOTUS. They discuss the late RBG, the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett, the high stakes at play and why Neal is still optimistic about the future of the Supreme Court. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.