Podcasts about Xinjiang

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Autonomous region of China

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  • May 11, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Xinjiang

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Latest podcast episodes about Xinjiang

The Secure Dad Podcast
Bonus: Life Under Surveillance in China with Josh Summers

The Secure Dad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 13:09


Josh Summers of All Things Secured lived for many years in Xinjiang, China. He shares with Andy about his time there and the escalation of government surveillance. More from Josh: https://www.allthingssecured.com/  More from The Secure Dad: Website | Books | Merch | Online Learning

KickBack - The Global Anticorruption Podcast
77. Frederik Obermaier on the Suisse Secrets

KickBack - The Global Anticorruption Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 45:38


Today, we welcome investigative journalist Frederik Obermaier (@f_obermaier). In the interview, we cover the Suisse Secrets (https://www.occrp.org/en/suisse-secrets/). Frederik also mentions the China Cables uncovering surveillance and mass internment without charge or trial of Uighurs and other Muslim minorities in Xinjiang, China (https://www.icij.org/investigations/china-cables/). We also discuss the Swiss Bank Secrecy Law and its infamous article 47 undermining Media Freedom in Switzerland): https://www.theguardian.com/news/2022/may/02/swiss-consider-amending-banking-secrecy-laws-amid-un-pressure Pop-culture references in the interview: The Laundromat(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuBRcfe4bSo) Frederik's pick of the podcast: Money Men (Dan McCrum) about the Wirecard Scandal: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/144/1444756/money-men/9781787635043.html

The Citizens Report
CITIZENS INSIGHT – Veteran Australian diplomat John Lander speaks out against war danger (PART TWO)

The Citizens Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 60:44


Veteran Australian diplomat, John Lander, speaks out against war danger (PART TWO) Interview with John Lander, Former Deputy Ambassador to China (1974-76), Former Ambassador to Iran (1985–87) Hosted by Robert Barwick, Research Director of the Australian Citizens Party Links featured in this show: (1) Interview with John Lander (Part One) – https://youtu.be/m4JWcv2FQAg (2) 'The most remarkable aspect of Western attacks on China over Xinjiang is the unabashed hypocrisy' – https://johnmenadue.com/most-remarkable-aspect-of-western-attacks-on-china-is-the-unabashed-hypocrisy (3) 'The Australian Strategic Policy Institute's Uyghurs for Sale Report: Scholarly Analysis or Strategic Disinformation?' – http://www.cowestpro.co/papers.html (4) 'ASPI trades Iraq War Criminal for new-age techno-spook' Australian Alert Service 27 April 2022 – https://citizensparty.org.au/sites/default/files/2022-05/aspi-trades-war-criminal.pdf Contact the Australian Citizens Party campaigns: PHONE: 1800 636 432 EMAIL: info@citizensparty.org.au WEB: www.citizensparty.org.au Contact John Lander: voicealive@aol.com

The History Hour
Fighting for Uyghur rights in China

The History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 49:57


Max Pearson gets a first-hand account of how the minority Uyghur community in China staged some of the first protests against the all-powerful Communist Party in the 1980s. Plus, the young lawyer who won the landmark Roe v Wade abortion rights case in the US, the chemistry of cannabis and the personal stories of two veterans of the 1982 Falklands War. PHOTO: A Uyghur yurt on the Xinjiang steppe (Getty Images)

Witness History
Fighting for Uyghur rights in China

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 9:01


In the 1980s, the minority Uyghur community in China staged some of the first protests against the all-powerful Communist Party. The Uyghurs were demanding that the Chinese government keep its promises to protect their culture and grant them political autonomy in Xinjiang region. In 1989, many Uyghur students enthusiastically supported the pro-democracy demonstrations centred on Beijing's Tiananmen Square. One of them was Aziz Isa Elkun, who talks to Josephine McDermott. PHOTO: A Uyghur yurt on the Xinjiang steppe (Getty Images)

Panorama
Mode-Labels: Baumwolle aus Zwangsarbeit?

Panorama

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 9:53


Adidas, Hugo Boss und Puma verkaufen offenbar Produkte, die umstrittene Baumwolle aus Xinjiang enthalten.

Beyond Belief
Who Are the Uyghurs?

Beyond Belief

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 26:47


As Muslims around the world celebrate Eid, Ernie Rea hosts a panel on the beliefs and culture of the Uyghurs, a majority Muslim people in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, North West China. Human rights organisations have accused China of committing crimes against humanity against the Uyghur people and the US government has accused the Chinese government of genocide. For over eight years, there have been reports of mass surveillance of the Uyghur population and abuses including forced incarceration in 're-education camps' and sterilisation against the Uyghur people in Xinjiang. The Chinese government have consistently denied accusations of abuse and insist their camps are vocational facilities, and to combat terrorism. Ernie Rea explores the faith of the majority Muslim Uyghur people. What could be lost from their language, culture and heritage? Ernie is joined by experts on the region, Dr Jo Smith Finley and Dr Rian Thum. Rahima Mahmut, a Uyghur Muslim. grew up in the region and is the UK Director of the World Uyghur Congress. And Abduweli Ayup, a Uyghur poet and linguistic scholar, tells his story of incarceration in Xinjiang. Producer: Rebecca Maxted

Chatter
#249 - Raffaello Pantucci - Sinostan: How China Are Gaining Control Of Central Asia

Chatter

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 54:23


Raffaello Pantucci is the co-author of the book Sinostan, alongside Alexandros Petersen. China's rise is changing the world. Much attention has been given to how China's geo-economic vision is playing out in the global economy, or how its technology is reshaping the planet, yet it is over its western borders, in Central Asia, that China's influence has been quietly expanding in a more pervasive way. It is here that you can find the first strand of Xi Jinping's grand Belt and Road Initiative, China's new Silk Road to the West. It is to the Eurasian heartland that we can look for an understanding of China's new foreign policy vision and its consequences. We talked about the expansion of Chinese influence in the region, the Belt and Road Initiative, and terrorism in China and the province of Xinjiang.  Sinostan: China's Inadvertent Empire - https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6492/9780198857969  https://raffaellopantucci.com/  https://rusi.org/people/pantucci  https://twitter.com/raffpantucci  https://www.lse.ac.uk/ideas/events/2022/04/sinostan/sinostan  HELP ME CROWDFUND MY GAMESTOP BOOK. Go to https://wen-moon.com to join the crowdfunding campaign and pre-order To The Moon: The GameStop Saga! If you haven't already and you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe to this podcast and our mailing list, and don't forget, my book, Brexit: The Establishment Civil War, is now out, you'll find the links in the description below. You can listen to the show on Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/5AYWZh12d92D4PDASG4McB?si=5835f2cf172d47cd&nd=1  Apple Podcasts - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/chatter/id1273192590  Google Podcasts - https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5wb2RpYW50LmNvL2NoYXR0ZXIvcnNzLnhtbA  And all major podcast platforms.  Watch Us On Odysee.com - https://odysee.com/$/invite/@TheJist:4   Sign up and watch videos to earn crypto-currency!  Buy Brexit: The Establishment Civil War - https://amzn.to/39XXVjq  Mailing List - https://www.getrevue.co/profile/thejist  Twitter - https://twitter.com/Give_Me_TheJist  Website - https://thejist.co.uk/  Music from Just Jim – https://soundcloud.com/justjim 

US-China trade war update
Analysing the Beijing-Solomon Islands deal; EU sharpens China trade policies; UN heads to Xinjiang

US-China trade war update

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 41:03


Finbarr Bermingham reports onthe EU's legislative tools aimed at trade with China; why Xi Jinping phoned French president Macron; and complications for the UN human rights mission headed to Xinjiang. Hear a deep-dive into the security pact signed by Beijing and Solomon Islands: Dr Anna Powles, geopolitics and security expert analyses the Pacific balance of power; former Solomon Islands diplomat and Melanesian diplomacy expert Mihai Sora on why climate change, not military power, is the primary…

Rádio BandNews BH
Xinjiang - X da Questão 28/04/22

Rádio BandNews BH

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 1:40


O professor João Marcelo, do coletivo Terra Negra, aborda sobre a província chinesa de Xinjiang.

New Left Radio
Plight of the Uyghurs - Interview w/ Darren Byler

New Left Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 46:02


Fan of the show? https://www.patreon.com/newleftradio (Support us on Patreon). There is a lot of political posturing on the plight of the Uyghur people. We're joined by Darren Byler to cut through it and discuss what life is like for Uyghurs under colonialism in Western China, in the diaspora, and what we can do to support their struggle. About In the Camps China's High-Tech Penal Colony How China built a network of surveillance to detain over a million people and produce a system of control previously unknown in human history. A cruel and high-tech form of colonization has been unfolding over the past decade in China's vast northwestern region of Xinjiang, where as many as a million and a half Uyghurs, Kazakhs and Hui have vanished into high-security camps and associated factories. It is the largest internment of a religious minority since World War II. https://globalreports.columbia.edu/books/in-the-camps/ (Buy In the Camps China's High-Tech Penal Colony now) About Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City In Terror Capitalism anthropologist Darren Byler theorizes the contemporary Chinese colonization of the Uyghur Muslim minority group in the northwest autonomous region of Xinjiang. He shows that the mass detention of over one million Uyghurs in “reeducation camps” is part of processes of resource extraction in Uyghur lands that have led to what he calls terror capitalism—a configuration of ethnoracialization, surveillance, and mass detention that in this case promotes settler colonialism. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in the regional capital Ürümchi, Byler shows how media infrastructures, the state's enforcement of “Chinese” cultural values, and the influx of Han Chinese settlers contribute to Uyghur dispossession and their expulsion from the city. He particularly attends to the experiences of young Uyghur men—who are the primary target of state violence—and how they develop masculinities and homosocial friendships to protect themselves against gendered, ethnoracial, and economic violence. By tracing the political and economic stakes of Uyghur colonization, Byler demonstrates that state-directed capitalist dispossession is coconstructed with a colonial relation of domination. https://www.dukeupress.edu/terror-capitalism (BuyTerror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City now) About Darren Byler Darren Byler is a sociocultural anthropologist whose teaching and research examines the dispossession of stateless populations through forms of contemporary capitalism and colonialism in China, Central Asia, and Southeast Asia. His monograph, https://www.dukeupress.edu/terror-capitalism (Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City) (Duke University Press, 2021), examines emerging forms of media, infrastructure, economics and politics in the Uyghur homeland in Chinese Central Asia (Ch: Xinjiang). The book, which is based on two years of ethnographic fieldwork among Uyghur and Han internal male migrants, argues that Chinese authorities and technologists have made Uyghurs the object of what it names “terror capitalism.” It shows that this emergent form of internal colonialism and capitalist frontier-making utilizes a post-9/11 discourse of terrorism, what he shows produces a novel sequence of racialization, to justify state investment in a wide array of policing and social engineering systems. These techno-political systems have “disappeared” hundreds of thousands of Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslims in “reeducation” camps and other forms of productive detention while empowering millions of state workers and private contractors who build the system. The book considers how the ubiquity of pass-book systems, webs of technological surveillance, urban banishment and mass internment camps have reshaped human experience among native Uyghurs and Han settler-colonizers in the capital of the region...

New Books in Political Science
Suzanne E. Scoggins, "Policing China: Street-Level Cops in the Shadow of Protest" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 58:20


China has the reputation for being a strong security state. After the pro-democracy Tiananmen protests, the Chinese government moved to increase stability maintenance – and that approach is reflected in today's suppression of social unrest in Xinjiang where somewhere between 800,000-2 million members of the Uighur minority have been interned in camps. Throughout the country, the government has maintained stability by installing millions of cameras. The Chinese and International press emphasize these actions – projecting a view of China as a strong security state.  But Suzanne E. Scoggins argues that the decision to prioritize stability maintenance comes at the expense of everyday policing. In remarkable interviews with police officers and analysis of policing journal articles she assesses resource allocation, police reforms, and structural patterns of control – to find a weak police force unable to protect citizens against violent crime. Policing China: Street-Level Cops in the Shadow of Protest (Cornell UP, 2021) provides a surprising – and more accurate – understanding of how the police function in China – how they can be so ineffective at everyday crime management while still being very good at stability maintenance. The podcast includes a remarkable conversation about how research access in China is changing – as well as the role of the National Committee on US-China Relations. Dr. Suzanne E. Scoggins is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and Director of Asian Studies at Clark University. She is also a Public Intellectuals Program Fellow at The National Committee on United States-China Relations. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Chinese Studies
Suzanne E. Scoggins, "Policing China: Street-Level Cops in the Shadow of Protest" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 58:20


China has the reputation for being a strong security state. After the pro-democracy Tiananmen protests, the Chinese government moved to increase stability maintenance – and that approach is reflected in today's suppression of social unrest in Xinjiang where somewhere between 800,000-2 million members of the Uighur minority have been interned in camps. Throughout the country, the government has maintained stability by installing millions of cameras. The Chinese and International press emphasize these actions – projecting a view of China as a strong security state.  But Suzanne E. Scoggins argues that the decision to prioritize stability maintenance comes at the expense of everyday policing. In remarkable interviews with police officers and analysis of policing journal articles she assesses resource allocation, police reforms, and structural patterns of control – to find a weak police force unable to protect citizens against violent crime. Policing China: Street-Level Cops in the Shadow of Protest (Cornell UP, 2021) provides a surprising – and more accurate – understanding of how the police function in China – how they can be so ineffective at everyday crime management while still being very good at stability maintenance. The podcast includes a remarkable conversation about how research access in China is changing – as well as the role of the National Committee on US-China Relations. Dr. Suzanne E. Scoggins is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and Director of Asian Studies at Clark University. She is also a Public Intellectuals Program Fellow at The National Committee on United States-China Relations. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

New Books Network
Suzanne E. Scoggins, "Policing China: Street-Level Cops in the Shadow of Protest" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 58:20


China has the reputation for being a strong security state. After the pro-democracy Tiananmen protests, the Chinese government moved to increase stability maintenance – and that approach is reflected in today's suppression of social unrest in Xinjiang where somewhere between 800,000-2 million members of the Uighur minority have been interned in camps. Throughout the country, the government has maintained stability by installing millions of cameras. The Chinese and International press emphasize these actions – projecting a view of China as a strong security state.  But Suzanne E. Scoggins argues that the decision to prioritize stability maintenance comes at the expense of everyday policing. In remarkable interviews with police officers and analysis of policing journal articles she assesses resource allocation, police reforms, and structural patterns of control – to find a weak police force unable to protect citizens against violent crime. Policing China: Street-Level Cops in the Shadow of Protest (Cornell UP, 2021) provides a surprising – and more accurate – understanding of how the police function in China – how they can be so ineffective at everyday crime management while still being very good at stability maintenance. The podcast includes a remarkable conversation about how research access in China is changing – as well as the role of the National Committee on US-China Relations. Dr. Suzanne E. Scoggins is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and Director of Asian Studies at Clark University. She is also a Public Intellectuals Program Fellow at The National Committee on United States-China Relations. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in East Asian Studies
Suzanne E. Scoggins, "Policing China: Street-Level Cops in the Shadow of Protest" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 58:20


China has the reputation for being a strong security state. After the pro-democracy Tiananmen protests, the Chinese government moved to increase stability maintenance – and that approach is reflected in today's suppression of social unrest in Xinjiang where somewhere between 800,000-2 million members of the Uighur minority have been interned in camps. Throughout the country, the government has maintained stability by installing millions of cameras. The Chinese and International press emphasize these actions – projecting a view of China as a strong security state.  But Suzanne E. Scoggins argues that the decision to prioritize stability maintenance comes at the expense of everyday policing. In remarkable interviews with police officers and analysis of policing journal articles she assesses resource allocation, police reforms, and structural patterns of control – to find a weak police force unable to protect citizens against violent crime. Policing China: Street-Level Cops in the Shadow of Protest (Cornell UP, 2021) provides a surprising – and more accurate – understanding of how the police function in China – how they can be so ineffective at everyday crime management while still being very good at stability maintenance. The podcast includes a remarkable conversation about how research access in China is changing – as well as the role of the National Committee on US-China Relations. Dr. Suzanne E. Scoggins is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and Director of Asian Studies at Clark University. She is also a Public Intellectuals Program Fellow at The National Committee on United States-China Relations. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

Le Nouvel Esprit Public
Thématique : La Chine, avec Jean-Philippe Béja / n°242 / 24 avril 2022

Le Nouvel Esprit Public

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 56:30


Connaissez-vous notre site ? www.lenouvelespritpublic.frUne émission de Philippe Meyer, enregistrée au studio l'Arrière-boutique le 4 mars 2022.Avec cette semaine :Jean-Philippe Béja, chercheur au CNRS.Isabelle de Gaulmyn, rédactrice en chef du quotidien La Croix. Marc-Olivier Padis, directeur des études de la fondation Terra Nova.Lucile Schmid, membre du comité de rédaction de la revue Esprit.LA CHINEAlors qu'il a fait supprimer par l'Assemblée nationale populaire en 2018 la limitation à deux des mandats du président et fait inscrire sa pensée dans la charte du Parti, Xi Jinping briguera à l'automne prochain un troisième mandat lors du Congrès du Parti. Au pouvoir depuis près de dix ans, il a consolidé son autorité en luttant contre ses potentiels opposants et a révisé la Constitution en 2017 pour y indiquer que « le Parti dirige tout ». En 2021, la Commission centrale disciplinaire a indiqué que 25 cadres de haut rang du PCC avaient fait l'objet d'enquêtes, c'est le chiffre le plus élevé depuis 2017. Des personnalités émettant des critiques à l'encontre du régime ont disparu provisoirement, comme Jack Ma, le créateur d'Alibaba et, plus récemment, la joueuse de tennis Peng Shuai. Le régime a renforcé le contrôle de sa population avec la généralisation en 2020 du système de crédit social sur l'ensemble du territoire et l'installation de 600 millions de caméras de surveillance à travers le pays. Mis en place pour lutter contre les incivilités et maintenir l'ordre, ce système qui repose sur la notation des citoyens peut empêcher les moins bien notés de contracter des crédits bancaires ou de voyager. En 2018, 5 millions de citoyens ont été interdits de prendre le train à grande vitesse, et 17 millions n'ont pas été autorisés à prendre l'avion. Le contrôle de la population a pris une autre dimension dans la province du Xinjiang où la population Ouïghoure, majoritairement musulmane, est réprimée. Depuis 2017, au moins un million de Ouïghours ont été envoyés dans des « camps de rééducation » où ils sont contraints de lire les textes du Parti communiste, doivent abjurer leur religion et où des femmes sont stérilisées de force. Le 20 janvier 2022, l'Assemblée nationale a reconnu que la Chine se rendait coupable de génocide dans le Xinjiang, faisant de la France le 8e pays à reconnaitre le traitement subi par les Ouïghours comme un crime contre l'humanité.La politique chinoise est aussi marquée depuis 2020 par la lutte contre la pandémie et la poursuite d'une stratégie « zéro covid » conduisant à des arrêts fréquents de l'activité. Le FMI a mis en garde Pékin contre le risque d'essoufflement de la croissance qui pourrait en résulter, d'autant que la situation économique chinoise inquiète en raison des fragilités du secteur immobilier.Le PCC semble être soutenu par une majorité de la population et affirme sa volonté d'étendre son emprise sur Hong-Kong et Taiwan. À Hong-Kong, la promulgation d'une loi sur la sécurité nationale en juillet 2020 puis son renforcement en mars 2021 ont fortement réduit l'autonomie de la région. Concernant Taiwan, le président Xi Jinping considère l'île comme une province sécessionniste chinoise et a appelé en octobre 2021 à une réunification pacifique, quoiqu'il ait précisé en 2019 que l'usage de la force demeurait une option.Jean-Philippe Béja, vous avez travaillé au CNRS, au Centre d'études français sur la Chine contemporaine, au Centre de recherches internationales et vous vous êtes particulièrement intéressé aux combats de la société pour la démocratie, mais aussi à la politique étrangère chinoise. Avant de vous demander de répondre à une question que vous aviez posée lors d'une conférence à Montréal, « Comment le parti communiste chinois parvient-il à tenir le pays ? », j'aimerais vous demander quel sens peut avoir, si elle en a un, l'expression de national confucianisme, qui est assez souvent utilisée pour caractériser l'évolution du PCC.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Manifold
Carl Zha: Xinjiang, Ukraine, and U.S.-China relations — #10

Manifold

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 130:03


Carl Zha is the host of the Silk and Steel podcast, which focuses on China, history, culture, and politics. He is a former engineer now based in Bali, Indonesia.Find Carl on Twitter @CarlZha.Steve and Carl discuss:1. Carl's background: Chongqing to Chicago, Caltech to Bali, Life as a digital nomad2. Xinjiang (35:20)3. Ukraine (1:03:51)4. China-Russia relationship (1:16:01)5. U.S.-China competition (1:49:26)Music used with permission from Blade Runner Blues Livestream improvisation by State Azure.–Steve Hsu is Professor of Theoretical Physics and of Computational Mathematics, Science, and Engineering at Michigan State University. Previously, he was Senior Vice President for Research and Innovation at MSU and Director of the Institute of Theoretical Science at the University of Oregon. Hsu is a startup founder (SafeWeb, Genomic Prediction, Othram) and advisor to venture capital and other investment firms. He was educated at Caltech and Berkeley, was a Harvard Junior Fellow, and has held faculty positions at Yale, the University of Oregon, and MSU.Please send any questions or suggestions to manifold1podcast@gmail.com or Steve on Twitter @hsu_steve.

Astro Awani
AWANI Pagi: Etnik Muslim Uyghur ditindas China: Benar atau tidak?

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 26:34


Isu penindasan etnik minoriti Uyghur di Xinjiang hangat diperdebatkan selepas media barat mendedahkan "bukti-bukti" kekerasan yang tidak berperikemanusiaan ke atas mereka oleh kerajaan China. Adakah ia benar atau hanya propaganda? Apa pula peranan Malaysia dalam hal ini? Ikuti perkongsiannya dalam AWANI Pagi.

China Global
EU-China Relations: The Summit and What Comes Next

China Global

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 28:00


Europe's relations with China have been on a downward trajectory the past few years. The list for this decline is long: Europe's concerns about human rights violations in Xinjiang, Chinese sanctions on EU parliamentarians, European uneasiness about PRC plans to dominate key strategic technologies, Chinese rebuff to international law in the South China Sea and its military pressure on Taiwan. Russia's unprovoked invasion of Ukraine and the resulting civilian causalities further strained relations between China and the EU as Beijing abstained in the UN Security Council and the UN General Assembly and blamed the conflict on the five waves of NATO expansion. On April 1, the 23rd EU-China summit took place via video conference. President of the European Council, Charles Michel, and President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, accompanied by High Representative Josep Borrell, met with Chinese Prime Minister Li Keqiang in the morning and Chinese President Xi Jinping in the afternoon. Borell later described the meeting as a dialogue of the deaf—the Chinese side had little interest in talking about the war in Ukraine, preferring to discuss shared EU and Chinese interests. In an effort to drive a wedge between the US and the EU, Xi also called on the EU to form its own perception of China and adopt an independent China policy. In this episode, Bonnie Glaser speaks with Janka Oertel, Director of the Asia Program at the European Council on Foreign Relations to further discuss the April 1 EU-China summit and analyze the overall EU-China relationship.

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
2.74 History of the Mongols: Final

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 22:58


From the heart of the Mongolian steppe, to North China's loess plateaus; from the rugged edges of Northern India, to the hot sands of Syria and the Levant, to humid jungles in southeastern Asia, rocky islands off the coast of Japan, the high peaks of the Caucasus, Himalayas, Altai, Tien Shan and Carpathian Mountains, to the frozen rivers  in Rus' granting access to Eastern Europe, and everywhere in between.  Our series on the Mongol Empire has taken you across Eurasia, meeting all sorts of figures; the brutal Tamerlane, the indefatigable Sultan Baybars, the brave if shortsighted Jalal al-Din Mingburnu and his foolish father Muhammad Khwarezmshah; the cunning Jia Sidao, the silver-tongued Qiu Chuji, the thorough scholar Rashid al-Din, and travellers like John de Plano Carpini, William of Rubruck, and Ibn Battuta, to the exhausted but noble-hearted Yelü Chücai. And of course, the Mongols themselves: the powerful Öz Beğ, Khan of the Golden Horde; the thorough and pious convert Ghazan Il-Khan; the scheming Du'a of the Chagatais, the stout Qaidu Khan of the Ögedaids, to the Great Khans of the thirteenth century, the most powerful of men; Khubilai, whose hands scrambled for more until his body and empire failed his ambitions; his brother Möngke, whose steely determination sought to solidify the empire at all costs, no matter the bloodshed; Güyük, a reluctant and unfortunate man to ascend to the throne; his mother Törögene, whose fierce will forced her son to that same throne; Ögedai, a drunk who despite his failings built the infrastructure of the empire. And of course, Chinggis himself; once a scared boy in the steppes, turned into the greatest conqueror of them all. Today we end our journey with the Empire of the Great Khans, and reflect on the passage of the Chinggisids. I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals, Ages of Conquest.       Back in our first episode, we highlighted certain trends to look for over the course of this series. The first emphasized looking for the middle ground between the Mongols as inherently evil or good forces, but as people whose expansion was rooted in historical events and personages. The second was the struggles that came with the management of a world empire, and the need to rely on non-Mongolian subject peoples—Chinese, Central Asian Muslims, Persians, Turks and others. The third was the struggle for the purpose of the empire; should it be continued conquest, or consolidation and serving the needs of the imperial princes. This was the balance between the Khan and his central government, or the Chinggisid and military aristocrats. The fourth was the steady assimilation, particularly Turkification, of the Mongols outside of Mongolia, as Mongolian was replaced as the language of administration, legitimacy and finally, among the ruling family itself, even while retaining the Mongolian imperial ideology.        Regarding the first theme, we have sought to highlight in our many discussions of sources their often complicated, conflicting portrayals or events and persons. While authors like Ibn al-Athir, Nasawi and Juzjani had little good to say about the Mongols or Chinggis Khan, and fit well with the popular model the destructive brute, we've also looked at many sources which had more positive portrayals of the khans. Some of these are rather obvious, imperial-produced sources such as the Secret History of the Mongols, but even sources from outside the empire could give glowing reviews of Chinggis Khan. For instance, the fourteenth century English writer Geoffrey Chaucer, in the Squire's Tale of his famous Canterbury Tales, opens with the following lines:   At Tzarev in the land of Tartary There dwelt a king at war with Muscovy Which brought the death of many a doughty man This noble king was known as Cambuskan And in his time enjoyed such great renown That nowhere in that region up or down Was one so excellent in everything; Nothing he lacked belonging to a king.       Written at the same time as Toqtamish Khan of the Golden Horde was fighting for control of that Khanate, here Chaucher remembered Chinggis Khan not as a bloodthirsty barbarian, but as a monarch embodying all ideal qualities of kingship. Chaucer continues thusly;   As to the faith in which he had been born He kept such loyalties as he had sworn, Then he was powerful and wise and brave, Compassionate and just, and if he gave His word he kept it, being honourable, The same to all, benevolent, and stable As is a circle's centre; and in fight As emulous as any squire or knight. Young personable, fresh and fortunate, Maintaining such a kingliness of state There never was his match in mortal man, This noble king, this Tartar Cambuskan.        For writers in fourteenth century England, obviously distant from the Mongol Empire itself, it was not unbecoming to idealize the portrayal of Chinggis Khan. This is not to say that Chaucher's description is accurate, or necessarily reflects any actual qualities about the man or any of his descendants. But rather, it reflects historical perception. How an individual is perceived by contemporaries, history, and modern people often bears little resemblance to actual details of the individual.  Instead, people will contort an image for whatever use suits their current purposes, context and political climate. Thus, warlords from the late imperial, and post-Mongol world styled Chinggis' image to suit their needs. In Central Asia Chinggisid descent remained one of the most prestigious, and necessary, requirements for rulership up until the nineteenth century in some areas. This was problematic though with the spread of Islam, given that Chinggis Khan's actual life produced very few episodes to nicely accommodate an Islamic narrative. Certain Persian writings during the Ilkhanate sought to fix this by making Chinggis a Muslim in all but name. On the tomb of Tamerlane, an inscription likely added during the reign of his grandson Ulugh Beğ, makes Tamerlane a descendant of both the Prophet Muhammad and of Chinggis Khan. Later post-imperial authors had a more direct solution; simply making Chinggis Khan outright a Muslim. As the destruction of the conquests slipped further back in time, this became easier and easier to accomplish.    Religion was not the only aspect which can be molded, for Chinggis' very status as a Mongol becomes malleable in state efforts to construct national mythos, in both medieval and modern settings. Today, you can find countries where official propaganda, or influential theorists, incorporate Chinggis into the desired story of their nation-state. In China, there remains a significant Mongolian population, largely in what the Chinese call the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region, the land south of the Gobi desert but north of the mountains which divide it from the North China plain. The Chinese government has taken to presenting China's non-Han peoples, Mongols among them, more or less as Chinese minority peoples and actively encourages their adoption of the state-language, Mandarin, and Han Chinese culture. In this view, the Mongol conquests are sometimes presented as a period of national reunification rather than foreign conquest. The efforts of Khubilai Khaan to legitimize the Yuan Dynasty based on Chinese dynastic legal precedent becomes the quote-on-quote “historical evidence,” that Chinggis Khan was actually Chinese, or that in fact, the Mongol conquerors were fully assimilated into the Chinese population and culture. The borders of the Yuan Dynasty served to justify later Chinese territorial claims in Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang, Manchuria, Tibet and Yunnan; places that were, before the Mongols, inconsistently in the Chinese sphere of influence, but since the conquests have often remained dominated by empires based in China. Not coincidentally, such narratives serve to support the narrative of 5,000 years of a continuous Chinese Empire, and remove the sting that may accompany the embarrassment of being conquered by perceived barbarians.    Likewise, various Turkic peoples, most notably Kazakhs, Tatars, and Anatolian Turks, have sought to claim Chinggis as their own, and there are even groups in Korea and Japan that will argue that Chinggis was actually one of theirs. The Japanese version has Chinggis as the Samurai Minamoto no Yoshitsune, who faked his death and fled Japan for the steppe! Khubilai's later invasions of Japan again become not foreign assaults, but attempts at national reunification or the efforts by Yoshitsune's descendants to return home. And of course, fringe groups even in Europe and Russia which, refusing to believe a barbarian horseman could conquer such great states, insist that Chinggis was actually a red-haired, green-eyed man of European ancestry. Such claims often include vague references to the mummies of the Tarim Basin, who bore some features associated with Caucasian populations. The fact that these mummies pre-date Chinggis by millenia is often conveniently left out. All of these people care much more about ethnic categorization than Chinggis himself likely ever did.        Just as religion or ethnicity can be forced to fit certain agendas, so too can portrayal as barbarian or saviour. In Mongolia today, Chinggis Khan's unification of the Mongols, his introduction of a writing system, religious tolerance, laws and stability are most heavily emphasized. For building a post-soviet national identity, obviously these are useful attributes to appeal to for the desired national character. But the Mongolian governmet also tends to gloss over the aspects less appreciated in the twenty-first century: namely, the destruction of people and property on a massive scale, mass-rapes, towers of skulls and wars of conquest. The fact that Mongolia's two neighbours, Russia and China, suffered particularly under Mongol onslaughts, also avoids some diplomatic hurdles to step past these military aspects. For most of the twentieth century during Mongolia's years as a Soviet satellite state, Chinggis was largely pushed aside, framed as a feudal lord. Instead, Mongolia's hero of the 1921 socialist revolution, Damdin Sükhbaatar, became the preferred national icon. After Mongolia was democratized in the 1990s after the fall of the USSR, Chinggis Khan has seen a massive resurgence in popularity. Today, Chinggis and Sükhbaatar remain national icons, with monuments to both throughout the country. Outside Mongolia's parliament, the main square has changed names from Sükhbaatar to Chinggis Square, and since back to Sükhbaatar square. An equestrian statue to Sükhbaatar sits in the middle of that square. More than a few foreign observers had mistakenly called this a statue of Chinggis. In fact, only a few metres away from the equestrian statue of Sükhbaatar sits a massive Chinggis Khan on a throne flanked by his generals, at the top of the steps leading into Mongolia's parliament. In a way it is metaphorical. No matter how prominent any later hero of Mongolia may be, he will always stand in the shadow of Chinggis Khan.  And that's not even mentioning the 40 metre tall silver monstrosity about 50 kilometres outside of Ulaanbaatar. Speaking of state narratives, much of the cost for this statue was covered by the company owned by Khaltmaagin Battulga, a former professional sambo wrestler who from 2017-2021 served as the fifth President of Mongolia.       Outside of Mongolia though, Chinggis and the Mongol Empire remain a top-point of reference to paint someone in the most unfavourable light. One of the highest level cases of recent years was when the President of Iraq, the late Saddam Hussein, compared former US President George W. Bush to Hülegü, Chinggis' grandson and conqueror of Baghdad. The American bombing and capture of Baghdad, and ensuing tragedies that Iraq as suffered in the aftermath of the campaign, have only solidified the connection for a number of Muslims.  Meanwhile Russian television and education tend to present the Mongols in a style comparable to Zack Snyder's film 300, such as the 2017 Russian film Легенда о Коловрате [Legenda O Kolovrate], also known as Furious. Like the Spartans in the film or Frank Miller's graphic novel, the Rus' soldiers are presented as formidable warriors fighting monstrous, untrained hordes from the east. Only through sheer numbers or trickery do the disgusting Orientals overcome the pasty-white heroes of the story— though few of the heroes in the Russian films have Scottish accents. Russia has turned the so-called Tatar Yoke into a catch-all to explain any perceived deficiencies compared to western Europe, from government absolutism to alcoholism. Not only the Russians have employed the comparison: “scratch a Russian and you'll find a Tatar,” Napoleon Bonaparte is supposed to have quipped. And in 2018 the Wall Street Journal released a particularly poorly written article, which compared the political machinations of current president Vladimir Putin as “Russia's turn to its Asian past,” accompanied by vague comparisons to the Mongols and an awful portrait of Putin drawn in Mongolian armour. In contrast, the Russian Defence Minister, at the time of writing, is Sergei Shoigu, a fellow of Tuvan descent who is alleged to enjoy comparisons of himself to Sübe'edei, the great Mongol general popularly, though inaccurately, portrayed as a Tuvan. The 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, essentially a good old-fashioned war of conquests accompanied by war crimes and destruction of cities, has also earned many comparisons to the Mongol conquests by many online commentators. Though unlike the Russians, the Mongols actually took Kyiv.   Somewhat surprisingly, most cinematic portrayals of Chinggis himself lean towards sympathetic or heroic. One of the most recent is a 2018 Chinese film entitled Genghis Khan in English, which features a slim Chinese model in the titular role, and one of his few depictions without any facial hair. In that film he battles a bunch of skeletons and monsters, and it could be best described as “not very good,” as our series researcher can, unfortunately, attest. One popular portrayal is the 2007 film Mongol, directed by Sergei Bodrov and starring a Japanese actor in the role of Chinggis. That actor, by the way, went on to play one of Thor's buddies in the Marvel movies.  Here, Chinggis is a quiet, rather thoughtful figure, in a film which emphasizes the brutal childhood he suffered from. Another sympathetic portrayal, and one perhaps the most popular in Mongolia, is the 2004 Inner Mongolian series where Ba Sen, an actor who claims descent from Chagatai and appeared in the previously two mentioned films, plays the role of Chinggis.       Hollywood does not tend to portray Chinggis Khan or the Mongols in films at all, but when it does, it really goes for a swing and a miss. Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure has Chinggis essentially only a step above a cave-man in that film. Other Hollywood endeavours are infamous for having non-Asian actors in the role, such as Egyptian-born Omar Shariff in 1965's Genghis Khan, Marvin Miller in 1951's The Golden Horde and the most infamous of them all, the cowboy John Wayne in 1956's The Conqueror. That film's theatrical release poster bears the tasteful tagline of, “I am Temujin…barbarian… I fight! I love! I conquer… like a Barbarian!” The film was also produced by Howard Hughes, founder of Playboy Magazine, and was filmed near a nuclear testing site.  As you may suspect, that film bears as much resemblance to the historical events as an opium-induced fever dream.        The appearance and depiction of Chinggis and his successors varies wildly. The internet today loves the stories of Chinggis being the ancestor of millions of people, and killing so many people that it changed the earth's climate. The articles that made both of these claims though, rested on shaky evidence. In the first, which we dedicated an entire episode of this podcast too, the study claimed that high rates of a certain haplotype among the Hazara of Afghanistan demonstrated that Chinggis himself bore that haplotype, and Chinggis was extrapolated to be the ancestor of other peoples bearing such a haplotype. But the historical sources indicate Chinggis and his immediate descendants spent little time in Afghanistan, and the associated Haplotype was probably one associated with various populations leaving Mongolia over centuries, rather than specifically Chinggis himself.  Likewise, the study which spawned the claim that the Mongols killed enough people to cool the climate, firstly did not make that claim itself, but moreso incorrectly made the Mongol conquests last from 1206 to 1380, and presented it as an almost two-century period of population decline brought on by Mongolian campaigns; despite the fact that the major destructive Mongolian military campaigns largely halted after 1279. While campaigns continued after that, they were never on the level of the great-campaigns of conquest. Thus it's irresponsible to claim that any atmospheric carbon loss over the fourteenth century was brought on by continued Mongol military efforts.       What these two popular descriptions lend themselves to, is one of extremes. The internet loves extremes of anything. For instance, since 1999 the Internet has always sought to outdo itself in declaring the latest Star Wars product to actually be the worst thing ever made. And the Mongol Empire, as history's largest contiguous land-empire, responsible for immense destruction and long-ranging campaigns and forced migrations, can easily slot in this ‘extreme manner.' A “top-ten” list where the author writes about how the Mongols were the most extreme and destructive and badass thing ever, repeating the same 10 facts, probably gets released on the internet every other month. Just as national-myth makers in Ulaanbaatar, Beijing and Moscow set how to portray the Mongol Empire in the way most suited to them, so too does the internet and its writers choose an aspect of the empire to emphasis; be it religious tolerance, free-trade, brutality, multi-culturalism, Islam, clash of civilizations, human impact on climate, the territorial expanse of a certain country or its national identity, or whatever argument the author hopes to make.        The Mongol Empire though remains in the past, and should be treated, and learned about, as such.  The events which led to the rise, expansion and fall of the Mongol Empire do not fit into nice, sweeping modern narratives, but their own historical context and situation. The Mongol Empire was not predetermined to ever expand out of Mongolia, or to break apart in 1260; had Chinggis Khan been struck by an arrow outside the walls of Zhongdu, or Möngke lived another ten years, in both cases the empire, and indeed the world, would look dramatically different. History is not the things which ought to be or needed to happen or were supposed to happen; it is the things that did happen, and those things did not occur simply for the purposes of the modern world to exist. A million choices by hundreds of millions of individuals, affected by climate and geography with a healthy dose of luck and happenstance, resulted in the world as we know it. Reading backwards from the present to understand the course of the Mongol Empire, and attempting to make it fit into the political narratives we like today, only does a disservice to history. It should be seen not as a virtuous force bringing continental peace justified by easier trade, nor as a demonic horde, but as an event within human history, in which real humans took part, where great tragedy occured in the pursuit of empire.     History is not just written by the victor of the actual battles; as we've detailed across this series, we have no shortage of historical sources on the Mongol Empire; imperial approved sources, sources by travellers passing through the empire, to sources written by the peoples the Mongols crushed. Instead, the history learned in schools and passed down through historical memory and media is built on top of preferred state narratives, those made today and in the past.   Our series on the Mongol Empire concludes next week with a final afterward on Mongolia after 1368, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast to follow. If you enjoyed this was want to help us keep bringing you great content, then consider supporting us on patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one. 

The Arts of Travel
Temur Umarov: The Economic Relationships of Central Asia, Russia & China

The Arts of Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 56:26


I spoke to policy expert Temur Umarov on the economic relationships between Central Asia, Russia & China as well as how regional policies (Xinjiang, One Belt One Road, The War in Ukraine) are impacting capitalism throughout the region. It's a fascinating conversation on Neoliberalism, Shock Therapy, and the global importance of Central Asia. For more w. Temur, you can find his biography here: https://carnegiemoscow.org/experts/1738 Music by Scarim: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDWvl8awZxSfoPRtsjw2zhw

Rich Zeoli
Biden's Approval Rating Hits New Low, State Department Destroyed Passports, Swinging with Hillary and Bill

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 193:26


6:00am- The Philadelphia International Airport's 12,000 on-site parking spots are already full ahead of Easter weekend. 6:05am- NEWS: The CDC announced a two-week extension to its mask mandate on federal transportation. 6:15am- Will the Biden Administration's over-regulation result in the adoption of less environmentally friendly vehicles?  6:25am- In a series of tweets, Governor Phil Murphy announced he will review a new, controversial K-12 lesson plan prior to its implementation across New Jersey in the Fall of 2022.  6:40am- British Prime Minister Boris Johnson was by police for violating lockdown regulations in May of 2020. 6:55am- According to several new polls, including one from Quinnipiac University, President Joe Biden's approval rating has reached new lows at 33%—with a 54% disapproval rating.   7:00am- NEWS: John Hinckley Jr., who attempted to assassinate former President Ronald Reagan, was recently released from prison and is now set to play music in front of a sold-out crowd in New York City. 7:05am- Elon Musk has offered to buy Twitter for $54.20 a share. Musk currently owns 9.2% of the social media company.  7:15am- Frank R. James, the man accused of shooting multiple people in a Brooklyn subway station, was arrested on Wednesday. He is being charged for having committed an act of terrorism.  7:35am- Earlier in the week, former President Donald Trump endorsed U.S. Senate candidate Dr. Mehmet Oz. Will he make at endorsement in Pennsylvania's Gubernatorial race? 7:40am- A Christian detainee who escaped a Xinjiang, China concentration camp spoke with National Review. The survivor, Ovalbek Turdakun, said he was injected with mysterious substances which caused pain, muscle weakness, and subordination. 7:45am- What's on the Cut Sheet: Joy Behar thinks the judicial branch of government is able to pass legislation, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer refers to the Student Debt Summit host as “babe,” and Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors said she is “triggered” by charity transparency laws. 8:00am- State Senator Holly Schepisi joins the show to discuss controversial school curriculum changes in New Jersey. The state announced it was planning to adopt new sexual education and gender identity lesson plans for students in grades K-12. 8:20am- NEWS: A man was arrested for killing his pregnant girlfriend in King of Prussia. 8:40am- According to a National Review report, the U.S. State Department was forced to destroy passports during the country's withdraw from Afghanistan. The passport destruction resulted in numerous Americans and American allies being stranded. 9:00am- NEWS: An 18-year-old was shot and killed in West Philadelphia. Police say they have found over twenty shell casings. 9:05am- Tom Szymanski, of the New Jersey GOP, joins the show to discuss the latest developments regarding new sex-ed courses for K-12 grades in New Jersey. Szymanski announces that NJ GOP has created a new webpage to make it easier for parents to stay up-to-date and have their voices heard: njgop.org/parents 9:40am- According to a National Review report, progressive organizations are utilizing seemingly non-political Facebook pages with the goal of ultimately pushing a political agenda.  9:45am- What's on the Cut Sheet: Megyn Kelly says she would “swing” with Hillary and Bill Clinton, Jen Psaki bizarrely blames Texas Governor Greg Abbott for inflation, and Donald Trump refers to Russia's attacks on Ukrainian citizens as “genocide.”

Rich Zeoli
Xianjiang Camp Survivor Describes Horrifying Treatment

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 49:27


Zeoli Show Hour 2: 7:00am- NEWS: John Hinckley Jr., who attempted to assassinate former President Ronald Reagan, was recently released from prison and is now set to play music in front of a sold-out crowd in New York City. 7:05am- Elon Musk has offered to buy Twitter for $54.20 a share. Musk currently owns 9.2% of the social media company.  7:15am- Frank R. James, the man accused of shooting multiple people in a Brooklyn subway station, was arrested on Wednesday. He is being charged for having committed an act of terrorism.  7:35am- Earlier in the week, former President Donald Trump endorsed U.S. Senate candidate Dr. Mehmet Oz. Will he make at endorsement in Pennsylvania's Gubernatorial race? 7:40am- A Christian detainee who escaped a Xinjiang, China concentration camp spoke with National Review. The survivor, Ovalbek Turdakun, said he was injected with mysterious substances which caused pain, muscle weakness, and subordination. 7:45am- What's on the Cut Sheet: Joy Behar thinks the judicial branch of government is able to pass legislation, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer refers to the Student Debt Summit host as “babe,” and Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors said she is “triggered” by charity transparency laws.

FRC - Washington Watch with Tony Perkins
Chuck Holton, Chris Smith, Meg Kilgannon, Ben Carson

FRC - Washington Watch with Tony Perkins

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022


On today's show: Chuck Holton, freelance reporter for CBN News, talks about reports that Ukraine has seriously damaged a Russia warship. Chris Smith, U.S. Representative for the 4th District of New Jersey, shares about a former Xinjiang prisoner

New Books in Central Asian Studies
Darren Byler, "Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Central Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 68:45


The continuing crisis in Xinjiang has, thanks to the work of many scholars and reporters, led to greatly increased awareness of the region's history and Uyghur population among publics outside China. But so far less appreciated have been the specific ways in which the targeted regime of Uyghur imprisonment operates, and its creeping emergence over the course of the 2010s. Darren Byler's Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City (Duke UP, 2022) is therefore a vital addition to our understanding of this emergency. Based on long-term fieldwork in Urumqi and elsewhere, this is a chilling and deeply moving portrait of processes of dispossession and ‘reeducation' whose advance has intensified since the 2014 onset of what the Chinese government calls the ‘People's War on Terror'. Combining ethnographic nuance with piercing insight into grand colonial processes, Byler both offers an encompassing theory of the technological, economic and political forces which have brought this situation about, and demonstrates its horrifying effects on ordinary people who face an unassailable edifice of state and corporate violence. Ed Pulford is a Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/central-asian-studies

New Books in Chinese Studies
Darren Byler, "Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 68:45


The continuing crisis in Xinjiang has, thanks to the work of many scholars and reporters, led to greatly increased awareness of the region's history and Uyghur population among publics outside China. But so far less appreciated have been the specific ways in which the targeted regime of Uyghur imprisonment operates, and its creeping emergence over the course of the 2010s. Darren Byler's Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City (Duke UP, 2022) is therefore a vital addition to our understanding of this emergency. Based on long-term fieldwork in Urumqi and elsewhere, this is a chilling and deeply moving portrait of processes of dispossession and ‘reeducation' whose advance has intensified since the 2014 onset of what the Chinese government calls the ‘People's War on Terror'. Combining ethnographic nuance with piercing insight into grand colonial processes, Byler both offers an encompassing theory of the technological, economic and political forces which have brought this situation about, and demonstrates its horrifying effects on ordinary people who face an unassailable edifice of state and corporate violence. Ed Pulford is a Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

New Books in East Asian Studies
Darren Byler, "Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 68:45


The continuing crisis in Xinjiang has, thanks to the work of many scholars and reporters, led to greatly increased awareness of the region's history and Uyghur population among publics outside China. But so far less appreciated have been the specific ways in which the targeted regime of Uyghur imprisonment operates, and its creeping emergence over the course of the 2010s. Darren Byler's Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City (Duke UP, 2022) is therefore a vital addition to our understanding of this emergency. Based on long-term fieldwork in Urumqi and elsewhere, this is a chilling and deeply moving portrait of processes of dispossession and ‘reeducation' whose advance has intensified since the 2014 onset of what the Chinese government calls the ‘People's War on Terror'. Combining ethnographic nuance with piercing insight into grand colonial processes, Byler both offers an encompassing theory of the technological, economic and political forces which have brought this situation about, and demonstrates its horrifying effects on ordinary people who face an unassailable edifice of state and corporate violence. Ed Pulford is a Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books Network
Darren Byler, "Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 68:45


The continuing crisis in Xinjiang has, thanks to the work of many scholars and reporters, led to greatly increased awareness of the region's history and Uyghur population among publics outside China. But so far less appreciated have been the specific ways in which the targeted regime of Uyghur imprisonment operates, and its creeping emergence over the course of the 2010s. Darren Byler's Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City (Duke UP, 2022) is therefore a vital addition to our understanding of this emergency. Based on long-term fieldwork in Urumqi and elsewhere, this is a chilling and deeply moving portrait of processes of dispossession and ‘reeducation' whose advance has intensified since the 2014 onset of what the Chinese government calls the ‘People's War on Terror'. Combining ethnographic nuance with piercing insight into grand colonial processes, Byler both offers an encompassing theory of the technological, economic and political forces which have brought this situation about, and demonstrates its horrifying effects on ordinary people who face an unassailable edifice of state and corporate violence. Ed Pulford is a Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Anthropology
Darren Byler, "Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 68:45


The continuing crisis in Xinjiang has, thanks to the work of many scholars and reporters, led to greatly increased awareness of the region's history and Uyghur population among publics outside China. But so far less appreciated have been the specific ways in which the targeted regime of Uyghur imprisonment operates, and its creeping emergence over the course of the 2010s. Darren Byler's Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City (Duke UP, 2022) is therefore a vital addition to our understanding of this emergency. Based on long-term fieldwork in Urumqi and elsewhere, this is a chilling and deeply moving portrait of processes of dispossession and ‘reeducation' whose advance has intensified since the 2014 onset of what the Chinese government calls the ‘People's War on Terror'. Combining ethnographic nuance with piercing insight into grand colonial processes, Byler both offers an encompassing theory of the technological, economic and political forces which have brought this situation about, and demonstrates its horrifying effects on ordinary people who face an unassailable edifice of state and corporate violence. Ed Pulford is a Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books in Islamic Studies
Darren Byler, "Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 68:45


The continuing crisis in Xinjiang has, thanks to the work of many scholars and reporters, led to greatly increased awareness of the region's history and Uyghur population among publics outside China. But so far less appreciated have been the specific ways in which the targeted regime of Uyghur imprisonment operates, and its creeping emergence over the course of the 2010s. Darren Byler's Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City (Duke UP, 2022) is therefore a vital addition to our understanding of this emergency. Based on long-term fieldwork in Urumqi and elsewhere, this is a chilling and deeply moving portrait of processes of dispossession and ‘reeducation' whose advance has intensified since the 2014 onset of what the Chinese government calls the ‘People's War on Terror'. Combining ethnographic nuance with piercing insight into grand colonial processes, Byler both offers an encompassing theory of the technological, economic and political forces which have brought this situation about, and demonstrates its horrifying effects on ordinary people who face an unassailable edifice of state and corporate violence. Ed Pulford is a Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books in Gender Studies
Darren Byler, "Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 68:45


The continuing crisis in Xinjiang has, thanks to the work of many scholars and reporters, led to greatly increased awareness of the region's history and Uyghur population among publics outside China. But so far less appreciated have been the specific ways in which the targeted regime of Uyghur imprisonment operates, and its creeping emergence over the course of the 2010s. Darren Byler's Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City (Duke UP, 2022) is therefore a vital addition to our understanding of this emergency. Based on long-term fieldwork in Urumqi and elsewhere, this is a chilling and deeply moving portrait of processes of dispossession and ‘reeducation' whose advance has intensified since the 2014 onset of what the Chinese government calls the ‘People's War on Terror'. Combining ethnographic nuance with piercing insight into grand colonial processes, Byler both offers an encompassing theory of the technological, economic and political forces which have brought this situation about, and demonstrates its horrifying effects on ordinary people who face an unassailable edifice of state and corporate violence. Ed Pulford is a Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Sociology
Darren Byler, "Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 68:45


The continuing crisis in Xinjiang has, thanks to the work of many scholars and reporters, led to greatly increased awareness of the region's history and Uyghur population among publics outside China. But so far less appreciated have been the specific ways in which the targeted regime of Uyghur imprisonment operates, and its creeping emergence over the course of the 2010s. Darren Byler's Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City (Duke UP, 2022) is therefore a vital addition to our understanding of this emergency. Based on long-term fieldwork in Urumqi and elsewhere, this is a chilling and deeply moving portrait of processes of dispossession and ‘reeducation' whose advance has intensified since the 2014 onset of what the Chinese government calls the ‘People's War on Terror'. Combining ethnographic nuance with piercing insight into grand colonial processes, Byler both offers an encompassing theory of the technological, economic and political forces which have brought this situation about, and demonstrates its horrifying effects on ordinary people who face an unassailable edifice of state and corporate violence. Ed Pulford is a Lecturer in Chinese Studies at the University of Manchester. His research focuses on friendships and histories between the Chinese, Korean and Russian worlds, and indigeneity in northeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

UPenn Center for the Study of Contemporary China
U.S. Human Rights Policy Towards China – Amy Gadsden

UPenn Center for the Study of Contemporary China

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 114:55


While the Chinese government's actions in Xinjiang and Hong Kong lately have been the subject of particular scrutiny from U.S. policymakers, systematic attention to China's human rights practices, more broadly, has been a consistent feature of U.S. policy towards China in recent decades, through successive Democratic and Republican administrations. In this episode, Neysun Mahboubi discusses with Amy Gadsden, a leading expert on human rights in China, the background to why human rights came to be such a major factor in U.S.-China relations, and how this portfolio of issues does (and should) relate to other policy considerations. The episode was recorded on August 16, 2019. Amy Gadsden is Associate Vice Provost for Global Initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania, in which capacity she works with Penn's schools and centers to develop and implement strategies to increase Penn's global engagement both on campus and overseas, including by advancing Penn's activities with respect to China. Previously, she served as Associate Dean for International and Strategic Initiatives at Penn Law School, where she built a comprehensive program aimed at expanding the Law School's global curriculum. As an adjunct faculty member, Dr. Gadsden has taught seminars in international human rights and the rule of law. Before coming to Penn, she served as Special Advisor for China at the U.S. Department of State, and before that she served as China Director for the International Republican Institute. She has published widely on democracy and human rights in China, documenting legal and civil society reform, and was one of the first American scholars to observe and write about grassroots elections in China in the mid-1990s. Dr. Gadsden holds a Ph.D in Qing legal history from the University of Pennsylvania.  Sound engineering: Kaiser Kuo and Neysun Mahboubi Music credit: "Salt" by Poppy Ackroyd, follow her at http://poppyackroyd.com

Asia Rising
Public event: The Xinjiang Emergency

Asia Rising

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 67:39


Since 2016, an estimated one million Uyghurs and members of other Turkic Muslim minorities have disappeared into a vast network of ‘re-education camps' in the far west region of Xinjiang, China in what some experts call a systematic, government-led program of cultural genocide. Those outside detention are subject to intensive surveillance through a network of hi-tech surveillance systems, checkpoints and interpersonal monitoring. While many countries now acknowledge these problems as a reality of President Xi Jinping's China, a more accurate understanding of how the detentions are perceived both within China and in the global community is crucial. The Melbourne book launch of The Xinjiang emergency Exploring the causes and consequences of China's mass detention of Uyghurs, edited by Michael Clarke. Panel: Dr Michael Clarke (Senior Fellow, Centre for Defence Research, Australian Defence College and Adjunct Professor, Australia-China Relations Institute, University of Technology Sydney) Professor James Leibold (Department of Politics, Media and Philosophy, La Trobe University) Associate Professor Rebecca Strating (Director, La Trobe Asia)(Chair) Recorded on 5 April 2022.

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Chris Chappell, Shelley Zhang, Salih Hudayar and Sam Faddis

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 52:58


CHRIS CHAPPELL & SHELLEY ZHANG, Hosts, China Uncensored, @ChinaUncensored Chris Chappell and Shelley Zhang talks about the nature of “Han supremacy” within China and abroad: “…because a lot of Chinese Americans or Chinese diaspora around the world, no matter where you are in the world, the Chinese Communist party considers you Chinese above all. So, if you are born in America but you are ethnically Chinese they think that you belong to them… MINISTER SALIH HUDAYAR, Founder, East Turkistan Awakening, Prime Minister, East Turkistan Government-in-Exile, @SalihHuayar Salih Hudayar talks about why many Muslim majority nations are not coming to the direct aid of the Uyghurs in Xinjiang, China: “I think it's primarily because of the economic and political relations. China has dumped hundreds of billions of dollars into Muslim countries. And because most of the Muslim countries, they're also authoritarian regimes” SAM FADDIS, Former Clandestine Operations Officer, CIA, Former Congressional Candidate, Editor, ANDMagazine.com, Author, “Beyond Repair: The Decline and Fall of the CIA,” @RealSamFaddis Sam Faddis talks about Chinese elite capture, Hunter Biden's laptop and the “Biden crime family” enterprise: “This is not about Hunter. It's not about hookers. It's not about drugs. I mean, all of that is in here. But the central issue is that what is being purchased here is Joe. That's what Hunter selling. That's what all this money and cash is for”

A Reagan Forum Podcast
Jim Talent

A Reagan Forum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 60:30


In this week's “A Reagan Forum” we go back two months to our Reaganism Podcast with Former Congressman and Senator of Missouri, Jim Talent. In this episode of Reaganism, Reagan Institute Director Roger Zakheim and Senator Talent discuss the 2021 report of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. The discussion touches on China's trade practices as well as their activities in the Xinjiang and Hong Kong regions.

TIME's Top Stories
The Arab World Isn't Just Silent on China's Crackdown on Uighurs. It's Complicit

TIME's Top Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 8:47


As China deepens relations with Saudi Arabia in the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, the Uighur diaspora finds itself in the crosshairs. Riyadh is preparing to deport two Uighurs back to China's western province of Xinjiang, where they will almost certainly be detained for “re-education” in its vast network of concentration camps for the region's Turkic inhabitants.

US-China trade war update
China faces ‘defining moment’ over Russia ties; Xi-Biden and Beijing’s TV diplomacy

US-China trade war update

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 29:20


The Post’s Europe correspondent Finbarr Bermingham reports on the one-year anniversary of China’s sanctions on European politicians and diplomats over Xinjiang, as the EU’s foreign and defence ministers meet in Brussels to discuss the war in Ukraine and Beijing’s support for Moscow. North America bureau chief Rob Delaney analyses the words used by Chinese ambassador Qin Gang on US television to balance Beijing’s refusal to condemn Putin’s war, and what Joe Biden had to say about the Russian…

Inside Geneva
What to expect from the UN Human Rights Office's visit to China?

Inside Geneva

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 31:30


The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights will visit China, but can she get an accurate picture of the situation?Podcast host Imogen Foulkes is joined in this episode by experts on China and human rights.Rights groups accuse Beijing of having interned over a million Uyghurs in so-called “re-education camps” in Xinjiang.“Michelle Bachelet will be the first UN High Commissioner for Human Rights to set foot in China in 17 years,” says Sophie Richardson, China director at NGO Human Rights Watch (HRW).Will it be safe for witnesses and victims of rights abuses to talk to her?“China has been cited by the Secretary General himself as engaging in a pattern of reprisals against those who engaged with the UN previously,” says Phil Lynch, director of NGO International Service for Human Rights (ISHR).Is there a risk of Michelle Bachelet's visit being instrumentalised by Chinese authorities?“Given that we cannot expect her to carry out any serious investigation of the reality of human rights in China, what is it that she's actually going for?” asks Nick Cumming-Bruce, a New York Times contributor in Geneva.

ThoughtSpace - A Podcast from the Centre for Policy Research
Episode 19: Unpacking the Socio-Cultural and Political Aspects of India-China Ties

ThoughtSpace - A Podcast from the Centre for Policy Research

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 45:09


In the fifth episode of the our special series on India-China relations as part of India Speak: The CPR Podcast, our host, Sushant Singh (Senior Fellow, CPR) is joined by Cindy Yu (Broadcast Editor, The Spectator) to discuss the socio-cultural and political aspects of India-China ties. Born in Nanjing, China, Yu helps us to understand modern contemporary China from a personal and professional perspective. Together Yu and Singh discuss India's relevance in Chinese households, Chinese education and propaganda and the popularity of Bollywood in the country. They discuss why, despite being physical neighbours, the people of India and China have been distant, the issue of Tibet and the Dalai Lama, Hong Kong and the atrocities in Xinjiang. Finally, Yu sheds light on the shifts in China's foreign policy, President Xi's personality, Han Nationalism and the Great Firewall of China.

Proletarian Radio
US ‘forced labour' act harms the people of Xinjiang

Proletarian Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2022 21:04


https://thecommunists.org/2022/01/26/news/us-forced-labour-act-xinjiang-china-cpc/

US-China trade war update
The EU-China diplomatic flurry; Russian banks buy yuan; Beijing's UN tightrope act

US-China trade war update

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 51:55


SCMP's EU reporter Finbarr Bermingham analyses Xi Jinping’s phone call with his French and German counterparts and provides the latest on the UN human rights chief visit to Xinjiang. Chad Bray analyses sanctions on Russian oil, its financial system and high-profile resignation of Huawei executives. China foreign policy expert Dr Courtney Fung analyses China’s abstention at the UN General Assembly vote and explains why the ‘no-limits’ Sino-Russian partnership comes with costs for Beijing’s UN…

The Belt and Road Podcast
Episode 52: Cotton Diplomacy in Central Asia: Dr. Irna Hofman on China in Tajikistan and Beyond

The Belt and Road Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 48:42


Just across the Xinjiang border, China is investing in a range of sectors. Infrastructure and road construction are booming as in many other places, but cotton investments dominate and are seen as a distinct type. Cotton is considered a strategic crop both to China and Tajikistan and is embedded in a range of elite networks and state power. Cotton Diplomacy is one of many things we cover in this episode, listen in!Read more of Dr. Hofman's work: Chinese Cotton Diplomacy in Tajikistan: Greasing the Ties by Reviving the Cotton EconomyIn the Interstices of Patriarchal Order: Spaces of Female Agency in Chinese-Tajik Labour EncountersTowards a geography of window dressing and benign neglect: The state, donors and elites in Tajikistan's trajectories of post-Soviet agrarian changeRecommendationsIrnaThe People's MapHost an event bringing together all the podcast interviewees!ErikEmbrace home design DIY!Listen to MeatLoaf Bat Outta Hell 2 album especiallyJulietThe Big Payback: The History of the Business of Hip-Hop (2010) The Power and Business of Hip-Hop: A Reading List on an American Art Form. Stories of hi-hop's genius, influence, struggle, and enduranceOvercoming Challenges to the Research Environment in China, Harvard Fairbank Center with YuenYuen Ang, Liz Perry, Denise Ho and Rob Weller (Summary)This Tik Tok that Erik sent me making fun of podcast hosts that do recommendations at the end lol

The Independent Riot
Shark Attacks, Black Mirrors, and Saving the World Through Solar Flares (Deep Dive w F-Cat)

The Independent Riot

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 117:41


In today's Deep Dive Jim and Freddy discuss what they learned from the past two interviews.  Matt Lewis on The Sinking of the Sudar Havid and Geoffrey Cain on China's Surveillance State.In their discussion of these episodes, Jim and Freddy weave through such important topics as the horrors of being on a tiny life boat in a massive storm, and if you'd rather be trapped underwater and eaten alive by sharks, or die waking up in a collapsed sink-hole in the middle of the night. (The answer is sink-hole, by the way, because sharks are scary as shit.)Then they go deep into discussing more aspects of the big-tech dystopian Black Mirror-type nightmare currently operating in Xinjiang, China, and different theories about why the world allows it to continue. (Hint, its money.)And to wrap it all up, Jim and Freddy get into an argument about the way controversial topics should be discussed, and if it is really important for saving the world to definitively figure out if Bill Gates has ever eaten a baby or not.So sit back, and enjoy this free-wheeling discussion between two independent thinkers, and then tune back in next week for a new interview with an actual smart person.Note: Deep dive episodes will soon be recorded LIVE with you, the listener, having the ability to call in to the show in real time and voice your own independent thoughts.It's free and easy to participate in the show, and be notified of the upcoming recording times, just download the "Callin" app (www.callin.com) on your phone and follow The Independent Riot.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/independme)

Kerning Cultures | Middle East

How do you preserve a language when your government is actively trying to erase it? Abduweli Ayup is a Uyghur linguist who was trying to stop the Chinese government from replacing Uyghur with Mandarin. He had been studying the language's history, teaching Uyghur to younger students and writing books in Uyghur. But when the Chinese government began forcibly detaining Uyghurs in Xinjiang, his work got much riskier. Then, they came for Abduweli himself. This week on Kerning Cultures, Abduweli's fight to preserve his mother tongue. This episode originally aired in August 2019. Special thanks to Abduweli Ayup and his family for sharing their story, and to Arienne Dwyer and Timothy Grose. You can find a transcript for this episode here. This episode was produced by Durrie Bouscaren and Alex Atack, with editorial support from Dana Ballout and Hebah Fisher. Sound design by Mohamed Khreizat. Fact-checking by Zeina Dowidar. Kerning Cultures is a Kerning Cultures Network production.