Podcasts about Soaked

  • 542PODCASTS
  • 673EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 2, 2023LATEST

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Best podcasts about Soaked

Latest podcast episodes about Soaked

Sunny 16 Presents
Music and Photography #21 Penne Ferris

Sunny 16 Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 40:30


Penne on IG: @fstops.forever Penne on Flickr: Pixel Geek   Penne mentioned the band Moral Crux and the documentary “Soaked in Bleach”   Theme song “Timeless” from Mike Gutterman at mikegutterman.bandcamp.com   Get in touch with Sunny 16 at sunny16presents@gmail.com   The show on IG: @musicandphotographypodcast The show on Twitter: @musicnphotopod

Breakfast with Refilwe Moloto
Santa Soaked - making children aware of climate change

Breakfast with Refilwe Moloto

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 10:23


Lester Kiewit speaks to Carl Lindemann, who has written a book "Santa Soaked", which tells the story of how Santa Claus' home at the North Pole is beginning to melt as a result of climate change and is intended to raise awareness among the younger generation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cool Parents
Soaked In Milk & Victorious

Cool Parents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 69:21


Making a Muscle Boy is back with a vengeance! We also have a brand new segment called The People in the Comments and so much more. www.linktr.ee/coolparents --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cool-parents/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cool-parents/support

The Yak
The Classic Wet Wheel is Back to Get Everyone SOAKED | The Yak 12-9-22

The Yak

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 96:19


Just gotta be chillYou can find every episode of this show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or YouTube. Prime Members can listen ad-free on Amazon Music. For more, visit barstool.link/barstoolyak

The SDR Show (Sex, Drugs, & Rock-n-Roll Show) w/Ralph Sutton & Big Jay Oakerson

Brenna McKenna joins Ralph Sutton and Big Jay Oakerson in studio and they discuss Ralph's airplane story and how Big Jay would've responded differently, drawing Ebony Mystique on The Bonfire, Brenna McKenna's customer trying to not pay the full amount owed, her first AVN nomination this year, Ralph's story about trying to date a neighbor, they then play a game to see if they can all identify Brenna McKenna in porn scene's by just hearing her voice, Brenna McKenna's first concert, first drug and first sexual experience and so much more!(Air Date: November 30th, 2022)Support our sponsors!YoDelta.com - Use promo code: Gas to get 25% off!The SDR Show merchandise is available at https://podcastmerch.com/collections/the-sdr-showYou can watch The SDR Show LIVE for FREE every Wednesday and Saturday at 9pm ET at GaSDigitalNetwork.com/LIVEOnce you're there you can sign up at GaSDigitalNetwork.com with promo code: SDR for a 7-day FREE trial with access to every SDR show ever recorded! On top of that you'll also have the same access to ALL the shows that GaS Digital Network has to offer!Follow the whole show on social media!Brenna McKennaTwitter: https://twitter.com/BrennvMcKennvInstagram: https://instagram.com/BrennvMcKennvBig Jay OakersonTwitter: https://twitter.com/bigjayoakersonInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/bigjayoakerson/Website: https://bigjaycomedy.comRalph SuttonTwitter: https://twitter.com/iamralphsuttonInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/iamralphsutton/The SDR ShowTwitter: https://twitter.com/theSDRshowInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thesdrshow/GaS Digital NetworkTwitter: https://twitter.com/gasdigitalInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/gasdigital/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

David Gornoski
Fighting Seed Oil-Soaked Tribalism - A Neighbor's Choice

David Gornoski

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 49:14


David Gornoski goes through a list of how our bodily organs are affected by consuming toxic seed oils. Why is nobody talking about core health issues like seed oil damage and instead focusing on the divisiveness of politics? Join David and Surit Dasgupta as they talk about the unraveling of tribal conflict and victim mentality in a Christ-haunted age. Visit A Neighbor's Choice website at aneighborschoice.com

Married, Divorced & Dating
#55 “We we're absolutely SOAKED”

Married, Divorced & Dating

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 34:45


Carl is back at it with his digging to what is happening with Rachel and her mystery man from another country who she has a matching tattoo with, however, she stays tight-lipped as she is afraid of the curse of the podcast!    We are joined again by our very close friend, Tyler Christie, who shares an intimate story of the time he and a hook-up were both absolutely soaked!    Then we chat messy break ups! Everyone is capable of the crazies! There's soo many good stories we will continue this topic next week! Got a good crazy breakup story?? Hit us up with it below!    Instagram: instagram.com/marrieddivorcedanddating/ Rachel's Instagram: instagram.com/rachelohdear/ Carl's Instagram: instagram.com/carlpthompson/ Tyler's Instagram: instagram.com/tyler_christie Show Sponsor: instagram.com/thats.quitegood Wanna email us a story, we know you've got one? mddtales@gmail.com   Intro Music: Neill Fraser - Married Divorced & Dating Theme instagram.com/neillfraser/  

The Chicago Audible - Chicago Bears Podcast and Postgame Show
Soaked! Bears blasted by Jets in game without Justin Fields

The Chicago Audible - Chicago Bears Podcast and Postgame Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 98:45


With QB Justin Fields inactive, the Chicago Bears lost a soggy, ugly game in New York. Trevor Siemian started after Nathan Peterman nearly did, but it didn't matter who played quarterback in the 31-10 loss. Adam Hoge, Mark Carman and Greg Braggs Jr. try to look on the bright side in today's CHGO Bears Postgame Show while Nicholas Moreano checks in from New Jersey. BUY BEARS TICKETS HERE: https://gametime.hnyj8s.net/c/3442941... TAILGATE WITH US: https://bit.ly/3SRS03z GET THE QB SLIDE SHIRT: https://chgolocker.com/products/qb-slide SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/c/CHGOSports ALL THINGS CHGO: https://linktr.ee/chgosports WEBSITE: http://allCHGO.com/ BUY MERCH: http://CHGOLocker.com FOLLOW ON SOCIAL: Twitter: @CHGO_Sports Instagram: @CHGO_Sports GET OUR FREE NEWSLETTER: http://www.allchgo.com/newsletter Use Code: CHGO for 50% off 2 or more pairs at https://ShadyRays.com - Buy One, Get One Free. Check out pinsandaces.com and use code CHGO to receive 15% off your first order and get free shipping. Check out FOCO for merch and collectibles here https://foco.vegb.net/CHGO and use promo code “CHGO” for 10% off your order on all non Pre Order items. Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. Just visit https://athleticgreens.com/CHGOBears Get up to 25% off when you subscribe and spend $40 or more at https://NextEvo.com/recover with promo code ‘Bears'. Visit https://weberinc.sjv.io/CHGO_Traveler to get yourself the best grill for tailgating from Weber Grills! Visit https://dkng.co/chgo to sign up for DraftKings Sportsbook using the code “CHGO” If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/LA/MI/NJ/PA/TN/WV/WY), 1-800- NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/KS/NH), 888-789-7777/visithttp://ccpg.org (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ NH/WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/KS/LA(select parishes)/MI/NH/NJ/ NY/OR/PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. $150 in Free bets: New customers only. Min. $5 deposit. Min $5 pregame moneyline bet. Bet must win. $150 issued as six (6) $25 free bets. Ends 12/31/22 @ 11:59pm ET. Stepped Up SGP: 1 Token issued per eligible game. Opt in req. Min $1 bet. Max bet limits apply. Min. 3-leg. Each leg min. -300 odds, total bet +100 odds or longer. 10+ leg req. for 100% boost. Ends 1/8/23 @ 8pm ET. See eligibility & terms at sportsbook.draftkings.com/footballterms. When you shop through links in the description, we may earn affiliate commissions. #Bears #ChicagoBears #BearDown Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

95bFM: Long Player
Long Player: Soaked Oats 'Working Title'

95bFM: Long Player

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022


Unlocking the Bible: Today's Key on Oneplace.com

The Book of Lamentations is a book of sorrow. Thank God that the Bible speaks to us in our pain.

Gospel Spice
Prepare for your most Christ-soaked Advent yet | with Ruth Chou Simons

Gospel Spice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 41:18


Ruth Chou Simons joins Stephanie today to invite families into an unconventional, life-changing Advent season. How can we prepare for a DIFFERENT kind of Advent - when Jesus is truly the center? How can we cultivate a posture of gratitude, an attitude of receiving goodness from the Lord, and a desire of deeper delight in His glory this Christmas season? How can we live an Advent season that is a true experience of what we do know about the goodness of the Lord? And, how can we carry Advent into all our other seasons of life - from January to November? Why and how is Christmas relevant in March, in July, in September--and every other season? Don't miss Ruth's powerful prayer for you towards the end of their conversation! The Advent season, brimming with glad tidings and great joy, is often followed by disappointment, post-holiday letdown, dashed expectations, and exhaustion. Box up the ornaments and take down the garland; put away the artificial trees and cheery red bows and flannel sheets: Christmas, with all its hustle and bustle, tinsel and twinkle lights, carols and celebrations, is over. But shouldn't post-Christmas feel more like an afterglow and less like an aftershock? Why don't even the best of celebrations feel like enough? After receiving so many gifts—including the birth of Christ, why is unfulfillment still lurking? Bestselling author, speaker and gifted artist behind GraceLaced Co., Ruth Chou Simons once asked those same questions at the end of the Advent season. She found herself wanting, in search of something that outlasted the month of December. In her new devotional, Emmanuel: An Invitation to Prepare Him Room at Christmas and Always, Ruth offers a fresh take on the Advent experience, showing readers that the birth of Jesus—the Christmas story—is only the beginning. And that the resurrection—often overlooked in December—is the most life-changing event. She guides readers on a beautifully-illustrated 25-day journey that changes the way they celebrate the season and live the rest of the year.  “If Jesus is the reason for the season, then the resurrection is really the most life‐changing event we can celebrate. The baby Jesus born to Mary and Joseph in Bethlehem is truly a miracle only because he was the promised Messiah,” she writes. “Without the cross, the baby in the manger is but novel and fascinating, not life‐changing. And what we long for right now, in the midst of the hustle, the mess, and the mundane, is life-changing. We want the Christmas miracle to change our lives and not just our wallets … Perhaps when we struggle to experience that kind of heart change at Christmas it is because we've left the resurrection out of our celebration of the incarnation.” In Emmanuel, Ruth combines her beautiful original artwork with personal insight and practical application. Each day in the book highlights a Bible passage, question to ponder, Christmas carol, and prayer. She helps readers understand they were created to know much more than the bustle, or even the magic, of Christmas; they were made to know Christ—the answer they have been longing for.  “When you see an infant lying in a manger this Christmas—a popular visual image representing the miraculous story in Scripture—don't let your affections remain there,” writes Simons. “Jesus is more than a baby, more than a beautiful miracle in a harsh world. He is more than a familiar figure sung about in festive tunes. Jesus is God with us—Immanuel, just as the angel of the Lord told Joseph.”  “The true miracle of Christmas isn't simply the virgin birth; it's much greater than even such an impossibility. No, the miracle of Christmas is in this: that a holy God made a way for all who believe to come to Him...by first coming to us. Let that sink in. God's promises, fulfilled by God Himself, are more than remarkable; they merit a response—not to get busy, but to fall down in reverence and awe for our great God.” MEET RUTH CHOU SIMONS Ruth Chou Simons is a Wall Street Journal bestselling and award-winning author of several books, including GraceLaced, Beholding and Becoming and When Strivings Cease, as well as the TruthFilled Bible study. She is an artist, entrepreneur, and speaker, using each of these platforms to spiritually sow the word of God into people's hearts. Through her online shoppe at GraceLaced.com and her social media community, Simons shares her journey of God's grace intersecting daily life with word and art. Ruth and her husband, Troy, are grateful parents to six boys—their greatest adventure. https://ruthchousimons.com/ www.emmanuelbook.com https://www.facebook.com/gracelaced https://www.instagram.com/ruthchousimons/ https://www.instagram.com/gracelaced/ GOD'S GLORY, OUR DELIGHT | THE GOSPEL SPICE SERIES Delighting in the glory of God. Does this concept strike you as reserved for spiritual contemplatives? What if, instead, it proved the highly practical, deeply foundational perspective you need right now? Why does God's glory even matter in our day and age? How can we learn from Jesus to make His glory our true North and lifelong quest? What keeps us from fully stepping into this God-ordained purpose for our life? How do we kindle delight for God on a daily basis? And, once we have embraced God's glory as our heart's true delight, how can we then come alongside others? Join us to cultivate a sincere delight for God's glory, rooted in an honest, hard look at the depth of our need, and in the much deeper Reality of His grace. Trace the glory of God through Scripture and in your own life. Behold the exact radiance of God's glory, revealed in Jesus. Learn to see yourself as Christ does—through the lens of the Father's love at the cross. Jesus offers to overwhelm our deadly self-centeredness with His resurrection power. He carries us every step of the way, even as He calls us to true humility on the path to glory. Who has time to cultivate the delight that comes from pondering the glory of God? And yet, nothing could be more urgent today. Marthas and Marys, Peters and Johns—we are all invited to dare to dream of a lifestyle of God-centered delight. Nothing could be more practical. We invite you to check out the first episode of each of our series, and decide which one you will want to start with. Or, of course, you can start at the beginning with episode 1.  Season 1: the gospel of Matthew like you've never experienced it Season 2: Experience Jesus through the Psalms Season 3: the gospel of Luke, faith in action Season 4: Proverbs spiced with wisdom Season 5: Identity in the battle | Ephesians Season 6: Centering on Christ | The Tabernacle experience Season 7: Shades of Red | Against human oppression Season 8: God's glory, our delight |    Support us!

The Rick and Kelly Show
RICK & KELLY'S DAILY SMASH! - Monday 10/31/2022

The Rick and Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 24:24


A special Halloween edition... Rick & Kelly preview their costumes & share some CRAZY stories from the weekend, including Kelly getting ROOFIED (maybe), someone getting SOAKED at Universal, & what REALLY happened at the Pelosi house...? #happyhalloween #universalstudios #jefflewis #paulpelosi #nancypelosi #housewives #jurassicpark

Trials & Trebuchets
Chapter 6 - Soaked!

Trials & Trebuchets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 25:54


Today on Trials & Trebuchets, the Counsellors find the clues and take charge of their own fates! Instagram | Twitter | Discord | Patreon | Merch Use code "TRIALS10" to get 10% off dice and accessories at Metallic Dice Games! If you enjoyed this episode, tell a friend or leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts! Weenie Hollow 2022 Part 6

Nerds of a Certain Vintage
Episode 195: WUWPA - Rain-Soaked Impromptu Recording

Nerds of a Certain Vintage

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 34:36


In this episode, Patrick stops by Andy's house for a beer after a run in the rain, and they decide to record an impromptu WUWPA.

The Howie Carr Radio Network
It's Nancy's Napa Wine-Soaked World and We're All Just Asking About Inflation - 10.24.22 - Grace Curley Show Hour 1

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 39:46


Dodging questions and changing subjects is just how Speaker Pelosi rolls. She's got her fridges full of ice cream, so the average American's struggle at the grocery store means nothing to her. Grace says that's just the thing: Democrats love to talk about hypothetical struggle, but never real problems for real people.

Mel's Music
Depp's Siren Pirate

Mel's Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 4:05


Depp's Siren Pirate : a song for Pirates of the Caribbean (Tribute to The Wave - Soaked Maiden by Ginny Di, featuring Michael Sheridan, R. Morgan Slade, & Leah Stein)Original written by: Ginny Di & J Black Smith ‘for Johnny Depp, for Pirates of the Caribbean, & for (most importantly) my Mom Happy Halloween

Guns & Yellow Ribbons
Episode 231 - Soaked On The South Coast

Guns & Yellow Ribbons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 84:30


Episode 231 - Soaked On The South Coast by Guns & Yellow Ribbons

Push Push
Soaked In Suzuka

Push Push

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 48:52


When we said Singapore was the most chaotic race of the season, we didn't know Suzuka was waiting to prove us wrong. From rain delays to World Title delays, Suzuka delivered a race some will never forget and for some it's race we don't want to remember. This episode we talk about the chaos on the track, the awkward cool down room, and the way Red Bull has a choke hold on the FIA. Danielle brings the New & Notes, while Shannon brings the fiery emotion sparked by the F1. Press Play and enjoy! Follow us on Instagram || TikTok || Twitter Support the pod: https://anchor.fm/pushpush/support --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pushpush/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pushpush/support

No Brakes | F1 Podcast
Verstappen Wins 2nd Title At Rain-Soaked 2022 Japanese GP

No Brakes | F1 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 73:01


Trey and Graydon break down Max Verstappen clinching his second world championship at a very rainy Japanese Grand Prix. Plus Pierre Gasly has a close call, more driver reshuffling, and bad karaoke.

Mon Goals - Riverhounds

The Riverhounds got soaked against San Antonio, in more ways than one.  Kev and Mike do their best to talk The post Soaked Pups appeared first on Beautiful Game Network.

Rugby on Off The Ball
Leinster win rain-soaked Belfast derby, Stormers punish sloppy Connacht

Rugby on Off The Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 16:18


Alan Quinlan joins Ger and Johnny on #OTBAM as Leinster beat Ulster in the first Interpro of the season, while Connacht are still winless as they host Munster this weekend. Catch OTB's sports breakfast show LIVE on weekday mornings from 7:30 am or just search for OTB AM and get the podcast on the OTB Sports app or wherever you listen to yours. SUBSCRIBE and FOLLOW the OTB AM podcast. #OTBAM is live weekday mornings from 7:30 am across Off The Ball, in association with Gillette | #EffortlessFlow

Dead Rabbit Radio
EP 951 - The Blood Soaked Specter Of Dead Man's Canyon

Dead Rabbit Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 40:03


Today we go underground with the US Army to possibly fight reptilians, and then we travel to Dead Man's Canyon in Colorado to meet a murderous yet friendly ghost!   Fan Art Friday Art by TVP VT U   Patreon  https://www.patreon.com/user?u=18482113 PayPal Donation Link https://tinyurl.com/mrxe36ph MERCH STORE!!! https://tinyurl.com/y8zam4o2 Amazon Wish List https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/28CIOGSFRUXAD?ref_=wl_share Dead Rabbit Radio Wiki https://deadrabbitradio.pods.monster/doku.php?id=Welcome   Help Promote Dead Rabbit! Dual Flyer https://i.imgur.com/OhuoI2v.jpg "As Above" Flyer https://i.imgur.com/yobMtUp.jpg “Alien Flyer” By TVP VT U https://imgur.com/gallery/aPN1Fnw   Links: Haunted Places: The National Directory: Ghostly Abodes, Sacred Sites, UFO Landings, and Other Supernatural Locations https://tinyurl.com/4hdp7aws Army Is Spending Half a Billion to Train Soldiers to Fight Underground https://www.military.com/daily-news/2018/06/24/army-spending-half-billion-train-troops-fight-underground.html DID A US INTEL AGENCY JUST GET A NEW SEAL WITH A UFO ON IT? https://www.sandboxx.us/blog/did-a-us-intel-agency-just-get-a-new-seal-with-a-ufo-on-it/ Flying Saucer Appears On U.S. Aviation Intelligence Office Logo (Updated) https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/flying-saucer-appears-on-u-s-aviation-intelligence-office-logo Who's Behind The Endless Wars? https://darkoutpost.com/dark-projects/dark-outpost-live-09-21-2022/ Brian Stelter Executed https://realrawnews.com/2022/09/brian-stelter-executed/   Henry Harkins - Dead Man's Canyon, El Paso County, CO https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM8HXC_Henry_Harkins_Dead_Mans_Canyon_El_Paso_County_CO   Listen to the daily podcast anywhere you listen to podcasts! ------------------------------------------------ Logo Art By Ash Black Opening Song: "Atlantis Attacks" Closing Song: "Bella Royale" Music By Simple Rabbitron 3000 created by Eerbud Thanks to Chris K, Founder Of The Golden Rabbit Brigade Dead Rabbit Archivist Some Weirdo On Twitter AKA Jack Youtube Champ Stewart Meatball The Haunted Mic Arm provided by Chyme Chili Thanks to Fabio N! Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/basque5150/jason-carpenter-hood-river/ http://www.DeadRabbit.com Email: DeadRabbitRadio@gmail.com Twitter: @DeadRabbitRadio Facebook: www.Facebook.com/DeadRabbitRadio Dead Rabbit Radio Subreddit https://www.reddit.com/r/DeadRabbitRadio/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@deadrabbitradio   Jason Carpenter PO Box 1363 Hood River, OR 97031   Paranormal, Conspiracy, and True Crime news as it happens! Jason Carpenter breaks the stories they'll be talking about tomorrow, assuming the world doesn't end today. All Contents Of This Podcast Copyright Jason Carpenter 2018 - 2022

It’s A Smallville After All
Clark vs. The Gin Soaked Journalist

It’s A Smallville After All

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 72:29


Mikey & Jeremy watch S3E5 "Perry". They discuss Bigfoot, Pete's big moment, and solar flares. 

ChipMusic.org - Music RSS Feed
Feryl - January (2010) - No Reverb

ChipMusic.org - Music RSS Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022


2010 track originally SOAKED, DRENCHED, UTTERLY ENGULFED in reverb. Now with 100% less! 2022 Creative Commons CC Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike (BY-NC-SA)

Men With Mics
Soaked to Death

Men With Mics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 55:21


Don Chenz and Casey Drake begin by discussing Chenz getting absolutely ROASTED by the blog Hoboken Girl over the weekend. Casey's Verbal Tweet is a hypothetical about whether you would get a better golf score by throwing the golf ball versus actually hitting the balls. Chenz's Verbal Tweet is about the recent "buy the bride a drink" Venmo phenomenon. The guys then debate what they think the best exotic pets would be and per usual...Casey's answers are a little outside the box. Corners of the Internet include a senior citizens home that got in trouble for hiring strippers and a cheating scandal that is sweeping the chess world.   Subscribe to our YouTube channel HERE for full episodes, clips, and bonus content.   Vote for who won the debate (best exotic pets) @menwithmicspod on Instagram and Twitter.   PorkSlut Hot Sauce is now available for sale! Go to www.porkslut.co and use the code 'MenWithMics' to save 15% on your order of hot sauce!   Hotline to leave us a voicemail to be featured on the show: 908-969-1230.   Follow us on TikTok, Instagram, and Twitter: TikTok - @menwithmicspod IG - @menwithmicspod Twitter - @menwithmicspod   Chenz: TikTok - @don_chenz IG - @don_chenz Twitter - @DonChenz   Casey: TikTok - @chubseyy IG - @chubseyy Twitter - @chubseyy

Garbled Twistory: A US History Podcast told through elections!
Ulysses S. Grant: Blood-Soaked Rags to Riches!

Garbled Twistory: A US History Podcast told through elections!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 40:03


This last prezzy wezzy candidate for 1868 is one of the strangest political anomalies I've ever read about. On the surface, this seems like a typical war hero story. But when you look under the hood, there's a lotta different stuff happening I think!

TheBadGuyRadio
Monsters of the Monsoon

TheBadGuyRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 54:47


Soaked but undefeated, Junior returns to B&W to restore his faith in the Bears and Justin Fields. The Whitesox are also a discussed.

New York Style Guide
Kaskade's Sun SoaKed, deadmau5's We Are Friends Festivals and Festication Team Up For Combined Destination Festival: Sun SoaKed & Friend5

New York Style Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022


Kaskade's Sun SoaKed, deadmau5's We Are Friends Festivals and Festication Team Up For Combined Destination Festival: Sun SoaKed & Friend5 Curated Lineup Announcement Includes Deadmau5, Kaskade, Adventure Club, Green Velvet, J. Worra, Laidback Luke, Malaa, San Holo (DJ Set), Testpilot, and many more One All-Inclusive, Can't Miss Festival at the Four-Diamond Paradisus & Fiesta Americana ...

The Lightworkers’ Guide | Spirituality, Health & Wellness, Human Design, the Gene Keys, and the Law of Attraction
3. The 3 Values for Today's Lightworker and What It Means To Live in a Christ-Soaked World

The Lightworkers’ Guide | Spirituality, Health & Wellness, Human Design, the Gene Keys, and the Law of Attraction

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 33:21


The 3 values to live our everyday lives are based on the teachings of Richard Rohr and the Universal Christ: Devotion to the heart. The simplicity of being enough. And having virtuous eyes to look outward with radical generosity to serve.   If we can renew these 3 historic vows, together we are going to give a gift to the world.   You are worthy, powerful, and created for a unique purpose. The world needs your genius—that thing inside of you waiting to be fully realized. Let's discover it, and use it for good, creating a legacy with your one and precious life.   Thank you for listening to the Lightworkers' Guide podcast. You were given a Divine download and it's your purpose to serve the world with it. I guide a select few clients per month to launch and scale their signature program. Coined the Kajabi queen, I take your brand and your vision to a whole new level. Are you ready? Apply today at lucycelebrates.com. And while you're there, check out the show notes and all the discount codes from my favorite guides.   Until next time, Lightworker, keep on shining on. You were created for something extraordinary.    Work with Me https://www.lucycelebrates.com/pages/coaching   The Intentional Planner https://www.lucycelebrates.com/collections/shop   Let's Connect https://www.instagram.com/lucycelebrates   Say Hello hello@lucycelebrates.com   And don't forget to hit the follow button here on The Lightworkers' Guide so you don't miss an episode.   You are seen, you are worthy, you are light.

Interviews by Brainard Carey

Portrait of Gaby Sahhar Page presents Gaby Sahhar, the New York debut of the London-based artist. Released explores alternative forms of knowledge-making through queer shapeshifting. Soaked in a kaleidoscopic palette of India and alcohol ink, Sahhar's new works draw on processes of articulation within LGBTQI+ communities that resist academic domination. Such tools of thought migrate across borders, slipping into the pores of the public sphere, shifting into a collective body. Gaby Sahhar (b. 1992, London, UK) lives and works in London, UK. Sahhar received a BA from Goldsmiths, London in 2015. Solo exhibitions include MAC VAL, Paris / The Kooples Art Prize (2023); PAGE (NYC), New York (2022); and Sweetwater, Berlin (2019). Group exhibitions include Fragment Gallery, New York (2022); Sadie Coles HQ, London (2022); and Museum of Moscow, Russia (2020). Installation view, Gaby Sahhar, Released, PAGE (NYC), 2022. Gaby Sahhar, Released, 2022, India and alcohol ink on synthetic paper, 80 x 156 inches. Gaby Sahhar, Shadow of the Other, 2022, Oil on canvas, 35.5 x 23.75 inches      

Hard Factor
Macaque Monkeys Continue to Attack the Japanese like the Brewers Attack Guys Named Mark | 8.31.22

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 73:52


On today's episode… US President Biden says you need more than an AR to take on an F-15 (00:18:50), What is this, ice refreezing in Greenland?? (00:26:20), Ohio Bratwurst controversy surrounding young girls (00:45:05), Macaque Monkeys are doubling down on their reign of terror in Asia (00:56:29), a man named Mark is ruined by the Brewers (01:03:50), and MUCH more… (00:00:00) - Timestamps ☕ Cup of Coffee in the Big Time ☕ (00:05:35) - Joke of the Day - Billy Joel is SOAKED (00:06:28) - Wrestling Night at the Ballpark w/ Tony from PA (00:10:24) - Trend Analysis: Elon, Football, and More Trouble in the Soft Corner (00:18:50) - Biden Time: Wilkes-Barre Edition (00:21:45) - RIP to Charlbi Dean, Mikhail Gobachev, and Pizza Hut Lunch Buffets

I don’t heart radio
EP 17 Soaked Oats

I don’t heart radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 40:28


Soaked Oat's latest single is out now and sounds killer https://soakedoats.bandcamp.com/album/working-title

Radio One 91FM Dunedin
Interview - Soaked Oats - Jamie Green - Radio One 91FM

Radio One 91FM Dunedin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022


Tune into the Radio One 91FM Breakfast show weekdays, 7am - 10am NZDT or head to https://www.r1.co.nz

RNZ: Nine To Noon
More evacuations can't be ruled out in flood-soaked Nelson

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 7:41


The rain has eased in Nelson but the flooding emergency is far from over and another round of heavy rain is set to come in later today. 411 homes have now been evacuated with some residents forced to leave their homes overnight. People are being asked to conserve water due to damage to the main pipe, roads are closed and thousands are without power. Rain-soaked hillsides have given way with slips continuing to threaten many properties. Nelson MP Rachel Boyack was with Emergency Management Minister Kieran McAnulty yesterday as they toured flooded areas to survey the damage. She talks to Kathryn about the situation facing residents today and the recovery ahead.

Origin Stories w JJK

Nilah Magruder is an absolute joy and an uber-talented author and artist. She was the first Black woman to write for Marvel, illustrated all of the Heroes of Olympus covers for Rick Riordan's books, and worked extensively in animation. Not to mention the books that she is the sole creator of, which have proven to be legendary in my home.Jarrett: Nilah Magruder. How are you? [00:00:03] Nilah: I'm doing pretty good. How are you? [00:00:06] Jarrett: Hangin', it in there Nilah, you will forever and ever be iconic in my home because your picture book, "How to Find a Fox" has been read so many times. So many times. In our home that it is held together by like scotch tape and like bubble gum.[00:00:29] Our son, we must have read that so many times. [00:00:32] Nilah: Oh my God.[00:00:32] Jarrett: Huge home run pal and I remember we met at Comics Crossroads in Ohio and we were tabling next to each other and, like we just were chatting the whole day and I'm always looking for something to bring home to the kids to make up for being gone.[00:00:45] And wow that book, man, I'm telling you like, iconic like that, that we will read that. I will read that to my grandkids, my wife and I will be reading that to our grandkids someday. So thank you for stop and a chat with us. But of course I what the show is all about of [00:01:01] course is about getting to know how creative people in comics got to be doing what they're doing.[00:01:09] And so I like to start at the very beginning cuz I, I love the idea and I also love the idea of imagine. A young author, an artist and getting to, to hear those stories directly from some of your favorite creators. My first question for you and it might really be the only question I ask and then we're gonna get into a conversation, but what was life like for you as a kid?[00:01:29] What was your home like? What was your family set up? What kind of art and stories were you consuming? What sort of laid the groundwork to create Nilah Magruder? [00:01:39] Nilah: My home life as a child, I grew up in a house in the woods in a small community back in a time where it was largely forest and largely rural.[00:01:53] And I think that had a lasting impact on how. I think visually in how I view story, the sort of stories that I'm interested in. A lot of the things I was interested at interested in as a kid were very pastoral and natural. I loved anything featuring animals and, honestly, I was isolated for a lot of my childhood.[00:02:20] This is something that you and I have in common. I had an alcoholic parent and as a kid, I didn't like to bring friends home because then they would see my dad and, whatever state that my dad was in, it was really unpredictable. I never quite knew what I was bringing friends into. So I didn't, bring friends here very much.[00:02:44] And I didn't go to friends' houses very much. And so a lot of my time was spent at home, but we were surrounded by this woodland, all of these trees and animals and so much nature. And that's really where I spent my time as a kid. Now, what I was interested in, like what I was ingesting, we had a small video rental store in the community, and this was long before Netflix.[00:03:18] This was even before Blockbuster. We didn't have a Blockbuster within driving distance. I'm not even sure if Blockbuster existed back then. And so we had this local mom and pop rental store and they would bring in videos from all over the world. A lot of imported... movies and television series.[00:03:43] And as a kid, I was interested in anything animated. If it was a cartoon, if it was drawn, I was there. And so like any cartoon that they had, I'd be like, mom, can we get this please? And I remember once I showed her one video that I hadn't watched yet, and I was like, mom, can we get this? And she looked at it, she looked at the cover and was like, no.[00:04:05] And she put it back and we never spoke of it again. and years later, like I was an adult on the internet and I saw this title called when the wind blows and I was like, oh, that's familiar. And I looked at the summary. I looked at the art from the movie and I was like, oh my God, that's it. That's that one movie that my mom wouldn't let me watch.[00:04:27] And so when the wind blows is a British animated film about nuclear fallout, And it's about it's about this couple. I think it's like a rural couple and there's this big catastrophe in England. And the government sends pamphlets out to everyone and is every, they're just like, don't panic everyone. It's fine.[00:04:54] Just stay at home. And so basically this couple they're older, they're very trusting. They're like the government knows what's best. So we'll just stay home. And eventually radiation reach reaches them and they get sick and die. [00:05:11] So... [00:05:11] Jarrett: what a prude! What a prude! What a...[00:05:14] Nilah: I know wouldn't let me. And then another time she was also a teacher and one day she brought home the animated Animal Farm.[00:05:22] Jarrett: Wow. Yeah.[00:05:23] Nilah: And, my thing is animals, of course. And she looks at me and she's do not watch this. And then she leaves it out. [00:05:32] Jarrett: Oh... [00:05:33] Nilah: And so one day when she wasn't there, I popped it in the VCR and watched it. And I think I was like nine or 10 at the time. And I loved it. So all that to say when I was a kid, I would just watch anything.[00:05:49] And so I was, and we had this rental store that would bring over anything. And so I was getting to watch animated movies from Japan and England and Russia and Canada, like Canada had a really great experimental animation program that was supported by the government. [00:06:07] Jarrett: Yeah.[00:06:07] Nilah: And so they were producing just like wild animated shorts and half the time, I didn't understand what I was watching, but because it was moving pictures, moving drawings, I was fascinated.[00:06:21] And a lot of the stuff that I look back on that I loved as a small child, it's very experimental and dark. And then I lived in this woodland that was also creepy, a lot of animals lived here and also a lot of people in the community were like fascinated cuz our home was situated secluded.[00:06:45] And so people would come drive through late at night just to, see the house or they'd, walk through, like it was a public park here. [00:06:55] Jarrett: Oh. [00:06:55] Nilah: So I had this experience as a child of just like constantly our space just constantly being invaded by strangers. And it was like scary, you're in bed at night....[00:07:11] And headlights reflected on your wall. Yeah. And you're a little kid and you're just like, oh my gosh. [00:07:19] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:07:19] Nilah: I have this, like I have this just this little, knot from my childhood, that's very, just creepy and wild and mysterious. And then I write children's books. [00:07:34] Jarrett: Yeah. It's not easy to be a creative kid who then you when you have worries, because then your creativity, which I've only realized now as an adult, like your imagination really creates scenarios in your head.[00:07:50] Nilah: Yeah![00:07:50] Jarrett: And I wanna point out to the listeners that it's remarkable. That you had access to VHS tapes of cartoons from other countries in that time period. Sometimes when I'm book touring and I talk to readers and they said; "did you love anime when you were a teenager?" And I didn't really have access to it.[00:08:10] I grew up in a suburban, urban area and my rental shop, which was another mom and pop rental shop. They didn't have that creative, curated collection. So how remarkable that, whoever it was that was down the street from you who had this, you know, who had an appetite for this flavor of creative cartoons, because otherwise you would've just been seeing like just Disney and nothing else.[00:08:35] That's, this kinda was the only game in town back then. [00:08:38] Nilah: Yeah. [00:08:39] Yeah. It is like looking back on it. I think that too, it's very odd. [00:08:44] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:08:45] Nilah: Like, how we had so many dubs at the time, but also that this little, this little spot in rural, Maryland was getting all of these videos and yeah, it was pretty, and this was before cable too.[00:09:01] Like we didn't have cable at the time, a lot of my access to animation was through this little rental shop. [00:09:11] Jarrett: Wow. Wow. And so did you love to draw before or after? Can you, or was it simultaneous love of animation and drawing for you? [00:09:21] Nilah: I think the animation came before and I always tell people that I was.[00:09:27] Bad at art at that age. And I'm talking about when I was in kindergarten, so five or six , who's good at art at that age? But it was this I was really bad at coloring in the lines. [00:09:39] Jarrett: Oh, that showed, that did show - sorry to cut you off - but all that did was show promise.[00:09:44] Nilah: Yeah.[00:09:45] Jarrett: All that did was show promise in your work. So it sounds like you had someone somewhere to say, no, you're supposed to color in the lines. And then you're like, oh, what?[00:09:53] Nilah: It was my peers, I remember sitting at a table in kindergarten and I'm coloring. And one of the little girls next to me was like, "Nilah, do you want me to do that for you?"[00:10:04] And that, that devastated me. [00:10:07] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:10:08] Nilah: And so from a very young age, I was like, wow, I have to get better at this cuz that's embarrassing. And so from five or six years old, I was just making this conscious effort to study and practice and be better at art. And my first subjects were animals cuz that's what I was interested in.[00:10:30] We had this magazine series called ZooBooks. And it was full of photos and illustrations of animals. And I would copy these, copy this art and learn animal anatomy from that. Later we got cable and I would watch discovery channel. And then I could see like animals in motion, and I love the Peanuts.[00:10:53] I love Charlie brown and Snoopy taught me how to draw animal toes. As a kid, I was, I would draw them wrong. And I knew they looked wrong, but I didn't know why. And so I would look at Snoopy's feet and how Charles Schultz drew Snoopy's feet. And I started drawing my feet more like that.[00:11:15] And... eventually, I came to understand why the way I was drawing feet before was wrong, anatomically and like that really, that really helped me take my drawings to the next level.[00:11:30] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:11:30] Nilah: And so it wasn't until much later that I really made the connection between animation and my own drawing, I just like watching cartoons and, I also love to draw.[00:11:42] And so as I got older, I, I did process drawing as a storytelling tool and would start drawing, drawing my own stories. And much, much later I got into anime, and... Also Disney started putting out those, like "Making-Of" specials [00:12:07] Jarrett: Yes! [00:12:07] Nilah: Where they talked about how they made animated films.[00:12:11] And that's when I started to learn; " Oh, people are drawing these movies." And that made, that kind of bridged things for me that you can, like that people make comics, people make animated cartoons, like people make children's books. And, I didn't understand where those illustrations came from or anything, but like seeing the process helped me connect the dots like; "Oh, I, as a person can also do this. I can, create stories with art."[00:12:44] Jarrett: And so growing, coming up then. You had art supplies you were drawing and what were your parents' reaction to that? Do they, they thought it was cute and then you'll outgrow it? Or what was that? What was that dynamic like for you? [00:13:05] Nilah: Oh, they thought it was real cute. My dad actually was known as an artist for a while.[00:13:10] He was in the military and I think... I'll have to ask my mom this. I think the story is that he actually considered going to college for art and he went into the military instead. And...[00:13:27] Jarrett: Those are two vastly opposite things![00:13:29] Nilah: Yeah. [00:13:30] Jarrett: Right?[00:13:30] Nilah: Yeah. And so he could draw as a kid, I found some of his some of his old sketches.[00:13:36] And he had a life drawing book, and he did a mural down in the basement that terrifies my nieces, now! It's this pirate face on this cinder block wall in the basement. And I guess when my nieces were growing up, this terrified them and they still don't like it. But so my dad drew and that's something I learned a little later.[00:13:59] It's not really people saw me drawing and they were like; "Oh, your father drew too." And so I learned about it that way. [00:14:07] Jarrett: Wow. [00:14:07] Nilah: My mom was a teacher, and so she would bring home reams of paper for me, and pencils, and drawing was a way to keep me quiet. So when we're at church or when we're out in public, she would just hand me and my brother like drawing supplies and we would go to town and, we would...[00:14:30] Be behaved. And so she, she liked that aspect of it. And then I got a little older and I would keep drawing and that fascinated small children. So it also kept other children quiet.[00:14:49] Everybody, everybody was like; "Yeah, Nilah! Keeping the peace, keeping everyone disciplined!" And that's all, it was for a long time until I was in high school. And I said; "Hey, I think I wanna go to art school." And then things took a turn [00:15:02] Jarrett: And they were like; "Wait a minute."[00:15:03] No, exactly. That's always the interesting thing, where it's supported. And then and it, what I've come to, to learn since years have passed since I was that age, that it comes from love. It comes from fear. Which is love for the kid of how is this kid gonna grow up to support themselves?[00:15:24] Nilah: Yeah. [00:15:24] Jarrett: Especially if it's a world that the parent or caretaker doesn't fully understand or know. Where and maybe and could be read between the lines, but, I don't never knew your dad never didn't know his childhood, but he chose what you know, was more, would be a more practical path.[00:15:39] So while that, that, like history was echoing in you then getting to that age and you went to art school, did you went to college to study art? [00:15:47] Nilah: I did. Yeah. [00:15:48] Jarrett: What, and what was your study? What did you study when you were there? [00:15:51] Nilah: Computer animation. [00:15:53] Jarrett: Oh yeah. And so animation was your... animation was like, that was your goal then?[00:15:58] Nilah: Yeah. [00:15:58] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:15:59] Nilah: Yeah. That was ever since I was 13. That was the end game for me. [00:16:04] Jarrett: And then, so you went to, you went to college and then you graduate from college and I'm sure your parents were like; "And now do you go to work at an office? Do you get a pension? Do you get a, do you get a 401k?" [00:16:16] Nilah: Yeah they didn't understand it for a long time.[00:16:19] And it didn't really materialize for a long time. And my mother was always very honest that she could offer me no advice. Cause vice cause when she was growing up, a black woman in the forties and fifties and sixties, she would say there were three options for us. Be a nurse, be a house cleaner or be a teacher.[00:16:41] And she picked teaching. Nowadays women and black women in particular have so many more options. And I would call home about my internal struggle about what I should be doing. And she'd be like; "Yeah, that sounds hard." [00:16:57] Jarrett: But she's, " I have nothing for you because I haven't walked that path,[00:17:00] other than, being a black woman who's dealt with society." And so... Right. Exactly. And so there, so yeah, there must have been so much fear. Obviously eventually... Oh yeah. You assuage those fears because you became very successful.[00:17:13] You became the first... [00:17:14] Nilah: So... [00:17:15] Jarrett: Yeah. Oh, go ahead. Go ahead. [00:17:16] Nilah: Yeah. Yeah. [00:17:16] The thing, so basically, my, my parents could never stop me. From doing what I was gonna do. And they both knew that. So they put the pressure on, but ultimately, the reason I ended up going to art school is... So we, we tried an animation, like an art trade school, art institutes, and that didn't work out.[00:17:42] And so I went with my mom's plan and did the whole four year college thing. I actually studied journalism and public relations. And when I finally went to Ringling College and studied animation, like I was an adult, I, at that point had a job. I had my own money. I had my own credit. And at this point my parents couldn't stop me.[00:18:06] So I went to art school under my own power and they just had to sit back and wait and see how things turned out. And yeah, there was a lot of fear and totally legitimate fear because we live in this culture that really doesn't support the arts as a career. [00:18:26] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:18:26] Nilah: Even now it's really hard to be an artist because, it's hard to get paid what we're worth. We're, we're still fighting this like societal image of artists as poor and free loaders and just an unnecessary expense. We're in a society where the arts in schools and arts foundations are constantly being defunded, and people don't really understand how much art and design impacts their everyday lives.[00:18:58] And and then, on top of that I think when you're a marginalized person, like your parents are always looking at where, what are the jobs? Where are the careers that people that look like us are thriving. And. That was not entertainment for black people. You don't see, you didn't see black people in those Disney specials. You... And nevermind that I was growing up on the east coast and we really didn't have an entertainment culture here, at least not in TV and film. Yeah. It's different in if you're growing up in California and you're surrounded by studios, who's working in those studios, but here, like there was no window to see where somebody with an animation degree could get a job.[00:19:43] Jarrett: And it's all, it is also, different when you're white, like growing up, I never had a search for characters that looked like me. I never had a search for seeing those specials. And so even though I was on the east coast, I was like; "Oh that's something I can do."[00:19:57] Nilah: Yeah. [00:19:58] Jarrett: But when growing up obviously that's ingrained if you don't see it. And because of your parents lived experience, there were, so there was, so the odds were so stacked against their daughter's favor and they want you to be happy and they want you to be healthy and they want you to succeed.[00:20:13] But you were UN you were unstoppable, you were just kept at it. And you had this love of art and story and you said, you, you said you studied journalism as well. So was like, what was your first paid gig as someone who put words on a paper? Was it journalism? Was it for a newspaper.[00:20:31] Nilah: It was journalism. It was, I think it was a food review. I think it was a restaurant review. Yeah. I worked toward the arts and entertainment department of a Western Maryland newspaper chain, which no longer exists sadly. But I got this job while I was in college. They were looking for interns and I got the internship.[00:20:52] And while I was interning the, the editor who hired me was like; "By the way, do you wanna do some writing?" And, looking back I'm like, what was the other part of this internship? Cuz all I remember is the writing. Like they, they definitely asked me to write in addition to interning, but I don't remember what the interning part was.[00:21:15] I do remember. The early writing gigs. And she was just like; "Hey, why don't you try doing a couple of food reviews?" And that was really cool. I got to go to restaurants and review, write a review. [00:21:27] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:21:27] Nilah: And then that summer there was there, was like a regime change at the paper and my editor rage quit.[00:21:37] And I was like; " I guess that's it for that job!" And so I was like that was fun. I worked for the newspaper for a few months. And then the editor who took our place called me and was like; "Hey, so I found your name on this list of freelance writers. Do you wanna keep writing for us?" And I was like; "Yeah, sure!"[00:21:59] and so he kept feeding me jobs and I didn't review restaurants again, but he would send me out to review gallery openings and to talk to local musicians and I speak to like local, owners of dance companies and theater companies and just this wide array of things. And I, my mom bought me a car cuz it was freaking her out.[00:22:24] I was basically walking around town at night to get to these jobs. And so she bought me a car. So I wouldn't do that. And so I was driving all around, Maryland, reviewing, like writing for this paper. And I did that for two years, through my junior and senior year of college. And then after I graduated and I did it up until the point that I got a full time job and just didn't have time anymore.[00:22:49] And yeah.[00:22:51] Jarrett: Moms are gonna mom forever. Never not gonna be your mom. Never not gonna be your mom looking out for you. And so you know that - granted you were pursuing degrees, but... it sounds like that was also like a whole other master's degree in, in learning about the arts. So you were studying... [00:23:08] Nilah: Yeah.[00:23:08] Jarrett: You were studying the stories of so many people who were you self-employed or making a go at, making a living via a non-traditional means. It's true. You must have met so many interesting people. I can't even, I'm sure that just yeah. Soaked into the fabric of who you became.[00:23:24] So what was your fulltime job? You said you had a full-time you said you had a full-time job. So you left that. What was your full-time case? [00:23:30] Nilah: I was a marketing writer for a health nonprofit. [00:23:34] Yeah. Sounds exciting. Was that super exciting? [00:23:38] Yes... [00:23:39] Jarrett: No? [00:23:39] Nilah: It was amazing. No, it was. So it was in like the DC Metro area and the commute was very long.[00:23:47] It was 70 minutes, one way. Ooh. On the DC beltway. And I'd have to leave home at, what, 4:30, 5 in the morning to get there before rush hour. And it was, it was a fine gig. This nonprofit runs a trade show. I think they do it every other year in Chicago. So while I was there, I got to go to Chicago and help coordinate this giant trade show which was actually that part was really cool.[00:24:17] It was, it was a fine job. It taught me, about the corporate space. It was pretty close to what I went to school to do. And they paid me well for a nonprofit. Like I had a competitive salary. It was, it was my first taste of money. [00:24:36] Jarrett: Yeah. Which is important to pay for things.[00:24:39] Nilah: Yeah.[00:24:40] Jarrett: like your basic needs and enjoyment for sure. [00:24:44] Nilah: And, at the time I was outlining this future and marketing and PR and that was gonna be it. But wow. I still, I still had this bug where I wanted to draw and write and working in marketing wasn't fully fulfilling it. And so I decided I wanted to give it another go.[00:25:06] I wanted to, I started just like poking at, looking at art programs, just, experimentally and ended up applying a lot faster than I thought I would and ended up going a lot faster than I thought I would. [00:25:25] Jarrett: And is that for a master's degree? Is that...[00:25:28] Nilah: No, a bachelor's. [00:25:29] Jarrett: For oh, for a bachelor's![00:25:31] Nilah: I have two bachelors and it feels so pointless.[00:25:35] Jarrett: Oh, here I am thinking like... Oh, I, my, like I'm always concerned. I'm not being a good listener... No, you went and got a second bachelors. [00:25:43] Nilah: I went and got a second. No one needs two bachelors. [00:25:45] Jarrett: Nilah Magruder. How are you? [00:25:49] Nilah: I'm doing pretty good. How are you? [00:25:52] Jarrett: Hangin', it in there Nilah, you will forever and ever be iconic in my home because your picture book, "How to Find a Fox" has been read so many times. So many times. In our home that it is held together by like scotch tape and like bubble gum.[00:26:14] Our son, we must have read that so many times. [00:26:18] Nilah: Oh my God.[00:26:18] Jarrett: Huge home run pal and I remember we met at Comics Crossroads in Ohio and we were tabling next to each other and, like we just were chatting the whole day and I'm always looking for something to bring home to the kids to make up for being gone.[00:26:31] And wow that book, man, I'm telling you like, iconic like that, that we will read that. I will read that to my grandkids, my wife and I will be reading that to our grandkids someday. So thank you for stop and a chat with us. But of course I what the show is all about of [00:26:47] course is about getting to know how creative people in comics got to be doing what they're doing.[00:26:54] And so I like to start at the very beginning cuz I, I love the idea and I also love the idea of imagine. A young author, an artist and getting to, to hear those stories directly from some of your favorite creators. My first question for you and it might really be the only question I ask and then we're gonna get into a conversation, but what was life like for you as a kid?[00:27:15] What was your home like? What was your family set up? What kind of art and stories were you consuming? What sort of laid the groundwork to create Nilah Magruder? [00:27:25] Nilah: My home life as a child, I grew up in a house in the woods in a small community back in a time where it was largely forest and largely rural.[00:27:38] And I think that had a lasting impact on how. I think visually in how I view story, the sort of stories that I'm interested in. A lot of the things I was interested at interested in as a kid were very pastoral and natural. I loved anything featuring animals and, honestly, I was isolated for a lot of my childhood.[00:28:05] This is something that you and I have in common. I had an alcoholic parent and as a kid, I didn't like to bring friends home because then they would see my dad and, whatever state that my dad was in, it was really unpredictable. I never quite knew what I was bringing friends into. So I didn't, bring friends here very much.[00:28:30] And I didn't go to friends' houses very much. And so a lot of my time was spent at home, but we were surrounded by this woodland, all of these trees and animals and so much nature. And that's really where I spent my time as a kid. Now, what I was interested in, like what I was ingesting, we had a small video rental store in the community, and this was long before Netflix.[00:29:04] This was even before Blockbuster. We didn't have a Blockbuster within driving distance. I'm not even sure if Blockbuster existed back then. And so we had this local mom and pop rental store and they would bring in videos from all over the world. A lot of imported... movies and television series.[00:29:29] And as a kid, I was interested in anything animated. If it was a cartoon, if it was drawn, I was there. And so like any cartoon that they had, I'd be like, mom, can we get this please? And I remember once I showed her one video that I hadn't watched yet, and I was like, mom, can we get this? And she looked at it, she looked at the cover and was like, no.[00:29:50] And she put it back and we never spoke of it again. and years later, like I was an adult on the internet and I saw this title called when the wind blows and I was like, oh, that's familiar. And I looked at the summary. I looked at the art from the movie and I was like, oh my God, that's it. That's that one movie that my mom wouldn't let me watch.[00:30:13] And so when the wind blows is a British animated film about nuclear fallout, And it's about it's about this couple. I think it's like a rural couple and there's this big catastrophe in England. And the government sends pamphlets out to everyone and is every, they're just like, don't panic everyone. It's fine.[00:30:40] Just stay at home. And so basically this couple they're older, they're very trusting. They're like the government knows what's best. So we'll just stay home. And eventually radiation reach reaches them and they get sick and die. [00:30:56] So... [00:30:57] Jarrett: what a prude! What a prude! What a...[00:31:00] Nilah: I know wouldn't let me. And then another time she was also a teacher and one day she brought home the animated Animal Farm.[00:31:08] Jarrett: Wow. Yeah.[00:31:09] Nilah: And, my thing is animals, of course. And she looks at me and she's do not watch this. And then she leaves it out. [00:31:17] Jarrett: Oh... [00:31:19] Nilah: And so one day when she wasn't there, I popped it in the VCR and watched it. And I think I was like nine or 10 at the time. And I loved it. So all that to say when I was a kid, I would just watch anything.[00:31:34] And so I was, and we had this rental store that would bring over anything. And so I was getting to watch animated movies from Japan and England and Russia and Canada, like Canada had a really great experimental animation program that was supported by the government. [00:31:52] Jarrett: Yeah.[00:31:52] Nilah: And so they were producing just like wild animated shorts and half the time, I didn't understand what I was watching, but because it was moving pictures, moving drawings, I was fascinated.[00:32:07] And a lot of the stuff that I look back on that I loved as a small child, it's very experimental and dark. And then I lived in this woodland that was also creepy, a lot of animals lived here and also a lot of people in the community were like fascinated cuz our home was situated secluded.[00:32:30] And so people would come drive through late at night just to, see the house or they'd, walk through, like it was a public park here. [00:32:41] Jarrett: Oh. [00:32:41] Nilah: So I had this experience as a child of just like constantly our space just constantly being invaded by strangers. And it was like scary, you're in bed at night....[00:32:57] And headlights reflected on your wall. Yeah. And you're a little kid and you're just like, oh my gosh. [00:33:04] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:33:05] Nilah: I have this, like I have this just this little, knot from my childhood, that's very, just creepy and wild and mysterious. And then I write children's books. [00:33:19] Jarrett: Yeah. It's not easy to be a creative kid who then you when you have worries, because then your creativity, which I've only realized now as an adult, like your imagination really creates scenarios in your head.[00:33:36] Nilah: Yeah![00:33:36] Jarrett: And I wanna point out to the listeners that it's remarkable. That you had access to VHS tapes of cartoons from other countries in that time period. Sometimes when I'm book touring and I talk to readers and they said; "did you love anime when you were a teenager?" And I didn't really have access to it.[00:33:55] I grew up in a suburban, urban area and my rental shop, which was another mom and pop rental shop. They didn't have that creative, curated collection. So how remarkable that, whoever it was that was down the street from you who had this, you know, who had an appetite for this flavor of creative cartoons, because otherwise you would've just been seeing like just Disney and nothing else.[00:34:21] That's, this kinda was the only game in town back then. [00:34:24] Nilah: Yeah. [00:34:24] Yeah. It is like looking back on it. I think that too, it's very odd. [00:34:29] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:34:30] Nilah: Like, how we had so many dubs at the time, but also that this little, this little spot in rural, Maryland was getting all of these videos and yeah, it was pretty, and this was before cable too.[00:34:47] Like we didn't have cable at the time, a lot of my access to animation was through this little rental shop. [00:34:56] Jarrett: Wow. Wow. And so did you love to draw before or after? Can you, or was it simultaneous love of animation and drawing for you? [00:35:06] Nilah: I think the animation came before and I always tell people that I was.[00:35:13] Bad at art at that age. And I'm talking about when I was in kindergarten, so five or six , who's good at art at that age? But it was this I was really bad at coloring in the lines. [00:35:25] Jarrett: Oh, that showed, that did show - sorry to cut you off - but all that did was show promise.[00:35:30] Nilah: Yeah.[00:35:31] Jarrett: All that did was show promise in your work. So it sounds like you had someone somewhere to say, no, you're supposed to color in the lines. And then you're like, oh, what?[00:35:38] Nilah: It was my peers, I remember sitting at a table in kindergarten and I'm coloring. And one of the little girls next to me was like, "Nilah, do you want me to do that for you?"[00:35:50] And that, that devastated me. [00:35:53] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:35:53] Nilah: And so from a very young age, I was like, wow, I have to get better at this cuz that's embarrassing. And so from five or six years old, I was just making this conscious effort to study and practice and be better at art. And my first subjects were animals cuz that's what I was interested in.[00:36:16] We had this magazine series called ZooBooks. And it was full of photos and illustrations of animals. And I would copy these, copy this art and learn animal anatomy from that. Later we got cable and I would watch discovery channel. And then I could see like animals in motion, and I love the Peanuts.[00:36:39] I love Charlie brown and Snoopy taught me how to draw animal toes. As a kid, I was, I would draw them wrong. And I knew they looked wrong, but I didn't know why. And so I would look at Snoopy's feet and how Charles Schultz drew Snoopy's feet. And I started drawing my feet more like that.[00:37:01] And... eventually, I came to understand why the way I was drawing feet before was wrong, anatomically and like that really, that really helped me take my drawings to the next level.[00:37:15] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:37:15] Nilah: And so it wasn't until much later that I really made the connection between animation and my own drawing, I just like watching cartoons and, I also love to draw.[00:37:27] And so as I got older, I, I did process drawing as a storytelling tool and would start drawing, drawing my own stories. And much, much later I got into anime, and... Also Disney started putting out those, like "Making-Of" specials [00:37:52] Jarrett: Yes! [00:37:53] Nilah: Where they talked about how they made animated films.[00:37:57] And that's when I started to learn; " Oh, people are drawing these movies." And that made, that kind of bridged things for me that you can, like that people make comics, people make animated cartoons, like people make children's books. And, I didn't understand where those illustrations came from or anything, but like seeing the process helped me connect the dots like; "Oh, I, as a person can also do this. I can, create stories with art."[00:38:30] Jarrett: And so growing, coming up then. You had art supplies you were drawing and what were your parents' reaction to that? Do they, they thought it was cute and then you'll outgrow it? Or what was that? What was that dynamic like for you? [00:38:51] Nilah: Oh, they thought it was real cute. My dad actually was known as an artist for a while.[00:38:56] He was in the military and I think... I'll have to ask my mom this. I think the story is that he actually considered going to college for art and he went into the military instead. And...[00:39:12] Jarrett: Those are two vastly opposite things![00:39:15] Nilah: Yeah. [00:39:16] Jarrett: Right?[00:39:16] Nilah: Yeah. And so he could draw as a kid, I found some of his some of his old sketches.[00:39:21] And he had a life drawing book, and he did a mural down in the basement that terrifies my nieces, now! It's this pirate face on this cinder block wall in the basement. And I guess when my nieces were growing up, this terrified them and they still don't like it. But so my dad drew and that's something I learned a little later.[00:39:45] It's not really people saw me drawing and they were like; "Oh, your father drew too." And so I learned about it that way. [00:39:52] Jarrett: Wow. [00:39:53] Nilah: My mom was a teacher, and so she would bring home reams of paper for me, and pencils, and drawing was a way to keep me quiet. So when we're at church or when we're out in public, she would just hand me and my brother like drawing supplies and we would go to town and, we would...[00:40:16] Be behaved. And so she, she liked that aspect of it. And then I got a little older and I would keep drawing and that fascinated small children. So it also kept other children quiet.[00:40:35] Everybody, everybody was like; "Yeah, Nilah! Keeping the peace, keeping everyone disciplined!" And that's all, it was for a long time until I was in high school. And I said; "Hey, I think I wanna go to art school." And then things took a turn [00:40:47] Jarrett: And they were like; "Wait a minute."[00:40:49] No, exactly. That's always the interesting thing, where it's supported. And then and it, what I've come to, to learn since years have passed since I was that age, that it comes from love. It comes from fear. Which is love for the kid of how is this kid gonna grow up to support themselves?[00:41:09] Nilah: Yeah. [00:41:10] Jarrett: Especially if it's a world that the parent or caretaker doesn't fully understand or know. Where and maybe and could be read between the lines, but, I don't never knew your dad never didn't know his childhood, but he chose what you know, was more, would be a more practical path.[00:41:25] So while that, that, like history was echoing in you then getting to that age and you went to art school, did you went to college to study art? [00:41:33] Nilah: I did. Yeah. [00:41:34] Jarrett: What, and what was your study? What did you study when you were there? [00:41:36] Nilah: Computer animation. [00:41:39] Jarrett: Oh yeah. And so animation was your... animation was like, that was your goal then?[00:41:43] Nilah: Yeah. [00:41:44] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:41:44] Nilah: Yeah. That was ever since I was 13. That was the end game for me. [00:41:50] Jarrett: And then, so you went to, you went to college and then you graduate from college and I'm sure your parents were like; "And now do you go to work at an office? Do you get a pension? Do you get a, do you get a 401k?" [00:42:02] Nilah: Yeah they didn't understand it for a long time.[00:42:04] And it didn't really materialize for a long time. And my mother was always very honest that she could offer me no advice. Cause vice cause when she was growing up, a black woman in the forties and fifties and sixties, she would say there were three options for us. Be a nurse, be a house cleaner or be a teacher.[00:42:27] And she picked teaching. Nowadays women and black women in particular have so many more options. And I would call home about my internal struggle about what I should be doing. And she'd be like; "Yeah, that sounds hard." [00:42:43] Jarrett: But she's, " I have nothing for you because I haven't walked that path,[00:42:46] other than, being a black woman who's dealt with society." And so... Right. Exactly. And so there, so yeah, there must have been so much fear. Obviously eventually... Oh yeah. You assuage those fears because you became very successful.[00:42:59] You became the first... [00:43:00] Nilah: So... [00:43:00] Jarrett: Yeah. Oh, go ahead. Go ahead. [00:43:01] Nilah: Yeah. Yeah. [00:43:02] The thing, so basically, my, my parents could never stop me. From doing what I was gonna do. And they both knew that. So they put the pressure on, but ultimately, the reason I ended up going to art school is... So we, we tried an animation, like an art trade school, art institutes, and that didn't work out.[00:43:27] And so I went with my mom's plan and did the whole four year college thing. I actually studied journalism and public relations. And when I finally went to Ringling College and studied animation, like I was an adult, I, at that point had a job. I had my own money. I had my own credit. And at this point my parents couldn't stop me.[00:43:52] So I went to art school under my own power and they just had to sit back and wait and see how things turned out. And yeah, there was a lot of fear and totally legitimate fear because we live in this culture that really doesn't support the arts as a career. [00:44:12] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:44:12] Nilah: Even now it's really hard to be an artist because, it's hard to get paid what we're worth. We're, we're still fighting this like societal image of artists as poor and free loaders and just an unnecessary expense. We're in a society where the arts in schools and arts foundations are constantly being defunded, and people don't really understand how much art and design impacts their everyday lives.[00:44:44] And and then, on top of that I think when you're a marginalized person, like your parents are always looking at where, what are the jobs? Where are the careers that people that look like us are thriving. And. That was not entertainment for black people. You don't see, you didn't see black people in those Disney specials. You... And nevermind that I was growing up on the east coast and we really didn't have an entertainment culture here, at least not in TV and film. Yeah. It's different in if you're growing up in California and you're surrounded by studios, who's working in those studios, but here, like there was no window to see where somebody with an animation degree could get a job.[00:45:29] Jarrett: And it's all, it is also, different when you're white, like growing up, I never had a search for characters that looked like me. I never had a search for seeing those specials. And so even though I was on the east coast, I was like; "Oh that's something I can do."[00:45:43] Nilah: Yeah. [00:45:44] Jarrett: But when growing up obviously that's ingrained if you don't see it. And because of your parents lived experience, there were, so there was, so the odds were so stacked against their daughter's favor and they want you to be happy and they want you to be healthy and they want you to succeed.[00:45:59] But you were UN you were unstoppable, you were just kept at it. And you had this love of art and story and you said, you, you said you studied journalism as well. So was like, what was your first paid gig as someone who put words on a paper? Was it journalism? Was it for a newspaper.[00:46:16] Nilah: It was journalism. It was, I think it was a food review. I think it was a restaurant review. Yeah. I worked toward the arts and entertainment department of a Western Maryland newspaper chain, which no longer exists sadly. But I got this job while I was in college. They were looking for interns and I got the internship.[00:46:38] And while I was interning the, the editor who hired me was like; "By the way, do you wanna do some writing?" And, looking back I'm like, what was the other part of this internship? Cuz all I remember is the writing. Like they, they definitely asked me to write in addition to interning, but I don't remember what the interning part was.[00:47:01] I do remember. The early writing gigs. And she was just like; "Hey, why don't you try doing a couple of food reviews?" And that was really cool. I got to go to restaurants and review, write a review. [00:47:12] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:47:13] Nilah: And then that summer there was there, was like a regime change at the paper and my editor rage quit.[00:47:22] And I was like; " I guess that's it for that job!" And so I was like that was fun. I worked for the newspaper for a few months. And then the editor who took our place called me and was like; "Hey, so I found your name on this list of freelance writers. Do you wanna keep writing for us?" And I was like; "Yeah, sure!"[00:47:45] and so he kept feeding me jobs and I didn't review restaurants again, but he would send me out to review gallery openings and to talk to local musicians and I speak to like local, owners of dance companies and theater companies and just this wide array of things. And I, my mom bought me a car cuz it was freaking her out.[00:48:10] I was basically walking around town at night to get to these jobs. And so she bought me a car. So I wouldn't do that. And so I was driving all around, Maryland, reviewing, like writing for this paper. And I did that for two years, through my junior and senior year of college. And then after I graduated and I did it up until the point that I got a full time job and just didn't have time anymore.[00:48:35] And yeah.[00:48:37] Jarrett: Moms are gonna mom forever. Never not gonna be your mom. Never not gonna be your mom looking out for you. And so you know that - granted you were pursuing degrees, but... it sounds like that was also like a whole other master's degree in, in learning about the arts. So you were studying... [00:48:54] Nilah: Yeah.[00:48:54] Jarrett: You were studying the stories of so many people who were you self-employed or making a go at, making a living via a non-traditional means. It's true. You must have met so many interesting people. I can't even, I'm sure that just yeah. Soaked into the fabric of who you became.[00:49:10] So what was your fulltime job? You said you had a full-time you said you had a full-time job. So you left that. What was your full-time case? [00:49:15] Nilah: I was a marketing writer for a health nonprofit. [00:49:20] Yeah. Sounds exciting. Was that super exciting? [00:49:24] Yes... [00:49:24] Jarrett: No? [00:49:25] Nilah: It was amazing. No, it was. So it was in like the DC Metro area and the commute was very long.[00:49:33] It was 70 minutes, one way. Ooh. On the DC beltway. And I'd have to leave home at, what, 4:30, 5 in the morning to get there before rush hour. And it was, it was a fine gig. This nonprofit runs a trade show. I think they do it every other year in Chicago. So while I was there, I got to go to Chicago and help coordinate this giant trade show which was actually that part was really cool.[00:50:03] It was, it was a fine job. It taught me, about the corporate space. It was pretty close to what I went to school to do. And they paid me well for a nonprofit. Like I had a competitive salary. It was, it was my first taste of money. [00:50:22] Jarrett: Yeah. Which is important to pay for things.[00:50:25] Nilah: Yeah.[00:50:25] Jarrett: like your basic needs and enjoyment for sure. [00:50:30] Nilah: And, at the time I was outlining this future and marketing and PR and that was gonna be it. But wow. I still, I still had this bug where I wanted to draw and write and working in marketing wasn't fully fulfilling it. And so I decided I wanted to give it another go.[00:50:52] I wanted to, I started just like poking at, looking at art programs, just, experimentally and ended up applying a lot faster than I thought I would and ended up going a lot faster than I thought I would. [00:51:11] Jarrett: And is that for a master's degree? Is that...[00:51:13] Nilah: No, a bachelor's. [00:51:15] Jarrett: For oh, for a bachelor's![00:51:16] Nilah: I have two bachelors and it feels so pointless.[00:51:21] Jarrett: Oh, here I am thinking like... Oh, I, my, like I'm always concerned. I'm not being a good listener... No, you went and got a second bachelors. [00:51:28] Nilah: I went and got a second. No one needs two bachelors.  [00:00:00] Jarrett: So hold up, you went and got a second bachelor's degree. Like...[00:00:05] Nilah: I went and got a second bachelor's.[00:00:07] Jarrett: And in what? So your first bachelor, your first bachelor's was in computer animation. [00:00:12] Nilah: My first bachelor's was in... Communications. [00:00:17] Oh...[00:00:18] Yeah.[00:00:19] Jarrett: I see. Then yeah. Two bachelors, but they're completely different.[00:00:22] Nilah: Completely different. [00:00:23] Jarrett: And what a different experience too, of being, an older student you're not fresh out of high school, you I'm sure you, your approach to the academics and what you were learning were so different, right? [00:00:35] Nilah: Yeah. Honestly, I was an older student both times.[00:00:39] I, I skipped a year when I when I graduated high school, me and my mom fought over the art school thing. And then I ended up not going to college that first year. And so I was older when I went to that first four year college, hood college. It was actually a women's college at the time.[00:00:56] So I was entering, I think at 19 instead of 18. And then when I went to Ringling, I was 25. So I was... Much, not the oldest adult student there, but I was older than all the 18 year olds coming in. Yeah. And it, it definitely, it's a different perspec- perspective for sure. This was not my first career attempt, it wasn't, at 18, like there's so much pressure to choose a career, choose it now and go to college for that career and stay in that career.[00:01:28] So you can pay back those student loans. And I didn't have that. I, animation was like I had my plan B already. I had my fallback career. Like I had my degree in marketing that I could always fall back on if the animation thing didn't work out. So animation was just like a fully like personal choice that I was making.[00:01:52] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:01:53] Nilah: Everything I did at that point, I, I did it as, a fully consenting adult. [00:01:58] Jarrett: And you, so then you had your second graduation and your family; "Didn't we do this seven years ago?" And... [00:02:05] Nilah: Yeah. [00:02:05] Jarrett: So you're like launching into the world a whole second time. That's like a caterpillar becoming a butterfly twice.[00:02:12] Yeah. [00:02:13] Nilah: Yeah. It was very it was very interesting. [00:02:16] Jarrett: Yeah! [00:02:16] Nilah: But... [00:02:17] Jarrett: Yeah so you, but you wow, but amazing that you had the foresight to say; "Okay, let me reset. Let me really follow the passion." Like you...[00:02:27] Nilah: Yeah. [00:02:27] Jarrett: And you learned a lot in that corporate space too, because we're artists.[00:02:31] But we still have to deal with the corporations who publish the work or help promote the work. So what was your, so then what was your first paid gig after getting a degree in animation? [00:02:42] Nilah: My first paid gig was in publishing because I couldn't get an animation job. I entered Ringling at the start of the recession.[00:02:50] Leading up to 2006, 2007, all of the feedback coming out of Ringling was come to this school and you'll get a high paid job in animation and... [00:03:06] Jarrett: Speaking of marketing. [00:03:10] Nilah: Right. And then I entered Ringling that, that year, 2007, And like we're in school, we're just watching on the news, all the jobs dry up.[00:03:24] Jarrett: Oh. [00:03:24] Nilah: And so it was basically for all of us, it was like this three or four year, wait to see, will there be jobs when we get out. And for me there wasn't. So my first job out of Ringling, I graduated in 2010, was a publisher in Maryland. And I was falling back on my previous career for that, I had, because of my earlier experiences, I had the credentials for this job.[00:03:56] I stayed for seven months. It was, it was a position that ended up being, not as advertised. And... [00:04:06] Jarrett: Yeah, yeah. [00:04:07] Nilah: And during this year that I was home was, it was difficult. My aunt died that year. And so my family needed me at home, but also so it reignited that fear my mom had of me leaving.[00:04:24] And so I was really trying to stay in Maryland. And at the same time, like there was just this thought in my head that I hadn't given animation, like a full try. Like I was trying to find work while being at home. Cuz I, I had nowhere else to go knowing that all of the work was in California. And no one would hire me here in Maryland, because most places they wanted someone right away.[00:04:59] And like, why hire someone in Maryland and wait for them to move out when you can just hire one of these thousands of people hanging around LA looking for work. So I ended up just packing all my things into my car and moving to LA that summer 2000 that fall 2011. And so at this point I'd been out of school for over a year and still did not have a job in animation.[00:05:31] And I was writing completely on my savings and the savings. Once I got to LA the savings dried up very quickly, I was completely broke and I was applying everywhere. And getting, getting nowhere. I got so desperate that I was applying for retail and that wasn't working out either. I couldn't, it was so dry.[00:05:55] I couldn't even get a retail job. I applied for a, an unpaid internship and I didn't get that either. I couldn't even get a job where I worked for free. And I was ready to throw in the towel, but I didn't have enough money to afford to move back home.[00:06:20] Jarrett: You couldn't afford to even buy the towel to throw it at that point.[00:06:23] Nilah: Yeah. [00:06:24] Yeah. Like my mom start, my mom was paying my rent. [00:06:27] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:06:28] Nilah: And she could have barely afford that. Like my parents were both retired and in January, 2012, I... I happened to see a listing on Ringling's job website for a little company in Burbank. And I got an interview there. They were, they did mostly live action work, but they were hiring their first in-house artist.[00:06:58] And the company was run by Florida state alums. I think it's Florida state. I can't remember now wow it's been a while, but oh, that's embarrassing if they watch this. But they had this Florida connection. So they, when they were hiring for this position, they decided to put a listing on the Ringling job site because Ringling is also in Florida, and I got the job.[00:07:26] Jarrett: Yes![00:07:26] Nilah: And that was my first LA job. It was the company is called Soapbox Films. and at the time they were doing a lot of like marketing and live action production, mainly for Disney. So if you ever heard of like Movie Surfers in like the early two thousands, I think they, the Disney channel had this program called Movie Surfers and Soapbox, like back in that day, Soapbox was the one developing that.[00:08:01] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:08:02] Nilah: They do a lot of production with the Muppets. They're one of a handful of studios in LA that are equipped to work with the Muppets. [00:08:10] Jarrett: Whoa. That's not an easy thing to get.[00:08:13] Nilah: Yeah, and they do what is called toolkit for animated films. Toolkit is like just it's a package of assets that the studios will use to advertise their animated films and to develop toolkit.[00:08:32] You need a storyboard artist and that's what they hired me for. [00:08:39] Jarrett: That's fantastic. So now you're getting paid to draw pictures that tell stories. [00:08:44] Nilah: Yeah. [00:08:44] Finally getting paid, just draw pictures. [00:08:47] Jarrett: You're on your way moving right along Fozzie and Kermit saying as they're driving across country. [00:08:52] Nilah: Yeah. [00:08:53] Jarrett: Oh man. And so that must have, that must have led to other things, right? [00:08:57] Nilah: It allowed me to stay in LA. [00:08:59] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:08:59] Nilah: They were, this was this was the conflict My time at Soapbox was great. I stayed there for three years, but it wasn't, it allowed me to tread water in Los Angeles, but it wasn't a stepping stone really to the next thing, because everything that I did there was so specific to what Soapbox did.[00:09:24] It didn't translate well to other jobs at other studios. So I couldn't use anything I was doing there in my portfolio. So if I wanted to, if I wanted to work in TV and film, which was still the goal, I had to develop my portfolio pieces outside of work. At this time I was, I had my day job at [00:09:50] Soapbox, but I was also still figuring out what is my career though.[00:09:55] Yeah. And there were times like I'd go through this cycle at Soapbox where I would try really hard to get out. So I'd be submitting my storyboarding portfolio to other studios and nothing would materialize. And I'd give up after six months and I'd say, you know what, let me just hunker down and focus on my time here at Soapbox.[00:10:17] And maybe this can become a long term career. And so I would really like put all of my energy into being like the best Soapbox employee I could be. And then after six months, I'd be like; "I can't take this. I can't do this anymore. I have to get out." And so I'd re-up and put all of my energy into storyboard portfolio stuff and try again.[00:10:43] And I did this for three years and meanwhile I fell into comics in children's books a little bit. Cause at this point, I was so desperate for money I was so desperate. Like I was just like clinging on by my fingernails. And I just needed something to work. And so I was, utilizing the skills I had, which were basically writing and drawing.[00:11:11] And I started a web comic and I started, I joined society of children's book, writers and illustrators, so I could learn how to make children's books. And I was doing picture book dumies and trying to write novels and looking for an agent and drawing this web comic in my spare time outside of Soapbox.[00:11:34] And, also, putting storyboard portfolios together. And so I did this for three years and then finally in 2015, everything changed. I submitted my web comic to the Dwayne McDuffy award for diversity and won that. I... [00:11:55] Jarrett: And hold on. You were the inaugural winner too! [00:11:58] Nilah: I was the inaugural winner.[00:12:00] Jarrett: You were the first person ever to win that award. [00:12:02] Nilah: It was bonkers. Yeah. I, and I was so used to losing at that point that and the competition was so stiff. I was like, I got nominated. And I was like that was a fun experience, but I'm never gonna win a little web comic with a very small following is not gonna win against all these like actual comics.[00:12:28] I was up against Ms. Marvel, and I believe Shaft by David Walker, and Hex 11. And I was just like, that's the end of the road. And, but it won MFK one. [00:12:41] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:12:41] Nilah: And it, it was the start of a very different... It was the start of things for me. [00:12:47] Jarrett: Yeah. Yeah. And and I do think film, and graphic novels, they do have a lot in common.[00:12:53] I look to film to inspire how I, I write my graphic novels and yeah. I have to say so a couple months ago, I was just, just binge watching some shows on Disney plus and they have this show that's about the history of Marvel. And then there was one episode about the women of Marvel and the women who've written for Marvel and how certainly they were there in the beginning, but they weren't necessarily writing the stories.[00:13:18] They were, they, it was everything back then in the world of comics, like most of the world too, and most of the country was, chauvinistic. And so I'm just watching and I'm so fascinated hearing these stories of these pioneers. And then you pop up on the show. I was like, wait a minute.[00:13:36] I don't need to see the, I didn't need to see the little name at the bottom. Like I know that's Nilah. And you became the first black woman to write for Marvel comics. [00:13:47] Nilah: Isn't that bonkers, like... [00:13:50] Jarrett: It is bonkers! Tell me about that. Tell me about your mom's reaction because there is something you said in something you'd said in the show was something about your back in the day.[00:14:05] Was it like your mom's was your mom's friends giving her flack or something? [00:14:09] Nilah: Oh yeah. [00:14:10] Yeah. I don't even know if I've told my mom that I'm the first black writer for Marvel, because some things I say about my career just mean nothing to her. [00:14:18] So... But... [00:14:21] Jarrett: Like I said: moms are gonna, mom.[00:14:23] Nilah: Moms are gonna mom.[00:14:24] Jarrett: No matter what.[00:14:26] Nilah: But, I didn't realize the extent of this coming up, but when I decided to go down this path like my mom's older black lady, friends in, Maryland middle class, Maryland were really judgey about it. And like one of them once asked me because I, the art school thing had not yet materialized.[00:14:46] And she was like; "Oh, so are you finally over that art hobby yet?"[00:14:51] Jarrett: Oof. [00:14:53] Nilah: And I, I didn't realize this either, but there's this other family friend that we don't speak to anymore. And I thought that we just drifted apart, but turns out like going to art school was like a point of contention for her.[00:15:08] Jarrett: Wow. [00:15:08] Nilah: And. And it's such a weird thing to think about that she would distance herself from our entire family over, over a personal choice that I made. [00:15:17] Jarrett: It's not witchcraft! It's not witch... I mean like sacrificing rabbits on the full moon or something. I don't...[00:15:24] Nilah: Right.. It's, yeah, but... [00:15:27] Jarrett: Wow. Wow. [00:15:29] Nilah: So like my mother, wasn't telling me about this.[00:15:33] She wasn't telling me that like her friends were coming down hard on her and she had to defend me [00:15:41] Jarrett: Wow![00:15:41] Nilah: And defend my choices. But when I started working for Dreamworks and Disney, she finally got her vindication, cuz she would say; "Hey, my kid works at Disney now." And they understood that. [00:15:55] Jarrett: Yes they, they certainly did.[00:15:57] Nilah: Yeah. [00:15:57] Jarrett: And run us through some of your credits of, cause I know you from the book world and I know that you've done stuff for Dreamworks and Disney, but what kind of jobs have you done over these years? [00:16:07] Nilah: So I was a storyboard revisionist on Dino Trucks at Dreamworks, and Dino Trucks is a Netflix show.[00:16:17] You can watch it on Netflix. It's just what it sounds like. It's dinosaur trucks. And it's based on a children's book.[00:16:23] Jarrett: And it's based on a children's book. You can't escape now. We're bringing you over just the same. You're in this publishing game too! [00:16:32] Nilah: At Disney, I hopped onto Tangled, the series. [00:16:36] Jarrett: Oh.[00:16:37] Nilah: Which is based on the movie. [00:16:38] Jarrett: Yeah. We love that show in my house. What did you do then? [00:16:41] Nilah: Yeah. [00:16:41] Jarrett: What did you do on the show? [00:16:43] Nilah: I was also a storyboard revisionist there. And so storyboard revisionists... They're basically the support team for storyboard artists. So they, the storyboard artists do their thing and storyboard revisionists help make sure that the storyboards are ready for the next process in the pipeline.[00:17:04] Jarrett: Okay. [00:17:05] Nilah: So we it's a lot of drawing. It's a lot of support drawing just to, to tighten things up for the animators. God what happened next? I was a writer for Cannon Busters produced by LaSean Thomas. [00:17:21] Jarrett: Wow.[00:17:22] Nilah: I was a writer for Polly Pocket.[00:17:27] Jarrett: Nice. [00:17:27] Nilah: Which is based on... [00:17:29] Iconic!. [00:17:30] Yeah. Yeah. Poly pocket is still around [00:17:33] Jarrett: Iconic. That's wild. Yeah. And you illustrated the Rick Riordan and Heroes of Olympus books too. [00:17:42] Nilah: Yeah![00:17:43] Jarrett: Goodness like that is huge. For you, you don't get bigger in publishing than Rick Riordan. [00:17:50] Nilah: It's true. Yeah.[00:17:52] Jarrett: And, And animals and fantasy. And you illustrated the covers for our friend Daniel Jose Older, the Dactyl Hill Squad books.[00:18:01] Nilah: That was my first time drawing dinosaurs in my life. [00:18:05] Jarrett: Really? I, would've never known that. I had never known that. [00:18:08] Nilah: Aside from Dino Trucks, but that was a very different thing. [00:18:11] Jarrett: Yeah. Those are more trucks than dinosaurs, right? Yeah. [00:18:13] Nilah: Yeah. It was wild. Like I had to learn dinosaur anatomy. [00:18:18] Jarrett: And so where in, where did all of that did Marvel come calling? [00:18:21] Nilah: So back in 2016, I think it all happened very fast. This was after the Dwayne McDuffy award and I never got a clear answer on how they found me. It might have been Twitter, but an editor from Marvel reached out one day and said; "Hey, would you like to write a short story for us on this new series called the Year of Marvels?" And they pitched a Rocket Raccoon -Tippy-Toe Squirrel team up and of course animals.[00:18:59] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:19:00] Nilah: So...[00:19:00] Jarrett: It's your wheelhouse! [00:19:01] Nilah: Yeah. Yeah. So I took it of course. And that kind of got things rolling. Once you're, once you write for a Marvel you're in the Marvel family. So...[00:19:09] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:19:10] Nilah: I didn't, I did that and didn't, work with them for a long while after that. And so it just so happened. I didn't know this at the time I was completely unprepared. But that ended up being their first writing credit by a black woman. And so 70 years into Marvel's history and it was just this little short di

Valleyview Friends Church
Aug 14, 2022 - Scripture Soaked Life - 2 Timothy 3:16 - 17

Valleyview Friends Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 28:49


You and I need to be soaked in the scriptures. Not just a light sprinkle. Not just a quick rinse. But soaked deeply so that the word of God permeates our lives.

The Last Bohemians
S4 Ep5: Lynn Castle: LA's first lady barber on Elvis, the LSD-soaked Sixties and her secret music career

The Last Bohemians

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 45:22


In the north of Los Angeles, in a neighbourhood called Glendale, an unassuming bungalow is home to one of the first women in Hollywood to cut men's hair. Today she goes by the glitziest of names, Madelynn von Ritz, but back in the 60s she was called Lynn Castle and hung out with key people of the era, lopping off Jim Morrison, the Byrds, Sonny Bono and Neil Young's locks. She was also a secret musician. But despite her childhood friends being musical svengalis like Phil Spector – who she once dated – as well as Jack Nietzcshe and Lee Hazlewood, it took her a while to reveal her talent. Eventually, however, she cut a number of intimate, melancholy demos in the hazy 60s with Hazlewood, who later famously teamed up with Nancy Sinatra and helped define the decade's psychedelic sound. Lynn is now 83 (going on 53!) and still writes music to this day, with a home studio tucked in the corner of her living room. Those old demos, meanwhile, were found by the label Light in the Attic and reissued as Rose Coloured Corner in 2017 – an album 50 years in the making – including her signature song, pop gem The Lady Barber.  In this episode of The Last Bohemians: LA, supported by Audio-Technica, Lynn discusses her 'friendship' with Elvis, her series of almost-famous moments with Bob Dylan and the Stones, her positive outlook and life, and unexpectedly digs out letters from an old flame... CREDITS Presenter/Exec-Producer: Kate Hutchinson Producer: Holly Fisher Photography: Lisa Jelliffe Theme music: Pete Cunningham, Ned Pegler and Caradog Jones With thanks to Light in the Attic Records. ABOUT AUDIO-TECHNICA In 1962, with a vision of producing high-quality audio for everyone, Audio-Technica's founder Hideo Matsushita created the first truly affordable phono cartridge, the AT-1 in Shinjuku, Japan. Since then, Audio-Technica has grown into a world-renowned company devoted to Audio Excellence at every level, expanding the product range to include headphones, microphones and turntables. Audio-Technica's commitment to the user experience and their devotion to high quality design, manufacturing, marketing, and distribution has placed them at the forefront of the industry for the last 60 years. ABOUT THE LAST BOHEMIANS Journalist and broadcaster Kate Hutchinson launched The Last Bohemians in 2019, pairing the audio with stunning portraits by photographer Laura Kelly. It stole hearts with 86-year-old Molly Parkin's stories of self-pleasuring, LSD countess Amanda Feilding's trepanning tales and Pamela Des Barres' reflections on supergroupiedom. It won silver for Best New Podcast at the 2020 British Podcast Awards and was a finalist at the 2021 Audio Production Awards. Series two featured folk legend Judy Collins; British fashion icon Zandra Rhodes, dealing with the aftermath of losing her lover while celebrating 50 years in fashion; anarcho-punk innovator and illustrator Gee Vaucher; and the controversial witch at the heart of the 1970s occult boom, Maxine Sanders. In 2021, The Last Bohemians launched a lockdown special with performance artist Marina Abramović; it returned in 2022 with the UK's greatest living painter, Maggi Hambling, as well as Bowie's former best friend Dana Gillespie and theatre actor Cleo Sylvestre. thelastbohemians.co.uk patreon.com/thelastbohemians instagram.com/thelastbohemianspod twitter.com/thelastbohospod 

RNZ: The Detail
The member's bill aimed at our booze-soaked society

RNZ: The Detail

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 23:41


The multitude of ways that alcohol harms society have been well documented - but will Chlöe Swarbrick's new Bill have unpleasant side-effects?

Hunter-Gatherers Podcast
Notes From Bourbon-Soaked New Orleans

Hunter-Gatherers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 17:06


The famous "Tales of the Cocktail" mixologist & drinks gathering returned to New Orleans, and about half of Louisville showed up for the bourbon tastings. It offered a chance to explore the complicated history between HST and his home town, even with some appreciation of Knob Creek offered in the bargain. Curtis and Christopher record live from NOLA for the first time in years – yes, that's a streetcar in the background noise.

Standby Line
Episode 24: You Will Get Wet, You May Get Soaked

Standby Line

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 56:58


For the June Viewer Poll, Tim and AJ learn the true lesson today is bluebirds will gaslight you into going on a life-threatening adventure then claim they had no hand in it.Warning: This episode contains discussion of themes of slavery and racism.  Listener discretion is advised.Hosted by Tim O'Connor and AJ SalisburyCover art by @roboptera on TwitterFacebook: facebook.com/Standby-LineTwitter: twitter.com/StandbyLinePodInstagram: instagram.com/standbylinepodcastPatreon: patreon.com/standbylinepodcastEmail: standbylinepodcast@gmail.com

The Baseball Card Podcast
#019 Home Run Derby predictions - Wine soaked auction wins - and the Fab5 family road trip

The Baseball Card Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 22:06


You're not gonna believe how much money I spent the other night winning wax in an online auction?! Check out my 2022 Home Run Derby predictions. Also, please be sure that you are subscribed to the podcast, leave me a rating and a review on your podcast app, share the show with a friend... Subscribe to the YouTube channel: Bart the Ripper Follow me on TikTok: @cardripper Email me directly: bartcards24@gmail.com And, have a great day my friend!

Unlocking the Bible: Today's Key on Oneplace.com

The Book of Lamentations is a book of sorrow. Thank God that the Bible speaks to us in our pain.

Childz Play
Kidz Bop 2021 (Part 2) - Alex R. Phillips and the Curse of the Piss Soaked Blankets

Childz Play

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 64:21


We're back, and it's time to review some more Kidz Bop tunes! We catch up on the back half of KB 2021, and record in a normal location for once. In between Adam showing his massive hog and R. Alex Murray not knowing the price of drugs, we also discuss The Jonas Brothers, Dua Lipa, and even your Mamacita. Alex goes beyond the physical; Adam mocks a genre Support Our Show on Patreon Please!! If you have a second, fill out this very short survey to help us define our demographic for potential advertisers. We haven't mentioned it in a while, but it would be truly awesome of you. Also, bonus points for reading this far in the show notes.  Check out our partner shows on the Missing Sock Network! And follow the Network on Instagram too. Follow Childz Play on Instagram and Twitter, and follow R. Alex Murray right now! Check Out our Merch and Keep On Boppin!

The Ash Williams Show
Soaked Up Scones

The Ash Williams Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 20:59


We are getting it going here at 'The Ash Williams Show'. In this episode we get a voicemail from Goldy Guy, look at some geeks, go through a new TV pitch: 'Australia's Best Wig', get a red flag expert on, Jurassic Park movie review and a new business pitch. Plus your questions get answered. If you want to hear this episode early plus get BONUS EXTRA EPISODE EACH WEEK: Only on patreon.  To listen and support the show go to: patreon.com/AshWilliamsShow Follow Ash on social media @AshWilliams1 & @AshWilliamsShow Hotline: 040 55 79 500 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mysteries of the Deep
Christina Chatfield - Interpretations Vol IV - 01 Sutro (Erika's Soaked Mix)

Mysteries of the Deep

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 2:00


Mysteries is thrilled to present the long-awaited remix EP for Christina Chatfield's 2021 debut album 'Sutro' – with stunning edits from Erika & Patrick Russell – plus unreleased bonus tracks from the album. Mastered by Rafael Anton Irisarri at Black Knoll Studios, NY Album tracks mixed by Oliver Chapoy at Ohm Sweet Ohm, Brooklyn Artwork by Gabriel Benzur Worldwide Distribution: Space Cadets Limited © Mysteries of the Deep MOTDEP005, 2022 mysteriesofthedeep.net

The Commstock Report Podcast
06/22/22 Two Americas: One Parched and One Soaked.... Lets Fix That!

The Commstock Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 5:36


The Commstock Report: Wednesday, June 22nd, 2022.  To get the full report, please sign up using the link below:   https://commstock.com/membership-account/membership-levels/

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books
Rachel Signer, YOU HAD ME AT PÉT-NAT: A Natural Wine-Soaked Memoir

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 27:29


Natural wine journalist, founder of Pipette Magazine, and winemaker Rachel Signer joins Zibby to discuss her memoir, You Had Me at Pét-Nat. The two talk about how and why Rachel made the leap into writing about natural wine at a time when many had no idea what that was and the experience she had that inspired her to share her stories in Pipette. Rachel also shares how to find natural wine in your area, what it was like to write this during the pandemic with a newborn, and which genre she wants to return to after completing a memoir.Purchase on Amazon or Bookshop.Amazon: https://amzn.to/3QqbeMGBookshop: https://bit.ly/3xAP8yrSubscribe to Zibby's weekly newsletter here.Purchase Moms Don't Have Time to Read Books merch here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals
Blood-Soaked America ft. Greg Abbott, Ted Cruz and Charlton Heston (G&R 165)

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 58:00


It's a bleak outlook for America these days-- mass shootings, the end of Roe vs. Wade, inflation, culture wars and the rise of the far right. Bob and Scott take some time to talk about it. We get into the culture wars, the National Rifle Association, guns in Texas, organizing, mutual aid, direct action and the need for a real opposition. ------------------------ Outro// "Hard Times" by Baby Huey Links// The NRA celebrates in Texas before Uvalde victims are buried (https://bit.ly/3NRQFXn) A secret tape made after Columbine shows the NRA's evolution on school shootings (https://n.pr/38NqlyQ) G&R: The End of Roe vs. Wade: Reproductive Rights and Direct Action ft. Hope w/ Shutdown DC (https://apple.co/3Nhx2Yt) G&R:The End of Roe vs. Wade: Texas, Abortion and Mutual Aid ft. reporter Candice Bernd w/ Truthout (https://apple.co/3MtxCT4) Follow Green and Red// https://linktr.ee/greenandredpodcast Check out our new website: https://greenandredpodcast.org/ Join our Discord Party: https://discord.gg/dF99bJNb Donate to Green and Red Podcast// Become a recurring donor at https://www.patreon.com/greenredpodcast Or make a one time donation here: https://bit.ly/DonateGandR This is a Green and Red Podcast (@PodcastGreenRed) production. Produced by Bob (@bobbuzzanco) and Scott (@sparki1969). “Green and Red Blues" by Moody. Editing by Scott.

Monocle 24: Konfekt Korner
Sun-soaked hosting, handmade knives and tennis

Monocle 24: Konfekt Korner

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 53:14


This episode looks at the meaning behind the things we own and the craft that goes into them. We meet knife-maker Holly Loftus in her small London studio, speak to Ajiri Aki, an entrepreneur who deals in antique linens and beautiful crockery, and journalist Fleur MacDonald muses on the iconic white Airtex and green turf that signal the arrival of June's tennis season.