Podcasts about Nairobi

Capital of Kenya

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Latest podcast episodes about Nairobi

Digital Planet
What's the future of bots on Twitter?

Digital Planet

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2023 44:41


What is happening with API's, more commonly known as bots, on Twitter? The platform is set to eliminate free access to its APIs this Thursday, although there appears to have been some backtracking following announcements that bots providing “good content” will have access to the Twitter API for free. Tech writer, broadcaster and bot user and creator Kate Bevan will be on the show with the latest. The right to disconnect Kenya is the latest country to propose a new law that will block employers from interrupting their staff during their time off. The Employment Amendment Bill aims to give Kenyans “the right to disconnect in the digital age” and protect them from working out of hours, at weekends and public holidays – often for no additional pay. Nairobi based tech reporter Wairimu Gitahi is on the show. Tech that tells you when fruit is ripe Harvesting a crop at the correct time is vital to ensure higher profits for the farmer and also to reduce food waste. Reporter Rani Singh has met two entrepreneurs in India who have developed a device that checks 19 vegetable and fruits for ripeness, texture and taste – just by scanning their skin. The handheld device checks the chemical composition e.g. sugar levels of fruits and veg and can tell if there has been damage from insects or disease. The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson. Studio Manager: Michael Millham Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz (Image: Twitter headquarters in San Francisco, California Credit: David Odisho/Stringer/Getty Images)

Africa Today
Africans affected by Turkey earthquake

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 34:27


We speak to two African students living in Turkey after two devastating earthquakes killed hundreds of people there and in Syria. President Erdogan has described it as Turkey's worst disaster since 1939, while many people were also killed in war-torn northern Syria, including in areas held by rebel groups. Plus, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has held talks with Mali's ruling junta on expanding military ties between the two countries, on his third trip to Africa in six months. We get the verdict of the opposition M5-RFP coalition. And content moderator who worked in Facebook parent company Meta's Nairobi office wins the right to sue the social media giant in a Kenyan court. We look at why it's a landmark case for the continent.

MedxTek Africa
Ep30 - Equipping primary healthcare providers with essential digital tools

MedxTek Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2023 22:24


Ilara Health, located in Nairobi, is a leading provider of medical products and solutions aimed at enhancing patient, clinical, and economic outcomes through the use of technology. The company supplies low-cost, modern diagnostic devices to primary care providers in under-served rural and peri-urban areas, where access to common diagnostic tools is limited. Their proprietary software integrates all of the devices they distribute, enabling healthcare professionals to offer effective patient management. In this episode, Maximilian Mancini, co-founder and Chief Strategy Officer of Ilara Health, shares the company's vision and progress to date. Learn more about Ilara Health by visiting: http://www.ilarahealth.com/ MedxTek Africa is produced and hosted by Dr Sam Oti, and co-edited by Veronica Ojiambo. This episode also features Veronica as co-host. If you have any thoughts on this episode, or recommendations of African health innovators that you'd like us to host on the show, please reach out directly by email: sam.oti@alumni.harvard.edu or find us on Twitter or LinkedIn. Please note that the MedxTek Africa Podcast is distinct from Dr. Oti's role as a Senior Program Specialist at Canada's International Development Research Centre. The information provided in this podcast is not medical advice, nor should it be construed or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The MedxTek Africa Podcast, its production team, guests and partners assume no liability for the application of the podcast's content.

Africa Daily
Why is mental health often misunderstood?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2023 14:44


Today's guest on Africa Daily is a young woman who seemed to have it all. Noella got a job as a reporter with a local TV station in Nairobi – and then, around six years ago, she got a scholarship to study filmmaking in the US. But then she had her first manic episode and woke up in a psychiatric ward in North Carolina. She was told she had unspecified bipolar – but didn't understand what it meant and how it would change her life. Now she's made a film for BBC Africa Eye called ‘What is Eating My Mind' to try and help others in a similar situation. She spoke to Mpho Lakaje about her experiences.

The Mics Are Open
#156 - Baba Doesn't Love Gor Mahia!! - The Wheneversode

The Mics Are Open

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 27:30


A cross continental edition of the pod today. Ugo is visiting from Lagos and we compare and contrast life between Lagos and Nairobi! Plus how could Baba hold a rally on the day we played AFC Leopards LOL!! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conrad-gray4/support

COMPOUND
Shamba MRV Network & Ecological Oracle | Kennedy Ng'ang'a | Gitcoin Climate Solutions

COMPOUND

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 27:46


Please meet Kennedy Ng'ang'a, Founder & CEO of Shamba, the Ecological Data Oracle & MRV Network. Based out of Nairobi, Kenya, Shamba is an ecological data oracle and Decentralized Monitoring, Reporting & Verification (dMRV) Network. Shamba is building a decentralized #MRV network to power #regenerativefinance (ReFi) and provides affordable MRV powered by web3. Their MRV solution enables smallholders to create carbon credits on their farms irrespective of their size. https://shamba.network/ This episode is part of the Gitcoin Climate Series. Gitcoin is matching $333,000 for #climate as part of the Gitcoin Alpha Round. Please support the project by going to gitcoin.basin.global and adding all grants to your "ballot". Every donation helps no matter how small. With quadratic funding, it is not the $ amount that matters, it is the # of donors. Support your favorite climate project today! This episode is brought to you by .basin which is perpetual place-based climate and nature finance. .basin scales land, ecosystem, and carbon sink restoration and conservation to solve the climate, nature, and carbon crises. In This Episode: 00:03 Gitcoin Climate Solutions 00:36 (chapters forthcoming)

Limitless Africa
How can Africans get their voices heard in international institutions? RE-RELEASE

Limitless Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 14:58


Historically Africans have not been well represented in international institutions. This is a problem: these organizations are key to tackling things like climate change and Covid-19.But with a Nigerian leading the World Trade Organization and an Ethiopian heading the World Health Organization, that could be changing. But is this happening fast enough? How can Africans make sure their voices are heard on the world stage? Pedro Matos has worked for the United Nation and the World Food Programme for well over a decade. He was part of the team which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2020 and he was working till recently in Sudan, delivering food and assistance to over six million people. Mutemi Wa Kiama is an activist from Nairobi, Kenya. He's known for campaigning against aid in the shape of international loans. Dr Oby Ezekwesili is a former Education minister in the Nigerian government and a former Vice President of the World Bank (Africa Region). She was also the co-founder of the #BringBackOurGirls movement.Made possible with a grant from the U.S. Department of State and the Seenfire Foundation. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

DevTalles
100- Flutter Forward

DevTalles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023 31:54


Este es un resumen de las impresiones que tuve con el evento de Flutter Forward que tomó lugar en Nairobi, Kenya el 25 de enero del 2023. Hubo muchas cosas interesantes como otras que faltaron, pero aquí un resumen de lo que a mí me pareció Flutter Forward. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fernando-her85/support

Nooit meer slapen
Tom Waes (presentator)

Nooit meer slapen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 52:50


Tom Waes is presentator. In Reizen Waes doet hij landen en plekken aan die de gemiddelde toerist links laat liggen. Van Bhutan tot Transnistrië, van Noord-Korea tot Zuid-Soedan en van Alaska tot Tuvalu. In de nieuwste reeks gaat hij wereldsteden af, zo bezoekt hij onder andere Mumbai en Nairobi. Femke van der Laan ging met Tom Waes in gesprek.

Josiah's Voice
Create in Every Medium You Want

Josiah's Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 74:01


Khavaya Shirao of Nairobi, Kenya writes poems, short novels, screenplays, models, directs photography shoots, and more. She personifies the artist, the storyteller, and the griot of African lore in every way and with curiosity and exuberance. In today's interview, we discuss her creative process and the lessons learned along the way that can help us all explore our artistry and imaginations. We hope you enjoy! Follow the show on Instagram @josiahsvoicepod #JosiahsVoicePodcast. Connect with Khavaya Shirao on Instagram: @khavaya_shirao. BLOG: Episode Notes. Theme Song: BREWERB. by MuhTeyOh. This episode is sponsored by Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. HTTP://anchor.fm/app. Listen to this episode at www.newsly.me or download the app on IOS or ANDROID. For a Free 1 Month subscription use my PROMO CODE: JosiahVoice. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/josiahsvoiceonblackfilm/message

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
Những con chuột tìm bệnh cứu người

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 5:20


Năm Mèo nói chuyện chuột, tuy nhiên không phải là mèo bắt chuột mà là những con chuột được xem như anh hùng ở Châu Phi. Trong các phòng thí nghiệm ở Tanzania và Nairobi, chuột đã được huấn luyện để đánh hơi bệnh lao. Vốn được biết đến với khả năng rà tìm mìn, loài gặm nhấm này giờ đây có thể thay đổi cách phát hiện bệnh.

The_C.O.W.S.
The C. O. W. S. w/ Nairobi Thompson: Almost British No. 3 #StephenLawrence

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023


The C.O.W.S. (Context of White Supremacy) Radio Program welcomes the return of Nairobi Thompson live from the United Kingdom. A writer, poet and learning and development specialist, Ms. Thompson is a versatile communicator and facilitator with a rare ability to challenge and entertain professional and artistic audiences. She's been gracious enough to visit with us twice the last 2 months to discuss the re-release of her memoir, Almost British: Re-Visited, which gives detailed account of years of deliberate White Supremacist abuse from mostly White Women in British Prison service. Since our last exchange, the Metropolitan Police Department acknowledged that former officer David Carrick brandished a badge while being a serial rapist for years. The MET is reportedly investigating approximately 1,000 officers for possible sexual misconduct. We'll ask Ms. Thompson to relate this revelation to her experience in the prison service - where she was nicknamed Madam "Kinky Boots" by her White male co-workers. We also explore Ms. Thompson's candid admissions about how the torrent of Racist abuse compromised her mental health. Panic attacks, dizzy spells, nightmares... and thinking that she was just being paranoid trying to blame everything on Racism. We also analyze the 1993 White Supremacist killing of 17-year-old Stephen Lawrence as well as the 2000 prison death of Zahid Mubarek, a non-white (Pakistani) male who was killed by a White Supremacist cell mate. The Race Soldier planned his attack and compared himself to US serial killer Charles Manson. #StephenLawrence #TheCOWS13 INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 605.313.5164 CODE 564943#

SBS World News Radio
Hero rats could help detect tuberculosis

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 5:20


In laboratories in Tanzania and Nairobi, rats have been trained to sniff out tuberculosis. Already known for finding land mines, the rodents could now transform the way the disease is detected.

The Mics Are Open
#154 - Every One In Nairobi Is Fake!! - The Wheneversode

The Mics Are Open

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 16:43


Are there any genuine people left in Nairobi. Everyone is bougie without knowing why? Special Guest is Eli Mwenda --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conrad-gray4/support

The Nonlinear Library
EA - EA Organization Updates: January 2023 by Lizka

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 18:10


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: EA Organization Updates: January 2023, published by Lizka on January 16, 2023 on The Effective Altruism Forum. These monthly posts originated as the "Updates" section of the EA Newsletter. Organizations submit their own updates, which we edit for clarity. Job listings that these organizations highlighted (as well as a couple of other impactful jobs) are at the top of this post. Some of the jobs have pressing deadlines. You can see previous updates on the "EA Organization Updates (monthly series)" topic page, or in our repository of past newsletters. Notice that there's also an “org update” tag, where you can find more news and updates that are not part of this consolidated series. The organizations are in alphabetical order, starting with L-Z, 0-A-K. Job listings Consider also exploring jobs listed on “Job listing (open).” GiveWell Senior Researcher (Remote / Oakland, CA, $181,400 - $199,800) Senior Research Associate (Remote / Oakland, CA, $127,000 - $139,900) Content Editor (Remote / Oakland, CA, $83,500 - $91,900) Global Priorities Institute Operations Coordinator (Maternity Cover) (Oxford, £29,614 - £35,326, apply by 24 January) IDinsight 2023 Associate & Senior Associate Global Drive (Multiple locations) Technical Delivery Manager/Director (New Delhi, India or Nairobi, Kenya) Associate Product Manager (New Delhi, India or Nairobi, Kenya) Open Philanthropy Assorted jobs in Salesforce administration, operations, and recruiting (Remote; working hours must overlap with US hours for most roles. Salary range $84,303 - $127,021 across all jobs) Rethink Priorities Board Member (Remote, voluntary roles entail 3-10 hours/month while paid roles require 5-10 hours/week at a rate of $40.53/hour, apply by 20 January) Wild Animal Initiative Development Director (Remote, US preferred, open to UK applicants, $82,020 - $100,247, apply by 23 January) Organizational updates These are in alphabetical order, starting with L-Z, 0-A-K. Legal Priorities Project LPP's Eric Martínez and Christoph Winter published a new working paper titled “Ordinary meaning of existential risk” investigating the ordinary meaning of legally relevant concepts in the existential risk literature. The paper aims to provide crucial insights for those tasked with drafting and interpreting existential risk laws, and for the coherence of ordinary meaning analysis more generally. José Villalobos and Christoph Winter participated in EAGxLatinAmerica. They hosted a Q&A on international law and existential risk. Matthijs Maas published a blog post titled “Existential risk mitigation: What I worry about when there are only bad options” as part of Draft Amnesty Day. LPP received a grant of $115,000 from the Survival and Flourishing Fund to support their general operations. One for the World One for the World mirrors the recommendations made by GiveWell for their own Nonprofit Partners portfolio. This year, GiveWell has updated its portfolio to contain a smaller list of nonprofits than before. In practice, this means that their Nonprofit Partners list has temporarily become much smaller, containing just four individual nonprofits. These nonprofits continue to offer gold-standard evidence that their method works and is incredibly cost-effective: Against Malaria Foundation, Malaria Consortium, New Incentives, and Helen Keller International. They are also adding a new option upon taking the 1% Pledge, which is GiveWell's new All Grants Fund. This Fund will continue to make higher-risk grants, potentially including grants to nonprofits removed from GiveWell's recommended nonprofits list. One for the World therefore thinks this gives donors the best chance to continue supporting a wider variety of granting opportunities. Open Philanthropy Open Philanthropy pre-announced its AI Worldviews Contest, which will launch in early 20...

Modern Minorities
Naaz Khan's (Room) for Everyone

Modern Minorities

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 65:18


“So here we are foreign enough to be foreign at home, home enough to be home in the foreign. I have come to see when I am at home in my heart, I am always enough for everywhere.” Naaz Khan is an educator, writer, and life long learner with a background in refugee education, curriculum development, and interfaith dialogue. Naaz's debut children's book moved us when we first discovered it, so were excited to have the opportunity to have a chat with her on the pod. Through beautiful illustrations and entertaining rhymes, you'll find yourself falling in love with the journey of others in a far off land depicted in Room for Everyone Naaz currently lives in Washington DC. but has lived all over the world — including Jubail, Cairo, Nairobi, Bangalore, Berkeley, San Diego, and New York. Naaz works as an education coordinator at An Open Book Foundation, a literacy organization that connects young people in the DC area with authors, illustrators and books. Naaz is also part of Reading Is Fundamental (RIF), the nation's leading champion for children's literacy — which recently launched it's second annual Rally to Read 100 — which runs thru the end of March — designed to motivate children to read, starting with a pledge to read 100 books. You can learn more @ RallytoRead.org LEARN ABOUT NAAZ Naazkhan.org instagram.com/naazhkhan BOOK: Room For Everyone - goodreads.com/en/book/show/56980329-room-for-everyone This episode is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, who's encouraging you and your community to make sure you've got your updated COVID-19 Vaccines. We can do this,. Find updated vaccines near you @ VACCINES.gov Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Afrobeats Intelligence
#S2E6: AV — Benin Boy, Lagos Star

Afrobeats Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 65:50


Adindu Victor, popularly known as AV, is a singer and songwriter who comes from a music and entertainment enthusiastic family, ‘the Adindu's'. With a late guitarist father, and years of leading a dance group in Benin, the Nigerian star moved to Lagos to see the lights, cameras and the crowd going wild.Find Afrobeats Inteliigence Newsletters here: https://afrobeatsintelligence.substac...Stay connected with Afrobeats Intelligence here: Sign up for our audio podcasts here!http://afrobeatsintelligence.podlink....Website: https://afrobeatsintelligence.substac...Instagram: http://Instagram.com/AfrobeatsIntel (Follow) Twitter: http://twitter.com/AfrobeatsIntel (Follow) Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Afrobeats Intelligence (Like) TikTok: Afrobeats IntelligenceAbout Afrobeats Intelligence :Afrobeats Intelligence Podcast is a podcast spin-off of the popular music newsletter, Afrobeats Intelligence. It's focused on African music and the sprawling ecosystem that inspires and supports creativity from Lagos, Accra, Nairobi, Johannesburg, and more. Hosted by multi-award-winning music journalist Joey Akan, the podcast explores the intersection of art, humanity and processes that give birth to African sonic excellence. Expansive interviews, the most informed and diverse views, and a snapshot into the soul of an industry pushing for global success. We dig into the past, the present and the future, democratizing the core of African music.Beyonce, Rihanna, Lil Yachty, Kendrick Lamar, Kanye West, Solange, and many more.

The Fifth Floor
Why Kenyan pupils are burning schools

The Fifth Floor

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 41:14


Why are students in Kenya burning their boarding schools? That was the question that inspired BBC Africa reporter Ashley Lime in the Nairobi bureau to investigate these sometimes deadly arson attacks which escalated after the covid pandemic. She spoke to students, relatives of teenagers who died in the fires and experts to better understand this decades old problem. Russian 'Old New Year' After the 1917 Bolshevik revolution in Russia, the calendar and date of the official New Year changed from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian. But some people still choose to celebrate the 'Old New Year' which falls on the 14th January. Julia James of BBC Russian tells us how those Russians celebrate. Brazil: flags and nationalism The design of the Brazilian flag is supposed to represent the unity of the country, but in recent years the flag has become more associated with supporters of the previous president, Jair Bolsonaro. BBC Brasil's Ricardo Senra explains the polarisation of Brazil's flag. Where are pandemic Bali farmers now? Tourism is Bali's main industry so when covid struck many people lost their jobs and returned to their home villages. In Tembok in northern Bali a local scheme sponsored many to go into farming, so what's happened to those 'covid farmers' now tourism's resumed? BBC Indonesian's Valdya Baraputri found out. Afghan women fight for education Since the Taliban retook power in Afghanistan in August 2021 women's education has been dramatically curtailed. Secondary schools closed to women in March, and in December that ban was extended to university. Aalia Farzan is a journalist for BBC Dari who's been hearing about their experiences of protesting and imprisonment. (Photo: People attend the requiem mass for nine young girls who died in the Moi Girls School dormitory fire, in Nairobi on September 14, 2017. Credit: Simon Maina/AFP via Getty Images)

Arroe Collins
Joe Yogerst Releases The Book 100 Cities 5000 Ideas

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 9:03


This informative travel guide takes you from skyscraper filled concrete jungles to coastal urban oases. You'll find hot tips for the best sights, bites, museums and more for each location, as well as practical planning advice for when to go and what to expect when you arrive. And there's something in these pages for every traveler: history buff, art lover, foodie, beach bum, or anyone in between. Take a dim sum tour through San Francisco's Chinatown, ride a bullet train from Tokyo to Kyoto to capture two of Japan's best cities in one vacation, discover the hidden historical gems in bustling Mumbai; bathe in the sun on Sydney's beaches; temple hop your way through Bangkok and shop its floating markets; stand on the edge of the world in Ushuaia, Argentina, the world's southernmost city; take a walk through art history in Florence, or go on an urban safari in Nairobi. Filled with expert tips, bonus side trip suggestions, and tons of innovative activities, this is an inspirational and practical keepsake for any kind of globetrotter.

Arroe Collins
Joe Yogerst Releases The Book 100 Cities 5000 Ideas

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 9:03


This informative travel guide takes you from skyscraper filled concrete jungles to coastal urban oases. You'll find hot tips for the best sights, bites, museums and more for each location, as well as practical planning advice for when to go and what to expect when you arrive. And there's something in these pages for every traveler: history buff, art lover, foodie, beach bum, or anyone in between. Take a dim sum tour through San Francisco's Chinatown, ride a bullet train from Tokyo to Kyoto to capture two of Japan's best cities in one vacation, discover the hidden historical gems in bustling Mumbai; bathe in the sun on Sydney's beaches; temple hop your way through Bangkok and shop its floating markets; stand on the edge of the world in Ushuaia, Argentina, the world's southernmost city; take a walk through art history in Florence, or go on an urban safari in Nairobi. Filled with expert tips, bonus side trip suggestions, and tons of innovative activities, this is an inspirational and practical keepsake for any kind of globetrotter.

The Social Change Career Podcast
E13S9: Confessions of a Headhunter: Impact Job Search Strategies for the 21st Century

The Social Change Career Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 55:50


In Episode 13 of Season 9 learn from innovator, founder and social entrepreneur Paul Breloff. Paul has been working in the social impact sector for over 2 decades in a variety of innovative roles including currently as CEO and Co-Founder of Shortlist, a leading search, recruiting and upskilling startup connecting impact talent to opportunity across Africa and beyond.  Paul shares his rich experience and insights from developing and recruiting talent for a wide variety of regional and global social impact organizations. He discusses tips for how to work with headhunters, explore what are the key skills in demand, how the world of work is changing across Africa and his suggestions for candidates to be more competitive in their job searches. In addition, he highlights his lessons from working at the intersection of development, investment, startups and the global change industry for over two decades. For those seeking to scale innovative solutions to local and regional challenge, Paul will shares unique lessons from his work across a wide range of roles and the ups and downs (as well as maintaining one's well-being) in the impact world.  Paul is the Co-Founder and CEO of Shortlist, a talent advisory and executive search firm working across Africa and India. Since its founding in 2016, Shortlist has worked with 1,000+ companies and 1,800,000+ jobseekers across 30 countries. Before Shortlist, Paul was the Founder and Managing Director of Accion Venture Lab, a VC fund investing in inclusive fintech startups globally, and head of business development for SKS Microfinance in Hyderabad. He has also been a corporate lawyer and advertising account executive, and advises several startups and investment funds in Africa. He lives in Nairobi, Kenya.   This session is supported by the Rotary Peace Fellowship, a fully-funded master's degree or certificate in peace and development studies. 

Africa Daily
Why aren't second hand trucks welcome in Kenya?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 18:46


If you've ever been stuck in Nairobi traffic, you'll know that the emissions from cars and trucks is no joke. According to the World Health Organisation, air pollution contributes to 18,000 deaths per year in Kenya. The government is taking the issue seriously and has set targets to cut emissions by 2030. First on their hit list are older trucks, which are thought to be significantly worse polluters. The government has banned the import of trucks older than three years. And by the summer importing second hand trucks will be banned all together. So, can it help bring air pollution down? #AfricaDaily

The Radio Vagabond
248 SAUDI ARABIA: Discovering the Unique Charm of Riyadh

The Radio Vagabond

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 33:08


مرحبا بكم في المملكة العربية السعودية Join us as we explore the stunning landscapes, rich culture, and fascinating history of KSA. From the towering sand dunes where we get stuck many times to the vibrant cities of Riyadh and Jeddah, and literally to the Edge of the World (yes, that is the name of a place in this country), I'll take you on a journey driving more than 4,000 km through one of the most misunderstood and least-visited countries in the world. Along the way, we'll meet some locals and experts who will share their insights and experiences, and delve into the customs, traditions, and daily life of the Saudi people. This is the first of many episodes from KSA, where we explore the capital, Riyadh and go quad biking in the Red Sand Dunes – after a struggle to catch the flight from Dubai. Road tripping with “Cynthia Globe” I'm travelling to Saudi Arabia with my good friend, Cynthia. She is a lawyer, a CouchSurfing Ambassador, and a big-time traveller – and calls herself “Cynthia Globe”. When I met her in her home state, Florida, I did an interview with her. We got along so well, that we ended our meeting with talking about going on a trip together. Maybe doing a “2.0 in Nairobi”. Fast forward just four months we meet again on the other side of the planet in Dubai. We are there because we booked a cruise going from Dubai to Cape Town, via Seychelles, Reunion, Madagascar, and a few other places. All in all, a cool cruise. But then the Omicron Variant of the Corona Virus was discovered in South Africa. It didn't come from there; the South African scientists were just the first to find it. I guess they were just smarter than in other countries. Nevertheless, the whole southern part of Africa was hit by travel restrictions, and we had a feeling that it would affect our cruise. But Norwegian Cruise Line didn't say anything about this. We heard several rumours of changes, but nothing from NCL. They didn't even change it on their website, and just for fun, I tried calling them one day, to see if they were still selling it. And they were. Then as I was on my flight to Dubai a few days before departure, I got an email saying that it was cancelled. I did get all my money back and even a 25% discount on my next cruise, but still. They could have told us a long time before. Cynthia was also on her way to Dubai, and we ended up spending a few weeks there, and even spent several days going to the World Expo that was held in Dubai at the time. At the same time, we were discussing where to go. We were seconds away from booking a flight to Kenya – and actually doing the 2.0 in Nairobi. But then Cynthia said: “Hey, why don't we go to Saudi Arabia”. And so, we did. But before we get there, we had to go through a stressful day in Dubai Airport. Stressful day in Dubai Airport We flew "FlyADeal" for 2 hours to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from Dubai. It was not much of a "deal" at 364 USD/340 EUR. Plus, the service was very poor, even for budget airlines. We waited in line at check-in for 15 minutes and found out that we were in the Saudi national's line. We then switched to a big line, and it hardly moved. We stood in that line for 2.5 hours (!!) to finally get checked in. There are lots of steps to entering Saudi: VISA (which was very hard to get until a few years ago), a Covid test, register your visa and covid test, print these first three requirements, and download a special monitoring app, that we needed to enter shops, restaurants, and other places in the country. Cynthia's app didn't work for four days, but she used her vaccine card or showed the app – and was never denied entry even without the QR identifier, that didn't work. She had done her registration and printed it but back at the airport at check-in, the gate agent said it wasn't right, as there was no QR code. She didn't know there was another step to the ones she had done; it was tense at the airport as she was doing the final step there at the check-in counter – with many people behind us in the line. The Gate Agent said there was no rush, as the flight was late due to check-in not being completed. When we asked, “for how long”, they didn't know. You would think that someone could have called the check-in people, so they could inform the stressful passengers. We also asked if we were able to make it in time for the flight – now that check-in was so slow. And all they said was “we will try…” So, once we finally got our boarding passes, we sprinted through the airport, arriving at the gate at 10:29 for the 10:30 am flight. On the plane, Cynthia was upgraded to the “Ladies Only Row” with a Saudi Mom and her four Daughters. “They were so sweet to me – helped me store my bag, travel tips; and when they thought I was cold: they wrapped me up in a black fur coat.” She also says that this was a wonderful encounter with Saudi women – we would soon find out that Saudi's are warm, welcoming, polite and enjoy meeting foreigners. Yes, flight delayed The flight took off 1.25 hours late. The pilot apologized twice with a lame excuse: "We are delayed 15 minutes as a passenger forgot a bag at security; it is out of our control." Ahhh, what about the extra 1 hour, as check-in took 2.5 hours?! We finally arrived in Saudi Arabia or “KSA” – the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia as it's officially called. The Riyadh Metro On the first day, we decided to take the metro to the center, but when we got to the station, we discovered that it's so new that it wasn't running yet. I even asked our Airbnb host if it was close to the Metro station, and he just said, “yes, it's very close”. Not “but it's not working yet”. Who needs a Metro that isn't working? Since we were there the Metro in Riyadh should be running – or at least most of it. It will have six lines that serve the city and its suburbs and is designed to help avoid traffic congestion and improve mobility in the city. The Riyadh Metro has a total length of 176 kilometres (109 miles) and serves 85 stations. It's fully automated and features state-of-the-art trains and stations, and is equipped with advanced security and safety systems. The metro system is also accessible to people with disabilities, and then it's eco-friendly. The stations come with solar cells that will contribute to 20 percent of the entire station's energy. The service once up and running will contribute to the decrease of nearly 250,000 car journeys a day, thereby reducing the city's fuel requirement of 400,000 litres. A project like that isn't cheap: Around 22.5 billion US dollars or 21 billion Euros. But that's possible when money's not an issue. Saudi Arabia's 2030 All of this is a part of Saudi Arabia's 2030 plan also known as Vision 2030. It was launched in April 2016 by the Saudi Arabian Government as a program aimed at transforming the country into not being so dependent on oil export in the future. Here are some of the key goals: Diversification of the economy The plan aims to reduce the country's reliance on oil exports and encourage the growth of non-oil sectors such as manufacturing, tourism, and small and medium enterprises. Job creation The plan aims to create more than 3 million new jobs for Saudi citizens by 2030. Social and cultural development The plan aims to improve the quality of life for Saudi citizens by investing in education, healthcare, and cultural initiatives. Infrastructure development The plan includes investments in transportation (like the new Metro system in Riyadh), energy, water, and telecommunications infrastructure to support economic growth and development. Environmental sustainability The plan aims to reduce the country's carbon footprint and increase its use of renewable energy sources. Open to tourists And then the big one for someone like me: Saudi Arabia began welcoming tourists in September 2019, also as part of its 2030 plan. Tourism is seen as a key growth sector in Saudi Arabia. It can generate significant economic benefits, including jobs, tax revenues, and foreign exchange earnings. By attracting more tourists, Saudi Arabia hope to diversify its economy and reduce its reliance on oil exports. It's also in the plan that tourism also can contribute to cultural exchange and understanding between different countries and regions. They feel that by welcoming visitors from around the world, Saudi Arabia can promote its culture and traditions and learn from other cultures. Overall, the decision to open up to tourists is part of Saudi Arabia's broader efforts to transform itself into a more diversified and innovative economy, and to create a more prosperous and dynamic society. To transform Saudi Arabia into a global hub for trade and commerce, and to create a more prosperous and dynamic society. Renting a car and two quad bikes To see Saudi, a car is a must, so the next day, we picked up a rental car for the next 10 days at a place called Hanco at the Riyadh airport. It was 31 USD (29 EUR) per day, so definitely not too bad. Then we drove about an hour from Riyadh to the Al-Dahna desert. We came here to drive Quad Bikes in the famous and dramatic Red Sand Dunes. After talking to two vendors and doing a bit of bargaining for the 1-hour rental, we rented a Quad Bike each. These sand dunes are formed from fine, red sand that has been blown by the wind over the years, creating towering mounds that can reach up to 100 feet in height. The terrain is rough and rugged, with steep inclines and sudden drops that can be challenging to navigate. Except for when we got stuck, it was totally fun. We were at the far end of the Dunes looking for a route back when our vendor came out to find us. FACTS ABOUT RIYADH Riyadh is the capital city of Saudi Arabia and is home to over 7 million people. The city was founded in the early 18th century and has a rich history that can be seen in the many historical landmarks and museums scattered throughout the city. The Masmak Fortress, a historic castle located in the heart of the city, played a crucial role in the founding of modern-day Saudi Arabia and is a popular tourist attraction. The city is known for its vibrant nightlife and has a thriving arts and culture scene, with numerous galleries, theaters, and music venues to explore. Riyadh is also home to some of the world's most luxurious and exclusive hotels, including the Ritz-Carlton and the Four Seasons, which offer breathtaking views of the city and surrounding desert landscape. The city is also home to many world-class shopping malls, including the Kingdom Centre, which features a rooftop skybridge that offers panoramic views of the city. Riyadh has a number of world-class sports facilities, including the King Fahd International Stadium, which is one of the largest football stadiums in the world and has a seating capacity of over 75,000. One that would be put into good use if they win the bid to host the 2030 FIFA World Cup. Stuck in Traffic At 3 pm, we started the drive back in to Riyadh because Ali, one of Cynthia's CouchSurfing friends was leading a walking tour, and we wanted to join in. But that didn't go as planned. We got the outskirts of the city just in time for the glorious rush hour. One of the main challenges of driving during rush hour in Riyadh is that there are so many cars trying to get ahead at the same time, not always sticking to their lanes. It is definitely not for the faint at heart and a challenging experience, especially for those who are not used to heavy traffic or driving in busy cities. We were already getting late for our appointment for the walking tour with Ali, and then we had another challenge. Finding a place to park. We finally did find one and met for a quick chat with Ali, for just a few minutes. Sunset at Nabd Al Riyadh Then, we strolled the exterior of the Palace Museum, Fort and an Original City Gate and ended up in "Nabd Al Riyadh," an outdoor courtyard area with coffee shops, live music, and a chalk-art artist. It's a peaceful and pleasant spot to end our day and with a local performer in the background and the sun setting over Riyadh, we sat down and reflected on an adventurous day. Much more from Saudi Arabia In the next episode, we literally go to the Edge of The World. But there's much more in that episode /next Tuesday). You'll get the full travel versions of The Radio Vagabond like this one on Tuesdays (let's call it “Travel Tuesday”), and then Flashback episodes every Friday and the ten-minute diary entry from where I am right now every Saturday. But there's more: Sometimes, you'll get a short one about the country we're covering in the travel episodes on Thursdays. And this week I have one for you. Having listened to this episode, you might think that I'm painting a rosy picture of Saudi Arabia. And yes, I did like it. But not all is perfect, they still have some challenges in my eyes; so, on Thursday I'll give you an episode, that I call “The Good and The Bad about Saudi Arabia”. Here I'll share what I think is good about Saudi Arabia and also what I think is not so great. If you like what you hear, please tell a friend about The Radio Vagabond. My name is Palle Bo, and I gotta keep moving. See you. Poem about this episode – written by an AI The Radio Vagabond, Palle Bo, Took a trip to Saudi Arabia with his friend, Cynthia. A CouchSurfing Ambassador, and a big-time traveler, She calls herself "Cynthia Globe," and she's quite the explorer. They caught a flight from Dubai, but not without a fight, And soon they found themselves exploring the city of Riyadh at night. Quad biking through the Red Sand Dunes, they got stuck in the sand, But they had a lot of fun and made the most of their planned Adventure, even if it didn't go quite as planned. But then they hit some traffic, causing them to arrive At Nabd Al Riyadh, an outdoor courtyard to their delight, Where coffee shops, live music, and chalk-art artists ignite Their senses and keep them entertained until the morning light. In the next episode of this podcast, they set out to see The Edge of The World, where they meet many camels, wild and free. The Radio Vagabond continue to travel and explore this land of gold.

IRISE RAGE
S6E6 - Research Practicum: Learning while Unlearning in Africa

IRISE RAGE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 13:29


Host of The R.A.G.E. Podcast, Micaela Parker, discusses her practicum experience in Nairobi, Kenya. In this episode, Micaela chronologically recalls her life while living in Kenya over the winter break. Micaela was honored with the opportunity to conduct incredible research, learn about the history of Kenya, and unlearn the colonial perceptions of the African context. Resources The RAGE Website: theragepodcast.com The African Center DU: korbel.du.edu/regional-studies/content/icrs-africa-program Students for Africa: korbel.du.edu/regional-studies/content/icrs-africa-student-resources DU Health & Counseling Center: studentaffairs.du.edu/health-counseling-center Crimson Connect: crimsonconnect.du.edu/home_login

Radiovagabond med Palle Bo fra rejse hele verden rundt
296 SAUDI ARABIEN: Velkommen til charmerend Riyadh

Radiovagabond med Palle Bo fra rejse hele verden rundt

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 33:47


Nu kun på engelsk Dette er den danske udgave af Radiovagabond. Hvis du har været med længe, så vil du vide, at jeg normalt laver både en dansk og en engelsk udgave af podcasten. Og når der nu altid har været en hel del på engelsk, så går jeg ud fra, at du forstår engelsk. Men jeg har alligevel altid indtalt en hel del på dansk – og oversat blog post til dansk. Og det tager tid. I forvejen bruger jeg 3-4 fulde arbejdsdage på en enkelt episode, og jeg har valgt, at det er mere vigtigt at producere flere nye episoder end også at lave den danske version. Jeg håber, at det er okay med dig. Og jeg vil meget gerne høre fra dig, hvad du synes.   مرحبا بكم في المملكة العربية السعودية Join us as we explore the stunning landscapes, rich culture, and fascinating history of KSA. From the towering sand dunes where we get stuck many times to the vibrant cities of Riyadh and Jeddah, and literally to the Edge of the World (yes, that is the name of a place in this country), I'll take you on a journey driving more than 4,000 km through one of the most misunderstood and least-visited countries in the world. Along the way, we'll meet some locals and experts who will share their insights and experiences, and delve into the customs, traditions, and daily life of the Saudi people. This is the first of many episodes from KSA, where we explore the capital, Riyadh and go quad biking in the Red Sand Dunes – after a struggle to catch the flight from Dubai. Road tripping with “Cynthia Globe” I'm travelling to Saudi Arabia with my good friend, Cynthia. She is a lawyer, a CouchSurfing Ambassador, and a big-time traveller – and calls herself “Cynthia Globe”. When I met her in her home state, Florida, I did an interview with her. We got along so well, that we ended our meeting with talking about going on a trip together. Maybe doing a “2.0 in Nairobi”. Fast forward just four months we meet again on the other side of the planet in Dubai. We are there because we booked a cruise going from Dubai to Cape Town, via Seychelles, Reunion, Madagascar, and a few other places. All in all, a cool cruise. But then the Omicron Variant of the Corona Virus was discovered in South Africa. It didn't come from there; the South African scientists were just the first to find it. I guess they were just smarter than in other countries. Nevertheless, the whole southern part of Africa was hit by travel restrictions, and we had a feeling that it would affect our cruise. But Norwegian Cruise Line didn't say anything about this. We heard several rumours of changes, but nothing from NCL. They didn't even change it on their website, and just for fun, I tried calling them one day, to see if they were still selling it. And they were. Then as I was on my flight to Dubai a few days before departure, I got an email saying that it was cancelled. I did get all my money back and even a 25% discount on my next cruise, but still. They could have told us a long time before. Cynthia was also on her way to Dubai, and we ended up spending a few weeks there, and even spent several days going to the World Expo that was held in Dubai at the time. At the same time, we were discussing where to go. We were seconds away from booking a flight to Kenya – and actually doing the 2.0 in Nairobi. But then Cynthia said: “Hey, why don't we go to Saudi Arabia”. And so, we did. But before we get there, we had to go through a stressful day in Dubai Airport. Stressful day in Dubai Airport We flew "FlyADeal" for 2 hours to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from Dubai. It was not much of a "deal" at 364 USD/340 EUR. Plus, the service was very poor, even for budget airlines. We waited in line at check-in for 15 minutes and found out that we were in the Saudi national's line. We then switched to a big line, and it hardly moved. We stood in that line for 2.5 hours (!!) to finally get checked in. There are lots of steps to entering Saudi: VISA (which was very hard to get until a few years ago), a Covid test, register your visa and covid test, print these first three requirements, and download a special monitoring app, that we needed to enter shops, restaurants, and other places in the country. Cynthia's app didn't work for four days, but she used her vaccine card or showed the app – and was never denied entry even without the QR identifier, that didn't work. She had done her registration and printed it but back at the airport at check-in, the gate agent said it wasn't right, as there was no QR code. She didn't know there was another step to the ones she had done; it was tense at the airport as she was doing the final step there at the check-in counter – with many people behind us in the line. The Gate Agent said there was no rush, as the flight was late due to check-in not being completed. When we asked, “for how long”, they didn't know. You would think that someone could have called the check-in people, so they could inform the stressful passengers. We also asked if we were able to make it in time for the flight – now that check-in was so slow. And all they said was “we will try…” So, once we finally got our boarding passes, we sprinted through the airport, arriving at the gate at 10:29 for the 10:30 am flight. On the plane, Cynthia was upgraded to the “Ladies Only Row” with a Saudi Mom and her four Daughters. “They were so sweet to me – helped me store my bag, travel tips; and when they thought I was cold: they wrapped me up in a black fur coat.” She also says that this was a wonderful encounter with Saudi women – we would soon find out that Saudi's are warm, welcoming, polite and enjoy meeting foreigners. Yes, flight delayed The flight took off 1.25 hours late. The pilot apologized twice with a lame excuse: "We are delayed 15 minutes as a passenger forgot a bag at security; it is out of our control." Ahhh, what about the extra 1 hour, as check-in took 2.5 hours?! We finally arrived in Saudi Arabia or “KSA” – the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia as it's officially called. The Riyadh Metro On the first day, we decided to take the metro to the center, but when we got to the station, we discovered that it's so new that it wasn't running yet. I even asked our Airbnb host if it was close to the Metro station, and he just said, “yes, it's very close”. Not “but it's not working yet”. Who needs a Metro that isn't working? Since we were there the Metro in Riyadh should be running – or at least most of it. It will have six lines that serve the city and its suburbs and is designed to help avoid traffic congestion and improve mobility in the city. The Riyadh Metro has a total length of 176 kilometres (109 miles) and serves 85 stations. It's fully automated and features state-of-the-art trains and stations, and is equipped with advanced security and safety systems. The metro system is also accessible to people with disabilities, and then it's eco-friendly. The stations come with solar cells that will contribute to 20 percent of the entire station's energy. The service once up and running will contribute to the decrease of nearly 250,000 car journeys a day, thereby reducing the city's fuel requirement of 400,000 litres. A project like that isn't cheap: Around 22.5 billion US dollars or 21 billion Euros. But that's possible when money's not an issue. Saudi Arabia's 2030 All of this is a part of Saudi Arabia's 2030 plan also known as Vision 2030. It was launched in April 2016 by the Saudi Arabian Government as a program aimed at transforming the country into not being so dependent on oil export in the future. Here are some of the key goals: Diversification of the economy The plan aims to reduce the country's reliance on oil exports and encourage the growth of non-oil sectors such as manufacturing, tourism, and small and medium enterprises. Job creation The plan aims to create more than 3 million new jobs for Saudi citizens by 2030. Social and cultural development The plan aims to improve the quality of life for Saudi citizens by investing in education, healthcare, and cultural initiatives. Infrastructure development The plan includes investments in transportation (like the new Metro system in Riyadh), energy, water, and telecommunications infrastructure to support economic growth and development. Environmental sustainability The plan aims to reduce the country's carbon footprint and increase its use of renewable energy sources. Open to tourists And then the big one for someone like me: Saudi Arabia began welcoming tourists in September 2019, also as part of its 2030 plan. Tourism is seen as a key growth sector in Saudi Arabia. It can generate significant economic benefits, including jobs, tax revenues, and foreign exchange earnings. By attracting more tourists, Saudi Arabia hope to diversify its economy and reduce its reliance on oil exports. It's also in the plan that tourism also can contribute to cultural exchange and understanding between different countries and regions. They feel that by welcoming visitors from around the world, Saudi Arabia can promote its culture and traditions and learn from other cultures. Overall, the decision to open up to tourists is part of Saudi Arabia's broader efforts to transform itself into a more diversified and innovative economy, and to create a more prosperous and dynamic society. To transform Saudi Arabia into a global hub for trade and commerce, and to create a more prosperous and dynamic society. Renting a car and two quad bikes To see Saudi, a car is a must, so the next day, we picked up a rental car for the next 10 days at a place called Hanco at the Riyadh airport. It was 31 USD (29 EUR) per day, so definitely not too bad. Then we drove about an hour from Riyadh to the Al-Dahna desert. We came here to drive Quad Bikes in the famous and dramatic Red Sand Dunes. After talking to two vendors and doing a bit of bargaining for the 1-hour rental, we rented a Quad Bike each. These sand dunes are formed from fine, red sand that has been blown by the wind over the years, creating towering mounds that can reach up to 100 feet in height. The terrain is rough and rugged, with steep inclines and sudden drops that can be challenging to navigate. Except for when we got stuck, it was totally fun. We were at the far end of the Dunes looking for a route back when our vendor came out to find us. FACTS ABOUT RIYADH Riyadh is the capital city of Saudi Arabia and is home to over 7 million people. The city was founded in the early 18th century and has a rich history that can be seen in the many historical landmarks and museums scattered throughout the city. The Masmak Fortress, a historic castle located in the heart of the city, played a crucial role in the founding of modern-day Saudi Arabia and is a popular tourist attraction. The city is known for its vibrant nightlife and has a thriving arts and culture scene, with numerous galleries, theaters, and music venues to explore. Riyadh is also home to some of the world's most luxurious and exclusive hotels, including the Ritz-Carlton and the Four Seasons, which offer breathtaking views of the city and surrounding desert landscape. The city is also home to many world-class shopping malls, including the Kingdom Centre, which features a rooftop skybridge that offers panoramic views of the city. Riyadh has a number of world-class sports facilities, including the King Fahd International Stadium, which is one of the largest football stadiums in the world and has a seating capacity of over 75,000. One that would be put into good use if they win the bid to host the 2030 FIFA World Cup. Stuck in Traffic At 3 pm, we started the drive back in to Riyadh because Ali, one of Cynthia's CouchSurfing friends was leading a walking tour, and we wanted to join in. But that didn't go as planned. We got the outskirts of the city just in time for the glorious rush hour. One of the main challenges of driving during rush hour in Riyadh is that there are so many cars trying to get ahead at the same time, not always sticking to their lanes. It is definitely not for the faint at heart and a challenging experience, especially for those who are not used to heavy traffic or driving in busy cities. We were already getting late for our appointment for the walking tour with Ali, and then we had another challenge. Finding a place to park. We finally did find one and met for a quick chat with Ali, for just a few minutes. Sunset at Nabd Al Riyadh Then, we strolled the exterior of the Palace Museum, Fort and an Original City Gate and ended up in "Nabd Al Riyadh," an outdoor courtyard area with coffee shops, live music, and a chalk-art artist. It's a peaceful and pleasant spot to end our day and with a local performer in the background and the sun setting over Riyadh, we sat down and reflected on an adventurous day. Much more from Saudi Arabia In the next episode, we literally go to the Edge of The World. But there's much more in that episode /next Tuesday). You'll get the full travel versions of The Radio Vagabond like this one on Tuesdays (let's call it “Travel Tuesday”), and then Flashback episodes every Friday and the ten-minute diary entry from where I am right now every Saturday. But there's more: Sometimes, you'll get a short one about the country we're covering in the travel episodes on Thursdays. And this week I have one for you. Having listened to this episode, you might think that I'm painting a rosy picture of Saudi Arabia. And yes, I did like it. But not all is perfect, they still have some challenges in my eyes; so, on Thursday I'll give you an episode, that I call “The Good and The Bad about Saudi Arabia”. Here I'll share what I think is good about Saudi Arabia and also what I think is not so great. If you like what you hear, please tell a friend about The Radio Vagabond. My name is Palle Bo, and I gotta keep moving. See you. Poem about this episode – written by an AI The Radio Vagabond, Palle Bo, Took a trip to Saudi Arabia with his friend, Cynthia. A CouchSurfing Ambassador, and a big-time traveler, She calls herself "Cynthia Globe," and she's quite the explorer. They caught a flight from Dubai, but not without a fight, And soon they found themselves exploring the city of Riyadh at night. Quad biking through the Red Sand Dunes, they got stuck in the sand, But they had a lot of fun and made the most of their planned Adventure, even if it didn't go quite as planned. But then they hit some traffic, causing them to arrive At Nabd Al Riyadh, an outdoor courtyard to their delight, Where coffee shops, live music, and chalk-art artists ignite Their senses and keep them entertained until the morning light. In the next episode of this podcast, they set out to see The Edge of The World, where they meet many camels, wild and free. The Radio Vagabond continue to travel and explore this land of gold.

The Takeaway
Is Facebook Responsible in Ethiopia?

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 11:31


Two Ethiopians recently filed a lawsuit against Meta, Facebook's parent company, alleging that the company not only allowed hate speech to spread online during the country's recent civil war — it prioritized hate speech. Facebook's content moderation practices have been under scrutiny for years, particularly after whistleblower Frances Haugen revealed internal documents that showed Facebook was well aware that its practices for finding and removing hate speech in a number of countries — including Ethiopia — were severely lacking. Will the recent peace deal also mean a reckoning for the social media giant?  We speak with Berhan Taye, a Practitioner Fellow at the Digital Civil Society Lab of Stanford University, researching digital rights and social justice. She's based in Nairobi, Kenya.  Meta answered The Takeaway's request for comment with the following statement: "We have strict rules which outline what is and isn't allowed on Facebook and Instagram. Hate speech and incitement to violence are against these rules and we invest heavily in teams and technology to help us find and remove this content. Our safety and integrity work in Ethiopia is guided by feedback from local civil society organizations and international institutions. We employ staff with local knowledge and expertise and continue to develop our capabilities to catch violating content in the most widely spoken languages in the country, including Amharic, Oromo, Somali and Tigrinya." To read the full transcript, see above.

The Takeaway
Is Facebook Responsible in Ethiopia?

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 11:31


Two Ethiopians recently filed a lawsuit against Meta, Facebook's parent company, alleging that the company not only allowed hate speech to spread online during the country's recent civil war — it prioritized hate speech. Facebook's content moderation practices have been under scrutiny for years, particularly after whistleblower Frances Haugen revealed internal documents that showed Facebook was well aware that its practices for finding and removing hate speech in a number of countries — including Ethiopia — were severely lacking. Will the recent peace deal also mean a reckoning for the social media giant?  We speak with Berhan Taye, a Practitioner Fellow at the Digital Civil Society Lab of Stanford University, researching digital rights and social justice. She's based in Nairobi, Kenya.  Meta answered The Takeaway's request for comment with the following statement: "We have strict rules which outline what is and isn't allowed on Facebook and Instagram. Hate speech and incitement to violence are against these rules and we invest heavily in teams and technology to help us find and remove this content. Our safety and integrity work in Ethiopia is guided by feedback from local civil society organizations and international institutions. We employ staff with local knowledge and expertise and continue to develop our capabilities to catch violating content in the most widely spoken languages in the country, including Amharic, Oromo, Somali and Tigrinya." To read the full transcript, see above.

The Inside Story Podcast
What are the prospects for peace in DR Congo?

The Inside Story Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 19:33


M-23 fighters say they are pulling out of a town in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, where conflict has forced many people to flee the region. A UN investigation has also documented widespread human rights abuses. So, what are the prospects for lasting peace?  Join host Laura Kyle. Guests: Djaffar Al Katanty - Reporter in Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo.  Jean-Mobert Senga - DRC researcher at Amnesty International in Nairobi. Felix Ndahinda - Consultant and researcher from Democratic Republic of Congo based in Tilburg, Netherlands.

ILSoyAdvisor Podcasts
By Associaiton With Roberta Simpson - Dolbeare EP. 8

ILSoyAdvisor Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 14:59


In the latest By Association podcast episode, Rachel and Betsy are checking in with Roberta Simpson-Dolbeare, Illinois soybean farmer and Chair of the American Soybean Association's World Initiative for Soy in Human Health Program (WISHH) which is dedicated to connecting trade and development across global market systems. Tune in to learn more about Roberta's recent trade mission in Nairobi, Kenya, and Zanzibar, Tanzania, and the good work happening for, and because of, Illinois soy.

Launch Left
Rooney Mara Launches Suay Sew Shop

Launch Left

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 57:51


Rooney Mara joins Rain on LaunchLeft and launches Suay Sew Shop. The conversation begins with family, film, music, and activism before welcoming Lindsay Rose Medoff, CEO and Lead Designer of Suay. Lindsay tells us about the mission and services that this unique retail shop provides. The best news is that Suay is cultivating a workforce of textile recyclers dedicated to eliminating post-consumer waste and giving opportunities for under-appreciated workers fair pay and recognition. With its original location in Los Angeles, Suay will open another location in New York. Don't miss this episode of LaunchLeft to catch up with Rooney Mara and learn all about Suay Sew Shop. -----------------  LAUNCHLEFT OFFICIAL WEBSITEhttps://www.launchleft.com  LAUNCHLEFT PATREON https://www.patreon.com/LaunchLeft  TWITTER https://twitter.com/LaunchLeft  INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/launchleft/  FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/LaunchLeft  --------------------- LaunchLeft Podcast hosted by Rain Phoenix is an intentional space for Art and Activism where famed creatives launch new artists. LaunchLeft is an alliance of left-of-center artists, a curated ecosystem that includes a podcast, label and NFT gallery. --------------------- IN THIS EPISODE: [02:52] Rooney Mara reflects on her childhood.  [06:10] Choices made in life, deciding not to relinquish control in an acting career and her film, Women Talking.  [16:30] Rooney discusses motherhood and being a co-partner in a two-actor home and the creation of the production company, Valentine Pictures.  [21:29] Reflecting on a catalog of work starting with Girl with a Dragon Tattoo, how music played a role, and living the life of a vegan.  [36:37] Rooney launches Suay Sew Shop. Lindsay Rose Medoff, CEO and Lead Designer of Suay, describes their mission and services.  [42:44] Empowering manual laborers and paying for the value they bring to the table. The difference between saying you want to help make a change and being willing to be uncomfortable and make the change. KEY TAKEAWAYS:  Rooney Mara takes on causes, films, lifestyle, and “shopping” in ways that she can be proud of and that can positively impact the world.  Suay Sew Shop in Los Angeles is a unique business employing skilled manual laborers. They provide free clothing to the needy that they have repurposed. In addition, they are working on becoming worker-owned, which empowers workers that otherwise would remain an overlooked population.  There are ways to close the gap between the impoverished and business tycoons. It's a decision to share the wealth and take less in profits. It's one thing to stand on a soap box and “talk” about making a difference and quite another thing to put people over profits. RESOURCE LINKS Website - Rooney Mara Instagram - Rooney Mara Facebook - Rooney Mara Website - Suay Sew Shop Instagram - Suay Sew Shop Facebook - Suay Sew Shop LinkedIn - Lindsay Rose Medoff BIO:  Rooney Mara:  Actress and philanthropist Rooney Mara was born on April 17, 1985 in Bedford, New York. She made her screen debut in the slasher film Urban Legends: Bloody Mary (2005), went on to have a supporting role in the independent coming-of-age drama Tanner Hall (2009), and has since starred in the horror remake A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010), the biographical drama The Social Network (2010), the thriller remake The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011), and the romantic drama Carol (2015). Patricia Rooney Mara is one of four children of Kathleen McNulty (née Rooney) and NFL football team New York Giants executive Timothy Christopher Mara. Her grandfathers were Wellington Mara, co-owner of the Giants, and Timothy Rooney, owner of Yonkers Raceway, and her grand-uncle is Steelers Chairman Dan Rooney, the former Ambassador to Ireland. She is the great-granddaughter of Art Rooney, the founder of the Pittsburgh Steelers football franchise. Her father has Irish, German, and French-Canadian ancestry, and her mother is of Irish and Italian descent. After graduating from Bedford's Fox Lane High School, she went to Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia in South America for four months as part of the Traveling School, an open learning environment. She attended George Washington University for a year and then transferred to New York University, where she studied international social policy psychology and nonprofits. She took her degree from New York University in 2010. Her studies focused on non-profit organizations, as her family has a tradition of involvement in philanthropic causes. She had thought of acting after watching old movies and attending musical theater, but did not think of it as a serious vocation and was afraid she might fail at this. As a result of her reservations, she appeared in only one play while in high school. She began seriously focusing on acting when she was at New York University, appearing in student films. Inspired by her older sister, actress Kate Mara, she began to pursue the craft, auditioning for acting jobs at age 19. She appeared with her sister Kate in the video horror movie Urban Legends: Bloody Mary (2005), billing herself as "Patricia Mara". As "Tricia Mara", she had guest roles on television and won her first lead in the movie Tanner Hall (2009), which was shot in the fall of 2007. She originally auditioned for the supporting role of Lucasta in "Tanner Hall", a $3-million independent film, but director Tatiana von Fürstenberg was so impressed by the young actress, she had her return to audition for the lead role of Fernanda, which Mara won. Furstenberg was delighted with her nuanced performance, saying, "Still waters run deep". Continuing to call herself Tricia Mara, this was during the making of "Tanner Hall" that she considered changing her professional name to Rooney Mara, soliciting the advice of the cast and crew. After premiering at the 2009 Toronto International Film Festival, her performance in "Tanner Hall" brought the rechristened Rooney Mara a "Rising Star" award at the 2009 Hamptons Film Festival and a "Stargazer Award" at the 2010 Gen Art Film Festival. She received her first lead role in a major feature, in the $35 million remake A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010). The movie proved disappointing at the box office, grossing only $63 million domestically and racking up a worldwide gross of just under $116 million. However, she was noticed by critics in the small but pivotal role of the Boston University undergrad Erica Albright who dumps Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network (2010). Director David Fincher subsequently cast her as the lead, Lisbeth Salander, in his thriller remake, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011), based on Stieg Larsson's Millennium book series. She received critical acclaim for her performance, and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress and a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture - Drama. She starred in the thriller film Side Effects (2013), the independent drama Ain't Them Bodies Saints (2013), and the acclaimed sci-fi romantic drama Her (2013). The following year, she starred in the adventure drama Trash (2014). She garnered further critical acclaim for her performance in Todd Haynes' romantic drama Carol (2015), for which she won the Best Actress Award at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, and was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture - Drama and the SAG, BAFTA, and Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. In the spirit of her family's philanthropic endeavors, Rooney created Faces of Kibera, a charity that provides food, medical care and housing to orphans in Nairobi, Kenya's Kibra district, a small slum that houses a million people. There are many orphans as AIDS is rampant in the slum.   Lindsay Rose Medoff, CEO and Lead Designer of Suay:  SUAY SEW SHOP is creating a culture of community and reuse. As our global community demands change from corporations, our dedication to design, coupled with a drive for activism, is putting reclaimed products at the center of a social, economic and environmental revolution. Cultivating upcycling as the priority will not only massively impact our planet, but our daily quality of life. SUAY is a Los Angeles based 100% vertical sewing, production and consulting shop founded in 2017 by CEO, Lindsay Rose Medoff.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Africa Daily
What will be the big stories for Africa in 2023?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 11:57


In our last episode of 2022, Africa Daily's Alan Kasujja looked back on the year with the help of friends of the programme Mpho Lakaje in South Africa, Beverly Ochieng in Nairobi and Thomas Naadi in Ghana. So today – with the start of the new year, the team turn their attention to next year – and try and predict what's to come. Never an easy task… Presenter: Alan Kasujja @kasujja Guests: @BeverlyOchieng of @bbcmonitoring, @Mpholakaje and @Thomas_Naadi

The Science Hour
The James Webb Space Telescope - the first 6 months

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 63:30 Very Popular


NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has produced amazing images in its first 5 months, but amazing science as well. Roland hears from one of the leading astronomers on the JWST programme, Dr Heidi Hammel, as well as other experts on what they are already learning about the first galaxies in the Universe, the birth places of stars, the strange behaviour of some other stars, and the first view of Neptune's rings in over 30 years. Over the past 12 months, CrowdScience has travelled the world, from arctic glacierscapes to equatorial deserts, to answer listeners' science queries. Sometimes, the team come across tales that don't quite fit with the quest in hand, but still draw a laugh, or a gasp. In this show, Marnie Chesterton revisits those stories, with members of the CrowdScience crew. Alex the Parrot was a smart bird, with an impressive vocabulary and the ability to count and do basic maths. He was also intimidating and mean to a younger parrot, Griffin, who didn't have the same grasp of the English language. Scientist Irene Pepperberg shares the consequence of this work-place bullying.  Take a tour of the disaster room at ICPAC, the IGAD Climate Prediction and Applications Centre (ICPAC) based in Nairobi, Kenya. It's a new building where scientists keep watch for weird new weather and passes that information to 11 East African countries. Viola Otieno is an Earth Observation (EO) Expert and she explained how they track everything from cyclones to clouds of desert locust. Malcolm MacCallum is curator of the Anatomical Museum at Edinburgh University in Scotland, which holds a collection of death masks and skull casts used by the Edinburgh Phrenological Society. Phrenology was a pseudoscience, popular in the 1820s, where individuals attempted to elucidate peoples' proclivities and personalities by the shape of their heads. We see what the phrenologists had to say about Sir Isaac Newton and the “worst pirate” John Tardy. While recording on Greenland's icesheet, the CrowdScience team were told by Professor Jason Box about “party ice.” 40,000 year old glacial ice is a superior garnish for your cocktail than normal freezer ice, apparently. This starts a quest for the perfect Arctic cocktail. (Image: Young stars form from clouds of interstellar gas and dust in the stellar "nursery" of the Carina Nebula. Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI)

CrowdScience
Bullying Parrots and Glacial Cocktails

CrowdScience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 29:39


Over the past 12 months, CrowdScience has travelled the world, from arctic glacierscapes to equatorial deserts, to answer listeners' science queries. Sometimes, the team come across tales that don't quite fit with the quest in hand, but still draw a laugh, or a gasp. In this show, Marnie Chesterton revisits those stories, with members of the CrowdScience crew. Alex the Parrot was a smart bird, with an impressive vocabulary and the ability to count and do basic maths. He was also intimidating and mean to a younger parrot, Griffin, who didn't have the same grasp of the English language. Scientist Irene Pepperberg shares the consequence of this work-place bullying.  Take a tour of the disaster room at ICPAC, the IGAD Climate Prediction and Applications Centre (ICPAC) based in Nairobi, Kenya. It's a new building where scientists keep watch for weird new weather and passes that information to 11 East African countries. Viola Otieno is an Earth Observation (EO) Expert and she explained how they track everything from cyclones to clouds of desert locust. Malcolm MacCallum is curator of the Anatomical Museum at Edinburgh University in Scotland, which holds a collection of death masks and skull casts used by the Edinburgh Phrenological Society. Phrenology was a pseudoscience, popular in the 1820s, where individuals attempted to elucidate peoples' proclivities and personalities by the shape of their heads. We see what the phrenologists had to say about Sir Isaac Newton and the “worst pirate” John Tardy. While recording on Greenland's icesheet, the CrowdScience team were told by Professor Jason Box about “party ice.” 40,000 year old glacial ice is a superior garnish for your cocktail than normal freezer ice, apparently. This starts a quest for the perfect Arctic cocktail. Presented by Marnie Chesterton  Produced by Marnie Chesterton, featuring producers Florian Bohr, Sam Baker and Ben Motley  (Photo:)

Africa Daily
What were the big events in Africa in 2022?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 20:58


What were the factors that affected your life last year? Insecurity? The cost of fuel and bread? Power cuts? Politics? The Africa Daily ‘family' gets together to talk about some of the biggest issues which impacted the continent over the last year. “You and I, Alan, should move to Zambia – that's where we should be man!” With presenter Alan Kasujja (@Kasujja), @BeverlyOchieng of @bbcmonitoring in Nairobi, Africa Daily's @Mpholakaje in Johannesburg and @Thomas_Naadi, the BBC's correspondent in Ghana.

Mint | Where Crypto Meets Creators
Shorts | Dada Boipela: The End Goal of Capturing High Quality Moments Digitally

Mint | Where Crypto Meets Creators

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 3:47


Dada Boipelo, a multidisciplinary artist, creative director, and NFT artist based in Nairobi joined Season 3 to share her view on the end goal of capturing high quality moments digitally.Full EpisodeSeason 3 Episode 20About Mint ShortsEnjoy the best moments from the podcast in bite-size segments.---------------------------------------------------------------------------Sign up for Adam Levy's newsletterhttps://levychain.substack.com---------------------------------------------------------------------------Follow Adam Levy on social media:Twitter:https://twitter.com/levychainInstagram:https://www.instagram.com/levychainLinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/levy-adamWebsite:https://adamlevy.io

Money Tales
The Tables Have Turned, with Lubna Bhayani

Money Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 32:34


In this episode of Money Tales, our guest is Lubna Bhayani. Lubna is a globetrotter. For most of her marriage, she followed her husband from country to country, wherever his job took them. Recently, they turned the tables. Lubna relocated the family to Kenya for an exciting position she wanted to take. This latest move has caused the couple to go deep into money conversations, which she shares with us on Money Tales. Lubna works for the International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Regional Office as the Lead Specialist for Partnerships, Grants Management and Resource Mobilization. With a career spanning over 15 years and several countries, Lubna has worked on issues linking gender and development, women in humanitarian crisis. In recent years, she has focused on universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights, especially for those who are most structurally marginalized due to their age, sex, sexual identity and gender orientation. Most recently Lubna has begun to delve into the issue of menstrual hygiene, which should really be a non-issue but is omnipresent yet very absent from broader SRHR discourse. Lubna hopes to design projects and advocate to address this. Lubna has an undergraduate degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and master's degrees from both the London School of Economics and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the UK. She moved to Nairobi in 2021 with her husband and two boys and spends her time ensuring her boys #BreakTheBias and believe women and men are distinctly equal. Learn more about Money Tale$ > Subscribe to the podcast Recent episodes See all episodes > Form CRS Form ADV Terms of Use Privacy Rights and Policies

Les enjeux internationaux
L'aide humanitaire en Afghanistan peut-elle se passer des femmes ?

Les enjeux internationaux

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 17:26


durée : 00:17:26 - Les Enjeux internationaux - par : Baptiste Muckensturm - Depuis le 24 décembre, les femmes ne peuvent plus exercer dans les ONG en Afghanistan. L'aide humanitaire en Afghanistan peut-elle se passer d'elles ? - invités : Hervé Nicolle Codirecteur du Centre de recherche sur les migrations Samuel Hall, basé à Kaboul et Nairobi

Culture by Design
Your Difference is Your Greatest Strength with Nelson Derry [Rerun]

Culture by Design

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 48:03


In this week's episode of Culture by Design, Timothy R. Clark is joined by Nelson Derry, Global Head of Culture, Diversity, Equity & Inclusion at Aesop. Nelson's inspiring upbringing and the depth of his career experience have shaped his worldview and taught him valuable lessons. He and Tim explore his story and discuss what it really takes to intentionally change organizational culture. Hint: it involves shedding bias and harnessing divergent perspectives. Here are some gems from the conversation:Your difference is your greatest strength (7:00). Nelson's mother risks it all to give Nelson the opportunity to learn. Nelson learns how to harness his differences because of his environment.One interaction can change a life (10:15). A complete stranger decides to support Nelson and invest in his future, completely changing the trajectory of his life and career. He sends Nelson from Nairobi, Kenya overseas to England.The value of showing up, having courage, and being humble (15:20). Nelson explains the value of consistent interactions in environments where you are encouraged to thrive. Live above demographics and psychographics (18:00). According to Nelson, you're not responsible for your first thought, but you're responsible for your second thought and your first action. The power lies between your first thought and your first action.When things are hard, it's not the time to play it safe (22:00). Nelson and Tim talk about lessons learned from Jacinda Ardern, the New Zealand Prime Minister who intentionally appoints an extremely diverse cabinet in the midst of a global pandemic and terrorist attacks.Harnessing the differences in divergent perspectives (26:30). Easy doesn't equate to performance. Performance requires the hard work of diverse, divergent perspectives. Trapped in the paradigm of unwheeled luggage (27:30). Nelson talks about what it means to be a prisoner in your own paradigm. He tells the story of a 1950s entrepreneur who identifies a game changer, but the response he gets is lukewarm at best.The compounding effects of behaviors (33:00). Nelson explains how behaviors become habits, how habits become norms, and how norms change organizational culture. Save a seat for those without a voice (36:25). Nelson shares his experiences navigating a world where he felt compelled to hide his differences. Affection for humanity is contagious (42:00). Nelson models for and teaches others how to supersede bias and prejudice and interact with others intentionally.About Our Guest:Nelson currently serves as the Global Head of Culture, Diversity, Equity & Inclusion at Aesop. He is responsible for driving a company-wide strategy around Aesop's People Commitments including Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, Culture transformation, Engagement, and Well-being. Prior to joining Aesop, Nelson led the Global Organisational Culture Practice at North Highland serving as a trusted advisor to senior leaders and supporting them with their people transformation agendas including culture and behaviour change, communications & engagement, leadership development, and diversity & inclusion.Previously Nelson spent a decade at Goldman Sachs in a variety of leadership roles including Head of Strategy and Change within the European asset management business as well as leading several operations teams. An award-winning executive he has been recognised by the Financial Times and EMPower as one of the Top 30 U.K. and US Future Leaders for contributions to workplace inclusion. Nelson is the author of ‘Rise of the 2020 Leader - Entering a new era of Trust, Purpose, and Inclusion'. His thought leadership and articles have been featured in publications including Manage HR Magazine. He is also a regular speaker and storyteller at company events and industry conferences on the topics of high-performing teams, organisational culture, leadership, and diversity & inclusion. Most recently he was invited to deliver the keynote address at the Diversity & Inclusion Workplace Summit, hosted by Business Forums International.Nelson has been a judge at several international industry awards. Most recently he was invited to be a judge at the U.K. Employee Experience Awards for the ‘Most Innovative Employee Engagement Initiative' category. He also judged the ‘Global HR Leader of the Year' award at the Leadership Excellence Awards hosted by GDS.

The Conversation
Women with a passion for wine

The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 28:02


Kim Chakanetsa talks to a multi-award winning wine expert from France and a young sommelier from Kenya who was part of the first all-female team to take part in the World Wine Blind Tasting Championships 2022. Pascaline Lepeltier was studying for a PhD in Philosophy when she switched to work in a restaurant and pursue her interest in wine. She went on to become the only woman to have been named “Un des Meilleurs Ouvriers de France - Sommellerie”, and also in 2018, Best French Sommelier. She has a passion for championing organic, natural and biodynamic wines and is beverage director at the New York restaurant Chambers. Melissa Mwende is a Kenyan born and raised sommelier and wine educator. After working as a wine ambassador for a brand in South Africa she opened a small wine shop outside Nairobi and works as a wine consultant. She wants people to learn about fantastic wines produced across the African continent. Produced by Jane Thurlow (Image: (L) Pascaline Lepeltier, credit Cedric Angeles. (R) Melissa Mwende, courtesy Melissa Mwende.)

Capital FM
The Evolution of e-commerce as told by Ronald Kaleu | S02E04

Capital FM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 40:12


Ronald Kaleu is the founder of Progressus Mavericks Limited, an e-commerce platform created and located in Nairobi. He provides technological and physical resources necessary to operate an e-commerce platform or business to his clients.

Habari za UN
IMP umepatia Kenya mkopo wa dola milioni 447.9

Habari za UN

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 0:02


Bodi tendaji ya Shirika la fedha duniani IMF imekamilisha awamu ya nne ya Ukaguzi wa Mpango wa Upanuzi wa Hazina kwa taifa la Kenya na kuipa nchi hiyo mkopo wa dola milioni 447.9li iweze kutekeleza mipango yake ya upanuzi na usaidizi wa mikopo.Ni  Mary Goodman, Mwakilishi wa IMF nchini Kenya akisema kuwa Kenya imepata takriban dola milioni 450 kutoka IMF ikiwa ni  mkopo unaolenga kusaidia nchi hiyo ya Afrika Mashariki kuhimili majanga yanayosumbua dunia kwa sasa ikiwemo ukame, changamoto zilizosababishwa na COVID-19, Kuimarisha utawala bora na mageuzi mapana ya kiuchumi. Amesema hayo akitoa taarifa hapo jana jijini Nairobi kenya na kwamba mkopo huu umefanya ukubwa wa mpango wa IMF nchini Kenya kufikia takriban dola bilioni 2.4 na haya yote yanawezekana kwakuwa fedha zinazotolewa kwa nchi hiyo zimeonekana kuleta matokeo.Bi. Goodman amesema “Kuongezeko la ukusanyaji kodi na uangalifu kwenye matumizi, hatua hizi zina imarisha deni kwani sehemu ya Pato la Taifa GDP lipo chini ya viwango vilivyotarajiwa. Kenya ilifanikisha hili kwa sababu utawala wa Rais wa Kenya William Ruto imejitolea kwa nguvu kukabili bili zilizosalia za mwaka jana na matumizi yasiyokuwa na bajeti kuanzia mapema mwaka huu. Walichukua hatua ya ujasiri. Walimaliza kabisa ruzuku ya mafuta ya petroli, na wanatafuta kila sehemu namna ya kuokoa gharama ili kushikilia nakisi ya mwaka huu iwe chini ya kiwango kilichowekwa kwenye bajeti.”Uwazi kwenye kandarasi zinazotolewa na serikali pia ni eneo jingine Mwakilishi huyu wa IMF alilogusia na kusema “Katika mapitio yaliyo fanywa na IMF yameona maendeleo katika utawala. Kuna maelezo mapya kuhusu wamiliki wa makampuni yanayoshinda kandarasi za serikali na yanachapishwa kwenye tovuti ya ununuzi wa umma. Hata hivyo kazi zaidi bado iko ya kuimarisha mfumo wa Kenya wa kupambana na ufujaji wa fedha na kurekebisha makampuni ya serikali.”Pamoja na kumwagiwa sifa kwenye kufanikiwa katika ajenda ya mageuzi ya kimuundo, Bi, Goodman amesema bado kuna ucheleweshaji fulani.“Changamoto bado zipo, ingawa Kenya bado inakabiliwa na bei ya juu ya kimataifa ya chakula na mbolea, na dola ya Marekani nayo imekuwa na nguvu sana dhidi ya sarafu nyingi za kimataifa. Katika kipindi hiki kigumu, sera ya fedha na kubadilika kwa viwango vya ubadilishaji fedha vina jukumu kubwa la kutekeleza. Hatua za kufufua soko la fedha za kigeni pia ni muhimu na zitasaidia kusaidia hifadhi ya fedha za kigeni nchini Kenya. “Mwakilishi huyo wa IMF amehitimisha kwa kusema kuwa   shirika hilo linakaribisha ushirikiano zaidi na Kenya.

African Father in America
Experience mystery and excitement on this 10-day Magical Kenya Adventure | AFIAPodcast

African Father in America

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 5:00


Vibrant cities bursting with life, a pride of lions stalking the grassy plains, the snow‐capped peak of Mt Kilimanjaro looming in the distance – Kenya is a photographer's dream come true. From the bustling streets and markets of Kisumu to the wilds of the vast Maasai Mara National Reserve, this package will showcase the beauty, the history, and the culture of Kenya like never before. Experience Kenya's magic, mystery, and excitement on this 10-day package visiting Nairobi, Kisumu, Maasai Mara National Reserve, and beyond. Go in search of lions, elephants, buffalo, and more on up to three game drives within the Maasai Mara National Reserve. Participate in numerous activities at the Young Generation Centre where One Vibe Africa is based, including educational, musical, and cultural experiences and share ideas with a community of knowledge seekers. This once‐in‐a‐lifetime Kenyan adventure includes, 9 nights in hotels, boutique lodges, tented camps, English‐speaking tour leader and guides, meals, and more.

The Mics Are Open
#189 - Hodari Wa Mapenzi!!

The Mics Are Open

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 69:25


Neville's Back and the Pod is Crazy as ever, the conversation ranges from the Nairobi festival how you save names in your phone! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conrad-gray4/support

Young Black Travelers
Tanzania, Start of the African Adventure

Young Black Travelers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 46:44


Shenia has left the trip and Asshur, Anthony and Stella continues on to Tanzania. The groups talk about their experience driving from Nairobi to Tanzania. They also review the hotel where they stayed, Marriott Arusha. They flew from Arusha to Dar, and so they discuss what they experienced in Dar es Salam. Stella also discussed some of the night spots we definitely recommend. Enjoy our journey to Tan-zan-nia! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/youngblacktravelers/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/youngblacktravelers/support

Chai with Pabrai
Mohnish Pabrai's Q&A Session with YPO Gold Nairobi in Kenya on October 11, 2022

Chai with Pabrai

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 72:02


Mohnish Pabrai's Q&A Session with YPO Gold Nairobi in Kenya on October 11, 2022 (00:00:00) - Introduction (00:03:00) - Buying Manhattan from the Native American Indians in 1626 (00:09:52) - My daughter's investment journey with compounding (00:12:36) - Active vs. Passive Investing (00:19:38) - Error rate in investing (00:26:00) - Reysas (00:29:28) - TAV Airports (00:31:33) - Circle of competence (00:35:31) - Macroeconomic factors (00:39:38) - When to sell a stock (00:43:58) - Intrinsic Value (00:46:14) - Global investment opportunities (00:53:57) - Too hard pile (00:58:15) - TAV business model (01:02:19) - Learning from mistakes (01:07:09) - The Dakshana story

Foreign Correspondence
Will Brown - Daily Telegraph - Nairobi

Foreign Correspondence

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 62:29


A chance meeting with some French journalists in a New Delhi park led Will Brown (@_Will_Brown) to quit his job as a teacher to become a reporter. After freelancing doesn't work out, he finds himself back in London working at The Economist, eventually being dispatched as a stringer to Senegal. He also talks about covering the outbreak of the Tigray War from the Sudan-Ethiopia border as Africa Correspondent for The Daily Telegraph. Countries featured: India, Senegal, Kenya, Ethiopia, Guinea, Sudan, DR Congo, UK Publications featured: The Times of London, The Economist, Daily Telegraph   Here are links to some of the things we talked about: His Vice story on Indian brothels - bit.ly/3Br1snE Economist story on Guinea bauxite mining - bit.ly/3Ppzs9S His story on Ethiopians fleeing Tigray war - bit.ly/3FhfIR3 His story with nurse leaving patients behind - bit.ly/3FIudP9 BBC Africa Eye - bit.ly/3hkI2Ks HumAngle - https://bit.ly/3WaAxnW Manisha Ganguly's doc on Libya drone strikes - https://bit.ly/3WaicY6   Follow us on Twitter @foreignpod or on Facebook at facebook.com/foreignpod Music: LoveChances (makaih.com) by Makaih Beats From: freemusicarchive.org CC BY NC

Africa Daily
Can Kenya run away from doping troubles?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 15:15


Kenya and athletics are synonymous to one another. In November the country came close to being banned from the sport it loves and excels in the most. There is no doubt that the sports is huge to the country's image and great effort goes into it - 34 of Kenya's 35 Olympic gold medals have come from track and field events. But with 17 Kenyan athletes suspended just this year by the Athletics Integrity Unit for a range of violations, joining another 55 who are already serving bans, the threat of a ban loomed large. So the country's authorities made assurances to World Athletics and avoided a ban. But can Kenya run away from its doping troubles? Alan Kasujja speaks with BBC Sport Africa's Michelle Katami in Nairobi.

The_C.O.W.S.
The C. O. W. S. w/ Nairobi Thompson: Almost British (Revisited) # Part 2 #NgoziFulani

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022


The C.O.W.S. (Context of White Supremacy) Radio Program welcomes the return of Nairobi Thompson. A writer, poet and learning and development specialist, Ms. Thompson is a versatile communicator and facilitator with a rare ability to challenge and entertain professional and artistic audiences. She was gracious enough to visit with us last month, to discuss the re-release of her memoir, Almost British: Re-Visited, which gives detailed account of years of deliberate White Supremacist abuse from mostly White Women in British Prison service. Last time, we detailed Ms. Thompson's resistance to blame her workplace troubles on Racism as well as the lecherous comments White Male colleagues made about her attire. This time we'll dig into the myriad ways White Women sabotaged her efforts, denied her access to training, and undermined her confidence and #BlackSelfRespect. We discuss the corrosive impact this had on her health and attempted marriage. We'll hear how some non-white colleagues who did not smoke joined Whites for "fag breaks" - British slang meaning sessions to smoke cigarettes. This employs the meaning of the term "fag" connoting a bundle of sticks. Gus submits this is another illustration of the homoerotic foundations of White culture. #WorkplaceRacism #TheCOWS13 INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE 564943#