Seminole Wars

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The Seminole Wars podcast looks at the United States' long campaign of Indian removal against the Florida Seminole in the 1800s. We explore what the Seminole Wars were; how they came to be; how they were fought; and how they still resonate some two centuries later. We talk with historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, archivists, writers, novelists, artists, musicians, exhibitors, craftsmen, educations, park rangers, military-era reenactors, living historians, and, to the descendants of the Florida and Oklahoma Seminole who fought to tenaciously to avoid US government forced removal.

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    • Jul 25, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
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    Latest episodes from Seminole Wars

    SW066 West Florida's 1821 Transfer Ceremony at Pensacola Confirmed US Acquisition, Presaged Enduring Conflict with Diverse Peninsular Tribes

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 50:19

    Images courtesy of TwoEgg TV. We recently podcasted on the 200th anniversary commemoration of the United States taking possession of the Florida territory from Spain. That signing and flag ceremony occurred in St Augustine for East Florida. A week later, Pensacola hosted a similar event for West Florida. Under United States possession, East and West became simply Florida. At sunrise on July 17, 2021 Chief Dan “Sky Horse” Helms, of Santa Rosa Creek Tribe, offered a blessing in Ferdinand Plaza before the ceremony recreating the exchange of Spanish and American flags, 200 years since the first time. In Pensacola, the University of West Florida's Symphonic Band played The Star-Spangled Banner and provided a medley of Spanish, British, French and American music. Hispanic musicians drifted through the Village and, just as they did 200 years ago, performers of African descent danced in the plazas. Spanish and English military reenactors mingled with the public for the West Florida Days Living History Weekend event.  The ceremony 200 years ago was a culmination of sharp diplomatic negotiations sprinkled with outlaw military actions on the American side. It begged the question: Why did Spain part with Florida by 1819 treaty? In addition, what part did border conflicts with the new American republic influence this decision? Even so, why was Spain willing to part with any possession, even one as negligible to its empire as Florida was? An understanding of Spain's motivations requires a look at Spanish Florida in 1821. What was Pensacola like at this transfer? What was Florida like as a whole? Why were the two sides joined as one territory? What became of the free whites with multicultural backgrounds already living in Florida? What challenges did free blacks have in U.S. Florida? And, as for the Seminole, whether two Floridas or one, why did territoriality bring unnecessary oversight from the Great Father in Washington, an oversight that subsequently led to unnecessary conflict, as listeners well know. With us to sort this out is Dr. Brian Rucker, a member of the 200th anniversary committee. He sketches Florida life at the transfer and addresses these questions. Doctor Rucker is a Professor of History at Pensacola State College, He also teaches courses in Florida History and History of the Florida Panhandle at the University of West Florida.  He is past president of the Gulf South Historical Association and has authored and edited over 40 books and articles related to West Florida history, including the Gulf borderlands struggles of the early 1800s. Image courtesy of TwoEgg TV. His most recent publication is a most engaging change of pace: The Story of Walt Disney World Resort Hotels 1971-2021.   Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW065 Sword-Swinging General Scolds Soldiers, Steeles Resolve at Withlacoochee River Battle

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021 54:06

    Jackson Walker painting of the Battle of Withlacoochee In January and February of 1836, the eyes of the United States in the press were concentrated upon the Withlacoochee River, where a relative handful of Seminole and Mikosukee warriors and their families were ensconced to resist the Indian removal policy of the United States. We've discussed how the path to the Second Seminole War was paved with tariffs, land grabs, broken treaties – and a fundamental misunderstanding on the part of the US Government about who the Seminole were. For its own convenience, rather than deal with more than a dozen different bands of Seminole tribes, the US Government created the political fiction of a unified Seminole nation. In fact, the Seminole comprised many disparate tribes from different backgrounds and cultures. Although loosely aligned throughout the Florida territory, their primary unity came from opposition to forced removal west to the Oklahoma Territory. The commanding general in Florida, Duncan L. Clinch, had dealt with Seminole for more than a decade. Despite unrest and scattered Seminole violence against sugar plantations in East Florida in the last half of 1835, Clinch held out hope to secure an agreement. He amassed a military force to march from Fort Drane to meet the Seminole chiefs in the Withlacoochee River region of Central Florida. He intended to awe the Seminole with his Army's strength so that the Seminole would, in his view, recognize resistance was futile and they should prepare to pack their bags to leave Florida on waiting transport ships in Tampa Bay. And if the Seminole rebuffed his last peace overture, his Army would crush them and deport the survivors. He failed to recognize the Seminole had a vote in this proposal and that they had other ideas about the removal policy; namely, they would refuse to leave, but would fight by force of arms to the last Indian rather than consent.  The Battle of the Withlacoochee was the first U.S. Army-planned engagement with the Seminole. The inconclusive battle came around the same time Seminole were ambushing a 108-soldier column moving along the Fort King Road from Fort Brooke, Tampa. When troops faltered in the battle, Clinch unsheathed his sword and waved his symbol of authority to motivate troops to maintain discipline and form properly to fight.   Map that shows location of Fort Drane, the later Fort Clinch, and the Dec. 31, 1835 location of the battle with the Seminoles in the Withlacoochee. (Above) (Below) a notional reproduction of a typical military fort of the era.  Autodidact, living historian, and military reenactor Jesse Marshall returns to the Seminole Wars podcast to answer these questions and to provide perspective on why things went the way they did. The outcome was not foreordained. Seminole War soldier reenactor Jesse Marshall explains the situation to Matt Milnes, admist other Soldier-reenactors. (Above) (Below) Jesse Marshall appears at living history events as an 1830s Florida Cracker.      Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW064 Historic Florida Militia Commemorates July 10 Florida Bicentennial that Brought Federal Authority, Confrontation to Seminole

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 35:07

    On July 10, 1821, the United States of America accepted possession of the Spanish Florida territory in a ceremony at St Augustine. Whatever tranquility the Seminoles enjoyed began to end with this change of ownership. They knew and trusted the Spanish authorities. They liked them because they left the Seminole alone. But these Americans were different. The Seminole had sided with the Spanish in the so-called Patriot War of 1812. Now the patriots were coming to town to run the peninsula. The Spanish days of benign neglect of the Seminoles began to end with this ceremony. The Historic Florida Militia is providing a living history interpretation with mock proclamation signings, musket and cannon firing, and living historians mingling with the public on July 9 and 10. Maria Alvarez. who run the company with her husband Bob, joins us to tell us about the importance of this transfer of authority to the United States. She also explains how her group brings to life various historic periods, such as Pedro Mendendez's founding in 1565 and Sir Francis Drake's 16th century raids and the British colonial period (1763-1783) in St Augustine's history.  FHM presents the past to the present for the future.    Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of theU.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us      

    SW063 At Charleston Conference, CAMP Historians Pay Homage at Osceola's Grave, Tour Fort Moultrie Seminole Prisoner Holding Cells

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 21:49

    Dr. Wesley Moody, a member of the Council on America's Military Past or CAMP, joins us to discuss the historical ties between Charleston and the Florida Territory during the Seminole Wars. The City of Charleston may be in South Carolina, not in Florida, but it retains strong historical ties to the U.S. Government's Indian Removal Campaign. Fort Moultrie served as a holding area for Seminole awaiting passage to the Oklahoma Territory. The Army detained the famous Seminole warrior Osceola there. He is buried just outside its gates. Respectful grave marker for Osceola just outside main gate at Fort Moultrie. Dr. Moody invites listeners to consider attending CAMP's October conference in Charleston where they can visit the sites he discusses, as well as Revolutionary and Civil war sites at the port city. Dr Moody closes with an orientation to what CAMP does and how one can learn more about the organization and this fall conference. Find them online at campjamp.org. Registration opens July 15. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW062 Fort Sumter Union Civil War Commander Battled Seminole at Loxahatchee in 1830s

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 59:42

    In April 1861, following a steady barrage of artillery that left him unable to resupply his garrison, the commander of the Union outpost of Fort Sumter, in Charleston's harbor, surrendered his command to the new Confederates States of America. Some argue that the actions of U.S. Army Major Robert Anderson, an old Seminole War hand, may have sealed the fate unfavorably for the new CSA. While he ordered his men to return cannon fire to the onshore batteries, he specifically prohibited shelling of the heart of Charleston, with all the loss of civilian life and structural destruction. By acting in response to CSA provocations, Anderson positioned his command to be viewed as both a victim of Confederate aggression and as a heroic defender of sovereign federal rights and authority. Who was Robert Anderson and how did assignments in a longer military career shape his temperament as commander of Fort Sumter? Dr. Wesley Moody fills us in. He has embarked on a full-scale biography of Anderson, whom, incredibly, has never had a biography written about him. Our listeners will find it of note that Anderson enjoyed extensive service in Florida, fighting at the Battle of Loxahatchee River, near present-day Jupiter, Florida, and on the staff of General Winfield Scott. Florida-native, Dr. John Wesley Moody III, has been a professor of history since 2007, Dr Moody has worked as a professor of history at Florida State College at Jacksonville.  Born and raised in Pensacola, Dr. Moody received a Bachelor's from the University of Southern Mississippi; a Master's degree from University of West Georgia; and a Ph.D. from Georgia State University. He specializes in 19th century American history, specifically military. He is in preliminary stages of a textbook proposal to tell Florida history from first European contact to the present. He is also presently in preliminary stages for a biography of Major Robert Anderson, the commander at Fort Sumter when the first shots there began the military aspects of the American Civil War. Dr Moody is author of four books already, including Demon of the Lost Cause: Sherman and Civil War History; Seven Myths of the Lost Cause; the Battle of Fort Sumter; and a biography of a civil war Marine. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website: seminolewars.org   

    SW061 GARI Surveys Wahoo Swamp to Spot the Battle Lines to confirm or refute written accounts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 37:26

      Sean Norman, acting director of GARI, Gulf Archaeological Research Institute, joins us to discuss the research findings of GARI's report on the 1836 Battle of the Wahoo Swamp. He describes how they engaged the community impacted, surveyed the available terrain, discovered various artifacts, and what GARI concluded in its report. Official register entry for Battle of the Wahoo Swamp from Nov. 26, 1836. Wahoo Swamp is the battle with the funny name. It provided a bookend to US military efforts to remove Seminole from Florida in 1836. Spring battles within the Withlacooche River region taxed the efforts of a number of Federal Army generals. With these regulars unable to bring the Seminole heal, Florida territorial governor Richard Keith Call, as territorial militia chief, took troops into the Wahoo Swamp to try his hand at removing the Seminole, in this case, using volunteers and Florida militia with available regular troops. His efforts were as futile as the regulars' attempts before him. The battle became known for the death of one of its officers, David Moniac, who had led Creek volunteers and had been the first Native American (Indian) to attend and graduate from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. This is because the battle itself was inconclusive for the U.S. military. For the Seminoles, thwarting American military advance meant they would live another day free in Florida.   Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Subscribe automatically to the Seminole Wars through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart or Stitcher or Spotify, DoubleTwist, or Pandora or Google podcasts or iTunes, or ...Check it out so you always get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube!  

    SW060 At Wahoo Swamp, Seminoles Continue to Frustrate Army Indian Removal Plans

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2021 34:42

      The battle with the funny name, Wahoo Swamp, provided a bookend to US military efforts to remove Seminole from Florida in 1836. Spring battles within the Withlacooche River region taxed the efforts of a number of Federal Army generals. With these regulars unable to bring the Seminole heal, Florida territorial governor Richard Keither Call, as territorial militia chief, took troops into the Wahoo Swamp to try his hand at removing the Seminole, in this case, using volunteers and Florida militia with available regular troops. His effots were as futile as the regulars' attempts before him. Craftsman constructed a miniature representation of the Battle of Wahoo Swamp. The battle became known for the death of one of its officers, David Moniac, who had led Creek volunteers and had been the first Native American (Indian) to attend and graduate from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. This is because the battle itself was inconclusive for the U.S. military. For the Seminoles, thwarting American military advance meant they would live another day free in Florida.   National report newspaper account on the battle (bottom second column). Sean Norman, acting director of GARI, Gulf Archaeological Researrch Instititute, joins us to discuss the battle itself and its contours. In our next episode, he returns to discuss the GARI survey on the area of the Battle of Wahoo Swamp. He describes how they engaged the community impacted, surveyed the available terrain, discovered variouis artifacts, and what GARI concluded in its report.  Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Subscribe automatically to the Seminole Wars through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart or Stitcher or Spotify, DoubleTwist, or Pandora or Google podcasts or iTunes, or ...Check it out so you always get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube!  

    SW059 College History Professor Illuminates Seminole War Research Hurdles, Faddish Academic Theories, and Joy of Discovery

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2021 32:14

    Following three weeks of how-to research methods from Chris Kimball, Seminole War historian and author, we bring an academic into our fold to discuss the view from inside the proverbial ivory tower. Professors battle over arcane academic theories but to do history right, this week's guest says one still must do basic gumshoe detective work to find out what happened and, possibly, why. The great news for researchers is that the Seminole Wars were well documented in writing from the highest levels of government down to the foot soldier or pioneer. Materials are available, even if they are crumbling in one's hands when inspected today.  Florida-native, Dr. John Wesley Moody III, has been a professor of history since 2007, Dr Moody has worked as a professor of history at Florida State College at Jacksonville. He compares and contrasts historical research methods, such as those Chris Kimball highlighted. And he discusses contentious contemporary approaches to historical research. Dr. Moody prefers the narrative aoproach, telling a coherent and possibly unified story to understand what happened at a given place and time. Other historical approaches include applying race, class, gender, and sexual identity as the lens through which a historian should view the past. Dr. Moody discusses pros and cons of historical approaches. Born and raised in Pensacola, Dr. Moody received a Bachelor's from the University of Southern Mississippi; a Master's degree from University of West Georgia; and a Ph.D. from Georgia State University. He specializes in 19th century American history, specifically military. He is in preliminary stages of a textbook proposal to tell Florida history from first European contact to the present. He is also presently in preliminary stages for a biography of Major Robert Anderson, the commander at Fort Sumter when the first shots there began the military aspects of the American Civil War. Dr Moody is author of four books already, including Demon of the Lost Cause: Sherman and Civil War History; Seven Myths of the Lost Cause; the Battle of Fort Sumter; and a biography of a civil war Marine. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us          

    SW058 Central Florida National Cemetery Honors Veterans on Seminole Wars Hallowed Ground

    Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 7:34

    In this short second-part discussion, Doug Gardner of the Florida National Cemetery chats about that cemetery and its central location within the battle space of the Second Seminole War. Guest Doug Gardner is a Vietnam veteran. He heads FNC’s monument committee and serves on the Joint Veterans Support Committee. Doug is executive vice president of Flags of Fallen Vets Inc, for Florida. No Seminole Wars veterans are interred there -- a headstone memorializes Creek Indian David Moniac whose remains are thought to be in St Augustine with Major Dade's fallen men. However, as our fellow guest Chris Kimball has pointed out, there is at least one known Seminole Wars reenactor buried at FNC. That Air Force veteran is David "Chobee" Exum.  The former delivery driver volunteered for Hillsborough River State Park Native American Living History Programs. Kimball said the funeral for Exum, one of the original group of Second Seminole War reenactors, was quite a spectacle since many of his fellow reenactors paid their respect in full Native American garb.  Chobee was a member of the Royal Rangers and of the Native American Outreach. Two news articles discuss his work.  A schematic of the FNC's various sections would help one find his grave. His memorial ID is 15901000 Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW057 Seminole Wars Panels Available for Proposed Freedom Memorial Plaza at Bushnell's Florida National Cemetery

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 21:43

        We devote our next two episodes to honoring veterans who fell in battle and veterans for whom we memorialize. In Bushnell, a national cemetery provides an honored abode to deceased American veterans. It is located in the heart of where were waged the first battles of the Second Seminole War Ironically, Florida National Cemetery at Bushnell, or FNC, contains no Seminole Wars veterans. Only one marker – a headstone – honors Seminole War service. That marker belongs to Creek Indian and Alabama native David Moniac, the first native American graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. His remains are not interred at FNC but his memory is.   A unique feature is the ability to take an image of a headstone to learn more about the veteran.  Overall, FNC contains no monuments to ANY of the wars Americans have fought in. That is about to change. Doug Gardner joins us to introduce listeners to the Freedom Memorial Plaza initiative. Its centerpiece is 68 etched panels depicting the various wars Americans have fought in since our nation’s founding. Several of those panels are available to recognize events from the Seminole Wars of Florida. Doug Gardner is a Vietnam veteran – welcome home, buddy! – He heads FNC’s monument committee and serves on the Joint Veterans Support Committee. Doug is executive vice president of Flags of Fallen Vets Inc, for Florida. This week, Doug describes the monument initiative. Next week, on Memorial Day, Doug chats about the cemetery itself.   Other monuments include Gold Star Families, missing soldiers, and a monument to veterans buried who had no families to attend the ceremony.    Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW056 Unpolished yet Glimmering Gems of Knowledge Await Intrepid Seminole War Scholars

    Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2021 53:15

      This week is the pay off for our time learning about how to research. Chris Kimball has explained how one can search for knowledge on the internet and at libraries. He's talked about how he takes that knowledge and uses it to tell a fuller story of the Second Seminole War. This week, Chris Kimball shares the anecedotes and curious stories about players in the Seminole War -- people and stories he countered in his research.   In this episode, listeners will hear about Osceola and the fate of his head and his belongings. They will learn about military inventions or improvements -- land mines and pontoon bridges -- that later came into their own in the American Civil War. They will learn how the Army armed the Seminole by treaty with 2,200 Derringer small-caliber and percussion capped rifles while supply Halls breach-loading musket-rifles that proved easier to reload while horse riding but which tended to break easily or worse, explode. And they will learn about how tempers flare and people die, needlessly and foolishly, and blood fueds are begun...and finished after originating in service in the Seminole Wars. .    Above, Gabriel Rains designed mines (then called torpedoes) that he used in the Second Seminole War and refined later for use in the Civil War. This illustration is a representation of an explosion. Above, one can find these Jaeger rifles at the Florida Historical Society in Cocoa. They were a coda to a blood fued begun over insurbination and disobedience in the chain of command of territorial militia mobilized for the Florida War. The back story is fascinating and Chris Kimball handles its complexities with aplomb. The Jäger rifle was one the most balanced and compact rifles, very characteristic for its big caliber; equipped with double set trigger, it was very precise, able to shoot big balls having a very high energy. The Jäger rifle was first made in the flintlock version and only afterwards it was transformed to a percussion rifle.   Chris Kimball's sleuthing led him to discover that contrary to a headstone in Pensacola (above)that says it contains Major Dade's only daughter, in fact he had another child, a daughter, who died as a toddler. (below)   Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW055 Delicacy and Discernment Key to Accessing Dormant Knowledge about Seminole Wars

    Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2021 51:40

      Above is an item from Record Group 391, Records of U.S. Army Mobile Commands, 2nd Artillery, entry 81, General, Special, and Other Orders Received from Superior Commands.  This volume includes letters sent from Fort Brooke, December 1835 - January 1836, most of which relate to the Dade Massacre. Librarians explained that they could reproduce portions upon request but that researchers should not attempt to copy its contents on a flat-bed scanner, because it is an exceptionally fragile condition. This document requires a visit to the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, where one can view it in the reading room. How to research at NARA is available at its  https://www.archives.gov/dc-metro/washington   Author and historian Chris Kimball returns to discuss techniques to acquire, handle, and categorized dormant knowledge from official records, letters, newspapers, and diaries about the Seminole Wars. Some remains are found on headache-inducising microfilm. Some are scanned and available as PDF scans. And some, like the orderly books from Fort Brooke -- bound into a collected volume by the War Department, can be viewed wearing protective gloves. The books at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in Washington, DC, are so fragile, one cannot even scan them on a machine without the pages crumbling from the handling. Instead, the NARA folks permit records copying only by individuals if they use non-flash photography. Or one can read the contents and hand-copy them or type them into a word processing program on a laptop permitted in the research area.  Cursive handwriting in order books is often quite clear. Chris Kimball laments that much correspondence from military officers compiled in such books is often received looking better than chicken-scratch. That is one of the benefits to recopying the incoming correspondence: Its contents all look as if written from the same hand. If one can't make out an original illegible note from a COL William Harney, one can turn to this book as scribes doubled their efforts to transcribe originals as closely to what was drafted as possible. Translation: they had to be able to decipher handwriting accurately to ensure the Orderly Book was authoritative.  As onoerous as it may seem, the knowledge represented by words scrawled in ink on those documents still tells tales of worthy of continued interest. The War Department records usually have neat, crisp, clear cursive handwriting. A scribe would take disparate field reports and copy their contents into an orderly book. These were entered based on when written or when received. One may find accounts from the Florida War interspersed with reports from Texas, or the Great Lakes states about military operations. These are often as fascinating as the Seminole War reports. Sometimes, they have indirect ties to the Seminole Wars because of the actions described or the people involved in those actions. But, one won't know this until less on goes paintakingly through such an orderly book to view the collected contents.  Chris Kimball tells what he does in such cases.   Chris Kinball compiled an index guide specifically aligned with Seminole War reports as presented in the Army-Navy Chronicle. It is a handy "cheat sheet" so one knows what are the Seminole War reference in any given issue of the chronicle -- and where to find them (e.g., inside pages or on the front page, etc...) A problem for Chris Kimball is that he detected an eight-month period when the Chronicle is absent from the collected records in hard-bound books, on microfilm, or on internet-available PDF scans. Were those copies lost? If not, what reason explains the inability to find these "missing" issues. The Chroncile's publisher drafted a Supplement that he inserted into the newspaper at the end of October 1840. He harranged subscribers to finally pay their "dues." And he noted that if military officers who read the Chronicle but didn't pay for it continued in this practice, he would be forced to cease publication as he could not pay his bills otherwise. This was the "smoking gun" that outlined why the Chronicle might not be sustainable. Hence, the supplement informs us that the later issues from mid-January to the end of August 1841 were not lost; they were simply never published -- because of inability to pay the printing costs. The people who scanned the back issues of the Chronicle apparently did not have access to the Supplement as the microfilm and PDF images do not include it. The library at the US Military Academy at West Point, NY, responsibly kept the actual hard-copy issues of the Chronicle in addition to offering the microfilm or online PDF versions for researchers. Because of this, the Supplement was not lost -- and the knowledge it contained about publication problems was preserved to assist researchers even today.     Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW054 Author and Historian Shares Techniques to Research the Seminole Wars from Home

    Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 20:36

    The internet and on-site library visits helped John and Mary Lou Missall research their book on the life of an officer who served in the Second Seminole War. Chris Kimball promoted that book on his Youtube Channel.  The COVID-19 pandemic has led civil authorities to close down many facilities as a public health measure. One of the casualties has been libraries. How do you conduct research when the facilities with the research information are closed?  In the first of several episodes, author and historian Chris Kimball, author of books on the battles of the Seminole Wars, people in the Seminole Wars, and newspapers covering the war, explains how to use one's keyboard to access the internet and its wealth of resources. He explains reliable sources to consult. Next week he will discuss some of what he found from using such resources, and later he will share anecdotes about people and events of the Seminole Wars that he discovered in the course of his research. These fascinating stories and tidbits add color to our understanding of the war and help to personalize the war when one may look at it in an abstract and impersonal fashion. To find these, one must start with solid sources and the internet and on-site in libraries are two means to start the knowledge quest.  Chris Kimball is also a Seminole living-history reenactor.    The State Library is the RA Gray Library in Tallahassee (above). A look at the stacks on the shelves is below.  Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW053 Seminole Frustrated Army by Fighting 2SW on Its Terms, not by Military Expectations

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2021 39:04

    Reenactment photo (courtesy) At times in its history, the US Army has personified the admonition that those who forget the past are condemned to repeat it. This is especially disconcerting since the US Army has been the architect of its past and yet, as in the case of unconventional conflicts, it has often sought to bury those memories in favor of a pledge never to fight in such ways again. The reality is that the Army does not usually get to choose what type of war it fights; its political leaders choose. The unconventional guerrilla-style operations of the Second Seminole War are a prime case in point. With us today to discuss how the Army wanted to fight the Second Seminole War versus how the Seminole forced them to fight, and how its leaders adapted is Dr. James S. Robbins. He is an author, political commentator and professor, with expertise in national security, foreign and military affairs, military history, and American politics.  Reenactors fire volleys against Seminole practicing guerilla war tactics (Courtesy Photo) Dr. Robbins’ books include Last in Their Class: Custer, Pickett and the Goats of West Point. During his years in government service, he directed the U.S. Intelligence Community Center for Academic Excellence, and also taught International Relations at the National Defense University, and the United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College. His insights gained from Last in Their Class inform our discussion today about adaptability against adversity. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us    

    SW052 Military Strategist Examines Evolution of U.S. Army War Preparations on Eve of 2SW

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2021 49:22

    For nearly 250 years and with a few notable exceptions, US Army readiness has swung like a pendulum from woefully inadequate to veritable invincible force in its engagements for war. From the Revolution to the War of 1812, from the Civil War to the Second World War, too often the Army began fighting unprepared and only over time – and at great cost in blood and treasure -- has it righted itself to gain the victory it sought. The Second Seminole War was little different. The Army entered unprepared for an extended conflict with Florida Indians. Fortunately, the fate of the Republic was not at stake. After getting whipped in its early encounters with the Seminole in late 1835 and throughout 1836, the Army muddled along through failed strategies and failed tactical execution, through poor supply, poor medicine, and poor conditions, until it belatedly recognized the futility of total Seminole removal, declarejd victory and went home. It left behind roughly two hundred ravaged but still defiant Seminole warriors and their families to live in peace, at least for the time being. It learned some lessons from the conflict but these were quickly forgotten, along with the war, when hostilities finally ceased. The Army's lesson was not to get involved in THIS kind of war again.  Historically, why has the Army done this? In Preparing for War: The Emergence of the Modern U.S. Army, 1815-1917, JP Clark, a US Army colonel, Army War College professor, military strategist, and military historian, answers why, especially for the Second Seminole War. He weaves the chronicle of the US Army's state in the 1830s into an overall century-long narrative of challenge, change, and adaptation. He examines four generations of Army forces and how military culture evolved from just after the War of 1812 until our expedition overseas in Europe for the Great War in 1917. Although every Soldier carried a musket, marksmenship was limited to rote reputation of the manual of arms and close-order drill. Soldiers rarely practiced weapons firing. Despite the weapon's inaccuracy, they were important because one could affix bayonets -- the ultimate weapon of the era. (courtesy photos) Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us     Likes | Share | Download(35)

    SW051 War as Indian Removal by 'Other Means': Applying Classic Prussian Military Strategist's Insights, Maxims to Second Seminole Conflict

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2021 42:14

    The US Government passed the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and that political decision led to U.S. military demands that the Seminole relocate to Oklahoma. The US Government accepted that it might require waging war to enforce the removal. The great Prussian military strategist Carl Von Clausewitz anticipated this contingency: "War is the continuation of politics by other means."Clausewitz warned, though, "No one starts a war -- or rather, no one in his sense ought to do so -- without first being clear in his mind what he intends to achieve by the war and how he intends to conduct." The Seminole were clear on their political objectives in opening fire on Major Dade's command to begin formal hostilities with the U.S. government: Wage war until the Army agreed to stop forced removal to Oklahoma. They would fight on the run if they had to, with hit-and-run tactics and nuisance attacks. But they would still fight.  In response, the U.S. Army embarked on a punitive operation against the Florida Seminole to achieve its own political objectives by warlike means. It seemed a simple enough proposition. Engage the Seminole in a big battle. Defeat them. Remove them. Restore peace. No one in America had read how Clausewitz would have scoffed at this simple proposition. In war, he wrote, everything is simple. But the simplest things are very, very difficult to perform Removing the Seminole was only simple on paper. More than seven years later, the U.S. Army had not completed its simple mission to capture all the Seminole and deport them. It eventually gave up on 100% removal, packed up, and went home. Joining us is US Army Colonel and War College graduate JP Clark, a military historian and a military strategist. He explains how an understanding of Clausewitz could have informed officers in the Second Seminole War -- and does inform us today. Without a copy of On War in its collective haversacks to inform and guide its strategy, operations, and tactics, the Army muddled along in the Second Seminole War. Much blood and treasure might have been spared had the Army's senior officers known of and embraced Clausewitz' strategic insights.    Who was Carl von Clausewitz? Clausewitz' insights continue to resonate two centuries after he penned them. His relevance to thinking about strategy remains undiminshed by time.    Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW050 Park Focus: Loxahatchee River Battlefield Park Hosts Sites of Second Seminole War Clashes

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2021 37:36

    Living historians and the public have a blast at battle reenactments. Photo by Andrew Foster Who oversees custodial care for Seminole Wars battlefields? For years, it has been hard to even determine where some battlefields were. Florida's landscape has changed much in 180 years or so, some nature's doing, some not. In Jupiter, concerned citizens banded together to care for two battlefields near them. They formed the Loxahatchee Battlefield Preservationists. The LBP protects and safeguards the Loxahatchee River Battlefield Park, along with the 6,000-year-old prehistoric Native American occupation area contained therein.  Joining us today to discuss the LBP’s efforts, the park, and to provide an overview of these battles is the vice president of the LBP, Andrew Foster. He also has taken many exceptional photographs of the living history events. Many of those photos have helped illustrate these podcast episodes. Park visitors learn about Seminole lives and fighting spirit and U.S. Soldier life. Photos by Andrew Foster          Photos of Andrew Foster by Heather Burney Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW049 Irish-Immigrant U.S. Army Private Paddington "Paddy" McCormick Discusses Soldiers' Perspectives at Living History Events

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2021 40:31

    Irish-Immigrant Army Private Paddington McCormik meets us this week along the Dade Battlefield historic trail in Bushnell, Florida. He's at his post, guarding the trail from any potential hostile Seminole incursions. The lot of a private -- and an immigrant one at that, was a miserable one. Paddy explains how he ended up at what he calls "this Godforsaken place", what Soldier life is like -- the rotten pay, the inhuman heat, the dicey rations -- and his hope that if he just keeps his head down, he just might get out of the war alive. Paddy may be a private, but when he steps out of his 1830s-era sky blue fatigues, he becomes Seminole Wars Foundation president, Steve Rinck. Steve is instrumental in a multitude of ways in bringing awareness about the Seminole Wars throughout Florida. Steve chats about how he created the Paddy character and about how he went from mild-manner school teacher and later school principal to joining the ranks of Seminole War historians.  Above, Pvt. Paddy McCormick, ever vigilant at his post along the Dade Battlefield trail, says Army life is miserable and he is just trying to keep his head down so he can get out of the war alive. Below, Steve Rinck (far right) as Pvt Paddy McCormick joins other Seminole War living historians, such as George Webb (second from left) playing a sutler/trader and Ken Wood portraying his main impression, a Seminole fighter called "Hawkwood". To the left is British Air Commodore (Air Cdre) Stephen R. Thornber, the senior UK  officer from the British contingent visited the Dade Battlefield as part of a militaray staff ride from U.S. Central Command, at MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa, Florida.  Such staff rides help contemporary military personnel to learn and apply lessons to current operations from past military battles and conflicts, such as the Dade Battle and the Second Seminole War.    Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us

    SW048 Gunpowder Warrior Discusses Seminole Fighters' Perspectives at Living History Events

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2021 27:53

    A Seminole going by the name Gunpowder Warrior spoke with this host along the memorial trail at Dade Battlefield Park in Bushnell, Florida. We engaged in a short colloquy about the reason for the battle, Seminole perceptions during the battle, and where the Seminole went after their victory. Visiting groups on military staff rides often encounter Gunpowder Warrior as they trek along the hallowed ground that we call the Dade Battlefield trail. He stands as a stark reminder that there was another side to the battle, a side different from that of the soldiers who fought and perished here. I was aided in our discussion by translator Steve Creamer. Steve has portrayed Seminole at various events and venues around Florida for many decades. When Gunpowder Warrior and I completed our talk, Steve Creamer stayed behind to discuss how he portrays the Seminole fighter, how he has also portrayed a Missouri volunteer militiaman, and what the public can learn from witnessing battle reenactments and engaging with the re-enactors, such as Steve, who portray Seminole and Soldier at Florida parks.  Participants in miltiary staff rides have often encountered Gunpowder Warrior (Steve Creamer) along the trail at Dade Battlefield Historic State Park. Steve Creamer and other non-Seminole Tribe members portray Seminole Warriors at living history events. Living historians such as Steve Creamer often reenact Second Seminole War battles side by side with members of the Seminole Tribe of Florida, such as Pedro Zepeda.  Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us

    SW047 Digging into the Tantalizing What Ifs Surrounding the 1836 Peace Parley at Camp Izard

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2021 50:39

    The Battle of Camp Izard, Second Day by Jackson Walker In March,1836, the commanding general of a large US Army force had foolishly boxed himself into a hastily built fortification, a 250-yard quadrangle fortified with log breastworks and earthen bastions. He called it Camp Izard, after a West Point-trained officer who had perished on the first day of what became known to history as the aptly named Battle of Camp Izard. The Camp was located along the Withlacoochee River about 20 miles southwest of today’s Ocala, Florida. The expedition’s leader was General Edmund P. Gaines, commander of the US Army’s Western Military Department, based in New Orleans. Upon learning of the Seminole’s annihilation of Major Francis Dade’s column in late December 1835 and their rebuff of General Duncan’s Clinch’s advance against them in early January 1836, Gaines quickly amassed a military force and rushed off to Florida to join the fight. Gaines found the Dade site, buried the fallen with military honors, and set out to avenge Dade’s men and the Army’s honor. Resupplying at Fort Drane, Gaines believed he could quickly find the Seminole, whip them into submission with his combined force of regulars and militia, and evict them to the Oklahoma territory. Color map of Camp Izard in February 1836 and black and white photograph of Maj. Gen. Edmund P. Gaines (late in his life) Instead, he found himself besieged and beleaguered facing a force of Seminole he could not perceive at a small camp he could not escape into terrain he did not know his way out of. As his supplies dwindled, his men began killing and eating their horses and mules to survive. Anxious with the precariousness of his position, Gaines sent messengers begging for relief from the commander of US Army forces in Florida, the aforementioned General Clinch, but thus far no relief had received no reply. Therefore, he speedily agreed to parley when he received such a Seminole request. They told him they were willing to let his starving Army retreat unmolested if he agreed to leave them alone in Florida. He was close to agreeing to this condition when men from General Clinch’s late arriving relief party stumbled onto the camp and, unaware of the negotiations, began firing. The Seminoles withdrew. The war would drag on for another seven years. We who look back at the poor timing can only despair and ask, What If? In this episode, Sean Norman, acting executive director for the Gulf Archaeological Research Institute, returns to the Seminole Wars podcast to help us address this great “What if” question. He will explore how the specialized study of Conflict Archaeology informs his study of this Seminole War site, and, how an acronym called KOCOA can aid archaeological teams in complementing and in some cases verifying written accounts of military engagements, such as this one. And, as Camp Izard is the first site GARI began surveying from the Seminole Wars, Sean will address GARI’s challenges in locating and excavating at the camp’s remains, and he will examine why camps and forts in Florida were so short-lived and left such an ephemeral signature on the landscape. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW046 In Seminole Wars, West Point's 1829 Military Academy Graduates Showed Mettle and Officer Corps' Institutionalized Professionalism

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2021 57:55

    Monument to Major Dade and His Command that perished in 1835 is located on the grounds of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. Although Major Dade himself did not graduate from West Point, the Academy graduated many officers who served honorably in the Second and Third Seminole Wars. Recently, a military historian cast his lens on the West Point Class of 1829. That class featured 11 cadets who later saw service in what was then termed, The Florida War. One 1829 graduate in fact served under Major Dade in 1835, but found himself detached to deliver a message and therefore unable to accompany Dade on that disastrous march in late December 1835. Another saw action at the First Battle of Loxahatchee in January 1838, ironically though, as a civilian contractor rather than as a military officer. He later put back on a military uniform advancing to general officer in both the Union, and, in 1861, in the Confederate States of America. One graduate, to commemorate a close friendship, changed his surname to that of a fallen comrade from the Class of 1828 who had died in the war. One other became a trusted Indian agent in the years leading up to the Third Seminole War. Other classes had representation in the Army during the long Second Seminole War, with most of the officers in Major Dade’s ill-fated command having West Point pedigrees. With us to discuss this West Point Class of 1829 and those among it who served in the Florida Wars – and one famous graduate, Robert E. Lee, who did not -- is Professor P.J. Springer. He is the chair for the Department of Research at the Air Command and Staff College at Maxwell Air Force Base in Montgomery, Alabama. A military historian, he has taught at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, and at the U.S. Army War College in Carlyle, Pennsylvania.  Along with Christopher Mortenson, he is the editor of the three volume Daily Life of U.S. Soldiers: From the American Revolution to the Iraq War. He is also the author of several books including America's Captives: Treatment of POWs from the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror; Transforming Civil War Prisons: Lincoln, Lieber, and the Laws of War; Military Robots and Drones: A Reference Handbook; and Cyber Warfare: A Reference Handbook.  Dr. Springer first discussed the 1829 West Point for the podcast A Better Peace from the U.S. Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. That podcast is available here: https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/podcasts/class-of-1829/ A list of officers from that class and where their careers eventual led is here: https://civilwarintheeast.com/west-point-officers-in-the-civil-war/class-of-1829/ Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW045 Dade Battlefield Staff Rides Instruct Present-Day Military Leaders in Challenges of Command When Under Fire in Irregular Conflict

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2021 47:40

    George Webb, a former Florida State park ranger, portrays a trader of the 1830s. He briefs British officers and NCOs from US Central Command on a military staff ride to the Dade Battlefield. The Dade Battle of December 28, 1835 is considered one of the U.S. Army’s most lopsided defeats. How an Army column could allow itself to be caught so unaware of a hostile adversary in its midst is a question that military professionals still ask to this day. One way to answer that question is through what's called the Military Staff Ride. The staff ride puts military leaders in the figurative shoes of the officers and men of Dade's column. Although the battle was part of what is now called “irregular warfare,” today’s leaders—uniformed and civilian—can find ample opportunity to highlight the role of all warfighting functions with a particular emphasis on intelligence, fires and protection. Was the outcome foreordained? Would it be foreordained in the contemporary world? How might today's leaders have conducted the march and the battle differently had they been in charge? Listeners will not be surprised that the insights gleaned from conducting the Dade’s Battle staff ride are as relevant today as they were over 175 years ago. With us today to discuss the Military Staff Ride and specifically how one is conducted at the Dade Battlefield is David A. “Scotty” Dawson, the civilian command historian for U.S. Central Command, at MacDill Air Force Base, in Tampa, Fla. Scotty is a retired Marine Corps colonel with numerous combat deployments to his credit.  Reenactor Steve Rinck, Seminole Wars Foundation president, portrays Irish-immigrant Pvt. Paddington McCormick -- Paddy to his friends. Paddy explains the miserable life of a U.S. Army recruit in Florida to British officers and NCOs from US Central Command visiting Dade Battlefield on a military staff ride in the summer of 2016. The British Army military contingent (in civilian clothes) and three living history reenactors (front row) portraying a trader, a Seminole warrior, and a U.S. Army soldier, pose for a group photo after completing the Dade Battle staff ride. The reenactors explained their character and the part they played in the Second Seminole War. Our guest this week, Scotty Dawson,  command historian for US CENTCOM, is standing in the back row, third from the left (white hat). Seminole Wars podcast host, Patrick Swan, is in center rear (wearing safari hat). Summer 2016.  The Staff Ride Handbook for Dade’s Battle, Florida, 28 December 1835 is published by The Combat Studies Institute at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. Authored by Michael G. Anderson, this extensively researched handbook examines this opening conflict of the Second Seminole War. He uses it as a vehicle to allow organizations at any echelon to study leadership at the tactical level. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW044 Living Historian Louie Bear's Heart Demonstrates Seminole Cultural Practices to Teach and Educate on Traditional Ways of Life

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2021 40:53

    For many warrior re-enactors of the Seminole Wars, the smell of gunpowder from a mock battle is sweeter than the aroma of a roasting pig from camp fire barbecue. Smoking gunpowder represents action…and engagement. It represents an adrenalin rush from fighting for your side while hundreds of onlookers watch nearby. And it represents a means to show what is usually only described through the written word in a history book. THIS, they are saying, is how it went down. Smoking gunpower then is indeed sweeter…for some. But not for Louie Bear’s Heart. He prefers the slow-burn of smoking meats in a Seminole hunting camp; where he can live in tune with the old ways of self-reliance far removed from the conveniences of modern American life; where he can trap and then carefully butcher a racoon, sear it on a spit, and then provide it for his family’s dinner plates. After all, you just can’t find tender enough racoon filets at your local supermarket these days. It is where he can quietly engage with the public about Seminole life OUTSIDE of the famous battles they fought to resist Army removal to Oklahoma. And, it is where he can personally demonstrate and educate through his appearance, his words, and his activities what the Seminole customs were that sustained a people often on the run throughout Florida.  Louie (Ferris) Bear’s Heart joins us to discuss all this: Why he believes authenticity is the key to all he does and represents; how he earned his noble Seminole name; and how his living history interpretation is a family affair.  Reenacting Seminole ways is a famly affair. Louie is here with his wife Pam (and young son Christian) and (back row) daughter Justine and son Taj.  At historical events, they don period attire to portray traditional Seminole life.  Louie with wife Pam (left). Louie (right) and son Taj (center) portray Seminole at living history events.  Louie's son, Taj. Louie's daughter, Justine.  In his day job, Louie Ferris (second from right) is a Hillsborough County (State) Park Ranger.  Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida.  Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast catcher, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website www.seminolewars.us  

    SW043 Just Who WERE the Black Seminoles?

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2021 34:17

    We recognize that the Second Seminole War was a war of Indian Removal, ignited by Indian resistance to U.S. government efforts to deport them from Florida to Indian Territory west of the Mississippi.A key sticking point in resolving the conflict was the disposition of those who were known, for purposes of convenience, as Indian slaves, Seminole Negroes or Black Seminoles.And at the center of that was the delicate business of defining who the Black Seminoles were. The translator, diplomat, and strategist Abraham was a leader among Black Seminole and a representative among the Seminole of their interests.One can use the structure of a classic internet meme to illustrate the difficulty in defining who were Black Seminole such Abraham and his people. Who did the Seminole say they were? [Abraham and his people were property, not to be given up without financial compensation and worth fighting to keep.]Who did the Americans say they were? [To the Americans in Georgia and other southern states, Abraham's people were a threat to national security, poised to pour across the border under cover of darkness or to filter up through the swamps to pillage at will.]Who did the Spaniards who ruled Florida say they were? [men and women who fled slavery were potential citizens and able allies who were worth arming and supporting for their value in protecting St. Augustine's back door.]Who did the Black Seminoles say they were? [Abraham, his people, and hundreds of others like them were "freedom seekers" who fled the slavery of the American South and deliberately forged symbiotic alliances with the more numerous and established Seminole Indians.]Who can WE say the Black Seminoles were?Returning to the Seminole Wars podcast to help with what Sherlock Holmes might dub, “The Curious Case of the Black Seminoles of Florida,” is Dr. Brent Weisman.Doctor Weisman has podcasted with us earlier to discuss the continued Historical and Cultural Importance of the Seminole in Florida. He is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at the University of South Florida. He has served as the editor of The Florida Anthropologist, president of the Seminole Wars Historic Foundation and the Alliance for Weedon Island Archaeological Research and Education, and was a founding director of the Florida Public Archaeology Network. His research interests continue to be Seminole Indian culture and history, Florida archaeology, and North American Indians. Black Seminoles at the annual Dade Battle reenactment. Photos by Andrew FosterHost Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website

    SW042 Matt Griffin Uses Military Reenactment to Bring Alive the Black Seminole Warrior Spirit

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2021 26:16

    First-time visitors to the annual commemoration at the Dade Battlefield in Bushnell, Florida, are sometimes startled to see -- amidst the melee -- a Black Seminole racing his war horse up and down the field of action. Likewise, groups escorted along the Dade Park memorial trail discover this same Black Seminole emerge from a concealed strategic position to converse with them.The young man portraying the Black Seminole warrior is Matt Griffin. He is a native Floridian who traces his heritage back to the times of forced Indian removal during the Second Seminole War. He joins us to discuss what the alliance between Seminole and Black Seminole in that war signifies to him; what part Black Seminoles played in the Dade battle itself; what portraying a Black Seminole Reenactor for two decades has taught him about the war; and why we should know and still care about that conflict from nearly two centuries ago.Peace in our Time? Black Seminole Matt Griffin casts a skeptical eye as a Seminole Swamp Owl shakes the hand of Maj. Gen. Thomas Jessup (Steven Rinck) at Fort Dade Capitulation Historical Reenactment Ceremony at the Pioneer Museum Dec. 19, 2020. Photo by Andrew Foster Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW041 Waging War Amidst Fear and Anxiety on the Frontier of 1830s Territorial Florida

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2021 39:30

    Painting: The Macon Volunteers by Jackson WalkerLast week, we looked at the terrain, environment, climate and on-the-ground atmosphere for Seminole and Soldiers and Settlers. This week, we look at some of the underlying causes of the war; some the places and incidents where the Second Seminole War was waged; and also the strategic, operations and tactics used to wage the war. Returning again is Dr. Joe Knetsch, author of a number of books and journal articles on the Seminole Wars. His anthology Fear and Anxiety on the Florida Frontier: Articles on the Second Seminole War 1835-1842, informs our discussion today.Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW040 Living in Fear and Anxiety on the Frontier of 1830s Territorial Florida

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2021 45:56

    Painting: The Captive Osceola by Jackson WalkerThe 1830 Indian Removal Act aimed to relocate Indian tribes in the southeastern United States to undetermined land across the Mississippi River in the Oklahoma Territory. The tribes affected were the Choctaw, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek – the so-called “four C” tribes -- and the Seminole of Florida. The tragic tale of this unjust trail of tears rips at our collective hearts to this day. When removal efforts came to the Seminole of Florida, some departed voluntarily. But, the majority stood their ground and refused to be moved.  Dr. Joe Knetsch. author of a number of books and journal articles on the Seminole Wars, joins us for the first of two episodes to discuss what life was like for Floridians in those days. We examine the Florida terrain, climate and on-the-ground atmosphere for Seminole and Soldiers and Settlers. His anthology Fear and Anxiety on the Florida Frontier: Articles on the Second Seminole War 1835-1842, informs our discussion today. Next week, we look at some of the underlying causes of the war, some the places and incidents where the Second Seminole War was waged, and also the strategic, operations and tactics used to wage the war. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW039 Army Victuals: Jerry Morris Takes Measure of Marchers by the Volume of their Vittles

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2021 27:22

    [Editor's Note: This is the 11th in a series of podcasts over the coming weeks promoting the Seminole Wars Foundation's self-paced virtual challenge, The Major Dade Memorial March to Fort King that launches in just a few days, on Dec. 22. Registration to join Laumer's Legion is now open. Visit www.seminolewars.us for details.]Courtesy photo Linda and Jerry Morris at St Francis Barracks, St Augustine, Fla.In this episode, Jerry Morris discusses his 1830s victuals display and the pamphlet he penned based on it along with his overall research, entitled The Army Moves on Its Stomach. He does not ration his insights here but doles out healthy portions to help listeners understand what it took the Army to feed its troops on a 7- to 10-day march between military posts in Florida.Why did he do this? Because it wasn't enough for ex-paratrooper Jerry Morris to march 60 miles with Laumer's Legion in 1988, retracing the 1835 route of Major Dade's fateful march to massacre. He had to map it as well and he did with Jeff Hough in The Fort King Road: Then and Now. Even that wasn't enough. Jerry Morris also wanted to know what the Soldiers ate along the march route. He had wondered about this while he himself was marching five days from Tampa to Bushnell. The contemporary fare he nibbled upon gnawed at his conscience. This wasn't what they ate, he told himself. A library quest soon ensued and after that, a compilation of recipes and after that, carefully measured amounts in mason jars along with baked hard tack meeting all 1830s standards for quality (Note: no worms. Those only came later with the Civil War and unscrupulous contractors). He soon had a field table display from which he educated spectators visiting various Seminole War battlefield sites during living history demonstrations. With his great wife Linda, Jerry moves the accoutrements in a trailer from site to site today, even though he now moves around in a mobility scooter. From middle school students to the author of the History of the Second Seminole War, Dr. John Mahan to a five-year-old girl attending a battle reenactment with her dad, Jerry gives every presentation as if it was his first one and with the personal delivery one would expect to his dearest friend.Courtesy photo Jerry and Linda Jerry Morris at Seminole Wars Battle Reenactment in Florida.  Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW038: Military Marcher Maps Full 1835 Major Dade Route on Fort King Road and Then Some

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2021 24:46

    [Editor's Note: This is the 10th in a series of podcasts over the coming weeks promoting the Seminole Wars Foundation's self-paced virtual challenge, The Major Dade Memorial March to Fort King. We launched Dec. 22. Registration to join Laumer's Legion is still open. Visit www.seminolewars.us for details.]Courtesy photo of Jerry Morris holding part of a Gunter's ChainIt wasn't enough for ex-paratrooper Jerry Morris to march 60 miles with Laumer's Legion in 1988, retracing the 1835 route of Major Dade's fateful march to massacre. He wanted to "finish the march" continuing another 40 miles north from the Dade Battlefield Historic State Park to re-created Fort King in Ocala. Told no one has re-mapped that route from the old 1840s survey maps, Jerry replied, "Then I'll do it." And so he did. Many years and a collaboration with Geospatial Imager Jeff Hough later, they published The Fort King Road: Then and Now. The unspoken question gnaws at us, though. How did they do it then and now.  In this episode, Jerry Morris explains the ins and outs of surveying in the 1600s and 1700s with so-called Gunter Chains, named for its inventor. He then recalls just what it took to assess the old survey maps -- spot check their accuracy with these Gunter Chains -- and overlap aerial photographs and satellite imagery to produce a highly accurate representation of the old Fort King Military Road. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW037 A More Detailed Look at how Major Dade Led His Troops to Massacre on Fort King Road

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2021 44:53

    [Editor's Note: This is the ninth in a series of podcasts promoting the Seminole Wars Foundation's self-paced virtual challenge, The Major Dade Memorial March to Fort King. We launched Dec. 22. Registration to join Laumer's Legion is still open. Visit www.seminolewars.us for details.]"Dade's Battle" Copyright Guy LaBree 1987U.S. Army Major Francis L. Dade’s movement of a combined artillery and infantry column from Fort Brooke to Fort King is a controversial one, mainly because it ended in disaster. Dade knew such movement could be dangerous but believed the intent of the orders from General Duncan L. Clinch were clear: reinforce the garrison at Fort King without delay. This would explain why he did not wait for the two additional companies that were expected to arrive any day to join him. But, other questions remain. Why were communications interrupted between Fort Brooke and Fort Drane, where General Clinch was planning a campaign to confront the Seminoles about removal to the west? What was the terrain like that Dade’s column had to traverse? What were his troops eating on the march? Did either of these hamper Dade’s ability to move his troops with alacrity to relieve Fort King? What were his troops carrying? What role did their heavy great coats, worn to protect against cold and rain, play when the troops came under fire? How did Dade’s men maintain their professionalism and good order when the Seminole assault ripped through their ranks? After they won the battle, why didn’t the Seminole take any prisoners? And were the Seminole actions to dispatch the wounded soldiers a massacre, as portrayed in news accounts, and a violation of accepted norms of war?Autodidact, living historian, and military reenactor Jesse Marshall returns to the Seminole Wars podcast to answer these questions and to provide perspective on why things went the way they did. The outcome was not foreordained.Dade Battlefield Sketch from Diary of Surgeon Nathan Jarvis, 1836Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW036 Major Dade's Column Battles Seminole Ambush on Fort King Military Road 185 Years Ago

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2020 44:53

    [Editor's Note: This is the eighth in a series of podcasts promoting the Seminole Wars Foundation's self-paced virtual challenge, The Major Dade Memorial March to Fort King. We launched Dec. 22. Registration to join Laumer's Legion is still open. Visit www.seminolewars.us for details.]Dade Battle by Ken Hughes 1974 Miami History CenterOver several episodes, we have alluded to or briefly described the Dade Battle of late December 1835. The time has come to take a deep dive. The Dade Battle, also known as the Dade Massacre, arguably served as the opening shots to the Second Seminole War. Other shots were being fired throughout Florida in that December as well as in the months leading up to this engagement. But this was the Big Battle that seized everyone’s attention and that informed the U.S. Government that the Seminole would not go quietly into Oklahoma exile.With us today to set the scene and describe the Dade Battle is Ross Lamoreaux. Ross is a military re-enactor, a museum exhibitor at the Tampa Bay History Center, the newly elected president of the Dade Battlefield Society, and someone who has actually walked the path of Dade’s march from Tampa toward turmoil in present-day Bushnell.Post return Dec. 28, 1835, list of casualties from "Engagement on the Withlacoochee" Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website

    SW035: Original Laumer's Legionnaire of 1963 recalls 1988 Second Major Dade Commemorative March on Fort King Military Road

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2020 23:31

    Making progress to Dade City (above) (Below) newspaper article with Frank Laumer, Chris Laumer and assorted marchers. [Editor's Note: This is the seventh in a series of podcasts over the coming weeks promoting the Seminole Wars Foundation's self-paced virtual challenge, The Major Dade Memorial March to Fort King that launches in just a few days, on Dec. 22. Registration to join Laumer's Legion is now open. Visit www.seminolewars.us for details.]Our guest this week is one of the last remaining survivors of – well, not Maj. Dade’s march of 1835 from Tampa to Ocala – but of the first Laumer’s Legion, in 1963, that sought to retrace Dade march along a rediscovered Fort King Road. That group succeeded in reaching Bushnell and the Dade Battlefield Historical State Park, where Dade’s journey came to an abrupt halt from a Seminole ambush. The first Laumer’s Legion had no need to track it any further because Dade’s column was unable to trek it any further. Battle survivors had returned to Fort Brooke in Tampa rather than marched north to Fort King, which was a shorter distance but had unknown composition of Seminole who would oppose any passage through.Chris Laumer was 12 years old in 1963. He walked one long, full day with his father, Frank Laumer, family friend William Goza, and several other interested impresarios eager to blaze the pathway anew. Twenty-five years later, his father decided to try it again, this time attired as a blue-sky uniformed 1835-era Soldier, one who would march himself, ford rivers himself, and camp overnight himself to gauge a Soldier's life moving through hostile Indian country, as we term it today. This time, Chris chose to accompany his father – with a legion of historical hobbyists – for the full five-day walking journey.In this episode, Chris shares insights on the difference between the two marchers as he perceived them, whether he thought the marches were a good idea, and what he gleaned from them about the arduous nature of a Soldier’s life back then and how alien it appears to us today. Chris and I shared narration duties of William Goza’s 1963 book on that pathbreaking march for an earlier episode of this podcast.(Above) Crawling under property owner's fences did not appeal to Chris Laumer. (Below) Emerging from swamps, the Legion enters Zephyrhills city streeet.Chris Laumer then (1988) and now (2020)Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW034 Doubting Thomas: Did Dade Battle Survivor Truly Trek an Epic Feat of 60 miles Overnight to Break the News to Fort Brooke?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2020 37:10

    [Editor's Note: This is the sixth in a series of podcasts over the coming weeks promoting the Seminole Wars Foundation's self-paced virtual challenge, The Major Dade Memorial March to Fort King that launches Dec. 22. Registration to join Laumer's Legion is now open. Visit www.seminolewars.us for details.] With military marching, only the first 100 miles are hard.If you are thinking that our virtual march challenge will be tough to complete at 102.3 miles over 90 days, then consider the case of U.S. Army Pvt. John Thomas, a wounded survivor of the Dade Battle in Bushnell. Under penalty of sudden death at Seminole hands, he high-tailed it back to Tampa – some 60 miles and overnight in hostile Indian country –  wearing 1830s-era Army boots (and not much else!) to break the news. Let's just say, his trek was "incentive-based."   In this episode, we examine his story. While Soldiers dragged cannon and limber across the bracing, swift Big Withlacoochee River Dec. 25, 1835, Thomas injured his back severely pulling with them. A surgeon later certified him 3/4ths disabled. Historians have debated whether Thomas then left immediately for Fort Brooke, or continued with Maj. Dade's column. Either way, post returns show Thomas arrived Dec. 29. So, he either tramped back at a brisk clip of 60 miles in 30 hours with a thigh wound and an injured back after the fight -- a most challenging hike without question but not infeasible -- or he was competing for the distinction of the most malingering messenger of all time, sauntering back a full five days after this Dec. 25 crossing mishap. Listen to Jesse Marshall, our resident autodidact and aficionado on most things related to the Seminole Wars, explain not only how Thomas could have done it but also why many continue to doubt it to this day.The late Dave "Boxcar" Leonard, long-time 1830s Soldier living historian who walked the walk, like Jesse Marshall, so he could talk the talk. He marched with the 1988 iteration of Laumer's Legion from Tampa to Bushnell to commemorate Maj. Dade's march of 1835. He even had his prescription adapted for that spectacles modeled on that era. He brought natural food snacks with him on that several day excursion and, of course, wore his uniform, carried his rifle, and camped overnight along the way to add authenticity. He would have appreciated Thomas' feat (and feet!).Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us  

    SW033 Second Seminole War Historical Hobbyist Jesse Marshall Walks the Walk to Talk the Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2020 27:05

    For their craft, Jesse Marshall and colleague march through the blisters, aches and pains. Virtual Challenge hikers wear comfortable clothes & shoes and move at their own pace. [Editor's Note: This is the fifth in a series of podcasts over the coming weeks promoting the Seminole Wars Foundation's self-paced virtual challenge, The Major Dade Memorial March to Fort King that launches Dec. 22. Registration to join Laumer's Legion is now open. Visit www.seminolewars.us for details. In calculating the toll on ones' feet and muscles from this virtual hike, consider what it would have been like to have walked in the replica Brogan Army boots of our guest this week.]For nearly three decades, Jesse Marshall has literally walked the walk as well as talked the talk about soldier life in 1830s-1860s U.S. military eras.An autodidact historical hobbyist, Jesse has portrayed the Confederate grey in Civil War confabs, one time even walking 80 miles to recreate a rebel march before engaging immediately upon arrival in the simulated Battle of Red River. In the Federal blue for Seminole War events, Jesse has trekked some 65 miles along the perilous shoulder of U.S. Highway 301 from Tampa to Bushnell. He did THAT just to commemorate the movement of Dade’s men from Fort Brooke to their untimely demise from a Seminole ambush in 1835. Jesse is one of the most renown and most respected in the living history profession of arms in Florida today.It is easy to recognize why. In his quest for authenticity in what he does, Jesse’s boots have literally worn right off his feet. His knapsack has pinched him too tight to move naturally. His high beaver-skin hat carried forage well enough for him but needlessly irritated his head. Yet he emphatically maintains that, whatever the discomfort, to interpret a period both properly and professionally, one must get the regalia and reactions right. Or not partake in the exercise at all.He joins us to explain why he marched such distances, what he learned in the process about Soldiers' travails, and what the spectacle of a military battle reenactment entails for those practicing the craft. Below: Living Historian Jim Flaherty showcases an 1830s Soldier's kit.  Below, in 1988, the late Frank Laumer demonstrated an 1830s Soldier's struggles simply to ground his gear.  Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us  

    SW032 Frank Laumer and Co. Blaze New Path on an Old Trail in 1963, Retracing Fatal Steps of Major Dade's 1835 March along Fort King Military Road

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2020 48:22


    Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott published a map of central Florida detailing the route of Dade's 1835 march along the Fort King Military Road from Fort Brooke, in Tampa to Fort King in Ocala. Thecolumn never arrived. [Editor's Note: This is the fourth in a series of podcasts over the coming weeks promoting the Seminole Wars Foundation's virtual challenge, The Major Dade Memorial March to Fort King that launches Dec. 22. Registration to join Laumer's Legion is now open. Visit www.seminolewars.us for details.]In this episode, we present an adaptation of William Goza’s Fort King Road 1963 booklet. Although Mr. Goza has passed away, along with Frank Laumer,  a participant from that 1963 march still lives today. Frank Laumer’s son, Christopher, now age 69, walked part of the route with the men when he himself was 12 years of age. It is our distinct pleasure to welcome Chris to our podcast to read the first-person portions of William Goza’s account of the first march to specifically mark that trail since Major Dade himself trod it with his doomed 108-man detachment of artillery and infantry soldiers in 1835.Background:In 1963, land developer Frank Laumer and Clearwater attorney William Goza, joined by a St Leo College student, Jim Beck, decided to take a little hike in the country, tracing the path of Major Dade’s ill-fated column from Tampa to present-day Bushnell, Florida.   Frank Laumer and Co. (above) arrive at Dade Battlefield Historic State Park in December 1963 and accepts greetings from the Park Superintendent. In the 2010s, Frank Laumer (above right) gives a public address at Dade Battlefield Historic State Park.The trek attracted many camp followers – and a few members of the news media. The men had successfully re-established a walking trail that mirrored that of Major Dade in 1835. They donated copies of their maps to the Dade Battlefield Historic State Park and to the Florida Historical Society. And William Goza dedicated himself to drafting an account of their motivations, planning, and many-day journey to the site of what was then still called “The Dade Massacre.” The product of that work became a short booklet, The Fort King Road 1963.William Goza, who died in 2008 at age 90, lived a long and prosperous life as an attorney and municipal judge, after serving honorably as a battery commander during World War II.  But his true passion traced a different route, that of Florida history and forensic science. Twice president of the Florida Historical Society, William Goza was a life-long student of the Seminole Wars and a board member of the Seminole Wars Foundation. He participated in many Dade Battle talks and participated in the acquisition of the US Army Lt. Henry Prince Seminole War diary at the University of Florida in Gainesville.Mr. Goza participated in the investigations of the circumstances surrounding the deaths of President (and one-time Florida War commanding general) Zachary Taylor, the Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizzaro, and Joseph Merrick, the so-called “Elephant Man.” This work in forensics is believed to have influenced his good friend, Frank Laumer to seek answers about Dade Battle survivor, Ransom Clark, by having his remains exhumed and examined by a professional pathologist. This confirmed that all Private Clark had stated about his battle wounds was true. Frank Laumer was instrumental in getting a new VA headstone for battle survivor Ransom Clark. He acquired and donated the legacy headstone to the Tampa Bay History Center. (below)    The 1963 march attracted much news media attention. Chris Laumer, who narrates William Goza's first-person portions of the trek account, is pictured in a photo in the top news article. A Miami newspaper (below) organized a mock Seminole ambush, led by Chairman Howard Osceola, as Frank Laumer's party approached the famous Dade's Breakfast Pond, four miles shy of the Dade Battlefield. All survived and a friendly campfire cookout followed. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us  


    SW031 Despite Close Call, 3rd Time is Still a Charm for Dade Marchers on 2004 Fort King Road Trek

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2020 29:00

    Editor's Note: This is the third in a series of podcasts over the coming weeks promoting the Seminole Wars Foundation's virtual challenge, The Major Dade Memorial March to Fort King that launches Dec. 22. Registration to join Laumer's Legion is now open. Visit www.seminolewars.us for details.In modern times, there have been three formal treks commemorating Major Dade’s march from Fort Brooke to catastrophe, near present-day Bushnell. The first was in 1963. The second was in 1988. And a third was in 2004.In this episode, Ross Lamoreaux returns to the Seminole Wars podcast to describe what that third march – and his first – was like and what perils these marchers encountered along that most dangerous stretch of the old Fort King Military road called...US Route 301. Ross then spends a little time explaining what it means to be a living historian military reenactor at sites such as the Dade Battlefield Historic State Park, where he often portrays soldiers but sometimes an individual, such as Captain Gardiner’s from Dade’s column.Ross Lamoreaux, current president of the Dade Battlefield Society, portrays a 1835-era US Army Soldier at the annual memorial to the fallen combatants at the Dade Battlefield Historic State Park in Bushnell, Fla. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW030 On Whim, Ex-Paratrooper, Trucker Joins Laumer's Legion for 1988 March to Dade Battlefield; Remains a Stalwart Sentinel

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2020 36:57


    Editor's Note: This is the second in a series of podcasts over the coming weeks promoting the Seminole Wars Foundation's virtual challenge, The Major Dade Memorial March to Fort King that launches Dec. 22. Registration to join Laumer's Legion is now open. Visit www.seminolewars.us for details. Jerry C. Morris spotted the innocuously titled newspaper notice by chance in the Nov. 20, 1988 Tampa Tribune-Times: "Historian to Lead Excursion." That historian was the late Frank Laumer and he was recruiting his legion of soldier-reenactors to recreate the march of Major Francis L. Dade's ill-fated column along the Fort King Road, from Tampa to Bushnell. The former trucker and ex-paratrooper gave it a moment's consideration and told his wife, Linda, "I think I want to do this." No longer as fit and trim as he was when he jumped out of perfectly good airplanes for the Army in 1956, nevertheless, 50-year-old Jerry signed up. At a planning meeting with the Dade Battlefield Society, the personable Jerry quickly made contacts with living historians who helped outfit him in the proper period soldier’s attire. A month later, in late December 1988, Jerry joined a group of not especially fit middle-aged men to pace the route of Major Dade’s ill-fated march of 1835. Although its composition was not exactly the size of a Roman Legion -- or even a Roman Century, for that matter -- when the trek began, the hard-physical marching soon quickly decimated the ranks hour by hour and day by day until by the time they reached Dade Battlefield Historic State Park, roughly a baker's dozen of hearty troopers remained. Among them was ...Jerry Morris, who said he really only intended to walk one day's worth (12 to 15 miles) just for the experience. But, one foot in front of the other lead to one hour after another and one day after another until five days later he found himself, to his complete surprise, finishing the 60-mile or so trek. Jerry joins us to tell us first his story of how a scrawny teenager, standing 5'9" and 119 pounds soaking wet, proved the Army doubters wrong about his capabilities and physical caliber to complete airborne training and become an elite paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division. Then he explains how that drive, determination, and stick-to-itiveness served him well 32 years afterward when he decided on a whim to become a soldier volunteer again, enlisting in the elite ranks of the historical-enthusiast marchers of Laumer's Legion. Jerry has remained a stalwart sentinel every since, proving himself many times to be an indispensable voice, mover, and shaker in the Seminole Wars' commemoration community to this day.Once a scrawny 5'9" 119-pound teenager, Jerry built himself into a man "built like a fireplug" (above) with paratrooper jump wings tattooed to his "slab-like" forearm, Jerry Morris set out cheerfully on a whim to march the Fort King Road with Laumer's Legion in 1988. Enraptured by Frank Laumer's captivating campside tales of Dade's men in 1835, Jerry has stayed on with the troop, remaining a stalwart sentinel in the Legion's informal ranks, ever since.In an Aug. 15, 2015 commemoration of the 1842 procession and interment of the remains of Dade's men into the St. Augustine National Cemetery at St Francis Barracks, an older Jerry Morris (above and below) rides atop a memorial caisson with funeral pall, pulled by 2 elegant mules, owned and driven here by Denise and Tom Fitzgerald.Completing the march to Fort King has been Jerry's longstanding dream ever since the 1988 march. Relying on a motor scooter for his mobility these days, Jerry even at 82 has never surrendered that desire. On Veterans Day 2020, Jerry registered formally for The Major Dade Memorial March virtual challenge so he can finally reach Fort King, 32 years after he first entered the elite ranks of Laumer's Legion. We'll hear more from Jerry in upcoming episodes about how he researched and documented the full route of the Fort King Military Road, as well as a pamphlet, An Army Moves on Its Stomach, about what soldiers ate as rations in Florida-based Army garrisons and while marching along blazed trails, such as the Fort King Military Road.   Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 


    SW029 Virtual March Honors Seminole Wars Combatants

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2020 56:27

    This week guest host Steven Rinck, president of the Seminole Wars Foundation, interviews Patrick Swan about The Major Dade Memorial March, a 103-mile virtual challenge that takes hikers on a virtual footpath along the entire unbroken length of the old Fort King Military Road. Similar to the Inca Trail in Peru and Hadrian’s Wall path in England, entrants “walk” (or run) a renowned route steeped in history. This episode discusses how the Army used the Fort King Military Road, how the Second Seminole War began on this road, why it is important to walk the terrain where famous battles occurred, and everything one may want to know about how to participate in this memorial march, including registration fees, benefits, and what exercises are permitted to complete it. Registration opened Veterans Day 2020 and the mission itself launches Dec. 22, 2020 and is open for 90 days after that. Frequently Asked Questions and the registration links are available by visiting www.seminolewars.usPatrick Swan, the regular host for the Seminole Wars, devised this virtual challenge in cooperation with myvirtualmission.com, which sponsors various fitness challenges at notable sites around the globe. He himself recently walked the length of Roman Hadrian's Wall path in England in a virtual challenge as well as walking it physically in 2016 over 7 consecutive days. He offers insights in what one learns from trekking such distances in person and virtually and how taking the journey along the Fort King Military Road will provide one a greater understanding for significant aspects of the Second Seminole War. Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW028 Park Spotlight: Dade Battlefield State Park Commemorates Historic Military Event, Hosts Engaging Year-Round Events, Programs

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2020 23:06

    This week we begin a recurring special feature, on state and federal parks with ties to the Seminole Wars.Dade Battlefield Historic State Park, acquired by the State of Florida in 1921 (see full newspaper clipping below), is the second oldest site in the state. It serves as a memorial to the brave men, both soldiers and Seminoles, whose 1835 battle marked the beginning of the Second Seminole War, the longest armed conflict in the first 195 years of American history. Visitors can inspect the recreated breastworks where the last of Dade's men desperately fought off their Seminole attackers, and then stroll down the eerily quiet original trail where commemorative markers note the precise spots where some of the officers fell in the battle.  https://www.floridastateparks.org/parks-and-trails/dade-battlefield-historic-state-parkRoss Lamoreaux portrays an 1835 US Army sergeant as he speaks at the annual wreath-laying ceremony to memorialize the lives lost at the now-Dade Battlefield State Park, in Bushnell, Fla. He stands outside the perimeter to a recreated breastwork of the type the last remaining soldiers used desperately for cover as they fought to stave off the final Seminole attack on Dec. 28, 1835. Courtesy Photo by Linda Charlton, Leesburg Daily Commercial. https://www.dailycommercial.com/news/20181228/dade-battlefield-pays-tribute-to-slain-soldiersIn this episode, Ross Lamoreaux, Dade Battlefield Society president, Seminole Wars-era soldier-reenactor and living historian, outlines how the Society orchestrates its well-known, authentic annual reenactment of Dade’s Battle each January as well as sponsors living history events, nature programs, social functions, educational and recreational activities, and festivals throughout the year.  Some of these include World War II Commemoration Weekend every March, with a nighttime "World War 2 USO-style" entertainment; an historic-era interpretation with period-attired living historians for visiting groups, such as National Guard members, US and Foreign Militaries, ROTC cadets, and students in schools of all grade levels.  The Society increases public awareness of Dade Battlefield and enhances youth education and citizenship through field trips, quality outreach programs, sponsoring of scholarships, and creation of the Dade Pioneers for school-age children and Dade's Youth for teens interested in earning volunteer hours, while allowing them to become Dade Battlefield Society members.  https://www.dadebattlefield.com/society.html Tampa Times July 7, 1921 Dade Park DedicationHost Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW027 Why a SECOND Seminole War? Federal Government's Eminent Domain Land Grab Fueled Removal Demands & Invited Imminent Conflict

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2020 30:19

    There is a short answer to the question, "What started the Second Seminole War?" That’s simple. An ambush. The Florida Seminole Indians attacked a column of American Soldiers by surprise. The Soldiers were marching along the old Fort King Military Road to relieve the garrison at Fort King.A better question, however, begins with why. Why did the Second Seminole War start? Seminole anger with the US Government. Why were the Seminoles suddenly hostile to the US Government? Because the US Government had unilaterally ended its treaty with the Seminole. Why did the US Government abrogate its treaty and fervently insist they remove from Florida ten years before the treaty’s expiration? It wanted their land. Why did it want their land?  The answer to that question is more nuanced than one may imagine.In this episode, autodidact, living historian, and military reenactor Jesse Marshall joins us to explain the underlying causes that blazed a path to war between the US Government and the Florida Seminole in 1835.Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW026 War Pressure Forges Lasting Cultural Identity Among Loosely Aligned Seminole Bands

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2020 38:26

    This week we look at how the Second Seminole War forged a distinct lasting cultural identity among the loosely aligned bands of Florida Seminole in the 1830s.In 1817, two years before the legal transfer of Florida from Spain to the United States, the Seminole Indians numbered as many as 5,000. They were organized into settled towns across North and Central Florida and thriving on an agricultural economy.  By the close of hostilities in 1858, those remaining Florida Seminole, who had not died from combat or illness or had been forcibly removed to reservations in the Oklahoma territory, numbered fewer than 200. These hearty, defiant survivors remained in scattered family camps on mostly inaccessible remote tree islands in the Everglades and Big Cypress Swamp. It is these Florida-based survivors whose descendants are now organized into the federally-recognized Seminole Tribe of Florida and the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians.Federal recognition depended on cultural survival and continuity of historical identity, both of which resulted from an internalized self-identity born in response to a period of cultural stress and crisis. Among the three federally recognized tribes today, distinct political identities exist.The Seminole Tribe of Florida has about twenty-six hundred members, with most living on the three largest reservations at Hollywood, Big Cypress, and in the Everglades regions of the Florida South.The five hundred or so members of the Miccosukee Tribe live on the Tamiami Reservation around U.S. Route 41 west of Miami in the Everglades. A small, politically independent group in Florida lives separate from these two and has resisted federal recognition in favor of maintaining a traditional identity, staying away from modern society.The third federally recognized political entity is among the descendants of the Seminole deported to Oklahoma during the wars. They comprise the twelve-thousand member Seminole Nation of Oklahoma in the Wewoka area of Seminole county.In this podcast, we will explore the ethno-genesis of the Florida Seminole. We will define ethno-genesis. And we will explain the continued cultural importance of the Seminole Wars to the people of Florida.To help understand this is Brent R. Weisman. Dr. Weisman is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at the University of South Florida. He has served as the editor of The Florida Anthropologist, president of the Seminole Wars Historic Foundation, and the Alliance for Weedon Island Archaeological Research and Education, and was a founding director of the Florida Public Archaeology Network. His research interests continue to be Seminole Indian culture and history, Florida archaeology, and North American Indians. He has written and published numerous journal articles and books about the Seminole.Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW025 Archaeologists Reconcile Discrepancies, Omissions in Withlacoochee Cove Battle Accounts

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2020 36:37

    Graphic Courtesy Historical Marker Data Base, HMDB.org The "big bang" battle that began the Second Seminole War in late 1835 comprised the Seminole ambush of a column of US Soldiers marching along the Fort King Road to relieve that under-manned military outpost. Three big battles followed it, all along the banks of Florida’s Withlacoochee River. Rather than achieve a quick, decisive victory over the Seminole, the Army found itself forced to settle in for a long, hard slog in its removal efforts. Many written accounts survive these battles, but they tell only the Army’s side of the story. And some of these contradict each other.The need to reconcile historical discrepancies -- and account for omissions of Seminole perspectives --  provided an ideal opening for the Gulf Archaeological Research Institute, or GARI, from Crystal River, Florida. GARI dispatched a survey team to assess incongruities in the official record by examining the terrain features in comparison to known locations and surviving artifacts. From these, GARI drew fresh conclusions about how the battles were fought by each side to the conflict. GARI is the only independent, not-for-profit organization focused on preserving both the archaeological and the natural heritage of Florida. Joining us to explain their findings is Sean Norman, GARI’s acting executive director.BACKGROUND: The first of the cove battles featured Brigadier General Duncan Clinch in command. He lead a large force toward the Withlachoochee River from his post at Fort Drane, to the north. He intended to meet Seminole chiefs and compel them to accept removal to the Oklahoma territory by it’s the US government’s self-imposed January 1st deadline in 1836.Rather than conduct a parlay and negotiations, Clinch found himself instead engaged in an intense but inconclusive battle. Some weeks later, Major General Edmund Gaines also sought the Seminole at the Withlacoochee River. He intended to bring them to heel for the annihilation of the Army’s Fort King-bound relief column. He was fortunate to survive a hostile Seminole siege on his position, following an inconclusive battle. Finally, Major General Winfield Scott arrived to try his hand at taming the Seminole at the Withlacoochee River. The Seminoles resisted and bedeviled his efforts bringing a now-familiar result: inconclusive battle.Copy of 1836 Map prepared by Major General Winfield Scott for engagements in the Florida War. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW024 Black Seminole Leaders Offered Key Support, Collaboration to Native Resistance

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2020 24:05

    We have discussed the Florida Black Seminole as a group previously and how they allied with the Seminole against the US Government’s Indian removal policy of the 1830s.  A number of Florida Black Seminole stood out with distinction and are remembered today in history books. students of the Second Seminole War may recognize these names: Abraham, John Ceasar, and Gopher John, also known as John Horse or John Cavallo.Returning to the Seminole Wars to elaborate on their contributions is Dr. Anthony E. Dixon, who podcasted with us previously to discuss the Black Seminole as a group. He is the author of Florida’s Negro War. Dr. Dixon is also the Founder and President of AHRA, the Archival and Historical research Associates. He an Adjunct Professor of History at Florida A&M University and has been the Field Director for the Florida African American Heritage Preservation Network.Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW023 Battle Log: A Short Review of the Long Seminole Wars and Noteworthy Events

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2020 45:31

    In Seminole & Creek War Battles and Events, Chris Kimball stitches every single reference to a war, campaign, battle, engagement, skirmish, or ambush into the most comprehensive list of such engagements ever assembled. Although the Seminole Wars had a few well documented big battles, it also encompassed scores of small skirmishes that comprised the bulk of the fighting between soldiers and Seminole. Seminole & Creek War Battles and Events offers a regional perspective lacking in accounts of either just the Seminole Wars or of just the first and second Creek Wars of the American southeast. Most of what he chronicles here has been long overlooked in history books.  Finding this comprehensive list in one place is a godsend for anyone who seeks to understand the fighting of this period and is a must-have for anyone interested in Florida or American military history.Joining us to explain how he assembled Seminole & Creek War Battles and Events and why is Chris Kimball. Chris is a researcher and living historian of the Seminole Wars, and is a member of the Board of the Seminole Wars Foundation. He podcasted with us previously to discuss his reference collection to Seminole War articles found in the Army-Navy Chronicle and his compilation of letters, reports, and descriptions of the war’s bloodiest battles and events in the region of Alachua County, Florida.Chris Kimball has always been interested in Florida history and Seminole Indians due to growing up in Florida.  After earning a degree in Public Administration from UCF, Chris served as a Sergeant in the US Army, in the Adjutant General Corps, where he learned to navigate the various systems of administration and paperwork that the Army is famous for, which prove invaluable for researching Florida Seminole War history.He is active in historical living history presentations since 1985, and recreates historical clothing, writes articles, web pages, and newsletters.  He has assisted with museum exhibits and made reproductions of outfits for museums.He created the first book of battles and events of the Florida Seminole War as a resource to provide a better perspective of events that happened in the war. For his next project, he scoured 6,000 surviving pages of the military trade journal printed in 1835 to 1844, the Army and Navy Chronicle, to construct a synopsis of all the Seminole War articles. This project led him to riveting accounts, many previously unpublished, from the latter half of the war around Alachua County, which he summarized in his third book, Alachua Ambush.The Kimball Bookshop is at: https://bookshop.org/shop/seminolewarHis Youtube channel is at: https://www.youtube.com/user/seminolewar/Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it by subscribing through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, DoubleTwist, Pandora, Podbean, Google podcasts, iTunes or directly from the Seminole Wars Foundation website at www.seminolewars.us 

    SW022 Newnan's 1812 Raid Nearly Leads to 1835 Dade-like Massacre

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2020 39:16


     We ended our last episode in September 1812,  just before Georgia Militia Colonel Daniel Newnan prepared to lead an attack on the Seminole Indian settlement called Paynestown in the fertile Alachua region of north central Florida.This episode picks up as Newnan departs to find, fix, and destroy the Seminole and win some booty for his troops in the process. With us again to explain it all is Doctor James Cusick. As we have mentioned, Doctor Cusick wrote about this in The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish East Florida.Newnan sought retribution against the Seminole for, well, we are not clear precisely why. Was it because the Seminole backed the Spanish government in Saint Augustine rather than maintain neutrality against the illegal Patriot invasion? Was it because they felt humiliated from an attack by Black militia and Black Maroon Seminoles? Although the attackers did don Indian war paint, the Alachua Seminoles were not part of or behind that attack. Maybe they just thought that as a Spanish ally, the Seminole would be easy mark to whom they could “teach a lesson” -- since they could not get inside the Spanish-held garrison at the Castillo de San Marcos.   Artist rendering of Newnan's breastwork under siege in September 1812It is not as if a persuasive justification was needed. The Patriots were mostly land-hungry Georgians posing as Floridians who were disgruntled with Spanish rule. They sought an imagined reason or none at all to stoke an uprising so they could declare a Republic and obtain American recognition for evicting the Spanish. The Alachua band of Seminole Indians resided on a main trading route close to Saint Augustine and who possibly -- the Georgia militia was not sure -- had wealth to pillage and plunder.Thus, did events bring Georgians -- and by extension, Americans as a whole – into their first large-scale encounter with the feisty Alachua Seminole Indians. Although Newnan’s raid itself was ill-fated – it almost became Newnan’s massacre with his force wiped out – it did expose to the Georgians the Seminole’s rich and fertile grazing and farming land. This "first contact" discovery would, pardon the expression, plant the seed for a return later to take possession of this territory, with or without Seminole consent. The raid became a pivotal, and perhaps inaugural, battle that ushered in a half century of contention and conflict between the United States and the many bands and tribes comprising the Seminole Indians of Florida. These wars ultimately left the Seminole battered severely, partially removed to Oklahoma, but unconquered in Florida when it was all over.George Militia Colonel Daniel Newnan State Marker for Newnan's Raid in Alachua County  Marker from Daughters of the American Revolution to Newnan's Raid  Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Subscribe automatically to the Seminole Wars through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart or Stitcher or Spotify, DoubleTwist, or Pandora or Google podcasts or iTunes, or ...Check it out so you always get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube.


    SW021 Prelude to the Seminole Wars: American 'Patriot' Invasion of Spanish East Florida in 1812

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2020 36:03


    To explain how the Patriot War set the stage for an early military showdown between American forces and Seminole Indians, one that would chart the course of US-Seminole relations in Florida for the next half century, is James G. Cusick. Dr. Cusick is the author of The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish East Florida. He is the curator of the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida at the University of Florida, a research associate with the Saint Augustine Historical Society, and a former board member and officer of the Seminole Wars Foundation, producer of this podcast.  In March of 1812, on the eve of a major war with Great Britain, the United States became embroiled in a military incursion with Spain on its southern doorstep, in Spanish East Florida. Called the Patriot War, the Georgia militia "assisted" local English-speaking Floridians (e.g., "Patriots") in laying siege to Saint Augustine. They occupied nearby Spanish towns and forts in an attempt to seize East Florida from Spain by force. The US Government's special envoy to the Seminole, a retired Georgia governor, George Mathews, sought to keep them neutral in any conflict between the Patriots and Spain. This covert and unjustified military occupation of Spanish territory destroyed livestock and countless homesteads, The "Patriots" claimed to have established a free republic in East Florida. They drafted and approved a constitution, and called for US annexation. All that remained for success was for Spain to surrender her garrison at the Castillo de San Marcos in Saint Augustine.That surrender never took place. Spain steadfastly held out. The Alachua Seminole ultimately decided to back the Spanish, concluding that while the Spanish would not seek to encroach upon their lands, the Americans, in contrast, likely would, soon or later. Mathews' black interpreter, a slave called Tony Proctor, had escaped his servitude and sought refuge with the Seminole. He confirmed their worst suspicions about the Americans ultimate designs upon their territory. Soon after, as British-aligned Spain vigorously protested this illegal occupation to the Madison Administration, the Patriot's Mission: Impossible began to falter. With America on the cusp of war with Great Britain, and seeking to avoid a two-front conflict, the Madison Administration denied any culpability for the so-called Patriot's conduct. It refused to support or recognize the fledgling Patriot Republic.Nevertheless, the United States feared Britain might use the port of its Spanish ally at Saint Augustine to land an invasion force against Georgia. So, Madison, as a deterrent to Britain, dispatched the U.S. Army to occupy captured Spanish East Florida posts in place of the Patriots. Spain stayed neutral. Soon, Patriot military forces began to withdraw in quiet ignominy.Spain's stubborn defense raised the Georgians’ ire. But what they really found intolerable was the Spanish use of black troops to defend Florida from outside its Saint Augustine military garrison. These forces clashed with the Georgians on Sept. 9, 1812 when a war party of Free Black militia and Black Maroon Seminoles, dressed as Indians, boldly attacked and destroyed the storehouses at the Patriot outpost at Picolata on the St. Johns River. This, despite the presence of 250 Georgia Volunteer soldiers. A humiliation such as this would simply have to be avenged. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Subscribe automatically to the Seminole Wars through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart or Stitcher or Spotify, DoubleTwist, or Pandora or Google podcasts or iTunes, or ...Check it out so you always get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. 


    SW020 Seminole War Interpreter, Craftsman Trades on Past to Preserve Tribe's Future

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2020 33:27


    One of the premises of this podcast is how the Seminole Wars of the 19th century dead past continue to resonate even to our own times. This may be a hard case to make to a Florida population largely transplanted from elsewhere. For those native to the Sunshine State living outside of the reservation, the case is bit easier.But, for the Seminole, who trace a heritage in Florida back centuries if not millennia, the past is not dead, as the great novelist William Faulkner put it; it is not even past.Our guest explains how Seminole still think about those wars all the time as part of their upbringing. They listen to stories about the wars passed down from generation to generation. Even as they reflect on what happened to them in the past, though, Seminole keep themselves well prepared for any recurrence of it in the future.They are, after all, the unconquered Seminole. The tribe that never signed a peace treaty with the US government ending those Florida wars. They have a reputation to sustain.Not that they long to go back to war with the US government.I’m just saying.Joining us is Brian Zepeda, a member of the Panther Clan who calls Naples, Florida as his home. The tribal artist, although raised in a traditional Seminole village on a reservation, credits the importance of learning his trade in art as equally important as the survival skills his multi-generation family instilled in him. He appears as a living history interpreter at various Seminole Wars battle reenactments throughout Florida in state parks and on the Seminole reservation.Brian offers a rare glimpse into the Seminole perspective on the wars, on how some of the most popular stories about it, such as the fate of Osceola, differ noticeably from the Seminole understanding, and on how the Seminole maintain their culture today while having fully adapted to 21st century America. [Photos courtesy Brian Zepeda]Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Subscribe automatically to the Seminole Wars through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart or Stitcher or Spotify, DoubleTwist, or Pandora or Google podcasts or iTunes, or ...Check it out so you always get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. 


    SW019 Crack Survey Team Sights Forgotten Forts Shrouded in Florida Foliage

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2020 32:32

    Was there a battle here? "Not that I know of. Now get off my property."Finding Seminole War battlefield sites is hard. We generally know the vicinity but things have, well, developed in Florida since then. What the US Army left behind was not exactly buried underground with full military honors. In fact, when it abandoned its wooden- or earthen-structured forts in Florida in the 1830s, the Army usually just burned them to the ground. The Florida climate and the organic nature of the forts themselves has meant little remains in the soil some one-hundred-eighty-five years later or so. Fauna overgrowth has obscured them as well. Then came the pioneers, and after that, the commercial developers, and the subdivision homeowners. Fortunately, all is not lost. Thanks to the, pardon the term, pioneering survey work by the Gulf Archaeological Research Institute, or GARI, from Crystal River, Florida, we are reclaiming these overgrown garrisons.GARI is the only independent, not-for-profit organization focused on preserving both the archaeological and the natural heritage of Florida. GARI takes a holistic approach to studying the past. This approach includes consideration of natural history, ecology, hydrology, and sedimentology to comprehensively investigate past peoples and the environments they inhabited.  One of its focuses is The Seminole Wars. Joining us today is Sean Norman, GARI’s acting executive director. Sean explains some of what GARI has learned from its battle site excavations over the years; how this has enhanced understanding of how the combatants waged the Seminole Wars; and what benefits the identification of such sites holds for communities that surround them.Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Subscribe automatically to the Seminole Wars through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart or Stitcher or Spotify, DoubleTwist, or Pandora or Google podcasts or iTunes, or ...Check it out so you always get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. 

    SW018 Road to Ruin: Retracing the old Fort King Military Road by Strategy

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2020 32:16

    Two researchers, overlaying nineteenth century survey maps, the earliest aerial photos available, and state-of-the-art geospatial imagery, documented notionally and visually the old Fort King Road -- the first purpose-built US military road through the wilderness of central Florida.Wilderness, that is, to Americans. In fact, central Florida was the home of the Seminole Indians, who knew its environs quite well. They inhabited by treaty what had long been their land in reality.These researchers’ book, The Fort King Road: Then and Now has been an essential reference on the key path linking Fort Brooke in modern-day Tampa to Fort King, in modern-day Ocala. It was US Army Infantry Captain Francis Langhorne Dade who had a hand in building it and in commuting along its approximately one-hundred-mile length. He did this a decade before he led his Command to its doom from an ambush by Seminole Indians in late 1835 in what became known as the Dade Massacre, near present-day Bushnell.Called an invaluable reference for information on this long-derelict frontier highway, the Fort King Road lives on in history books and in the minds of those reading about its use in Florida’s territorial years, especially during the Second Seminole War, to which it hosted the opening of active hostilities.With Jerry Morris, Jeff Hough wrote The Fort King Road: Then and Now. He joins us today to discuss its enduring significance to Florida’s history.Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Subscribe automatically to the Seminole Wars through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart or Stitcher or Spotify, DoubleTwist, or Pandora or Google podcasts or iTunes, or ...Check it out so you always get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube.

    SW017 God Willing a Creek Will Rise: Reinterpreting David Moniac's Heroism and Death at Wahoo Swamp Battle

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2020 39:30

    The folk expression, “If God is willing and the Creek don’t rise” traces one lineage to a probably (and sadly) apocryphal letter from an early 19th century Superintendent of Indian Affairs. If true, it would have referred to lingering fears regarding a potential Indian insurrection, not to an overflowing of the banks of a body of water, as is commonly assumed today.  In this episode, we modify it for a third use: By looking closely at the exemplary heroism of the extraordinary David Moniac in the Second Seminole War, we pray the esteem of this Creek will rise among our podcast's listeners. You see, David Moniac was a Creek, one of mixed ancestry. He held the distinction as both the first Native American and the first Alabaman to secure an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy, from which he graduated with the Class of 1822 at West Point, N.Y. Moniac lead a band of 750 Creek warriors (serving alongside a US Army contingent) against the Seminole at Florida's Wahoo Swamp in present-day Sumter County.  Major General Thomas Jesup declared Moniac "as brave and gallant a man as ever drew a sword or faced an enemy." He perished in the fighting.Generations of historians have attributed Moniac's death to being struck down by a "barrage of galling fire" from Seminoles perched on the other side of a stream that Moniac had been attempting to cross. They draw this narrative from the later recollections of a military officer who was in the vicinity but not actually present at the site of this specific engagement. Something did not seem right with this long-accepted report, however, to retired US Army Brigadier General Richard Allen. Why would a West Point-trained officer attempt crossing a stream of an unknown depth to reach a hostile shore in the middle of a fire fight? Allen, an artillery and later ordinance officer who’d commanded troops in Vietnam, knows soldiering and he knows jungle fighting. A graduate of the US Army War College and the US Army Command and Staff College, which he completed first in his class, Allen also knows researching.For the occasion of the 2019 bicentennial of Alabama’s entry into the Union, Allen began exploring its favorite sons of the era. This is when he first encountered the curious circumstances surrounding David Moniac’s death. Backed by previously overlooked official documents as well as his own common sense about military matters and swamp terrain, Allen makes a most persuasive case that Moniac’s action in this battle was even more heroic than the diarists and historians ever suspected. Allen joins us today to share his revelatory findings. [Art of David Moniac leading Creeks at Battle of Wahoo Swamp by Jackson Walker]Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Subscribe automatically to the Seminole Wars through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart or Stitcher or Spotify, DoubleTwist, or Pandora or Google podcasts or iTunes, or ...Check it out so you always get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube!

    SW016 Educator Extols Black Seminole Leader John Horse as Florida's First Freedom Fighter

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2020 28:29

     Last week we listened to a fictionalized story about the life of one of the dogs left behind when the Army removed Seminoles to the Oklahoma Territory. Efa, in that tale, belonged to Black Seminole John Horse. This week, we hear of John Horse himself.The name John Horse should be familiar to listeners. Guests have mentioned him in passing when relating key events of the Second Seminole War. John Horse was one of several prominent Black Seminoles, along with Abraham and John Ceasar, who organized Black Seminoles to fight along with Seminole Indians, against the U.S. Army's removal efforts. A Florida educator penned a historical novel about him, entitled John Horse: Florida’s First Freedom Fighter. (Alas, Efa is not part of her account). Betty Turso joins us to discuss how she wove the amiable John Horse's inspiring Florida life story around actual events of the Second Seminole War, and why she wanted her students to see him as a heroic role model. Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. He is a combat veteran and of the U.S. Army, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait, and Kosovo, and at the Pentagon after 9/11. A military historian, he holds masters degrees in Public History, Communication, and Homeland Security, and is a graduate of the US Army War College with an advanced degree in strategic studies. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Florida. Subscribe automatically to the Seminole Wars through your favorite podcast provider, such as iHeart or Stitcher or Spotify, DoubleTwist, or Pandora or Google podcasts or iTunes, or ...Check it out so you always get the latest episode without delay where and when you want it. Like us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube! 

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