Podcasts about historic places

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Best podcasts about historic places

Latest podcast episodes about historic places

The Daily Sun-Up
What to expect from Denver Startup Week; Chimney Rock becomes a National Monument

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 12:11


Today - We're talking to The Colorado Sun's business reporter Tamara Chuang about Denver Startup Week.   [NEW - running all week] Before we begin, We'd like to thank our sponsors - Xcel Energy. Xcel Energy can help you find ways to keep your home or business running smoothly, while reducing energy use and saving you money. Find everyday tips for using less energy and simple ways to manage your energy budget at X-C-E-L-energy-dot-com."   Now, let's go back in time with some Colorado History.   More than 1,000 years ago, a culture known as Chacoan dominated the Four Corners region from a cluster of cities in Chaco Canyon in today's northwestern New Mexico. Satellite communities with allegiance to the canyon extended for a hundred miles in every direction. On the northern Chacoan frontier stood a community known today as Chimney Rock, named for one of two stone spires that towered above it, in present-day Archuleta County.   Starting around 900 AD, Chacoans colonized the region, erecting towns in the shadow of Chimney and Companion Rocks. Higher in elevation than any other Ancestral Puebloan settlement, archaeologists believe Chacoans used the Chimney Rock site as an astronomical calendar, with important buildings aligned with both the stones and celestial bodies at important times of the year, including solstices, equinoxes, and phases of the moon. For two and a half centuries, several hundred Chacoans inhabited eight communities clustered below the pinnacles.   For reasons unknown, around 1150 AD the residents burned and abandoned the site, although competition from groups to the west (such as Mesa Verde) might have contributed to its decline. Archaeological work at Chimney Rock, now located in the San Juan National Forest, occurred sporadically in the twentieth century. Although surveys are still made, American Indian descendants of the community's inhabitants have requested that no further excavations disturb the site. In 1970, Chimney Rock earned a listing in the National Register of Historic Places, spurring further attempts to protect and recognize it. To better preserve and interpret the historic landmark, President Barack Obama used his authority under the Antiquities Act to declare Chimney Rock National Monument in 2012.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WUWM News
Committee agrees to apply for national historic designation for Milwaukee's Domes, future remains uncertain

WUWM News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 4:39


The future of the Mitchell Parks Domes took a baby step forward Tuesday. After much debate, a Milwaukee County committee agreed to apply for National Register of Historic Places status. If approved, it would mean The Domes might qualify for historic credits to help fund their much-needed restoration. Yet, no long-term plan or budget exists to ensure the future of the unique bee-hived shaped structures.

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS
Marshall Miles Interviews-Oskar Espina Ruiz: Music Mountains Closing Weekend For 2022

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 9:08


CASSATT STRING QUARTET & ELIOT FISK, GUITAR September 18, 2022 Gordon Hall, Music Mountain (Sun Quartets Concert #6/6)   HAYDN String Quartet in F Minor, Op. 20 #5GODFREY Guitar QuintetTURINA The Bullfighter's PrayerBOCCHERINI Guitar Quintet in D Major, G.448, “Fandango” Since 1930, generations of music lovers have come to Music Mountain for an exceptional concert experience and audiences continue to praise the outstanding quality and consistency of the events at Music Mountain, the exceptional acoustics of air-conditioned Gordon Hall, and the beauty and peaceful serenity of Music Mountain's mountaintop grounds. While The New Yorker has described Music Mountain as “the summer shrine of the string quartet,” recent concertgoers see Music Mountain as “a peaceful green oasis” and highlight its “amazing venue, ambience, and experience.” Music Mountain, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, began as the unique vision of Jacques Gordon, Chicago Symphony concertmaster from 1921 to 1930 and the founding first violinist of the Gordon String Quartet, one of the leading quartets of its time. The buildings at Music Mountain form a well-designed campus in the Colonial Revival style. They were built by Sears, Roebuck & Company's prefabricated housing division and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Nicholas Gordon, the son of Jacques Gordon, was president of Music Mountain from 1974 until his death in 2017. With an encyclopedic knowledge of chamber music and performing quartets, he expanded the teaching programs, and arranged for broadcasts of Music Mountain concerts that reach over one million listeners nationwide and in 45 countries. As artistic and executive director, as well as principal fundraiser, Nick's guidance included not only traditional chamber music classics, but also the introduction of Twilight Jazz Concerts on Saturday nights. Nick believed Music Mountain's longevity is due to the fact it has been faithful to its mission and is supported by a dedicated community sharing a passion and love of music--traditions that are alive and well today. ​​​​​​​Since 2016, artistic director Oskar Espina-Ruiz and Music Mountain's dedicated board of directors steer Music Mountain through a period of continued growth.

Coney Island Stories
Growing Up in the 1990s

Coney Island Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 30:40


Season Two's theme is “Growing Up in Coney Island” through the decades, from the 1930s to the 21st century. In Episode Seven, narrators who grew up here in the 1990s share stories of loss and change. They remember living in Gravesend Houses and Sea Rise apartments as well as on West 5th, West 8th and West 19th Streets. The Boardwalk, the Beach, Astroland, the Cyclone Roller Coaster and the Wonder Wheel were their playgrounds.The decade began with the Cyclone winning a spot on the National Register of Historic Places in 1991. The same year, a fire gutted the wooden house under Coney's other surviving roller coaster from the 1920s, the still standing but nonoperational Thunderbolt. The house was known to film lovers as Woody Allen's boyhood home in the movie Annie Hall, but it was originally built as the Kensington Hotel in the late 1800s. It was the last remaining structure from Coney's original waterfront, since the shoreline at that time was much farther inland than it is now. The 1925 coaster was caught between an owner who neglected it, and City officials who considered it an eyesore. Some viewed the Thunderbolt as a symbol of Coney's decline, but to many, it served as a monument to survival.The oral histories in Episode Seven are with Tiana Camacho, Emmanuel Elpenord, Theresa Giovinni, Allen James, and Marina Rubin The interviews were conducted by Amanda Deutch, Katya Kumkova, Ali Lemer, Samira Tazari, and Tricia Vita between 2014 and 2020. This episode was produced by Charles Denson, Ali Lemer and Tricia Vita. Music by Blue Dot Sessions.This program is sponsored in part by an Action Grant from Humanities New York with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Urban Roots
Black Indy Part 2: Reclaiming Indianapolis' Black History

Urban Roots

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 26:47


In the 1950s and 1960s, Ms. Jean Spears was a young mother and burgeoning preservationist. She saved antiques from houses about to be demolished; she bought a home in a white slum and renovated it; later on, she did the same with a historic home in the black neighborhood near Indiana Avenue. In the eighties, she and some neighbors started digging into this black neighborhood's history, uncovering the names of Black doctors, civic leaders, and other professionals who had lived there, many of whom had worked for Madam C.J. Walker. She helped rename the neighborhood to Ransom Place, in honor of Freeman Ransom, Madam Walker's prodigious lawyer. And in 1991, they succeeded in getting the Ransom Place Historic District included in the National Register of Historic Places. Thanks in no small part to the connection to Madam C.J. Walker, Jean Spears was able to save this pocket of Black history, in an area that — as we explained last episode — the city of Indianapolis had almost erased from memory. But black Indy history is about more than Madam Walker, and other stories and places in the city need protection, too. In this episode, we'll introduce you to three Black women who are carrying on what Ms. Jean Spears started — safeguarding these little-known stories of the past and guiding Indianapolis toward a brighter future. Guests We talk with Claudia Polley of the Urban Legacy Lands Initiative; Kaila Austin, an artist and historian (who also shared her oral history with Flinora Frazier with us); Judith Thomas, the Deputy Mayor of Neighborhood Engagement for the City of Indianapolis; and Paula Brooks, the Environmental Justice Program Manager at the Hoosier Environment Council. Sponsors This episode, the first of a two-part series on Black Indy, was made possible by a grant from Indiana Humanities. We need help for future projects so please consider donating to Urbanist Media on PayPal, Venmo, or Patreon! Credits Host & Executive Producers: Vanessa Maria Quirk & Deqah Hussein-Wetzel Editor: Connor Lynch Mix: Andrew Callaway Music: Adaam James Levin-Areddy About Us Urban Roots unearths little-known stories from urban history, especially histories of women and people of color that are in danger of being forgotten. Our mission is to elevate underrepresented voices and help preserve the places significant to them. Find Us Online: Website | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube

Charlottesville Community Engagement
August 3, 2022: Throneburg challenges Good to a debate for Fifth District seat; Albemarle PC sees options to continue for growth management

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 23:18


There are many made-up holidays that somehow have found their way into being mentioned on this particular channel of programming as part the introduction. For some reason, today is Clean Your Floors Day, though it’s unclear who makes the money off of those greetings cards. But how clean are your floors? Are you a rebel without a broom, or are you a vacuum warrior? It’s a very good thing that none of the rest of this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement has anything to do with this particular topic. But I will have you know, I mopped mine yesterday in anticipation of this very important day. On today’s show:So far there are no debates scheduled in the contested Fifth Congressional District race but Democrat Josh Throneburg wants to change thatArea home sales volumes have decreased, though the cost to buy a place to live continues to increaseGreene County hires a water and sewer director to prepare to expand supplySeveral area organizations receive funding from Virginia Humanities, including a project to tell stories of PVCC students who have been or are in prisonAlbemarle County continues to review its Comprehensive Plan and the seven-member Planning Commission got their chance to review growth management options late last month First shout-out is for LEAP’s new Thermalize Virginia program In today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: Have you been thinking of converting your fossil-fuel appliances and furnaces into something that will help the community reduce its greenhouse gas emissions? Your local energy nonprofit, LEAP,  has launched a new program to guide you through the steps toward electrifying your home. Thermalize Virginia will help you understand electrification and connect you with vetted contractors to get the work done and help you find any rebates or discounts. Visit thermalizeva.org to learn more and to sign up!  Challenger Throneburg challenges Good to an in-person debateThe Democratic candidate in the Fifth District Congressional race has asked his opponent to agree to meet in person for a debate or other kind of candidate forum before the November 8 election. Josh Throneburg of Charlottesville became the candidate earlier this year before the primary when he was the only one to qualify for the ballot. “There’s one question I get asked more than any other and that is, when will the two of you debate?” Throneburg asked in a campaign video sent out this morning. Throneburg addressed his comments directly to Good and said there were at least three organizations that would hold a campaign event, and that he’s accepted all of them.“But you have either rejected or ignored those invitations and so I want to make things crystal clear. I, Josh Throneburg, challenge you, Representative Bob Good to an in-person debate sometime between now and November 8.”Good is seeking his second term in the U.S. House of Representatives having defeated Cameron Webb in the 2020 election. Candidate Good did participate in a September 9, 2020 virtual campaign forum put on by the Senior Statesmen of Virginia. You can take a listen to that whole event at the Charlottesville Podcasting Network. A request for comment or a response is out to the Bob Good for Congress campaign. CAAR: Charlottesville real estate market continues to cool as prices continue to increaseThe number of sales in the Charlottesville housing market continues to drop as the median sales price continues to climb. That’s according to the latest report from the Charlottesville Area Association of Realtors. (view the report) “There were 1,380 homes sold in the CAAR area in the second quarter,” reads one of the bullet points in the CAAR Home Sales Report for the second quarter. “This is an eleven percent drop from the second quarter a year ago, which is 165 fewer sales.” CAAR’s jurisdictional area is the same as the Thomas Jefferson Planning District with the city of Charlottesville as well as the counties of Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, and Nelson. The median sales price increased to $417,850, an eleven percent increase over the second quarter of 2021. Additionally, supply has increased with 741 active listings in the area, a 28 percent increase over the same period in 2021. To put the increase in perspective, consider that the median sales price for the second quarter of 2018 was $301,000. The report also covers recent economic trends such as steady job growth and low unemployment. “Several job sectors have fully recovered and have actually expanded since the start of the pandemic, including the Professional and Technical Services sector, and the Federal Government sector. The homeownership rate within these two job sectors tends to be relatively high, so growth in these sectors provides fuel for the housing market in Virginia.”However, the leisure and hospitality sector continues to show signs of recovery. Mortgage rates are higher than last year, but have shown a slight decline from the end of June when the average rate on a 30-year fixed was 5.7 percent. However, the report acknowledges the cooling effect of rates that have increased two percentage points so far this year. Sales volumes were down in all localities except Greene County where there was a 33 percent increase in sales. There were 122 homes sold in that jurisdiction between April and June of this year compared to 92 in the same period the year before. The median sales price increased in all of the jurisdictions, but Nelson County saw the biggest jump in values from $285,000 in second quarter of 2021 to $425,000 in the second quarter of 2022. Visit caar.com to download the report. What do you think? If you’re a property owner, how does this change your views on what you may do with your own place? What about if you want to own? Say something in the comments. New water and sewer director in GreeneGreene County is preparing for anticipated population growth by expanding its urban water supply. Now the locality has hired its first ever water and sewer director. “Mr. Greg Lunsford… will oversee the development of a team to operate Greene County Water and Sewer Department as Greene transitions out of the Rapidan Service Authority,” reads an announcement posted to the county’s Facebook page. Greene County recently left the RSA in order to build a reservoir that’s already received permission from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The idea is to impound White Run to create storage. (learn more on the Greene website)Lunsford recently served as the town manager of Elkton in Rockingham County where the release states he helped advance a water system upgrade. In Greene, he will lead the work to create a water and sewer ordinance to govern the new supply. Virginia Humanities awards grants to area nonprofitsThe state agency that serves as the official humanities council for Virginia has made its latest round of grants to nonprofit organizations that seek to tell new stories about the people who have lived in the Commonwealth. “We want Virginians to connect with their history and culture and, in doing that, we hope we’ll all get to know each other a little better,” reads the About section of the website for Virginia Humanities. In all, Virginia Humanities awarded $153,200 to eighteen organizations including several in this general area. The Catticus Corporation of Berkeley, California will get $10,000 for a project to build a website intended to tell the story of Barbara Johns and the 1951 student walk out in Prince Edward County to a larger audience across Virginia and the nation. James Madison University will get $5,400 toward a project called A Miserable Revenge: Recovering 19th-Century Black Literature from the Shenandoah Valley. This will transcribe a handwritten novel by George Newman around 1880. Newman was an African American educator from the Winchester area. The Louisa County Historical Society will get $7,000 for a project called Representing our Residents: African American History at the Louisa County Historical Society. This will be a series of oral history interviews and public outreach activities.The National D-Day Memorial in Bedford will get $8,000 for a project called Someone Talked! A Podcast of the National D-Day Memorial. This will include conversations between the prolific WWII historian John McManus and other scholars and is intended and designed to reach and engage new audiences now that the generation that lived through WWII has passed. A project to add two Louisa County churches to the National Register of Historic Places received $3,000.Piedmont Virginia Community College will receive $10,000 for the PVCC Prison Creative Arts Project. The idea is to collect original writing from incarcerated PVCC students and then create a theatrical production based on the stories. The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Museum will get $8,250 to make three videos to introduce the Monacan Nation as “custodians of the lands and waters in and around Charlottesville” to serve as land acknowledgments The Virginia Tech Foundation will receive $20,000 for a podcast to be called Tribal Truths on the histories and cultures of state and federally recognized Tribes in Virginia. To see the rest, visit the release at Virginia Humanities. Second shout-out goes to Camp AlbemarleToday’s second subscriber-supported public service announcement goes out to Camp Albemarle, which has for sixty years been a “wholesome rural, rustic and restful site for youth activities, church groups, civic events and occasional private programs.”Located on 14 acres on the banks of the Moorman’s River near Free Union, Camp Albemarle continues as a legacy of being a Civilian Conservation Corps project that sought to promote the importance of rural activities. Camp Albemarle seeks support for a plan to winterize the Hamner Lodge, a structure built in 1941 by the CCC and used by every 4th and 5th grade student in Charlottesville and Albemarle for the study of ecology for over 20 years. If this campaign is successful, Camp Albemarle could operate year-round. Consider your support by visiting campalbemarleva.org/donate. Albemarle Planning Commission reviews seven options for growth management Is this the summer of 2022, or is it the Summer of AC44? AC44 is the name Albemarle County has given for the review of its Comprehensive Plan. That’s a document Virginia requires all localities to adopt and review every five years. Albemarle last updated its plan in 2015 and work got underway earlier this year. “We’re currently in phase one, plan for growth, where we are reviewing and evaluating the current growth management policy, using lenses of equity, climate action, and capacity projects,” said Tori Kannellopollous, a senior planner with Albemarle County.At the end of this phase, staff and hired consultants will have developed a draft vision for “growth and resilience” on which new policy objectives will be written.  The work so far has led to the development of seven growth management policies for the public to review. “We are planning having in-person and virtual roundtables and online opportunities in step three,” Kannellopollous saidThe Commission will then review the work in September followed by a review by the Board of Supervisors. Discussions about what changes might come in the rural area will come during phase two of the Comprehensive Plan Review. Several Commissioners wanted to know if survey responses have done enough to capture a diversity of opinion. “I did a deep dive on the last one that came out and when I look at the demographics, the demographics really trend white, upper class, middle-upper class, and extremely well-educated,” said Commission Julian Bivins. “What I’m nervous about is that those responses become the drivers for lots of decisions.” Charles Rapp, the deputy director of the Community Development Department, said he expected participation to increase when the plan review gets into specifics.“People are excited to get into the specific topics [and] into the details of this plan,” Rapp said. “At this point we’re still at such a high level trying to figure out which of those avenues we’re going to go down and which ideas we want to explore and what are those topics that we want to dive into.” The Commission also got an update on the buildout analysis of the county’s existing capacity for new homes and businesses. The firm Kimley Horn has been hired to conduct that work. Kannellopollous had several preliminary observations.“In mixed-use developments, the residential component tends to fill out first and the non-residential component may not build out until years later,” Kannellopollous said. “When factoring in site readiness and site-selection criteria, there appears to be sufficient capacity for commercial and retail uses but much less currently available for office and industrial uses.” Another finding is that new developments are not being approved at the maximum possible, and that by-right developments also do not use all of the potential building space recommended in the existing Comprehensive Plan.Seven growth management optionsThe firm EPR has been hired to help develop the growth management options. “These were developed by the consultants and the staff after the first round of public input,”  said Vlad Gavrilovic with EPR. “They’re not intended as picking one as the winner or the loser. They’re intended to initiate discussion.” Let’s go through them. Here’s option one:“Applying more density and more in-fill development within the existing development areas and retaining and enhancing green infrastructure,” Gavrilovic said. “Next option was looking in the development areas to adjust the densities and reduce the maximum densities to more closely align with what people have actually been building as.” The third option would be to develop criteria for which the growth area might be adjusted. “Looking at new criteria to identify when, where, and how growth areas should be expanded,” Gavrilovic said.  “The next option was opportunities for non-residential development around the interchanges on I-64 to support job growth and economic development.” Option five would explore the possibility of rural villages. “Rural villages where you would promote small scale commercial and service uses to nearby rural area residents,” Gavrilovic said. “Number six was looking at current service provisions and seeing if adjustments are needed to ensure equitable distribution of services, particularly health and safety services.” The final option is to “explore opportunities to promote forest retention and regenerative land uses in the Rural area that support climate action goals.” So those are the seven scenarios. A second round of community engagement went out with these results. “We heard that the three options that best support climate action were regenerative uses in the rural area, rural villages, and distribution of service provision,” Kannellopollous said. “The three options that best support equity were service provision, rural villages, and providing more density and infill in the development areas with green infrastructure.” For the “accommodating growth” lens, the top three options were rural villages, non-residential development at Interstate interchanges, and service provision. Commissioner feedbackCommissioner Karen Firehock said she saw the provision of infrastructure to support development areas as an equity issue.“People should be able to walk to a park or a trail or a healthy environment near to where they live and not have to get in the car and drive a really long way to find something green,” Firehock said. Firehock said the county is expanding some services into the rural area, such as the Southern Convenience Center in Keene. She said that will make it easier for people to meet other environmental goals. Commissioner Lonnie Murray lives in the rural area, and hopes the growth management strategy does not undo work to date. “I think it’s important to have a concept of ‘do no harm’ in the rural area,” Murray said.As an example, he said he wants the county to stop paving gravel roads in the rural area. Bivins urged the Commission to look ahead to the next redistricting after the 2030 Census, when he said the urban areas will continue to have more of the county’s expected population. “If we do not increase the development area, Samuel Miller [District] will end up in the near future as the largest land mass district in Albemarle County.” Bivins said “From an equity standpoint, one has to say ‘is that where we want to go as a county?’” The Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service currently projects Albemarle’s population as increasing to 124,016 by 2030, up from 112,395 in the U.S. Census of 2020. Commissioner Fred Missel said he wanted to know more information about how capital infrastructure works together to support development.“How does the capital plan for infrastructure, how does that inform development and how are they linked together?” Missel asked. “Not to throw the [Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority] into the mix it’s just one that comes to mind. What is their capital plan and how does that support strategic density? How does it support sustainability?” Missel’s day job is as director of design and development at the University of Virginia Foundation. The Foundation is pursuing a rezoning at its North Fork Discovery Park for a potential mixed-use residential complex. If you’d like to learn more about capital projects in Albemarle County, click here.If you’d like to learn more about the Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority’s Capital Improvement Program, download it here.Luis Carrazana’s day job is at the University of Virginia’s Office of the Architect. He said he wanted better metrics. “And a lot of times we focus on the big picture but we lose that option to say ‘we know we’re going in the right direction if we’re achieving A, B, C, and D,” Carrazana said. “So I would encourage everyone to think about that as well.” Planning Commissioner Corey Clayborne said density in the right place can help the county achieve certain goals, but he also acknowledged a tension with those who have pushed back. “That’s something we kind of have to wrestle to the ground and I’m not sure if that would be part of the final deliverable here as much as, is there an education sense in this process with the community as we step through this?” Clayborne asked. “Does that mean there are graphics or visuals? I’m not sure what that answer is yet but addressing it… if we can get our arms around and embrace strategic density, I think if you start talking about design importance, that could be a major key to affordable housing.” Commissioner Dan Bailey said one piece of data is experience that comes from what’s been approved and what’s actually been built. “I live in Belvedere and it has a concept that’s been there for nearly ten years of having centers in the community, but it’s been vacant for ten years,” Bailey said. “And we’ve done a lot of approving these novel neighborhood model density and other things where they should have this retail or office building. I would really love to know how many of them have actually been developed.” The next step will be a series of public engagement on the themes as well as the growth management options. Stay tuned. If you’re interested in this topic, invest an hour in the conversation to inform how you might participate. Housekeeping notes for 415 (Clean Floor edition)That’s the end of another installment of the program. Thank you so much for being here! I hope to have another one out tomorrow, followed by another on Friday. Then the Week Ahead and the Government Glance. The latter is the first publication of the new Fifth District Community Engagement.  That’s another service of Town Crier Productions, a company formed to keep you in the know. Contributions and payments to Town Crier Productions cover the cost of reporting. That includes a bill with the United States for the Public Access to Court Electronic Records. I use that service to stay up to date on federal lawsuits such the one former City Manager Tarron Richardson had filed against the city, or the two court cases that sought a House of Delegates race this year.  So, if you’re like to support this program which includes expenses like court reporting, consider a paid subscription through Substack. If do so, Ting will match your initial payment! And, if you sign up for their services through this link you’ll get a free standard install, your 2nd month free, and a $75 downtown mall gift card! Enter the promo code COMMUNITY for full effect. All of the funding goes to ensure I can keep doing the work, which two years ago included bringing the audio from a campaign forum to the public via the Charlottesville Podcasting Network. That’s also part of Town Crier Productions. There’s a lot, and your support will help me pull all of the pieces together into whatever it becomes. Music comes from the D.C. entity that currently goes by the name Wraki, selected randomly from a bin of basement-recorded cassette tapes. You can support that work by purchasing the album Regret Everything for whatever you would like to pay. Now. Off to go clean some floors. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Hawthorne Towncast
S3 E31 The Passaic County Arts Center

Hawthorne Towncast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 36:21


The John W. Rea house, in Hawthorne NJ, was built in 1810. In 1999 it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places and today, is the home of the Passaic County Arts Center, celebrating and exhibiting local and international artists. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/flavio-romeo/message

Idaho Matters
Pocatello church receives recognition for civil rights activism

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 5:23


The Bethel Missionary Baptist Church has been around for more than 100 years and is now the first property to be added to the National Register of Historic Places under African American Civil Rights in Idaho.

The Valley Today
Colonial Kids Day at Burwell-Morgan Mill

The Valley Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 28:13


Nathan Stalvey, Director of Clarke County Historical Association joined the conversation today to talk about a few upcoming events and give us a bit of a history lesson. Nathan told us about a yearly tradition happening at Burwell-Morgan Mill on Saturday, July 2 where they will be grinding red, white, and blue corn and grits. Burwell-Morgan Mill, also known as the Millwood Mill, is a historic grist mill located at Millwood, Clarke County, Virginia. It was built between 1782-1785 by Lt. Col. Nathaniel Burwell and Gen. Daniel Morgan who both served in the American Revolution. It is the oldest operable merchant mill in the Shenandoah Valley. Nathan explained it's history and told us how it came to be in the possession of the Clarke County Historical Association. We discussed it's maintenance and upkeep as well as the grants that help with costs. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1969. Also happening at the Burwell-Morgan Mill on Saturday, July 9 will be Colonial Kids Day. The event, which started six years ago as an intern's project will feature interactive activities including blacksmithing, craft making, colonial games, a scavenger hunt, the history of the Mill, living history interpretations, and grinding in action. There will be food available on site as well as across the street at Locke's Store. You are also welcome to bring a picnic and enjoy your lunch in the meadow and at of the picnic tables. The cost for the event is $5 and it runs from 11am - 4pm. You can purchase tickets or get more details by clicking here. Nathan also gave us details for a talk featuring historian Stephen Campbell entitled George Washington: The Will to Win and Conquering Adversity that will happen on Sunday, July 17, 2022 from 2pm - 4pm at the VFW Post 9760. The lecture will discuss George Washington before the Revolutionary War and his time as a surveyor. Washington, during this time journeyed through and surveyed Clarke County which was formally Frederick County during the 1700's. Learn how Washington evolved from a young officer to our nation's first Commander-in-Chief. Tickets and more details can be found by clicking here. For more information about Clarke County Historical Association, it's events, membership or volunteer opportunities, visit their website: https://www.clarkehistory.org/ and follow them on Facebook.

Confessions of a Closet Romantic
Quick Take: Fire Island

Confessions of a Closet Romantic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 20:10


Happy Pride Month! Squeaking just under the wire with a quick take on this frothy, fun gay retelling of Pride and Prejudice, set in that historic LGBTQ+ summer destination, Fire Island in New York. What a sunny, cute, romantic romp of a romcom this is! https://www.confessionsofaclosetromantic.comThere's more than a touch of Boogie Nights in the look of Fire Island. Joel Kim Booster talked to Variety about how the movie was developed. His favorite romcoms are My Best Friend's Wedding and Clueless, so the guy knew how to put together a solid retelling.Here's a taste of Joel Kim Booster's stand up. He's adorable, even when he's making fun of difficult topics.Fire Island's queer literary history is fascinating, starting with Oscar Wilde visiting Cherry Grove in the late 19th century.Fire Island has a National Seashore and here is a bit more about its fascinating history stretching back to the 1700s. It has a few structures on the National Register of Historic Places, and a long history with pirates and shipwrecks.Support the show

Grating the Nutmeg
145. Activists Paul and Eslanda Robeson in Connecticut

Grating the Nutmeg

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 38:53


In the Summer 2022 issue of Connecticut Explored, author and historian Steve Thornton of the Shoeleather History Project brings us the story of the internationally-renown activist, actor, and singer Paul Robeson and his wife Eslanda, an anthropologist, author and activist in her own right. The Robeson's home from 1941 to 1953 in Enfield, Connecticut is on the Connecticut Freedom Trail as well as the National Register of Historic Places. The Hartford Courant reported on April 1, of 1941 that, “The stucco house is situated on two and a half acres of land. The property includes a recreational building which houses a bowling alley and an outdoor swimming pool… A purchase price of about $10,000 was indicated by the attached revenue stamp.” The next day the Courant reported, “Paul Robeson will move into his new home here, “The Beeches” on May 1… The luxurious house is in a state of disrepair but Mrs. Robeson has arranged with local workers to renovate the house and grounds…Built in 1903, the living room is richly paneled with a marble mantle… The grounds are shaded by many old trees, including several beeches on the broad lawns in front of the house.” What attracted the Robeson's to Enfield? Why did the FBI keep them under surveillance in Connecticut? And how did a Robeson concert at Hartford's Weaver High School in 1952 become a huge local controversy? Let's hear from Steve Thornton about the Robesons activism and life while living in Connecticut. Read more in the Summer 2022 issue of Connecticut Explored “The Robesons Move to Enfield” by Steve Thornton. Get your copy at ctexplored.org   And to learn more about Hartford history from the grassroots, visit The Shoeleather History Project at shoeleatherhistoryproject.com To learn more about a Connecticut citizen was arrested and tried for being a Communist, listen to his first-hand account from Alfred Marder in Episode 7 of Grating the Nutmeg at https://gratingthenutmeg.libsyn.com/gtn7e-extended-version-a-communists-arrest-in-1950s-new-haven And read more at https://www.ctexplored.org/al-marder-a-life-of-conviction/ This episode was produced by Mary Donohue, Assistant Publisher of Connecticut Explored, and engineered by Patrick O'Sullivan of High Wattage Media, highwattagemedia.com Song: Shenandoah, Paul Robeson (Copland, A.: Fanfare for the Common Man / Tilzer, A. Von: Take) Donohue may be reached at marydonohue@comcast.net Please join us again for the next episode of Grating the Nutmeg!

Catholic News
June 28, 2022

Catholic News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 2:46


A daily news briefing from Catholic News Agency, powered by artificial intelligence. Ask your smart speaker to play “Catholic News,” or listen every morning wherever you get podcasts. www.catholicnewsagency.com - Pope Francis has asked people to pray after 46 migrants were found dead in a Texas trailer truck on Monday. “I sorrowfully heard the news of the tragedy of the migrants in Texas and Melilla,” the pope said in a social media post on June 28. “Let us Pray Together for these brothers and sisters who died following their hope of a better life; and for ourselves, may the Lord might open our hearts so these misfortunes never happen again.” The migrants were found dead in an abandoned tractor-trailer in San Antonio, Texas on the evening of June 27. Sixteen other people were hospitalized, including four children, according to the Associated Press. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/251658/draft-pope-francis-expresses-sorrow-for-migrant-deaths-at-texas-border St. Colman Chapel, which was discovered burned to the ground the morning of June 27, was the last surviving remnant of a once-thriving Irish immigrant community in West Virginia, and its adjacent cemetery marks the final resting place of many of those Irish Catholics. The chapel burned under suspicious circumstances the night of June 26-27 and is being investigated as arson, according to the local volunteer fire department. The Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston told CNA it "is saddened to hear of the devastating fire at the historic St. Colman Catholic Church near Shady Spring, WV. Thankfully, no one was inside the building when the fire occurred and the structure is a total loss. The church, which was placed on the National Register of Historic Places since it was built in 1877 was not regularly used. The Diocese is truly grateful for the response of so many fire departments in the area, but the little church burned quickly and nothing can be saved. The cemetery behind the church will continue to be maintained." https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/251655/the-little-catholic-church-on-irish-mountain-stood-in-west-virginia-for-150-years-before-it-burned Today, the Church celebrates Saint Irenaeus of Lyons, a second-century bishop and writer in present-day France. He is best known for defending Christian orthodoxy, especially the reality of Christ's human incarnation, against the set of heresies known as Gnosticism. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/saint/st-irenaeus-285 The Church also celebrates Saint Vincentia Gerosa. In 1832, she and St. Bartholomea Capitanio formed the Sisters of Charity of Lovere, with a charism to care for and educate the poor. She took the religious name Vincentia, and led the congregation after Bartholomea died in 1836, until her own death 11 years later. She was beatified in 1926 and canonized by Pope Pius XII in 1950. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/saint/st-vincentia-gerosa-517

PreserveCast
Restoring Historic Places One Brick at a Time

PreserveCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 38:23


Today's episode of PreserveCast returns to the United Kingdom to open a conversation with Colin and Dan Richards of CJR Heritage, a company that has spanned continents and worked with princes to save priceless heritage. From Transylvania to the Great Wall of China, we're talking with two of England's most accomplished tradespeople about the future of historic trades.

This Is Nashville
Exploring the living history of Promise Land, Tennessee

This Is Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 51:02


Promise Land was established and settled by formerly enslaved people near Charlotte, Tenn., during Reconstruction. The original settlers included at least five former members of the United States Colored Troops: Clark Garrett, Landin Williams, Ed Vanleer and the brothers John and Arch Nesbitt. The community grew at one point to about 1,000 acres, home to about 50 families. It remained independent and flourished in spite of Jim Crow. But during the Great Migration, families began moving away, many to Ohio and other locations in the Midwest. By the 1950s, the town dwindled and only a few families remained. At one point, just about two descendants of the original settlers remained. Today, the St. John Promise Land Church and the old Promise Land School Building are all that remain of the original town. The school closed in 1957 and, thanks to the efforts of the Promise Land Heritage Association, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007. Each June, descendants and others gather to celebrate this place and to keep its stories alive. But first, at the top of the show, we respond to your comments with our weekly @ us! segment. Guests: Serina Kay Gilbert, descendant of three founding families; executive director of Promise Land Heritage Association Sokoto Fulani, descendant of John Nesbitt Learotha Williams, professor of African American and public history, Tennessee State University

Trendy Lobotomy
A Little Of This and A Little Of That

Trendy Lobotomy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 33:53


Tori starts with another of her hyperfocuses, federal parks, in particular Yosemite National Park. This park paved the way for the National Park Service and it's current mission in the US. This park has soooooo many stories and Tori gives some quick little stories as a taste of things to come. She has plans to revisit this park's stories and give you more of the interesting tales for there. Krysti gives us some interesting stories close to home and from a place close to sexy voice guy. Starting with the Rose Hotel which of course in on the National Register of Historic Places. Thought to be a toll house this hotel has gone through many incarations including the current version as a bed and breakfast. Def haunted. Next up we have the Asher Walton House in Atlanta IN. This haunted location has some ties to the haunted Roads Hotel as well. Last up we have Fischer Theater in Danville IL, more to come on that story.Our Sources: nationalparkreservations.com, nps.gov, roadtrippers.com, ranker.com, atthefischer.com, downtowndanville.org, illinoishauntedhouses.com, enjoyillinois.com, historicrosehotel.com, onlyinyourstate.com, chicagotribune.com, dailyegyptian.com, bumpinthenight.net, townpost.com, allevents.inOur theme music: “Danse Macabre - Busy Strings" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Support our show on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trendylobotomypodcast Find us at FB/Instagram @TrendyLobotomyPod and at Twitter @TrendyPod as well as our blog trendylobotomypodcast.blogspot.com Support the show

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS
Marshall Miles Interviews Oskar Ruiz, Music Mountain Weekend of June 25/26

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 10:15


June 25, 2022 - 7:00 PM Gordon Hall, Music Mountain BILL CHARLAP TRIO: Twilight Jazz & More Opening Concert Grammy Award winning pianist, BILL CHARLAP has performed and recorded with many leading artists of our time, ranging from jazz masters Phil Woods and Wynton Marsalis to singers Tony Bennett and Barbra Streisand. Since 1997, he has led the Bill Charlap Trio with bassist Peter Washington and drummer Kenny Washington, recognized as one of the leading groups in jazz. Charlap is the artistic director of New York City's Jazz in July Festival at the 92nd Street Y, and he has produced concerts for Jazz at Lincoln Center, the JVC Jazz Festival and the Hollywood Bowl.  June 26, 2022 - 3:00 PM Gordon Hall, Music Mountain Cuarteto Latinoamericano & Thomas Gallant, Oboe MOZART Oboe Quartet in F Major, K. 370 PIAZZOLLA Oblivion for oboe and string quartet VILLA-LOBOS String Quartet # 1 REVUELTAS String Quartet #4, “Music of the Fair” GARDEL Volver; Por una cabeza for string quartet BROWER String Quartet #3 Since 1930, generations of music lovers have come to Music Mountain for an exceptional concert experience and audiences continue to praise the outstanding quality and consistency of the events at Music Mountain, the exceptional acoustics of air-conditioned Gordon Hall, and the beauty and peaceful serenity of Music Mountain's mountaintop grounds. While The New Yorker has described Music Mountain as “the summer shrine of the string quartet,” recent concertgoers see Music Mountain as “a peaceful green oasis” and highlight its “amazing venue, ambience, and experience.” Music Mountain, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, began as the unique vision of Jacques Gordon, Chicago Symphony concertmaster from 1921 to 1930 and the founding first violinist of the Gordon String Quartet, one of the leading quartets of its time. The buildings at Music Mountain form a well-designed campus in the Colonial Revival style. They were built by Sears, Roebuck & Company's prefabricated housing division and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Seven Ages Audio Journal
Mound Builders Series: Pinson Mounds, Tennessee | SAAJ 55

Seven Ages Audio Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 72:51


In this episode, the Seven Ages team is joined by Chase Pipes of the Chasing History Youtube channel and podcast, as they travel and record live from the Pinson Mounds site in Eastern Tennessee. Jason Pentrail and Chase Pipes are joined by Tennessee State Park Ranger Dedra Irwin, who explains all the details of this truly unique woodland-era mound complex. Pinson Mounds State Archaeological Park covers over 1,200 acres and contains at least 15 Native American mounds. In addition to Sauls Mound, the group includes Oxier Mound, the Twin Mounds, and Mound 31. Archaeological evidence suggests the mounds were both burial and ceremonial in purpose. Pinson Mounds is a national historic landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Follow the Seven Ages Research Associates online:  Twitter Instagram  Facebook  Seven Ages Official Site  Chasing History  Pinson Mounds State Park  Our Sponsor The Smokey Mountain Relic Room

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Why a Minnesota bank building ranks among the nation's most significant architecture

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 4:36


The National Farmers' Bank in Owatonna, Minnesota, is one of the most significant architectural works in the country, part of the Prairie School of Design. Kaomi Lee of Twin Cities PBS went to see why this 1908 building, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, continues to attract tourists from around the nation and the world. It's part of our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Art Beat
Why a Minnesota bank building ranks among the nation's most significant architecture

PBS NewsHour - Art Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 4:36


The National Farmers' Bank in Owatonna, Minnesota, is one of the most significant architectural works in the country, part of the Prairie School of Design. Kaomi Lee of Twin Cities PBS went to see why this 1908 building, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, continues to attract tourists from around the nation and the world. It's part of our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

321 Lift Off
Historic Cocoa Village Playhouse

321 Lift Off

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 43:15


Welcome back to 321 Lift Off. Join us as we speak with Dr. Anastacia Hawkins-Smith, Chief Executive Officer & Artistic Director of the Historic Cocoa Village Playhouse. Established as the Aladdin Theater, the doors opened to the public on August 18, 1924, showing silent movies. Later, Brevard's first “talkie” movie house became known as “the showplace of the Indian River Section.” Several owners and several decades later, the auditorium was acquired by the City of Cocoa, changing the name to The Cocoa Village Playhouse. The Brevard County Community College District Board of Trustees purchased the playhouse in 1984 for $1 from the city. In 1991, the auditorium was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in Tallahassee. In the Spring of 2011, Brevard Community College returned ownership of the Cocoa Village Playhouse to the City of Cocoa, who started a million-dollar renovation on the building in 2012. Today, the City of Cocoa still owns the playhouse, and it is considered one of the most beautiful theatres in Florida. We will be on stage at the Cocoa Village Playhouse, discussing the rich history of the auditorium, the Stars of Tomorrow youth program, and the various shows, past and present, put on at the playhouse.

Southern Discomfort
Arkansas Butter Ghost

Southern Discomfort

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 50:49


The Crescent Hotel was built in 1886 as a resort for the rich and famous, but quickly became unmanageable and fell into disrepair. In 1908, it was reopened as the Crescent College and Conservatory for Young Women. This institution closed down in 1924, and then opened again in 1930 as a junior college. After the college closed in 1934, the Crescent was leased as a summer hotel.   In 1937, it got a new owner, Norman G. Baker, who turned the place into a hospital and health resort. Baker, a millionaire inventor and radio personality, styled himself as a doctor, despite having had no medical training. He claimed to have discovered a number of "cures" for various ailments, including cancer, and launched frequent attacks on organized medicine, which he accused of being corrupt and profit-driven.   Having been run out of Iowa for practicing medicine without a license, Baker moved his cancer patients to Arkansas and advertised his new health resort at the Crescent. His "cure" consisted primarily of drinking the area's natural spring water. In 1940, federal charges were filed against Baker for mail fraud and he spent four years in prison. The Crescent Hotel was left ownerless until 1946. In the spring of 1946, the Crescent Hotel was purchased by John R. Constantine, Herbert E. Shutter, Herbert Byfield, and Dwight Nichols. On March 15, 1967, the hotel was nearly burned to the ground. The only living owner at this time was Dwight Nichols.   In 1997, Marty and Elise Roenigk purchased the Crescent Hotel for $1.3 million. They oversaw a six-year restoration and renovation of the hotel rooms. Marty Roenigk died in a car crash in 2009; Elise Roenigk remains the hotel's current owner. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2016.   Theodora's Spicy Secret Ghost Pepper Vodka Midori Watermelon Lemonade https://www.legendsofamerica.com/ar-crescenthotel/ http://www.americasmosthauntedhotel.com/ https://crescent-hotel.com/blog/unexplained-happenings-at-americas-most-haunted-hotel/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crescent_Hotel_(Eureka_Springs,_Arkansas)  

NDB Media
TRAVEL ITCH RADIO

NDB Media

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 30:00


Sandwiched between St. Lucie County to the north and Palm Beach County to the south, Martin County is one of the hidden treasures of Florida's Atlantic Coast. Parts of Hobe Sound are on the National Register of Historic Places and history lives on Hutchinson Island, where some structures are a century old. There's a shipwreck site, an archaeological dig, an audobon museum, and many points, inlets, and beaches attractive to visitors who prefer peace and quiet to the hustle-and-bustle of South Florida. Learn more on Thursday, May 26, when Martin County spokesman Ian Centrone visits TRAVEL ITCH RADIO for an interview with Dan Schlossberg and Maryellen Nugent Lee. Listen live at 8p EDT on iTunes or BlogTalkRadio.com or check out the TRAVEL ITCH RADIO page on Facebook.

Queens of the Mines
Helen Hunt Jackson - Poet turned Activist & Andrea's Birthday Episode

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 28:14


 It is my birthday week so today I am talking about my new favorite queen, the American poet and writer who became an activist demanding better treatment of Native Americans from the United States government. Her name was Helen Hunt Jackson, and I will share some of her poetry throughout the story.    We will start the story with Deborah & Nathan Fiske, in Amherst, Massachusetts. The couple both suffered from chronic illness through their lives. Nathan was a Unitarian minister, author, and professor of Latin, Greek, and philosophy at Amherst College. Unitarians did not believe in the concepts of sin and of eternal punishment for sins. Appealing to reason, not to emotion. They believed that God is one person. They did not believe in the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, the God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit.  Their daughter, Helen Maria Fiske, was born on October 15 of 1830. Deborah encouraged Helen to have a cheerful disposition and Helen was smart and she worked hard to live up to her father's expectations. As a result of their parent's disabilities, Helen and her younger sister Ann often stayed with relatives.  Deborah died from tuberculosis when Helen was fourteen. A few years later, Nathan Fiske was also suffering from tuberculosis. His doctor advised him to find a new climate to alleviate his symptoms. He arranged for Fiske's education to be paid for and left on his last adventure. He was in Palestine in the summer of her 17th year when her father died of dysentery. He was buried on Mt. Zion.   Helen's maternal grandfather, Deacon David Vinal, assumed financial responsibility for the sisters. Julius A. Palmer, a prominent Boston attorney and state legislature representative, took on the role as their guardian, and the girls moved into his puritan home. Palmer sent Helen to the private schools and while she was away for education, she formed a long lasting friendship with the young Emily Dickinson. After school, Helen moved to Albany, New York. The following year, a Governor's Ball was held in Albany. Helen went, and met Lieutenant Edward Bissell Hunt, who was also in attendance. Hunt graduated from West Point, was an Army Corps of Engineers officer and a civil engineer. The couple married on October 28th of that year. She lived the life of a young army wife, traveling from post to post. Helen said she was almost too happy to trust the future.  A woman's intuition is often right. Helen gave birth to a son the year after the wedding. His name was Murray. Sadly, Murray was born with a disease attacking his brain and he did not live to see his first birthday. She became pregnant soon after and had a second son, Warren, a year after they lost Murray. They nicknamed him "Rennie".  Eight years later, Helen's husband was testing one of his own designs of an early submarine weapon for the military when he fell and suffered a concussion, overcome by gunpowder fumes. It was a devastating loss. The perhaps most profound loss next. Up to this time, her life had been absorbed in domestic and social duties. Her son Warren, her last living family member, soon died due to diphtheria.   When she was young, her mother had encouraged her to expand on her vivid imagination by writing. Helen also suffered from chronic  illness like her parents, and she took inspiration from her mom and started to write poetry, withdrawing from public view to grieve. Two months later, her first poem was published. She emerged months later dressed in all too familiar mourning clothes, but now determined to pursue a literary career.   “And every bird I ever knew Back and forth in the summer flew;  And breezes wafted over me The scent of every flower and tree:  Till I forgot the pain and gloom And silence of my darkened room“   Most of Hunt's early melancholic work grew out of this heavy experience of loss and sorrow. Like her mother, she continued turning negatives into positives in spite of great hardship. She was 36 years old and writing had become her greatest passion. She moved to a lively community of artists and writers in Newport, Rhode Island where she met the women's rights activist,   Unitarian minister, author and abolitionist Thomas Wentworth Higginson. He would become her most important literary mentor.    “Only a night from old to new; Only a sleep from night to morn. The new is but the old come true; Each sunrise sees a new year born.”   After living in Boston for two years, she spent a few years traveling through England, France, Germany, Austria and Italy. She soaked up inspiration and wrote from her writing desk from back home, which she brought with her on all her journeys.  She wrote about popular culture, domestic life, children's literature and travel, using her editorial connections to cover the costs for her cross-country trips. Her career began.  She became well known in the literary world, publishing poetry in many popular magazines and a book, followed by a string of novels. She used the pseudonyms “H.H.”, “Rip van Winkle,” and “Saxe Holm.”   Helen was a good business woman and made connections with editors at the New York Independent, New York Times, Century Magazine, and the New York Daily Tribune. Her circle of friends included publishers and authors including Harriet Beecher Stowe who wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin and Ralph Waldo Emerson, who admired and published her poetry. The smart woman used her connections to help her shy and reluctant childhood friend Emily Dickinson get her initial work published. Helen visited California for the first time in 1872. While there, she explored the Missions in Southern California and took an eight day trip to Yosemite. She was enamored with the native populations she met.   “When one thinks in the wilderness, alone, many things become clear.  I have been learning, all these years in the wilderness,  as if I had had a teacher.”   Helen received bad news in 1873. Like her parents, she suffered from chronic health issues throughout her life, and now, like her parents, Helen had tuberculosis. When her mother passed away, tuberculosis management was difficult and often of limited effect but people were now seeking tuberculosis treatment in Colorado Springs because of its dry climate and fresh mountain air. At the time, one-third of the people living in Colorado Springs had tuberculosis staying in boarding houses, or sanatoriums with hospital-like facilities.  She moved to the small town of Colorado Springs with 3,000 residents and very few amenities and was quickly disappointed. She said, “There stretched before me, to the east, a bleak, bare, desolate plain, rose behind me, to the west, a dark range of mountains, snow-topped, rocky-walled, stern, cruel, relentless. Between them lay the town – small, straight, new, treeless. One might die of such a place alone, but death by disease would be more natural.” She wasn't happy with the challenges of western life at first, but she  stayed cheerful. Helen said her mother's tireless “gift of cheer” was her greatest inheritance. Soon Helen understood and appreciated the beauty of the local scenery. She fell in love with the Pikes Peak region. Her admiration for the natural beauty of the west showed in her work, andher work, boosted tourism to the region. Helen said her mother's tireless “gift of cheer” was her greatest inheritance.    “Today that plain and those mountains are to me well-nigh the fairest spot on earth. Today I say one might almost live in such a place alone!”   William Sharpless Jackson, a trusted business associate of the Founder of Colorado Springs, wealthy banker and railroad executive for the Denver and Rio Grande Railway became fast friends with Helen. They married in 1875. After they wed, Helen took his name and became known in her writing as Helen Hunt Jackson. Helen and William had the most fabulous home in town at the corner of Kiowa and Weber streets. It was a leader in architecture and technology. Inside was one of the first indoor bathrooms in town. William had the exterior of the house remodeled to give Helen a picture-perfect view of Cheyenne Mountain out her window. One of her most popular poems is Cheyenne Mountain. The Jackson's entertained at their home regularly. Helen lavishly filled the rooms with pieces from her travels, reflecting her insatiable curiosity about the world and its people. A lamp hung, attached to a hemp belt embellished with camel hair, Cowrie shells and red and black wool over pottery and an ornately carved Shell Dish, created by Haida craftsmen from the Pacific Coast. There were also many pictures of her loved ones, including her beloved son Rennie that sat on bookshelves next to her purse, made from the inner ear of a whale. The shelves were full of fiction, poetry, natural sciences, travel guides, and books on spiritualism and the afterlife. On the back of a chair, an unfinished Navajo Chief's Blanket produced in 1870, featuring diamonds woven atop an alternating background of stripes, cut from the loom and made into a saddle blanket.  There were native woven baskets from a Yokut tribe in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Heavily carved, unpainted wooden Spanish Stirrups, tear-drop shaped with cone and leaf designs, illuminated from the soft glow behind Asian decorative brass lighting fixtures made from incense burners.    “Dead men tell no tales," says the proverb.  One wishes they could.  We should miss some spicy contributions to magazine and newspaper literature; and a sudden silence would fall upon some loud-mouthed living.”   Helen traveled to Boston in 1879, attending a lecture by Chief Standing Bear about the creation of the Great Sioux Reservation. During the lecture, Standing Bear described the forced removal of the Ponca from their reservation in Nebraska, and transfer to a Reservation in Indian Territory, in present-day Oklahoma. They suffered from disease, harsh climate, and poor supplies. Upset about the mistreatment of Native Americans by government agents, she became an activist on an all-consuming mission on behalf of the Native Americans.  For several years, she investigated, raised money, circulated petitions, and documented the corruption of the agents, military officers and settlers who encroached on the land.  She publicized government misconduct in letters to The New York Times about the United States Government's response to the Sand Creek and Meeker Massacres. She wrote on behalf of the Ponca and publicly battled William Byers of the Rocky Mountain News and Secretary of the Interior Carl Schurz,whom she once called "the most adroit liar I ever knew." The locals in Colorado Springs were not always keen on Helen's fiercely independent nature, or her fiery advocacy for Native rights at the time. In 1881, Jackson condemned state and federal Indian policies and recounted a history of broken treaties in her book, A Century of Dishonor. The book called for significant reform in government policy towards the Native Americans. Jackson sent a copy to every member of Congress with a quote from Benjamin Franklin printed in red on the cover: "Look upon your hands: they are stained with the blood of your relations." Helen needed rest after some years of advocacy, let's not forget she had a chronic illness. So she spent a significant amount of time among the Mission Indians in Southern California.  Don Antonio Coronel, former mayor of the city, had served as inspector of missions for the Mexican government. He was a well-known early local historian and taught Helen about the history and mistreatment of the tribes brought to the Missions. In 1852, an estimated 15,000 Mission Indians lived in Southern California. By the time of Jackson's visit, they numbered fewer than 4,000.   “The wild mustard in Southern California  is like that spoken of in the New Testament.  Its gold is as distinct a value to the eye  as the nugget of gold in the pocket.”     When the U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs Hiram Price recommended her to be appointed as an Interior Department agent; she was named Special Commissioner of Indian Affairs in Southern California. She would document the location and condition of various bands, and determine what lands, if any, should be purchased for their use. At one point, she hired a law firm and fought to protect the rights of a native family facing dispossession from their land at the foot of the San Jacinto Mountains. In 1883, Jackson completed a 56-page report on the Conditions and Needs of the Mission Indians. In the report, she recommended extensive government relief for the Mission Indians, including the purchase of new lands for reservations and the establishment of more Indian schools. The report was well received and legislation was drawn up based on her findings. The bill passed the U.S. Senate but died in the House of Representatives. She knew she needed a wider audience and decided to write about it for the masses. She said, "I am going to write a novel, which will set forth some Indian experiences in a way to move people's hearts. People will read a novel when they will not read serious books. If I could write a story that would do for the Indian one-hundredth part what Uncle Tom's Cabin did for the person of color, I would be thankful for the rest of my life."  With an outline she started in California, Helen began writing in December 1883 while sick with stomach cancer in her New York hotel room and completed it in three months. She cared enough to undermine her health to better their lives. In 1884, Helen published Ramona. The book achieved rapid success and aroused public sentiment. In the novel, Ramona is a half native and half Scots orphan in Spanish Californio society. The romantic story coincided with the arrival of railroad lines in the region, inspiring countless tourists to want to see the places described in the novel.  Historian Antoinette May argued that the popularity of the novel contributed to Congress passing the Dawes Act in 1887. This was the first American law to address Indian land rights and it forced the breakup of communal lands and redistribution to individual households, with sales of what the government said was "surplus land".  When few other white Americans would do so, she stood up for this cause and brought the topic to light. She wanted to write a children's story about Indian issues, but her health would not allow it. Helen was dying. The last letter she wrote was to President Grover Cleveland. “From my deathbed I send you a message of heartfelt thanks for what you have already done for the Indians. I ask you to read my Century of Dishonor. I am dying happier for the belief I have that it is your hand that is destined to strike the first steady blow toward lifting this burden of infamy from our country and righting the wrongs of the Indian race.”  Cancer took Helen Hunt Jackson's life on August 12, 1885 in San Francisco.   I shall be found with 'Indians'  engraved on my brain when I am dead.  A fire has been kindled within me, which will never go out.   Her husband arranged for her burial near seven cascading waterfalls on a one-acre plot at Inspiration Point, overlooking Colorado Springs. Her remains were later moved to Evergreen Cemetery in Colorado Springs.  One year after her death, the North American Review called Ramona "unquestionably the best novel yet produced by an American woman" and named it one of two of the most ethical novels of the 19th century, along with Uncle Tom's Cabin.  Helen believed her niece would be a good bride for her husband after she passed, indicating this to William in a letter from her deathbed. After Helen died, William Sharpless Jackson remarried to Helen's niece and namesake. Together William and Helen's niece Helen had seven children in the house in Colorado Springs.   Darling,' he said, 'I never meant To hurt you; and his eyes were wet. 'I would not hurt you for the world: Am I to blame if I forget?' 'Forgive my selfish tears!' she cried, 'Forgive! I knew that it was not  Because you meant to hurt me, sweet- I knew it was that you forgot!' But all the same, deep in her heart, Rankled this thought, and rankles yet 'When love is at its best, one loves So much that he cannot forget   The family took an active role in preserving the legacy of Helen Hunt Jackson's life, literature and advocacy work. Several rooms from the home  furnished with her possessions are preserved in the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum. The Helen Hunt Jackson Branch of the Los Angeles Public Library is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Ramona High School in Riverside, California and Ramona Elementary in Hemet, California are both named after her. She was inducted into the Colorado Women's Hall of Fame in 1985. Helen Hunt Falls, in North Cheyenne Cañon Park in Colorado Springs, was named in her memory. Visitors can enjoy the view from the base of the falls or take a short walk to the top and admire the view from the bridge across the falls.    When Time is spent, Eternity begins.   Sources: https://www.cspm.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Helen-Hunt-Jackson-Exhbit-Text.pdf https://somethingrhymed.com/2014/05/01/emily-dickinson-and-helen-hunt-jackson/  

Dakota Datebook
Ingersoll School

Dakota Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 3:01


May is National Historic Preservation Month. Today, we celebrate North Dakota's preservation history by highlighting a site on the "National Register of Historic Places."

Texas Emerging Leaders
Rodney Fischer, President of Midtex Oil L.P. & First Protestant Church

Texas Emerging Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 51:38


Rodney Fischer is the President of Midtex Oil, a family-owned  business that is one of Texas foremost petroleum distributors providing quality fuel and lubricants to customers throughout the state in cities like Austin, Houston, and San Antonio. Rodney also serves as the President of the Church Council at First German Protestant Church of New Braunfels, which was built in 1875 and is on the National Register of Historic Places.Learn more at MidtexOil.com.Featuring:Rodney Fischer, President of Midtex Oil, L.P.Sean Christian, Podcast OfficerChris Sanger, President & CCOTo join our team.  Go here!Disclaimer: The comments herein are considered to be the personal comments of the speakers and not to be mistaken for advice in any way. Copyright 2021 Sanger Syndicate LLC. All Rights Reserved.

KUNC's Colorado Edition
''What a community theater should be:'' Loveland's historic Rialto Theater celebrates a century of the performing arts

KUNC's Colorado Edition

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 7:19


A landmark of the northern Colorado art scene is turning 102 years old this year. The historic Rialto Theater in Loveland originally planned to celebrate its true centennial in 2020, when it would have turned 100. Because of the pandemic, though, those festivities had to be postponed – until now.  Visitors from all over Colorado flocked to the Rialto this week to share memories and to marvel at the lovingly restored building.  Guests enjoyed silent film screenings and special behind-the-scenes tours that took them through winding, cramped passageways below the stage and into the bright, newly designed community spaces.   KUNC's Erin O'Toole and Yoselin Meza Miranda tagged along on one of those tours, joining about a dozen guests who gathered in front of the main stage with small bags of fresh popcorn. Rialto theater manager Steve Lemmon and events coordinator Heather Rubald spoke about the work that's been done to update and expand the space. Most of the theater's aesthetic has been preserved. The seats are new, but have a vintage look, and the stylized flower murals on the walls have either been restored or painted to look almost exactly like the original.Rubald remembers when she used to go to the Rialto to watch movies. “It was a rather run-down movie theater, so we had mutated the name from Rialto to 'Rathole,'" she said with a laugh.Built in 1920, the Rialto was designed as a silent movie theater. In the late 1960's they tried to attract more visitors by installing a large movie screen and a snack bar. The building went through many changes over the years, and for a time it housed a shopping mall and office space. It was so rundown that it came perilously close to being torn down. In 1988 it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. And after the Downtown Development Authority purchased the building, the process of restoring the Rialto to its original glory began.  Some of that work included expanding dressing rooms and adding a modern Green Room for performers.Donna Evans was one of those touring the theater. Years ago, she performed a few times at the Rialto as part of a choral group. There were only two tiny dressing rooms below the stage, and she remembers a Tae Kwon Do studio across the alley that would allow performers to change costumes there.“We had to go out through those back doors, run across all the parking and stuff, get in there [with] no privacy, change your costumes, run back across the thing, get back up on the stage again," Evans recalled. "It's much better now. It's beautiful.”Theater manager Steve Lemmon says much of the renovation was done by a group of volunteers who would come in Saturday mornings to work. “Slowly but surely they brought it back to life, and that's the only reason this theater's still open today,” he said.Of course any building that is over 100 years old has secrets. “We have a couple of ghosts that live here in the theater,” said Rialto technical coordinator Phil Baugh. One of those spirits haunting the theater is Clarence, a projectionist who worked from the 1940s and 50s. Baugh says Clarence messes with sound and light every now and then. There's also the infamous “woman in white," a performer from the vaudeville era who has allegedly been seen floating on the stage. She even has her favorite seat – J-16. “She was  in the middle of a performance and passed away in the dressing rooms,” said Baugh. “If you feel a little bit of a cold breeze, it just might be the woman in white.”For those interested in paranormal activities, the Rialto offers ghost tours in October, just in time for Halloween. But for this week, the focus is entirely on celebrating the here and now of this longtime cornerstone of the Loveland arts community.  “A lot of people who grew up here remember it in its heyday; they remember the tough times it went through; they remember the redemption story of all the community members who brought it back to life," said theater manager Steve Lemmon. "People feel like it's their theater, and that's really what a community theater should be.”   The Rialto's centennial celebration wraps up Saturday, May 21. Due to inclement weather, many of the events will be held inside the theater. Find more information and a full event schedule here.Colorado Edition is hosted and produced by Erin O'Toole (@ErinOtoole1). Web was edited by Jackie Hai.The mission of Colorado Edition is to deepen understanding of life in Northern Colorado through authentic conversation and storytelling. It's available as a podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts.Colorado Edition is made possible with support from our KUNC members. Thank you!Our theme music was composed by Colorado musicians Briana Harris and Johnny Burroughs. Other music in the show by Blue Dot Sessions.

Dakota Datebook
Oscar-Zero Missile Alert Facility

Dakota Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 2:55


May is National Historic Preservation Month. Today, we celebrate a North Dakota example by highlighting a State Historic Site on the "National Register of Historic Places."

Dewhitt L Bingham Justice For All Podcast Show

Episode 36: The Washington SchoolGuest: Mr. Howard Pruitt and Mrs. Alice SmithDewhitt has a social justice conversation with two alumni of the Washington Negro School located in Monroe City, Missouri, Mrs. Alice Smith, and Mr. Howard Pruitt. The Washington School is on the National Register for Historic Places. To qualify, properties eligible for listing include buildings, districts, sites, structures, and objects that are significant to local, state, or national history because of the integrity of their location, design, setting, materials, feeling, and association. Dewhitt, Howard, and Alice discuss the following:Alice and Howard's careersAdvice for high school and college studentsFDR's 1933 New DealWorks Project Administration (Labor Focus)Public Works Administration (Grant and Loans)What the Washington School was likeWhat the Washington School means to themThe owner of the schoolThe degradation of the schoolSolutions for the problemhttps://mostateparks.com/sites/mostateparks/files/Washington%20School.pdfPlease respond to this episode via emailDave Almanye-mail: dave@lickingcamps.comwebsite: davealmany.comblog: rollingdownhwy83.blogspot.comcamp site: www.lickingcamps.commsalice2277@sbcglobal.net (Alice Smith) hdp200@aol.com (Howard Pruitt)You can listen to the JFA Podcast Show wherever you get your podcast or by clicking on one of the links below.https://dlbspodcast.buzzsprout.com   https://blog.feedspot.com/social_justice_podcasts/   https://peculiarbooks.org   Also if you are interested in exercise and being healthy check out the Top 20 Triathlon Podcasts.https://blog.feedspot.com/triathlon_podcasts/

Blood Tied
Episode 4:(SPOOKY) A Mother Daughter Haunting at the Windsor Hotel

Blood Tied

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 21:06


HEY BT BUDDIES! Today's episode is a Marcia Mini a very special mini (Marcia's Birthday episode). In this supernatural mini, Marcia tells a ghost story about a mother and daughter said to haunt the halls of the Windsor Hotel in Americus, GA. We'll explore how this ghost story blurs the line between fact and fiction. After all, how do you validate a ghost story? As Amy mentioned in the episode the TikTok Creator @aprettycoolhoteltour videos about secret-themed rooms in Best Western Hotels. If you like today's episode please subscribe to Blood Tied wherever you listen to podcasts and as always we appreciate your support.  We have NEW episodes every other Thursday! Source Materials: History, hauntings, and ghosts at the Windsor Hotel - Americus Times.  Historic Windsor Hotel, Americus, Georgia. Windsor Hotel. National Archives and Records Administration. U.S. Department of the Interior. National Register of Historic Places. National Parks Service. Wikimedia Foundation. (2022, March 2). Americus, Georgia. Wikipedia.  Sounds & Music from pixabay.com & soundboard.com It's Your Birthday! by Monk Turner + Fascinoma. Music Promo Link. Licensed under Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bloodtied/support

Bourbon Lens
174: Jack Daniel's Launches New Bottled in Bond Whiskies

Bourbon Lens

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 27:33


Jack Daniel's just launched two new bottled in bond whiskies and Bourbon Lens is among the first to try them.  Among the two new releases, a Bonded Tennessee Whiskey and a Triple Mash Blended Straight Whiskey.  One of the most recognizable, traditional American Whiskey distilleries has really stepped up their whiskey releases beyond Old No. 7 Tennessee Whiskey and we discuss how these new Bottled in Bond offerings fit into their portfolio. Interestingly, this may be the first time that the Kentucky boys have discussed Jack Daniel's on the Bourbon Lens.  Were the guys impressed with the new whiskies?  Tune in to find out. This episode of the Bourbon Lens is brought to you by ​MANSCAPED™​, who is proving themselves to be the best in men's below-the-waist grooming. ​Their products are precision-engineered tools and are designed specifically for maintaining and taking care of your family jewels. MANSCAPED's™ Performance Package the ultimate men's hygiene bundle and what we recommend to our followers! Get 20% Off and Free Shipping with the code BOURBONLENS at MANSCAPED.com. That's 20% off with free shipping at www.MANSCAPED.com  and use code BOURBONLENS. Unlock your confidence and always use the right tools for the job with MANSCAPED™.  Stream this episode on your favorite podcast app and be sure to drop us a review while you're there.   We are thankful for everyone who has supported us. A huge shoutout goes to our growing Patreon Community as well! We'd appreciate it if you can take the time to give us feedback on our podcast. If you enjoy our content, consider giving us a 5 star rating on your favorite podcast app, leave us a review, and tell a fellow bourbon lover about our show. Follow  us @BourbonLens on Instagram, Facebook, & Twitter.  And please check out our Patreon to learn how you can support our endeavors, earn Bourbon Lens swag, be part of future barrel picks, and more. If you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please email us at TheBourbonLens@Gmail.com. Visit our website BourbonLens.com to check out our blog posts, or even purchase your own Bourbon Lens tasting glass or t-shirt. Cheers,Scott and JakeBourbon Lens   About the Product Launch & Full Press Release Jack Daniel's Launches First Super Premium Line Extension in 25 Years, Jack Daniel's Bonded and Jack Daniel's Triple Mash.  Jack Daniel's two new Bottled-In-Bond whiskeys premiere as first two permanent expressions in the brand's new Bonded Series Lynchburg, Tennessee (May 3, 2022) – The Jack Daniel Distillery introduces Jack Daniel's Bonded Tennessee Whiskey and Jack Daniel's Triple Mash Blended Straight Whiskey as the first two permanent expressions in the brand's new Bonded Series. The Bonded Series honors the whiskey making excellence of the iconic Jack Daniel Distillery and will be a permanent extension in the Jack Daniel's Family of Brands. Both Jack Daniel's Bonded and Triple Mash are Bottled-in-Bond at 100 proof (50% abv), with packaging inspired by the original design of the 1895 Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey bottle. As stipulated by the Bottled in Bond Act of 1897, a bonded whiskey must be distilled by a single distiller during a single season, matured in a government bonded warehouse for at least four years and bottled at 100 proof. “The Jack Daniel Distillery has been making exceptional American whiskey to the highest standards for generations, before and after the Bottled in Bond Act, dating back to the days of Mr. Jack himself,” said Chris Fletcher, Jack Daniel's Master Distiller. “Jack Daniel's Bonded and Triple Mash are a nod to our heritage with a touch of innovation and craftsmanship. These whiskeys are another opportunity for both our friends and new drinkers to explore and discover everything Jack Daniel's has to offer.” Jack Daniel's Bonded Tennessee Whiskey Jack Daniel's Bonded is Jack's time-honored recipe of 80% corn, 12% malted barley, and 8% rye. Barrels were hand selected for their unique and particular characteristics of deeper color, flavor, and aroma, which bring a darker, richer, and more oak-forward character to Jack Daniel's Bonded. It is a big, bold Tennessee Whiskey at 100 proof with layered notes of caramel, rich oak, and spice giving way to a pleasantly lingering finish. Jack Daniel's Triple Mash Blended Straight Whiskey Jack Daniel's Triple Mash is a blend of three straight Bottled-In-Bond whiskeys – 60% Jack Daniel's Tennessee Rye, 20% Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey and 20% Jack Daniel's American Malt. Each expression is distilled in Lynchburg, Tennessee, in the same distilling season, aged to the stipulations of the Bottled in Bond Act, then blended and bottled at 100 proof. It's a remarkable whiskey that can only be crafted by a complete distillery like Jack Daniel's. Jack Daniel's Triple Mash has pleasant notes of honey, malt, and soft oak leading to a long lasting well-rounded finish. Jack Daniel's Bonded and Triple Mash will be available across the US beginning in May with international markets to follow later in 2022. It will initially be available in 700mL bottles for suggested retail prices of $29.99 and $32.99 respectively. They will be available for pre-sale through ReserveBar beginning May 3, 2022 including a limited edition Jack Daniel's gift item while supplies last. About Jack Daniel's Officially registered by the U.S. Government in 1866 and based in Lynchburg, Tenn., the Jack Daniel Distillery is the first registered distillery in the United States and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Jack Daniel's is the maker of the world-famous Jack Daniel's Old No. 7 Tennessee Whiskey, Gentleman Jack Double Mellowed Tennessee Whiskey, Jack Daniel's Single Barrel Tennessee Whiskey, Jack Daniel's Tennessee Honey, Jack Daniel's Tennessee Fire, Jack Daniel's Tennessee Apple, Jack Daniel's Tennessee Rye, Jack Daniel's Sinatra Select and Jack Daniel's Country Cocktails. Today, Jack Daniel's is a true global icon found in more than 170 countries around the world and is the most valuable spirits brand in the world as recognized by Interbrand. Show Links: Jack Daniel Distillery  Bourbon Lens Use Code BOURBONLENS to save 20% and get Free Shipping (Sponsored Link) Jack Daniel's Is Debuting the Bonded Series, Starting With Two Releases | VinePair

Grating the Nutmeg
141. Saving the Merritt Parkway

Grating the Nutmeg

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 30:16


Most people in the tri-state area have driven the Merritt Parkway with its extraordinary bridges and landscaped vistas.  But can a roadway built in the 1930s during the Great Depression survive today in the 21st century without losing its charm? In celebration of Historic Preservation Month, we will learn how the Merritt Parkway, the state's most heavily visited National Register historic district, was saved from modernization and restored to its original design. In this episode, Asst. Publisher Mary Donohue learns more about the history and preservation of the parkway from her guests Christopher Wigren deputy director of Preservation Connecticut and author of Connecticut Architecture: Stories of 100 Places. He co-wrote the National Register of Historic Places nomination for the Merritt Parkway and serves on the Department of Transportation's Merritt Parkway Advisory Committee. And her second guest, Wes Haynes, the Executive Director of the Merritt Parkway Conservancy, a non-profit organization committed to the preservation, revitalization and stewardship of the Parkway.    Thanks to Chris for being our guest. You can order his book here: https://www.amazon.com/Connecticut-Architecture-Stories-Places-Garnet/dp/0819578134/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1072LVNSI3O9I&keywords=wigren&qid=1651172449&s=books&sprefix=%2Cstripbooks%2C58&sr=1-1 And thanks to Wes for being our guest. Find out more about the Merritt Parkway Conservancy here: https://www.merrittparkway.org/ For more Connecticut Explored stories about the Merritt Parkway, https://www.ctexplored.org/soapbox-preserving-the-meritt-parkway/ https://www.ctexplored.org/national-historic-preservation-act-40-and-fabulous/ https://www.ctexplored.org/meet-preservation-connecticut/ Photos used with permission from the Merritt Parkway Conservancy. This episode of Grating the Nutmeg was produced by Mary Donohue and engineered by Patrick O'Sullivan, High Wattage Media, LLC at highwattagemedia.com Donohue has documented the built environment and pop culture for over 30 years She may be reached at marydonohue@comcast.net.

Dr Mary Travelbest Guide
Fort Myers, FL

Dr Mary Travelbest Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 5:55


Please leave a review of the book/episodes on Amazon, where other women like you can learn to travel. In this episode: FAQ is: What are the best snacks to bring on a trip? Today's Destination is: Fort Myers, Florida Today's Mistake- I Couldn't sleep Travel Advice:  Pack an extra toothbrush FAQ: What are the best and easiest snacks to bring on a trip? Answer: My favorite snack food is nuts, mixed with a trail type snack that's packed in small baggies by me. I buy larger sizes and transfer them to the size that I need for my trips. I mix it up a bit, with the ingredients, such as berries, coconut, seeds and other non-salty flavors. If I am craving salty snacks, I like the idea of edamame or popcorn. Even cheese can help me with satisfying this craving. The only other favorite is fruit, but most of the time this will need to be chilled.   https://www.today.com/health/9-cheap-healthy-snacks-when-you-re-craving-something-salty-t192259 Today's destination: Fort Myers, Florida Fort Myers is a fast growing coastal city in and the county seat and commercial center of Lee County. The population has been growing from about 62,000 in 2010 to about 90,000 in 2020. I was heading to Florida for a trip and got some good advice on this destination from a friend's cousin, Beth Ann. There is so much going on here. I have to thank my friend Jo Balsamo Wood for her help in navigating my solo trip. In Fort Myers, visit Manatee State Park, Edison-Ford Winter Estates,  https://www.edisonfordwinterestates.org/ For lunch or dinner, visit the Mucky Duck restaurant on Sanibel Island, which is right by the beach.  Check out the Ding Darling Wildlife Refuge on Sanibel, the Lighthouse on Lighthouse Beach on Sanibel. You can even take a sunset boat cruise from Fort Myers Beach and see the dolphins. There is also Koreshan State Park worth visiting, located on U.S. Highway 41 at Corkscrew Road. It was also added to the National Register of Historic Places . Beth Ann likes kayaking or canoeing, there's the Estero River or further south at Clam Pass.  She recommends parasailing on Fort Myers Beach—lots of fun! Just south in Naples are the Naples Botanical Gardens-very lovely! A bit outside of the city, you will find these. Tampa: e bor   Ybor City, The Florida Aquarium, Henry Plant Museum on campus of U. Of Tampa St Petersburg: The Salvador Dali Museum  Sarasota: The Ringling Museum, and next to that The Car Museum, The Mote Aquarium, Selby Gardens, which was having a special exhibit on art. North Port is on the way to Fort Myers: Warm Mineral Springs, said to have healing powers! There are signs off I-75 directing you there. May you have a great visit to the Fort Myers area as a destination. Today's Mistake- I Couldn't sleep I could not fall asleep and I  just lay there awake, which was not a good plan. I spent most of the night worrying about not sleeping, which was also making things worse. If that happens to you, don't be like me. Instead, do one of the following: pray for peace and comfort, breathe deeply and quietly with eyes closed and rest every part of your body. If those don't work, try taking a hot bath or shower and that may be what needs to happen for the sleep to arrive.   Today's Travel Advice-Pack an extra toothbrush   Taking care of your oral hygiene is a long term project and every day you think of your teeth as precious gems, you will prolong their life. Pack an extra toothbrush and some extra floss and picks. You never know when you'll be away from the comfort of running water for best tooth care. So bring this with you and you will be glad you did. Your dentist will notice your big smile when you make your next visit.   Today I want to bring meaning to your travels. Send me your travel tip. You can send it to my website, Facebook page, group, or Instagram. You can send to my Twitter, blog, and maybe you'll see your tips in Dr Travelbest's 5 Steps to Solo Travel. Connect with Dr Travelbest Website Drmarytravelbest.com Mary Beth on Twitter Dr. Mary Travelbest Twitter  Dr. Mary Travelbest Facebook Page Dr. Mary Travelbest Facebook Group Dr. Mary Travelbest Instagram

The History Of The Evergreen State
40- The U.S. Navy in the Jim Creek Valley

The History Of The Evergreen State

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 26:00


The United States Navy arrived in the Jim Creek Valley in Snohomish County in late 1953 and began construction on the world's most powerful radio transmitter, which was completed the following year. In its original form, it was designed by the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) and was capable of transmitting messages instantly to every one of the navy's installations, ships, and aircraft all over the world, including submarines traveling beneath the ocean's surface. Six steel towers on the summit of Blue Mountain and six on Wheeler Mountain to the north were connected by cables with lengths varying from 5,640 to 8,700 feet. The result was a massive dish formed by the zig-zag pattern of ten cables strung between the towers in a zig-zag pattern over the valley. Additional towers that rise from the valley floor provide the necessary support for the cables' midpoint energization through vertical cables carried by these towers. It is powered by a direct transmission line from Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, and a 2,500-kilowatt Worthington diesel-powered standby generator was constructed in 1957 as a backup power source. Many features of the complex, including the Worthington generator, were determined to be suitable for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places in 2016. The generator, which has been in service for more than 60 years, was scheduled to be removed and replaced in 2019.Listen now to learn more!A special thank you goes out to Al Hirsch for providing the music for the podcast, check him out on YouTube.Find merchandise for the podcast now available at:     https://washington-history-by-jon-c.creator-spring.comIf you enjoy the podcast and would like to contribute, please visit: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/EvergreenpodIf you have any questions, episode ideas you'd like to see explored, or just have a general comment, please reach out at Historyoftheevergreenstatepod@gmail.comTo keep up on news for the podcast and other related announcements, please like and follow:https://www.facebook.com/HistoryoftheevergreenstatepodcastThank you for listening!

Bubbler Talk
The legend of the Pfister Hotel ghost

Bubbler Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 5:13


The Pfister Hotel is one of Milwaukee's most historic and luxurious places to stay. It's been around for nearly 130 years and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It's also supposedly haunted. For Bubbler Talk WUWM's Becky Mortensen explores the history, lore, and legend behind the Pfister Hotel ghost.

John Howell
John Howell: Essential Cuts (4/21) - Illinois' Voter Voice & Endangered Historic Places

John Howell

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 47:03


*Retired Police Chief Tom Weitzel makes the case for the continued use of Automated License Plate Readers. *Deb Otis of FairVote tells John where Illinois ranks for ‘voter voice' in Congressional elections. Spoiler - it's not great *Rex Huppke of USA Today looks back at the Oklahoma City bombing 27 years later, where he was reporting at the time. *Bonnie McDonald of Landmarks Illinois shares the endangered historical landmarks in Illinois that are worth saving. *Plus, the latest on the Florida bill targeting Disney, and Vicky Lynch of the Chicago Red Stars discusses the rise in popularity of soccer.

Bedford & Sullivan Brooklyn
Ep. 158 - LIVE from Park Slope's Old Stone House w Exec Director Kim Maier!

Bedford & Sullivan Brooklyn

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 51:00


LIVE at 8pm ET, we continue to make our way around Brooklyn on-location, coming to you LIVE from the Old Stone House in Park Slope's Washington Park with Executive Director Kim Maier! Kim Maier is the Executive Director of the Old Stone House & Washington Park - a community-based history, culture and environmental organization that is the conservancy organization for Washington Park/JJ Byrne Playground in Park Slope, Brooklyn. The Old Stone House, originally the Vechte Cortelyou House, is a member of the Historic House Trust of New York City and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In partnership with the OSH board of directors, Kim has overseen more than $10 million in park renovations over the past ten years; as well as the installation of a family-focused permanent exhibit for the OSH that explores the original Lenape settlement of the site, Dutch colonization, how the Battle of Brooklyn and the Revolutionary War-time occupation impacted the lives of 18th century Brooklynites from all walks of life, and the history of Washington Park, which was one of the country's first professional baseball fields. A resident of Park Slope since 1983, Kim has served on the board of the Park Slope 5th Avenue Business Improvement District, the Park Slope Civic Council and the PTA of every school ever attended by her children. There will be lots to talk about so join us LIVE at 8pm ET with the latest edition of the Bedford & Sullivan Podcast! SUBSCRIBE on Apple Podcasts SUBSCRIBE on Spotify Podcasts

Getting Bridged with Gar and Kelli

Gar and Kelli talk about photography, neighborhood radio stations, AMA wrestling and the trials and tribulations of making closet wine. Thanks to the following sources:Jill Waterman's "Classic Cameras: My Dad's Argus C3": https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/photography/hands-on-review/classic-cameras-my-dad%E2%80%99s-argus-c3Michael Rainville Jr.'s "The AWA: Professional Wrestling in the Twin Cities": http://millcitytimes.com/news/the-awa-professional-wrestling-in-the-twin-cities.htmlUnited States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, National Register of Historic Places: http://zenithcity.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/DowntownHistoricDistrict.pdf

Musings of an ADD Mind
Why Old Buildings Matter

Musings of an ADD Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 75:09


My guest Dr. Matthew Pearce talks about why saving historic builds is important. As the National Register of Historic Places coordinator for the State of Oklahoma, Matthew is able to fill us in on the ins and outs of this important part of history. My Social Media: Facebook: www.facebook.com/musngsofanaddmind/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/musingsofanaddmind/ My website: www.podpage.com/dashboard/musings-of-an-add-mind/ The Charity I Support: www.servicedogproject.org email: musingsofanaddmind@gmail.com Intro Music: Purple Planet Music - Fatal Chase Outro Music: Scott Holmes Music - Come and Get It --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-robertson39/support

The Guys Review
Letterkenny Live at the Fox Theatre

The Guys Review

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 83:14


Letterkenny Live at the Fox Theatre, Atlanta Welcome to The Guys Review, where we review media, products and experiences.   **READ APPLE REVIEWS/Fan Mail**Mention Twitter DM group - like pinned tweet @The_GuysReviewRead emails theguysreviewpod@gmail.comTwitter Poll Fox Theatre The 4,665 seat theatre was built in 1929 as part of a as part of a large Shrine Temple, but was ultimately developed into a lavish movie theatre. The principal architect of the project was Olivier Vinour of the firm Marye, Alger and Vinour. The design is supposed to replicate an Arabian courtyard, complete with 96 flickering lights and clouds that move across the ceiling. There is an Egyptian Ballroom that is designed after a temple for Ramses II at Karnak while the mezzanine Ladies Lounge features a replica of the throne chair of King Tut and makeup tables that feature tiny Sphinxes. The theater opened on December 25, 1929, just two months after the stock market crash. Originally build for the shriners, when the project went over budget, they leased the building to William Fox, a movie mogul who was building theaters around the country at the time. The theatre closed December, 1932, 125 weeks after it opened due to the Shriners defaulting on the mortgage and Fox going bankrupt. It was purchased by Paramount Pictures and Lucas & Jenkins, a Georgia company that owned a hundred theatres. In the 1940's the Fox because one of the most popular locations, with the Egyptian room drawing big bands and country and western swing bands of the era. It was notable for being the only club in Atlanta at the time that would allow both black and white patrons. Though still segregated, with a seperate entrance that still remains today at the back of the theatre for historical purposes. The Fox would fully integrate in 1962 In the 70's there was a decline in the theatre attendance, and was almost sold to AT&T with plans to tear it down and put a parking deck in its place, but was ultimately subverted by a group and placed on the National Register of Historic Places in May 1974. Celebrities that assisted saving the Fox include Liberace and Lynyrd Skynyrd (recording their first live album there and debuting guitarist Ed King's replacement, Steve Gaines, to the world). The U.S. Department of the Interior subsequently named the Fox a National Historic Landmark on May 26, 1976, citing its architectural uniqueness. Currently, the Fox is the only remaining movie palace in Atlanta, being run by the non-profit group, Atlanta Landmarks, Inc. An estimated 750,000 people visit the Fox every year. The venue was the site of Prince's final performance, held one week before his death on April 21, 2016. Notable acts who have played the Fox are Elvis, Bruce Springsteen, Bob Marley, Pearl Jam, the Allman Brothers, Ray Charles, James Brown, B-52s, A fun bit of trivia... When the shriners built the theatre, they built a 3,640 sq/ft office space in the theatre that was converted into an apartment that Joe Patten, the technical director from 1974 to 2004, occupied with a rent free lease for life. Patten died in 2016. Since then, the space has been unoccupied, but there is a passageway leads from the bedroom to a former spotlight platform at the top of the auditorium. Thoughts and impressions of the Fox theatre? Would you visit again? Special thanks to Megan George and Aly Grubb for the media tickets they gave us, they were fantastic seats.  Letterkenny Live Produced by New Metric media Staring:Jared KeesoNathan DalesK. Trevor WilsonMichelle MylettMark ForwardTyler JohnstonDylan PlayfairAndrew HerrEvan Stern Letterkenny live was started back in 2018, with only Jared Keeso, Nathan Dales, K. Trevor Wilson, and Mark Forward. Michelle Mylett joined in 2019, and Johnston, Playfair, Herr and Stern joining 2020. Though, the 2020 tour was, of course, postponed indefinitely in March. The dates were not announced to be rescheduled on July 19, 2021. Based on the show of the same name, the stage performance consists of some old, reworked, and new sketches with the cast. Including a set of stand up by Mark Forward and K. Trevor Wilson... and as themselves, not in costume. Which is funny because they reference the actors may resemble the characters. Letterkenny, the tv show, debuted on Crave tv in canada in Feburary 2015, which was based on the YouTube channel Keeso developed called Letterkenny Problems. It arrived in the US in July 2018 on Hulu who now owns exclusive distribution rights in the US. Its been nominated and won numerous Canadian screen awards, including best comedy series, best directing for Jacob Tierney (who directs all the episodes of Letterkenny), Best Lead Actor for Jared Keeso, even technical awards like best editing and best photography for the Sleepover episode. Back to Letterkenny live, Mark Forward, as Coach, welcomed everyone to the show and then informed us that due to an injury, Taylor Johnston who plays Stewart will not be performing that night... Which prompts some boos, and I yelled that it's fucking embarrassing... Which Coach agreed with. Roald then comes on stage and addresses the crowd, being weird and funny, then the hicks start coming on stage. Staring with Squirrely Dan, followed by Katy, then Dary, finally Wayne enters to thunderous applause. They do some back and forth, and crowd interaction with How're ya now? The crowd yells back, Good'n you?! It was fun. They exit the stage and Reily and Jonesy come on and do a bit talking about hockey, referencing the Atlanta Thrashers hockey team, when we hear Shoresy start chirping them from the toilet as he did in the show... But Shorseys chips also work in local attractions and themes, like coke and hot chicken. This goes for a bit, as usual, but its very engaging and works well. I feel there were more sketches, just a little cross over stuff. Roald then introduces Mark Forward to do a small set of stand up. His humor is very misdirectional, like when he walks on stage, he says things like, "yes, thank you, I'm very good." His set was funny, but I honestly don't remember much from it, but he ended it was a joke/song that he admitted before he started that it was "stupid" Xavier McCutchins, who named bears until the end. After Mark finished, another hick skit ened with Coach telling the hicks people want to see the classics. They started updating the crowd on what everyone else in Letterkenny is upto, also giving the crowd a sneak peek to season 11, and showing a cold open to an episode. They moved to an intermission, during which we were able to move everyone from our original seats to about 7 rows back, right in the center. It was awesome. Going into the second half, they continue giving humorous updates to other characters in letterkenny, as well as showing a preview for Shoresy, and a blooper reel for S10. Followed by K. Trevor Wilson coming on and doing a stand up set. His standup is totally different from Mark Forward, and Squirrely Dans character. His long form, informal storytelling type of jokes were a change of pace. We got another skit of Reilly and Jonesy being chirped by Shoresy, again throwing in references to Atlanta like the Varsity and chili hotdogs. And coach drunkenly talking about barb. The final skit brought back one of the best bits from the show, when the whole cast comes on stage making porn sounds, yes yes yes yes yesing and "aw fuck, aw fuck." The lights go out, the cast had a group hug, as they did their curtain call, they introduced themselves and each said something they loved about Atlanta. Two final bows, and they exit stage right. Lights up, and the show is over. Thoughts on the show? Would you go again?  Top Five Trivia of the movie: Top 5 Trivia  **TRIPLE LINDY AWARD** **REVIEW AND RATING** TOP 5Stephen:1 Letterkenny Live2 Breakfast club3 T24 Sandlot5 Back to the Future Chris:1. sandlots2. T23. trick r treat4. rocky horror picture show5. hubie halloween Trey:1) Boondocks Saints2) Mail Order Brides3) Tombstone4) Very bad things5) She out of my league  Tucker:1. T22: Tombstone3: Gross Pointe Blank4: My Cousin Vinny5: John Wick WHAT ARE WE DOING NEXT WEEK? Web: https://theguysreview.simplecast.com/EM: theguysreviewpod@gmail.comIG: @TheGuysReviewPodTW: @The_GuysReviewFB: https://facebook.com/TheGuysReviewPod/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYKXJhq9LbQ2VfR4K33kT9Q Please, Subscribe, rate and review us wherever you get your podcasts from!! Thank you,-The Guys

Whiskey Lore: The Interviews
Top 10 Historic Places to Visit In Kentucky's Bourbon Country with Jerry of Stone Fences Tours

Whiskey Lore: The Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 119:39


With the Derby and Summer right around the corner, it is time to start thinking about Kentucky travel plans and for lovers of bourbon history, it is time to dig into a best of list of historic bourbon destinations. To do this, I have invited my friend and fellow history fan Jerry Daniels of Stone Fences Tours onto the show to compare our top 10 lists of the best historic destinations in the Bluegrass State. We'll even toss in a few extras - perfect for your travel planning.

The Creepshow Chronicles
80. The Stanley Hotel

The Creepshow Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 16:28


Join us as Ashley tells the story of The Stanley Hotel. The Stanley Hotel is a 140-room Colonial Revival hotel in Estes Park, Colorado, United States, about five miles from the entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park. It was built by Freelan Oscar Stanley of Stanley Steamer fame and opened on July 4, 1909, as a resort for upper-class Easterners and a health retreat for sufferers of pulmonary tuberculosis. The hotel and its surrounding structures are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Today, the hotel includes a restaurant, spa, and bed-and-breakfast; with panoramic views of Lake Estes, the Rockies, and Long's Peak.The Stanley Hotel inspired the Overlook Hotel in Stephen King's 1977 bestselling novel The Shining. Source: Outtherecolorado.com Social Media: facebook.com/thecreepshowchronicles instagram.com/thecreepshowchronicles twitter.com/TheCreepshow1

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON
Micro-Dairy Underway In Paoli

MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 14:35


A historic dairy processing facility in Paoli is under renovation to become a unique agricultural experience. Led by Nicolaas Mink and his wife Danika Laine, a group of entrepreneurs purchased the 21,000 square foot former dairy factory on seven acres of land along the Sugar River at 6858 Paoli Road, just south of Madison. They got approval to list the property on the State and National Register of Historic Places. Seven Acre Dairy Company anticipates opening later this year. Pictured left to right: Anna Thomas Bates, Anna Landmark, Nic Mink and Danika Laine. Photo by Nicole Hansen See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AreWeHereYetPodcast
Submerged Stories: An Interview with Doug Harris, Pt. 2

AreWeHereYetPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 31:21


SMG's 'Are We Here Yet?' podcast is about a strong sense of place and the people who generate that energy. Today's episode brings a different dimension to that fact.  We're exploring the Native American effect on the landscape.  This discussion will generate in each of you, our listeners, some profound questions of American identity and exactly who gets to have a say in deefining that identity while leaving you observing your local landscape as you've never done before. Doug Harris began his career as a documentarian during the height of the civil rights movement in the deep south.  Doug heeded the words of his grandfather to honor his native American Nansemond ancestors of Virginia and those of the former Cherokee, Choctaw and Chickasaw peoples of the deep south at the same time he was honoring the struggle of yet another group of American people to find their place on this great continent. Doug is the retired Deputy Tribal Historic Preservation Officer/Preservationist for Ceremonial Landscapes for the Narragansett Indian Tribe. He is a preservationist of ceremonial landscapes and helps communities request the preservation of ceremonial landscapes through the National Register of Historic Places, legislation so lately enacted some 30 years ago to protect such places of cultural and spiritual significance. We discussed a variety of evidence of animal stone effigies, stone groupings that assist to keep celestial time and the reasons for the grandfather stones, in our English, that were placed in many cases more than 3000 years ago. In part II of our two part episode we'll focus on the mounting evidence for major activity along what is now submerged continental shelf territory off the coasts of Rhode Island and Massachusetts. To learn more of Submerged Landscapes click here

City Cast Pittsburgh
If Amazon Is Done With Churchill, Why Are They Still Going To Court?

City Cast Pittsburgh

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 17:56


For almost two years, a group of neighbors out in Churchill have been fighting a Goliath. The retail giant Amazon has been lobbying to bulldoze the old Westinghouse Research & Technology Park to build a new distribution facility, bringing jobs but also trucking traffic to the largely residential borough. Officials now say that's over — that Amazon will look elsewhere — but residents and developers are still expected in court on Thursday to make their case. Senior producer Megan Harris is with vocal Churchill Future member Cathy Bordner to talk about why she's skeptical and what may come next. The 150-acre Westinghouse campus is considered an important example of postwar corporate architecture. Metropolis Magazine asks, can it be saved? https://metropolismag.com/viewpoints/westinghouse-research-development-som/ And Preservation Pittsburgh is watching. Check out their piece from late last year that discusses its merit for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places: https://docomomo-us.org/news/you-can-be-sure-if-its-westinghouse Our newsletter is fresh daily at 6 a.m. Sign up here. We're also on Twitter @citycastpgh & Instagram @CityCastPgh!

AreWeHereYetPodcast
Preserving Prayers: An Interview with Doug Harris, Pt. 1

AreWeHereYetPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 63:10


SMG's 'Are We Here Yet?' podcast is about a strong sense of place and the people who generate that energy. Today's episode brings a different dimension to that fact.  We're exploring the Native American effect on the landscape.  This discussion will generate in each of you, our listeners, some profound questions of American identity and exactly who gets to have a say in deefining that identity while leaving you observing your local landscape as you've never done before. Doug Harris began his career as a documentarian during the height of the civil rights movement in the deep south.  Doug heeded the words of his grandfather to honor his native American Nansemond ancestors of Virginia and those of the former Cherokee, Choctaw and Chickasaw peoples of the deep south at the same time he was honoring the struggle of yet another group of American people to find their place on this great continent. Doug is the retired Deputy Tribal Historic Preservation Officer/Preservationist for Ceremonial Landscapes for the Narragansett Indian Tribe. He is a preservationist of ceremonial landscapes and helps communities request the preservation of ceremonial landscapes through the National Register of Historic Places, legislation so lately enacted some 30 years ago to protect such places of cultural and spiritual significance. We discussed a variety of evidence of animal stone effigies, stone groupings that assist to keep celestial time and the reasons for the grandfather stones, in our English, that were placed in many cases more than 3000 years ago. In part II of our two part episode we'll focus on the mounting evidence for major activity along what is now submerged continental shelf territory off the coasts of Rhode Island and Massachusetts. To learn more of Submerged Landscapes click here

Down the Road on the Blue Ridge Music Trails of North Carolina

The Happy Valley community lies between Lenoir and Blowing Rock along the Yadkin River. This fertile valley is so scenic and peaceful that early settlers gave it the name “Happy Valley.” The valley was home to General William Lenoir, for whom the Caldwell County seat of Lenoir was named. His home, Fort Defiance, is on the National Register of Historic Places, open regularly to visitors, and also hosts several public events a year.

Down the Road on the Blue Ridge Music Trails of North Carolina
Episode 3: The Musical Happy Valley