Podcasts about national register

Federal list of historic sites in the United States

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Best podcasts about national register

Latest podcast episodes about national register

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast
Restaurant owner charged with sexual assault of employees

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 10:15


Nicholas Tiliacos, the owner of Marietta's Come-N-Get-It restaurant, has been charged with sexual assault against two employees, arrest warrants show. Both Cobb and Marietta police charged Tiliacos with multiple counts of sexual battery and cruelty to children against two individuals who worked at the restaurant. The alleged victims were underage at the time, per the warrants. The incidents allegedly occurred over the course of two years from 2020 to 2022, both at the restaurant and at Tiliacos' home in east Cobb. Tiliacos is accused by one victim of groping them multiple times over the two-year period without their consent. Similar allegations of groping were made by a second victim, who also alleged the incidents took place at both the restaurant and Tiliacos' home. It was unclear if the two alleged victims still worked at the restaurant. Joel Pugh, Tiliacos' attorney, declined to comment on the case. Tiliacos is out on a $60,000 bond after he was charged in October. He has yet to be indicted and his case is pending, per the Cobb District Attorney's office. More than two months after voters cast ballots to create a new city of Mableton, hundreds of residents turned out to continue the fight against cityhood with a single-minded purpose. They want out. A standing-room-only audience of hundreds packed the Cobb County Police Academy on Wednesday night, demanding an exit ramp from the first Cobb city to be incorporated in more than 100 years. Some said they'd never known they were in the city limits until they showed up to vote. Others, like Donna Georgiana, had simply assumed the proposal would fail like its counterparts in East Cobb, Lost Mountain, and Vinings — until it didn't. Georgiana told the MDJ she wasn't mixed up in the debate before the election, because “I really never thought it would pass, ever.” Through the town hall, pacing the stage was state Representative David Wilkerson of Powder Springs, who derided the 78,000-strong Mableton as “the largest H.O.A. in Cobb County.” Wilkerson has emerged as one of Mableton's fiercest critics since the city's referendum passed in November with 53% of the vote. Highlighting what he called “open questions” that remain after the referendum, he plans to introduce legislation this year to de-annex from the new city several precincts that voted “no” in the referendum. But the loudest voices Wednesday came from the audience, who wanted above all the answer to this question: what can we do? Wilkerson said for now, their best bet is with lawmakers under the Gold Dome. But the key, he said, will be persuading the entire Cobb County Legislative Delegation to get on board with the proposal, and he encouraged attendees to lobby their representatives hard in the coming months. Options on the table could include a “surgical” de-annexation of areas that voted against cityhood (predominantly in the city's northeast), or a do-over of the election entirely. That latter option got some of the most spirited cheers of the night. But state Representative Sharon Cooper,  of east Cobb, told the MDJ Thursday that lawmakers will likely want to hear from both sides of the issue before jumping to a legislative fix Walker did not have to look far to find its new football coach, promoting T.J. Anderson to lead the Wolverines' program. Anderson has been at Walker for two years as associate head coach and offensive coordinator. Anderson has experience at all levels of football. A graduate of South Gwinnett High School, he was a running back at Georgia Southern and was part of the Eagles' 2000 national championship in what was then NCAA's Division I-AA. He also won three Southern Conference championships under coaches Paul Johnson and Mike Sewak. Anderson, who also played in the Arena Football League for two years, returned to Georgia Southern in 2018 to served as the director of high school relations under then-coach Chad Lunsford. He also has experience in high school as an assistant coach at Westminster, Mountain View and Etowah. Anderson succeeds interim coach Tom Evangelista and becomes the fifth head coach since the beginning of the 2020 season. During that time, Walker has gone 3-25. No longer science fiction, the use of artificial intelligence to recognize and match faces to public images harvested from the internet is a reality the Cobb County Police Department wants people to understand and support. Members of Cobb police spent two hours discussing the use of facial recognition technology and their new contract with Clearview AI, hoping to alleviate concerns and inform the 25 residents gathered for the District 3 town hall meeting Wednesday night at the Tim Lee Senior Center  Cobb Police Chief Stuart VanHoozer said the technology is secure and would only be used by law enforcement in a limited capacity, likening it to receiving an anonymous tip. The majority of the questions asked by the public dealt with fears of living in a surveillance state. It was mainly up to Cobb Police Captain Darin Hull of the Violent Crime Bureau to make the case for using the technology in a safe, secure manner to rapidly apprehend suspects. Hull repeatedly emphasized how the technology would not be abused and how “guardrails" would be in place. The 150-year-old covered bridge on Concord Road in Smyrna has been reopened after it was once again hit by a vehicle and closed for repairs. Cobb DOT was repairing the protective beam of the bridge Friday morning, according to the county.   "Concord Road has been reopened to (hopefully height appropriate) traffic," the county said on its Twitter. "The bridge is fine." The historic covered bridge has been the site of crashes and closures that have grown too numerous to count, the most recent occurring in December. The bridge's low clearance, indicated by abundant signage around the bridge, is the cause of most of the accidents. The bridge was built in 1872 and is the county's only remaining covered bridge still in use. In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Officials symbolically shoveled dirt downtown on Thursday afternoon to mark the start of a new, $6 million amphitheater at Depot Park. Construction will begin February 1 and is scheduled to last 12 months. Kennesaw staff said that timeline is subject to adjustment, if the project is hampered by weather or supply chain issues. Once complete, the amphitheater will hold between 1,500 and 2,000 people, according to City Manager Jeff Drobney. The design calls for a 50-foot by 42-foot stage, with turf grass terraces fanning out from there. The project also includes new restrooms and storage space, and the renovation of the Community House. The amphitheater will cap off a long-running, eight-phase master plan for the park, which now boasts a playground, open play field, walking trail, picnic tables and benches. Construction of Depot Park was funded by successive rounds of 1% special purpose local option sales tax dollars. The amphitheater will be funded by the 2022 round of SPLOST, which began collecting revenue last January and will run through the end of 2027. #CobbCounty #Georgia #LocalNews      -            -            -            -            -            The Marietta Daily Journal Podcast is local news for Marietta, Kennesaw, Smyrna, and all of Cobb County.             Subscribe today, so you don't miss an episode! MDJOnline            Register Here for your essential digital news.            https://www.chattahoocheetech.edu/  https://cuofga.org/ https://www.esogrepair.com/ https://www.drakerealty.com/           Find additional episodes of the MDJ Podcast here.             This Podcast was produced and published for the Marietta Daily Journal and MDJ Online by BG Ad Group   For more information be sure to visit https://www.bgpodcastnetwork.com      See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Clinical Consult
Dr. Leah Katz on Helping Clients Get “Unstuck”

The Clinical Consult

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 28:42


Dr. Leah Katz—psychologist, social media influencer, and author of Gutsy: Mindfulness Practices for Everyday Bravery—reframes how we understand bravery by focusing... View More The post Dr. Leah Katz on Helping Clients Get “Unstuck” appeared first on National Register.

Seven Ages Audio Journal
Parkin Mounds: Mound Builders Series | SAAJ 061

Seven Ages Audio Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 64:16


In this episode, the Seven Ages team leads off their final episode of 2022 with a discussion on a ground-breaking new report on the Cooper's Ferry archaeological site. Recent Carbon 14 dating suggests this site may pre-date Clovis occupation in North America by as much as 2,000 years. Next, the team discusses the recent geological report that indicates the Bering Land Bridge may have been a late addition to the end of the last Ice Age. The team is then joined by Nathan Odom, a park interpreter at Parkin Mounds Archaeological State Park in Arkansas.  The Parkin Mounds Archaeological State Park is a National Historic Landmark that preserves a 17-acre Mississippian Period American Indian village located on site from A.D. 1000 to 1550. Archeologists at this research station also uncovered evidence that Hernando de Soto visited this site in 1541. The site was the location of the 1920s-era Northern Ohio Lumber Cooperage Company, and the Northern Ohio School House still remains. The site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Odom shares his knowledge of the history of the location, and the fascinating discoveries made there during excavations over the years.  Twitter  Instagram  Facebook  Seven Ages Official Site   Seven Ages Patreon  Seven Ages YouTube  Chasing History  Parkin Archaeological State Park  Our Sponsor: The Smokey Mountain Relic Room 

Galveston Unscripted | VisitGalveston.com
St. Mary's Basilica | Established 1847

Galveston Unscripted | VisitGalveston.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 4:54


St. Mary's Cathedral was documented by the Historic American Buildings Survey in 1967 and, in 1968, was named to the National Register of Historic Places. Learn about her founding in 1847!Follow Galveston Unscripted on Spotify or Apple Podcasts! More history content on Visit Galveston!Galveston Unscripted What is Galveston Unscripted?

Save As: NextGen Heritage Conservation
[ENCORE] Fictional History: Recognizing TV and Film Locations

Save As: NextGen Heritage Conservation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 36:13


In case you missed it, we're re-releasing an episode from last season, chosen by our Save As intern, Emily Kwok. It's an Emily's Pick!  Should the Brady Bunch House be in the National Register of Historic Places? Why not? asks alum Jonathan Kaplan. In his master's thesis, the TV writer-turned-heritage conservationist makes a case for designating sites specifically for their use in movies and TV shows. Along with literary precedent dating back to Chaucer, Jonathan cites the deep meaning and shared cultural experiences these places create.  If a place inspires meaning, does it matter where that meaning comes from? Does reality matter in these fact-fluid times? Join us for a fascinating conversation that's just the tip of the iceberg. Photos, links, and thesis on episode pageConnect with us @saveasnextgen on Instagram and Facebook

Gaston's Great
Episode 72 - Hoyle Historic Homestead

Gaston's Great

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 55:48


WATCH NOW: https://youtu.be/-lASpr9KufUPeter Westbrook once said, "So much of our future lies in preserving our past". We 100% agree! Join us this week as we interview Robert Carpenter (Board Member) and Dr. Alan May (President)  with the Hoyle Historic Homestead. Listen to learn about all the great things they are doing to keep the Hoyle Homestead looking great! About: The Hoyle Historic Homestead, Inc. was formed in 1991 to purchase and preserve Gaston County's oldest residence.  In 1993, the site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The organization has raised and continues to raise funds from memberships, donations and from grants to enable it to preserve the buildings and grounds. Website: https://hoylehomestead.org/Donate: https://www.paypal.com/donate?token=AqMP54zirmGZnY3MzRJwpEEzrii01xzYQ7GA_WHUTb3WIITyHiJwhYtw_aj_8_Lmb_ZqELoXqhDSJv0-Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HoyleHistoricHomestead/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hoylehistorichomestead/Podcast of the Week:  History that doesn't Suck - Greg Jacksonhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/history-that-doesnt-suck/id1291579828?mt=2Gaston's Great loves feedback, suggestions, or questions! Want to get in touch with us? We'd love to hear from you! Feel free to reach out to us by a method that is convenient for you.Website: https://www.gastonsgreat.com/Email: podcast@gastonsgreat.comPhone: 704-864-0344

Heidi and Toni Explore Cleveland
Tower City Observation Deck and Public Square

Heidi and Toni Explore Cleveland

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 33:09


Tower City has a very rich history and the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. This historic building was once the second tallest building in America outside of New York City; and you can go to the 42nd Floor and see 360 degree views of Northeast Ohio. Before you go, check out their website https://www.towercitycenter.com to see all of their current events and hours of operations. Below the tower you will find the Terminal Tower and access to the RTA Rapid. You can follow Tower City on social media. Heidi and Toni Explore Cleveland is produced by Heidi Johnson and Toni Gambino; all rights reserved. Please follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter and TikTok. https://exploringclevelandwithheidiandtoni.com. Email: exploringclevelandht@gmail.com The views and opinions expressed in this podcast belong to the content creators and not the business, organization, affiliates, or their employees. This podcast is for entertainment purposes only. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/heidi-johnson39/support

Small Town News
Cave Creek, AZ - Ugg and His Pizza Buddies Get Leaky Gut

Small Town News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 57:31


Welcome to Cave Creek, Arizona, "Where the Wild West Lives."  Located in the Sonoran Desert, the town was settled in 1870 by soldiers from Fort McDowell.  In 1873 prospectors found gold in parts of upper Cave Creek and started a 20 year "gold rush" in Cave Creek.  As the gold rush subsided, cattle ranching and sheep grazing became popular.  As drought and overgrazing took its toll on the west, central Arizona became a popular destination for those suffering from tuberculosis.  The Desmount Sanitarium opened in 1920 with 16 small buildings to house patients.  The Sanitarium closed in 1929 as the Great Depression gripped the nation.  One cabin still remains and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  In June of 2009, the town attracted national attention when a card draw was used to break a tie in a local election.  The Arizona State Constitution allows a game of chance to be used to break ties.  We hope you enjoy of visit to Cave Creek!

The Clarke County Democrat Podcast
Historic grave shelter restored after 2020 hit by Hurricane Zeta

The Clarke County Democrat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 4:23


It took nearly two years, but the Airmount Grave Shelter north of Thomasville near the Wilcox County line has been completely restored. The National Register structure, owned by the Clarke County Historical Society, was crushed by falling trees during Hurricane Zeta in October, 2020. Built in 1853; one-of-a-kind in state The important historic building was built in 1853 and is believed to be the only one of its type in Alabama. Architecturally significant, the unusual, splayed eaves and vaulted or “compass” interior ceiling can be traced to Eastern Seaboard church yards in Delaware and Virginia. “I thought we had gotten...Article Link

The Clinical Consult
Dr. Marisa G. Franco on the Science of Attachment and Making Friends

The Clinical Consult

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 43:37


Dr. Marisa G. Franco, author of Platonic: How The Science of Attachment Can Help You Make—and Keep—Friends, explores how attachment... View More The post Dr. Marisa G. Franco on the Science of Attachment and Making Friends appeared first on National Register.

Idaho Matters
Idaho motorcycle club added to the National Register of Historic Places

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 14:53


Since 1946, the Owyhee Motorcycle Club has trained and competed on a track in the Boise Foothills. Now the club has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the first one to do so in the United States.

222 Paranormal Podcast
Murder Violence Ghost Tommyknockers in the Appalachians Eps. 334

222 Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 36:28


On today's Episode #334: Join us for haunted tales of Brushy Mountain, haunted caves and Appalachian weirdness, we cover it all! Please remember to hit Subscribe/Follow Please Help Support the show with a donation. Click here to donate ======================================= Links From this episode 222 Paranormal Website Jen's Poshmark Closet Joe's Book =================================== During Miranda's overnight, she captured class A EVP's Ghost Biker Explorations: End of the Line, S2 Episode 1 Click Here to go to Her Video. ==================================== Brushy Mountain state pen In 1891 there was a major uprising of the miners in the town of coal Creek 39 miles from Brushy mountain Pen this was known as the coal Creek war which was a fight against convict leasing. In 1896 the Tennessee legislature abolished the act of leasing prisoners for labor at the coal mine. But I ended up building the brushy Mountain State prison and coal mine. Which made the prisoners the workforce and the prisoners ended up doing every bit of the work. The prisoners became the complete workforce for the mines. They use the prisoners to build everything including the railroad tracks and all the mining equipment needed to mind the earth. Then the prisoners themselves became unpaid employees of the mine. The conditions were so bad that hundreds of inmate minors died in accidents in the mine. According to old news accounts. The inmates had a daily quota they had to come up with every day and if they did not make that quota they were beaten severely, and the next day had to make up for that quota they missed. Beatings happened in the courtyard in front of the other inmates. In 1966 the state closed the mine. Known as the end of the line or Alcatraz of the South Is now open to tours, and ghost hunts, and has a restaurant and distillery. There was no spot in the prison considered death row, the prison was so violent that the entire prison was considered death row that's why they called it the end of the line. Once you were sentenced to brushy Mountain State penitentiary you were pretty much guaranteed never to leave. The prison cemetery has around 400 burials, but none are identified or kept secret. There was no part of the prison off limits to murder from inmate to inmate from guard to inmate and guard to guard. Hauntings include everything that you can imagine that comes out of a prism. Noises, screams, voices, apparitions, EVPs , light, anomalies, shadows, figures, noises such as banging, machinery, door slams, the rattling of chains, noises that the inmates did on a regular basis. Other haunted locations involve the prison. Drummond's Bridge/Trestle (Briceville, TN) In Briceville, there is a scary bridge that is made even scarier by local lore. There are many different accounts of the Drummond legend, however, it seems the real story is that a 25-year-old miner was hanged in retaliation for the murder of William Laugherty during the Coal Creek War (Karin Shapiro, A New South Rebellion). Richard (Dick) Drummond - Coal Creek War, Briceville, TN Dick Drummond was one of the many laborers who were killed by militiamen sent by Governor John P. Buchanan. Legend has it that the ghost of Dick Drummond still wanders the area looking for revenge against the soldiers who dragged him to the railroad trestle and hanged him. If you are one to connect with the spirits, you may be able to see a shadowy figure hanging from the bridge's trestlework or walking the tracks. As part of a spooky game, kids dare each other to walk across the bridge at midnight. Apparently, at this witching hour, Drummond walks across the bridge and then vanishes into thin air. Whether it's a local trickster or the ghost of Drummond himself, the trip will surely scare the wits out of you. Bring your camera, you may just be able to capture it. If you don't think that's scary enough, try driving through Circle Cemetery Road, up the hill on Circle Road, which causes the chills even during daylight. Also be sure to check out Red Ash Cemetery (official name is Turley Cemetery), around 10 minutes away from the bridge, located off Old Tennessee 63 in Caryville, TN The entire Red Ash area is suspected of being haunted, including reports of giant goat men and hell-hounds. From Satanic rituals to murder, stories and hauntings abound.   Mine's haunted by Tommyknockers According to Merriam-Webster, a tommyknocker is “the ghost of a man killed in a mine.” Other references indicate that the folktale is more complicated than mere haunting.  “The Knocker, Knacker, is a mythical creature in Welsh, Cornish and Devon folklore. It is closely related to the Irish leprechaun or clurichaun, Kentish kloker, and the English and Scottish brownie. The Cornish described the creature as a little person two feet tall, with a big head, long arms, wrinkled face, and white whiskers. It wears a tiny version of a standard miner's garb and commits random mischief, such as stealing miners' unattended tools and food. Some miners believed Cornish Tommyknockers haunted underground passages. Miners crafted crude clay statues of knockers with match stick eyes and placed them in the mines as guardians. Some miners believed Cornish Tommyknockers haunted underground passages. Miners crafted crude clay statues of knockers with match stick eyes and placed them in the mines as guardians. “The name comes from the knocking on the mine walls that happens just before cave-ins – actually the creaking of earth and timbers before giving way. To some miners, knockers were malevolent spirits and the knocking was the sound of them hammering at walls and supports to cause the cave-in. To others, who saw them as essentially well-meaning practical jokers, the knocking was their way of warning the miners that a life-threatening collapse was imminent.” “According to some Cornish folklore, the Knockers were the helpful spirits of people who had died in previous accidents in the many tin mines in the county, warning the miners of impending danger. To give thanks for the warnings, and to avoid future peril, the miners cast the last bite of their tasty pasties into the mines for the Knockers.”   Cross Mountain Mine disaster  25 miles north of Brushy mountain pen in Briceville, Tennessee The Cross Mountain Mine disaster was a coal mine explosion that occurred on December 9, 1911, near the community of Briceville, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. In spite of a well-organized rescue effort led by the newly created Bureau of Mines, 84 miners died as a result of the explosion. The likely cause of the explosion was the ignition of dust and gas released by a roof fall. At least 22 of the miners killed in the Cross Mountain Mine disaster were buried in a circular memorial known as the Cross Mountain Miners' Circle, which is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

WXVU Podcasts
WXVU Main Line News Minute - November 22, 2022

WXVU Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 1:28


By: Gabriella Raful, WXVU News Director Radnor Township is collecting gifts for children and adults throughout the community. The town is collecting unwrapped toys in a “Toys for Tots” campaign as well as toiletry items and non-perishable food in partnership with Wayne Cares for Wayne Food Pantry. Items for both causes can be dropped off at Radnor Township Municipal Building, 302 Iven Ave. by Friday, Dec. 2. The township police department is also collecting gifts for the Saint Edmond's Home for the Children, a home for children with intellectual disabilities in the Bryn Mawr section of the township. Items include art supplies, baking supplies, socks, and gift certificates to Walmart, Hobby Lobby, Michaels, Dollar Store and Target. The gifts can be dropped off at the Radnor Police Station, 302 Iven Ave., by Dec. 16. In other news, on Bryn Mawr Avenue in Radnor there are three small brick and concrete arch bridges near the Sacred Heart Academy. These bridges were built 117 years ago and one of them is in the National Register of Historic Places. The bridges carry 10,515 vehicles daily, according to PennDOT. The work on the bridges was part of a $7.7 million project to restore seven bridges in the Philadelphia area. Preservation Pennsylvania noticed the 1905 bridges' rehabilitation and awarded PennDOT two Ralph Modesku Awards for Excellence in Transportation, Design, Perseverance and Archaeology.

Senior Times
Irish GenPod 8 - Steven Smyrl

Senior Times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 42:53


Steven Smyrl is a professional genealogist who has been at the heart of Irish genealogy for over 30 years. He and Paul go back a long way. They reminisce about how Steven got involved in family history in Ireland and his early days in the profession. They also touch on his work on the unsuccessful campaign to have the 1926 Census released early. But coincidentally funding for the digitisation of that census was announced on the day this podcast went live. Steven is somewhat taken aback by a compliment paid by Paul, but Paul ploughs on despite Steven's proper show of humility. Protestant dissenting congregations are one of several areas of genealogy and history in which he has particular expertise. His book, Dictionary of Dublin Dissent (Dublin, 2009), is a major contribution to research in that area. His primary work is in probate research. He tells Paul about the television series Dead Money in which he and his genealogist brother, Kit Smyrl, were the stars of the show, tracing some interesting inheritance cases. Steven is well known for his voluntary work in the field, especially with the Irish Genealogical Research Society and his professional organisation, Accredited Genealogists Ireland. However, few will know that he was instrumental in having the 1939 National Register for England and Wales released. Posterity will thank him for his involvement in having extra information added to death records in the Republic and in Northern Ireland from the 2000s forward. Steven Smyrl is involved in genealogy on all fronts and this chat could have gone on for hours. Series Producer: Conor O'Hagan Audio Supervisor: John Hughes Link to Accredited Genealogists Ireland: https://accreditedgenealogists.ie/ AGI Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/AccreditedGenealogistsIreland Link to the Irish Genealogical Research Society: https://www.irishancestors.ie/ IGRS Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/IrishGenealogicalResearchSociety

Grating the Nutmeg
154. Numbers to Names: Restoring Humanity to CT Valley Hospital Cemetery

Grating the Nutmeg

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 37:46


Connecticut Explored magazine is celebrating its 20th anniversary and our Grating the Nutmeg podcast it's 7thanniversary. Neither of these milestones could have been reached without your support! Please make a gift to our new Fund for Excellence in Publishing at https://www.ctexplored.org/subscribe/friends-of-connecticut-explored/   For over a century, almost 1700 people buried in the cemetery at the Connecticut Valley Hospital were identified with gravestones bearing only a number instead of a name.  In the 1990s, names of the deceased were restored to the site. In this episode of Grating the Nutmeg, Natalie Belanger of the Connecticut Historical Society (https://chs.org/) is taking a look at a digital history project that will help expand our understanding of the lives of the people buried in that cemetery and of mental health care in Connecticut's past. Kaitlyn Oberndorfer, CREC history teacher and graduate student, has undertaken a project that will link genealogical and demographic information to the names in the cemetery, restoring some of the residents' lost humanity.     Look for Kaitlyn's finished project to go live online sometime in 2023. For a detailed history of the Connecticut Valley Hospital Cemetery, you can read the application that placed the site on the National Register of Historic Places.    You can click here to learn about the “Uncovering Their History” project that inspired “Numbers to Names”  Read more here: https://www.ctexplored.org/unburying-hartfords-native-and-african-family-histories/ And listen to our podcast episode here: https://gratingthenutmeg.libsyn.com/78-uncovering-african-and-native-american-lives-in-17th-18th-century-hartford   For more about the treatment of Civil War soldiers at the Connecticut Valley Hospital, read more here:https://www.ctexplored.org/civil-war-soldiers-heart/   And for more about the treatment of mental illness in Connecticut, read more here: https://www.ctexplored.org/treating-the-mind-in-times-past/     Join Connecticut Explored's 20th anniversary celebration by subscribing at ctexplored.org New subscribers can get 6 issues for the price of 4 with our Holiday sale before 12/31/2022.   This episode of Grating the Nutmeg was produced by Natalie Belanger, Adult Programs Manager at the Connecticut Historical Society and engineered by Patrick O'Sullivan of High Wattage Media at https://www.highwattagemedia.com/

Outdoors, Brews, & BBQ
Outdoors, Brews, & BBQ - Some beers from across Florida in Tampa and a historic site in St. Augustine.

Outdoors, Brews, & BBQ

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 55:14


In our podcast we will be covering a little on Outdoors A little of the Drinking side and a BBQ Features, and Recipes Outdoors Castillo de San MarcosNot to be confused with Castle of San Marcos (El Puerto de Santa María)."Fort Marion" redirects here. For the ship, see USS Fort Marion (LSD-22).Castillo de San Marcos National Monument it si registered under U.S. National Register of Historic Places. It was Built between 1672–1695It's coordinates are 29°53′52″N 81°18′41″WCoordinates: 29°53′52″N 81°18′41″WAdded to NRHP on October 15, 1966Aerial view photo taken from northwest. Although the fort had a water-filled moat at the time, it was originally a dry moat.The Castillo de San Marcos (Spanish for "St. Mark's Castle") is the oldest masonry fort in the continental United States; it is located on the western shore of Matanzas Bay in the city of St. Augustine, Florida.It was designed by the Spanish engineer Ignacio Daza, with constructionBEERSCoppertail Brewery over in Tampa, FLhttps://coppertailbrewing.com/Free Dive ABV. 5.9%  Unholly ABV. 9.2 % Samual Adams in Boston, MASamuel Adams Jack-O  ABV. 4.4% BBQMojo Old City BBQ https://www.mojobbq.com/mojo-old-city-bbq#menus

The Culture Matters Podcast
Season 10, Episode 112: Guest: Tony Capullo: There Are Leaders In All Of Us

The Culture Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 130:03


Twenty-five years ago, Tony Capullo founded a national consulting firm that provided regulatory, compliance, audit, and cutting-edge, web-based training solutions to healthcare organizations across the country. His company, PPS, developed, implemented, and evaluated corporate compliance programs for healthcare organizations and also served as the Independent Review Organization (IRO) for the Office of Inspector General imposed corporate integrity agreements. From 2005 to 2008, PPS served as a MEDIC contractor for CMS. As an integrity contractor, PPS was responsible for promoting the integrity of the Medicare program by helping to address fraud, waste, and abuse by identifying problems, internal control gaps, and potentially fraudulent activity. Mr. Capullo is a lifetime member of Cambridge Who's Who in the National Register of Honored Professionals, Executives, and Entrepreneurs. He has been an expert witness on Medicare issues in TN, NC, MS, and AL. He has been featured in several business magazines and periodicals and was nominated by the Business Advisory Council for Florida Businessman of the Year in 2003, 2004, and 2005. He served nine years as a member of the Editorial Board for Report on Medicare Compliance and has contributed articles to the Aspen Publishers' Physician Practice Compliance Resource Manual and Strategies for Healthcare Compliance Officers. He was featured in CNN Radio's "The Innovators"​in February 2012 and on "Mind Your Own Business," Radio for Entrepreneurs, in 2014. He was nominated for Entrepreneur Magazine's "Entrepreneur of the Year"​ for 2012.In this episode, Tony and Jay discuss everyday advice Tony has received and given and his approach to what a true consultant is, Tony explains explicitly that there are leaders in all of us.

The Ordinary, Extraordinary Cemetery
Episode 108 - Clay Street Cemetery in Fairbanks, Alaska

The Ordinary, Extraordinary Cemetery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 48:26


Dianne and Jennie are joined by special guest Janet Richardson from Fairbanks, Alaska who shares stories of those buried in Fairbanks's first cemetery and shares many of the details of the years of restoration and preservation that has kept this cemetery alive. Clay Street Cemetery, formerly called the Fairbanks Cemetery, was established in 1903, the same year the city of Fairbanks was established on the banks of the Chena River. Here are buried people from all walks of life from local Native Americans to the first pioneers who came from all over the world to the Fairbanks area, most seeking their fortune in gold.  In 1982, the cemetery was placed on the National Register of Historic Places and The Clay Street Cemetery Commission was formed. The commission has spent countless hours researching every Ordinary Extraordinary individual buried here and making sure their stories are not forgotten by engraving them on beautiful granite headstones often provided by members/businesses of the Fairbanks community.For more information on Fairbanks history and The Clay Street Cemetery, visit: https://www.fairbanksgenealogicalsociety.com/To help support Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Sleepy Hollow, New York with your $5 donation click here: https://gofund.me/062c87d8To watch the video of our adaptation of Washington Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, click  here:  https://youtu.be/uWaWbg4C82s

Michigan's AutoTalk Podcast
Episode 80: “The Inside Story of the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant"

Michigan's AutoTalk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 22:14


Episode 80: “The Inside Story of the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant"In this episode, producer Phil Tower, along with hosts Al Schwinkendorf and John Puhek, welcome special guest Barry Cogan, a member of the Piquette Avenue Plant's Board of Trustees, and volunteer for the facility for more than ten years. We learned that Barry also served on the Board of Directors for the Dodge Brothers Club, the Eastside A's Model A Club, and Piquette T's Model T Club.Barry told us that The Model-T Automotive Heritage Complex, Inc., better known as the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant, was organized in 2000 as a nonprofit organization for the purpose of preserving the Plant and keeping it from being demolished. The facility is now open year-round as a Museum and education center and attracts visitors from around the world. We also learned that the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant (FPAP) is managed by a Board of Trustees and volunteer committees and the treasured historic site is financially self-supported. The Ford Piquette Avenue Plant was dedicated as a MotorCities National Heritage Area site in 1996 and was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 2002 and listed as a Michigan State Historic Site in 2003. Barry also shares with us the amazing story of how the plat was nearly torn down and eventually saved from the wrecking ball!Learn more online: https://www.fordpiquetteplant.org/Like us on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/MichigansAutoTalkPodcastMichigan's AutoTalk podcast is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, iHeartRadio, Google Podcasts, Amazon Audio, Spreaker.com, Deezer, and Podcatcher.Thank you for listening. If you like our podcast please share it with a friend!

Cato Event Podcast
Can Prescribing Psychologists Help Solve the National Mental Health Crisis?

Cato Event Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 62:44


t his 2022 State of the Union address, President Biden focused the nation's attention on “a national mental health crisis.” Mood disorders and suicidal thoughts and behaviors have been rising at alarming levels for years. The pandemic and government‐​mandated lockdowns increased anxiety, isolation, and despair while also reducing access to mental health services. Approximately 40 percent of Americans currently cannot access mental health services, particularly services requiring drug‐​based therapy.Clinical psychologists can play a greater role in meeting those needs. Some federal agencies, five states, and the territory of Guam authorize competent clinical psychologists to prescribe medications that affect mood and mental functions. Those jurisdictions refer to such psychologists as prescribing psychologists, medical psychologists, or RxPs. However, most states prohibit competent clinical psychologists from prescribing such medication. To address the mental health crisis, should state lawmakers expand the scope of practice of competent clinical psychologists to include prescribing?Joining us to discuss this are Dr. Beth Rom‐​Rymer, a clinical psychologist, chair and president of the board of directors of the National Register of Health Service Psychologists, and CEO of the Illinois Association of Prescribing Psychologists; Dr. Rebecca Weintraub Brendel, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, director of the master's degree program at Harvard Medical School's Center for Bioethics, and president and distinguished fellow of the American Psychiatric Association; Dr. Thomas D. Lee, a psychiatrist at the Ascension Alexian Brothers Center for Mental Health in Arlington, Illinois, who supervises psychology fellows in the Ascension RxP Fellowship Program; and Dr. Claudia Mosier, a prescribing psychologist licensed in Illinois and Louisiana. The discussion will be moderated by Cato Institute senior fellow Jeffrey A. Singer, MD. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Only in OK Show
OKlatober - Haunted Constantine Theater, Pawhuska, OK

Only in OK Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 20:14


How can you tell if a monster likes you? He takes another bite.   Today we are discussing the Haunted Constantine Theater in Pawhuska, Oklahoma.   Constantine Theater in Pawhuska, Oklahoma is the second oldest performing arts center in Oklahoma. The Constantine Theater was built in 1914 and touted as the "Finest Opera House in the Southwest."   Pawhuska, Oklahoma is a great mix of American Indian and western culture and is steeped in history. 86 of the 98 downtown buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.   #TravelOK #onlyinokshow #Oklahoma #PawhuskaOK #SmallTownFun #ghost #mysteriousOK  

The UMB Pulse Podcast
Visiting the Catacombs and Edgar Allan Poe's Grave in Baltimore

The UMB Pulse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 21:03 Transcription Available


You might know that Edgar Allan Poe is buried in Baltimore, but do you know the story behind the burial ground of his final resting place? And did you know there are catacombs in Baltimore? It's a perfect historic Halloween haunt! The Westminster Hall and Burying Ground is under the care of the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, and October is a popular time of year for the venue, featuring public tours of the historic hall, cemetery and the catacombs. Learn how you can visit and tour this landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Sites. Jessica Williams, associate director, Event Services & Westminster Preservation Trust, Inc. and Heather McKlveen, administrative assistant, take us inside and underneath Westminster Hall.Once you're done at Westminster Hall, stop over at our other October Bonus Episode on the new Lexington Market.Halloween is just around the corner and we have some tricks and treats in store for The UMB Pulse. Listen now to learn when you can grab a bite at the new Lexington Market. Once you've had your fill, tour the catacombs and Edgar Allan Poe's grave site at Westminster Hall and Burying Ground.Listen to The UMB Pulse on Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon, and wherever you like to listen. The UMB Pulse is also now on YouTube.Visit our website at umaryland.edu/pulse or email us at umbpulse@umaryland.edu.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - RUTH HOSKINS - Dream Incubation

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 45:16


Ruth Hoskins, Ph.D., H.H.S. (Holistic Health Sciences) LCSW, BCD, founder of the Psychology of Balance Wellness Programs and Effortless Meditation Therapy (EMT) in Philadelphia, is the Director of Relaxation International. She is recognized in the 2005 National Register's of Who's Who in Executives and Professionals. An adjunct professor at Chestnut Hill College teaching Health Psychology, The Mind Body Connection. Ruth earned her Ph.D. in Holistic Health Sciences and completed research on Dream Incubation, the ability to solve problems during sleep. A trainer for Fortune 500 companies, licensed clinical social worker, stress management consultant, certified relationships counselor, and approved critical incident stress trainer, Ruth is a National speaker presenting information on mind-body health. She is the author several products to enhance one's mood including, No Time for Down Time? Balance your life, And Dream Moments, The Voice in Your Dreams Prophecy and Intuition. She is the producer of audio Easy Stress Solutions for You, Wholeness Words Guided Visualization, and Active Relaxation. Ruth is available to speak nationwide.To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

Think Out Loud
Federal funds aid in restoration of La Grande theater

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 11:15


The Liberty Theater in La Grande, Oregon will be receiving a grant for almost $600,000 from the U.S. Department of Commerce's Economic Development Administration. In July 1999, the theater was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Almost a decade later, restoration efforts began. Ashley O'Toole is the Board Chair of the Liberty Theater Foundation, the organization that is spearheading restoration efforts. He joins us to share what this federal grant will mean for the theater and his hopes for the future.

Tulsa World Opinion
Oklahoma's eroding mental health services

Tulsa World Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 33:51


Ginnie Graham and Bob Doucette talk about Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler, who spoke passionately about the erosion of mental health services in the state after being stabbed by his daughter. If a prominent district attorney in the state cannot access proper mental health services for his family, then how does that bode for everyone else? Plus, how can the community support Tulsa McLain High School after the fatal shooting? Related Watch Now: Mental health crisis is 'gaping wound,' needs prioritization by Legislature, Tulsa County DA says after stabbing Tulsa County DA's daughter arrested; DA released from hospital after stabbing Daughter of Tulsa County district attorney charged in his stabbing Ginnie Graham: Steps Oklahoma lawmakers can take to turnaround mental health system Christian Costello found not guilty by reason of insanity in death of state labor commissioner Watch Now: Superintendent addresses security at McLain after fatal shooting Tulsa police decry recent fatal teen shootings, spate of homicides Friday McLain High School students, staff return to class following fatal shooting As games keep moving, TPS focused on increasing safety at football games Bob Doucette: We need to rally around McLain Stitt signs bill preventing gender-transition treatments for minors at OU medical facilities Editorial: Lawmakers must work through ARPA fund hold up Greenwood District added to National Register of Historic Places Editorial: Greenwood District deserves placement on national historic registry Surreptitiously obtained video targets TPS' Rogers Middle School teacher on HB 1775 Editorial: Osage Nation is right: We need to repeal HB 1775 Contact us Editorial Editor Ginnie Graham: Email | Twitter | Follow her stories Editorial Writer Bob Doucette: Email | Twitter | Follow his stories Click here to submit a letter to the editor (Note: endorsement letters will not be published from Saturday-Tuesday ahead of Nov. 8's general election)Support the show: https://tulsaworld.com/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Build Me Up
La Crosse's Landmark by the Rivers: Revitalization, Revision, and Innovative Use

Build Me Up

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 32:10


The Landmark by the Rivers project team joins this episode of "Build Me Up" to talk about the completed apartment and retail complex. The building, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2016, provides downtown La Crosse with modern, luxurious living while maintaining its rich history. We chat with the team about the building's background, what to consider during historical renovation, and how they incorporated the past while building for the future.

NDB Media
TRAVEL ITCH RADIO

NDB Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 30:00


Once called "the Queen City of the Gulf," Galveston has six historic districts and one of the nation's largest collections of 19th century buildings -- with more than 60 on the National Register of Historic Places. A port city that was once the capital of the Republic of Texas, Galveston has gone from hurricane victim to tourist mecca, with a benign climate and multiple attractions. Hear all about the area, located on an island off the southwest coast of Texas, when Mary Beth Bassett, senior public relations manager of VisitGalveston, visits TRAVEL ITCH RADIO on Thursday, September 29. Listen live at 8p EDT on iTunes or BlogTalkRadio.com or catch the archived show on Facebook.

The Daily Sun-Up
What to expect from Denver Startup Week; Chimney Rock becomes a National Monument

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 12:11


Today - We're talking to The Colorado Sun's business reporter Tamara Chuang about Denver Startup Week.   [NEW - running all week] Before we begin, We'd like to thank our sponsors - Xcel Energy. Xcel Energy can help you find ways to keep your home or business running smoothly, while reducing energy use and saving you money. Find everyday tips for using less energy and simple ways to manage your energy budget at X-C-E-L-energy-dot-com."   Now, let's go back in time with some Colorado History.   More than 1,000 years ago, a culture known as Chacoan dominated the Four Corners region from a cluster of cities in Chaco Canyon in today's northwestern New Mexico. Satellite communities with allegiance to the canyon extended for a hundred miles in every direction. On the northern Chacoan frontier stood a community known today as Chimney Rock, named for one of two stone spires that towered above it, in present-day Archuleta County.   Starting around 900 AD, Chacoans colonized the region, erecting towns in the shadow of Chimney and Companion Rocks. Higher in elevation than any other Ancestral Puebloan settlement, archaeologists believe Chacoans used the Chimney Rock site as an astronomical calendar, with important buildings aligned with both the stones and celestial bodies at important times of the year, including solstices, equinoxes, and phases of the moon. For two and a half centuries, several hundred Chacoans inhabited eight communities clustered below the pinnacles.   For reasons unknown, around 1150 AD the residents burned and abandoned the site, although competition from groups to the west (such as Mesa Verde) might have contributed to its decline. Archaeological work at Chimney Rock, now located in the San Juan National Forest, occurred sporadically in the twentieth century. Although surveys are still made, American Indian descendants of the community's inhabitants have requested that no further excavations disturb the site. In 1970, Chimney Rock earned a listing in the National Register of Historic Places, spurring further attempts to protect and recognize it. To better preserve and interpret the historic landmark, President Barack Obama used his authority under the Antiquities Act to declare Chimney Rock National Monument in 2012.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Twilight Tonic Paranormal Podcast

History: Dale Kaczmarek has been investigating paranormal phenomena since 1975. He co-founded the Ghost Trackers Club in 1977 with Martin V. Riccardo and worked for five years as its Research Assistant. In 1982, Mr. Kaczmarek assumed the sole owner of what would become the Ghost Research Society. He has investigated almost 4,100 cases around the world both public and private. He is frequently called upon to lecture at conferences, give workshops on the paranormal and ghost hunting techniques and teaches courses on the paranormal. Mr. Kaczmarek offers a free service for those interested in having photographs examined that might be deemed paranormal. He approaches the paranormal from a scientific standpoint but has worked with a number of psychics over the years. He is a believer in the paranormal but seasons his beliefs with a bit of skepticism. Dale has accumulated a wide array of the latest in state-of-the-art paranormal equipment that compliments his work in the field. Attributes: President of the Ghost Research Society, past Editor of The Journal, Ghost Trackers Newsletter and The Ghostly Whisper, Author of "Windy City Ghosts" and "Windy City Ghosts 2", "A Field Guide to Spirit Photography", "Illuminating the Darkness: The Mystery of Spooklights", "Field Guide to Ghost Hunting Techniques", "Field Guide to Haunted Highways and Bridges," Bibliography of Ghost Movies, Directory of Ghostly Websites, Glossary of Occult Terms, Greater Chicagoland and Northwest Indiana Psychic Directory, International Directory of Psychic Sciences, National Catalog of Occult Bookstores, National Register of Haunted Locations, Occult Publications Directory. Memberships: American Association Electronic Voice Phenomena (AA- EVP), International Fortean Organization (INFO), Honorary Life Member of The Ghost Club, Society for the Investigation of the Unexplained, Ghost Safari and Oak Lawn Chamber of Commerce. For more info on Dale http://www.ghost research.org/ Moonflyers Tees is on ✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨✨ on Spring ✨

Psychology America with Dr. Alexandra
Beth Rom-Rymer on Rabbi Hillel, How to get Big Things Done and the Robber's Cave Experiment

Psychology America with Dr. Alexandra

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 53:12


Beth Rom-Rymer, PhD is the Chair and President of the Board of Directors of the National Register of Health Service Psychologists, the co-founder and co-chair of the International Movement for Prescriptive Authority (a movement supporting psychologists ability to prescribe medications) and at the time of this recording, a current candidate for the presidency of the American Psychological Association (APA).  Through her leadership and her ability to bring together multiple groups, Dr. Rom-Rymer has greatly increased access to mental health care in the United States.    I hope you will enjoy learning from her as much as I did through this interview!  Support the show

WUWM News
Committee agrees to apply for national historic designation for Milwaukee's Domes, future remains uncertain

WUWM News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 4:39


The future of the Mitchell Parks Domes took a baby step forward Tuesday. After much debate, a Milwaukee County committee agreed to apply for National Register of Historic Places status. If approved, it would mean The Domes might qualify for historic credits to help fund their much-needed restoration. Yet, no long-term plan or budget exists to ensure the future of the unique bee-hived shaped structures.

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS
Marshall Miles Interviews-Oskar Espina Ruiz: Music Mountains Closing Weekend For 2022

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 9:08


CASSATT STRING QUARTET & ELIOT FISK, GUITAR September 18, 2022 Gordon Hall, Music Mountain (Sun Quartets Concert #6/6)   HAYDN String Quartet in F Minor, Op. 20 #5GODFREY Guitar QuintetTURINA The Bullfighter's PrayerBOCCHERINI Guitar Quintet in D Major, G.448, “Fandango” Since 1930, generations of music lovers have come to Music Mountain for an exceptional concert experience and audiences continue to praise the outstanding quality and consistency of the events at Music Mountain, the exceptional acoustics of air-conditioned Gordon Hall, and the beauty and peaceful serenity of Music Mountain's mountaintop grounds. While The New Yorker has described Music Mountain as “the summer shrine of the string quartet,” recent concertgoers see Music Mountain as “a peaceful green oasis” and highlight its “amazing venue, ambience, and experience.” Music Mountain, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, began as the unique vision of Jacques Gordon, Chicago Symphony concertmaster from 1921 to 1930 and the founding first violinist of the Gordon String Quartet, one of the leading quartets of its time. The buildings at Music Mountain form a well-designed campus in the Colonial Revival style. They were built by Sears, Roebuck & Company's prefabricated housing division and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Nicholas Gordon, the son of Jacques Gordon, was president of Music Mountain from 1974 until his death in 2017. With an encyclopedic knowledge of chamber music and performing quartets, he expanded the teaching programs, and arranged for broadcasts of Music Mountain concerts that reach over one million listeners nationwide and in 45 countries. As artistic and executive director, as well as principal fundraiser, Nick's guidance included not only traditional chamber music classics, but also the introduction of Twilight Jazz Concerts on Saturday nights. Nick believed Music Mountain's longevity is due to the fact it has been faithful to its mission and is supported by a dedicated community sharing a passion and love of music--traditions that are alive and well today. ​​​​​​​Since 2016, artistic director Oskar Espina-Ruiz and Music Mountain's dedicated board of directors steer Music Mountain through a period of continued growth.

Coney Island Stories
Growing Up in the 1990s

Coney Island Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 30:40


Season Two's theme is “Growing Up in Coney Island” through the decades, from the 1930s to the 21st century. In Episode Seven, narrators who grew up here in the 1990s share stories of loss and change. They remember living in Gravesend Houses and Sea Rise apartments as well as on West 5th, West 8th and West 19th Streets. The Boardwalk, the Beach, Astroland, the Cyclone Roller Coaster and the Wonder Wheel were their playgrounds.The decade began with the Cyclone winning a spot on the National Register of Historic Places in 1991. The same year, a fire gutted the wooden house under Coney's other surviving roller coaster from the 1920s, the still standing but nonoperational Thunderbolt. The house was known to film lovers as Woody Allen's boyhood home in the movie Annie Hall, but it was originally built as the Kensington Hotel in the late 1800s. It was the last remaining structure from Coney's original waterfront, since the shoreline at that time was much farther inland than it is now. The 1925 coaster was caught between an owner who neglected it, and City officials who considered it an eyesore. Some viewed the Thunderbolt as a symbol of Coney's decline, but to many, it served as a monument to survival.The oral histories in Episode Seven are with Tiana Camacho, Emmanuel Elpenord, Theresa Giovinni, Allen James, and Marina Rubin The interviews were conducted by Amanda Deutch, Katya Kumkova, Ali Lemer, Samira Tazari, and Tricia Vita between 2014 and 2020. This episode was produced by Charles Denson, Ali Lemer and Tricia Vita. Music by Blue Dot Sessions.This program is sponsored in part by an Action Grant from Humanities New York with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Haunted History Chronicles
The Ghosts Of Woodchester Mansion with Chris Howley

Haunted History Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 64:51


Joining me today to explore Woodchester Mansion is Chris Howley who has been the Paranormal Supervisor there since 2006. Chris has been a highly respected paranormal investigator for many years and has appeared on a number of TV shows. Chris is a member of the Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena (ASSAP) and was one of the first in the UK to be listed on the National Register of Professional Investigators (NRPI). Woodchester Mansion and its grounds are steeped in history and certainly look and feel as if it should be haunted. Today we are going to explore the history and paranormal activity that lurk within its walls and journey up the long path from the gate to explore the magic and fascination that the mansion provides once you step inside ... Thank you for listening. Guest Information: Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/chrishowley_ Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/chrishowley_ Website: https://www.chrishowley.com/ YouTube: https://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMcNquXsuAoehS_7hJ4A1h6aV4qbsGIBb Woodchester Mansion https://www.woodchestermansion.org.uk/ If you want to get your hands on The Feminine Macabre Volume I, II or III then make sure to take a look at https://spookeats.com/femininemacabre/ or via Amazon. You can explore my chapter titled, 'In Search of the Medieval' in Volume III. If you wish to support the Haunted History Chronicles Podcast then please click on the Patreon link. https://www.patreon.com/Haunted_History_Chronicles Please use the links below or on the website to keep in touch via our social media pages : to ask questions and review other content linked to this episode. Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/HauntedHistoryChronicles/?ref=bookmarks Twitter: https://twitter.com/hauntedhistory4 Instagram: instagram.com/haunted_history_chronicles Website: https://www.podpage.com/haunted-history-chronicles/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hauntedchronicles/message

Urban Roots
Black Indy Part 2: Reclaiming Indianapolis' Black History

Urban Roots

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 26:47


In the 1950s and 1960s, Ms. Jean Spears was a young mother and burgeoning preservationist. She saved antiques from houses about to be demolished; she bought a home in a white slum and renovated it; later on, she did the same with a historic home in the black neighborhood near Indiana Avenue. In the eighties, she and some neighbors started digging into this black neighborhood's history, uncovering the names of Black doctors, civic leaders, and other professionals who had lived there, many of whom had worked for Madam C.J. Walker. She helped rename the neighborhood to Ransom Place, in honor of Freeman Ransom, Madam Walker's prodigious lawyer. And in 1991, they succeeded in getting the Ransom Place Historic District included in the National Register of Historic Places. Thanks in no small part to the connection to Madam C.J. Walker, Jean Spears was able to save this pocket of Black history, in an area that — as we explained last episode — the city of Indianapolis had almost erased from memory. But black Indy history is about more than Madam Walker, and other stories and places in the city need protection, too. In this episode, we'll introduce you to three Black women who are carrying on what Ms. Jean Spears started — safeguarding these little-known stories of the past and guiding Indianapolis toward a brighter future. Guests We talk with Claudia Polley of the Urban Legacy Lands Initiative; Kaila Austin, an artist and historian (who also shared her oral history with Flinora Frazier with us); Judith Thomas, the Deputy Mayor of Neighborhood Engagement for the City of Indianapolis; and Paula Brooks, the Environmental Justice Program Manager at the Hoosier Environment Council. Sponsors This episode, the first of a two-part series on Black Indy, was made possible by a grant from Indiana Humanities. We need help for future projects so please consider donating to Urbanist Media on PayPal, Venmo, or Patreon! Credits Host & Executive Producers: Vanessa Maria Quirk & Deqah Hussein-Wetzel Editor: Connor Lynch Mix: Andrew Callaway Music: Adaam James Levin-Areddy About Us Urban Roots unearths little-known stories from urban history, especially histories of women and people of color that are in danger of being forgotten. Our mission is to elevate underrepresented voices and help preserve the places significant to them. Find Us Online: Website | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | YouTube

FANTI
Thwarting (Professional) Conventions

FANTI

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 54:44


DIS/Honorable Mentions JH:hm: suicide prevention hot line becoming 988Ta:hm: Nichelle Nichols, Space iconBlack History is Happening Every Day!Shady Rest Golf and Country Club in Scotch Plains joins National Register of Historic PlacesOur Sponsors This WeekLumi Labs Microdose GummiesOur show this week is sponsored by Microdose Gummies. Microdose Gummies deliver perfect, entry-level doses of THC that help you feel just the right amount of good. To learn more about microdosing THC, go to Microdose.com and use code: FANTI  to get free shipping & 30% off your first order. Go ahead and @ usEmail: FANTI@maximumfun.orgIG@FANTIpodcast@Jarrett Hill@rayzon (Tre'vell)Twitter@FANTIpodcast@TreVellAnderson@JarrettHill@Swish (Senior Producer Laura Swisher)FANTI is produced and distributed by MaximumFun.orgLaura Swisher is senior producer Music: Cor.eceGraphics: Ashley Nguyen

Charlottesville Community Engagement
August 3, 2022: Throneburg challenges Good to a debate for Fifth District seat; Albemarle PC sees options to continue for growth management

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 23:18


There are many made-up holidays that somehow have found their way into being mentioned on this particular channel of programming as part the introduction. For some reason, today is Clean Your Floors Day, though it’s unclear who makes the money off of those greetings cards. But how clean are your floors? Are you a rebel without a broom, or are you a vacuum warrior? It’s a very good thing that none of the rest of this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement has anything to do with this particular topic. But I will have you know, I mopped mine yesterday in anticipation of this very important day. On today’s show:So far there are no debates scheduled in the contested Fifth Congressional District race but Democrat Josh Throneburg wants to change thatArea home sales volumes have decreased, though the cost to buy a place to live continues to increaseGreene County hires a water and sewer director to prepare to expand supplySeveral area organizations receive funding from Virginia Humanities, including a project to tell stories of PVCC students who have been or are in prisonAlbemarle County continues to review its Comprehensive Plan and the seven-member Planning Commission got their chance to review growth management options late last month First shout-out is for LEAP’s new Thermalize Virginia program In today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: Have you been thinking of converting your fossil-fuel appliances and furnaces into something that will help the community reduce its greenhouse gas emissions? Your local energy nonprofit, LEAP,  has launched a new program to guide you through the steps toward electrifying your home. Thermalize Virginia will help you understand electrification and connect you with vetted contractors to get the work done and help you find any rebates or discounts. Visit thermalizeva.org to learn more and to sign up!  Challenger Throneburg challenges Good to an in-person debateThe Democratic candidate in the Fifth District Congressional race has asked his opponent to agree to meet in person for a debate or other kind of candidate forum before the November 8 election. Josh Throneburg of Charlottesville became the candidate earlier this year before the primary when he was the only one to qualify for the ballot. “There’s one question I get asked more than any other and that is, when will the two of you debate?” Throneburg asked in a campaign video sent out this morning. Throneburg addressed his comments directly to Good and said there were at least three organizations that would hold a campaign event, and that he’s accepted all of them.“But you have either rejected or ignored those invitations and so I want to make things crystal clear. I, Josh Throneburg, challenge you, Representative Bob Good to an in-person debate sometime between now and November 8.”Good is seeking his second term in the U.S. House of Representatives having defeated Cameron Webb in the 2020 election. Candidate Good did participate in a September 9, 2020 virtual campaign forum put on by the Senior Statesmen of Virginia. You can take a listen to that whole event at the Charlottesville Podcasting Network. A request for comment or a response is out to the Bob Good for Congress campaign. CAAR: Charlottesville real estate market continues to cool as prices continue to increaseThe number of sales in the Charlottesville housing market continues to drop as the median sales price continues to climb. That’s according to the latest report from the Charlottesville Area Association of Realtors. (view the report) “There were 1,380 homes sold in the CAAR area in the second quarter,” reads one of the bullet points in the CAAR Home Sales Report for the second quarter. “This is an eleven percent drop from the second quarter a year ago, which is 165 fewer sales.” CAAR’s jurisdictional area is the same as the Thomas Jefferson Planning District with the city of Charlottesville as well as the counties of Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, and Nelson. The median sales price increased to $417,850, an eleven percent increase over the second quarter of 2021. Additionally, supply has increased with 741 active listings in the area, a 28 percent increase over the same period in 2021. To put the increase in perspective, consider that the median sales price for the second quarter of 2018 was $301,000. The report also covers recent economic trends such as steady job growth and low unemployment. “Several job sectors have fully recovered and have actually expanded since the start of the pandemic, including the Professional and Technical Services sector, and the Federal Government sector. The homeownership rate within these two job sectors tends to be relatively high, so growth in these sectors provides fuel for the housing market in Virginia.”However, the leisure and hospitality sector continues to show signs of recovery. Mortgage rates are higher than last year, but have shown a slight decline from the end of June when the average rate on a 30-year fixed was 5.7 percent. However, the report acknowledges the cooling effect of rates that have increased two percentage points so far this year. Sales volumes were down in all localities except Greene County where there was a 33 percent increase in sales. There were 122 homes sold in that jurisdiction between April and June of this year compared to 92 in the same period the year before. The median sales price increased in all of the jurisdictions, but Nelson County saw the biggest jump in values from $285,000 in second quarter of 2021 to $425,000 in the second quarter of 2022. Visit caar.com to download the report. What do you think? If you’re a property owner, how does this change your views on what you may do with your own place? What about if you want to own? Say something in the comments. New water and sewer director in GreeneGreene County is preparing for anticipated population growth by expanding its urban water supply. Now the locality has hired its first ever water and sewer director. “Mr. Greg Lunsford… will oversee the development of a team to operate Greene County Water and Sewer Department as Greene transitions out of the Rapidan Service Authority,” reads an announcement posted to the county’s Facebook page. Greene County recently left the RSA in order to build a reservoir that’s already received permission from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The idea is to impound White Run to create storage. (learn more on the Greene website)Lunsford recently served as the town manager of Elkton in Rockingham County where the release states he helped advance a water system upgrade. In Greene, he will lead the work to create a water and sewer ordinance to govern the new supply. Virginia Humanities awards grants to area nonprofitsThe state agency that serves as the official humanities council for Virginia has made its latest round of grants to nonprofit organizations that seek to tell new stories about the people who have lived in the Commonwealth. “We want Virginians to connect with their history and culture and, in doing that, we hope we’ll all get to know each other a little better,” reads the About section of the website for Virginia Humanities. In all, Virginia Humanities awarded $153,200 to eighteen organizations including several in this general area. The Catticus Corporation of Berkeley, California will get $10,000 for a project to build a website intended to tell the story of Barbara Johns and the 1951 student walk out in Prince Edward County to a larger audience across Virginia and the nation. James Madison University will get $5,400 toward a project called A Miserable Revenge: Recovering 19th-Century Black Literature from the Shenandoah Valley. This will transcribe a handwritten novel by George Newman around 1880. Newman was an African American educator from the Winchester area. The Louisa County Historical Society will get $7,000 for a project called Representing our Residents: African American History at the Louisa County Historical Society. This will be a series of oral history interviews and public outreach activities.The National D-Day Memorial in Bedford will get $8,000 for a project called Someone Talked! A Podcast of the National D-Day Memorial. This will include conversations between the prolific WWII historian John McManus and other scholars and is intended and designed to reach and engage new audiences now that the generation that lived through WWII has passed. A project to add two Louisa County churches to the National Register of Historic Places received $3,000.Piedmont Virginia Community College will receive $10,000 for the PVCC Prison Creative Arts Project. The idea is to collect original writing from incarcerated PVCC students and then create a theatrical production based on the stories. The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Museum will get $8,250 to make three videos to introduce the Monacan Nation as “custodians of the lands and waters in and around Charlottesville” to serve as land acknowledgments The Virginia Tech Foundation will receive $20,000 for a podcast to be called Tribal Truths on the histories and cultures of state and federally recognized Tribes in Virginia. To see the rest, visit the release at Virginia Humanities. Second shout-out goes to Camp AlbemarleToday’s second subscriber-supported public service announcement goes out to Camp Albemarle, which has for sixty years been a “wholesome rural, rustic and restful site for youth activities, church groups, civic events and occasional private programs.”Located on 14 acres on the banks of the Moorman’s River near Free Union, Camp Albemarle continues as a legacy of being a Civilian Conservation Corps project that sought to promote the importance of rural activities. Camp Albemarle seeks support for a plan to winterize the Hamner Lodge, a structure built in 1941 by the CCC and used by every 4th and 5th grade student in Charlottesville and Albemarle for the study of ecology for over 20 years. If this campaign is successful, Camp Albemarle could operate year-round. Consider your support by visiting campalbemarleva.org/donate. Albemarle Planning Commission reviews seven options for growth management Is this the summer of 2022, or is it the Summer of AC44? AC44 is the name Albemarle County has given for the review of its Comprehensive Plan. That’s a document Virginia requires all localities to adopt and review every five years. Albemarle last updated its plan in 2015 and work got underway earlier this year. “We’re currently in phase one, plan for growth, where we are reviewing and evaluating the current growth management policy, using lenses of equity, climate action, and capacity projects,” said Tori Kannellopollous, a senior planner with Albemarle County.At the end of this phase, staff and hired consultants will have developed a draft vision for “growth and resilience” on which new policy objectives will be written.  The work so far has led to the development of seven growth management policies for the public to review. “We are planning having in-person and virtual roundtables and online opportunities in step three,” Kannellopollous saidThe Commission will then review the work in September followed by a review by the Board of Supervisors. Discussions about what changes might come in the rural area will come during phase two of the Comprehensive Plan Review. Several Commissioners wanted to know if survey responses have done enough to capture a diversity of opinion. “I did a deep dive on the last one that came out and when I look at the demographics, the demographics really trend white, upper class, middle-upper class, and extremely well-educated,” said Commission Julian Bivins. “What I’m nervous about is that those responses become the drivers for lots of decisions.” Charles Rapp, the deputy director of the Community Development Department, said he expected participation to increase when the plan review gets into specifics.“People are excited to get into the specific topics [and] into the details of this plan,” Rapp said. “At this point we’re still at such a high level trying to figure out which of those avenues we’re going to go down and which ideas we want to explore and what are those topics that we want to dive into.” The Commission also got an update on the buildout analysis of the county’s existing capacity for new homes and businesses. The firm Kimley Horn has been hired to conduct that work. Kannellopollous had several preliminary observations.“In mixed-use developments, the residential component tends to fill out first and the non-residential component may not build out until years later,” Kannellopollous said. “When factoring in site readiness and site-selection criteria, there appears to be sufficient capacity for commercial and retail uses but much less currently available for office and industrial uses.” Another finding is that new developments are not being approved at the maximum possible, and that by-right developments also do not use all of the potential building space recommended in the existing Comprehensive Plan.Seven growth management optionsThe firm EPR has been hired to help develop the growth management options. “These were developed by the consultants and the staff after the first round of public input,”  said Vlad Gavrilovic with EPR. “They’re not intended as picking one as the winner or the loser. They’re intended to initiate discussion.” Let’s go through them. Here’s option one:“Applying more density and more in-fill development within the existing development areas and retaining and enhancing green infrastructure,” Gavrilovic said. “Next option was looking in the development areas to adjust the densities and reduce the maximum densities to more closely align with what people have actually been building as.” The third option would be to develop criteria for which the growth area might be adjusted. “Looking at new criteria to identify when, where, and how growth areas should be expanded,” Gavrilovic said.  “The next option was opportunities for non-residential development around the interchanges on I-64 to support job growth and economic development.” Option five would explore the possibility of rural villages. “Rural villages where you would promote small scale commercial and service uses to nearby rural area residents,” Gavrilovic said. “Number six was looking at current service provisions and seeing if adjustments are needed to ensure equitable distribution of services, particularly health and safety services.” The final option is to “explore opportunities to promote forest retention and regenerative land uses in the Rural area that support climate action goals.” So those are the seven scenarios. A second round of community engagement went out with these results. “We heard that the three options that best support climate action were regenerative uses in the rural area, rural villages, and distribution of service provision,” Kannellopollous said. “The three options that best support equity were service provision, rural villages, and providing more density and infill in the development areas with green infrastructure.” For the “accommodating growth” lens, the top three options were rural villages, non-residential development at Interstate interchanges, and service provision. Commissioner feedbackCommissioner Karen Firehock said she saw the provision of infrastructure to support development areas as an equity issue.“People should be able to walk to a park or a trail or a healthy environment near to where they live and not have to get in the car and drive a really long way to find something green,” Firehock said. Firehock said the county is expanding some services into the rural area, such as the Southern Convenience Center in Keene. She said that will make it easier for people to meet other environmental goals. Commissioner Lonnie Murray lives in the rural area, and hopes the growth management strategy does not undo work to date. “I think it’s important to have a concept of ‘do no harm’ in the rural area,” Murray said.As an example, he said he wants the county to stop paving gravel roads in the rural area. Bivins urged the Commission to look ahead to the next redistricting after the 2030 Census, when he said the urban areas will continue to have more of the county’s expected population. “If we do not increase the development area, Samuel Miller [District] will end up in the near future as the largest land mass district in Albemarle County.” Bivins said “From an equity standpoint, one has to say ‘is that where we want to go as a county?’” The Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service currently projects Albemarle’s population as increasing to 124,016 by 2030, up from 112,395 in the U.S. Census of 2020. Commissioner Fred Missel said he wanted to know more information about how capital infrastructure works together to support development.“How does the capital plan for infrastructure, how does that inform development and how are they linked together?” Missel asked. “Not to throw the [Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority] into the mix it’s just one that comes to mind. What is their capital plan and how does that support strategic density? How does it support sustainability?” Missel’s day job is as director of design and development at the University of Virginia Foundation. The Foundation is pursuing a rezoning at its North Fork Discovery Park for a potential mixed-use residential complex. If you’d like to learn more about capital projects in Albemarle County, click here.If you’d like to learn more about the Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority’s Capital Improvement Program, download it here.Luis Carrazana’s day job is at the University of Virginia’s Office of the Architect. He said he wanted better metrics. “And a lot of times we focus on the big picture but we lose that option to say ‘we know we’re going in the right direction if we’re achieving A, B, C, and D,” Carrazana said. “So I would encourage everyone to think about that as well.” Planning Commissioner Corey Clayborne said density in the right place can help the county achieve certain goals, but he also acknowledged a tension with those who have pushed back. “That’s something we kind of have to wrestle to the ground and I’m not sure if that would be part of the final deliverable here as much as, is there an education sense in this process with the community as we step through this?” Clayborne asked. “Does that mean there are graphics or visuals? I’m not sure what that answer is yet but addressing it… if we can get our arms around and embrace strategic density, I think if you start talking about design importance, that could be a major key to affordable housing.” Commissioner Dan Bailey said one piece of data is experience that comes from what’s been approved and what’s actually been built. “I live in Belvedere and it has a concept that’s been there for nearly ten years of having centers in the community, but it’s been vacant for ten years,” Bailey said. “And we’ve done a lot of approving these novel neighborhood model density and other things where they should have this retail or office building. I would really love to know how many of them have actually been developed.” The next step will be a series of public engagement on the themes as well as the growth management options. Stay tuned. If you’re interested in this topic, invest an hour in the conversation to inform how you might participate. Housekeeping notes for 415 (Clean Floor edition)That’s the end of another installment of the program. Thank you so much for being here! I hope to have another one out tomorrow, followed by another on Friday. Then the Week Ahead and the Government Glance. The latter is the first publication of the new Fifth District Community Engagement.  That’s another service of Town Crier Productions, a company formed to keep you in the know. Contributions and payments to Town Crier Productions cover the cost of reporting. That includes a bill with the United States for the Public Access to Court Electronic Records. I use that service to stay up to date on federal lawsuits such the one former City Manager Tarron Richardson had filed against the city, or the two court cases that sought a House of Delegates race this year.  So, if you’re like to support this program which includes expenses like court reporting, consider a paid subscription through Substack. If do so, Ting will match your initial payment! And, if you sign up for their services through this link you’ll get a free standard install, your 2nd month free, and a $75 downtown mall gift card! Enter the promo code COMMUNITY for full effect. All of the funding goes to ensure I can keep doing the work, which two years ago included bringing the audio from a campaign forum to the public via the Charlottesville Podcasting Network. That’s also part of Town Crier Productions. There’s a lot, and your support will help me pull all of the pieces together into whatever it becomes. Music comes from the D.C. entity that currently goes by the name Wraki, selected randomly from a bin of basement-recorded cassette tapes. You can support that work by purchasing the album Regret Everything for whatever you would like to pay. Now. Off to go clean some floors. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

New Books Network
Tracey Meyers, "Yin Yoga Therapy and Mental Health: An Integrated Approach" (Singing Dragon, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 56:59


Tracey Meyers' book Yin Yoga Therapy and Mental Health: An Integrated Approach (Singing Dragon, 2022) teaches yoga therapists and mental health professionals how to integrate Yin Yoga into practice and treatment plans as part of a holistic approach to healing and treating a variety of mental health challenges and brain injuries. Yin yoga is an accessible form of yoga consisting of mainly floor based low force stretching, perfect for all patients regardless of physical limitations. The use of Yin yoga when combined with breath work and meditation can decrease anxiety, improve overall mood, and create a sense of well-being. With explanations on the principles of practice, such as asanas, meditation, breathwork and how to integrate different psychological methods to decrease emotional suffering and increase self-care along with examples of how to apply these principles for a range of mental health conditions; this guide is essential reading for all practitioners interested in an integrated approach to healing. Tracey Meyers, PsyD is a licensed clinical psychologist in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York. She is currently employed at Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers (LCL) in Massachusetts, a lawyer assistance program where she focuses on lawyer wellbeing and mental health and maintains a private practice as well. In addition, she is an advanced yoga teacher, certified yoga therapist, and MBSR and mindfulness teacher. Prior to LCL, Tracey worked for the State of Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services where she spent 17 years working as a clinical neuropsychologist working with clients with learning disabilities, attention-deficit disorder, traumatic brain injury, and developmental and brain-based disorders providing neuropsychological assessment, group and individual psychotherapy, and positive behavioral support planning. Tracey graduated from Skidmore College in 1992 and completed her doctorate in clinical psychology from Florida Tech in 1997. She completed her internship and post-doctoral training in neuropsychology at the Miami VA and University of Miami. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, the National Association of Neuropsychology, the International Neuropsychological Society, and the National Register of Healthcare Providers in Psychology. Tracey has authored several publications and book chapters around neuropsychological assessment, autism spectrum disorders, behavioral treatment for different mental health conditions, yoga for addiction, and has written a book Yin Yoga Therapy and Mental Health that was recently published in June of 2022 (Singing Dragon, 2022). Tracey is an adjunct faculty member at Maryland University of Integrative Health Master of Science Yoga Therapy program in Laurel, Maryland.  Elizabeth Cronin, Psy.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist and mindfulness meditation teacher with offices in Brookline and Norwood, MA. You can follow her on Instagram or visit her website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Psychology
Tracey Meyers, "Yin Yoga Therapy and Mental Health: An Integrated Approach" (Singing Dragon, 2022)

New Books in Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 56:59


Tracey Meyers' book Yin Yoga Therapy and Mental Health: An Integrated Approach (Singing Dragon, 2022) teaches yoga therapists and mental health professionals how to integrate Yin Yoga into practice and treatment plans as part of a holistic approach to healing and treating a variety of mental health challenges and brain injuries. Yin yoga is an accessible form of yoga consisting of mainly floor based low force stretching, perfect for all patients regardless of physical limitations. The use of Yin yoga when combined with breath work and meditation can decrease anxiety, improve overall mood, and create a sense of well-being. With explanations on the principles of practice, such as asanas, meditation, breathwork and how to integrate different psychological methods to decrease emotional suffering and increase self-care along with examples of how to apply these principles for a range of mental health conditions; this guide is essential reading for all practitioners interested in an integrated approach to healing. Tracey Meyers, PsyD is a licensed clinical psychologist in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York. She is currently employed at Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers (LCL) in Massachusetts, a lawyer assistance program where she focuses on lawyer wellbeing and mental health and maintains a private practice as well. In addition, she is an advanced yoga teacher, certified yoga therapist, and MBSR and mindfulness teacher. Prior to LCL, Tracey worked for the State of Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services where she spent 17 years working as a clinical neuropsychologist working with clients with learning disabilities, attention-deficit disorder, traumatic brain injury, and developmental and brain-based disorders providing neuropsychological assessment, group and individual psychotherapy, and positive behavioral support planning. Tracey graduated from Skidmore College in 1992 and completed her doctorate in clinical psychology from Florida Tech in 1997. She completed her internship and post-doctoral training in neuropsychology at the Miami VA and University of Miami. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, the National Association of Neuropsychology, the International Neuropsychological Society, and the National Register of Healthcare Providers in Psychology. Tracey has authored several publications and book chapters around neuropsychological assessment, autism spectrum disorders, behavioral treatment for different mental health conditions, yoga for addiction, and has written a book Yin Yoga Therapy and Mental Health that was recently published in June of 2022 (Singing Dragon, 2022). Tracey is an adjunct faculty member at Maryland University of Integrative Health Master of Science Yoga Therapy program in Laurel, Maryland.  Elizabeth Cronin, Psy.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist and mindfulness meditation teacher with offices in Brookline and Norwood, MA. You can follow her on Instagram or visit her website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

Hawthorne Towncast
S3 E31 The Passaic County Arts Center

Hawthorne Towncast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 36:21


The John W. Rea house, in Hawthorne NJ, was built in 1810. In 1999 it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places and today, is the home of the Passaic County Arts Center, celebrating and exhibiting local and international artists. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/flavio-romeo/message

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Thursday July 21, 2022

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 8:58


While 47 U.S. congressional Republicans voted with the unanimous Democrats to codify same-sex marriage into federal law on Tuesday, the only one from Texas was Tony Gonzales of San Antonio - the rest, including the several who represent gerrymandered slices of Austin, voted against. Kaitlin Armstrong had her first court appearance yesterday, during which she entered a plea of not guilty. She's charged with first-degree murder. Samsung is considering a massive additional investment in the Austin area including 11 new chipmaking plants - a $200 billion spend that could create as many as 10,000 new jobs. Gas prices have continued to drop, now down to a local average of $4.02 per gallon - that's 20 cents below this time last week. The cheapest gas in central Austin as of this morning is $3.82. A new study finds Austin squeaking into the top ten most educated cities in America - the only one in Texas to do so. Austin history: Huston-Tillotson University has been registered on the National Register of Historic places, and the 1929 Hancock-area home where both Tom Miller and Emma Long once lived is likely to officially become a historical landmark via the Austin Historic Landmark Commission. Dale Watson's iconic coin-covered Telecaster-style guitar was stolen from a Houston restaurant's parking lot last weekend. Weekend live music highlights: Friday shows include Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder at the Haute Spot and Blackillac at Jester King Brewery. Saturday and Sunday the Float Fest is on at Gonzales Texas with Deadmaus, Vampire Weekend and Chance the Rapper headlining Saturday, and Marshmello, Cage The Elephant, Lord Huron, Tove Lo and CHVRCHES playing Sunday. And the Ripplefest heavy metal and stoner rock festival runs through the weekend at the Far Out Lounge and Stage. And, while blazing temperatures continue through the early part of next week, some relief may be on the way - highs in the upper 90's, by the current forecast, will begin by next Thursday and extend into early August.

Idaho Matters
Pocatello church receives recognition for civil rights activism

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 5:23


The Bethel Missionary Baptist Church has been around for more than 100 years and is now the first property to be added to the National Register of Historic Places under African American Civil Rights in Idaho.

The Valley Today
Colonial Kids Day at Burwell-Morgan Mill

The Valley Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 28:13


Nathan Stalvey, Director of Clarke County Historical Association joined the conversation today to talk about a few upcoming events and give us a bit of a history lesson. Nathan told us about a yearly tradition happening at Burwell-Morgan Mill on Saturday, July 2 where they will be grinding red, white, and blue corn and grits. Burwell-Morgan Mill, also known as the Millwood Mill, is a historic grist mill located at Millwood, Clarke County, Virginia. It was built between 1782-1785 by Lt. Col. Nathaniel Burwell and Gen. Daniel Morgan who both served in the American Revolution. It is the oldest operable merchant mill in the Shenandoah Valley. Nathan explained it's history and told us how it came to be in the possession of the Clarke County Historical Association. We discussed it's maintenance and upkeep as well as the grants that help with costs. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1969. Also happening at the Burwell-Morgan Mill on Saturday, July 9 will be Colonial Kids Day. The event, which started six years ago as an intern's project will feature interactive activities including blacksmithing, craft making, colonial games, a scavenger hunt, the history of the Mill, living history interpretations, and grinding in action. There will be food available on site as well as across the street at Locke's Store. You are also welcome to bring a picnic and enjoy your lunch in the meadow and at of the picnic tables. The cost for the event is $5 and it runs from 11am - 4pm. You can purchase tickets or get more details by clicking here. Nathan also gave us details for a talk featuring historian Stephen Campbell entitled George Washington: The Will to Win and Conquering Adversity that will happen on Sunday, July 17, 2022 from 2pm - 4pm at the VFW Post 9760. The lecture will discuss George Washington before the Revolutionary War and his time as a surveyor. Washington, during this time journeyed through and surveyed Clarke County which was formally Frederick County during the 1700's. Learn how Washington evolved from a young officer to our nation's first Commander-in-Chief. Tickets and more details can be found by clicking here. For more information about Clarke County Historical Association, it's events, membership or volunteer opportunities, visit their website: https://www.clarkehistory.org/ and follow them on Facebook.

Confessions of a Closet Romantic
Quick Take: Fire Island

Confessions of a Closet Romantic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 20:10


Happy Pride Month! Squeaking just under the wire with a quick take on this frothy, fun gay retelling of Pride and Prejudice, set in that historic LGBTQ+ summer destination, Fire Island in New York. What a sunny, cute, romantic romp of a romcom this is! https://www.confessionsofaclosetromantic.comThere's more than a touch of Boogie Nights in the look of Fire Island. Joel Kim Booster talked to Variety about how the movie was developed. His favorite romcoms are My Best Friend's Wedding and Clueless, so the guy knew how to put together a solid retelling.Here's a taste of Joel Kim Booster's stand up. He's adorable, even when he's making fun of difficult topics.Fire Island's queer literary history is fascinating, starting with Oscar Wilde visiting Cherry Grove in the late 19th century.Fire Island has a National Seashore and here is a bit more about its fascinating history stretching back to the 1700s. It has a few structures on the National Register of Historic Places, and a long history with pirates and shipwrecks.Support the show

Grating the Nutmeg
145. Activists Paul and Eslanda Robeson in Connecticut

Grating the Nutmeg

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 38:53


In the Summer 2022 issue of Connecticut Explored, author and historian Steve Thornton of the Shoeleather History Project brings us the story of the internationally-renown activist, actor, and singer Paul Robeson and his wife Eslanda, an anthropologist, author and activist in her own right. The Robeson's home from 1941 to 1953 in Enfield, Connecticut is on the Connecticut Freedom Trail as well as the National Register of Historic Places. The Hartford Courant reported on April 1, of 1941 that, “The stucco house is situated on two and a half acres of land. The property includes a recreational building which houses a bowling alley and an outdoor swimming pool… A purchase price of about $10,000 was indicated by the attached revenue stamp.” The next day the Courant reported, “Paul Robeson will move into his new home here, “The Beeches” on May 1… The luxurious house is in a state of disrepair but Mrs. Robeson has arranged with local workers to renovate the house and grounds…Built in 1903, the living room is richly paneled with a marble mantle… The grounds are shaded by many old trees, including several beeches on the broad lawns in front of the house.” What attracted the Robeson's to Enfield? Why did the FBI keep them under surveillance in Connecticut? And how did a Robeson concert at Hartford's Weaver High School in 1952 become a huge local controversy? Let's hear from Steve Thornton about the Robesons activism and life while living in Connecticut. Read more in the Summer 2022 issue of Connecticut Explored “The Robesons Move to Enfield” by Steve Thornton. Get your copy at ctexplored.org   And to learn more about Hartford history from the grassroots, visit The Shoeleather History Project at shoeleatherhistoryproject.com To learn more about a Connecticut citizen was arrested and tried for being a Communist, listen to his first-hand account from Alfred Marder in Episode 7 of Grating the Nutmeg at https://gratingthenutmeg.libsyn.com/gtn7e-extended-version-a-communists-arrest-in-1950s-new-haven And read more at https://www.ctexplored.org/al-marder-a-life-of-conviction/ This episode was produced by Mary Donohue, Assistant Publisher of Connecticut Explored, and engineered by Patrick O'Sullivan of High Wattage Media, highwattagemedia.com Song: Shenandoah, Paul Robeson (Copland, A.: Fanfare for the Common Man / Tilzer, A. Von: Take) Donohue may be reached at marydonohue@comcast.net Please join us again for the next episode of Grating the Nutmeg!

Trendy Lobotomy
A Little Of This and A Little Of That

Trendy Lobotomy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 33:53


Tori starts with another of her hyperfocuses, federal parks, in particular Yosemite National Park. This park paved the way for the National Park Service and it's current mission in the US. This park has soooooo many stories and Tori gives some quick little stories as a taste of things to come. She has plans to revisit this park's stories and give you more of the interesting tales for there. Krysti gives us some interesting stories close to home and from a place close to sexy voice guy. Starting with the Rose Hotel which of course in on the National Register of Historic Places. Thought to be a toll house this hotel has gone through many incarations including the current version as a bed and breakfast. Def haunted. Next up we have the Asher Walton House in Atlanta IN. This haunted location has some ties to the haunted Roads Hotel as well. Last up we have Fischer Theater in Danville IL, more to come on that story.Our Sources: nationalparkreservations.com, nps.gov, roadtrippers.com, ranker.com, atthefischer.com, downtowndanville.org, illinoishauntedhouses.com, enjoyillinois.com, historicrosehotel.com, onlyinyourstate.com, chicagotribune.com, dailyegyptian.com, bumpinthenight.net, townpost.com, allevents.inOur theme music: “Danse Macabre - Busy Strings" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Support our show on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trendylobotomypodcast Find us at FB/Instagram @TrendyLobotomyPod and at Twitter @TrendyPod as well as our blog trendylobotomypodcast.blogspot.com Support the show

The Clinical Consult
Dr. Wei-Chiao Hsu on Providing Bilingual Psychotherapy Services

The Clinical Consult

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 36:44


Dr. Wei-Chiao Hsu discusses finding a bilingual psychologist in college mental health settings, training to be a bilingual psychologist, and... View More The post Dr. Wei-Chiao Hsu on Providing Bilingual Psychotherapy Services appeared first on National Register.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Why a Minnesota bank building ranks among the nation's most significant architecture

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 4:36


The National Farmers' Bank in Owatonna, Minnesota, is one of the most significant architectural works in the country, part of the Prairie School of Design. Kaomi Lee of Twin Cities PBS went to see why this 1908 building, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, continues to attract tourists from around the nation and the world. It's part of our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Seven Ages Audio Journal
Mound Builders Series: Pinson Mounds, Tennessee | SAAJ 55

Seven Ages Audio Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 72:51


In this episode, the Seven Ages team is joined by Chase Pipes of the Chasing History Youtube channel and podcast, as they travel and record live from the Pinson Mounds site in Eastern Tennessee. Jason Pentrail and Chase Pipes are joined by Tennessee State Park Ranger Dedra Irwin, who explains all the details of this truly unique woodland-era mound complex. Pinson Mounds State Archaeological Park covers over 1,200 acres and contains at least 15 Native American mounds. In addition to Sauls Mound, the group includes Oxier Mound, the Twin Mounds, and Mound 31. Archaeological evidence suggests the mounds were both burial and ceremonial in purpose. Pinson Mounds is a national historic landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Follow the Seven Ages Research Associates online:  Twitter Instagram  Facebook  Seven Ages Official Site  Chasing History  Pinson Mounds State Park  Our Sponsor The Smokey Mountain Relic Room