Podcasts about Greyhound

Dog breed used in dog racing

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Best podcasts about Greyhound

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Latest podcast episodes about Greyhound

Stories For Glory
The Pit and the Prayer

Stories For Glory

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 55:05


Have you heard of The Good Shepherd by C. S. Forester? Neither had we, until we watched Greyhound.

Talking Pointes
The Rise of Frances Rings

Talking Pointes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 42:25


The incredible Frances Rings, Bangarra's Associate Artistic Director, joins us on this episode of Talking Pointes. A descendant of the Kokatha people, Frances was born in Adelaide and spent her childhood traveling, dancing, and living all around Australia while her father worked on the railways. However, it was a teacher at her boarding school in Queensland that spotted her talent, and encouraged her to audition for NAISDA, the National Aboriginal and Islander Skills Development Association.And so at 18 years of age, Frances boarded a Greyhound bus and traveled the 12 hours to Sydney. In this beautifully raw and personal interview, Frances talks about her journey into dance, her incredible career with Bangarra, and finding confidence in her own body. But Frances talks about more than that. Her onstage connection with the late Russell Page, becoming a mum, and the pressure but also the importance of not only being a female leader, but a First Nations female leader in dance in Australia.Listen here or find us on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or Spotify.For our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander listeners, this episode of Talking Pointes contains the names of people who have passed. Please pause now, if you'd prefer not to hear their names. The Page family have given Bangarra Dance Theatre permission to use their names for the purpose of this interview. And just a trigger warning for this episode, we discuss issues around suicide, so if you'd prefer not to listen or read, please press pause or stop reading now. Your host and producer is Claudia Lawson, additional production by Penelope Ford, with editing and sound production by Martin Peralta. And for the latest in all things dance, head to fjordreview.com.

BizTalk with Bill Roy
293 - Greg - Tice - SPT - Architecture

BizTalk with Bill Roy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 18:53


SPT Architecture's Greg Tice talks about his firm's building renovations at the old Greyhound bus terminal, which won the first half of our Coolest Office competition.

In The Money Players' Podcast
Nick Luck Daily Ep 660 - BHA secures huge ban for ex-jockey in corruption case

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 41:34


Nick is joined by writer and broadcaster Lydia Hislop to discuss the latest news and developments from around the racing world. They lead with the 15 year ban for ex jockey Danny Brock, and hear from GBGB MD Mark Bird, who suggests that Brock's ban will be reciprocated by the Greyhound authorities (where he is now a licensed trainer). They also discuss the large number of theoretical whip offences reported in the new 'bedding in' period, the TonyBet affair, and the relocation of the Clarence House, with an important contribution from Sean Graham, who discusses the chances of Energumene reappearing at a rescheduled event. Later in the show, trainer Harry Eustace talks about today's UAE 1,000 Guineas fancy Cite d'Or, while ARC's Rebecca Davies outlines the racecourse group's commitment to syndicate owners.

Nick Luck Daily Podcast
Ep 660 - BHA secures huge ban for ex-jockey in corruption case

Nick Luck Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 42:16


Nick is joined by writer and broadcaster Lydia Hislop to discuss the latest news and developments from around the racing world. They lead with the 15 year ban for ex jockey Danny Brock, and hear from GBGB MD Mark Bird, who suggests that Brock's ban will be reciprocated by the Greyhound authorities (where he is now a licensed trainer). They also discuss the large number of theoretical whip offences reported in the new 'bedding in' period, the TonyBet affair, and the relocation of the Clarence House, with an important contribution from Sean Graham, who discusses the chances of Energumene reappearing at a rescheduled event. Later in the show, trainer Harry Eustace talks about today's UAE 1,000 Guineas fancy Cite d'Or, while ARC's Rebecca Davies outlines the racecourse group's commitment to syndicate owners.

RSN Racing Pulse
Jason Adams - Greyhound News 18th January 2023

RSN Racing Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 12:08


Jason Adams joins Racing Pulse with all the latest greyhound news in Victoria and around Australia - 18th January 2023

Beyond Reproach
S5 Ep64: Capitalists Are Gonna Capitalist: Episode 64 (The Explosive History of the Ford Pinto)

Beyond Reproach

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 58:37


We are back with another very special episode, we are graced by the presence of the brilliant hosts of the Hashtag History podcast, Rachel and Leah.  In this episode, we are drinking a simple vodka-based cocktail named after the infamous bus company called the Greyhound that features grapefruit juice. This bright and tart concoction's popularity matches the era of HASHTAG HISTORY's scandal.

The Creative Classroom with John Spencer
What Our Adopted Greyhound Taught Me About Life, Learning, and Creativity

The Creative Classroom with John Spencer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023


Four years ago, we adopted Jasmine, a retired racing greyhound. We knew we wanted a dog that was lower energy, more introverted, and less likely to bark. We had done our research ahead of time and we knew she would be a good choice for... The post What Our Adopted Greyhound Taught Me About Life, Learning, and Creativity appeared first on John Spencer.

Outside the Oval
Taking A Greyhound Through Jan Figueroa's Running Journey and the Upcoming Indoor Season

Outside the Oval

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 68:10


On this week's Outside the Oval, host Gavin Frick is joined by two guests. First, Julian Guinane from The Runners Central on Instagram joins the show once again to take a quick look at the upcoming season and make some predictions along the way. As always, Julian provides excellent insight into key races entering the indoor season such as the Women's 3000m and Men's 5,000, while also breaking down some of his favorite meets on the horizon. Once Julian and I finish up, you may know him as Greyhound Bus Jan, the man who traveled from Tampa to Eugene by Greyhound for the World Athletics Championships, Jan Figueroa sits down and shares his journey through the sport. I can't wait for you to hear the conversation I have with Jan as we run through his career, starting with his time at Florida Gulf Coast University. From there, Jan guides me through his journey to where he is today and highlights his ambitions in the sport of Track and Field. This is an interview you won't want to miss, which does a tremendous job of putting a spotlight on other areas of our sport that help move our sport forward. All this and a whole lot more on this week's trip Outside the Oval! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/outsidetheoval/support

Mass-Debaters
One on One: Will Smith and Tom Hanks Movies Bracket with CA

Mass-Debaters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 41:20


We are sitting down with CA, and she is doing her own Will Smith, and Tom Hanks, Movie tournaments. Check out this episode to see what she thinks is the best movie from both actors. If you want to do your tournament, please contact us, and we will set it up. Here are all the movies in the tournaments: Will Smith: MEN IN BLACK (1997) King Richard (2021) After Earth (2013) SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION (1993) WINTER'S TALE (2014) SPIES IN DISGUISE (2019) Men In Black 2 (2004) BAD BOYS FOR LIFE (2020) COLLATERAL BEAUTY (2016) ENEMY OF THE STATE (1998) WILD WILD WEST (1999) HITCH (2005) BAD BOYS II (2003) MEN IN BLACK 3 (2012) GEMINI MAN (2019) I AM LEGEND (2007) SUICIDE SQUAD (2016) ALI (2001)BRIGHT (2017) INDEPENDENCE DAY (1996) SEVEN POUNDS (2008) THE PURSUIT OF HAPPYNESS (2006) MADE IN AMERICA (1993) CONCUSSION (2015) SHARK TALE (2004) ALADDIN (2019) HANCOCK (2008) FOCUS (2015) BAD BOYS (1995) I, ROBOT (2004) THE LEGEND OF BAGGER VANCE (2000) Tom Hanks: TOY STORY 2 (1999) Splash (1984) THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES (1990) TOY STORY (1995) THE CIRCLE (2017) TOY STORY 3 (2010) ITHACA (2015) TOY STORY 4 (2019) INFERNO (2016) BIG (1988) THE DA VINCI CODE (2006) CATCH ME IF YOU CAN (2002) PINOCCHIO (2022) APOLLO 13 (1995) LARRY CROWNE (2011) A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD (2019) ANGELS & DEMONS (2009) CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (2013) EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE (2011) SAVING PRIVATE RYAN (1998) THE MAN WITH ONE RED SHOE (1985) THAT THING YOU DO! (1996) THE MONEY PIT (1986) BRIDGE OF SPIES (2015) TURNER & HOOCH (1989) CAST AWAY (2000) DRAGNET (1987) THE POST (2017) THE 'BURBS (1989) NEWS OF THE WORLD (2020) NOTHING IN COMMON (1986) SULLY (2016) BACHELOR PARTY (1984) CHARLIE WILSON'S WAR (2007) THE LADYKILLERS (2004) ROAD TO PERDITION (2002) THE POLAR EXPRESS (2004) A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN (1992) VOLUNTEERS (1985) SAVING MR. BANKS (2013) PUNCHLINE (1988) ELVIS (2022) THE TERMINAL (2004) THE GREEN MILE (1999) JOE VERSUS THE VOLCANO (1990) PHILADELPHIA (1993) CLOUD ATLAS (2012) GREYHOUND (2020) YOU'VE GOT MAIL (1998) SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE (1993) FORREST GUMP (1994) THE GREAT BUCK HOWARD (2008) A HOLOGRAM FOR THE KING (2016) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mass-debaters/support

It Takes 2 with Amy & JJ
See it, Stream it, Skip it: A Man Called Otto, M3GAN & Stream Tom Hanks Favs

It Takes 2 with Amy & JJ

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 10:20


On this episode of "See it, Stream it, Skip it" JJ tells you about A Man Called Otto and M3GAN in theaters. And, if you want to steam some Tom Hanks favorites: The Terminal, Charlie Wilson's War & Greyhound. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

What Happens in the Woods
The Canadian Greyhound Bus Cannibal 

What Happens in the Woods

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 58:22


The Canadian Greyhound Bus Cannibal Hello, friends! Join Jess, Brice, and our special guest Dean around the campfire while Mara takes the reins and tells us about the shocking case of the killing of young Tim McLean. Tim McLean was just 22 years old when he boarded Greyhound bus 1170 bound for Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. On the fateful day of July 30th, 2008, he lost his life to Vince Li. Mara tells us about the stabbing and eventual cannibalism that led to a standoff with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba. Li was finally taken into custody and charged with second-degree murder but he would not be found criminally responsible for the crime due to mental illness. We discuss the profound impact this case had on the passengers of the bus and the family of the victim. Was justice served for McLean and his family? Should Li be able to rejoin society? Listen to the episode and don't forget to give us your thoughts!https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killing_of_Tim_McLeanhttps://web.archive.org/web/20080810005604/http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080805.wbus06/BNStory/National/homechrome-extension://efaidnbmnnnibpcajpcglclefindmkaj/https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/3458881/Manitoba-Criminal-Code-Review-Board-decision.pdfhttps://www.ranker.com/list/facts-about-tim-mclean-greyhound/jen-jeffershttps://nypost.com/2017/02/11/man-who-beheaded-bus-passenger-granted-total-freedom/https://web.archive.org/web/20090315135511/http://www.edmontonjournal.com/Health/Beheader%2Bcriminally%2Bresponsible/1356476/story.htmlhttps://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/greyhound-killer-believed-man-he-beheaded-was-an-alien-1.1131575https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/the-scream-that-haunts-the-forgotten-passengers-of-bus-1170/article1372244/?page=allhttps://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/40-year-old-suspect-held-in-gruesome-manitoba-bus-killing-1.705008https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/greyhound-beheading-10th-anniversary-1.4760074https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/mother-of-tim-mclean-ends-petition-to-change-law-1.2502104https://globalnews.ca/news/1855998/timeline-of-decisions-in-the-case-of-vince-li/

Rounding Down with Chid
Buffets, Bakersfield, and Best Friends with @AndrewKoeth

Rounding Down with Chid

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 90:30


This week, we welcome long-overdue guest King Koeth (@AndrewKoeth) to discuss Bakersfield, buffets, and so much more. Plus, the return of everyone's favorite game, "What can I do to get you in a BugConCon today?" This one is great. Follow Andrew on Twitch, and get his music!Follow us on Twitter: @CHIDSPIN / @SighFieri / @RoundingDownSupport the showFollow us on Twitter: @CHIDSPIN / @SighFieri / @RoundingDownRate and review us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts!

WINNERS
George Farrugia - Greyhound News 4th January 2023

WINNERS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 6:40


George Farrugia joins Big V Racing with all the latest Greyhound news Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WINNERS
George Farrugia - Greyhound News 2nd January 2023

WINNERS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 4:27


George Farrugia joins Big V Racing with the latest Greyhound news and his tips for Sale and Warrnambool Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WINNERS
George Farrugia - Greyhound News 30th December 2022

WINNERS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 18:36


George Farrugia - Greyhound News 30th December 2022 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WINNERS
Robert Tecson - Greyhound Itchy Carla won at start 100

WINNERS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 12:25


Greyhound Trainer Robert Tecson joins Big V Racing after one of his greyhounds Itchy Carla won at start 100 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

UConn 360: The UConn Podcast
The Person Who Makes Sure UConn is Picture-Perfect

UConn 360: The UConn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 27:01


If you've ever looked at a copy of UConn Magazine, visited the UConn Today website, or received any UConn-related material in the mail, you've probably seen the work of Peter Morenus. University photographer for nearly three decades, Morenus has photographed everyone from first-year students on their first day moving in to U.S. presidents. Here, he talks with UConn 360 about some of his most memorable assignments, the changes he's seen in photography since he started out as a freelancer in New York putting rolls of film on Greyhound buses, and even a little bit of K-Pop. Also, Julie and Tom discuss where on campus you can find a really old bog. 

WINNERS
George Farrugia - Greyhound News 27th December 2022

WINNERS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 18:03


George Farrugia - Greyhound News 27th December 2022 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WINNERS
George Farrugia - look ahead to the Christmas Greyhound races including the Sale Cup

WINNERS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 10:09


George Farrugia joins Big V Racing with a look ahead to the Christmas Greyhound races including the Sale Cup on Boxing Day Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

EpochTV
NTD Business (Dec. 23): Report: $482 Billion Taxpayer Money Wasted in 2022; Friday Flight Cancellations Top 4,700

EpochTV

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 24:17


The House passes the $1.7 trillion spending bill with just hours to spare—avoiding a partial government shutdown. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) says nearly half a trillion dollars of taxpayer money were wasted this year. Of that, $3 million went into research on hamsters fighting on steroids. ByteDance admits that two TikTok employees spied on two U.S. journalists. Greyhound offers free rides to young people in need—so they can reunite with their families for the holidays. What are the best movies to watch at Christmas? Residents of different states talked about their own choices. ⭕️ Watch in-depth videos based on Truth & Tradition at Epoch TV

Round Guy Radio
Burlington Greyhound's basketball

Round Guy Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 25:12


Coach Caleb Akey talks the first half.

This Day in Baseball - The Daily Rewind
December 19 - Doc Ellis Passes Away

This Day in Baseball - The Daily Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 16:15


December 19th Show Notes December 19, 1934 – The New York Yankees send five players to the San Francisco Seals of the Pacific Coast League as partial compensation for the acquisition of Joe DiMaggio. The Yankees had previously paid $25,000 for the future Hall of Famer. DiMaggio will play one more season in the PCL before reporting to the Yankees in 1936. In ‘36, DiMaggio will hit .323 with 125 RBIs in helping the Yankees to a World Series title. December 19, 1976 — A single-engine Piper Cherokee plane crashes into the upper deck of Baltimore's Memorial Stadium, home of the Orioles, injuring the pilot and three others. Minutes prior to the mishap, the plane had buzzed the stadium during the final moments of the Steelers' playoff victory over the Colts.   The pilot of the Piper Cherokee was 33-year-old Donald Kroner. Kroner served three months of a two-year sentence for malicious destruction of property and violation of aviation ordinances. Kroner had been arrested prior to the Stadium incident for making threats against former Colt Bill Pellington. This included Kroner being accused of dropping a bottle and toilet paper from his plane onto the roof of Pellington's Timonium restaurant. According to news reports, Kroner was upset over being thrown out of the restaurant. Kroner died in 2013. Kroner had been fired as an MTA bus driver the day before the crash. He also had been a flight instructor and, according to some accounts, had worked as an air traffic controller. In 1980, Kroner was charged with stealing a Greyhound bus from Dulles International Airport. December 19, 1990 — At a press conference, Tiger management and WJR announce 1991 will be Ernie Harwell's 32nd and final season in the broadcast booth. The dismissal of the Motor City's popular play-by-play announcer starts a furor among fans, which includes a threatened boycott of Domino's Pizza, a business of club owner Tom Monaghan, and the rise of the slogan, “Say It Ain't So, Bo”, which appears on bumper stickers and T-shirts all over Detroit, referring to Bo Schembechler, the team president and former University of Michigan football coach. "[Harwell's situation is] not going to change no matter how much clamor is made over it," said team president Bo Schembechler. The situation caused outrage so much that some made threats of violence against Schembechler. Some, such as Mitch Albom, blamed the situation causing as much negative feeling as it did on WJR executive Jim Long who was the one who pushed the quick, no severance pay removal of Harwell.[6] The movement in favor of keeping Harwell was so strong that even billboards in favor of his remaining were put up.[7] Rick Rizzs was hired away from the Seattle Mariners to replace Harwell in 1992, teaming with Bob Rathbun. Harwell worked a part-time schedule for the California Angels in 1992. The following year, the Tigers were purchased by Mike Ilitch, who made it one of his first priorities to bring Harwell back. In 1993, Harwell teamed with Rizzs and Rathbun on the WJR broadcasts, calling play-by-play of the middle innings in each game. From 1994 to 1998, Harwell called television broadcasts for the Tigers on PASS Sports and later WKBD-TV. In 1999, he resumed full-time radio duties with the team, swapping roles with Frank Beckmann (who had replaced Rizzs in the radio booth following the 1994 season), teaming with analyst Jim Price, and continuing in that role even as the team's radio rights changed from WJR to WXYT in 2001. During spring training in 2002, Harwell announced that he would retire at the end of the season; his final broadcast came on September 29, 2002. Dan Dickerson, who had joined Harwell and Price in 2000, took over as the Tigers' lead radio voice. Died: December 19, 2008 in Los Angeles, CA Dock Ellis, a solid pitcher for the Bucs, is best known for his performance on June 12, 1970, when he would forever etch his name in major league baseball history. That night Dock, despite the fact he walked eight batters, no-hit the San Diego Padres 2-0 on the strength of two Willie Stargell home runs. Also that night, which he admitted later on, was the fact that Ellis pitched his gem while on LSD. Welcome to the wild and bizarre world of Dock Ellis. He had a 14-3 record at the 1971 All-Star break, but famously said baseball wouldn't let two soul brothers – he and Vida Blue – start the AS game. Ellis ended up surrendering Reggie Jackson's titanic blast at Tiger Stadium. He was also the starter when the Pirates become the first team to start 9 black players. Ellis, never one to avoid controversy, also hit the first three Reds on May 1, 1974 because he felt his team was lackluster. Ellis will eventually end up a Yankee in ‘76 and win comeback player of year after winning 17 games. Doc Finished up with 138 wins vs. 119 loses and a 3.46 ERA. In 1955, he broke Ty Cobb's record to become the youngest player to win a batting title. Al Kaline was one day younger in 1955 than Cobb had been in 1907, when “The Georgia Peach” won his first title. Despite a history of injuries, he tied Tris Speaker's record of 100+ games in the outfield for 19+ seasons. A future Hall of Famer, Kaline was born on December 19, 1934, in Baltimore, Maryland. In his 22-year career (1953-1974), the outstanding right fielder had 3007 hits, 399 HR, 1582 RBI, 1622 runs, .297 BA, .376 OBP, .480 Slg., & .855 OPS. In the 1968 World Series, Kaline batted .379 with 11 hits, which included two home runs.   Playing his entire career with the Detroit Tigers, his nickname was Mr. Tiger. He was an All-Star in 15 seasons, won 10 Gold Glove Awards, won a batting title in 1955, and was a member of the 1968 World Series champions. His uniform #6 is retired by the Tigers. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1980 (88.3% on the 1st ballot).

WINNERS
George Farrugia - 21st December 2022

WINNERS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 5:36


George joins Big V Racing with a look at the Greyhound meetings at The Meadows and Ballarat Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

RSN Racing Pulse
Jason Adams - Greyhound News 21st December 2022

RSN Racing Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 10:40


Jason Adams joins Racing Pulse with all the latest Greyhound news Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WINNERS
Off The Leash with George Farrugia - 20th December 2022

WINNERS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 31:23


George Farrugia joins Big V Racing for Off The Leash with all the latest Greyhound news from a huge weekend Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Startuprad.io - Startup podcast from Germany
Meet the German Entrepreneur of the Year - Co-founder of Flix, which now owns Greyhound #GSA22

Startuprad.io - Startup podcast from Germany

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 47:46 Transcription Available


Executive SummaryJochen Engert won the German Startup Award 2022 as German Entrepreneur of the Year. He is the co-founder of Munich-based Flix a unicorn recently valued at 3 bn US$ and the owner of Greyhound Lines. He shares in this interview his entrepreneurial journey, and his experience in winning 90% of the local long-distance bus market in less than a decade, without owning even one bus. We talk about the rough times during COVID when the service was shut down for 8 weeks, their expansion into different countries, acquisitions, and investments. He also shares some experience from his business angel investments.“We are getting to profitability pretty soon”Jochen Engert Co-Founder FlixSubscribe HereThe Authority on German, Swiss and Austrian Startups | Linktree“Our families, even our girlfriends thought we were crazy leaving our consulting jobs to start this ‘bus thing'.”Jochen Engert Co-Founder FlixGerman Startup Awards 2022This interview is in media partnership with the German startup association (Bundesverband Deutscher Startups https://deutschestartups.org/). Their German Startup Awards #GSA22 honor each year outstanding female and male founders and investors in special categories. You can learn more about the winners in our interviews and on this website: https://germanstartupawards.de/rueckblick/rueckblick-2022You can also have a look at our history, we also interviewed many winners of the German Startup Awards 2021 already.“Our initial hypothesis was that you need one central player to orchestrate in order to put up a national network.”Jochen Engert Co-Founder FlixThe FounderOur guest today is Jochen, the Supervisory Board Director (formerly CEO) and Co-Founder of Munich-based mobility unicorn startup Flix (formerly Flixbus). Jochen studied at the University of Ottawa, Canada, as well as at Stuttgart University and in Koblenz at WHU. He has also been a consultant at Boston Consulting Group for 5 years, prior to starting Flix.“If you want to be a founder, you are always on sales, to clients, investors, and also people you want to hire”Jochen Engert Co-Founder FlixThe trigger of Flix was the 2009 coalition government contract, where the ruling parties stated they wanted to de-regulate the bus service in Germany, for the first time permitting long-distance buses. Before the de-regulation there was a law in force forbidding long-distance bus connections, competing with train service. So they founded GoBus, later re-branded to FlixBus, then to Flix.“ … for all operational complex businesses: Operational excellence, passion for detail and laser focus on customer centricity and ultimately customer technology … that is something that compounds, …. Building ultimately a competitive advantage, that is very hard to impossible to replicate ”Jochen Engert Co-Founder FlixThe StartupFlix started as GoBus, later FlixBus (https://global.flixbus.com/). Today they operate FlixBus, FlixTrain, FlixCar, Kâmil Koç in Turkey, and Greyhound Lines in...

RSN Racing Pulse
Jason Adams - Greyhound News 14th December 2022

RSN Racing Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 18:01


Jason Adams joins Racing Pulse with all the latest Greyhound News with plenty happening this week! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

They Thought I Was You
Getting There: Part 2

They Thought I Was You

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 105:17


Today we conclude our two-part epic journey discussing Mary-Kate and Ashley's sixth direct-to-video full-length feature film, Getting There, about Mary-Kate and Ashley's misadventure getting to to the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah.Picking up right where we left off with the gang stranded at home for a third time, in this episode we get to see them finally leave California. We discuss the absolute horror it would be to lose your sister on a Greyhound bus, our theory that their female friend Charly might have originally been written as a boy, the film's uncomfortable socioeconomic disconnect from reality, and the wild things we thought we heard because of the terrible diction in so many of the lines in this film.We also break down in excruciating detail just how much money these teens poured down the drain on this botched road trip, and decide once and for all: is the fun Getting There, or is the fun just... there?So zip up your Chanel ski suit, get in your private jet and leave the chaperones behind because today we're skiing with Alex Reisher (who is NOT, in fact, a real Olympian)!Subscribe to our Patreon to watch the full video version of this podcast here.Rewatch Getting There in @SimplyOlsen's instagram bio that deserves a Nobel peace prize.Find us on Social Media!Instagram: @theythoughtiwasyouTikTok: @theythoughtiwasyouBecca: @beccarothLani: @laniharmsDid you think this film was totally HYPE? Email us at theythoughtiwasyou@gmail.com

Greyhound Nation
Charlie Blanning and Gary Guccione: Racing’s Top Five Greyhounds

Greyhound Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 58:54


Episode 33: Recorded November 19, 2022 "He had become the darling of the crowds in England...we're talking about crowds...of a hundred thousand people..." Author Charlie Blanning on Mick the Miller, one of his "top five" Greyhound picks Show Notes Charlie Blanning and Gary Guccione are second to none when it comes to declaring the "top five" racing Greyhounds in the modern era. Charlie -- author of three Greyhound history books -- gravitates towards the finest English and Irish racers 20th century. Gary -- former Executive Director of the National Greyhound Association -- brings a distinctly American selection of Greyhounds to his "best of" list. In this episode, host John Parker asks the question of both Charlie and Gary -- "Can you name five racing Greyhounds that stand out above all others?" Charlie and Gary deliver, with stories of Mick the Miller, Westy Whizzer and Westmead Hawk, just to name a few. Join us for a fine hour of Greyhound history, discussion of the sport of Greyhound racing, and news on Charlie's books. Charlie's Top Five Racing Greyhounds Westmead Hawk (Wikipedia) Ballyregan Bob (Wikipedia) Pigalle Wonder (Wikipedia) Endless Gossip (Wikipedia) Mick the Miller (Website) Gary's Top Five Racing Greyhounds Downing (Greyhound Hall of Fame) Miss Whirl Westy Whizzer Real Huntsman (Greyhound Hall of Fame) Traffic Officer (Website) and Flashy Sir Links The Greyhound and the Hare (Facebook)

Seminole Wars
SW0138 Writer Presents Seminole as Integral Players in Florida's Past and Present

Seminole Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 40:13


The US Government spent millions of dollars and incurred thousands of casualties attempting to remove the Seminole from Florida in the first half of the 1800s. Today, the Seminole are still here – and they are thriving; they are integral to a study of Florida's history. And they are the subject of fascination in popular culture. A 1950s Greyhound busline booklet features iconic sites to visit around the United States. For Florida, that meant no Disney park – had not been built yet; no NASA space center– again, not built yet. THE tourist attraction of Florida were the Seminole! Doug Alderson returns to discuss how he presents the Seminole in his books, one of which is on such old Florida attractions. Seminole are also portrayed in vintage art around the Sunshine State, and no study of American alligators is complete without an exploration of Seminole wrestling of the ancient creatures. Doug even explores the Seminole in spooky ghost stories. Topping it off is his compelling historical novel, Seminole Freedom. It traces the tale of a self-liberated black teen and her adventures and contacts in the first two Seminole wars. We will discuss all this and more with Doug.          Greyhound Buslines featured Seminole as the Florida attraction in the 1950s.                   Host Patrick Swan is a board member with the Seminole Wars Foundation. This podcast is recorded at the homestead of the Seminole Wars Foundation in Bushnell, Fla.  Subscribe automatically to the Seminole Wars through your favorite podcast catcher and "like" us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube!    

WINNERS
Paul Brown - trainer of Greyhound Rejuvanate

WINNERS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 6:39


Paul Brown joins Big V racing to discuss Rejuvanate who is the hot dog in the Greyhound world Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Clare FM - Podcasts
Clare FM Greyhound Focus December 9th

Clare FM - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 3:57


Clare FM Greyhound Focus December 9th

Off Duty Influencers - Comedy Deep Dive into some outlandish Grindr, Tindr, Bumble Dating Profiles!
Ep. 10 Season Finale - "Another ankle monitor?! Also, backup... who fucking cares about the McRib you road a greyhound at 14?!"

Off Duty Influencers - Comedy Deep Dive into some outlandish Grindr, Tindr, Bumble Dating Profiles!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 31:23


Boy goes in on Barrie HARD in this episode. Of course Boy can't help himself to shame his wonderful cohost about his past. From AOL chat rooms to hookups via Greyhound this episode will knock your socks off and maybe your jockstrap also. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/offdutyinfluencers/support

RSN Racing Pulse
Tassie Time Weekly Podcast - 8th December 2022

RSN Racing Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 14:09


Greyhound trainer Blake Pursell joins Matt Nevett and Matt Reid to discuss the Hobart Thousand heats and his kennel of runners tonight at Hobart Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WINNERS
Angela Langton - Trainer in Profile

WINNERS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 24:40


Greyhound trainer Angela Langton joins Big V Racing as the profile trainer of the week Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

RSN Racing Pulse
Jason Adams - Greyhound News 7th December 2022

RSN Racing Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 14:48


Jason Adams joins Racing Pulse with all the latest Greyhound news this week Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

10 Minute Murder
Cannibal on the Greyhound

10 Minute Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 9:31


On the evening of July 30, 2008, Greyhound bus 1170 was traveling from Alberta toward Ontario, Canada. The passengers aboard were expecting a routine trip but instead, were about to be witness to one of the most horrifying and gruesome murders that Canada has ever seen. The disturbing event would leave a man named Tim McLean dead, and others mentally altered for the rest of their lives.Subscribe and share 10 Minute Murder with your true crime loving friends. Connect on social media to know when new episodes are released and to see visuals that go along with the episodes.10minutemurder.comemail: joe@10minutemurder.comFacebook: https://facebook.com/10MMpodcastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/10minutemurder/Youtube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCkJLUCEZlkn9In3AA46RVxwTwitter: https://twitter.com/10minutemurderSave on Ka'Chava with this link: https://www.kachava.com/collections/tenmm-podcastClick Here for Merch : https://www.teepublic.com/user/minute-murder

Richmond Til We Die: A Ted Lasso Podcast
Ted Lasso S2E11: I'm Not Good With Goodbyes

Richmond Til We Die: A Ted Lasso Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 57:50


Welcome back to the Dogtrack, Greyhounds! In this episode Marisa, Christian, and Brett have a conversation about Season 2, Episode 11: Midnight Train to RoystonThe penultimate episode of season two is fraught with tenuous relationship statuses: Roy and Keeley, Sam and Rebecca, Sharon and Ted, Keeley and... Nate??? So we have a long conversation about the looming tensions that seem to be dividing our beloved AFC Richmond family and what it might mean for the future of these characters who we care about so deeply.Not to worry, though – we do have a bit of fun, as well. We talk about grown men learning choreography, praise the brilliant use of props in this episode, admire the staying power of "Seven Nation Army," and wonder whether we may have actually met the real-life Banksy in a museum?Full show notes and transcript will be available at https://www.tedlassopod.com/ted-lasso-episode-02-11-midnight-train-to-roystonRichmond Til We Die is a conversation about the Apple TV+ show Ted Lasso, where we explore the characters, their relationships to each other, and how they're able to make us laugh until we can hardly breathe one moment and then feel with the deepest parts of our hearts the next. When you're here, you're a Greyhound!

Clare FM - Podcasts
Clare FM's Greyhound Focus December 2nd 2022

Clare FM - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 3:11


Clare FM's Greyhound Focus December 2nd 2022

Alle Jahre Mörder
#113 Der Greyhound Bus Killer

Alle Jahre Mörder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 42:00


Es ist der 30. Juli 2008 als der 22-jährige Tim McLean in den Greyhound Bus 1170 nach Winnipeg einsteigt. Nach ca. 18 Stunden Fahrt, steigt ein weiterer Fahrgast beim Halt in Erickson, Manitoba ein. Es ist Vince Li, der sich kurze Zeit später, neben Tim setzt. Ohne zuvor ein Wort mit ihm gewechselt zu haben, zückt er plötzlich ein Jagdmesser und sticht um die 50 Mal auf sein Opfer ein. Der 40-Jährige Vince Li leidet unter Schizophrenie und tötet sein 22-jähriges Opfer im Glauben, von Gott dazu angewiesen worden zu sein.

Almost In Agreement
Ep. 244 Sams Back

Almost In Agreement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 115:39


After some schedule work Sam and I sit down to talk more drama on the KCSO vs. 15 year old fast food worker, the importance of non-profits, economics of UT Football, Federal mid-terms, Greyhound's non-bus station, and much more. We hope you all had a wonderful Thanksgiving.   Website, Facebook, Twitter 

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast
THIS IS REVOLUTION>podcast Ep. 365: Don't Get Mad UPS is Hiring w/ Richard Hooker, Jr and Paul Prescod

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 69:42


The TIR gang speaks with Union activist and leader Richard Hooker from Teamsters Local 623. Richard Hooker is the Secretary-Treasurer & Principal Officer of Teamsters Local 623 for Building Shift at PHL Airport, UPS, and Greyhound. For over a hundred years Teamsters Local 623 has represented warehouse workers, UPS package-car drivers, and Greyhound ticket and baggage agents among others in the fight for a dignified life for all working people. https://www.teamsterslocal623.org/ https://twitter.com/hookabrasi https://twitter.com/623Local   About TIR Thank you for supporting the show! Remember to like and subscribe on YouTube. Also, consider supporting us on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/join/BitterLakePresents   Check out our official merch store at https://www.thisisrevolutionpodcast.com/   Also follow us on... https://podcasts.apple.com/.../this-is.../id1524576360 www.youtube.com/thisisrevolutionpodcast www.twitch.tv/thisisrevolutionpodcast www.twitch.tv/leftflankvets https://www.facebook.com/Thisisrevolutionpodcast/ Instagram: @thisisrevolutionoakland Follow the TIR Crüe on Twitter: @TIRShowOakland @djenebajalan @DrKuba2 @probert06 @StefanBertramL @MadamToussaint @MarcusHereMeow

The Language of Creativity Podcast
Friends Like Family – Spiro Razatos (Action Director, Fast and Furious franchise) Ep. 29

The Language of Creativity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 70:22


Fast and Furious action unit director Spiro Razatos shares rags to riches story and how seeing the movie Shaft at age 11 inspired him on his path to becoming a Hollywood Stuntman. Apple Podcasts users full show notes here: https://languageofcreativity.podbean.com/e/spiro-razatos-friendslikefamily-fastandfurious-action Spiro Razatos began his career as a stunt man and quickly worked his way into the Directors Guild of America just by asking. Somehow, on the spot producers gave him his very first sequence directing a car chase! Since then Razatos has 2nd Unit Directed major films such as Venom, Bad Boys II and Bad Boys For Life, films in The Fast and The Furious franchise (Fast Five, Fast & Furious 6, Furious 7, Fate of the Furious, F9), and Captain America Winter Soldier, to name a few. From Denver, Colorado and the son of Greek immigrants, young Spiro began training himself to be a stuntman after a fateful day when his dad took him on a Greyhound to visit the zoo. His father, who was also blind had saved for six months for the trip, but they never made it to the zoo. Eleven year old Razatos saw the marquee for the movie Shaq and begged his father to take him to see it… that day. “I started crying and said I don't know, I just need to see it now.” He practiced jumping off of roofs (don't try this at home) and crashing his own bicycles until he was finally able to get a Super Eight movie camera. He'd managed to get his home-made stunt reel onto the set of Heart to Heart, when legendary stunt coordinators Mike Vendrell and Greg Barnett finally called him and told him they would help him come to Hollywood. In this episode we talk about the magic of visual storytelling, the importance of shooting practical stunts and how CG (computer generated elements) can totally ruin the believability of a sequence, why Spiro always hires his own editor (the one he's had his whole career) spending hours at the end of every shooting day to present the sequence to the studio. We talk about his work/life balance and yearly trips to the “ashram” to detox. But most importantly Spiro highlights the importance of having a team of people you know and trust with your life. His stunt team, Team Malaka has been with him for over 30 years, oh yeah, and of course we talk about his favorite “team building activity” playing Call of Duty 2. Guest: Spiro Razatos  IMDB On My Radar - Spiro Razatos ShootOnline.com Bullitt Signs Director Spiro Razatos for branded content spots CineMovie.tv F9 Car Stunt Coordinator says movie ran out of cars to crash Host: Steven Leavitt Site: https://www.icreatesound.com/ Portfolio: http://stevenleavitt.com/ Featured Music “Haunting Me” by Testing Tomorrow Episode References Fast 5 Vault Sequence (YouTube) Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcom Gladwell (GoodReads) Vantage Point (IMDB) 'Star Wars: Episode VII' Producer Talks Story, Characters, and Practical Effects vs. CGI (Interview: ScreenRant) correction: I said Deborah Winger it was actually Kathleen Kennedy Shaft (IMDB) Buzz Bundy (Memoriam JamesBond007.se) Paul Walker death (The Guardian) Wiz Khalifa - See You Again ft. Charlie Puth (Music Video - YouTube) Stunt Coordinator (Wikipedia) Squib hit (Wikipedia) Ashram (Wikipedia) Call of Duty 2 (Wikipedia) Captain America Winter Soldier (IMDB) The Russo Brothers (Wikipedia) Fast Getaway (IMDB) Midnight Run (IMDB) The Goonies (IMDB) The Goonies - ‘Slick Shoes'' scene (YouTube) Gainer (gymnastics) (Wikipedia) Hook (IMDB)   Please review this podcast on Google Play, iTunes, Amazon and Stitcher and help other creatives find their tribe! Website: https://thelanguageofcreativity.com/ Facebook Group: The Language of Creativity Discussion Group - Facebook Tags Fast & Furious, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Bad Boys for Life, Crash, Taurus World Stunt Awards, Justin Lin, second unit director, action unit, cannon rolls, visual effects, VFX, Man of Steel, Debra Winger, Star Wars, practical effects, video game industry, editing, film, first unit, making choices, what the audience feels, mastering, mixing, speed, driving, cars, 100mph, focal length, background, foreground, location, big break, DGA, Directors Guild of America, The Bourne Identity, Denver, Greyhound, Greg Barnett, Michael M. Vendrell, Super 8, Greek American, Buzz Bundy, The Fall Guy, The Dukes of Hazzard, Ronnie Rondell Jr., hiring your heroes, Paul Walker, Vin Diesel, Tyrese Gibson, luck, stunt coordinating, stunt coordinator, Robert Blake, taking a chance, long hours, work-life balance, prep, time off, Rome, dog parent, luxurious home, staycation, game-room, spa, travel, enjoy while you can, The Ashram, clean slate, Henry Kingi, Justin Sundquist, clarity of mind, lifestyle, stress, big budgets, expensive mistakes, producers, movie producers, Malaka Stunt Team, playbook, football, experience, the Subi, Subaru, The Bay Bomber, Michael Bay, Bad Boys II, custom camera cars, remote camera heads, camera operator, playground, Xbox, Call of Duty, Phil Culotta, Jon Escobar, caring, loving heart, capture the flag, strategy, people skills, tax write-offs, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Marvel, email, be who you are, filmmaker, The Gray Man, 21 Bridges, Captain America: Civil War, Kong: Skull Island, fun, storytelling, Corey Haim, home theater, home renovation, Prada, Gucci, dog collars, Robert De Niro, Steven Spielberg, 20 takes, Prince, Janet Jackson, Michael Jackson

One Minute Movie Reviews
Greyhound has two things going for it. Tom Hanks and World War 2. And its enough.

One Minute Movie Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 4:24


Somehow I was able to pull a couple of Dad Jokes for World War 2. While the movie lacks overall heart it makes up for it in other ways.

Keeping Up With Jones: The Lonnie Jones Podcast Adventure

I rushed the field...but I was inspired by a win but they heart of Greyhound. Life lived is life learned. Every experience has facts, concepts and applications. These are stories from the eclectic life of Lonnie Jones, Licensed Professional Counselor, Minister, SWAT Team Chaplain, Outdoor Enthusiast and Quixotic Jedi. Support this podcast at https://anchor.fm/lonnie-jones/support Please subscribe and share. www.lonniejones.org or lonjones@bellsouth.net Check out YouTube.com/c/LonnieJones for archived lessons, Skits, videos explaining some of the rope stuff we talk about. Get t-shirts, stickers, prints and other art at www.teespring.com/stores/lonnie-jones-art Visit Amazon for the following books: "Cognitive Spiritual Development: A Christ Centered Approach to Spiritual Self Esteem"; "Grappling With Life. Controlling Your Inside Space"; "Pedagogue" The Youth Ministry Book by Lonnie Jones; "If I Were a Mouse" a children's story written and illustrated by Lonnie Jones; "The Selfish Rill, a story about a decision" A fantasy parable by Lonnie Jones. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lonnie-jones/support

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 157: “See Emily Play” by The Pink Floyd

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “See Emily Play", the birth of the UK underground, and the career of Roger Barrett, known as Syd. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "First Girl I Loved" by the Incredible String Band. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this time, due to the number of Pink Floyd songs. I referred to two biographies of Barrett in this episode -- A Very Irregular Head by Rob Chapman is the one I would recommend, and the one whose narrative I have largely followed. Some of the information has been superseded by newer discoveries, but Chapman is almost unique in people writing about Barrett in that he actually seems to care about the facts and try to get things right rather than make up something more interesting. Crazy Diamond by Mike Watkinson and Pete Anderson is much less reliable, but does have quite a few interview quotes that aren't duplicated by Chapman. Information about Joe Boyd comes from Boyd's book White Bicycles. In this and future episodes on Pink Floyd I'm also relying on Nick Mason's Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd and Pink Floyd: All the Songs by Jean-Michel Guesdon and Philippe Margotin. The compilation Relics contains many of the most important tracks from Barrett's time with Pink Floyd, while Piper at the Gates of Dawn is his one full album with them. Those who want a fuller history of his time with the group will want to get Piper and also the box set Cambridge St/ation 1965-1967. Barrett only released two solo albums during his career. They're available as a bundle here. Completists will also want the rarities and outtakes collection Opel.  ERRATA: I talk about “Interstellar Overdrive” as if Barrett wrote it solo. The song is credited to all four members, but it was Barrett who came up with the riff I talk about. And annoyingly, given the lengths I went to to deal correctly with Barrett's name, I repeatedly refer to "Dave" Gilmour, when Gilmour prefers David. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A note before I begin -- this episode deals with drug use and mental illness, so anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to skip this one. But also, there's a rather unique problem in how I deal with the name of the main artist in the story today. The man everyone knows as Syd Barrett was born Roger Barrett, used that name with his family for his whole life, and in later years very strongly disliked being called "Syd", yet everyone other than his family called him that at all times until he left the music industry, and that's the name that appears on record labels, including his solo albums. I don't believe it's right to refer to people by names they choose not to go by themselves, but the name Barrett went by throughout his brief period in the public eye was different from the one he went by later, and by all accounts he was actually distressed by its use in later years. So what I'm going to do in this episode is refer to him as "Roger Barrett" when a full name is necessary for disambiguation or just "Barrett" otherwise, but I'll leave any quotes from other people referring to "Syd" as they were originally phrased. In future episodes on Pink Floyd, I'll refer to him just as Barrett, but in episodes where I discuss his influence on other artists, I will probably have to use "Syd Barrett" because otherwise people who haven't listened to this episode won't know what on Earth I'm talking about. Anyway, on with the show. “It's gone!” sighed the Rat, sinking back in his seat again. “So beautiful and strange and new. Since it was to end so soon, I almost wish I had never heard it. For it has roused a longing in me that is pain, and nothing seems worth while but just to hear that sound once more and go on listening to it for ever. No! There it is again!” he cried, alert once more. Entranced, he was silent for a long space, spellbound. “Now it passes on and I begin to lose it,” he said presently. “O Mole! the beauty of it! The merry bubble and joy, the thin, clear, happy call of the distant piping! Such music I never dreamed of, and the call in it is stronger even than the music is sweet! Row on, Mole, row! For the music and the call must be for us.” That's a quote from a chapter titled "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" from the classic children's book The Wind in the Willows -- a book which for most of its length is a fairly straightforward story about anthropomorphic animals having jovial adventures, but which in that one chapter has Rat and Mole suddenly encounter the Great God Pan and have a hallucinatory, transcendental experience caused by his music, one so extreme it's wiped from their minds, as they simply cannot process it. The book, and the chapter, was a favourite of Roger Barrett, a young child born in Cambridge in 1946. Barrett came from an intellectual but not especially bookish family. His father, Dr. Arthur Barrett, was a pathologist -- there's a room in Addenbrooke's Hospital named after him -- but he was also an avid watercolour painter, a world-leading authority on fungi, and a member of the Cambridge Philharmonic Society who was apparently an extraordinarily good singer; while his mother Winifred was a stay-at-home mother who was nonetheless very active in the community, organising a local Girl Guide troupe. They never particularly encouraged their family to read, but young Roger did particularly enjoy the more pastoral end of the children's literature of the time. As well as the Wind in the Willows he also loved Alice in Wonderland, and the Little Grey Men books -- a series of stories about tiny gnomes and their adventures in the countryside. But his two big passions were music and painting. He got his first ukulele at age eleven, and by the time his father died, just before Roger's sixteenth birthday, he had graduated to playing a full-sized guitar. At the time his musical tastes were largely the same as those of any other British teenager -- he liked Chubby Checker, for example -- though he did have a tendency to prefer the quirkier end of things, and some of the first songs he tried to play on the guitar were those of Joe Brown: [Excerpt: Joe Brown, "I'm Henry VIII I Am"] Barrett grew up in Cambridge, and for those who don't know it, Cambridge is an incubator of a very particular kind of eccentricity. The university tends to attract rather unworldly intellectual overachievers to the city -- people who might not be able to survive in many other situations but who can thrive in that one -- and every description of Barrett's father suggests he was such a person -- Barrett's sister Rosemary has said that she believes that most of the family were autistic, though whether this is a belief based on popular media portrayals or a deeper understanding I don't know. But certainly Cambridge is full of eccentric people with remarkable achievements, and such people tend to have children with a certain type of personality, who try simultaneously to live up to and rebel against expectations of greatness that come from having parents who are regarded as great, and to do so with rather less awareness of social norms than the typical rebel has. In the case of Roger Barrett, he, like so many others of his generation, was encouraged to go into the sciences -- as indeed his father had, both in his career as a pathologist and in his avocation as a mycologist. The fifties and sixties were a time, much like today, when what we now refer to as the STEM subjects were regarded as new and exciting and modern. But rather than following in his father's professional footsteps, Roger Barrett instead followed his hobbies. Dr. Barrett was a painter and musician in his spare time, and Roger was to turn to those things to earn his living. For much of his teens, it seemed that art would be the direction he would go in. He was, everyone agrees, a hugely talented painter, and he was particularly noted for his mastery of colours. But he was also becoming more and more interested in R&B music, especially the music of Bo Diddley, who became his new biggest influence: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "Who Do You Love?"] He would often spend hours with his friend Dave Gilmour, a much more advanced guitarist, trying to learn blues riffs. By this point Barrett had already received the nickname "Syd". Depending on which story you believe, he either got it when he started attending a jazz club where an elderly jazzer named Sid Barrett played, and the people were amused that their youngest attendee, like one of the oldest, was called Barrett; or, more plausibly, he turned up to a Scout meeting once wearing a flat cap rather than the normal scout beret, and he got nicknamed "Sid" because it made him look working-class and "Sid" was a working-class sort of name. In 1962, by the time he was sixteen, Barrett joined a short-lived group called Geoff Mott and the Mottoes, on rhythm guitar. The group's lead singer, Geoff Mottlow, would go on to join a band called the Boston Crabs who would have a minor hit in 1965 with a version of the Coasters song "Down in Mexico": [Excerpt: The Boston Crabs, "Down in Mexico"] The bass player from the Mottoes, Tony Sainty, and the drummer Clive Welham, would go on to form another band, The Jokers Wild, with Barrett's friend Dave Gilmour. Barrett also briefly joined another band, Those Without, but his time with them was similarly brief. Some sources -- though ones I consider generally less reliable -- say that the Mottoes' bass player wasn't Tony Sainty, but was Roger Waters, the son of one of Barrett's teachers, and that one of the reasons the band split up was that Waters had moved down to London to study architecture. I don't think that's the case, but it's definitely true that Barrett knew Waters, and when he moved to London himself the next year to go to Camberwell Art College, he moved into a house where Waters was already living. Two previous tenants at the same house, Nick Mason and Richard Wright, had formed a loose band with Waters and various other amateur musicians like Keith Noble, Shelagh Noble, and Clive Metcalfe. That band was sometimes known as the Screaming Abdabs, The Megadeaths, or The Tea Set -- the latter as a sly reference to slang terms for cannabis -- but was mostly known at first as Sigma 6, named after a manifesto by the novelist Alexander Trocchi for a kind of spontaneous university. They were also sometimes known as Leonard's Lodgers, after the landlord of the home that Barrett was moving into, Mike Leonard, who would occasionally sit in on organ and would later, as the band became more of a coherent unit, act as a roadie and put on light shows behind them -- Leonard was himself very interested in avant-garde and experimental art, and it was his idea to play around with the group's lighting. By the time Barrett moved in with Waters in 1964, the group had settled on the Tea Set name, and consisted of Waters on bass, Mason on drums, Wright on keyboards, singer Chris Dennis, and guitarist Rado Klose. Of the group, Klose was the only one who was a skilled musician -- he was a very good jazz guitarist, while the other members were barely adequate. By this time Barrett's musical interests were expanding to include folk music -- his girlfriend at the time talked later about him taking her to see Bob Dylan on his first UK tour and thinking "My first reaction was seeing all these people like Syd. It was almost as if every town had sent one Syd Barrett there. It was my first time seeing people like him." But the music he was most into was the blues. And as the Tea Set were turning into a blues band, he joined them. He even had a name for the new band that would make them more bluesy. He'd read the back of a record cover which had named two extremely obscure blues musicians -- musicians he may never even have heard. Pink Anderson: [Excerpt: Pink Anderson, "Boll Weevil"] And Floyd Council: [Excerpt: Floyd Council, "Runaway Man Blues"] Barrett suggested that they put together the names of the two bluesmen, and presumably because "Anderson Council" didn't have quite the right ring, they went for The Pink Floyd -- though for a while yet they would sometimes still perform as The Tea Set, and they were sometimes also called The Pink Floyd Sound. Dennis left soon after Barrett joined, and the new five-piece Pink Floyd Sound started trying to get more gigs. They auditioned for Ready Steady Go! and were turned down, but did get some decent support slots, including for a band called the Tridents: [Excerpt: The Tridents, "Tiger in Your Tank"] The members of the group were particularly impressed by the Tridents' guitarist and the way he altered his sound using feedback -- Barrett even sent a letter to his girlfriend with a drawing of the guitarist, one Jeff Beck, raving about how good he was. At this point, the group were mostly performing cover versions, but they did have a handful of originals, and it was these they recorded in their first demo sessions in late 1964 and early 1965. They included "Walk With Me Sydney", a song written by Roger Waters as a parody of "Work With Me Annie" and "Dance With Me Henry" -- and, given the lyrics, possibly also Hank Ballard's follow-up "Henry's Got Flat Feet (Can't Dance No More) and featuring Rick Wright's then-wife Juliette Gale as Etta James to Barrett's Richard Berry: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Walk With Me Sydney"] And four songs by Barrett, including one called "Double-O Bo" which was a Bo Diddley rip-off, and "Butterfly", the most interesting of these early recordings: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Butterfly"] At this point, Barrett was very unsure of his own vocal abilities, and wrote a letter to his girlfriend saying "Emo says why don't I give up 'cos it sounds horrible, and I would but I can't get Fred to join because he's got a group (p'raps you knew!) so I still have to sing." "Fred" was a nickname for his old friend Dave Gilmour, who was playing in his own band, Joker's Wild, at this point. Summer 1965 saw two important events in the life of the group. The first was that Barrett took LSD for the first time. The rest of the group weren't interested in trying it, and would indeed generally be one of the more sober bands in the rock business, despite the reputation their music got. The other members would for the most part try acid once or twice, around late 1966, but generally steer clear of it. Barrett, by contrast, took it on a very regular basis, and it would influence all the work he did from that point on. The other event was that Rado Klose left the group. Klose was the only really proficient musician in the group, but he had very different tastes to the other members, preferring to play jazz to R&B and pop, and he was also falling behind in his university studies, and decided to put that ahead of remaining in the band. This meant that the group members had to radically rethink the way they were making music. They couldn't rely on instrumental proficiency, so they had to rely on ideas. One of the things they started to do was use echo. They got primitive echo devices and put both Barrett's guitar and Wright's keyboard through them, allowing them to create new sounds that hadn't been heard on stage before. But they were still mostly doing the same Slim Harpo and Bo Diddley numbers everyone else was doing, and weren't able to be particularly interesting while playing them. But for a while they carried on doing the normal gigs, like a birthday party they played in late 1965, where on the same bill was a young American folk singer named Paul Simon, and Joker's Wild, the band Dave Gilmour was in, who backed Simon on a version of "Johnny B. Goode". A couple of weeks after that party, Joker's Wild went into the studio to record their only privately-pressed five-song record, of them performing recent hits: [Excerpt: Joker's Wild, "Walk Like a Man"] But The Pink Floyd Sound weren't as musically tight as Joker's Wild, and they couldn't make a living as a cover band even if they wanted to. They had to do something different. Inspiration then came from a very unexpected source. I mentioned earlier that one of the names the group had been performing under had been inspired by a manifesto for a spontaneous university by the writer Alexander Trocchi. Trocchi's ideas had actually been put into practice by an organisation calling itself the London Free School, based in Notting Hill. The London Free School was an interesting mixture of people from what was then known as the New Left, but who were already rapidly aging, the people who had been the cornerstone of radical campaigning in the late fifties and early sixties, who had run the Aldermaston marches against nuclear weapons and so on, and a new breed of countercultural people who in a year or two would be defined as hippies but at the time were not so easy to pigeonhole. These people were mostly politically radical but very privileged people -- one of the founder members of the London Free School was Peter Jenner, who was the son of a vicar and the grandson of a Labour MP -- and they were trying to put their radical ideas into practice. The London Free School was meant to be a collective of people who would help each other and themselves, and who would educate each other. You'd go to the collective wanting to learn how to do something, whether that's how to improve the housing in your area or navigate some particularly difficult piece of bureaucracy, or how to play a musical instrument, and someone who had that skill would teach you how to do it, while you hopefully taught them something else of value. The London Free School, like all such utopian schemes, ended up falling apart, but it had a wider cultural impact than most such schemes. Britain's first underground newspaper, the International Times, was put together by people involved in the Free School, and the annual Notting Hill Carnival, which is now one of the biggest outdoor events in Britain every year with a million attendees, came from the merger of outdoor events organised by the Free School with older community events. A group of musicians called AMM was associated with many of the people involved in the Free School. AMM performed totally improvised music, with no structure and no normal sense of melody and harmony: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] Keith Rowe, the guitarist in AMM, wanted to find his own technique uninfluenced by American jazz guitarists, and thought of that in terms that appealed very strongly to the painterly Barrett, saying "For the Americans to develop an American school of painting, they somehow had to ditch or lose European easel painting techniques. They had to make a break with the past. What did that possibly mean if you were a jazz guitar player? For me, symbolically, it was Pollock laying the canvas on the floor, which immediately abandons European easel technique. I could see that by laying the canvas down, it became inappropriate to apply easel techniques. I thought if I did that with a guitar, I would just lose all those techniques, because they would be physically impossible to do." Rowe's technique-free technique inspired Barrett to make similar noises with his guitar, and to think less in terms of melody and harmony than pure sound. AMM's first record came out in 1966. Four of the Free School people decided to put together their own record label, DNA, and they got an agreement with Elektra Records to distribute its first release -- Joe Boyd, the head of Elektra in the UK, was another London Free School member, and someone who had plenty of experience with disruptive art already, having been on the sound engineering team at the Newport Folk Festival when Dylan went electric. AMM went into the studio and recorded AMMMusic: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] After that came out, though, Peter Jenner, one of the people who'd started the label, came to a realisation. He said later "We'd made this one record with AMM. Great record, very seminal, seriously avant-garde, but I'd started adding up and I'd worked out that the deal we had, we got two percent of retail, out of which we, the label, had to pay for recording costs and pay ourselves. I came to the conclusion that we were going to have to sell a hell of a lot of records just to pay the recording costs, let alone pay ourselves any money and build a label, so I realised we had to have a pop band because pop bands sold a lot of records. It was as simple as that and I was as naive as that." Jenner abandoned DNA records for the moment, and he and his friend Andrew King decided they were going to become pop managers. and they found The Pink Floyd Sound playing at an event at the Marquee, one of a series of events that were variously known as Spontaneous Underground and The Trip. Other participants in those events included Soft Machine; Mose Allison; Donovan, performing improvised songs backed by sitar players; Graham Bond; a performer who played Bach pieces while backed by African drummers; and The Poison Bellows, a poetry duo consisting of Spike Hawkins and Johnny Byrne, who may of all of these performers be the one who other than Pink Floyd themselves has had the most cultural impact in the UK -- after writing the exploitation novel Groupie and co-writing a film adaptation of Spike Milligan's war memoirs, Byrne became a TV screenwriter, writing many episodes of Space: 1999 and Doctor Who before creating the long-running TV series Heartbeat. Jenner and King decided they wanted to sign The Pink Floyd Sound and make records with them, and the group agreed -- but only after their summer holidays. They were all still students, and so they dispersed during the summer. Waters and Wright went on holiday to Greece, where they tried acid for the first of only a small number of occasions and were unimpressed, while Mason went on a trip round America by Greyhound bus. Barrett, meanwhile, stayed behind, and started writing more songs, encouraged by Jenner, who insisted that the band needed to stop relying on blues covers and come up with their own material, and who saw Barrett as the focus of the group. Jenner later described them as "Four not terribly competent musicians who managed between them to create something that was extraordinary. Syd was the main creative drive behind the band - he was the singer and lead guitarist. Roger couldn't tune his bass because he was tone deaf, it had to be tuned by Rick. Rick could write a bit of a tune and Roger could knock out a couple of words if necessary. 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' was the first song Roger ever wrote, and he only did it because Syd encouraged everyone to write. Syd was very hesitant about his writing, but when he produced these great songs everyone else thought 'Well, it must be easy'" Of course, we know this isn't quite true -- Waters had written "Walk with me Sydney" -- but it is definitely the case that everyone involved thought of Barrett as the main creative force in the group, and that he was the one that Jenner was encouraging to write new material. After the summer holidays, the group reconvened, and one of their first actions was to play a benefit for the London Free School. Jenner said later "Andrew King and myself were both vicars' sons, and we knew that when you want to raise money for the parish you have to have a social. So in a very old-fashioned way we said 'let's put on a social'. Like in the Just William books, like a whist drive. We thought 'You can't have a whist drive. That's not cool. Let's have a band. That would be cool.' And the only band we knew was the band I was starting to get involved with." After a couple of these events went well, Joe Boyd suggested that they make those events a regular club night, and the UFO Club was born. Jenner and King started working on the light shows for the group, and then bringing in other people, and the light show became an integral part of the group's mystique -- rather than standing in a spotlight as other groups would, they worked in shadows, with distorted kaleidoscopic lights playing on them, distancing themselves from the audience. The highlight of their sets was a long piece called "Interstellar Overdrive", and this became one of the group's first professional recordings, when they went into the studio with Joe Boyd to record it for the soundtrack of a film titled Tonite Let's All Make Love in London. There are conflicting stories about the inspiration for the main riff for "Interstellar Overdrive". One apparent source is the riff from Love's version of the Bacharach and David song "My Little Red Book". Depending on who you ask, either Barrett was obsessed with Love's first album and copied the riff, or Peter Jenner tried to hum him the riff and Barrett copied what Jenner was humming: [Excerpt: Love, "My Little Red Book"] More prosaically, Roger Waters has always claimed that the main inspiration was from "Old Ned", Ron Grainer's theme tune for the sitcom Steptoe and Son (which for American listeners was remade over there as Sanford and Son): [Excerpt: Ron Grainer, "Old Ned"] Of course it's entirely possible, and even likely, that Barrett was inspired by both, and if so that would neatly sum up the whole range of Pink Floyd's influences at this point. "My Little Red Book" was a cover by an American garage-psych/folk-rock band of a hit by Manfred Mann, a group who were best known for pop singles but were also serious blues and jazz musicians, while Steptoe and Son was a whimsical but dark and very English sitcom about a way of life that was slowly disappearing. And you can definitely hear both influences in the main riff of the track they recorded with Boyd: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive"] "Interstellar Overdrive" was one of two types of song that The Pink Floyd were performing at this time -- a long, extended, instrumental psychedelic excuse for freaky sounds, inspired by things like the second disc of Freak Out! by the Mothers of Invention. When they went into the studio again with Boyd later in January 1967, to record what they hoped would be their first single, they recorded two of the other kind of songs -- whimsical story songs inspired equally by the incidents of everyday life and by children's literature. What became the B-side, "Candy and a Currant Bun", was based around the riff from "Smokestack Lightnin'" by Howlin' Wolf: [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Smokestack Lightnin'"] That song had become a favourite on the British blues scene, and was thus the inspiration for many songs of the type that get called "quintessentially English". Ray Davies, who was in many ways the major songwriter at this time who was closest to Barrett stylistically, would a year later use the riff for the Kinks song "Last of the Steam-Powered Trains", but in this case Barrett had originally written a song titled "Let's Roll Another One", about sexual longing and cannabis. The lyrics were hastily rewritten in the studio to remove the controversial drug references-- and supposedly this caused some conflict between Barrett and Waters, with Waters pushing for the change, while Barrett argued against it, though like many of the stories from this period this sounds like the kind of thing that gets said by people wanting to push particular images of both men. Either way, the lyric was changed to be about sweet treats rather than drugs, though the lascivious elements remained in. And some people even argue that there was another lyric change -- where Barrett sings "walk with me", there's a slight "f" sound in his vocal. As someone who does a lot of microphone work myself, it sounds to me like just one of those things that happens while recording, but a lot of people are very insistent that Barrett is deliberately singing a different word altogether: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Candy and a Currant Bun"] The A-side, meanwhile, was inspired by real life. Both Barrett and Waters had mothers who used  to take in female lodgers, and both had regularly had their lodgers' underwear stolen from washing lines. While they didn't know anything else about the thief, he became in Barrett's imagination a man who liked to dress up in the clothing after he stole it: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Arnold Layne"] After recording the two tracks with Joe Boyd, the natural assumption was that the record would be put out on Elektra, the label which Boyd worked for in the UK, but Jac Holzman, the head of Elektra records, wasn't interested, and so a bidding war began for the single, as by this point the group were the hottest thing in London. For a while it looked like they were going to sign to Track Records, the label owned by the Who's management, but in the end EMI won out. Right as they signed, the News of the World was doing a whole series of articles about pop stars and their drug use, and the last of the articles talked about The Pink Floyd and their association with LSD, even though they hadn't released a record yet. EMI had to put out a press release saying that the group were not psychedelic, insisting"The Pink Floyd are not trying to create hallucinatory effects in their audience." It was only after getting signed that the group became full-time professionals. Waters had by this point graduated from university and was working as a trainee architect, and quit his job to become a pop star. Wright dropped out of university, but Mason and Barrett took sabbaticals. Barrett in particular seems to have seen this very much as a temporary thing, talking about how he was making so much money it would be foolish not to take the opportunity while it lasted, but how he was going to resume his studies in a year. "Arnold Layne" made the top twenty, and it would have gone higher had the pirate radio station Radio London, at the time the single most popular radio station when it came to pop music, not banned the track because of its sexual content. However, it would be the only single Joe Boyd would work on with the group. EMI insisted on only using in-house producers, and so while Joe Boyd would go on to a great career as a producer, and we'll see him again, he was replaced with Norman Smith. Smith had been the chief engineer on the Beatles records up to Rubber Soul, after which he'd been promoted to being a producer in his own right, and Geoff Emerick had taken over. He also had aspirations to pop stardom himself, and a few years later would have a transatlantic hit with "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?" under the name Hurricane Smith: [Excerpt: Hurricane Smith, "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?"] Smith's production of the group would prove controversial among some of the group's longtime fans, who thought that he did too much to curtail their more experimental side, as he would try to get the group to record songs that were more structured and more commercial, and would cut down their improvisations into a more manageable form. Others, notably Peter Jenner, thought that Smith was the perfect producer for the group. They started work on their first album, which was mostly recorded in studio three of Abbey Road, while the Beatles were just finishing off work on Sgt Pepper in studio two. The album was titled The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, after the chapter from The Wind in the Willows, and other than a few extended instrumental showcases, most of the album was made up of short, whimsical, songs by Barrett that were strongly infused with imagery from late-Victorian and Edwardian children's books. This is one of the big differences between the British and American psychedelic scenes. Both the British and American undergrounds were made up of the same type of people -- a mixture of older radical activists, often Communists, who had come up in Britain in the Ban the Bomb campaigns and in America in the Civil Rights movement; and younger people, usually middle-class students with radical politics from a privileged background, who were into experimenting with drugs and alternative lifestyles. But the  social situations were different. In America, the younger members of the underground were angry and scared, as their principal interest was in stopping the war in Vietnam in which so many of them were being killed. And the music of the older generation of the underground, the Civil Rights activists, was shot through with influence from the blues, gospel, and American folk music, with a strong Black influence. So that's what the American psychedelic groups played, for the most part, very bluesy, very angry, music, By contrast, the British younger generation of hippies were not being drafted to go to war, and mostly had little to complain about, other than a feeling of being stifled by their parents' generation's expectations. And while most of them were influenced by the blues, that wasn't the music that had been popular among the older underground people, who had either been listening to experimental European art music or had been influenced by Ewan MacColl and his associates into listening instead to traditional old English ballads, things like the story of Tam Lin or Thomas the Rhymer, where someone is spirited away to the land of the fairies: [Excerpt: Ewan MacColl, "Thomas the Rhymer"] As a result, most British musicians, when exposed to the culture of the underground over here, created music that looked back to an idealised childhood of their grandparents' generation, songs that were nostalgic for a past just before the one they could remember (as opposed to their own childhoods, which had taken place in war or the immediate aftermath of it, dominated by poverty, rationing, and bomb sites (though of course Barrett's childhood in Cambridge had been far closer to this mythic idyll than those of his contemporaries from Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle, or London). So almost every British musician who was making music that might be called psychedelic was writing songs that were influenced both by experimental art music and by pre-War popular song, and which conjured up images from older children's books. Most notably of course at this point the Beatles were recording songs like "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" about places from their childhood, and taking lyrical inspiration from Victorian circus posters and the works of Lewis Carroll, but Barrett was similarly inspired. One of the books he loved most as a child was "The Little Grey Men" by BB, a penname for Denys Watkins-Pitchford. The book told the story of three gnomes,  Baldmoney, Sneezewort, and Dodder, and their adventures on a boat when the fourth member of their little group, Cloudberry, who's a bit of a rebellious loner and more adventurous than the other three, goes exploring on his own and they have to go off and find him. Barrett's song "The Gnome" doesn't use any precise details from the book, but its combination of whimsy about a gnome named Grimble-gromble and a reverence for nature is very much in the mould of BB's work: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "The Gnome"] Another huge influence on Barrett was Hillaire Belloc. Belloc is someone who is not read much any more, as sadly he is mostly known for the intense antisemitism in some of his writing, which stains it just as so much of early twentieth-century literature is stained, but he was one of the most influential writers of the early part of the twentieth century. Like his friend GK Chesterton he was simultaneously an author of Catholic apologia and a political campaigner -- he was a Liberal MP for a few years, and a strong advocate of an economic system known as Distributism, and had a peculiar mixture of very progressive and extremely reactionary ideas which resonated with a lot of the atmosphere in the British underground of the time, even though he would likely have profoundly disapproved of them. But Belloc wrote in a variety of styles, including poems for children, which are the works of his that have aged the best, and were a huge influence on later children's writers like Roald Dahl with their gleeful comic cruelty. Barrett's "Matilda Mother" had lyrics that were, other than the chorus where Barrett begs his mother to read him more of the story, taken verbatim from three poems from Belloc's Cautionary Tales for Children -- "Jim, Who Ran away from his Nurse, and was Eaten by a Lion", "Henry King (Who chewed bits of String, and was cut off in Dreadful Agonies)", and "Matilda (Who Told Lies and Was Burned to Death)" -- the titles of those give some idea of the kind of thing Belloc would write: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Matilda Mother (early version)"] Sadly for Barrett, Belloc's estate refused to allow permission for his poems to be used, and so he had to rework the lyrics, writing new fairy-tale lyrics for the finished version. Other sources of inspiration for lyrics came from books like the I Ching, which Barrett used for "Chapter 24", having bought a copy from the Indica Bookshop, the same place that John Lennon had bought The Psychedelic Experience, and there's been some suggestion that he was deliberately trying to copy Lennon in taking lyrical ideas from a book of ancient mystic wisdom. During the recording of Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the group continued playing live. As they'd now had a hit single, most of their performances were at Top Rank Ballrooms and other such venues around the country, on bills with other top chart groups, playing to audiences who seemed unimpressed or actively hostile. They also, though made two important appearances. The more well-known of these was at the 14-Hour Technicolor Dream, a benefit for International Times magazine with people including Yoko Ono, their future collaborator Ron Geesin, John's Children, Soft Machine, and The Move also performing. The 14-Hour Technicolor Dream is now largely regarded as *the* pivotal moment in the development of the UK counterculture, though even at the time some participants noted that there seemed to be a rift developing between the performers, who were often fairly straightforward beer-drinking ambitious young men who had latched on to kaftans and talk about enlightenment as the latest gimmick they could use to get ahead in the industry, and the audience who seemed to be true believers. Their other major performance was at an event called "Games for May -- Space Age Relaxation for the Climax of Spring", where they were able to do a full long set in a concert space with a quadrophonic sound system, rather than performing in the utterly sub-par environments most pop bands had to at this point. They came up with a new song written for the event, which became their second single, "See Emily Play". [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] Emily was apparently always a favourite name of Barrett's, and he even talked with one girlfriend about the possibility of naming their first child Emily, but the Emily of the song seems to have had a specific inspiration. One of the youngest attendees at the London Free School was an actual schoolgirl, Emily Young, who would go along to their events with her schoolfriend Anjelica Huston (who later became a well-known film star). Young is now a world-renowned artist, regarded as arguably Britain's greatest living stone sculptor, but at the time she was very like the other people at the London Free School -- she was from a very privileged background, her father was Wayland Young, 2nd Baron Kennet, a Labour Peer and minister who later joined the SDP. But being younger than the rest of the attendees, and still a little naive, she was still trying to find her own personality, and would take on attributes and attitudes of other people without fully understanding them,  hence the song's opening lines, "Emily tries, but misunderstands/She's often inclined to borrow somebody's dream til tomorrow". The song gets a little darker towards the end though, and the image in the last verse, where she puts on a gown and floats down a river forever *could* be a gentle, pastoral, image of someone going on a boat ride, but it also could be a reference to two rather darker sources. Barrett was known to pick up imagery both from classic literature and from Arthurian legend, and so the lines inevitably conjure up both the idea of Ophelia drowning herself and of the Lady of Shallot in Tennyson's Arthurian poem, who is trapped in a tower but finds a boat, and floats down the river to Camelot but dies before the boat reaches the castle: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] The song also evokes very specific memories of Barrett's childhood -- according to Roger Waters, the woods mentioned in the lyrics are meant to be woods in which they had played as children, on the road out of Cambridge towards the Gog and Magog Hills. The song was apparently seven minutes long in its earliest versions, and required a great deal of editing to get down to single length, but it was worth it, as the track made the top ten. And that was where the problems started. There are two different stories told about what happened to Roger Barrett over the next forty years, and both stories are told by people with particular agendas, who want particular versions of him to become the accepted truth. Both stories are, in the extreme versions that have been popularised, utterly incompatible with each other, but both are fairly compatible with the scanty evidence we have. Possibly the truth lies somewhere between them. In one version of the story, around this time Barrett had a total mental breakdown, brought on or exacerbated by his overuse of LSD and Mandrax (a prescription drug consisting of a mixture of the antihistamine diphenhydramine and the sedative methaqualone, which was marketed in the US under the brand-name Quaalude), and that from late summer 1967 on he was unable to lead a normal life, and spent the rest of his life as a burned-out shell. The other version of the story is that Barrett was a little fragile, and did have periods of mental illness, but for the most part was able to function fairly well. In this version of the story, he was neurodivergent, and found celebrity distressing, but more than that he found the whole process of working within commercial restrictions upsetting -- having to appear on TV pop shows and go on package tours was just not something he found himself able to do, but he was responsible for a whole apparatus of people who relied on him and his group for their living. In this telling, he was surrounded by parasites who looked on him as their combination meal-ticket-cum-guru, and was simply not suited for the role and wanted to sabotage it so he could have a private life instead. Either way, *something* seems to have changed in Barrett in a profound way in the early summer of 1967. Joe Boyd talks about meeting him after not having seen him for a few weeks, and all the light being gone from his eyes. The group appeared on Top of the Pops, Britain's top pop TV show, three times to promote "See Emily Play", but by the third time Barrett didn't even pretend to mime along with the single. Towards the end of July, they were meant to record a session for the BBC's Saturday Club radio show, but Barrett walked out of the studio before completing the first song. It's notable that Barrett's non-cooperation or inability to function was very much dependent on circumstance. He was not able to perform for Saturday Club, a mainstream pop show aimed at a mass audience, but gave perfectly good performances on several sessions for John Peel's radio show The Perfumed Garden, a show firmly aimed at Pink Floyd's own underground niche. On the thirty-first of July, three days after the Saturday Club walkout, all the group's performances for the next month were cancelled, due to "nervous exhaustion". But on the eighth of August, they went back into the studio, to record "Scream Thy Last Scream", a song Barrett wrote and which Nick Mason sang: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Scream Thy Last Scream"] That was scheduled as the group's next single, but the record company vetoed it, and it wouldn't see an official release for forty-nine years. Instead they recorded another single, "Apples and Oranges": [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Apples and Oranges"] That was the last thing the group released while Barrett was a member. In November 1967 they went on a tour of the US, making appearances on American Bandstand and the Pat Boone Show, as well as playing several gigs. According to legend, Barrett was almost catatonic on the Pat Boone show, though no footage of that appears to be available anywhere -- and the same things were said about their performance on Bandstand, and when that turned up, it turned out Barrett seemed no more uncomfortable miming to their new single than any of the rest of the band, and was no less polite when Dick Clark asked them questions about hamburgers. But on shows on the US tour, Barrett would do things like detune his guitar so it just made clanging sounds, or just play a single note throughout the show. These are, again, things that could be taken in two different ways, and I have no way to judge which is the more correct. On one level, they could be a sign of a chaotic, disordered, mind, someone dealing with severe mental health difficulties. On the other, they're the kind of thing that Barrett was applauded and praised for in the confines of the kind of avant-garde underground audience that would pay to hear AMM or Yoko Ono, the kind of people they'd been performing for less than a year earlier, but which were absolutely not appropriate for a pop group trying to promote their latest hit single. It could be that Barrett was severely unwell, or it could just be that he wanted to be an experimental artist and his bandmates wanted to be pop stars -- and one thing absolutely everyone agrees is that the rest of the group were more ambitious than Barrett was. Whichever was the case, though, something had to give. They cut the US tour short, but immediately started another British package tour, with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Move, Amen Corner and the Nice. After that tour they started work on their next album, A Saucerful of Secrets. Where Barrett was the lead singer and principal songwriter on Piper at the Gates of Dawn, he only sings and writes one song on A Saucerful of Secrets, which is otherwise written by Waters and Wright, and only appears at all on two more of the tracks -- by the time it was released he was out of the group. The last song he tried to get the group to record was called "Have You Got it Yet?" and it was only after spending some time rehearsing it that the rest of the band realised that the song was a practical joke on them -- every time they played it, he would change the song around so they would mess up, and pretend they just hadn't learned the song yet. They brought in Barrett's old friend Dave Gilmour, initially to be a fifth member on stage to give the band some stability in their performances, but after five shows with the five-man lineup they decided just not to bother picking Barrett up, but didn't mention he was out of the group, to avoid awkwardness. At the time, Barrett and Rick Wright were flatmates, and Wright would actually lie to Barrett and say he was just going out to buy a packet of cigarettes, and then go and play gigs without him. After a couple of months of this, it was officially announced that Barrett was leaving the group. Jenner and King went with him, convinced that he was the real talent in the group and would have a solo career, and the group carried on with new management. We'll be looking at them more in future episodes. Barrett made a start at recording a solo album in mid-1968, but didn't get very far. Jenner produced those sessions, and later said "It seemed a good idea to go into the studio because I knew he had the songs. And he would sometimes play bits and pieces and you would think 'Oh that's great.' It was a 'he's got a bit of a cold today and it might get better' approach. It wasn't a cold -- and you knew it wasn't a cold -- but I kept thinking if he did the right things he'd come back to join us. He'd gone out and maybe he'd come back. That was always the analogy in my head. I wanted to make it feel friendly for him, and that where we were was a comfortable place and that he could come back and find himself again. I obviously didn't succeed." A handful of tracks from those sessions have since been released, including a version of “Golden Hair”, a setting by Barrett of a poem by James Joyce that he would later revisit: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, “Golden Hair (first version)”] Eleven months later, he went back into the studio again, this time with producer Malcolm Jones, to record an album that later became The Madcap Laughs, his first solo album. The recording process for the album has been the source of some controversy, as initially Jones was producing the whole album, and they were working in a way that Barrett never worked before. Where previously he had cut backing tracks first and only later overdubbed his vocals, this time he started by recording acoustic guitar and vocals, and then overdubbed on top of that. But after several sessions, Jones was pulled off the album, and Gilmour and Waters were asked to produce the rest of the sessions. This may seem a bit of a callous decision, since Gilmour was the person who had replaced Barrett in his group, but apparently the two of them had remained friends, and indeed Gilmour thought that Barrett had only got better as a songwriter since leaving the band. Where Malcolm Jones had been trying, by his account, to put out something that sounded like a serious, professional, record, Gilmour and Waters seemed to regard what they were doing more as producing a piece of audio verite documentary, including false starts and studio chatter. Jones believed that this put Barrett in a bad light, saying the outtakes "show Syd, at best as out of tune, which he rarely was, and at worst as out of control (which, again, he never was)." Gilmour and Waters, on the other hand, thought that material was necessary to provide some context for why the album wasn't as slick and professional as some might have hoped. The eventual record was a hodge-podge of different styles from different sessions, with bits from the Jenner sessions, the Jones sessions, and the Waters and Gilmour sessions all mixed together, with some tracks just Barrett badly double-tracking himself with an acoustic guitar, while other tracks feature full backing by Soft Machine. However, despite Jones' accusations that the album was more-or-less sabotaged by Gilmour and Waters, the fact remains that the best tracks on the album are the ones Barrett's former bandmates produced, and there are some magnificent moments on there. But it's a disturbing album to listen to, in the same way other albums by people with clear talent but clear mental illness are, like Skip Spence's Oar, Roky Erickson's later work, or the Beach Boys Love You. In each case, the pleasure one gets is a real pleasure from real aesthetic appreciation of the work, but entangled with an awareness that the work would not exist in that form were the creator not suffering. The pleasure doesn't come from the suffering -- these are real artists creating real art, not the kind of outsider art that is really just a modern-day freak-show -- but it's still inextricable from it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Dark Globe"] The Madcap Laughs did well enough that Barrett got to record a follow-up, titled simply Barrett. This one was recorded over a period of only a handful of months, with Gilmour and Rick Wright producing, and a band consisting of Gilmour, Wright, and drummer Jerry Shirley. The album is generally considered both more consistent and less interesting than The Madcap Laughs, with less really interesting material, though there are some enjoyable moments on it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Effervescing Elephant"] But the album is a little aimless, and people who knew him at the time seem agreed that that was a reflection of his life. He had nothing he *needed* to be doing -- no  tour dates, no deadlines, no pressure at all, and he had a bit of money from record royalties -- so he just did nothing at all. The one solo gig he ever played, with the band who backed him on Barrett, lasted four songs, and he walked off half-way through the fourth. He moved back to Cambridge for a while in the early seventies, and he tried putting together a new band with Twink, the drummer of the Pink Fairies and Pretty Things, Fred Frith, and Jack Monck, but Frith left after one gig. The other three performed a handful of shows either as "Stars" or as "Barrett, Adler, and Monck", just in the Cambridge area, but soon Barrett got bored again. He moved back to London, and in 1974 he made one final attempt to make a record, going into the studio with Peter Jenner, where he recorded a handful of tracks that were never released. But given that the titles of those tracks were things like "Boogie #1", "Boogie #2", "Slow Boogie", "Fast Boogie", "Chooka-Chooka Chug Chug" and "John Lee Hooker", I suspect we're not missing out on a lost masterpiece. Around this time there was a general resurgence in interest in Barrett, prompted by David Bowie having recorded a version of "See Emily Play" on his covers album Pin-Ups, which came out in late 1973: [Excerpt: David Bowie, "See Emily Play"] At the same time, the journalist Nick Kent wrote a long profile of Barrett, The Cracked Ballad of Syd Barrett, which like Kent's piece on Brian Wilson a year later, managed to be a remarkable piece of writing with a sense of sympathy for its subject and understanding of his music, but also a less-than-accurate piece of journalism which led to a lot of myths and disinformation being propagated. Barrett briefly visited his old bandmates in the studio in 1975 while they were recording the album Wish You Were Here -- some say even during the recording of the song "Shine On, You Crazy Diamond", which was written specifically about Barrett, though Nick Mason claims otherwise -- and they didn't recognise him at first, because by this point he had a shaved head and had put on a great deal of weight. He seemed rather sad, and that was the last time any of them saw him, apart from Roger Waters, who saw him in Harrod's a few years later. That time, as soon as Barrett recognised Waters, he dropped his bag and ran out of the shop. For the next thirty-one years, Barrett made no public appearances. The last time he ever voluntarily spoke to a journalist, other than telling them to go away, was in 1982, just after he'd moved back to Cambridge, when someone doorstopped him and he answered a few questions and posed for a photo before saying "OK! That's enough, this is distressing for me, thank you." He had the reputation for the rest of his life of being a shut-in, a recluse, an acid casualty. His family, on the other hand, have always claimed that while he was never particularly mentally or physically healthy, he wasn't a shut-in, and would go to the pub, meet up with his mother a couple of times a week to go shopping, and chat to the women behind the counter at Sainsbury's and at the pharmacy. He was also apparently very good with children who lived in the neighbourhood. Whatever the truth of his final decades, though, however mentally well or unwell he actually was, one thing is very clear, which is that he was an extremely private man, who did not want attention, and who was greatly distressed by the constant stream of people coming and looking through his letterbox, trying to take photos of him, trying to interview him, and so on. Everyone on his street knew that when people came asking which was Syd Barrett's house, they were meant to say that no-one of that name lived there -- and they were telling the truth. By the time he moved back, he had stopped answering to "Syd" altogether, and according to his sister "He came to hate the name latterly, and what it meant." He did, in 2001, go round to his sister's house to watch a documentary about himself on the TV -- he didn't own a TV himself -- but he didn't enjoy it and his only comment was that the music was too noisy. By this point he never listened to rock music, just to jazz and classical music, usually on the radio. He was financially secure -- Dave Gilmour made sure that when compilations came out they always included some music from Barrett's period in the group so he would receive royalties, even though Gilmour had no contact with him after 1975 -- and he spent most of his time painting -- he would take photos of the paintings when they were completed, and then burn the originals. There are many stories about those last few decades, but given how much he valued his privacy, it wouldn't be right to share them. This is a history of rock music, and 1975 was the last time Roger Keith Barrett ever had anything to do with rock music voluntarily. He died of cancer in 2006, and at his funeral there was a reading from The Little Grey Men, which was also quoted in the Order of Service -- "The wonder of the world, the beauty and the power, the shapes of things, their colours lights and shades; these I saw. Look ye also while life lasts.” There was no rock music played at Barrett's funeral -- instead there were a selection of pieces by Handel, Haydn, and Bach, ending with Bach's Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major, one of his favourite pieces: [Excerpt: Glenn Gould, "Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major"]  As they stared blankly in dumb misery deepening as they slowly realised all they had seen and all they had lost, a capricious little breeze, dancing up from the surface of the water, tossed the aspens, shook the dewy roses and blew lightly and caressingly in their faces; and with its soft touch came instant oblivion. For this is the last best gift that the kindly demi-god is careful to bestow on those to whom he has revealed himself in their helping: the gift of forgetfulness. Lest the awful remembrance should remain and grow, and overshadow mirth and pleasure, and the great haunting memory should spoil all the after-lives of little animals helped out of difficulties, in order that they should be happy and lighthearted as before. Mole rubbed his eyes and stared at Rat, who was looking about him in a puzzled sort of way. “I beg your pardon; what did you say, Rat?” he asked. “I think I was only remarking,” said Rat slowly, “that this was the right sort of place, and that here, if anywhere, we should find him. And look! Why, there he is, the little fellow!” And with a cry of delight he ran towards the slumbering Portly. But Mole stood still a moment, held in thought. As one wakened suddenly from a beautiful dream, who struggles to recall it, and can re-capture nothing but a dim sense of the beauty of it, the beauty! Till that, too, fades away in its turn, and the dreamer bitterly accepts the hard, cold waking and all its penalties; so Mole, after struggling with his memory for a brief space, shook his head sadly and followed the Rat.

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Richmond Til We Die: A Ted Lasso Podcast
Ted Lasso S2E10: Funerals Are So Weird

Richmond Til We Die: A Ted Lasso Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 61:44


Welcome back to the Dogtrack, Greyhounds! In this episode Marisa, Christian, and Brett have a conversation about Season 2, Episode 10: No Weddings and a Funeral.This episode is one of our absolute favorites of the entire series! As we navigate both the hilarity and the heaviness of this episode, we discuss the weirdness of funerals, the end of Sam and Rebecca's relationship, and the respective breakdowns and breakthroughs of Ted and Rebecca.We also talk a bit about shoes (the expensive and the uncomfortable), the awkwardness of grief, the cultural staying power of the almighty Rick Roll, and the masterful music choices in this episode.Full show notes and transcript will available at https://www.tedlassopod.com/ted-lasso-episode-02-10-no-weddings-and-a-funeralRichmond Til We Die is a conversation about the Apple TV+ show Ted Lasso, where we explore the characters, their relationships to each other, and how they're able to make us laugh until we can hardly breathe one moment and then feel with the deepest parts of our hearts the next. When you're here, you're a Greyhound!

Murder In America
91: ILLINOIS - John Wayne Gacy Part One: Who Is The Killer Clown?

Murder In America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 77:43 Very Popular


It was the 1970s, and young men who had their whole lives in front of them started going missing around the greater Chicago area. While some disappeared while looking for a job in the city, or hanging out near the Greyhound bus station, or walking along the roads outside of Chicago, the one thing all 33 missing young men had in common was that they were manipulated and murdered by a man named John Wayne Gacy, with many of their bodies being left to decompose within the crawlspace of his suburban Chicago home. This is part one of the story of John Wayne Gacy, the Killer Clown, and you are listening to Murder in America. - Give your hair what it deserves! Visit vegamour.com/MIA and use code MIA to save 20% off your first order - Visit betterhelp.com/MIA and use our custom code MIA for 10% off your first month of easy online therapy - Stay Connected:  Join the Murder in America fam in our free Facebook Community for a behind-the-scenes look, more insights and current events in the true crime world: https://www.facebook.com/groups/4365229996855701 If you want even more Murder in America bonus content, including ad-free episodes, come join us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/murderinamerica Instagram: http://instagram.com/murderinamerica/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/people/Murder-in-America-Podcast/100086268848682/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/MurderInAmerica TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@theparanormalfiles and https://www.tiktok.com/@courtneybrowen Feeling spooky? Follow Colin as he travels state to state (and even country to country!) investigating claims of extreme paranormal activity and visiting famous haunted locations on The Paranormal Files Official Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheParanormalFilesOfficialChannel

Small Town Murder
#315 - A Dangerously Unpredictable Cannibal - Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada

Small Town Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 67:36 Very Popular


This week, in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada, an unpredictable, and unbelievable scene happens, seemingly out of nowhere, leaving someone without a head, and some other body parts. The even crazier part is that the killer forced a large group of people to helplessly watch as he stabbed, beheaded, and began to eat the victim. When the murderer was taken into custody, he even had a few parts, in his pocket. This leads to a strange outcome in court, but there's no way that person will ever walk the streets, again, right? Right?? RIGHT??? Not so fast...Along the way, we find out that Canada loves potatoes, that you truly never know who you're sitting next to, and that the only thing worse than being on a Greyhound bus, is being beheaded & eaten on a Greyhound bus!!Hosted by James Pietragallo and Jimmie WhismanNew episodes every Thursday!Donate at: patreon.com/crimeinsports or go to paypal.com and use our email: crimeinsports@gmail.comGo to shutupandgivememurder.com for all things Small Town Murder & Crime In Sports!Follow us on...twitter.com/@murdersmallfacebook.com/smalltownpodinstagram.com/smalltownmurderAlso, check out James & Jimmie's other show, Crime In Sports! On Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Wondery, Wondery+, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.