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Best podcasts about rifles

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Latest podcast episodes about rifles

War Stories by Manstalgia
Black Rifle Communist Coffee? - Locker Room 12 022021

War Stories by Manstalgia

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 72:40


The boys discuss current events including Alec Baldwin's interview and magic gun as well as conservatives giving other conservatives a bad name. Remember to like, subscribe and leave a review to help us grow the podcast. Go to www.warstoriesofficial.com and  Join our subscriber forums to get access to premium episodes. Support us at https://patron.podbean.com/warstoriesofficial and get a shout out on an upcoming episode and access to subscriber only episodes. Follow us on Instagram @war_stories_official and on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/WarStoriesOfficialPodcast

Gun Talk
Marksmanship Training at FTW Ranch | Gun Talk Nation

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 26:14


On location at FTW Ranch in Texas, Gun Talk's Ryan Gresham talks with instructor Dave Knesek about what you can learn at FTW classes, long range shooting, reading the wind, hunting, and more. Gun Talk Nation is brought to you by Meprolight, Timney Triggers, Safariland, Springfield Armory, Hodgdon Powder, CrossBreed Holsters, Brownells, and Smith & Wesson. Gun Talk Nation 12.01.21

Firearms Radio Network (All Shows)
Who Moved My Freedom 838 – Omicron & WWSD 2020 Rifle

Firearms Radio Network (All Shows)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 134:40


On This episode of Who Moved My Freedom it's FreeForAll Monday with Walter of Safety Harbor Firearms and Patrick Babyface. We are back from Thanksgiving break! Whats up with Omicron, How many AR's do you need, I show off the new Brownells WWSD (what would Stoner do) rifle that just came in and lots of Gorn ... and so much more!

Who Moved My Freedom Podcast
Episode 838 : FreeForAll Monday: Omicron & WWSD 2020 Rifle BFP Walt

Who Moved My Freedom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 129:05


WMMF Podcast: FreeForAll Monday: Omicron & WWSD 2020 Rifle BFP Walt —————————————————————————————————-  PLEASE

Who Moved My Freedom Podcast
Episode 838 : FreeForAll Monday: Omicron & WWSD 2020 Rifle BFP Walt

Who Moved My Freedom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 129:05


WMMF Podcast: FreeForAll Monday: Omicron & WWSD 2020 Rifle BFP Walt —————————————————————————————————-  PLEASE

Poddin' Next Door
E99 - "Service Worker"

Poddin' Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 115:04


On this episode: The ”Poddin' Next Door" crew opens with some Rotten Tomatoes vibes. The guys try out a different location and get right to it. The guys play some slappers, Black Friday shopping, Thanksgiving meals, King Richard review, Pushing your kids, not showering during the winter, wet strip clubs, Ahmaud Arbery Verdict, Wagyu steak, Slim Thick Rachel, and Washer Machine Mania. Listen on most Digital Streaming Platforms. Apple, Amazon, Spotify, Google…… Follow + Subscribe: Instagram - @poddinnextdoor YouTube - Poddin' Next Door

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Broken Record with Malcolm Gladwell, Rick Rubin, and Bruce Headlam

Mary Gauthier is a folk singer/songwriter whose songs have quite literally saved her life. Writing music did not come easily to Gauthier. She began abusing drugs and alcohol as a young girl growing up in Louisiana. After years of struggling with addiction, Gauthier got clean at age 27 and began frequenting open mics around Boston. She released her debut album, Dixie Kitchen, in 1997 and moved to Nashville not long after. She has since become known for her ability to write vivid, literary-style lyrics that pull from her past trauma, loss, and heartbreak. On today's episode Bruce Headlam talks to Mary Gauthier about how the same determination that once drove her to drink now powers her songwriting. She also talks about how conversations with young U.S. veterans inspired her Grammy-nominated album, Rifles & Rosary Beads. And Gauthier recalls seeing one particularly moving open mic performance that inspired her to become the artist she is today.    Subscribe to Broken Record's YouTube channel to hear all of our interviews:  https://www.youtube.com/brokenrecordpodcast and follow us on Twitter @BrokenRecord You can also check out past episodes here: https://brokenrecordpodcast.com Check out our favorite Mary Gauthier songs HERE. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Back Country Pa
Rifle Season in Pa

Back Country Pa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 75:09


On this episode Cody & Ethan head up with their fathers to Potter county! Join them as they sit down an recap how opening day of Rifle season went for everyone along with some stories from the past and discussions about some regulations! Patrick also gives you some news!

The Born And Raised Audio Experience
Rifle Hunting and the Pressure of a Big Tag

The Born And Raised Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 31:53


Trent and Noah talk about the recent elk hunt, the differences between bow and rifle season and the pressure of filling a big tag.  Did you know you can get a discount on the onX Hunt app? http://bit.ly/BRO_onXHuntShop  Use the promo code: BRO and you'll get a 20% discount!Everything that first-timers need to know 

Gun Talk
Liberal Gun Owners; Making Your Own Ammunition; Is There A Perfect Caliber?: Gun Talk Radio | 11.28.21 Hour 1

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 43:48


In this hour: - The Liberal Gun Club's Lara Smith talks about the diversity of gun owners in the U.S. - Customizing ammunition for low-recoil practice - Searching for a perfect caliber probably is pointless. Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.28.21 Hour 1

Gun Talk
How To Find Ammunition; Why Buy A Lever Action; Passing Down Guns To Children: Gun Talk Radio | 11.28.21 Hour 2

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 43:40


In this hour: - Brownells' Roy Hill talks ammo availability and more - Why buy a lever action rifle? - The value of passing down guns to children and grandchildren Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.28.21 Hour 2

Gun Talk
Skeet Shooting On Private Property; The Danger Of Tree Stands; A Different Kind Of Shooting Class: Gun Talk Radio | 11.28.21 Hour 3

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 43:43


In this hour: - World Champion skeet shooter Dania Vizzi is training for the Olympics, but already had to battle the county for the right to do so on her own land - A near accident prompts a renewed look at tree stand safety - A Gunsite class features three types of guns. Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.28.21 Hour 3

Gun Talk
Bought A Used Gun - That Won't Work; Pepper Guns For Defense; A Surprise Score On New Gun: Gun Talk Radio | 11.28.21 After Show

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 39:51


In this hour: - He bought a used shotgun, but it won't work right.  What now? - The roll of pepper spray and pepper launchers for self defense. - A caller was surprised when he called a gun store, and they had what he was looking for     Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.28.21 After Show

Free Range American Podcast
Black Rifle Coffee Podcast: Ep 183 Clay Hutmacher - Tier One Leadership Part 2

Free Range American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 89:47


Evan Hafer and Clay Hutmacher continue their conversation about leadership in this second part. Clay led a legendary career in the military, retiring as a Major General and serving in leadership roles at some of the most prestigious units the military has to offer.

Midnight Train Podcast
The Banana Massacre - Yep, bananas. Happy Thanksgiving 2021

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 90:05


So we're gonna get into something a bit different this week. Not really truecrime, not unsolved, but definitely crazy. This is another one we got from a listener that we had no clue ever happened. While the official death toll of this incident is usually put at around 45, some estimates say it could be up to 2000. Those bodies are said to either have been dumped in the sea or buried in mass graves. So what was the incident about you ask? Well, long story very short… Bananas. We're gonna dive into what is simply known as the Banana massacre,  a crazy tale of a government squashing a banana strike with excessive force and what came after. Buckle up guys, here we go!   Before we start, I want to acknowledge the great sources of info for this episode. 90% of the information on this week's episode came from two amazing sources that had tons of info that we couldn't find anywhere else. First a paper by Jorge Enrique Elias Caro and Antonino Vidal Ortega on the website scielo.org was our source for the actual massacre info while an article called Rotten Fruit by Peter Chapman on the Financial Times website was our source for the company history.  So, let's start by talking about a fruit company. United Fruit company to be exact. United Fruit began life in the 1870s when Minor Cooper Keith, a wealthy young New Yorker, started growing bananas as a business sideline, alongside a railway line he was building in Costa Rica. Both ventures took off, and by 1890 he was married to the daughter of a former president of Costa Rica and owned vast banana plantations on land given to him by the state. The bananas were shipped to New Orleans and Boston, where demand soon began to outstrip supply.Keith teamed up with Andrew Preston, a Boston importer, and in 1899 they formed United Fruit. Bananas sold well for their tropical cachet: they were exotic, a luxury only affordable to the rich. But the rapidly rising output of United Fruit's plantations brought down prices. The company created a mass market in the industrial cities of the US north-east and Midwest. The once bourgeois banana became positively proletarian.   By the 1920s, United Fruit's empire had spread across Central America. It also included Jamaica, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. In South America the company owned chunks of Colombia and Ecuador. It came to dominate the European as well as the US banana markets with the help of its Great White Fleet of 100 refrigerated ships, the largest private navy in the world.   There are more than 300 varieties of banana, but United Fruit grew only one: the Gros Michel or ”Big Mike”. This variety suited most tastes; it was not too big or too small, too yellow or too sweet - if anything, it was a little bland. This was the forerunner of the transnational products we have today.           But mass production took its toll. In 1903, disease hit United Fruit's plantations in Panama. An array of pathogens kept up the attack, and the banana was discovered to have a genetic weakness. Its seeds are ill equipped for reproduction, so growers take cuttings from one plant to create another. The banana is a clone, with each inbred generation less resilient.    Although the banana was diseased, United Fruit marketed it as a product that exemplified good health. Banana diseases did not affect humans, and the fruit was said to be the cure for many ills: obesity, blood pressure, constipation - even depression. In 1929, United Fruit set up its own ”education department”, which supplied US schools with teaching kits extolling the benefits of the banana and the good works of the company. Meanwhile, United Fruit's ”home economics” department showered housewives with banana recipes.   One of United Fruit's most successful advertising campaigns began in 1944, designed to boost the banana's profile after its scarcity during the war. It featured Senorita Chiquita Banana, a cartoon banana who danced and sang in an exuberant Latin style. Senorita Chiquita bore a close resemblance to Carmen Miranda, the Brazilian entertainer who, in her ”tutti-frutti” hat, wowed Hollywood at the time. Sales soon regained prewar levels.   By the 1960s, the banana had become an inseparable accompaniment to the morning cereal of most American children. And today, in countries such as the US and Britain, it has ousted the apple as the most popular fruit. In the UK, figures indicate that more than 95 per cent of households buy bananas each week, and that more money is spent on them than on any other supermarket item, apart from petrol and lottery tickets.    Soooo sounds like a pretty typical big business rise to power by providing a wholesome treat to the people right? Wrong… There was more going on than almost everybody knew.    Over the years, United Fruit fought hard for low taxes and light regulation. By the beginning of the 20th century, troublesome anti-trust laws had been passed in the US to crack down on business behaviour such as price-fixing and other monopolistic practices. Taxes on large corporations were increased to fund welfare benefits in the US and fully fledged welfare states in Europe. But, with a centre of operations far from the lawmakers of Washington DC, United Fruit largely avoided all this.   The company also gained a reputation as being ruthless when crossed, and acted to remove governments that did not comply with its wishes. United Fruit had first shown its tough nature in the invasion of Honduras in 1911, which was planned by Sam ”The Banana Man” Zemurray, a business partner of United Fruit who later headed the company. Efforts by Zemurray and United Fruit to set up production in Honduras had been blocked by the Honduran government, which was fearful of the power it might wield. United Fruit was not so easily deterred. Zemurray financed an invasion, led by such enterprising types as ”General” (self-appointed) Lee Christmas and freelance trouble-shooter Guy ”Machine Gun” Molony. Thanks to United Fruit, many more exercises in ”regime change” were carried out in the name of the banana.   In 1941, the company hired a new consultant, Sigmund Freud's nephew, Edward Bernays, who had adapted the early disciplines of psychoanalysis to the marketplace. Bernays is known as the ”father of public relations” following his seminal 1928 book, Propaganda, in which he argued that it was the duty of the ”intelligent minority” of society to manipulate the unthinking ”group mind”. This, Bernays asserted, was for the sake of freedom and democracy.   United Fruit had become concerned about its image. In Central America, it was commonly known as el pulpo (the octopus) - its tentacles everywhere. In the US, United Fruit's territories were seen as troubled and forbidding. Under Bernays' guidance, the company began issuing a steady flow of information to the media about its work, rebranding the region as ”Middle America”.   America”.   In 1954, Bernays exercised his manipulative powers to get rid of the Guatemalan government. Democratically elected, it had taken some of United Fruit's large areas of unused land to give to peasant farmers. Bernays' response was to call newspaper contacts who might be amenable to the company view. Journalists were sent on ”fact finding” missions to Central America and, in particular, Guatemala, where they chased false stories of gunfire and bombs. In dispatches home, Guatemala became a place gripped by ”communist terror”.   The company looked, too, to friends in high places, both in the corridors of power and in the offices where the big decisions were made. During the Guatemalan crisis, John Foster Dulles, one of the world's most esteemed statesmen, was secretary of state. His brother, Allen Dulles, was head of the CIA. Both were former legal advisers to United Fruit. Together, the Dulles brothers orchestrated the coup that overthrew Guatemala's government in 1954.   Despite its ugly reputation, United Fruit often made philanthropic gestures.  Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company, played a part in coining the term ”corporate social responsibility” when, in reference to earthquake relief sent to Nicaragua in 1972, he extolled the company's deeds as ”our social responsibility”.  And in the 1930s, Sam Zemurray donated part of his fortune to a children's clinic in New Orleans. He later gave $1m to the city's Tulane University to finance ”Middle American'' research; he also funded a Harvard professorship for women. Philanthropy, however, did not prevent United Fruit's abuses, and, in the 1950s, the US government decided it had to act. The company's activities had caused such anti-US feeling in Latin America that leftwing revolutionaries such as Fidel Castro and Che Guevara had prospered. And so Washington began to take away some of United Fruit's land.   Ironically, Castro had benefited from the presence of United Fruit in Cuba. His father, a sugar planter, leased land from the company, and had made enough money to afford a good upbringing for his children. Guevara had fought both United Fruit and the CIA during the Guatemalan coup; he maintained thereafter that Latin America had no choice but ”armed struggle”. At New Year 1959, Castro and Guevara seized power in Cuba and kicked out the US-supported regime of Fulgencio Batista.   Like an ailing dictator, United Fruit lashed out - and nearly took the world with it. In 1961, it lent part of its Great White Fleet to the CIA and Cuban exiles in the US who were plotting to overthrow Castro. When the Bay of Pigs invasion failed, Castro, fearing another attack, ushered in armaments from the Soviet Union, prompting the missile crisis of 1962.   United Fruit battled on through the 1960s, its product ever more the victim of disease. Big Mike flagged, died and gave way to the dessert banana most of the developed world eats today, the Cavendish. It was said to be ”disease resistant”. Now that's dying, too.   Eli Black took over the company in 1970, imagining he could turn it back into the colossus it once was. The early 1970s, however, were a terrible period for the image of multinational corporations. Chief among them, oil companies made huge profits from the crisis after the 1973 Middle East war, to the inflationary ruin of rich and poor countries alike. United Fruit became an embarrassment. It was weak where others, such as the oil moguls, remained strong. When its stock market value crashed and regulators moved in, it looked like natural selection.   Early on Monday February 3 1975, a man threw himself out of his office window, 44 floors above Park Avenue, New York. He had used his briefcase to smash the window, and then thrown it out before he leapt, scattering papers for blocks around. Glass fell on to the rush-hour traffic, but amazingly no one else was hurt. The body landed away from the road, near a postal service office. Postmen helped emergency workers clear up the mess so the day's business could carry on.    This jumper was quickly identified as Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company.   It emerged that Black, a devout family man, had bribed the Honduran president, Oswaldo Lopez Arellano, with $1.25m to encourage him to pull out of a banana cartel which opposed United Fruit. The story was about to come out in the US press. United Fruit's Central American plantations were also struggling with hurricane damage and a new banana disease. Facing disgrace and failure, Black took his own life. His death was shocking, not least because he had the reputation of a highly moral man. Wall Street was outraged, the company's shares crashed and regulators seized its books to prevent ”its further violation of the law”. The company subsequently disappeared from public view and was seemingly erased from the collective mind.   After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, in a born-again spirit of globalisation, the world's main banana companies picked up the free-market banner once carried by United Fruit. The companies - Chiquita, Del Monte and Dole from the US, and Noboa from Ecuador - did not have anything like the force of United Fruit individually, but they were still a formidable presence. Together they were known to their critics, if not to themselves, as the ”Wild Bunch”.   In the 1990s, the US took its case to the World Trade Organisation, the new high court of globalisation. The companies protested that west European countries unfairly protected the producers of so-called ”Fairtrade” bananas in former European colonies through a complex system of quotas and licences. The Wild Bunch characterised this as revamped colonialism and outmoded welfare state-ism and, instead, promoted their own ”Free Trade” bananas.   In the new millennium, after what had become a general trade war, the Europeans backed down and agreed to concessions. They did so with some rancour, protesting that Washington had again allowed itself to be manipulated by narrow interests. Some spoke of a return of the ”old and dark forces”. They were thinking of United Fruit.   Ok so that's kind of a basic history of United Fruit company to get us going in the right direction to talk about one of the most brutal things they carried out on their workers. You've seen the connection they had and the power they had.. Pretty nuts for a fucking banana company.    On the evening of October 5, 1928, the delegates for Colombia's banana workers in Magdalena gathered to discuss their grievances. Among their concerns were their long hours and low pay; one worker, Aristides López Rojano, remembered: “We worked from six in the morning until eleven and then from one in the afternoon until six.... The contractor paid the salary and reserved up to thirty percent for himself.” Erasmo Coronel (the one wearing the bowtie in the group portrait) spoke in favor of a strike, and the others agreed. At around five in the morning on October 6, 1928, the workers issued the United Fruit Company a list of nine demands.   Stop their practice of hiring through sub-contractors   Mandatory collective insurance   Compensation for work accidents   Hygienic dormitories and 6 day work weeks   Increase in daily pay for workers who earned less than 100 pesos per month   Weekly wage   Abolition of office stores   Abolition of payment through coupons rather than money   Improvement of hospital services   The strike turned into the largest labor movement ever witnessed in the country until then. Radical members of the Liberal Party, as well as members of the Socialist and Communist Parties, participated.   The workers wanted to be recognized as employees, and demanded the implementation of the Colombian legal framework of the 1920s.   After U.S. officials in Colombia and United Fruit representatives portrayed the workers' strike as "communist" with a "subversive tendency" in telegrams to Frank B. Kellogg, the United States Secretary of State, the United States government threatened to invade with the U.S. Marine Corps if the Colombian government did not act to protect United Fruit's interests. The Colombian government was also compelled to work for the interests of the company, considering they could cut off trade of Colombian bananas with significant markets such as the United States and Europe.   As there was no agreement the Government militarized the zone. The newspaper "La Prensa" published the following:   "MORE TROOPS FOR THE BANANERA REGION. We have been informed that the leaving of the Commissioner sent by the Industry Ministry due to the existing conflict between the workers and the company has turned the situation critical. For this reason, the War Ministry ordered the concentration of more troops in Ciénaga. Therefore, yesterday night, a numerous contingent was dispatched from here on a special ship"   By the end of November the Magdalena Agriculture Society tried to find a solution to the situation. They named a Commission and along with the Chief of the Work Office and the workers' delegates would have a meeting with the UFC since the conflict was affecting everyone's interests. The multinational rejected meeting the Commission stating that the workers were out of the law. The representatives of the workers left for Ciénaga with the aim of convincing their fellow workers to abandon the region. They also demanded the arbitration as a last legal resort.   Social Party (PSR) founded in 1927 in Bogotá. The strike was also supported by the national and departmental union leaders ascribed to the Magdalena Workers Federation, the Magdalena Worker Union and the General Union of Workers of the Union Society (popularly known as the Yellow Union which integrated railway, port and construction workers of Santa Marta).   The first week of December everything was at a standstill, without a solution. The company hired a steamboat and brought 200 military men and took over the town hall without the mayor's authorization. To this respect the Ciénaga newspaper "Diario del Córdoba" noted:   "We do not know who ordered changing the town house into a campsite of troops, but we are certain that the municipality spokesman was not consulted for this illegal occupation. He would have certainly opposed it since there was no alteration of public order according to the norms in force. We see that the procedures here are "manu militari", without any consideration under the obvious alarm of these peoples, panic in society and business."   Military roadblocks were displayed. Trains were searched and the army prevented strikers from using them33. Tension increased and temporary workers started to return to their hometowns. Military pressure blocked the communication systems and the mail, telephones, telegraph and even the press stopped working. The strikers seized the train from Ciénaga to the plantations and they prevented its exit during the day.   On December 3rd, the press was conscious of the extreme situation: The situation of the Banana Strike is worse than ever. Especially because of the uneasiness caused by the Governor's Office for having called the Army. Any kind of meeting was banned, as it was assumed that they questioned the state legitimacy and stability and the government decisions. This measure outraged workers, because some detentions took place in Ciénaga and they were justified by the police since some documents of an apparently communist campaign were confiscated.   From this moment on, American Diplomats started to worry for the security of the American employees up to the point that the Government of the United States sent a ship to Santa Marta for the protection of their citizens as was stated by the US ambassador in Bogotá. He made clear that it was not a war cruise. Anyhow, it was possible to confirm that in the ports of Ciénaga and Santa Marta war ships docked with the aim of reinforcing troops.    To break the strike, on December 2nd, a military contingent of 300 men arrived in Ciénaga from the interior of the country. The major of the zone considered that these soldiers would be better at facing the situation than those native of the region. At the same time that same day some municipalities protested against the disposition of the governor's office. The workers exodus continued, the general situation of commerce aggravated, many commercial houses closed and some of them stopped paying their debts alleging the scarce security conditions and low sales. Similarly occurred with the stores of the UFC which closed due to lack of business activity. There was a total lack of supplies of basic products in the banana zone.   With the excuse that in Ciénaga the strikers were committing all kinds of outrages, the army seized the train to mobilize troops to the different towns, preventing normal circulation; this information proved false and the train returned to Cienaga during the first hours of the next day. The community remained isolated and without the possibility to use the train as a transportation means. The train was used by the militaries for the surveillance of plantations.   A State of Siege declaration was expected and this increased tension among strikers who organized collective bodies in different locations to prevent the work of producers. Detentions continued. The train detention by the military and the impossibility to take bananas out due to the positions of the strikers and small landowners, the harvested fruit began to rot.   The Workers Union used the newspaper Vanguardia Obrera and other pasquinades to inform about their position and to keep public opinion updated. On December 5th, alleging that the strikers had managed to get weapons, the government decreed the State of Siege. This was not made public to the workers and for this reason they became more exacerbated.   A pressure mechanism used to obtain the support of merchants was the fact of creating solidarity to boycott the public market stores and other commercial firms if the transaction was not authorized by the Workers Union. This way, merchants could not sell if they did not have the "permission". To accomplish this policy the union had 5.000 workers acting as vigilantes. This situation led the UFC to ask the government if the State was in condition to protect its interests. The State response was dubious. In its effort to reach an equilibrium between the pressure of the company and that of the workers, it submitted a communication where it stated that it would analyse the situation and would take the corresponding steps.   The workers' unrest for not feeling the State support led them to radicalization of their protest and since that moment, seizures of banana farms took place in different municipalities. There were confrontations between land owners, the military and the workers. It is worth mentioning the events in Sevilla, where workers detained a group of soldiers.   As the tension increased with this last event the Ministry Council declared general alteration of public order on December 5th, and gave special faculties to Minister Arrazola to act as a mediator between the parties and positioned General Cortés Vargas as Civil and Military Chief. This intervention was justified by the economic losses of the socio-economic and political system of the nation because it had been estimated that up to that moment the losses exceeded one million dollars and given the fact that the fierce position of the workers had stopped communications and transportations and even there had been seizures in several localities and there was fear concerning the situation of Santa Marta.   The government sent information to the United Press as follows: "The government has decreed the State of Siege in the Province of Santa Marta where the workers of the United Fruit Company maintain a strike lasting several days. General Carlos Cortés Vargas has been appointed Civil and Military Chief". On the other hand, the national press and especially that of the capital announced: " there has never been a longer and more numerous strike in the country than this of the workers of Magdalena. Thirty-two thousand workers have been in total inactivity for more than thirty days in the banana region, there are no signs that this situation will have a favourable solution"   Events reached their peak in Ciénaga. The workers had concentrated for a pacific demonstration in the evening of the 5th of December. The Governor Nuñez Roca decreed the dispersion of the demonstration. The workers did not receive this well; they declared that authorities had taken this decision with the support of the UFC and the militaries without the presence of workers' representatives. This made clear to them that authorities were defending the interests of the Company and the local "bananacracy"and not theirs as Colombian workers. The concentration ended in a protest.   The militaries obeyed the orders of the Governor and it was authorized to follow orders and demand the workers to dissolve the demonstration as it was not authorized.   The text was read in the square and at the same time the troop took positions. There were approximately 1.500 strikers in the square.   The army gave the strikers 15 minutes to disperse and the workers' answer was a the massive agitation of the Colombian flags and shouts related to the workers movement. The army responded with drumbeats and the menace to repel the strikers. Three bugle warnings were given, but nevertheless the strikers remained in their positions. A deep silence reigned in the square and the menace of the army became an unfortunate reality when the shout "Shoot" was uttered. Rifles and machine guns were discharged against the defenceless and unarmed demonstrators. In minutes the ground of the square was tinted with blood.   Once the attack of the army against their own fellow citizens ended, the sight was dantesque. The cadavers, the wounded and their relatives were troubling scenes. These events took place at the dawn of December 6th: a brutal aggression against a workers' demonstration.   The news invaded the media and the first chronicles appeared with living information about the tragic balance of the events. The first report on the newspaper "La Prensa" from Barranquilla informed of 8 people killed and 20 wounded. After a week, the same newspaper mentioned 100 dead and 238 wounded. Meanwhile official sources and diplomatic communications signalled the number of people killed as being 1.000. This number, and along with other kind of testimonies collected, agree that the number of killings was over a thousand and that the militaries loaded the trains with the corpses and buried them in mass graves in inaccessible areas and up to the present times they have not been localized.   This repression caused a massive exodus of the terrified population. They abandoned the zone and migrated to different parts of the country for fear of military persecution and arrestment. Many of them left their scarce possessions behind.   National and international media widely covered this event. Both the UFC and the government tried to manipulate the information to protect their image. The press echoed and broadcasted the sometimes biased news, informing about "combats" between the army troops and the "revolutionaries" and that as a result of these combats, 8 "bandits" were killed and 20 were wounded. The War Ministry insisted that "in Magdalena there was no strike, but a revolution".   Other newspapers such as "La Prensa" from Barranquilla, issued their edition of December 8th in red characters as a reference to this event that brought mourning to the entire country and as a symbolic commemorative act.   Referring to a communication sent to the United Press, the War Ministry informed officially that in the attack of the strikers against the troops there had been 8 dead and 20 wounded and that in order to control the revolutionary outbreaks against state order, the immediate mobilization of more troops had been ordered. They would arrive from cities of the interior of the country. It also emphasised the position of the government that the workers' situation in Magdalena was delicate and that vigorous decisions had to be taken in order to solve this issue. It also informed that beside Ciénaga, other localities had to be intervened.   The Times from New York informed in a biased and extended way that the turmoil in the Colombian Banana Region was provoked by Mexican incendiaries, who had led the process of the Mexican Revolution, two decades earlier. It also gave details about the aspects of the banana strike that were consequences of the expiration of the Barco Concession .   At the same time the UFC issued a press communication to the New York agencies and the worldwide correspondents declaring: "the difficult situation experienced during the past days in the Colombian banana region, where the company has valuable interests, has quite improved in the last 24 hours and the dispatches sent from the scene, give rise to expectations for a prompt solution of the conflict surged between the workers and the company which ended in an extended strike of revolutionary nature".   While the American press provided biased information, trying to defend the multinational interests and that of their government, the national press analysed the situation with greater objectivity. The daily newspaper "El Tiempo" from Bogotá commented in an extended note that most of the claims of the strikers were righteous improvement of working conditions. Nevertheless, due to its conservative position, the editorial stated that they did not agree with the strike since they considered that the workers had a bad leadership and they made the leaders responsible for what had happened. They reminded the authorities that force is not the supreme reason as the only system to solve a conflict since violence is not a valid option to impose certain vindications.   In response to these events and as a protest for the massacre, several offices of the United Fruit and the railway were set on fire and destroyed. The hard situation caused by the army repression and the lack of jobs led to the assault of the company's stores where people seized food.    "It is not about fixing anyhow a difficult situation, it is about avoiding more critical events in the immediate future. Therefore we need a wise, prudent, political Colombian, who does not forget the circumstances regarding the conflict. Someone who does not forget how the United Fruit Company manipulates the political and civil life of Magdalena and who does not think it indispensable to send troops for hunting workers as animals. Someone who will not be hard and inflexible with them and subordinated and honey mouthed with the company agents"   After the massacre, the workers who managed to escape emigrated to other areas of the region and new versions of the events started to become public. It was the version of the defeated. This version informed the public opinion about the concentration in the Ciénaga square and not in farms as had been informed by authorities to justify the fact of not being able to notify the exact number of deaths.   On December 10th after a convulsed weekend, the headings announced "the revolutionaries' flee in stampede to the Sierra Nevada," "government troops completely defeated the strikers "; the War Minister informs that there were more deaths during the last combats". In general, the press informed about a revolutionary movement which confronted the military forces and that the army was responding with rigor, but that there had not been any excess on their part. The banana zone was returning to normal, as well as the train service between Ciénaga and Santa Marta and the steam boat service between Ciénaga and Barranquilla. They also informed that since public order had been reestablished, businesses had already opened and that the exodus of the population had ended.   General Cortés Vargas issued a decree through which the revolutionaries of Magdalena were declared a gang of outlaws. The decree consisted of three articles and in one section, as a justification, it was stated that the rebel strikers committed all kinds of outrages: arson in public and private property, pillage, interruption of telegraphic and telephonic communications, destruction of railways, assault of citizens who did not agree with their communist and anarchist doctrine. This was the justification for decreeing martial law to give security to citizens and to re-establish public order. On the other hand the workers' leaders and accessories should be prosecuted to face their responsibilities. And to finish, the public force was authorized to use their guns.   At the same time troops were sent to avoid the surviving strikers' flee to the Sierra Nevada and the Departament of Atlántico. To accomplish this all the towns neighbouring the banana zone were alerted. Numerous detentions occurred and the prisoners were sent to Ciénaga to be judged by a Martial Court.   Wow…. Fucking bananas caused all this shit… Well obviously not than JUST bananas but holy shit man.    So the crazy thing is United Fruit company continued to operate did so long after this incident until eventually after the the suicide of Eli Black things unraveled and the company went away. Or did it? Well it did not. In fact the company is now still a huge banana company called… Chiquita! But at least all that bullshit is on the past… Oh wait wait… No it's not!    While Chiquita is not actively massacring people, in 2007, it admitted to paying $1.7 million to the United Self-Defense Forces of Columbia (A.U.C.), a far-right paramilitary group responsible for thousands of killings and some of the worst massacres in Colombia. The A.U.C. was designated by the United States as a terrorist group at the time and Chiquita was forced to pay $25 million for violating counterterrorism laws. In particular, the A.U.C. targeted labor leaders, liquidated problem employees, and removed people from lands needed for cultivation.   “They are so bad that in 2001, even the Bush administration was forced to designate them as a terrorist organization,” said Terry Collingsworth, a Labor and Human Rights Attorney. He proceeds to say that multinational corporations had automatically aligned with the A.U.C. “They've made it safe for business here. That's what they do.” Collingsworth states, from his and his associates' reporting, that Chiquita likely paid much more than $1.7 million to the A.U.C.   Over much of the 20th century, banana companies like United Fruit effectively took over governments in countries like Guatemala and Honduras, leading to the countries' model being known as “banana republics”. A banana republic would describe politically unstable countries economically dependent on bananas as a sole export and product, and it has been diversified to include other limited-resource products. The CIA would strong-arm these governments to protect the business interests of banana companies at the expense of workers and people who lived in those countries, often propping up repressive regimes. With a historic priority of keeping the costs of bananas low, banana companies were willing to do whatever it took to keep prices low, from stifling labor movements, keeping wages low, and strong-arming governments. The United Fruit Company did it then, and Chiquita Brands does it now.   In 1999, President Clinton apologized to Guatemala, saying that “support for military forces and intelligence units which engaged in violence and widespread repression was wrong, and the United States must not repeat that mistake.” Movies:   Horror movies about killer food   https://screenrant.com/funniest-horror-b-movies-murderous-food/

Poddin' Next Door
E98 - "Crazy Man"

Poddin' Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 92:24


On this episode: The ”Poddin' Next Door" crew opens with their usual opening banter and other things. Late upload…

time comedy family food discussion culture social voting japan management jre weed california fighting mexico spotify music gentrification amazon apple christmas drink shot strippers dating relationships marriage political state champs feelings netflix picking space brothers world west social media theory energy texas single hip hop testing friend stories mother donald trump ios cons fake news mental health hulu border sugar religion holidays drugs gaming workplace guns cancer emotional hobbies outdoors driver baby bros rings school bullying happy thanksgiving afghanistan thanksgiving amish exotic ai phone sauce toxic dates body tradition mexican haitian after effects disabilities girlfriends helen keller closer whites shooting scams drip pod cleveland browns palestine fishing dj screw 1985 kanye west lies bill cosby pros plastic arab bitcoin nonbinary hiv how to conspiracy theory tendencies joe biden scammers historians attention capitol ye ancestry astro followers stocks kwanzaa headphones jeff bezos nascar bless incident gamble banking alec baldwin unrest astroworld life hacks dave chappelle beans russ jargon eats mike pence fossils whataburger takeover us military nra 1987 joe rogan colorism defensive finesse boyfriends fun facts expressing 21savage shaming noobs lacking taco tuesday right to die caitlyn jenner impacts jay electronica questioning randomness podding burning bush influenza alerts winter storms rifles atf donating gangland 23andme j balvin el salvador traits phonetic homies gang culture nfts nextdoor sleepers finish line gamestop nicknames dream girl blue origin enforcements doja cat hbic couponing taco truck sideburns arranged marriages pnd debacle surroundings reconnecting wealth gap summer walker pfas coke cola homesharing misogynist jbp gun laws terrenos more words dababy child tax credit pimp c alone time panhandling onlyfans birthday gifts partynextdoor thin blue line taco stand fat pat crazy man creosote drink champs poddin ivermectin criminal psychology coronavirus shoes off fifth ward false hope covid-19 contact tracing fast 9 delta variant
The Todd Herman Show
Hour 3: Stop Saying Rittenhouse Brought a Rifle Over State Lines

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 37:01


CNN is all of a sudden launching an investigation on what happened to Kyle Rittenhouse and learned he did not bring the rifle over state lines, English adults over 60 who have been vaccinated are dying at a faster rate than non-injected, // TEXTS & WRAP // PERSONAL NOTE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Nugget Climbing Podcast
EP 96: Joe Kinder — The Love of Projecting, Leaving a Legacy, and the Other Side of Cancellation

The Nugget Climbing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 173:37


Joe Kinder is one of the hardest-working route developers in North America. We talked about his recent ascent of ‘Kinder Cakes' 5.15a in Rifle, CO,  putting up routes in mediocre rock, leaving a legacy through route development, his love of projecting, current training approach, fashion influences, creating LOV, and his experience with cancellation and rebuilding a new life.Check out Chalk Cartel:charkcartel.comUse code "NUGGET" at checkout for 20% off your next order!Support the Podcast:thenuggetclimbing.com/supportWe are supported by these amazing BIG GIVERS:Bryan Fast, Leo FranchiBecome a Patron:patreon.com/thenuggetclimbingShow Notes:  thenuggetclimbing.com/episodes/joe-kinderNuggets:6:50 – Clipping chains, Joe's goals for his trip to Rifle, and the Wicked Cave11:01 – Putting up routes in mediocre rock14:54 – The responsibility and reward of putting up routes, and leaving a legacy18:16 – Establishing vs. FAing a route, and keeping routes open vs. red-tagging22:14 – “It's a case-to-case scenario.”24:55 – Putting up hard vs. moderate routes, giving back, and being surprised by the difficulty of new lines27:33 – The emotional rollercoaster of projecting, how Joe and I met, and his love of climbing33:04 – Climbing as a drug addiction34:57 – My “addicty” behavior, and why Joe finds Jonathan Siegrist fascinating38:31 – The ebbs and flows, breaks, and comebacks43:59 – Embracing the plan B's of life44:56 – Lessons from finger injuries49:18 – The Skull Cave, and how ‘Diarrhea Mouth' got its name52:29 – ‘Kinder Cakes', proposing grades, and picking limit projects in your style58:20 – Breakdown of ‘Kinder Cakes', the send, and those special moments1:03:46 – The days after ‘Kinder Cakes', and needing to work1:06:16 – Sushi celebration1:07:25 – How ‘Kinder Cakes' stacks up against Joe's other hardest routes, and “we do what we can”1:09:05 – Joe's early climbing in New England, and the project-focused approach1:11:18 – Joe's first experience with training, and planning his year around the Rifle project1:13:39 – Getting training ideas from Eric Horst, Patxi Usobiaga, and developing his own program1:16:37 – ‘Activator', watching Cam repeat ‘Bone Tomahawk', and Joe's year leading up to ‘Kinder Cakes'1:23:47 – Purchasing strength, Joe's outdoor vs. indoor balance, and more about the ‘Goonies' project1:28:29 – The ‘Bone Tomahawk' extension project1:31:47 – How Joe trained for ‘Kinder Cakes' (month 1)1:41:31 – Training as a callus, and taking your time to build it up1:41:46 – How Joe trained for ‘Kinder Cakes' (month 2)1:44:55 – Thoughts about in-season strength maintenance1:46:37 – Keeping an open mind, dropping the ego, and lessons from the Spaniards1:50:10 – “Always try shit.”1:50:39 – Who Joe looks up to in climbing1:53:38 – The current era of pro climbing, and how pro climbing has evolved1:57:01 – Stories, podcasting, and creating balance2:00:25 – Joe's movies, LOV as a creative outlet1:04:55 – How LOV (Life of Villains) got its name, and rooting for the villains in movies2:07:25 – More about LOV (the brand), and collaborations with non-profits2:12:07 – Patron Question from Devon: How do you pick athletes for the LOV shirts, and can you make a replica of the Bruce Lee shirt that Josune is wearing in her photo?2:14:57 – Fashion influences, confidence, my bleached hair, and Joe's nicknames for me2:20:42 – Patron Question from Ben: How does Joe's experience climbing on established routes differ from FA's?2:23:02 – Patron Question from Simon: Who has Joe drawn inspiration from outside of the sport of climbing?2:25:05 – Graffiti2:28:03 – Joe's experience with cancelation2:42:09 – My thoughts about Joe and him rebuilding a new life2:47:45 – Thanks and an apology2:48:07 – Gratitude and appreciation2:50:01 – Support mode, then on to the next

Free Range American Podcast
Black Rifle Coffee Podcast: Ep 182 The Other CIA - Core Four

Free Range American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:32


The boys gather up in the Black Rifle office to kick around content ideas and discuss the intelligence agency that really knows whats going on in the country.

Gun Talk
Kyle Rittenhouse Verdict and What It Means To Self Defense; Why The Media Gets Guns Wrong; Select Information Sources Carefully: Gun Talk Radio | 11.21.21 Hour 1

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 44:35


In this hour: - What can gun owners learn from the Kyle Rittenhouse case? - Why does so much of the media get the facts wrong about guns and self defense? - How to find reliable sources of informaton Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.21.21 Hour 1

Gun Talk
How and Why To Get Into Reloading; How He Got His Mother-In-Law To Buy A Gun; Improved Accuracy Through Reloading: Gun Talk Radio | 11.21.21 Hour 2

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 42:13


In this hour: - Lou Smith of Reloading All Day and The Avid Shooter discusses some of the steps to getting started as a reloader - How one man got his mother-in-law to buy a gun for defense - A detailed explanation of one method to improve accuracy with reloading Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.21.21 Hour 2

Gun Talk
A New 10mm Pistol From Smith & Wesson; Gunsmith Magic; A Good Deed Results In Two New Guns: Gun Talk Radio | 11.21.21 Hour 3

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 43:37


In this hour: - Smith & Wesson's Corey Beaudreau talks about the new M&P 10mm M2.0 - Sometimes the answer to a gun that's not accurate is to give it to a competent gunsmith - He helped a woman sell a car, so she gave him two guns Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.21.21 Hour 3

Gun Talk
Reducing Recoil With Custom Handloads; Handloading Safety Tips; Why So Many Are Uninformed On The Rittenhouse Case: Gun Talk Radio | 11.21.21 After Show

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 37:50


In this hour: - Your favorite gun can kick less if you reload for that. - Reloading safety -- tips for beginners - Millions are completely misinformed on the Kyle Rittenhouse case.  How did that happen? Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.21.21 After Show

Joey Saladino Show
420. Black Rifle Coffee Threw Kyle Under the Bus

Joey Saladino Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 30:34


Rittenhouse Lawyer Flooded with Death Threats | Peaceful Protesters call to Burn down EVERY Police Station | FDA Says it Needs until 2076 to Release Vaccine Data Subscribe to the Podcast Here  https://apple.co/2ZAGmU1 Please Support me here https://www.patreon.com/join/JoeySalads https://joeysaladinoshow.locals.com/ This is the Joey Saladino show where Joey goes over everything in the news. This is a Republican / Conservative News Commentary show. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

long range shooting and custom rifle building podcast
Episode 85 - Evaluating a poor shooting rifle!

long range shooting and custom rifle building podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 35:37


Sometimes it is the little things that will cause you the most heartache.  Whether custom or factory, new or well broken in.  If your rifle is not shooting or suddenly stops shooting so well.  Don't panic, take a look at these common issues that can pop up at anytime and really cause shooters some serious heartburn and grief.

Retired Roaders
Our Grandson, Jack takes us on a tour of his smallbore rifle practice.

Retired Roaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 10:15


How is it that an 11-year-old boy already has six years experience in firing a smallbore rifle. Come along with us on this edition of the RRs podcast and get all the details. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/retired-roaders/message

Free Range American Podcast
Black Rifle Coffee Podcast: Ep 181 Clay Hutmacher - Special Operations Warrior Foundation Part 1

Free Range American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 58:56


Evan Hafer welcomes Retired Major General Clay Hutmacher to Black Rifle Coffee Podcast. Clay is the President and CEO of the Special Operations Warrior Foundation providing financial assistance to severely injured service members and provide education to families of fallen Special Operations personnel.

Boiler Room
The Art of Common Sense & Self Defense

Boiler Room

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 113:22


Alternate Current Radio Presents: BOILER ROOM - The Social Rejects Club, headed up by HESHER and SPORE, put another meeting of the braintrust into the pod-streams on the interwebz for your consideration! We're joined by ODDMAN OUT, INFIDEL PHARAOH & RUCKUS on this November 18th, 2021 edition of the show to discuss how rotten the mass media cartel is, how the culture wars wage on while the stupidity of the masses turns the other cheek, the further unfurling of the pandemic industrial complex, the ramifications of the Rittenhouse case as a decision is held up through a third day of deliberations and what big stories could be being obfuscated by this highly politicized clown-show of a trail.

Aggie Radio Sports
The Statesman Sports Desk — preview of senior night against Wyoming

Aggie Radio Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 52:38


The Aggies prepare to take on the Wyoming Cowboys in the Battle for Bridger's Rifle on Utah State's senior night. The volleyball team is having an historic year and the basketball team prepares to tip off in the Myrtle Beach Invitational against UPenn. 

long range shooting and custom rifle building podcast
Episode 84 - Part 7 Custom Rifle Building Series - The little things!

long range shooting and custom rifle building podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 55:49


In episode 84, we continue into our custom rifle building series with part 7 and the little things that matter!  When you are finishing your rifle it is usually the small and often overlooked details that create the biggest headaches.  Here is a list of things that you should pay close attention too and check during your final assembly to finish your rifle in a way that allows it and you to shoot your fullest potentials.

The Late Night Vision Show
Ep. 185 - N-Vision Halo XRF Thermal Rifle Scope Review

The Late Night Vision Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 46:57


This week Jason and Hans release one of the most important reviews for 2021. One of the most anticipated reviews for literally the top thermal scope available in the US hunting market; the N-Vision Halo XRF. This scope needs very little description here, it speaks for itself, as does our review. This is a very serious scope for very serious hunters. If you're looking for the best of the best, this review is for you, don't miss it, this scope is unlike any other to ever be created and we don't even believe there's a contest. If you're looking to buy thermal optics or night vision and need pre-purchase advice, check out https://outdoorlegacygear.com or give Jason & Hans a call at (877)350-1818

ThePrint
ThePrintPod: Is Assam Rifles stretched with its dual role? Manipur ambush raises key questions

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 5:47


During my two tenures in Manipur, we ensured that the troops coordinated their move with school timing. Militants never attack convoys in those hours.----more---- Read the full article here : https://theprint.in/opinion/is-assam-rifles-stretched-with-its-dual-role-manipur-ambush-raises-key-questions/767107/

the Joshua Schall Audio Experience
Black Rifle Coffee Company SPAC Merger (IPO) Breakdown

the Joshua Schall Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 20:32


As the premium coffee market built by Starbucks matures, consumers are craving “a fresh set of brands.” To stand out, these coffee brands aren't attempting to take on the coffee giant directly, instead they're carving out unique niches to speak to certain demographics or geographies. With extremely strong founder market fit, Black Rifle Coffee Company looks to be in the early years of a long-term growth story. Black Rifle Coffee Company is veteran led and veteran controlled, with approximately 50% of its employees also being veterans or veteran's spouses. The mission of Black Rifle Coffee Company is to have a massive, positive impact in the veteran community and premium coffee and content will be that conduit to making it happen. This is the founding team's passion, and every decision is aligned to the mission. You can see how successful the coffee brand has been by looking at the top three reasons customers purchase Black Rifle Coffee Company products; (1) the company support for the military and veterans (2) has great tasting coffee (3) brand alignment with their values. Black Rifle Coffee Company has an exciting and growing brand, an early RTD coffee business with lots of wholesale growth runway, and an exciting experiential retail Outpost model. Glue all of that together with a fully aligned purpose-driven business strategy and a leadership team that has a relentless dedication to execution and it's hard to imagine anything less than positive results long-term to happen at BRCC. FOLLOW ME ON MY SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS LINKEDIN - https://www.linkedin.com/in/joshuaschallmba TWITTER - https://www.twitter.com/joshua_schall INSTAGRAM - https://www.instagram.com/joshua_schall FACEBOOK - https://www.facebook.com/jschallconsulting MEDIUM - https://www.medium.com/@joshuaschall

Drew Berquist Live
Rittenhouse Prosecutor Goes Full Alec Baldwin, Aims Rifle At Jury With Finger on Trigger | Ep 290

Drew Berquist Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 23:08


As closing arguments were made in the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, DA Thomas Binger made himself look even more foolish by pointing an AR-15 at the jury without ensuring it was empty and with his finger on the trigger. Plus, Jen Psaki tried to spin the White House and Biden's commentary on Rittenhouse, saying they can't comment on an ongoing case...but they have and did again. Finally, Dr. Fauci again is confused by the concept of freedom and says individuals need to get over individual rights for the greater good. Get Your Complete Concealed Carry & Family Defense Guide for Free at https://USCCA.com/DREW LIKE & SUBSCRIBE for new videos every day. **Donate directly to Drew and the show and be mentioned as a producer**: https://www.drewberquist.com/support/ Partner Links: Want hard-hitting conservative content? Visit our friends at https://RedVoiceMedia.com Show Sponsors and Fan Discounts: My Pillow - Get the best night's sleep of your life and save! Use Promo Code DREW to save up to 66% off your purchase at https://MyPillow.com The Root Brands-Get rid of heavy metals and toxins in your body! Purchase Clean Slate and other Root Brands products here: https://therootbrands.com/product/trinity-pack/drewberquist Mammoth Nation - Become a member and save at https://mammothnation.com/ UFM Underwear -Visit https://ufmunderwear.com/ and Use Promo Code DREW to receive $6 off! Red Beach Nation - Whether you live at the beach, are traveling to one or just want to imagine yourself there…Red Beach's comfy patriotic apparel is sure to lift your spirits. Use promo code DREW and save 10% at https://RedBeachNation.com

Vortex Nation Podcast
#10MinuteTalk - Firearm Surface Rust Removal

Vortex Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 12:29


It's time to knock the rust off. The elements can be rough on rifles, resulting in surface rust on Ol' Betsy. Vortex's own Ryan Muckenhirn gives us his tips to help get your rifle back into shape.As always, we want to hear your feedback! Let us know if there are any topics you'd like covered on the Vortex Nation™ podcast by asking us on Instagram @vortexnationpodcast

Poddin' Next Door
E97 - "24andMe"

Poddin' Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 99:48


On this episode: The ”Poddin' Next Door" crew opens with their usual opening banter, Dave doing country things, Taylor & Jake, 23andMe custom drugs, NASCAR update, Browns being White, Kyle case update, NRA hate, and Rapid Fire with Dave Listen on most Digital Streaming Platforms. Apple, Amazon, Spotify, Google…… Follow + Subscribe: Instagram - @poddinnextdoor YouTube - Poddin' Next Door

time comedy family food discussion culture social voting japan management jre weed california fighting mexico spotify music gentrification amazon apple christmas drink shot strippers dating relationships marriage political state champs feelings netflix picking space brothers world west social media theory energy texas single hip hop testing friend stories mother donald trump ios cons fake news mental health hulu border sugar religion holidays drugs gaming workplace guns cancer emotional hobbies outdoors driver baby bros rings school bullying afghanistan thanksgiving amish exotic ai phone sauce toxic dates body tradition mexican haitian after effects disabilities girlfriends helen keller closer whites shooting scams drip pod cleveland browns palestine fishing dj screw 1985 kanye west lies bill cosby pros plastic arab bitcoin nonbinary hiv how to conspiracy theory tendencies joe biden scammers historians attention capitol ye ancestry astro followers stocks kwanzaa headphones jeff bezos nascar incident gamble banking alec baldwin unrest astroworld life hacks dave chappelle beans russ jargon eats mike pence fossils whataburger takeover us military nra 1987 joe rogan colorism defensive finesse boyfriends fun facts expressing 21savage shaming noobs lacking taco tuesday right to die caitlyn jenner impacts jay electronica questioning randomness podding burning bush influenza alerts winter storms rifles atf donating gangland 23andme j balvin el salvador traits phonetic homies gang culture rapid fire nfts nextdoor sleepers finish line gamestop nicknames dream girl blue origin enforcements doja cat hbic couponing taco truck sideburns arranged marriages pnd debacle surroundings reconnecting wealth gap summer walker pfas coke cola homesharing misogynist jbp gun laws terrenos more words dababy child tax credit pimp c alone time panhandling onlyfans birthday gifts partynextdoor thin blue line taco stand fat pat creosote drink champs poddin ivermectin criminal psychology coronavirus shoes off fifth ward false hope covid-19 contact tracing fast 9 delta variant
Timcast IRL
Timcast IRL #408 - Rittenhouse Prosecutor AIMS RIFLE AT JURY, Finger ON Trigger w/ Drew Hernandez

Timcast IRL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 133:57


Tim, Ian, Luke and Lydia host friend, investigative journalist, political commentator and recent Rittenhouse witness Drew Hernandez to scrutinize the recent breaking news out of the trial, including the prosecutor aiming the gun in the direction of other people, how no one was actually afraid of Kyle, at least at the trial, how the trial is about all of our rights to self defense, and a summary of the crimes the attacker committed before Kyle dispatched him. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Highlights from Moncrieff
Are we witnessing the decline of the National Rifle Association in America? 

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 8:49


Tim Mak, Journalist with NPR and author of ‘Misfire: Inside the Downfall of the NRA'  joined Sean on the show to discuss the National Rifle Association... Listen and subscribe to Moncrieff on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or Spotify.    Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.     You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.

The Hunt Backcountry Podcast
MM 119 | Q&A on Rifles, Suppressors, and Related Topics

The Hunt Backcountry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 35:36


Mark answers a bunch of listener questions that have come in on rifles, cartridges, suppressors, and related topics. Topics include: rifle shooting positions, scope selection and comparisons, why he changed from the 30-06, why he built a 7 SAUM, what suppressor length is best, and much more. Resources mentioned in this episode: - Shooting Position Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DV4Z-R7NNXs - Mark's 6.5 Creedmoor: https://exomtngear.com/blogs/article/creedmoor-vs-prc - Mark's Tikka Build: https://exomtngear.com/blogs/article/diy-custom-tikka-rifle, https://exomtngear.com/blogs/article/suppressed-tikka-update - What to know about suppressors for hunting: https://exomtngear.com/blogs/article/hunting-with-a-suppressor-lessons-learned Share your question for the show: podcast@exomtngear.com View & Search the Podcast Archive: https://exomtngear.com/podcast

That Shakespeare Life
Ep 187: The Arquebus Rifle with Jonathan Ferguson

That Shakespeare Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 53:33


In 1593, Shakespeare wrote Venus and Adonis the play in which he writes “like the deadly bullet of a gun, His meaning struck her ere his words begun.” As our guest this week explains, “This is likely a reference to the phenomenon of a supersonic bullet hitting the target before the gunshot is heard. The Henrician arquebuses housed at the Royal Armouries in England, some dating from Shakespeare's lifetime, were capable of 400 metres per second or more, which is supersonic. The big heavy muskets of his era and many artillery pieces were also supersonic. 'Bullet' was used for any gun projectile at the time, so Shakespeare could actually have been talking about firearms or artillery (or both) here.” Shakespeare references either the word gun or musket a total of 7 times in his works. Like so many things during this Renaissance period of history, the technology of firearms and rifles was growing and evolving rapidly in terms of their construction, accuracy, firing mechanisms, and even which countries adopted the manufacturing of these weapons. Several surviving examples of these guns from 15-17th century Germany, France, and England are held at the Royal Armories Collections and their Keeper of Firearms and Artillery, Jonathan Ferguson, is here today to talk with us about the differences between matchlock, flintlock, rifles, and muskets, and to explore exactly what kind of weapons Shakespeare would have known about when he mentions guns, bullets, and muskets in his plays. 

Free Range American Podcast
Black Rifle Coffee Podcast: Ep 180 Mark D‘ambrosio - Discipline, Toughness, Gear Show and Tell

Free Range American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 92:43


Evan Hafer welcomes former Marine Scout Sniper Mark D'Ambrosio back to the BRCC Podcast. The two discuss mental toughness and all things long-range shooting, from deciding on a caliber and platform to leveling scopes, ideal zeroing distances, and how to read and call wind on a hunt.  Mark was a participant of season 7 of History Channel's hit show, ALONE. Mark battled the Arctic environment by himself for 44 days with only 10 items. Mark is currently an instructor at International Mountain Survival. www.intsurvival.com  

Gun Talk
Downfall of the NRA; Is A Sawed-Off Shotgun Legal?; Why Have Iron Sights On A Rifle?: Gun Talk Radio | 11.14.21 Hour 1

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 43:43


In this hour: - Investigative journalist Tim Mak discusses his latest release, MISFIRE: Inside the Downfall of the NRA - A listener inherited a sawed-off shotgun.  Is it legal? - Is there any value to having iron sights on a hunting rifle? Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.14.21 Hour 1

Gun Talk
New Springfield SA-35 Pistol; Ruger Services A 50-Year Old Revolver; Is It Safe To Shoot Magnum Loads In This Revolver?: Gun Talk Radio | 11.14.21 Hour 2

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 43:42


In this hour: - Springfield Armory's Rob Leatham talks about the new Springfield SA-35, and then Tom brings in a surprise guest for Rob - Ruger surprises the owner of a 50-year old rifle with a bill for the repair. - Is it safe to shoot magnum loads in a lightweight revolver?  Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.14.21 Hour 2

Gun Talk
Steel Target Safety; Discontinued Guns And Ammo; Kyle Rittenhouse Self Defense Case: Gun Talk Radio | 11.14.21 Hour 3

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 43:36


In this hour: - MGM Targets' Travis Gibson runs through the ins and outs of shooting steel targets - Why do companies stop making certain guns and ammunition? - The Kyle Rittenhouse self-defense case Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.14.21 Hour 3

Gun Talk
Can A Convicted Felon Use A Gun For Protection?; The Rising Cost Of Ammunition; Home Gun Building Mistakes: Gun Talk Radio | 11.14.21 After Show

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 36:29


In this hour: - Can a convicted felon pick up a gun to use for self defense? - Ammo prices soar. Is there an end in sight? - The mistakes made when building your own gun Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.14.21 After Show

Free Talk Live
Free Talk Live 2021-11-11

Free Talk Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 122:26


Kyle Rittenhouse Takes the Stand :: Bitcoin Exchanges :: Supreme Court Refuses to Hear Right to Record Police Case :: Chris Cantwell Calls In :: Qualified Immunity :: Rittenhouse Dragged by Rifle by Assailant? :: More Supreme Court Backing Violent Cops :: Chalking Conspiracy :: Show: 2021-11-11 Ian, Joa, Matt

Free Range American Podcast
Black Rifle Coffee Podcast: Episode 179 Attorney Tim Parlatore - The Stuart Scheller Case

Free Range American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 55:37


Tim Parlatore, Navy veteran and founder of cloud-based law firm Parlatore Law Group, joins Jarred Taylor for a second episode. This time, the two discuss Marine Lt. Col Stuart Scheller's case and the extreme lack of accountability with upper brass in the US military.

Free Range American Podcast
Black Rifle Coffee Podcast: Episode 178 Commander Scott Snow - Navy Fighter Pilot

Free Range American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 45:07


Jarred Taylor is joined by Commander Scott Snow, a twenty-one-year veteran of the U.S. Navy as a Naval Aviator. The two compare fighter jet models, discuss dogfight tactics, the nerve-racking process of landing on a naval carrier, and highlight CDR Snow's career leading 32 F-14D aircrew in Combat operations during Operation Iraqi Freedom. CDR Snow is now the founder and president of MCS Universal, a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB).   Follow the show on Instagram and Twitter: IG: @blackriflecoffeepodcast Twitter: @brccpodcast #podcast #blackriflecoffee #jarredtaylor

Gun Talk
Victory in Virginia; Tom Gets His Deer - With a Click-Bang: 10mm Bear Loads: Gun Talk Radio | 11.07.21 Hour 1

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 43:42


In this hour: - VCDL's Philip Van Cleave discusses this week's election in Virginia of a new Governor, Lt. Governor, and Attorney General, all which flipped from Democrats to Republicans - It's hard to shoot a deer with an empty gun, but that's what Tom tried to do. - What loads to use in a 10mm Glock for bear protection? Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 11.07.21 Hour 1

Free Range American Podcast
Black Rifle Coffee Podcast: Episode 177 Logan‘s Dojo - Hosts Only

Free Range American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 63:28


Welcome to Logan Stark's Dojo. AKA: Logan's garage. Evan Hafer and Jarred Taylor join Logan to discuss important topics such as the perfect 80s movie, Evan's in-depth knowledge of the Grammys and other award shows, Tactisquach, NASCAR, and Jarred's next caffeine fueled food product.