Podcasts about acl injuries

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 64PODCASTS
  • 83EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 1MONTHLY NEW EPISODE
  • Jul 28, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about acl injuries

Latest podcast episodes about acl injuries

The Soccer Queens Podcast
Episode 49: The Brain's Role in ACL Injuries

The Soccer Queens Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 46:32


In this episode, Sport Scientist, Jason Avedesian,  discusses an ignored factor in ACL injury: the brain. We discuss spatial awareness and reactivity research and executing in a practical setting to make girls more resilient. Jason is on the cutting edge of neural research in teenage athletes, so you don't want to miss this! Follow Jason on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JasonAvedesian Get the Total Youth Soccer Fitness BOOK: https://ericasuter.com/total-youth-soccer-fitness/

Rugby League Guru Podcast
24 Hours: ACL Injuries, Ofa's Comments and Eels New Target

Rugby League Guru Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2021 7:08


All the news from the last 24 hours! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The E3Rehab Podcast
40. ACL Injuries & Rehab in Professional Women's Sports w/ Dr. Nicole Surdyka

The E3Rehab Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 49:09


In this episode, we sat down with Dr. Nicole Surdyka to discuss ACL injuries & rehab in professional women's sports. Topics included: - Gendered environmental approach to ACL injury risk - Positively changing the landscape for these athletes and advice for coaches/clinicians - Viewing rehab after an ACL injury as an opportunity for introduction/exposure to S&C - Differences in rehab at the professional level - Advice for students and clinicians who want to work in professional sport - And much more!   More about Nicole: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.nicolept  Twitter: https://twitter.com/NSurdykaPhysio  Website: https://www.nicolesurdykaphysio.com/    More about us: Website: https://e3rehab.com/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/e3rehab/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/E3Rehab    This episode was produced by Matt Hunter.

The Trainer Feed
Episode 49 : Creatine supplementation + Fixing forward lean in squats + ACL injuries

The Trainer Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 72:07


The guys take another stab at analyzing the studies found in the supplementation of creatine, addressing the excessive forward lean in squats + the likely tendencies for ACL injuries --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

State Champs! Network
Health & Wellness with the DMC | Ready, Set, Cheer Podcast

State Champs! Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2021 23:03


On this episode of Ready, Set, Cheer, we've got a double dose of DMC. We kick off the podcast with an interview from the Hangtime Michigan podcast. Lorne Plant sat down with Dr. Manuel Schubert of the DMC to talk about ACL Injuries and how to prevent them. Then Dr. Steven Zavinsky sat down with Genna Rose and Antonette Phelps to talk about what athletes, coaches, and parents need to know about preventing foot injuries and how to treat them when you get them. Presented by Lawrence Technological University and sponsored by the MHSAA, DAC Athlete of the Year Award, and the DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan.

State Champs! Network
BONUS: ACL Injuries & Prevention | Hangtime Michigan

State Champs! Network

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2021 9:16


On this Special Edition of Hangtime Michigan, Lorne Plant is joined by Dr. Manuel Schubert of the DMC for a special edition of Hangtime Michigan to talk about ACL injuries and how to prevent them. Presented by the Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
524: Dr. Amy Arundale: How to Decrease Risk of ACL Injuries

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2021 43:29


Episode Summary In this episode physical therapist, biomechanist, and researcher,Dr. Amy Arundale talks about how to decrease the risk of ACL injury.  Amelia (Amy) Arundale, PT, PhD, DPT, SCS is a physical therapist and researcher.  Amy is transitioning to a new role as a physical therapist at Red Bull’s Athlete Performance Center in Thalgua, Austria. Today, Amy tells us about injury-prevention programs, communicating with different stakeholders, and helping empower athletes through education. We also get to hear about her recent publication on Basketball, Sports medicine, and rehabilitation. How does motor-learning, creative thinking, and problem-solving relate to ACL injuries? Amy tells us about implementation and compliance with injury-prevention programs, internal versus external cues as they relate to injury prevention, and the gaps in the research, all on today’s episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “We’ve got great information. We know these programs can work, but for them to work, you have to do them.” “You may be a physio, and you may have this injury-prevention knowledge, but you don’t have to be there for this to happen. It’s just as effective for you to run this program as it is for a coach or a parent to run it.” “It’s exciting to see where this next generation is going to be because I think we’re going to have some athletes that are more empowered to know more about their body.” “We need to be better at reporting our biases, looking at our subject populations, and funding and encouraging studies outside of ‘the global North.’” Giving yourself the space and kindness to recognise that you don’t know everything and make it a point to learn more is good therapy.   More about Amy:  Amelia (Amy) Arundale, PT, PhD, DPT, SCS is a physical therapist and researcher. Originally from Fairbanks, Alaska, she received her Bachelor’s Degree with honors from Haverford College. Gaining both soccer playing and coaching experience throughout college, she spent a year as the William Penn Fellow and Head of Women’s Football (soccer) at the Chigwell School, in London. Amy completed her DPT at Duke University and throughout gained experience working at multiple soccer clubs in the US and Norway. Amy applied this experience working at Balance Physical Therapy providing physical therapy for the Capitol Area Soccer Club (now North Carolina F.C. Youth) and the U23 Carolina Railhawks. In 2013, Amy moved to Newark, Delaware to pursue a PhD under Dr. Lynn Snyder-Mackler. Amy’s dissertation examined primary and secondary ACL injury prevention as well as career length and return to performance in soccer players. After a short post-doc in Linköping, Sweden in 2017, Amy joined the Brooklyn Nets as a physical therapist and biomechanist as well as The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Health System as a visiting scientist. Currently, Amy is transitioning to a new role as a physical therapist at Red Bull’s Athlete Performance Center in Thalgua, Austria. Outside of work, Amy plays Australian Rules Football for both the New York Magpies and US National Team.  Amy has also been involved in the APTA and AASPT, including serving as Director of the APTA’s Student Assembly, a member of the APTA’s Leadership Development Committee, chair of the AASPT’s Membership Committee, and currently as a member of the AASPT Diversity and Inclusion Committee.   Suggested Keywords ACL, Injuries, Recovery, Injury-Prevention, Learning, Sports, Physiotherapy, Research, PT, Rehabilitation, Health, Therapy,   Recommended reading https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/54/21/1245     To learn more, follow Amy at: Instagram:       @squeakyedgar LinkedIn:         Amelia (Amy) Arudale Twitter:            @soccerPT11   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:  https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:      https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:    Speaker 1 (00:07): Welcome to the healthy, wealthy, and smart podcast. Each week we interview the best and brightest in physical therapy, wellness, and entrepreneurship. We give you cutting edge information. You need to live your best life. Healthy, wealthy, and smart. The information in this podcast is for entertainment purposes only and should not be used as personalized medical advice. And now here's your host, Dr. Karen Litzy. Speaker 2 (00:38): Hey everybody. Welcome back to the podcast. I am your host. Karen Lindsay, and today's episode is brought to you by net health net health therapy for private practices, a cloud-based all in one EMR solution for managing your practice. That's right. One piece of software that handles all of your scheduling documentation, billing and reporting needs. Plus a lot more in one super easy to use package. Right now, Neta health is offering a special deal for healthy, wealthy, and smart listeners. Complete a demo with the net health team and get $100 towards lunch for your staff. Visit net health.com/ [inaudible] to get started and get access to free resources for PTs like eBooks on demand, webinars, and business tools. Once again, that's net health.com/l I T Z Y my last name very, very easy now onto today's episode. So what we're doing with the podcast this month, and really every month going forward is we're going to have several guests that are all going to talk about one topic in various forums. Speaker 2 (01:40): This month, our topic is ACL injury and rehabilitation. And my first guest is not only an incredible physical therapist, a great researcher, but also a great friend of mine. That is Dr. Amelia, Aaron Dale, or Amy Arundale. So Amy is a physical therapist and researcher originally from Fairbanks, Alaska. She received her bachelor's degree with honors, from Haverford college, gaining both soccer, playing and coaching experience throughout college. She spent a year as the William Penn fellow and head of women's football at the Chigwell school in London. Amy completed her DPT at Duke university and throughout gained experience working at multiple soccer clubs in the U S and Norway. Amy applied this experience working at balanced physical therapy, providing physical therapy for the capital area soccer club. Now North Carolina FC youth, and the U 23 Carolina rail Hawks. In 2013, Amy moved to Newark Delaware to pursue a PhD under Dr. Speaker 2 (02:40): Lynn Snyder, Mackler Amy's dissertation examined primary and secondary ACL injury prevention, as well as career link and returned to performance in soccer players. After a short postdoc in Linkoping Sweden in 2017, Amy joined the Brooklyn nets as a physical therapist, the biomechanics as, as the Icahn school of medicine at Mount Sinai health system, as a visiting scientist, currently, Amy is transitioning to a new role as a physical therapist at red bull's athletic performance center in Austria, outside of work, Amy plays Australian rules football for both the New York magpies and us national team. She has also been involved in the AP TA in the AA S P T, which is the American Academy of sports physical therapy, including serving as director of AP TA student assembly, a member of the AP TA's leadership development committee, chair of the AASP membership committee, and currently as a member of the AASP T diversity and inclusion committee. Speaker 2 (03:37): So what do we talk about today? All about ACL's right. So we talk about injury prevention and risk mitigation programs, how they work, what the pros and cons are how collaboration is so necessary amongst all stakeholders and why exciting new research that includes motor learning principles, creative thinking, and problem solving, and are there gaps in the literature and what can we, as clinicians and as researchers do about those gaps in the research. Now, the other thing Amy has so generously done for our listeners is she is going to give away one copy of basketball, sports medicine in science. This is a book that she was involved in as an editor, and it is over 1000 pages. The book is massive, it's huge. And she's going to give a copy away to one lucky listener. So how do you win that copy? All you have to do is go to my Instagram page. My handle is at Karen Lindsey, and you will find out how to win a copy of basketball, sports, medicine, and science. Again, that's go to my Instagram page at Karen Lindsey, and we will give this book away to one lucky listener at the end of the month of February. So you have the whole month to sign up for this. So a huge thanks to Amy and everyone enjoyed today's episode. Speaker 3 (05:04): Hey, everybody, welcome back to the podcast. So this month we're going to be examining ACL injuries and ACL rehab. And my first guest this month to help take us through the ACL Mays is Dr. Amy Arundale. So Amy, welcome to the podcast. Thank you so much. We're starting up at the beginning of the year with the A's with it. I didn't even think about that. Yes. But then next month we go right to running and just skip everything else in between. That's fine. Excellent. So Amy, before we get into sort of the meat of the episode, what I would love for you to do is tell the listeners a little bit more about some of your more current research projects, things like that. So I will hand it over to you. Sure. So I'm just finishing Speaker 4 (05:58): Up as a physical therapist and biomechanics at the Brooklyn nets. So I've been working clinically with them and then doing a little bit of kind of in-house research as well. And then on the side have been working on a few different projects. The biggest one right now is starting the revisions for the knee and ACL injury prevention me Andrew prevention, clinical practice guidelines. So those were originally published in [inaudible] in 2018 and clinical practice guidelines get revised every three years. So 2021 we're due for we're due for a revision. So that's my, the biggest project I've got going right now. And a few other things working with the United States Australian rules, football league on some injury surveillance and injury prevention, particularly on the women's side. And I'm getting ready to move to Austria to begin working for red bull and I, which I'm really excited about that. Speaker 3 (07:04): Amazing, amazing. They all sound really like really great projects. And since you brought up injury prevention, let's dive into that first. So there are a lot of injury prevention programs. So can you talk a little bit about those programs in general, and then talk about really, what is what's really key for injury prevention in our athletes when it comes to those programs? Speaker 4 (07:34): Absolutely. So there's a range of different programs that have all been published on and some of them are probably a little better known than others. The FIFA 11 plus, or what's now known as just the 11 plus maybe the, one of the most notable it actually came out of a program that was called the pep program. So the 11 plus was kind of aimed at soccer players, although it has been tested in other athletes and it's considered, it's kind of a dynamic warmup. So it has some dynamic stretching and some running, some strengthening, neuromuscular control, some balance exercises within it. And most of the programs that we see that have been researched are similar kind of dynamic warmups and include a variety of different things that help athletes kind of get warmed up. So some of the other ones that have been published on include the control or knee control program coming out of Sweden at the microburst and the ACL prevention in Norwegian handball has had some great success and great literature. Speaker 4 (08:47): There's the harmony program and then the sports metrics programs a little bit different. It's actually a program that was designed to be kind of a in and of itself. So it's a three times a week, 90 minute per program, primarily plyometric based. So it's a little bit different from the other programs, but has also been successful. So we've got a number of these programs that we've seen to reduce knee and ACL injuries in particular. And most of them actually have been quite successful at reducing just injuries as a whole. But the key components that we see in particular being important for ACL and knee injuries are that these programs have a strength component. So they're building strength, particularly in the hips, the quads, the hamstrings, but also in the core. So it kind of proximal in like terms of like hip and core strengthening, being important plyometric component seems to be important. To some extent a balance component may be important, although that's kind of questionable as to like how important that is. And that's one of the things that we still need more literature on is how do these components interact and influence each other? Because we seem to know what we think is important, but how much and how those different components interact. We still don't know as much about. Speaker 3 (10:25): And when we're talking about these programs, I would imagine some of the most difficult aspects of them, especially if we're looking at a younger population. So your high school, even collegiate athletes is doing them. Yup. So can you talk a little bit about implementation and compliance with these programs and how to instill that into these players and teams? Speaker 4 (10:57): Yeah, I think, you know, we've got, like you said, we've got great information. We know these programs can work, but for them to work, you have to do them. And that implementation piece, you know, whether that be in clinical research you know, we talk about that gap between research and clinical practice. We really see that here in ACL injury prevention. And part of that also is it's not just physios in implementing where we've got a whole range of stakeholders, whether those be the athletes themselves, to coaches who are often running training sessions to parents who really have to kind of be bought in to teams and clubs as a whole. Because if you have a culture that kind of instills the importance of doing a prevention program, then it's going to kind of, it may benefit in kind of trickling down. And that's also a wider culture as well. Speaker 4 (11:58): Social media scene pro teams do it. There's all sorts of layers to this. But what I think implementation really takes is identifying with that athlete or that team what's what are barriers what's important? What do we feel is, is most important? What's not as an important, and then coming up together kind of, kind of with a collaborative strategy to overcome what are those barriers? So we know information and knowledge kind of that buy-in is important. Why the why, why are we doing this in the first place? But then there's also some of the actual practical pieces of your athlete might not want to do an exercise lying down in the grass because that grass might be wet. They're going to be wet for the rest of their training session, wet and cold for the rest of their training session. So I think it has to be a really collaborative effort. Speaker 4 (12:59): And each in each situation that solution may look a little bit different. We've got some really kind of interesting information coming out. For example, the 11 plus has now a couple of studies on breaking it apart. So taking some of the pieces, for example, taking the strengthening pieces and putting them at the end of training sessions. So coaches often complained that, you know, these injury prevention programs take too long and when you've only got the field for an hour, they don't want to give up 20 minutes of their training session to do this program. So now let's take, maybe we can take this strength piece out. I means, all right. So maybe it's 10 minutes warming up at the beginning. That's probably a little easier for a coach to swallow. Then as we're cooling down, maybe we're off the pitch where we get everybody together, we finished those strengthening components. So we're still getting the entire prevention program done with that training session, but it's split up. And so thinking creatively like that are some of the ways that I think we can do a lot better in our implementation, rather than just saying, do this, here you go. Why aren't and then coming back and saying, well, why aren't you doing it? Speaker 3 (14:18): Right, right. Oh, that's, that is really interesting that and what is, does the research show that splitting it up is still as effective? Speaker 4 (14:28): Yeah. From what we know thus far, it does seem to be as effective. I think there's some other projects that are starting to look at, can you actually do that strengthening piece at home now there's other pieces that, you know, compliance at home, remembering doing those exercises the right way that could come into play there. But as of right now, what it seems like splitting it up does seem, seem to be splitting it up. At least within a training session does seem to be as effective. Speaker 3 (14:58): Excellent. And so aside from time and constraints on like you said, wet grass, things like that, what are some other common barriers that you have seen or that the research has shown to be a barrier to doing any of these? The above mentioned prevention programs. Speaker 4 (15:21): Yeah. I think coaching education is a really big one. So whether there's a few studies in Germany that we're just looking at a coach's awareness of the 11 plus and for a program that's kind of sponsored by FIFA, you know, it's promoted as kind of this soccer warmup, you would think that coaches would be kind of aware of it. And it's, it's very quite, it's actually quite surprising how few coaches are, are aware of it. Part of that is it's not in their coaching education. So at least in soccer, as coaches move up, what kind of within the ranks and, and in higher level teams, they've got a complete licenses, just like you have to complete a license to be a physio and complete continuing education in soccer coaches do to getting that program into that coaching education, I think is a really important piece. Speaker 4 (16:18): But then there's also the piece of helping them understand, again, coming back to that, why, you know, yeah, you want your players to be available. You don't want your players injured. And that's not just a, an immediate fact, but helping them understand the long-term implications, especially of something like an ACL injury, this is not an injury. That's just going to mean you don't have this athlete for a year. This is something that's going to affect how they play long-term it's gonna affect their knee long-term it could affect their career. So this has long-term implications. Buy-In also can come from kind of some of the performance effects, the stronger, faster, more talented athlete that's that there are some of those performance effects coming potentially from performing some of these injury prevention programs or injury prevention or injury risk medic mitigation programs that can help buy in. Speaker 4 (17:22): And then if we just look at Google would cut straight to the chase, is coaches want to win oftentimes and money. If you've got more players available, we know more players available equals a more successful team. And even Holly silver is actually in some of her dissertation work looked straight at the more you do the 11 plus the more successful the NCAA division one men's team was. So there's, there's she, she actually was able to draw a connection between doing the FIFA 11 plus and winning that those are the types of things that oftentimes coaches will latch onto and say, yeah, I want to win. Or clubs will say, yeah, we want to win. We want to do that thing that makes us that, that next level that makes us better at the higher levels that keeps us earning money. Speaker 3 (18:18): Okay. Exactly. So from, from what it sounds like is to get these programs implemented is you need a lot of collaboration from everyone, from all the stakeholders, whether it be the coaches, the trainers, the physios, the players, the owners, when we're talking about big league teams and, and with our younger, our younger subset of athletes, parents, coaches, and the kids themselves. And, and I guess communicating the value of these programs depends on who you're talking to, which is why, if you're the physio communicating the program, you really have to have a different set of communication bullet points, if you will, if you will, for each person on the, within that team, because you're going to talk differently to a parent than you are to an owner of a team, or you're going to talk differently to a coach than the player or the parents. So really knowing how to, how to talk to those stakeholders is key. And I think everything you just said will kind of help people understand how to have those different conversations with different people. Speaker 4 (19:26): Yeah. And I think there's all the other piece that some of those conversations is really empowering them. So there's the education piece and helping them understand, but there's also the empowerment piece that you may be a physio and you may have this injury prevention knowledge, but you don't have to be there for this to happen. It's just as effective for you to run this program as it is for a coach or a parent to run it. And we have, there's some good data on that that coaches can run really effective injury prevention programs. And so helping them kind of take on that role and say, yeah, no, I, I feel confident in taking my players through this. I feel confident in knowing why we're doing this there. I think that's the second piece too, is that it kind of empowerment piece, and maybe it's a player, maybe it's a captain that, that needs that education or that kind of empowerment as well. Speaker 4 (20:31): I think the generation of players that's growing up now is going to be very different from the generation of players say that you and I played played with we didn't understand or really have much of this. Whereas I think there's some really, there's some kids growing up now who are growing up with some amazing knowledge. And I think also coming with it, hopefully some better strength, some more and more neuromuscular control than maybe we had coming through puberty as well. So I think it's exciting to kind of see where this next generation is going to be, because I think we're going to have some athletes that are just like that more empowered to know more about their body. Maybe have a little bit more control maybe even coming with also potentially better talent who knows, who knows? Yeah. TBD to be determined. So you mentioned a little bit about motor learning. So let's dive into that a little bit because there is new research that includes motor learning, problem solving creative thinking. So what exactly does that mean in relationship to ACL injury? Speaker 2 (21:51): No, we're going to take a quick break to hear from our sponsor and we will be right back net health therapy for private practice as a cloud-based all in one EMR solution for managing your practice. That's right. One piece of software that handles all of your scheduling documentation, billing and reporting needs. Plus lots more and one super easy to use package right now, net health is offering a special deal for healthy, wealthy, and smart listeners completed demo with the net health team and get a hundred dollars towards lunch for your staff visit net health.com/lindsey to get started and get access to free resources for PTs like eBooks on demand, webinars, and business tools. Once again, that's net health.com/l I T Z Y. Speaker 4 (22:38): Yeah. So I think it's a really exciting area. And I think we're really just kind of tipping a little bit of the iceberg. People are starting to pay attention to some of the work that's coming out. And I think it's, it is really exciting and in the kind of prevention realm what we're seeing is people kind of pointing out that the programs that we have, we know we kind of have some principles of motor learning, but the programs in injury prevention that we have haven't really paid much attention to them. So at a very basic level one of the things that has been talked about from a motor learning perspective for a while now is internal versus external cues. So we know that giving an external cube, giving an output outcome focused, Q2 and athlete is going to help them keep that motion kind of more automatic. They're not going to be thinking about like, I need my hip in line with my knee in line with my toe and foot, my knee. Can't go too far over my shoe laces. I need to sit down. Speaker 3 (23:50): That's a lot to think about. Yeah. You can't Speaker 4 (23:52): Play a sport while you're thinking about all those things. Yeah, Speaker 3 (23:55): Yeah, no, no. Speaker 4 (23:58): So when that, if that cue is external or is outcome-based suddenly that athlete's much, much more, much better able to pay attention to the soccer ball that's flying past them or getting ready to, to bat. Speaker 3 (24:13): And can you let's if you wouldn't mind, just so people have a better idea of what an internal versus an external cue is. Can you give an example of, let's say a situation we'll use soccer as the example and give an internal cue and then give an external cue so that people can differentiate. Speaker 4 (24:34): Yeah. Yeah. So maybe, maybe we'll do say we're doing like a single leg squat, similar to what I, what I just said. So an internal cue might be, I want you to keep your hip, your knee and your foot all in one straight line that external cue might be giving them a we'll say a pole that's lined up in front of them and you might not even tell them what they're, what what's going on. Maybe you've got a pole in front of a mirror, so that's poles running vertically and they're, they're they're we, we just set them up so that their foot's in front of that pole and they're doing that single leg squat. So now you've got a visual line in front of them. You're paying their, their attention is going to be on that visual line. As they're doing that single leg squat, suddenly you see that they see that like, if their hips pretty far adducted or their knees collapsing in, you've got a line you can say, focus on that line. I'm going to focus on that line. Got it. That one, it isn't their body. Other cues, maybe like giving analogies I want you to think of your body as a column or that's, that's not a brilliant one. But you know, things like that. So analogies are helpful for external cues. They're also we'll get in, I'll get into that in a, in a sec, cause they're actually another, Speaker 3 (26:10): Go get into it, get into it. Speaker 4 (26:12): So analogies also bring in another piece of motor learning, which is called implicit learning. Again, kind of having that internal picture of what emotion should like should look or what that motion should feel like is implicit learning. So you've got external and internal, external internal cues, but you've also then got kind of implicit learning. So a great example of implicit learning is when you ask, you know, a really athlete to explain what they do on the court or on the pitch. And a lot of times they can't put words to what they do. And that's, that's kind of a good example of maybe implicit learning is they've got, there's no rules set to that learning. There is no order. It's just, I've got this internal knowledge, internal picture internal kind of motor memory of what, what that is. And I just execute that. Speaker 4 (27:11): I don't think about it. And so with those, all of my attention can stay to the game. I'm not thinking about how I'm moving. I'm just, just, just kind of to the game. So pulling those back to prevention are kind of injury prevention programs have said, here's a video or here's a picture. This is good. This is bad. Or they've given kind of implicit our internal cues. So those internal cues are those, keep your knee, your hip and your foot all in one straight line where we may benefit and where we might be able to bolster. Some of those programs is by adding some of these, these motor learning pieces at the very basic level, adding external cues, maybe adding some analogies or some implicit learning. Another, another way you can facilitate implicit learning is through dual tasking. One of my favorite things reading through some of the literature is in studying implicit learning. A few authors have taken novice novice golfers, and these novice golfers have, have to go and put, and while they're putting they basically yellow letters. Speaker 4 (28:35): So you literally just be out there like trying to learn to put you, you don't. I know how to put, you may not even get any directions, but you're just out there kind of yelling some letters, because if you have to generate letters, you can't be entirely focused on that pudding. So there's that aspect actually, of having two tasks going on at once. That means not all your attention can be on one of those tasks. How does that help? How does that help the movement? Yeah, so, so that's a very good question. What it means is, as you're learning, it it's like harder, but yeah, once you get to that kind of point where you're comfortable, you're able to execute that movement. It's an automatic movement, it's unconscious, it's automatic. And when we put that in the context of sport, that means that movement is happening without the athlete thinking about it and their attention remains, remains elsewhere. Their attention can remain on the game, that's going on the ball, that's flying at them. You know, that random thing that just flew by them that wasn't the ball and wasn't part of the game, but could be that perturbation, that in another situation could be distracting enough and could lead to an injury situation. Potentially. Speaker 3 (29:58): Got it, got it. Yeah. Like I, and you and I have had this conversation before, because I have a young athlete and we're doing, trying to do incorporate some of this stuff. So one of the things we're doing is I'm having her do some unpredictability drills with clock yourself, but we're trying to do them in Spanish. So she has to say things in Spanish as she's doing them. So that she's a little do. So she's accomplishing this kind of dual tasking. And, and I will also say it's fun. It's fun for the patients, fun for the therapist. And they kind of understand while they're why they're doing those things. And then every once in a while, just like throw a ball at her and see what happens. Speaker 4 (30:42): And you put this in the context then of some of those injury prevention programs and coach buy-in. So let's put Bali's in with single leg squats, but, but you know, squats and you jump into a header. There's already a little bit of some of that in some of the programs, but the more we can get that ball, some of those technical skills involved mix them potentially in with some of the movements that we're working on, maybe that might help with some of these, this kind of adding in some of this motor learning piece. Now I say all of this, none of this has been tested yet to change any of these programs we're really doing or to kind of, we need to go back and test them. And so, you know, this is where I say this, but it is kind of hypothetical, but in thinking about it, as well as we're kind of trying to overcome some of those barriers, that 10 minutes, that we're not, maybe we're at 10 to 15 minutes where we're trying to convince a coach to do something. Speaker 4 (31:49): Coaches are going to buy in a lot more. If there's a, if they can build some skills into that or they can see the sport reflected in it, rather than it just being kind of this abstract quote unquote injury prevention program. So can we get some of this dual tasking, can we get some of this kind of real world kind of environment type demands and challenges integrated in with some of those pieces that we're trying to build from a neuromuscular standpoint, can we mix them all together and end up with a maybe potentially more beneficial outcome? Speaker 3 (32:26): Yeah. And, you know, as you're saying all of this, it's kind of opening my mind up into these programs as being these living, breathing programs that aren't set in stone and that have the ability to change and morph over time as research continues to evolve. And I think that's really exciting for these programs as well, because you don't want to have these programs be thought of as stale because then that's going to not help with your buy-in. Speaker 4 (32:55): Yep. Yeah. And that's one of the complaints that you sometimes see about some of these programs is all right, so my team's done him for a season. They've all mastered, you know, all my players have mastered this program. They're bored of it now. And the likelihood that every single one of your players has mastered every single one of those exercises is that we'll put that into question, but we'll put that one on the side, but yeah, if you're doing the exact same program, the exact same exercise, every single training session for multiple years, yeah. Your players are going to get bored of it. And so are these, some of the opportunities where we kind of help with that buy in where we make it a little bit more creative, where we help kind of with some of those implementation pieces to make it more interesting to make it more long-term and to, to really help with people wanting to do them. Speaker 3 (33:50): I think it's great. And now we're, we've spoken a little bit about research here and there. So let's talk about any gaps in the research. So, I mean, are there gaps in the research? I feel like, of course, but are these gaps something that can't be overcome? Speaker 4 (34:09): No. All of the gaps that at least dive I'm aware of, and I'm sure there are more I just finished writing a paper alongside Holly and grant the Mark. So Holly silvers and, and Gretta microburst for the journal of orthopedic research. And, and one of the things that we did was kind of go through the literature and identify some of the gaps. Speaker 3 (34:35): What were, what were they, you don't have to say all of them, just give a couple of a couple of the big ones, Speaker 4 (34:42): But one of the big ones is a lot of our literature is focused on women, which is important, but in total numbers, we still have more ACL's happening in men. So we need more research in men. A lot of our research is in soccer and handball. There's a lot of other high-risk sports at there. So there were focused kind of on team sports but there is some pretty high risk team sports, something like net ball play ball volleyball have very high ACL injury numbers, individual sports things like gymnastics and wrestling. And those are also Tufts sports to come back to they're very high impact or they're very MBA. They've got some crazy positions that you don't see. So individual sports, I think have quite lacked outside of skiing. Skiing's got a lot of attention. One of the biggest ones that I think for me is really important is we don't have good reporting of the subjects and the diversity within the research that we've done. Speaker 4 (35:51): So most of the, the research that's been done has been done in the U S some in Canada and in Scandinavia, or at least in Europe as a whole, there's been a few studies that have been in in Africa. But we even within the studies that we have in the us and Europe and Australia, we don't, none of them have reported any of the, like really the, the, the race or ethnicity of the athletes who were part of them. So those may have implications and Tracy Blake did a amazing BJSM blog that was kind of a call to action for researchers. And it's one that I'd love to echo here that we need to be better at reporting our biases looking at our, our subject populations and funding and encouraging studies outside of kind of we'll call it quote, unquote, the global North. I think that's, that's a big gap that we need to fill and we need to be more aware of. Speaker 3 (37:01): Excellent. And on that note, we are going to wrap things up, but what I would like you to do is number one, is there anything that we didn't cover or anything more that you want to add to any of the subjects we covered? Speaker 4 (37:16): Ooh, I know you always ask this question and I always have never prepared for it. Speaker 3 (37:23): Well, you know, cause I don't want to like skirt over something and then the guests at the end is like, I really wanted to say this. And she just ended the interview. Speaker 4 (37:32): Think of it probably right before I go to bed. Probably. Speaker 3 (37:36): I can't think of anything right now. Okay. Speaker 4 (37:39): Excellent. Excellent. For any readers who haven't read Dr. Tracy Blake's BJSM post definitely go check it out. We'll put the link in. Speaker 3 (37:47): Yeah. Yeah. We'll put the link into the show notes here. So you can read her blog app over at BJSM and I agree. It was it was very well written and it was a really nice call to action and or call to awareness. Yes. Yeah, yeah. Right. Maybe not call to action, but certainly a call to awareness, which is step one in the sequence of actionable moves. Definitely. So yes, she's a gym. So now before we wrap things up I'll ask the same question to you that I asked to everyone and knowing where you are now in your life and in your career, what advice would you give to yourself as a new grad? Let's say like not new grad PhD grad, but new Speaker 4 (38:36): Duke grad, new, new grad coming out of Duke PT school. I'm trying to think of what I said the last time I was on. Speaker 3 (38:46): Well, don't say it again. No, I'm just kidding. Speaker 4 (38:48): Well, yeah, that's what I'm worried about saying the same thing again. I think what I said last time, but what is my like big thing is being more gentle on myself. When I came out of PT school, I started work. I was the first new hire new grad that they'd hired. And so I was working alongside some just phenomenal clinicians, but they had the least experience, one head, like 15 years of experience. And I came out of school, unexpected myself to kind of treat and operate on the, kind of the same experience level that they did. And I it's just not possible. So I've spent a lot of time kind of beating myself up. And so it takes a lot of reminding even now that like, I still have, you know, I've graduated in 2011. So I'm coming up on 11 years of experience and it's still not a lot in a lot of ways. So being gentle on myself that I don't have to come up with, you know, everything on the spot that I don't don't necessarily have the experience to know or have seen everything or every course or development. And so being okay with that and being gentle and allowing myself to be, to, to just be where I'm at is, is I think Speaker 3 (40:08): It's wonderful advice. And just think if you thought you did know everything, I mean, how boring number one and number two, you'd never move on for sure. Speaker 4 (40:18): Yeah. Yeah. Right. So Speaker 3 (40:20): You're stuck. You'd be pretty stuck. So giving yourself the space and the kindness to say, Hey, I don't know everything. So I'm going to make it a point to learn more is just good therapy. It's just being a good PT, being a good physio, you know, otherwise you're just stuck in 2011. I mean Speaker 4 (40:41): Gotcha. Yeah. 11 wasn't bad, but I'm glad I'm not stuck there. Speaker 3 (40:45): Yeah. I mean, what a bore, right. You'd be like so boring as a PT cause you would never advance. Speaker 4 (40:51): Yeah. So your ex Speaker 3 (40:54): Excellent advice. And now where can people find you on social media and elsewhere? Speaker 4 (40:59): So I am on Twitter at, at soccer, PT 11 I'm on Instagram at squeaky Edgar. I will note that's actually more personal but follow me anywhere cause you'll get some great, great adventures. And those are my primaries social media. Speaker 3 (41:20): Excellent. And before we hop off, can you talk quickly about basketball, sports, medicine Speaker 4 (41:26): Science? Oh yeah. I forgot to talk about that in my projects. Speaker 3 (41:30): Yeah. Let's talk about this quickly. Yes. So Speaker 4 (41:34): Was honored to be a part of an editorial group that just completed. I just got a book out. It's an ASCA public, a publication on basketball, sports medicine and rehabilitation. So it's a quite the book. But I say that because it is over over 1100 pages if I remember correctly. So it's, it's a, it's a, it's a chunk of a book. But we are, I've got an extra copy of it. So one of our allowed visitors really be getting a copy. Okay. Speaker 3 (42:15): Well Amy, thank you so much for coming on. I really appreciate your time. Speaker 4 (42:19): Thank you so much for having me. It's always fun. Speaker 3 (42:21): Everyone else. Thank you for listening. Have a great couple, have a great week and stay healthy, wealthy and smart. Speaker 2 (42:28): A big thank you to Dr. Amy Erindale for coming on the podcast today. And of course a big thank you to net health. Again, they have created net health for private, for net health therapy for private practice, which is a cloud-based all in one EMR solution for managing your practice. One piece of software that handles scheduling documentation, billing reporting needs. Plus a lot more. If you want to check it out, there's a special deal for healthy, wealthy and smart listeners. Complete a demo with the net health team and get a hundred dollars toward lunch for your staff. Visit net health.com/glitzy to get started again. That's net health.com/l I T Z. Speaker 3 (43:09): Why thank you for listening and please subscribe to the podcast at podcast dot healthy, wealthy, smart.com. And don't forget to follow us on social media.  

The Soccer Thread Podcast
Imaginary ACL injuries 24 Jan 2021

The Soccer Thread Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2021 61:02


Sorry Josmer, I really hope we didn't jinx you bud. Despite his lack of form, still one of our favorite USMNTers of all time. 

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine - The Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine Podcast
How do race and insurance status affect the care of pediatric ACL injuries?

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine - The Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2021 27:15


Our guest is Neeraj Patel, M.D., M.P.H., Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and attending surgeon at Lurie Children’s Hospital Chicago. He is part of the author team which produced a new study in the November 2020 CJSM investigating outcomes in pediatric ACL injuries.

Sports Medicine Weekly
Ask the Doctor: Which Sport suffers most from ACL Injuries

Sports Medicine Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2020 3:58


https://wp.me/p3Y82B-dhwThis Podcast segment of ‘Ask the Doctor’ addresses questions submitted by Sports Medicine Weekly followers. Dr. Brian Cole and Steve Kashul discuss the above topic.

Devil Town
Dementia and ACL Injuries

Devil Town

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2020 68:29


Austin and Mitch discuss the season three arcs of Smash and Saracen's Grandma, which means deep dives into dementia and ACL injuries. Plus a very stupid edition of Football Expert Austin. Follow us on twitter @deviltownpod, @a_greenameyer, and @organzapleatsEmail us at deviltownpodcast@gmail.comFind transcripts, sources, and links at deviltown.buzzsprout.comLinks: A Multisport Epidemiological Comparison of ACL Injuries in High School AthletesA History of the Wig Reveal on RuPaul's Drag RaceAlex Trebek laughing at nerds

Power Athlete Radio
EP 396 – Real Talk on ACL Injuries in the NFL with Dr. Zanis

Power Athlete Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2020 52:24


As excited as we are for the return of the NFL regular season, we are not surprised by the big number of injuries that have downright destroyed many fantasy football leagues. Premiere talents McCaffery, Barkley, and half the 49ers went down in Week 2 with more bumps, bruises, and tears coming Week 3. Closer look… The post EP 396 - Real Talk on ACL Injuries in the NFL with Dr. Zanis first appeared on Power Athlete.

Stiles and Giles Wellness Podcast

We all know someone with a knee injury or a  "bad knee". What if these injuries  were preventable? Well we think a large majority of them are!In this episode we talk about alignment and balance within and around the knee joint and how not having those  two important factors leads to us being predisposed to injury. It doesn't take a genius to know that having a well aligned balanced knee joint is far preferable to having a misaligned imbalanced joint.Ed takes us through some of the common imbalances and misalignments and how to fix them.We also do our usual weed whacking as we wander off into the woods of 'back injury land' but overall this episode is  definitely worth a listen. We think and hope it has the capability to enlighten and help a lot of people who may have an injury in their future if things don't change so please share it with anyone you feel may benefit.As ever, "All ye who listen are Legends"

We Are West Ham Podcast
100: Illustrious silverware, lack of investment and ACL injuries

We Are West Ham Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2020 88:44


Having continued our 100% pre-season record with a 2-1 victory over Brentford last weekend, we now go head-to-head with Bournemouth for a chance to lift the illustrious Betway Cup in our final friendly before the new season gets underway. Whether you see this is a chance to get some silverware on the board early on or just another meaningless friendly, it doesn't get much bigger than this for David Moyes' men. Or does it? On this week's show, the lads discuss pre-season form, our chances in the Premier League this season and, most importantly, the severe lack of investment in the squad while players are being sold cheaply, with a few more being linked with moves away in the last week. Will we ever see a new signing at the club ever again, or are the current owners deliberately seeking to balance the books in preparation for putting the club up for sale? Only time will tell, but it's a risky move in a summer when the squad is in desperate need of strengthening in key areas. Also on this week's show, James, Will and Tom compete in the new Name That Game quiz and have a chat about all the latest news surrounding the women's team, among many more headline news. It's an action-packed show, so make sure you subscribe, review and rate the pod on whichever podcast platform you prefer listening to us moaning on. And now you can also watch the show every week on our brand new YouTube channel! Make sure you subscribe here - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGub_tMpawm0U0YJhNTA8Lw Thanks again for your amazing support as we enter a new season - come on you Irons!

Nailed It Ortho
21: Operative Treatment of ACL Injuries w/ Dr. Cooke

Nailed It Ortho

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2020 45:08


Listen to our episode on the operative treatment of ACL injuries  as Dr. Cooke  gives us an excellent overview!    Link to post and show notes: www.naileditortho.com/acltreatment     Dr. Cooke is a sports medicine trained Orthopaedic Surgeon. He received his medical degree from Wayne State University School of Medicine and his residency in Orthopaedics there at Wayne state as well. He completed his fellowship in orthopaedic sports medicine at the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic clinic in Los Angeles LA.      Goal of episode: To develop a baseline knowledge on the treatment of ACL injuries.   We cover: Treatment options Graft selection Tunnel choice   Click here to listen on I-tunes Click here to listen on Android   Libsyn Link:  SCROLL BELOW FOR LINKS AND SHOW NOTES:   Disclosures:  NailedIt Ortho reports no relevant financial disclosures. Dr. Cole and Dr. Fitts report no relevant disclosures. This podcast is NOT medical advice, the podcast is for educational purposes only. Please consult your doctor prior to making any medical decisions. ----- You can follow NailedIt Ortho  at: Website: https://naileditortho.com/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/naileditortho   Dr. Fitts and Dr. Cole are orthopaedic surgery residents and the hosts of the NailedIt Ortho podcast. 

RealPod with Victoria Garrick
Kylie Ross - Body-Insecurity, ACL Injuries, & Perfectionism

RealPod with Victoria Garrick

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2020 57:26


Kylie Ross is a former Division I soccer player from Baylor University where she received both an undergrad as well as Master’s degree. During her last season at Baylor she created a YouTube channel which has since gained over 140,000 subscribers! Kylie and her videos are all about sharing her passion for sports, health, fitness, and more about her life as a female athlete. In this episode, Kylie talks about sitting on the sidelines her first two years at Baylor, recovering from a painful ACL injury, body image insecurities, the pressure of being "healthy," and finding her identity after sports. This convo is IT for all female athletes looking for an honest and all encompassing conversation about college sports! 2:49-5:46 Kylie’s start with soccer. 5:46-9:16 Expectation vs reality for freshman year. 9:16-16:49 Striving for perfection and an “athletic body.” 16:49-25:36 Dealing with injuries mentally and physically. 25:36-29:20 Mental growth as an athlete. 29:20-30:43 Working through fear after injury clearance. 30:43-34:17 Starting a YouTube channel. 34:17-36:15 Gaining a following on social media 36:15-43:42 Graduation and identity after sport. 43:42-48:48 Getting real on YouTube 48:48-50:34 Lessening up on perfectionism. 50:34-55:49 Working out and finding balance in fitness after graduation.

6-8 Weeks: Perspectives on Sports Medicine

Welcome to 6-8 Weeks: Perspectives on Sports Medicine. This podcast presents the people and stories behind sports medicine at UCSF and our community of learners.  Hosted by the UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Medicine, Division of Sports Medicine faculty:  NIRAV PANDYA, MD,  BRIAN FEELEY, MD, and DREW LANSDOWN, MD.

Metro Talks
#10: Sammy Benyamin, DPT-ACL Injuries & Recovery

Metro Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2020 25:16


Sammy Benyamin, DPT, is a physical therapist with Metro Physical & Aquatic Therapy.Links:Sammy Benyamin bio:https://www.metrophysicaltherapy.com/sam-benyamin

Nailed It Ortho
13: Intro to ACL injuries w/ Dr. Bonnaig

Nailed It Ortho

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2020 28:38


Listen to our episode on ACL injuries  as Dr. Bonnaig  gives us an excellent overview!    Link to post and show notes: www.naileditortho.com/aclintro     Dr. Bonnaig is a sports trained orthopaedic surgeon. He received his Medical Degree from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, TN and completed his Orthopaedic Surgery residency at the University of Cincinnati. He then completed his Sports Medicine Fellowship at The Campbell Clinic in Memphis, Tennessee.   Goal of episode: To understand the relevant anatomy, physical exam findings, and treatment options for ACL injuries.   We cover: Anatomy PE findings and maneuvers  Treatment options   Disclosures:  NailedIt Ortho reports no relevant financial disclosures. Dr. Cole and Dr. Fitts report no relevant disclosures. ----- You can follow NailedIt Ortho  at: Website: https://naileditortho.com/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/naileditortho   Dr. Fitts and Dr. Cole are orthopaedic surgery residents and the hosts of the NailedIt Ortho podcast. 

WiSP Sports
WiSP Sports Desk: S2E22 - ACL Injuries in Female Athletes

WiSP Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2020 40:27


On this week’s news show Chris Stafford and Nancy Gillen are joined again by Dr. Juliet McGrattan to discuss the prevalence of ACL injuries in female athletes which are linked to the menstrual cycle.  Plus the top news stories from around the world of women’s sport: Golf: Evian Championships Cancelled FIFA Women's World Cup British baseball women's team and league USOPC athlete led group Women's basketball Nigeria Japan Announces Inaugural Women’s Football Pro League for 2021 Women's football must escape shackles of the FA if it is to thrive after this crisis PSA Announce Tour Suspension Extended Until Mid-August Due to COVID-19  Host: Chris Stafford & Nancy Gillen Podcast length: 42 mins. Sponsor: Hyland's Homeopathic Earache Drops For more information, links and resources plus other conversations from the world of women’s sport including articles, blogs, videos and podcasts visit wispsports.com. WiSP Sports is the First and Only Podcast Network for Women’s Sport with 41 hosts, 1300+ episodes across 49 shows and a global audience of over 6 million. WiSP Sports is on all major podcast players. Follow WiSP Sports on social media @WiSPsports. Contact us at info@wispsports.com.

Sports Medicine Weekly
Prevention and Treatment of ACL Injuries

Sports Medicine Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2020 13:35


This Podcast features ACL Specialist, Cindy Krebsbach from Athletico Physical Therapy, talking about how to reduce your risk of ACL injuries. Cindy discusses with Dr.Continue readingThe post Prevention and Treatment of ACL Injuries appeared first on Sports Medicine Weekly.

Super Human Radio
New Hope for ACL Injuries PLUS GHRP6 to Cure GERD

Super Human Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2020 72:24


SHR # 2532 :: New Hope for ACL Injuries PLUS GHRP6 to Cure GERD - Dr. Lindsey Lepley, PhD, ATC - Joe Christiano - Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injuries are one of the most common injuries people sustain. The ACL is one of the key ligaments that help stabilize your knee joint. The ACL connects your thighbone (femur) to your shinbone (tibia). It's most commonly torn during sports that involve sudden stops and changes in direction, but more and more people are suffering injuries to the ACL. A new study shows adding eccentric exercises could improve physical therapy outcomes. PLUS GERD is a common condition in our population. Typical therapies include antacids, proton pump inhibitors and in extreme cases, surgery to tighten the esophageal sphincter. What if using the common peptide GHRP6 actually fixes the problem?

Super Human Radio
New Hope for ACL Injuries PLUS GHRP6 to Cure GERD

Super Human Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2020 72:24


SHR # 2532 :: New Hope for ACL Injuries PLUS GHRP6 to Cure GERD - Dr. Lindsey Lepley, PhD, ATC - Joe Christiano - Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injuries are one of the most common injuries people sustain. The ACL is one of the key ligaments that help stabilize your knee joint. The ACL connects your thighbone (femur) to your shinbone (tibia). It's most commonly torn during sports that involve sudden stops and changes in direction, but more and more people are suffering injuries to the ACL. A new study shows adding eccentric exercises could improve physical therapy outcomes. PLUS GERD is a common condition in our population. Typical therapies include antacids, proton pump inhibitors and in extreme cases, surgery to tighten the esophageal sphincter. What if using the common peptide GHRP6 actually fixes the problem?

Pediatric Insights: Advances and Innovations with Children’s Health

Dr. Loveland explains innovative ACL treatment methods being used at Children's Health Andrews Institute for Orthopedics and Sports Medicine.

Children’s Health Checkup
How to Prevent ACL Injuries

Children’s Health Checkup

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2020


Dr. Loveland discusses various training tips and exercises to prevent ACL injuries in kids.

We Talk Health - West Tennessee Healthcare's Podcast

On this episode of We Talk Health, Cathy Subry, and Jeff Lansdale talk all about ACL Injuries. Did you know that female athlete are 4 to 6 times more likely to experience ACL injuries than male athletes? Jeff dives into why that is, and ways to help prevent injury. If you ever have any questions that you would like answered, please don't hesitate to reach out to us at wetalkhealthpodcast@gmail.com, and we will get back to you as soon as possible!

Get The Pancake: A Podcast For Volleyball Coaches
47. Training Advice for Volleyball Players from David Hardy, Volleyball Trainer

Get The Pancake: A Podcast For Volleyball Coaches

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2020 46:21


What warm-ups are best for volleyball? Should you stretch before practice? Is there a best workout for volleyball players? You don't have to wonder anymore! David Hardy, volleyball trainer, makes these complex topics easy to understand for even beginner coaches! —————— GET IN TOUCH WITH DAVID —————— Instagram: @davidhardytrainer & @trademarkperformance (the company David works for) Facebook: David Hardy - Trainer Work with David in person: http://www.trademarkpc.com or call (219) 256-3832 —————— TRAINING ARTICLES BY DAVID HARDY ON WWW.GETTHEPANCAKE.COM —————— "Warming Up Before Playing Volleyball": https://getthepancake.com/drills-and-tips/volleyball-warmups "Training Differences Between Middle School and High School Volleyball Players": https://getthepancake.com/drills-and-tips/training-middle-school-high-school-volleyball "ACL/MCL Injury Prevention": https://getthepancake.com/drills-and-tips/acl-mcl-injury-prevention-volleyball "ACL Injuries and Female Athletes": https://getthepancake.com/drills-and-tips/acl-injuries-in-females-athletes —————— HELPFUL RESOURCES —————— ✅ "Essentials Packet" with all the basic printable new coaches need to get started: https://getthepancake.com/products/volleyball-coach-essentials ⭐️ "Ultimate Packet" with EVERY printable from Get The Pancake (at 20% off!): https://getthepancake.com/products/volleyball-coach-ultimate-packet

Young Athlete Podcast
Non Surgical Management of ACL Injuries - Kieran Richardson

Young Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2020 44:44


Mr. Kieran Richardson (FACP) is a Specialist Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist (as awarded by the Australian College of Physiotherapists in 2016) who provides ACL tear non-surgical management opinion, education and treatment for patients on a weekly basis, both in his home town of Perth, Western Australia, but also nationally and internationally through online platforms. Kieran has successfully managed paediatric clients with full thickness ACL tears non-surgically to return to high-level sports, as well as patients from the general population and paid-athletes.   He has lectured at state and national conferences in Australia on ACL tear non-surgical management, and also runs national workshops on the topic to Heath Care Professionals.   Kieran is the Director of Global Specialist Physiotherapy, a consultancy service of academics, researchers and educators that provide formal mentoring, latest evidence professional development and second opinions for complex patient presentations to private practices in Australia and abroad.     In this episode we cover; "The Australian Experience" of ACL injury management vs the US and Scandinavian approach to ACL injury management Why does it matter how we manage ACL injuries here in Australia The culture of ACL injury management in Australia Why its important to get the young athlete to commit to their rehab What is world's best practice in the management of ACL injuries

R5 Athletics and Health
#44 [ENG] Prehab for ACL injuries and how to improve speed (Bam & Mikael)

R5 Athletics and Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2020 48:13


Bam tells us the three thing he did with the womens national Rugby team to reduce ACL injuries and improve performance. We also discuss how to improve speed and what kind of results the team has had. Bam toimii valmentajana meillä ja hänelle voi varata ajan varauskalenterista: https://www.varaaheti.fi/r5varaus/fi

Princeton Spine and Joint Center
ACL Injuries - Princeton Spine & Joint Center Podcast

Princeton Spine and Joint Center

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2020 34:45


Welcome to Episode #23 of the Princeton Spine and Joint Center Podcast. In this episode Dr. Scott Curtis, Sports Medicine Director at Princeton Spine and Joint Center, discussed ACL Injuries with Nick Cifelli, a Sports Physical Therapist who works with Progression Physical Therapy in Princeton New Jersey as well as The Training Room in Southern New Jersey. The focus of this episode on ACL Injuries included primary and secondary prevention of ACL tears and rehabilitation. Scott Curtis and Nick Cifelli discussed what the ACL is and how it can be injured, how to diagnose a tear, and how to manage it both surgically and non-surgically. So if you have ever experienced an ACL injury or you are a parent of a child who has, you will learn a lot from this episode of the Princeton Spine and Joint Center Podcast. Nick Cifelli, PT, DPT, CSCS Nick grew up in Ewing, NJ and graduated from Ewing High School in 2009 where he played both soccer and baseball. As an undergraduate, Nick attended The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) and received a degree in Health and Exercise Science. He was a collegiate baseball player during his time at TCNJ, and also worked in the athletic training room. Upon graduating from TCNJ in 2013, he began personal training and became a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS). Nick graduated from Thomas Jefferson University in 2017 with a Doctorate in Physical therapy. His personal interests include weight lifting, golfing, skiing, playing soccer, and going to the beach. Education: Bachelor’s in Exercise Science from The College of New Jersey Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Thomas Jefferson University Continuing Education: Selective Functional Movement Assessment Maitland-Australian Physiotherapy Seminars MT-1: Essential Peripheral Soft Tissue Techniques – Release with Fascialization Certifications: Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) Scott Curtis, DO Director of Sports Medicine at Princeton Spine and Joint Center Dr. Scott Curtis is a board certified, fellowship trained physician who specializes in the care of sports related injuries and general musculoskeletal care. After attending Penn State University, Dr. Curtis received his medical degree from Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine and then completed his residency at Morristown Medical Center in Morristown, NJ where he was honored to serve as Chief Resident. Dr. Curtis completed the renowned Sports Medicine Fellowship at Atlantic Sports Health where he worked with the New York Jets, Seton Hall University Athletics, College of St. Elizabeth Athletics and various high school teams. From weekend warriors to professional athletes, high school athletes to 90+ year old tennis players, Dr. Curtis has a singular focus to treat each patient as an individual, identify their concerns as well as their specific goals and help them reach their aspirations using the most effective non-surgical care options.

Help To Recover From An Acl Injury
Interview with U of M soccer players with ACL injuries ( episode 2)

Help To Recover From An Acl Injury

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2019 21:29


An Athletes perspective on recovering from an ACL injury

PT Inquest
180 Lots of Ways to Prevent ACL Injuries

PT Inquest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2019 60:45


Brought to you by CSMi We can prevent ACL injuries!!! Or are we just reducing risk? Or both? How do these programs work? Does it matter what you do or do you just need to do something? A Majority of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries Can Be Prevented by Injury Prevention Programs: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials and Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trials With Meta-analysis. Huang YL, Jung J, Mulligan CMS, Oh J, Norcross MF. Am J Sports Med. 2019 Aug 30:363546519870175. doi: 10.1177/0363546519870175. [Epub ahead of print] Due to copyright laws, unless the article is open source we cannot legally post the PDF on the website for the world to download at will. That said, if you are having difficulty obtaining an article, contact us. Produced by: Matt Hunter Music for PT Inquest: "The Science of Selling Yourself Short" by Less Than Jake Used by Permission Direct Download

Young Athlete Podcast
ACL Injuries in Young Athletes - Dr Guri Ekås

Young Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2019 35:03


Dr. Guri Ekås is an orthopedic surgeon and sports physician specializing in knee injuries. Guri combines clinical and academic work, with a focus on the knee joint and ACL injuries, particularly in the pediatric population.   She works as a consultant at Akershus University Hospital in Norway. Guri finalized her PhD in June 2019: “Long-term outcomes after ACL injury during childhood” and is currently waiting for the defense. As part of this project, she has conducted clinical, functional and radiological follow-up of 50 young adults who have sustained an ACL injury during childhood.   Guri participated at the recent 2018 IOC Consensus statement on Management of Pediatric ACL injuries. She and her co-workers have also performed a systematic review on secondary meniscal injuries after ACL injury. Furthermore, she has been involved in sports medicine since 2010, working as a team physician for soccer, cycling and skiing.   She is currently team physician for the national ski jumping teams in Norway. Her affiliations are Akershus University hospital, University of Oslo and Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre (OSTRC). In this episode we cover; How big an issue are ACL injuries in young athletes How big an impact can an ACL injury have on young athletes What is the current evidence for ACL injury management in young athletes? Can young athletes cope without an ACL? The value of injury prevention programs to reduce ACL injury What are the treatment options for young athletes that have an ACL injury Do all young athletes need to have an ACL reconstruction How many young athletes can cope without an ACL? Should I complete a period of rehab first, or have an immediate ACL reconstruction What unique considerations are their for young athletes having an ACL reconstruction What is the re-injury rate for young athletes that have an ACL reconstruction The importance of early review when your young athlete injures their knee Meniscus injuries in young athletes have a high healing potential Every single knee injury is different in each young athlete Non surgical management of ACL injury with high quality, structured rehab is a good option for young athletes The critical importance of rehabilitation in ACL injury management Rehab programs need to be developed specifically for your young athlete Incorporating rehab in school and sport - Young athletes can complete rehab with their team Managing social isolation in young athletes Recommendations on Return to Sport after your ACL injury

Dynasty Nerds Podcast | Dynasty Fantasy Football
Ep. 283 - NFL Pre Season Week Two: Patriots WRS, ACL Injuries & Braveheart

Dynasty Nerds Podcast | Dynasty Fantasy Football

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2019 54:03


In this episode @DynastyRich and @DynastyPrice break down the latest news in the NFL and Pre-Season Week Two. What's become of the Patriots receiving core? What to do with D'Onta Foreman? What Tampa Bay running back do you need to pick up? All of these questions are answered and many more in this fantastic episode of dynasty goodness.

WHOOP Podcast
Ebenezer Samuel, Fitness Director at Men's Health Magazine, talks learning about training and recovery from pro athletes, keeping up with all the latest workout trends in Manhattan, and putting them to the test through self-experimentation.

WHOOP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2019 66:57


Men's Health Fitness Director Ebenezer Samuel discusses the start to his career in journalism (3:59), unwritten rules for interviewing a star athlete (8:14), learning about fitness from the New York Giants (9:29), coming back from an ACL injury (10:55), his biggest message when it comes to exercise and training (18:10), strategies for putting on muscle (19:59), his favorite gyms and classes in NYC (28:25), getting on WHOOP and #BeYourOwnLabRat (34:56) the afterburn effect (36:58), fitness goals and tests he likes (42:44), why his workouts are great for women too (51:56), the benefits of yoga (54:09), using resistance bands like Tom Brady (58:55), and what he does for physical and mental recovery (1:01:03).Support the show (http://whoop.com)

Train Smarter with Science Podcast
AFL and Super Rugby Physio, Dave Dawes, on ACL Injuries

Train Smarter with Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2019 35:53


The Physio dreamboat Dave Dawes from Subiaco Physiotherapy found a quiet spot to chat to Mark on today’s episode. The two discuss how to manage ACL injuries with a primary focus on the sub-elite level, recurrence rates, addressing kinesiophobia, the inception of AFLW and tips for best practice. After graduating from La Trobe, Dave cut his teeth working with high level sporting teams across Rugby Union and Australian Football Rules. Take it from us, the knowledge Dave brings to each consult is on another level, and we’re humbled that he was able to squeeze us into his busy schedule. For anyone with a niggle, a trip to Subiaco Physiotherapy is a no-brainer, and if you’re elsewhere in the world, don’t be afraid to reach out to Dave via his contact links below. Train Smarter with Science is brought to you by Velocity Performance. Visit www.velocityperformance.com.au to learn more. SUPPORT US on Patreon to keep TSWS going! https://www.patreon.com/trainsmarterwithsciencepodcast Team Contact If you have a guest recommendation or just want to shoot us a line, email us at: team@tswspodcast.com Guest Details To learn more or get in touch with Dave Dawes, please follow the links below: email: dave@subiaco-physiotherapy.com.au http://subiaco-physiotherapy.com.au/about/meet-our-team/ https://instagram.com/subiacophysiotherapy?igshid=bha8bafim3xp Music Credit: Panthurr https://open.spotify.com/artist/2NZPNX4jXljA8MsUTrrgNq https://instagram.com/spencer.panthurr https://soundcloud.com/panthurr Thanks for listening and we would love for you to subscribe so you don't miss any episodes! Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/trainsmarterwithsciencepodcast See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The [P]Rehab Audio Experience
#5 | ACL Injuries With Dr. Nima Mehran

The [P]Rehab Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2019 55:15


In this episode Mike and Dr. Nima Mehran discuss all things ACL related. We cover what the ACL is, how its most commonly injured, to get surgery or not to get surgery, the pros and cons of different graft options, what early and late rehab looks like, and most importantly ACL injury prevention strategies. Dr. Nima Mehran, M.D., is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine and joint replacements. He earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Southern California, attended the Chicago Medical School and was Chief Resident during his orthopedic surgery residency at Henry Ford Hospital. Dr. Mehran has published several scientific papers and has delivered numerous scientific lectures. He has been on the physician team for the USC Trojan Football team, Los Angeles Lakers, Los Angeles Sparks, Los Angeles Dodgers, Los Angeles Kings, and Anaheim Ducks  Enjoy!  -The Prehab Guys    Link to this article: https://theprehabguys.com/what-is-the-acl/  Guest: Dr. Nima Mehran  Learn more about the Knee Extension Overhaul [P]Rehab Program HERE Learn more about the Knee [P]Rehab Program HERE Visit our webiste: www.theprehabguys.com Follow us on: Instagram| Facebook| Youtube| Twitter Connect with The Prehab Guys- Info@theprehabguys.com Leave feedback, let us know what to talk about next. Did you enjoy this? Don't forget to rate, review, and subscribe.

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
426: Dr. Peter Fabricant: Pediatric ACL Injuries

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2019 21:17


On this episode of the Healthy Wealthy and Smart Podcast, I welcome Dr. Peter Fabricant on the show to discuss pediatric ACL injuries. Dr. Peter Fabricant is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in pediatric and adolescent orthopedic surgery. His clinical expertise is in sports medicine and trauma surgery of the knee, hip, shoulder, elbow, and ankle. In this episode, we discuss: -How to determine if a patient should have non-surgical treatment or surgical treatment following ACL injury -Rehabilitation considerations following Physeal-Sparing ACL Reconstruction Surgery -Setting realistic expectations for return to sport with the pediatric population -And so much more!   Resources: HSS Peter Fabricant   For more information on Dr. Fabricant: Dr. Peter Fabricant is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in pediatric and adolescent orthopedic surgery. His clinical expertise is in sports medicine and trauma surgery of the knee, hip, shoulder, elbow, and ankle. Dr. Fabricant completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Rochester, graduating with honors. He then attended Yale University School of Medicine. During his orthopedic surgery residency training at Hospital for Special Surgery, Dr. Fabricant earned a Master of Public Health Degree from Columbia University, and won several awards for excellence in patient care and innovation in patient safety. Following residency, Dr. Fabricant completed two fellowships: first in pediatric orthopedic surgery at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the second in sports medicine at Boston Children's Hospital. This afforded him the unique opportunity to study with renowned mentors at both institutions, including Dr. Lyle Micheli, Dr. Mininder Kocher, and Dr. Theodore Ganley, in order to compile additional subspecialty training uniquely focused on the care of children and adolescents with sports-related injuries. He has cared for athletes and performers at all levels, including the Boston Ballet, Babson College, the International Skating Union World Figure Skating Championships, and the Boston Marathon. Dr. Fabricant is an accomplished researcher, with over 100 peer-reviewed publications and 15 book chapters in circulation. He has received multiple institutional, national, and international awards for clinical research, including the Herodicus Award (AOSSM), the Excellence in Research Award (AOSSM), and the Promising Career Award (PRiSM Society), among others. Dr. Fabricant currently serves on several research and education committees in two international professional societies (POSNA and PRiSM). He is a member of several pediatric orthopedic and sports medicine research consortiums, through which he participates in cutting-edge multicenter clinical research studies with many of the most prolific researchers in pediatric and adolescent sports medicine. He also serves on the editorial boards of Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research (CORR) and the Journal of ISAKOS, on the Peer Review Committee for the Orthopaedic Research and education Foundation (OREF), and as a reviewer for several academic orthopaedic journals including the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS), the American Journal of Sports Medicine (AJSM), and the Bone & Joint Journal (BJJ). Dr. Fabricant understands the physical and emotional complexities of injuries in youth and adolescent athletes. Sports and recreational activities provide social, emotional, and physical development, leadership skills, and encouragement for children to work as a part of a team with their peers. Dr. Fabricant has dedicated himself to addressing sports injuries in the context of all of these important issues and strives to return his patients back to their sports and activities as quickly and as safely possible, while minimizing the risk of future injury and prioritizing their long-term health and well-being.   Read the full transcript below: Karen Litzy:                   00:00                Hi Dr. Fabricant Welcome to the Healthy Wealthy and Smart Podcast. I am so excited to have you on today to talk about pediatric ACL injuries. Karen Litzy:                   00:13                So we're just going to kind of jump right into it because I know our time is limited here so the reason that I wanted to do this is because I have a patient now with an ACL tear who had surgery and there seemed to be a lot of questions in the rehab world around this population. So after a confirmed ACL tear in a pediatric patient can you take us through your decision making process as to whether or not that patient will have non-surgical treatment which would mean high quality rehab or ACL reconstruction plus rehab. Dr. Fabricant:                00:53                Yeah that's a really great question. So historically kids who still had you know growth remaining who had open growth plates would kind of be held off until they were fully grown and then have an ACL reconstruction then. But we know that that's not the ideal thing to do just because they have an unstable knee they can develop cartilage and meniscus injuries that might not be repairable once they reach the maturity but there are a subset of patients who tend to do pretty well without surgery and with high quality rehab alone. And so typically when I'm evaluating a patient the ones that tend to do well with high quality rehab alone would be typically younger patients. So kids who are like under 14 years old and kids who have non full thickness ACL tear. So like a partial ACL tear like a 50 percent tear. Dr. Fabricant:                01:49                And so kids who are young and who have you know a 50 percent partial tear their ACL who have rotational stability of their knee so their knee doesn't kind of rotate during things like a pivot shift examination. Those are kids who tend to do pretty well without surgery with a period of protected weight bearing bracing and high quality rehab. When I'm seeing kids who are either older and or have a full thickness ACL tear with a really unstable knee those tend to be the kids who we recommend surgery for especially if they're involved in cutting or pivoting sports jumping or landing sports things like that. So that's basically how I approach it in general. Karen Litzy:                   02:34                And so let's talk about the surgical procedures because there are several surgical procedures one can do on a pediatric ACL patient taking into account the growth plate damage. How do you decide which surgical procedure to do with this population? Dr. Fabricant:                02:57                I think that's a great question too. So I kind of think about these kids in three groups. Dr. Fabricant:                03:04                Let's go from kind of oldest to youngest so the oldest type of kid is the kid who either has growth plates that are closed or near closed or they have very little growth remaining let's say like less than six months of growth remaining. Those are kids that I kind of think about a little more like adults. But then within that within kind of specific to your question the kids who have open growth plates. The question I ask myself are kind of are these kind of the youngest kids like prepubescent kids. So those are kids with greater than 2 years of growth remaining.  In girls, those who haven't had started having their periods yet. In boys and girls kids who really haven't had a growth spurt or who are kind of prepubescent. Dr. Fabricant:                03:53                There's kind of that group and then there's the pubescent kids who are between let's say two years of growth remaining and six months of growth remaining you know in girls let's say they've had their periods for a year, in boys they may have already showed some signs of puberty or of their growth spurt. So those are kind of the pubescent kids even though they have growth remaining and so in thinking about a reconstruction technique I try to figure out are they in the prepubescent group or the pubescent group. And then there are a couple of different described surgical procedures in each but in broad generalities the prepubescent group you need to really avoid the growth plate completely and so that can be done either with techniques where you do drill tunnels in the bone but you confine it to the epiphysis of the bone or the area that's kind of away from the growth plate or you can do a procedure where you're not drilling any tunnels which would be like the IT Band ACL procedure and that those both can protect the growth plate and they're both been well described and then in the kids who are pubescent who have growth remaining but maybe not so much growth remaining those kids you typically can drill tunnels in the bone but you just need to use a graft that's made of soft tissue because if you take let's say a bone plug from a graft and fix it across the growth plate that can inhibit their growth and cause a limb length deformity limb length discrepancy or like an angular deformity of the limb. Dr. Fabricant:                05:31                So that's kind of how I think about the two groups that still have growth remaining and taking surgical procedures. Karen Litzy:                                           And does the activity of the child come into play when deciding on which procedure to do or is it really just their kind of bony anatomy and age. Dr. Fabricant:                                        Yeah it's mostly their age and skeletal maturity and their developmental maturity. The sports sometimes come into play when you're deciding whether or not to do a reconstruction but once you kind of made the decision to do a reconstruction you know which technique you choose is typically chosen based on their skeletal maturity. Karen Litzy:                   06:11                Got it got it. And then you sort of alluded to this a little bit earlier talking about the meniscus but why is the health of the meniscus so important in the pediatric ACL patients. Karen Litzy:                   06:22                So from what I've read it seems like if there is a bucket handle tear or other repairable meniscus injury surgery is really warranted. Why is that?   Dr. Fabricant:                06:42                So if there's the meniscus is pretty precious tissue and it's really the shock absorber of the knee but it also provides secondary stability to the knee, nourishment of the joint. It provides congruence between the femur and the tibia and so it's really important to try to save as much meniscal tissue as possible and then these kids obviously have quite a long life ahead of them and many have a long athletic career ahead of them. So you definitely want to save as much meniscus as possible so if there is a large unstable meniscus tear and the knee remains unstable it's likely to continue to degenerate whereas if you go and stabilize the knee and fix the meniscus you have the best chance at preserving that tissue and getting it to heal. Karen Litzy:                   07:20                Yeah that makes sense. And now for a lot of my listeners who are physical therapists this is sort of the money question right. Karen Litzy:                   07:27                What are the most important considerations for rehab after these physeal-sparing ACL reconstruction surgeries? Dr. Fabricant:                07:36                So it's interesting there's not like a really strong evidence base about like specific things with rehab but I would tell you that kind of the way that I approach it and kind in in broad generalities typically the first six weeks are where there's the biggest difference depending on how the procedure goes. So if if it's let's say a procedure where you're drilling tunnels and fixing it with implants you know those kids can tend to weightbear relatively soon the implants tend to confer a lot of stability to the graft and allow the body to heal the graft. If there's a meniscus repair at the time of surgery, I tend to protect the weight bearing for a total of six weeks just to let the meniscus heal and in the kids who end up getting the IT Band ACL because there are no tunnels drilled in the bone and therefore there's no like screws holding the graft in place and the graft tends to be fixed to the periosteum of the bone or the skin around the bone with heavy duty suture. Dr. Fabricant:                08:39                Those kids I tend to protect for six weeks regardless of if they've had a meniscus tear repaired just because I want to make sure they've started to have some biologic healing of the graft before I let them really bear full weight. So for me the first six weeks are kind of the most critical portion where if I've done a IT Band ACL and I'm kind of relying on suture for fixation I tend to protect their weight bearing a little longer but once they hit about six weeks for me at least the rehab tends to progress the same whereas essentially all kids are kind of started to wean off crutches by six weeks starting to work on strengthening and then for me I tend to let kids start to jog around 12 weeks and from there on it's pretty similar rehab to the adult rehab. Karen Litzy:                   09:24                So why with the ACL reconstruction using the IT band, why is no lunging a precaution with this population. Dr. Fabricant:                09:37                When I was in training I had some of my mentors would say that they found that kids who load the knee from a flexed position after any ACL reconstruction tend to kind of flare the knee up especially in the early phase and so I tend to tell kids to avoid you know deep lunges and squats early on. So that's just something that I do I don't know that there's a lot of great evidence for that but it seems to have worked for some of my mentors and so I've kind of adopted it into my practice as well. Karen Litzy:                   10:13                Got it. Got it yeah. Because I read that out of Boston right. And OK so that makes a lot of sense because I often wondered. Karen Litzy:                   10:24                Well they can jog and run but they can't squat or they can't lunge. And is that obviously to protect the knee and is that also to maybe protect secondary problems like patellar tendinopathy or something like that. Dr. Fabricant:                10:38                You know right after surgery there is a bit of inflammation going on in the knee and so certainly doing like deep squats and lunges can increase the risk of further inflammation. Dr. Fabricant:                10:50                But I really do like squats like leg presses that go down to about 90 degrees of knee flexion. I really find it helps strengthen the knee without inflaming it too much. But you know the physical therapist that we work with tend to do that and the patients do pretty well and they end up building it pretty quickly. Karen Litzy:                   11:12                That makes sense. And now let's talk to a lot of these kids want to return to sport. I mean you're working with kids all the time as you know their attention spans are a little short and they're all really excited to get back to sport A.S.A.P. but according to the IOC consensus on pediatric ACL they recommend waiting twelve months to return to sport. So what is your thought on that? Dr. Fabricant:                11:43                Yeah I would say the short answer is I agree with that completely. I typically mentally prepare kids for a year to return to play. Dr. Fabricant:                11:53                I think that you know there's really three things you need in order to successfully return back to sports safely. So one is the anatomy which is really the job of the surgeon and reconstructing the anatomy. The other is you know strength and balance and coordination which is a team effort between the physical therapist and the patient and the surgeon as well. And then the third thing is just time. So it just takes about a year for the graft to incorporate and mature and remodel and kind of be biologically ready. And I think that's the hardest part about this surgery is really kind of keeping the kids engaged for a full year. I think kids sometimes hear about some professional athletes who get back to sports sooner than a year and so they feel like they want to get back sooner than a year. Dr. Fabricant:                12:39                But I typically tell families you know a couple of things. First off the average time to return to sport, even in professional athletes like in the NFL is about eleven months. So even in pro athletes who have no job other than to rehab their knee you know they don't have chores and schoolwork and things like that that it's still about a year and that's an average. So while they might hear you know on the news about people who get back after six or eight months there's also people who don't get back for 14 or 16 or 18 months. And so even professional athletes it takes about a year and then the other thing is that kids are really even higher risk than professional athletes because typically you know if there's something about the child's anatomy or their physiology or how they're moving Dr. Fabricant:                13:24                That puts them at such high risk that they're gonna tear their ACL when they're 11, 12, 13, 15 years old. They're at higher risk patient than the guy or gal who goes through you know high school and college and professional sports before tearing their ACL. They've made it through let's say 30 years of life before tearing their ACL. So I tend to try to kind of work with kids and families and say you know look you're a higher risk than a professional athlete for one and two you know all they do all day is rehab and it still takes them a year to get back to sports. So I tend to agree with the one year recommendation. I tend to let kids just because they're itching to get back. I tend to let them do some light practice with their team at the beginning of the following season. So for instance if a kid injures themselves midway through a soccer football season in the fall you know usually it's around nine or 10 months till the next beginning of the next season I say that they can do some kind of non contact practice with their team just so they can stay involved. But I do agree with the one year before they're really kind of on the field or the court competing with other kids. Karen Litzy:                   14:33                Yeah and I'm so glad that you brought up what they see on TV and what they hear or see on social media because that's something that's so pervasive amongst a lot of these kids and they think someone else did it. They should be able to do it too. So I thank you for that. And I think that advice to tell the parents and to keep reiterating that to the patient to the pediatric patient is so important because boy they just want to every day. Well when can I do this. Well when can I do that and being able to keep them like you said motivated but realistic expectations and being honest is a challenge. Dr. Fabricant:                15:14                Yeah you're totally right. I think that even setting expectations before surgery you know they kind of forget you know when their knee starts feeling pretty good around three or six months but you know I think the other important thing is that you know what they hear on TV and in social media tends to be the exceptions to the rule rather than the average. Dr. Fabricant:                15:31                So they hear about the person who gets back to sports at six or seven months but they don't necessarily hear about the people who take a year and a half to get back to sports in the pros or who don't make it back to sports in the pros. So I think you know also telling them they're probably getting a bit of a biased view when a lot of these kind of news outlets kind of sensationalize people who are getting that quickly they think it's the norm when actually it's the exception. Karen Litzy:                   15:54                Absolutely. I just had this conversation the other day about what a bell curve is and how some people are on one side some people are on the other but most people are in the middle. Karen Litzy:                   16:04                And to really keep that in mind when you see these big extremes so now is there anything else that you would like to add as far as let's say speaking to physical therapists or people who are going to be working with your patients. Anything else you would like to add as far as the pediatric ACL patient is concerned. Dr. Fabricant:                16:27                Not not really. I think we really kind of touched upon all the important topics. I think it's just important to understand a lot of people are really beginning to realize that you know kids aren't just small adults and they have their own unique considerations both with the surgery and in the rehab and in the kind of mental preparedness for sports. And so I always really enjoy working with therapists who enjoy working with kids and engaging kids because it's not just that the surgery and even the exercises are different it's the whole kind of mindset and the approach. And so when the whole team is on the same page it's always really rewarding. Karen Litzy:                   17:09                Awesome well thank you so much for taking the time out. And where can people find more about you if they would like to know more about you and what you do and have any questions. Dr. Fabricant:                17:18                Yes so I practice at the Hospital for Special Surgery so they can go to the hospital for special surgeries Web site which is a Hss.edu they can look me up on that Web site or they can Google search my name at HSS and we're here and happy to take care of our youth athletes who get injured. Karen Litzy:                   17:39                Awesome. Well thank you so much and everyone else. Thank you so much for listening. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy wealthy and smart.     Thanks for listening and subscribing to the podcast! Make sure to connect with me on twitter, instagram  and facebook to stay updated on all of the latest!  Show your support for the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes!  

Pro Football Doc Podcast
5: Lorenzo Neal, Cell Phone Breaks, CTE, and ACL Injuries Across Sports

Pro Football Doc Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2019 51:24


Dr. Chao talks about a vast array of topics including the studies of CTE in the wake of Rob Gronkowski's retirement, how NFL starting quarterbacks are staying healthier, and how ACL injuries in the NHL are different than in other sports. One of the greatest fullbacks of all time Lorenzo Neal joined Dr. Chao to discuss his career and how wrestling made him the great football player he was.

PrepsKC Podcasts
Reducing the risks of ACL Injuries with Megan Bechtold from The University of Kansas Health System

PrepsKC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2019 8:23


We discuss the Sports Medicine and Performance Center's new ACL Injury Reduction Program

Credit to the Girls - an AFLW podcast
Conference system question marks, ACL injuries with Brooke Patterson + has the Tribunal gone too far?

Credit to the Girls - an AFLW podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2019 39:19


Nat, Sarah and Lucy discuss the fallout from round two of the AFLW season, including why the tribunal's suspension of Nicola Barr may have been too harsh and whether the conference system is working.Plus, the girls are joined by Melbourne defender and physiotherapist Brooke Patterson to discuss ACL injuries.

Credit to the Girls - an AFLW podcast
Conference system question marks, ACL injuries with Brooke Patterson + has the Tribunal gone too far?

Credit to the Girls - an AFLW podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2019 39:19


Nat, Sarah and Lucy discuss the fallout from round two of the AFLW season, including why the tribunal's suspension of Nicola Barr may have been too harsh and whether the conference system is working.Plus, the girls are joined by Melbourne defender and physiotherapist Brooke Patterson to discuss ACL injuries.

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
411: Prof. Evangelos Pappas: ACL Injuries, Are We Creating Realistic Expectations

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2019 41:04


On this episode of the Healthy Wealthy and Smart Podcast, Dr. Evangelos Pappas joins the show to discuss the editorial in the Sports Medicine Journal, Time for a Different Approach to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries: Educate and Create Realistic Expectations.  Dr. Evangelos Pappas’ research interests are in the areas of sports medicine, biomechanics and musculoskeletal physiotherapy. Specifically, his interests are in the areas of etiology of lower extremity sports injuries, effectiveness of injury prevention programs, motor control re-training for the prevention and treatment of knee pathologies, epidemiology of ACL injuries, rehabilitation of lower extremity injuries, and dance medicine In this episode, we discuss: -How patients interpret the practitioner’s language and use of medical terminology surrounding ACL injury -Strategies to communicate the medical management of ACL injury to set realistic patient expectations -The limitations of the research in determining who will benefit from surgical versus conservative treatment for ACL injury -Physical therapy utilization and patient outcomes -And so much more!   “We have identified a big discrepancy between the expectations of the patient and the research and the outcomes that we know are produced after conservative or surgical treatment.”   “It is very frequently a life defining moment.”   “We do fail to communicate accurate information to our patients.”   “It is really risky to advocate to all patients conservative treatment including those who want to return to high level pivoting sports.”   “We don’t have good data to know who’s going to do well with conservative management at this point.”   For more information on Dr. Pappas: Professor Evangelos Pappas trained as a physiotherapist in Thessaloniki, Greece before pursuing a Masters in Orthopaedic Physical Therapy at Quinnipiac University and a PhD in Orthopaedic Biomechanics at New York University in the USA. Prior to coming to the University of Sydney, He taught for 11 years at Long Island University-Brooklyn Campus in kinesiology, clinical decision making and musculoskeletal pathology and physiotherapy. His excellence in teaching was recognized by his nomination for the Newton award for excellence in teaching. A/Professor Pappas joined the University of Sydney as a Senior Lecturer in 2013 where he continues to lecture in the areas of musculoskeletal physiotherapy, and particularly as it relates to the upper and lower extremities. Professor Pappas is also active in musculoskeletal research. His research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and intramural grants. He has presented his work in more than 50 national and international conferences and he has been interviewed on the radio as an expert on knee injuries. His publications appear in top journals in the fields of physiotherapy, sports medicine and biomechanics. One of his publications received the T. David Sisk award for best review paper from Sports Health; a leading multidisciplinary journal in sports medicine. In addition, Professor Pappas has served on the research subcommittee of the awards committee of the American Physical Therapy Association. Resources discussed on this show: Zadro, J.R. & Pappas, E. (2018). Time for a Different Approach to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries: Educate and Create Realistic Expectations. Sports Med. doi: 10.1007/s40279-018-0995-0. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30284693 Episode 227: Dr. Evangelos Pappas: ACL Rehab & Research 101 Episode 048: Physical Therapist Dr. Evangelos Pappas Evangelos Pappas Twitter Evangelos Pappas Facebook Email: evangelos.pappas@sydney.edu.au   Thanks for listening and subscribing to the podcast! Make sure to connect with me on twitter, instagram  and facebook to stay updated on all of the latest!  Show your support for the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes!   Have a great week and stay Healthy Wealthy and Smart!    Xo Karen    

Beyond The Weights
Episode 9 - ACL Injuries with Jon Hereth

Beyond The Weights

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2018 35:22


Jon joins Bryan again to discuss ACL tears in female athletes; how do we train and treat these injuries and work with female athletes and women in general to prevent this too-common injury.

Fighting Irish Podcasts presented by Nissan
5: Stronger Scars - Chloe Boice, Luisa Delgado, and Camryn Dyke (ND Women's Soccer ACL Injuries)

Fighting Irish Podcasts presented by Nissan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2018 42:54


Join host Bailey Cartwright as she and her guests embrace the strength found in their scars! In this week's episode, Bailey sits down with three of her teammates, Chloe Boice, Luisa Delgado, and Camryn Dyke. All have suffered ACL injuries in the past, and together they discuss the moment they knew they'd been injured and the rehab process. Later, they talk about how they tried to stay engaged with the team despite being sidelined and the impact they have had on one another in the recovery process. Also, Camryn wants to give a huge shoutout to Max Bertman as well for all of his work on her ACL since day one, she couldn’t have done it without him! Make sure to rate and review! Download and subscribe [HERE!](https://audioboom.com/channels/4976076)

Stronger Scars with Bailey Cartwright
5: Stronger Scars - Chloe Boice, Luisa Delgado, and Camryn Dyke (ND Women's Soccer ACL Injuries)

Stronger Scars with Bailey Cartwright

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2018 42:54


Join host Bailey Cartwright as she and her guests embrace the strength found in their scars! In this week's episode, Bailey sits down with three of her teammates, Chloe Boice, Luisa Delgado, and Camryn Dyke. All have suffered ACL injuries in the past, and together they discuss the moment they knew they'd been injured and the rehab process. Later, they talk about how they tried to stay engaged with the team despite being sidelined and the impact they have had on one another in the recovery process. Also, Camryn wants to give a huge shoutout to Max Bertman as well for all of his work on her ACL since day one, she couldn’t have done it without him! Make sure to rate and review! Download and subscribe [HERE!](https://audioboom.com/channels/4976076)

Youth Development
DD27 - 2 ACL Injuries & A Lifetime of Mental Growth | Harri Dowdell

Youth Development

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2018 35:24


Imagine what it's like to be 2 weeks away from fulfilling your biggest dream and having it ripped away from you...You go through 12 months of hard work, only for it to happen again, only this time, it's completely outside your controlThat's the exact 12 months that our very own Harri Dowdell​ had to endure, but the good news is, he's STRONGER have been through that fireIn this Deep Dive we have a vulnerable and authentic conversation about:✅ His ACL Injury + Rehab✅ The Lessons He Learned From It✅ The Power of A Support Network✅ His Funniest Joke✅ And Much More...Enjoy this one Academy Fam

Sports Medicine Weekly
Fall Sports and the Risk of ACL Injuries

Sports Medicine Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2018 12:00


Anne Bierman of Athletico is a Board Certified Specialist in Sports Physical Therapy and Staff Physical Therapist in Naperville, IL Brian Cole MD of Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Steve Kashul and Anne Bierman discuss upcoming fall sports season and ACL related … Continue reading →

Top of Mind with Julie Rose
Great Pacific Garbage Patch Clean-Up, ACL Injuries, Cuban Constitution

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2018 104:55


Kate O’Neill of UC Berkeley unpacks the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” clean-up. Michele Pistone of Villanova Univ. describes how refugees navigate the immigration system. Paul Sherbondy of Penn State Sports Medicine discusses ACL injuries. Sam Payne of The Apple Seed tells a story. Robert Zemsky of the Univ. of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education explains why universities are adding new majors. Ted Henken of Baruch College on Cuba's new constitution.

MediTalk Podcast
Preventing and Treating ACL Injuries

MediTalk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2018 17:22


Do you play sport? Do you like to workout? Would people describe you as a weekend warrior? Do you have children that play sport? Have you ever worried about suffering a knee injury? Do you suffer knee pain? Have you had a fall awkardly and just heard a 'pop'? Do you worry about doing your ACL? Have you suffered an ACL Injury? What I learnt from this interview with Orthopedic Surgeon Prof Fick is shockingly ACL injuries are on the rise and in Australia we have the highest incidence of ACL injuries in the world. I also learnt that when we watch TV we just assume ACL injuries only happen to elite athletes unfortuately this injury is happening to many young children, weekend warriors and just every day people going about their business. So please take 15-20mins in your day to listen to this Meditalk Podcast on ACL Injuries. Thank you for listening meditalk.com.au Specialist guest speaker Orthopaedic Consultant Prof Fick thejointstudio.com.au Professor Daniel Fick is happy to answer any questions you may have for him in another podcast so, please if you have some orthopaedic questions you would like answered send them through to danae@meditalk.com.au If you need high quality cardiac-respiratory specialist testing cvs.net.au sleepcrs.net.au

Sports Medicine Weekly
Fall Sports and the Risk of ACL Injuries

Sports Medicine Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2018 11:59


Anne Bierman of Athletico is a Board Certified Specialist in Sports Physical Therapy and Staff Physical Therapist in Naperville, IL Brian Cole MD of Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Steve Kashul and Anne Bierman discuss upcoming fall sports season and ACL related injuries. Anne also explains Athletico's ACL 3P program and how it identify risk factors for ACL injuries.

Sports Medicine Weekly
Jabari Parker and his fresh start with the Chicago Bulls after 2 ACL Injuries on the Same Knee

Sports Medicine Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2018 13:54


Steve and Dr. Cole talk with Jabari Parker about his past experience with 2 ACL injuries in the same knee, returning to play after signing on with the Chicago Bulls, the rehab process, importance of a positive mental attitude and … Continue reading →

Hit Zero: A Cheerleading Podcast
ACL Injuries | Cheerleading

Hit Zero: A Cheerleading Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2018 19:58


One of the most common knee injuries in all sports...and cheerleading is no exception. There are some big names in the sport that have reported injuries to the ACL and it is something that coaches, parents, and athletes should be concerned about. Learn about the ACL, what to expect with injury, and how to prevent ACL tears.--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cheerleading/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cheerleading/support

Physio Edge podcast
Physio Edge 079 How to rehabilitate ACL injuries with Dr Lee Herrington

Physio Edge podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2018 90:15


Following ACL injury, patients can have a smooth recovery with full return to sport and activity, or end up with ongoing knee symptoms and limited ability to perform the activities they love. How can you help your ACL injured patients have a great outcome? In Physio Edge podcast episode 079, Dr Lee Herrington and David Pope explore how to make your ACL injury rehab successful, and provide you with a comprehensive guide to rehabilitate ACL injuries. You will understand how to take your patients from initial injury to return to sport, and develop the knowledge to help inform your patients decide with your patient whether surgical repair or conservative management is their best option. You will discover: Do ACL injuries require surgical management? Which factors commonly affect whether people with ACL-deficient knees require surgery? Common diagnostic errors in ACL injury patients What are the key elements you need to include in your rehab of ACL injuries? Conservative vs surgical management Should your rehab focus on movement control, strength or skills? How you should objectively assess your patients rehab progress? What valid measurement tools can you use when assessing patient progress? Are open-chain exercises safe, and should they be used in your rehab? Most effective types of movement control and skill training How to know when your patient should progress their exercises? Which strength measures are important? Which strength training exercises can you include? When can running be commenced? Running progressions you can use What pain measures should you monitor throughout rehab? Is pain during rehab ok? How to return your patient to training and sport What maintenance exercises should your patient continue after completing their rehab? Related online courses Advanced ACL rehab with Andrew Ryan Other episodes of interest: Physio Edge 052 Conservative or surgical management for ACL injuries with Enda King Physio Edge 051 Lateral knee and LCL injuries with Matt Konopinski Physio Edge 034 - Advanced ACL rehab with Enda King   Click here to download the podcast handout Links associated with this episode: Download and subscribe to the podcast on iTunes Twitter - @LeeHphysio MSc Sports injury rehabilitation - University of Salford Online course - Acute low back pain treatment with David Pope - available with a free trial Clinical Edge membership Free sports injuries videos with Dr Ebonie Rio, Jack Hickey, Dr Adam Weir, Dr Michael Rathleff, Jo Gibson and Prof Bill Vicenzino Let David Pope know what you liked about this podcast on Twitter Review the podcast on iTunes Like the podcast on Facebook Infographics by Clinical Edge Articles associated with this episode: Bollen et al. 1996. Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament - a quiet epidemic? Comfort et al. 2011. Kinetic comparisons during variations of the power clean Frobell et al. 2010. A randomised trial of treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tears Gabbett. 2016. The training - injury prevention paradox: should athletes be training smarter and harder? Harris et al. 2017. Tibiofemoral osteoarthritis after surgical or nonsurgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament rupture: a systematic review Herrington et al. 2013. Task based rehabilitation protocol for elite athletes following Anterior Cruciate ligament reconstruction: a clinical commentary Hewett et at. 2010. Understanding and Preventing ACL injuries: current biomechanical and epidemiological considerations Mikkelsen et al. 2000. Closed kinetic chain alone compared to combined open and closed kinetic chain exercises for quadriceps strengthening after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with respect to return to sports: a prospective matched follow-up study Weiler et al. 2015. Non-operative management of a complete anterior cruciate ligament injury in an English Premier League football plater with return to play in less that 8 weeks: applying common sense in the absence of evidence

The Athletic Development Show
EP.96 - The Future for AFLW, ACL Injuries and the effect of professionalism on Junior Athletes

The Athletic Development Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2018 24:54


EP.96 - The Future for AFLW, ACL Injuries and the effect of professionalism on Junior Athletes   With the recent talk and media coverage surround ACL injury rates in Australia and the growing popularity of the AFLW this episode is timely advice to junior athletes across the country. We lay out some historical context and make predictions about how the injury rates are going to change over the next 3-5 years.   Resources to go with this one: The original article out of The Age (22 April 2018) https://www.theage.com.au/national/australia-endures-epidemic-of-preventable-acl-injuries-20180421-p4zay6.html The importance of getting your sporting load management right http://www.coreadvantage.com.au/blog/acute-chronic-workload-ratio?rq=acute%20 The history of AFL (as a hybrid game invented for Cricketers) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Australian_rules_football   You can find our warm up 2.0 guide on the home page of our website. This warm-up will work brilliantly as an AFL ACL prevention program in the absence of an official program. www.coreadvantage.com.au

CVASPS Podcast, Strength and Conditioning Info From The Worlds Top Sport Performance and Physical Preparation Practitioners
Episode 124-Dr. Steph Allen, Boston Physical Therapy and Wellness-New Conversations To Have Look At Female Athlete ACL Injuries

CVASPS Podcast, Strength and Conditioning Info From The Worlds Top Sport Performance and Physical Preparation Practitioners

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2018 31:25


“Exposing an ACL ligament to estradiol in a petri dish type thing resulted in less collagen synthesis and less, what they call fibroblast proliferation. So it’s basically, both things are going to correlate to less tensile strength.” In this week’s edition of The Podcast I get to sit down and discuss Dr. Steph Allen and discuss ACL injuries in female athletes. After a brief introduction Dr. Allen shares with us the research she has been looking into. These two areas are the neuromuscular training (brain-muscle connection) and hormonal contributions to the risk of injury. This conversation was prompted by a discussion with her colleague about what we have seen with our student athlete’s here. This revolved around twins who had multiple injuries at the same time of the year, and many other female student athlete’s who were injured who’s cycle where at similar parts of their cycle when they were injured. This leads us down a rabbit hole of her discussing literature that she has been diving into that discusses the relationship between specific hormone quantities leading to ligament issues, and what we have seen here with our student athletes. Both of us really hope that this leads coaches to have more in-depth conversations with their athlete’s about their cycles and research into when these injuries occur. As the saying goes, where there’s smoke there’s fire, and there seems to be quite a bit of smoke in this situation. Dr. Allen is putting out awesome content as to what they’re doing at Boston Physical Therapy and Wellness on instagram at @stpehallen.dpt. Make sure to give her a follow! ENJOY THE CONTENT? THEN YOU SHOULD CHECK OUT THE STRENGTH COACH NETWORK! You can find sensational content just like this in The Strength Coach Network. As a member of The Strength Coach Networks, you can access over 200 hours of the highest-level lecture content just like this one for 48 hours for only $1. Follow the link below to sign up and use the code CVASPS at check out to get a 48 hour trial for only $1. Check out The Strength Coach Network Here! https://strengthcoachnetwork.com/cvasps/ #StrengthCoach, #StrengthAndConditioningCoach, #Podcast, #LearningAtLunch, #TheSeminar, #SportsTraining, #PhysicalPreparation, #TheManual, #SportTraining, #SportPerformance, #HumanPerformance, #StrengthTraining, #SpeedTraining, #Training, #Coach, #Performance, #Sport, #HighPerformance, #VBT, #VelocityBasedTraining, #TriphasicTraining, #Plyometrics

Laugh At Adversity with Gary Savoie: Inspirational Messages to Conquer Anxiety, Depression, Fear, Relationships, Self-Doubt,
007 - The Beauty In Our Scars, ACL Injuries, And Professional Soccer with Jordan Angeli

Laugh At Adversity with Gary Savoie: Inspirational Messages to Conquer Anxiety, Depression, Fear, Relationships, Self-Doubt,

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2018 56:28


Former professional soccer player Jordan Angeli knows all too well what it’s like to be injured. Having torn her ACL three times (in the same knee), she still somehow found a way to return to the pro level. Now retired, Jordan has transitioned her leadership traits into a new purpose: helping others. She’s the founder of theACLclub, which focuses on bringing together a community to support, empower and inspire athletes in persevering through the challenges and triumphs of the ACL journey. And here’s a surprising fact for you, there are 300,000 ACL surgeries a year in the US alone. You hear about ACL injuries all of the time, especially in pro sports, but I had no idea the number of surgeries was that high! Jordan is also the host of the Show Your Scars podcast where she features guests with the focus of embracing your scars, overcoming injuries and sharing your strengths. Needless to say, Jordan is a huge influence in not only the ACL community, but a great role model for anyone overcoming sports related injuries.   In This Episode, You Will Learn: Her long journey of overcoming 3 ACL tears The mental and physical barriers no one talks about with a ACL injuries The power behind expressing your emotions during a setback Why it’s so important to refocus in everyday life How she overcame feeling like a failure when she got injured Why journaling was such an important outlet during her recovery Why it’s important to sometimes throw expectations out the window How she was able to turn her injuries into a greater purpose with the ACL club How being a leader on the field has helped her be a leader off the field Why she wants people to realize that they can do anything Why without struggles there would be very little success How serving others can help you change your perspective  

Ortho Eval Pal: Optimizing Orthopedic Evaluations and Management Skills
Episode 007- ACL Tears-8 questions to ask and observations to make when “ruling in” an ACL tear

Ortho Eval Pal: Optimizing Orthopedic Evaluations and Management Skills

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2017 11:53


Today I will talk about ACL tears and how important it is to ask patients the right questions and make certain observations that help you come to the diagnosis of an “ACL tear”. I will tell you what questions to ask and discuss what I have found to be most helpful in diagnosing patients with ACL tears.Here is a video of a patient evaluation with an ACL tear: WE HAVE A NEW WEBSITE!! Click HERE to check it outOne on one Coaching? We have it!Ask me your ortho evaluation questions and I will answer them on the show: paul@orthoevalpal.comBe sure to check out our 330+ videos on our YouTube Channel called Ortho Eval Pal with Paul MarquisFollow our Podcast show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and most all other podcasting platforms. Just search: Ortho Eval PalIf you are serious about Ortho Eval Pal content, click HERE and ask to join our closed Facebook page.#ACL#KneePain#OrthoEvalPal#PhysicalTherapyThe post Episode 007- ACL Tears-8 questions to ask and observations to make when “ruling in” an ACL tear appeared first on Ortho Eval Pal.Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=6GY24EJMBHTMU&source=url)

The Ask Mike Reinold Show
Quadriceps to Hamstring Ratio in ACL Injuries, PhDs, and Passing the PT Boards

The Ask Mike Reinold Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2017 10:24


On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show we talk about quadriceps to hamstring ratio in ACL rehabilitation, the choice between a PhD and a DPT, and if we would pass the PT boards right now! To view more episodes, subscribe, … Read more > The post Quadriceps to Hamstring Ratio in ACL Injuries, PhDs, and Passing the PT Boards appeared first on Mike Reinold.

Rainbow Soul
The Happy Knee 2016- practices to bring into 2017

Rainbow Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2016 31:00


Happy knee normally on Saturday morning at 9:00am EST will run at 4:30 pm on December 31st  EST.  Host Lillian Daniels welcomes listeners to her show the "The Happy Knee." wherein she discusses knee issues and helping you maintain a Happy Knee. Interested parties may call into the show at 914-338- 0695 and also visit www.TheHappyKnee.com   Todays topic is "2016 best practices" things that you want to be sure you take with you into 2017. The last episode of 2016 we will share a little of what is to comem in 2017 as well as finish sharing the 2016 practices we don't want you to leave in 2016 If you or a loved one have knee challenges be sure to get your free copy of the "The Happy Knee Gift"  for  effective at home solutions for a Happy Knee.  

Physio Edge podcast
Physio Edge 052 Conservative or surgical management for ACL injuries with Enda King

Physio Edge podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2016 64:41


ACL injuries commonly occur during pivoting and change of direction sports. What is the best way to manage these injuries? Are your patients suitable for conservative managment or will they require surgery? In Physio Edge podcast 052, David Pope and Enda King discuss acute management of ACL injuries, and how you can help your patient decide whether to have conservative or surgical management. We also explore: What is the latest research around ACL injury What leads to an ACL injury, and how is this important in your rehab? What are the outcomes following ACL injury How can you make clear decisions on when your patient is ready for return to training and return to sport What biomechanics lead to ACL injury What role does trunk control have in ACL injury A patient example with an ACL injury Conservative vs surgical management Post injury management Timeframe for surgery Who is suitable for conservative management How to prepare your patient for the extended rehab process following ACL injury Strength and power training in ACL rehab Youth and adolescent ACL injury management How to manage concomitant chondral and meniscal injury When can your patient return to running You can download the free podcast handout that will take you through lateral knee and LCL injury assessment and rehabilitation by clicking here. Get your free access to videos on sports injury assessment and treatment, including accelerated rehabilitation of LCL injuries with Matt Konopinski. Enda King will also be presenting at the Sports Injury Virtual Conference hosted by Clinical Edge along with the world leaders in sports injury management. How can you manage ACL injuries conservatively? What are the important components of ACL rehab to help your players return to sport? Enda’s presentation will take you through ACL rehab to address common strength and biomechanical issues found in athletes with ACL injuries. Discover exactly how to progress your conservative management of ACL injuries, and when your players can return to running and sport. ` ` ` Links mentioned in this episode Enda King Free sports injury assessment and treatment videos Sports Injuries virtual conference Free podcast handout on ACL and lateral knee injuries Enda King on Twitter @enda_king Sports Surgery Clinic Dublin Free trial of clinical edge membership David Pope on Twitter

Heads 'N Tales Podcast - Talking Sports Injury Rehab, Prevention, Perseverance, Concussions & Athlete Transition
46 : Mason Robinson, Former NFL Player, Learn How to Shock The World After 2 ACL Injuries

Heads 'N Tales Podcast - Talking Sports Injury Rehab, Prevention, Perseverance, Concussions & Athlete Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2016


The speedy Mason Robinson was a highly recruited running back out of Somerville High School in New Jersey.  Iowa, Boston College, Temple, Michigan State, Colorado, Maryland and Rutgers University all wanted Mason to play for their football team. One of the talking points in this episode is Mason's decision to be Ray Rice's protege at Rutgers University.  Unfortunately, 2 ACL injuries altered the course of the football career he envisioned.  Because of these injuries, Mason finished his time at Rutgers as a sixth year senior captain and was the team's fourth-string safety and special teams returner. This is not the typical resume of an NFL prospect, but Mason Robinson is not your typical athlete or man. After graduating from Rutgers, Mason spent time with both the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and New York Jets. During our interview he tells some great stories about his time in the NFL and his strategy for not getting star-struck. "Rutgers WR/RB Mason Robinson out for the year with knee injury" -NJ.com, September 10, 2009  After tearing his first ACL in 2009 while making a cut on a run against the Cincinnati Bearcats in the season-opener, Mason struggled on many levels.  While watching from the sidelines, Mason battled depression and was put on academic probation.  In this episode he talks about how it feels when the text's after games stopped pouring in and how he ultimately turned things around.  A couple strategies Mason used to battle back were positive self-talk and the creation of "Dream Posters."  Listen to the interview to learn how to make your own poster! "Rutgers cornerback Mason Robinson suffers season-ending knee injury" -NJ.com, September 6, 2011 Two years later and now playing corner back for the Scarlet Knights, Mason tore the ACL in his other knee during a non-contact drill. This injury couldn't have come at a worse time because he finally got the nod from Coach Greg Schiano to get the start against North Carolina Central in week 1 of the 2011 season.  This would have meant that he would be starting over current NFL players like Logan Ryan and Duron Harmon (New England Patriots). This time, Mason never let himself get into that "dark place" like he did after his first knee injury, even when coaches were doubting his chances.  Listen to the episode to hear how he handled the adversity dealt to him for a second time. "Mason Robinson savors sixth and final season at Rutgers" -NJ.com, August 25, 2012 Being named captain during his 6th season at Rutgers football as the team's 4th string safety is probably not what Mason had in mind when he walked in to the locker room and put the scarlet red helmet on

Heads 'N Tales Podcast - Talking Sports Injury Rehab, Prevention, Perseverance, Concussions & Athlete Transition
46 : Mason Robinson, Former NFL Player, Learn How to Shock The World After 2 ACL Injuries

Heads 'N Tales Podcast - Talking Sports Injury Rehab, Prevention, Perseverance, Concussions & Athlete Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2016 68:11


The speedy Mason Robinson was a highly recruited running back out of Somerville High School in New Jersey.  Iowa, Boston College, Temple, Michigan State, Colorado, Maryland and Rutgers University all wanted Mason to play for their football team. One of the talking points in this episode is Mason's decision to be Ray Rice's protege at Rutgers University.  Unfortunately, 2 ACL injuries altered the course of the football career he envisioned.  Because of these injuries, Mason finished his time at Rutgers as a sixth year senior captain and was the team's fourth-string safety and special teams returner. This is not the typical resume of an NFL prospect, but Mason Robinson is not your typical athlete or man. After graduating from Rutgers, Mason spent time with both the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and New York Jets. During our interview he tells some great stories about his time in the NFL and his strategy for not getting star-struck. "Rutgers WR/RB Mason Robinson out for the year with knee injury" -NJ.com, September 10, 2009  After tearing his first ACL in 2009 while making a cut on a run against the Cincinnati Bearcats in the season-opener, Mason struggled on many levels.  While watching from the sidelines, Mason battled depression and was put on academic probation.  In this episode he talks about how it feels when the text's after games stopped pouring in and how he ultimately turned things around.  A couple strategies Mason used to battle back were positive self-talk and the creation of "Dream Posters."  Listen to the interview to learn how to make your own poster! "Rutgers cornerback Mason Robinson suffers season-ending knee injury" -NJ.com, September 6, 2011 Two years later and now playing corner back for the Scarlet Knights, Mason tore the ACL in his other knee during a non-contact drill. This injury couldn't have come at a worse time because he finally got the nod from Coach Greg Schiano to get the start against North Carolina Central in week 1 of the 2011 season.  This would have meant that he would be starting over current NFL players like Logan Ryan and Duron Harmon (New England Patriots). This time, Mason never let himself get into that "dark place" like he did after his first knee injury, even when coaches were doubting his chances.  Listen to the episode to hear how he handled the adversity dealt to him for a second time. "Mason Robinson savors sixth and final season at Rutgers" -NJ.com, August 25, 2012 Being named captain during his 6th season at Rutgers football as the team's 4th string safety is probably not what Mason had in mind when he walked in to the locker room and put the scarlet red helmet on for the first time.  However, graduating from Rutgers with a masters degree, a 3.75 GPA and making it to the NFL is a testament to Mason's character and work ethic.  Mason's versatility (willingness and ability to play multiple positions) is a major contributing factor to his successful recovery.  Many people don't know that Mason was a third-string running back in high school when he received his first college scholarship offer. At every level, he made the most of every opportunity he was given, every time he stepped on the field.  It didn't matter if he was playing running back, corner, safety or kick/punt returner. Mason also credits his success to his knack for being a student of the game and gives some strategies for watching film for young athletes.  Mason overcame a lot of adversity before he worked himself back to running a 4.27 40-yard dash and and to picking-off my favorite football player of all-time, Tim Tebow, in a pre-season game against the New England Patriots. This blog post doesn't give justice to how jacked up I was after recording this interview, so do yourself a favor and give it a listen whether you're injured or not.  I promise you will be left feeling like you can and will SHOCK THE WORLD.  Mason is now training and mentoring upcoming athletes in the NJ area through his "Shock The World" company.  I have no doubt you will want to work with him after listening to this episode (links below). WHERE CAN YOU FIND MAson? website | INSTAGRAM | FACEBOOK | Youtube Download Episode 46 : iTunes | Stitcher Permalink

CVASPS Podcast, Strength and Conditioning Info From The Worlds Top Sport Performance and Physical Preparation Practitioners

In today's episode of The Podcast, Dr. Tim Hewett sits down and discusses all things related to ACL injuries. Dr. Hewett was kind enough to share with us his life's research on the topic relating to injury mechanism, playing surface significance, and some strategies that could help decrease the risk of injuring your knee. ENJOY THE CONTENT? THEN YOU SHOULD CHECK OUT THE STRENGTH COACH NETWORK! You can find sensational content just like this in The Strength Coach Network. As a member of The Strength Coach Networks, you can access over 200 hours of the highest-level lecture content just like this one for 48 hours for only $1. Follow the link below to sign up and use the code CVASPS at check out to get a 48 hour trial for only $1. Check out The Strength Coach Network Here! https://strengthcoachnetwork.com/cvasps/ #StrengthCoach, #StrengthAndConditioningCoach, #Podcast, #LearningAtLunch, #TheSeminar, #SportsTraining, #PhysicalPreparation, #TheManual, #SportTraining, #SportPerformance, #HumanPerformance, #StrengthTraining, #SpeedTraining, #Training, #Coach, #Performance, #Sport, #HighPerformance, #VBT, #VelocityBasedTraining, #TriphasicTraining, #Plyometrics

Sports Medicine Weekly on ESPN Radio » Season Six
Performance Solutions; Preventing ACL Injuries; Managing MLB Injuries

Sports Medicine Weekly on ESPN Radio » Season Six

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2016


Episode 16.14 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c. Segment One: Dr. Charles Bush-Joseph Continue reading The post Performance Solutions; Preventing ACL Injuries; Managing MLB Injuries appeared first on Sports Medicine Weekly.

Sports Medicine Weekly
Performance Solutions; Preventing ACL Injuries; Managing MLB Injuries

Sports Medicine Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2016 29:51


Featuring many interesting and informative guest authorities covering a broad range of sports injury and fitness topics. Speakers include nationally recognized authorities in the field of sports medicine, surgeons, coaches and trainers. Focusing on the most recent and relevant injuries affecting the professional athlete to the weekend warrior.

Sports Medicine Weekly
Performance Solutions; Preventing ACL Injuries; Managing MLB Injuries

Sports Medicine Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2016 29:51


Episode 16.14 with Hosts Steve Kashul and Dr. Brian Cole. Broadcasting on ESPN Chicago 1000 WMVP-AM Radio, Saturdays from 8:30 to 9:00 AM/c. Segment One: Dr. Charles Bush-JosephContinue reading

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine - The Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine Podcast
Dr. Lyle Micheli Dishes on ACL Injuries in Young Athletes

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine - The Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2016 20:25


Our guest is Dr. Lyle Micheli, Orthopaedic Surgeon at Boston Children’s Hospital and Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School. He is the corresponding author of a new CJSM study, “Return to Sport after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Skeletally Immature Athlete.” He discusses this study and how the prevention and treatment of ACL injuries has changed over the decades of his career.

University of Virginia Health System
How Can You Prevent and Treat ACL Injuries?

University of Virginia Health System

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2016


Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, happen frequently among athletes. How can athletes reduce their risk for ACL injuries? If they do injure their ACL, what is the typical recovery period? Learn more from Dr. Mark Miller, a UVA orthopedic surgeon whose specialties include ACL injuries. Tagged under: ACL, Sports Injuries

BJSM
The father of accelerated rehabilitation, Dr Don Shelbourne, on history and managing ACL injuries

BJSM

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2016 15:39


Dr Donald Shelbourne is an orthopedic surgeon at The Shelbourne Clinic in Indianapolis, Indiana. He has performed more than 6,000 ACL reconstructions since 1982 and he is credited with developing the ‘accelerated rehabilitation program’. He discusses the history of the field and how he contributed to eliminating the big problem of the ‘stiff stable’ knee. He does NOT detail the rehabilitation method itself. He has an interesting thought on the role of ACL reconstruction in young people who suffer ACL tears. See the timeline below that includes a paper referred to in the discussion and two additional BJSM resources. If I had to create a short slogan for the podcast I would go with ‘Symmetric Motion is Key’. 1:00 How Dr Shelbourne discovered accelerated rehabilitation 3:00 The problem of knees that were too stiff after ACL surgery in the 1980s. 4:00 The problem of excessively large ACL grafts and graft hypertrophy blocking knee extension 4:40 Casts contributing to knees becoming ‘stiff-stable’. Knees not returning to full extension (1980s) 6:00 Moving patients from plaster to one hour a day of a limited motion brace 6:50 Dr Shelbourne comments on augmented lateral procedures today. Discusses hamstring grafts and allografts in this context. His rationale for ipsilateral patellar tendon grafts. 9:40 Patellar tendon donor site problems – the role of physiotherapy in solving the problem 9:10 A comment on Dr Leo Pinzewski’s 20 year post-ACL surgery followup study. (Hamstring graft) Paper in American Journal of Sports Medicine (http://ow.ly/hcRx300Eb58). See also Professors Hutchinson and McCormack discuss that paper in BJSM (http://ow.ly/f1JM300EcQ0). They also have a new editorial on ACL outcomes online first as this podcast goes live (http://ow.ly/gqdk300Edm7). 10:50 Stiffness is not acceptable. Patients prefer a bit of instability with full range of motion than a stiff stable knee. Stiff knee is a time bomb for osteoarthritis. 12:00 Who should have an ACL reconstruction? About half of patients who have ACL injuries are not getting back to sport at the previous level. “In a way you are much better off having non-operative treatment….” 13:00 If you are wondering whether to have surgery or not after ACL injury – go for conservative management first. “Nothing to lose”. “A stiff knee is a time bomb for osteoarthritis later on.” 13:45 Osteoarthritis. Patients who don’t get all their movement back have a high risk of osteoarthritis moving forward. Many surgeons overlook the loss of motion as a risk factor. Related podcasts: Dr Mark Hutchinson on ACL reconstruction: https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/markhutchinson2?in=bmjpodcasts/sets/bjsm-1 Dr Mark Hutchinson on meniscectomy for symptoms of painful locking and clicking: https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/mark-hutchinson?in=bmjpodcasts/sets/bjsm-1

TVH Health Chat
Training Methods to Prevent ACL Injuries

TVH Health Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2016


One of the most common knee injuries is an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sprain or tear.Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament are rare; and most ACL injuries are complete or near complete tears.The ACL can be injured in several ways, like changing direction rapidly, stopping suddenly, slowing down while running and landing from a jump incorrectly and there are certain risk factors, such as gender and sport training that can increase your risk of suffering an ACL injury. Scott Herron, MD,  board certified orthopedic surgeon and a member of the Medical Staff at Temecula Valley Hospital is here to discuss the best ways to train your knees to help prevent ACL injuries.

Physio Edge podcast
PE034 Advanced ACL Rehab with Enda King

Physio Edge podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2015 86:09


The advanced stages of ACL rehabilitation are enjoyable to progress your patients through, and at the same time challenging to find the right exercises, and optimise the rate of progression through to return to training (RTT) and return to play (RTP). In this episode, Enda King from the Sports Surgery Clinic Dublin and David Pope discuss these later stages of rehabilitating your patients following an ACL Reconstruction. We discussed the prehabilitation and early stage ACL Rehab in the Physio Edge podcast episode 32, and episode 34 Enda and I cover in detail: • Return to straight line running and change of direction • Advanced Exercise Programming • What exercises to choose • Proprioception and motor control training • Strength and power programming • Periodisation • Sports specific conditioning • Plyometrics - readiness, what to use and timing of these in the training schedule • Multi-directional performance • Strength testing - what Enda uses, indicators of strength • Decisions on return to training • Return to contact • Decision making on Return to play • Bridging the gap between the gym and the field • Advice for Physios rehabilitating athletes recovering from an ACL reconstruction • When to discharge an ACL athlete • And much more Links of interest Physio Edge podcast episode 32 - How to rehabilitate ACL Injuries with Enda King Enda King Enda on Twitter @enda_king Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin SSC Research Foundation David Pope on Twitter Clinical Edge Webinar program - register your interest Clinical Edge Review the podcast in iTunes David Pope Tags: ACL, knee, injury, anterior cruciate ligament, surgery, rehabilitation, soccer, football, strengthening, movement, non-contact, physiotherapy, physio edge, podcast, enda king, SSC, sports surgery clinic, david pope, clinical edge, advanced, strengthening, proprioception

Physio Edge podcast
PE #032 How to rehabilitate ACL Injuries with Enda King

Physio Edge podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2014 68:39


ACL injuries can be career ending, or they can be an opportunity to sort out movement efficiency, motor control and and technical skills, coming back from the rehabilitation process with more power, speed and efficiency than your patients had before they injured their ACL. In this podcast, Enda King from the Sports Surgery Clinic in Dublin currently completing his PhD in 3D biomechanical analysis after ACL reconstruction, with the aim to assist in RTP decision making and identifying fully rehabilitated athletes, and David Pope discuss ACL injuries, and the most important factors in pre-operative management and post-operative exercise programming to get your patients back to sport with improved sporting performance. Going deep on the details involved in ACL Rehabilitation, including: 01:20 Enda King and SSC, and working with ACL athletes PhD in 3D biomechanical analysis after ACL reconstruction, aim to assist in RTP decision making and what a fully rehabilitated athlete looks like What does a fully rehabilitated athlete look like? Incorporating performance goals into the rehab process Can athletes achieve better performance post ACL rehab than they were pre-injury Types of ACL grafts Preoperative ACL Physiotherapy, helping your patient to prepare for the surgery Preoperative education Restoring knee extension, balancing pain and improved range of movement, empowering your patient Guidelines for pain, swelling when restoring range of movement Restoring quadriceps activation, normalising gait patterns Clinical Edge Clinical Edge’s free webinar program Preoperative length of time Post-op - initial management To use or not use co-contraction exercises of quads and hamstrings Should you use squatting style exercises Week 1 post op Activating quadriceps - internal quadriceps cues or external exercise focus How much pain should a patient experience during or after an exercise Week 2 post-op When can heavy gym training commence Changing movement patterns throughout the kinetic chain Advice for patients in the early stages of rehab Frequency of exercise Week 2 onwards - exercises incorporating balance and proprioception Open vs closed chain exercises Advice for patients in weeks 2–6 Nutrition and dietary advice for patients Gym based rehabilitation Choosing and modifying exercises for middle stages of the rehabilitation process Various types of squatting movement, and progressing the types of squats Goblet squats Retraining ideal squat patterns Progressing squats, deadlifts and lunges Front squats Front squats and trap bar deadlifts vs back squats during rehabilitation When can an athlete start cycling Disadvantages of using cycling as the main part of a rehabilitation program Hamstring rehabilitation after semitendinosis/gracilis graft Strength and power development Strength testing - mid thigh pull, leg press Should we use open chain strength tests When to perform strength tests Strength vs power and rate of force development Running - incorporating into the program. When can your patient start running? Preparation for running Running drills Ideal movement patterns in running Enda King and SSC, and working with ACL athletes Podcast timeline 3:35 What does a fully rehabilitated athlete look like? 5:40 Incorporating performance goals into the rehab process 6:50 Can athletes achieve better performance post ACL rehab than they were pre-injury 8:20 Types of ACL grafts 11:10 Preoperative ACL Physiotherapy, helping your patient to prepare for the surgery - an opportunity to prepare your patients knee, ROM, strength and educate them on the rehabilitation process 14:20 Preoperative education 14:40 Restoring knee extension, balancing pain and improved range of movement, empowering your patient with 15:40 Guidelines for pain, swelling when restoring range of movement 16:15 Restoring quadriceps activation, normalising gait patterns 17:10 Clinical Edge 18:45 Clinical Edge’s free webinar program 19:30 Preoperative length of time 20:35 Post-op - initial management 23:20 To use or not use co-contraction exercises of quads and hamstrings 24:50 Should you use squatting style exercises Week 1 post op 25:25 Activating quadriceps - internal quadriceps cues or external exercise focus 26:30 How much pain should a patient experience during or after an exercise 27:30 Week 2 post-op 28:30 When can heavy gym training commence 29:30 Changing movement patterns throughout the kinetic chain 31:00 Advice for patients in the early stages of rehab 32:10 Frequency of exercise 32:55 Week 2 onwards - exercises incorporating balance and proprioception 34:10 Open vs closed chain exercises 35:40 Advice for patients in weeks 2–6 37:15 Nutrition and dietary advice for patients 37:45 Gym based rehabilitation 38:50 Choosing and modifying exercises for middle stages of the rehabilitation process 41:00 Various types of squatting movement, and progressing the types of squats 41:45 Goblet squats 42:30 Retraining ideal squat patterns 43:25 Progressing squats, deadlifts and lunges 44:00 Front squats 46:00 Front squats and trap bar deadlifts vs back squats during rehabilitation 47:25 When can an athlete start cycling 48:00 Disadvantages of using cycling as the main part of a rehabilitation program 48:30 Hamstring rehabilitation after semitendinosis/gracilis graft 49:45 Strength and power development 51:00 Strength testing - mid thigh pull, leg press 53:15 Should we use open chain strength tests 54:20 When to perform strength tests 55:00 Strength vs power and rate of force development 55:50 Running - incorporating into the program. When can your patient start running? 57:30 Preparation for running 58:35 Running drills 1:00:30 Ideal movement patterns in running Links: Enda King Enda on Twitter @enda_king Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin SSC Research Foundation David Pope on Twitter Clinical Edge Webinar program - register your interest Clinical Edge Review the podcast in iTunes   Tags: ACL, knee, injury, anterior cruciate ligament, surgery, rehabilitation, soccer, football, strengthening, movement, non-contact, physiotherapy, physio edge, podcast, enda king, SSC, sports surgery clinic, david pope, clinical edge, webinar

JBJS Podcast
August 2014 Podcast

JBJS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2014 22:46


This podcast covers the JBJS issue for August 2014. Featured are articles covering: Nonsurgical or Surgical Treatment of ACL Injuries; recorded commentary by Dr. Fithian; Evaluation of AAOS Guidelines on Prophylaxis of VTE in Total Joint Arthroplasty; recorded commentary by Dr. Devitt; Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Osteogenic Genes in Atrophic Delayed Fracture-Healing; Soft-Tissue Allografts Terminally Sterilized with an Electron Beam Are Biomechanically Equivalent.

JBJS Podcast
August 2014 Podcast

JBJS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2014 22:46


This podcast covers the JBJS issue for August 2014. Featured are articles covering: Nonsurgical or Surgical Treatment of ACL Injuries; recorded commentary by Dr. Fithian; Evaluation of AAOS Guidelines on Prophylaxis of VTE in Total Joint Arthroplasty; recorded commentary by Dr. Devitt; Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Osteogenic Genes in Atrophic Delayed Fracture-Healing; Soft-Tissue Allografts Terminally Sterilized with an Electron Beam Are Biomechanically Equivalent.

Move Forward Radio
Preventing ACL Injuries in Youth Athletes

Move Forward Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2014


May 22, 2014: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are becoming increasingly common among youth athletes and can lead to arthritis of the knee later in life. But a recent clinical report in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, notes that the risk for ACL injuries can be significantly reduced with a … Continue reading Preventing ACL Injuries in Youth Athletes

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine - The Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine Podcast
Neuromuscular training programs: can they decrease ACL injuries in youth soccer players?

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine - The Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2014 29:31


An interview with Dr. James Carson, one of the authors of a Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine (CASEM) position statement published in the May 2014 CJSM.

Staying Well
Are ACL Injuries More Common in Women?

Staying Well

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2014


ACL injuries are on the rise in women, and ACLs are the most common knee injury. In fact over 200,000 torn ACLs occur in the U.S. each year.Your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of four ligaments that are located in your knee to provide stability. When a quick change of direction or if part of your knee comes in contact with a hard object, or a pivot happens in your knee, your ACL can be torn.You will know for sure if you've torn your ACL when your knee pops, swells and you feel excruciating pain. When your ACL is torn, your knee can become unstable. Surgery is an option, since there is a way to reconstructing your ACL from other tissue. This gives your knee back the stability it lost during the injury.Is there any way to you can prevent an ACL injury from happening?There are ACL prevention programs that teach athletes certain positions that are helpful in changing directions, positions to avoid and exercises that can be done.Orthopedic surgeon with Illinois Bone and Joint Institute, Dr. Eric Chehab joins Melanie Cole, MS to discuss ACL injuries, prevention and treatment options for female and male athletes.

Strength and Conditioning Journal Podcast
Training for Prevention of ACL Injuries

Strength and Conditioning Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2013 4:32


04:32 no william.gee@wolterskluwer.com (Ben Reuter, SCJ Podcast Editor)Ben Reuter, SCJ Podcast EditorStrength and Conditioning Journal is the professional journal of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). The purpose "SCJ Podcasts" is to highlight current topics in the journal related to the fie

Move Forward Radio
ESPN’s Stephania Bell on ACL Injuries and Fantasy Sports

Move Forward Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2013


April 4, 2013: Since 2007, physical therapist Stephania Bell has been ESPN’s leading injury analyst for fantasy sports enthusiasts. One of the injuries she’s often analyzing is the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. In this episode, Bell describes the impact of ACL tears on both elite athletes and amateur weekend warriors, and she helps to … Continue reading ESPN’s Stephania Bell on ACL Injuries and Fantasy Sports

The Balancing Point Podcast
ACL Injuries, Yeast Infections, Awareness and more. Balancing Point 6.21.12

The Balancing Point Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2012


ACL injuries. Situational awareness. Energy field therapy. Olfaction. Rotton odor and lung disorders. Probiotics and UT and yeast infections. Glucocorticoids and mental disorders. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Western Perspective, Integrative and Functional Medicine. Live streaming. The Balancing Point health radio talk show about Traditional Chinese Medicine, supplements, nutrition, and more.  Host Dr. John Nieters, acupuncturist [...]Read More »

Athletics
Researchers Take a Look at ACL Injuries

Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2010 1:45


Researchers at UC Davis take a look at how they can prevent ACL injuries in collegiate athletes.

Back Row Bros
Episode 8: ACL Injuries

Back Row Bros

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 1969 20:29


We're back with our Season Finale of this season of the Back Row Bros. We know it's been awhile since an episode post but we went on a little adventure to the Smoky Mountains last weekend. This week's episode is about ACL injuries: how they happen, how we treat them, and what the recovery timeline looks like. We also have another injury report for you. Hope y'all enjoy! Remember to send us feedback and like us on social media at @backrowbros!